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Sample records for judeo-christian religious experience

  1. Experiences of Judeo-Christian Students in Undergraduate Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. Elizabeth; Truong, Jasmine M.; Brownell, Sara E.

    2017-01-01

    A major research thrust in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is focused on how to retain students as STEM majors. The accumulation of seemingly insignificant negative experiences in STEM classes can, over time, lead STEM students to have a low sense of belonging in their disciplines, and this can lead to lower…

  2. Psychiatry and religion: Judeo-Christian theism and Fromm's humanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D F; Bachelder, R

    1985-03-01

    This paper provides a discussion of the ethical humanism of the late psychoanalyst Eric Fromm as compared to traditional Judeo-Christian theism. Considering their respective views of human nature and possibility, and of the relationship between truth, reason, and revelation, the authors posit that Fromm and traditional theists take radically different positions, making their religious stances fundamentally incompatible. In conclusion, the authors suggest how these differences could have significant implication for pastoral care.

  3. The Influence of Greco-Roman and the Judeo-Christian On Western Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷华

    2010-01-01

    western culture itself is a part of world culture. It is made up of many elements, which has gone through changes over the centuries. The more enduring are: the Greco-Roman element, and the Judeo-Christian element. This paper briefly analyzes the origin and foundation of western culture: ancient Greek culture, ancient Roman culture and Christianity which have decisive influence on the shape of western culture. It is expected that this paper helps us better understand western culture.

  4. An exploration of lived religion in same-sex couples from Judeo-Christian traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon Scales; Riggle, Ellen D B; Brodnicki, Carolyn; Olson, Amber

    2008-09-01

    Religious involvement has been found to be associated with higher levels of commitment and relationship satisfaction among heterosexually married individuals (Mahoney et al., 1999). Little is known, however, about the religiosity of gay, lesbian, bisexual (GLB) individuals, and virtually nothing is known about religious involvement in same-sex couples. The purpose of this qualitative interview study was to examine couples' experiences of incorporating religious involvement into their committed relationships. In a sample of 14 same-sex couples, we found that couples used their spiritual/religious values to understand and undergird their relationships. In this process, they negotiated intra-couple differences in religious practices, involved themselves in activities that have religious or spiritual meaning to them, created religious social support for their relationships, and experienced some non-supportive or rejecting interpersonal interactions with religious family members, congregants, and strangers. These findings are instructive to therapists who work with same-sex couples and the family members of GLB individuals. We conclude with specific suggestions for practitioners.

  5. Holistic health and well-being: a psycho-spiritual/religious and theological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayalilkarottu, John

    2012-12-01

    Neuro-biological studies have established the perennial teaching of all the world's religious traditions that human persons are primarily religious/spiritual beings. They confirm that religion and spirituality are hardwired into the human brain and into human nature. The transcendental dimension of human nature demands that progress in man's ethical formation and inner growth is the most essential aspect of holistic health. Their experience of the divine led the Hindu sages to commit themselves to establish peace, happiness and well-being for all the human family and the universe. Judeo-Christian theology advocates that human beings created in the image of God have potential for theocentric-transcendence. Catholic theologians like St. Augustine propose that God has made humans for himself and that their hearts are restless until they rest in him. With the revolutionary shift in recent years from attacking faith and religion to the exploration of the benefits of spirituality and religion for human flourishing, the outstanding themes of Christian theology and other religious traditions became topics of research in health sciences. Interdisciplinary interaction will result in attaining a profound understanding of the human person and help him/her to achieve lasting fulfilment by adequately paying attention to the transcendental, religious and spiritual needs.

  6. Religious experiments in colonial Calcutta: modern Hinduism and bhakti among the Indian middle class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Sardella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Any discussion of India from the point of view of the West must deal with the problem posed by the colonial past and the ways in which India was colonized, interpreted and constructed to fit into an imperialist agenda. The terms ‘Hinduism’ and ‘religion’, for example, are themselves quite problematic, since they are born of Western and Judeo-Christian thought, and may not reflect the complexity and diversity of Indic traditions well enough. A translation and transmission of terms and concepts from one cultural domain to another is required, but it is bound to be merely tentative and approximate, since a comprehension of the full meaning of words and concepts related to Indic religions presupposes an extensive grounding in the rich religious thought of India. Bhaktisiddhānta lived on the border between the nineteenth and the twentieth century, between the black and the white towns of Calcutta, between India and the West, and between two world wars. His effort to search for and apply bhakti to the social, political and cultural crises of his time is important for grasping the vitality and dynamism of Indic religions in our time. It is also important for appreciating the struggle carried out by a growing Indian and Hindu middle class to bridge the gaps between East and West, and on the basis of indigenous culture produce new ideas for reciprocal co-operation, which in the case of Bhaktisiddhānta were related to the idea and practice of bhakti.

  7. The uniqueness of the Islamic experience: historical context, revelation and conception of God (Part I

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    Carlos Frederico Barboza de Souza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present important aspects of Islamic spirituality. To this end, it starts with a presentation of the historical context in which Islam appears in order to place the roots that will give a specific configuration to this religious experience. In that aspect, the life and the figure of the Prophet Muḥammad are fundamental as well as the historical context of the Arabian Peninsula and its socio-political and religious perspectives. Then, one begins to handle on the conception of singular revelation that Islam has from the experience with the angel Gabriel in which content is transmitted and should be repeated without alteration by the followers of this revelation. In this aspect, the prospect about the revelation in Islam differs from the Judeo-Christian conception, in which the revelation has a historical perspective. Finally, this article will deal with the Islamic conception of God, especially as such conception nods to the central point in the Muslim spirituality: the divine omnipotence and the search for unity.

  8. Phenomenological Account of Religious Experience

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    Donny Gahral Adian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available History of philosophy is built upon rigid discrimination between various human experiences. Human experiences are divided mainly into two major experiences: Perceptual and intelectual. Perceptual experience is deined by empiricism as an aposteriori experience of empirical sensations. Meanwhile, rationalism claims that the only acceptable experience is apriori experience of intelectual object (natural laws, mathematical equations and logical operations. There is no other experience outside those two philosophical account of experiences. All other experiences must be subsumed either within perceptual or intelectual experience.

  9. Experience and Reality in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Mike

    2011-01-01

    A central task of religious education is to show how the puzzlements to human intelligence and the experiences that are associated with spirituality, are compelling in relation to our development as human beings. There are always more theories than objects or events to be explained, and while the spiritual "data" that gives rise to our puzzlements…

  10. A Neuro-psychological Explanation of Religious Experience?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runehov, Anne Leona Cesarine

    2004-01-01

    The search for the basis of religious experience among neurological processes in the brain has resulted in a widespread debate within, as well as outside the academic world. The aim of this paper is to analyse to what extent a neuro-psychological theory could explain the phenomenon of religious...... experience. To clarify what the neuro-psychological studies of the present paper mean by the concept of religious experience, the concept has been divided into three different types: the Erlebnis or RErl type, the Erfahrung or RErf type and the ideological or RIT type of religious experience. In his studies...... and for the problem arising when drawing inadequately reasoned conclusions. Key Words Religious experiences, religious Erlebnis, religious Erfahrung, (religious) ideology, neuroscience, neuropsychology, pain, PET, reductionism, partial reductionism, Transcendental Meditation, epilepsy, schizophrenia....

  11. Conflict Theory and the Analysis of Religious Experience | Obiefuna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fundamental element of religion and in the study of religion(s). It states ... This communication is a form of experience that, like other experiences, is a source of ... of conflicts (intrapersonal and interpersonal) arising from religious experience.

  12. Religious Experience from a Neuro-Psychological View

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    Hadi Vakili

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The search for the basis of religious experience among neurological processes in the brain has resulted in a widespread debate within, as well as outside the academic world. The aim of this paper is to analyze to what extent a neuro-psychological theory could explain the phenomenon of  religious experience. To clarify what the neuro-psychological studies of  the present paper mean by the concept of  religious experience, the concept has been divided into three different types: The Erlebnis or RErl type, the Erfahrung or RErf type and the ideological type of religious experience or RIT type. Furthermore, the present paper is focused on the work of neuro-psychologist M. A. Persinger [1997, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1987, 1985, and 1984]. In his studies, Persinger indicates that mystical experience (RErl has its seat in the right hemisphere of the human brain, whereas (religious ideology (RIT is related to the left hemisphere. Consequently, the hemisphere in which the (religious experience is taking place seems to label the type of experience. Persinger, interested in the powerful effects of religious experience (of the RErf type on human beings, asserts that if we could understand the neuro-cognitive processes involved in experiencing religiously, such processes might be copied for clinical use in order to improve psychiatric therapy for curing depression. Thus, Persinger studied and compared people practicing religious meditation with people who did not, and also studied the results of PET scanning on the experiences of schizophrenic and epileptic patients. PET scanning measures the metabolic activity in the hemispheres, ranging it on a scale from under normal to over normal activity. This paper will account for the relevance of comparing these two apparently different studies and for the problem arising the experience of pain because, neurologically, pain, like religious experience,is said to be caused by processes in the human brain.

  13. Neuroscientific Explanations of Religious Experience are Not free from Cultural Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runehov, Anne Leona Cesarine

    2008-01-01

    We cannot disregard that the neuroscientific research on religious phenomena such as religious experiences and rituals for example, has increased significantly the last years. Neuroscientists claim that neuroscience contributes considerably in the process of understanding religious experiences, b...... neuroscientific issues, also cultural-religious assumptions that underlie this conclusion. Key Words Culture, Neuroscience, Religious Experience, Meditation. Udgivelsesdato: January...

  14. Pinned on Karma Rock: whitewater kayaking as religious experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, A Whitney

    2007-01-01

    This paper argues that whitewater paddling constitutes religious experience, that non-western terms often best describe this experience and that these two facts are related and have much to tell us about the nature of religious experience. That many paddlers articulate their experiences using Asian and/or indigenous religious terms suggests that this language is a form of opposition to existing norms of what constitutes religious experience. So, investigating the sport as an aquatic nature religion provides the opportunity to revisit existing categories. As a "lived religion," whitewater kayaking is a ritual practice of an embodied encounter with the sacred, and the sacred encounter is mediated through the body's performance in the water. This sacred encounter-with its risk and danger-illustrates Rudolph Otto's equation of the sacred with terrifying and unfathomable mystery and provides a counterpoint to norms of North American religiosity and related scholarship.

  15. William James' The Varieties of Religious Experience revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Curtis W

    2008-12-01

    This essay addresses the familial, religious, and cultural context for the writing and presentation of William James' classic work The Varieties of Religious Experience. The essay emphasizes the importance of the impact of Henry James, Senior, upon his son. This relationship along with a severe cardiac condition contributed to James' taking on and carrying through with his exploration of religious experience. The article explores The Varieties and concludes with a discussion of the importance of James' use of narrative to the study of mind-body medicine. This paper was originally presented at the Richardson Research Seminar in the History of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College.

  16. Leadership, Decision Making, and the Judeo-Christian Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-04

    the Army War College. The author offers the Kohlberg Theory of Moral Development as a framework for teaching professional ethics in the Army. Dr...series of ever-maturing stages of personal development , Colonel Lindemann applies Kohlberg’s Theory to the Army’s moral and ethical training program...ultimate challenge for senior professionals is to take their skills and merge them with a sound ethical and moral base, in order to hope to develop this

  17. "Long, Boring, and Tedious": Youths' Experiences with Complex, Religious Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackley, Eric D.; Kwok, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Growing out of the renewed attention to text complexity in the United States and the large population of youth who are deeply committed to reading scripture, this study explores 16 Latter-day Saint and Methodist youths' experiences with complex, religious texts. The study took place in the Midwestern United States. Data consisted of an academic…

  18. Carl Gustav Jung and Granville Stanley Hall on Religious Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Young

    2016-08-01

    Granville Stanley Hall (1844-1924) with William James (1842-1910) is the key founder of psychology of religion movement and the first American experimental or genetic psychologist, and Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) is the founder of the analytical psychology concerned sympathetically about the religious dimension rooted in the human subject. Their fundamental works are mutually connected. Among other things, both Hall and Jung were deeply interested in how the study of religious experience is indispensable for the depth understanding of human subject. Nevertheless, except for the slight indication, this common interest between them has not yet been examined in academic research paper. So this paper aims to articulate preliminary evidence of affinities focusing on the locus and its function of the inner deep psychic dimension as the religious in the work of Hall and Jung.

  19. Religious Education in the Experience of Young People from Mixed-Faith Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweck, Elisabeth; Nesbitt, Eleanor

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of a recent ethnographic study at the University of Warwick of the religious identity formation of young people in "mixed-faith" families, this article focuses on their (and their parents') experiences and perceptions of religious education (RE) and of religious nurture in the community. The young people's experience of RE…

  20. The Tourism Experience Offered by Religious Theme Parks: Taman Tamadun Islam (TTI) in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Moal - Ulvoas, Gaëlle M

    2016-01-01

    Theme parks are major drivers of tourism development and experience is a central concept in tourism research. This study investigates the experience potential associated with religious theme parks which offer a combination of religious and secular activities. The experiences of visitors to Taman Tamadun Islam (TTI), a Muslim theme park based in Malaysia, are identified through the analysis of visitors’ feedback on Tripadvisor.

  1. Religious Experience and its Essentialism in William James and Ghazzali’s Views

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    Ahmad Ebadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Religious experience is an approach to which Western thinkers are considered pioneers among whom Schleiermacher is the most prominent. "The essentialism of religious experience" is one of the several approaches that have been adopted in the case of religious experience. Accordingly, the religion that has sides and various dimensions has been reduced to a religious experience and the religious experience is introduced as the essence of religion. What is presented in this article is a comparative study of the essence of religious experience from the perspective of William James and Ghazzāli. Although mystical experience has a different structure form the religious experience and Ghazali as well as other Muslim philosophers and mystics paid more attention to the way of mystical experience, in the works of Ghazali there are also a traces of religious experience and hence, they are adaptable to some aspects of religious experience offered by William James. William James defines the religion “as the feelings, acts, and experiences that can occur for every individual in their solitudes and he believes that feeling is the essential pillar of religion and inherently reinforces it”. Religious experience is the essence of religion and it means that-the truth of the faith is the same as feelings and emotions that emerge from rational reflections on concrete reality as such, and other spiritual, transcendental, mystical and psychological actions are the consequences of these experiences. On the other hand, in the Muslim world, Al-Ghazzali believes that: The ultimate and holy aim of religion is the perception and experience of ultimate truth that can be achieved through good deeds, worship, asceticism and piety. This article tries to find similarities and differences in essence of religious experience of the two thinkers, because it is only in the theory of the essentialism of religious experience that the similarities and differences of

  2. A Scalar Comparison of Motivations and Expectations of Experience within the Religious Tourism Market

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    Daniel H. Olsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic studies on tourism market segmentation have decreased in scale over time, with the focus on tourist segmentation changing from segmenting the market as a whole to segmenting specific tourism niche markets. This change in scale can also be seen in how academics have attempted to segment the religious tourism market moving from discussions related to the pilgrim-tourist dichotomy to segmenting visitors based on religious affiliation to world regions and countries to specific religious activities such as religious festivals and infrastructural amenities such as hotels. In this paper the author, following Wall’s (1997 discussion of the spatial characteristics of tourist attractions (i.e., points, lines, and areas, raises the question as to whether there is a scalar difference in the motivations and the ‘expectation of experience’ of: people who travel to specific religious sites (points; those who travel along religiously - themed routes (lines and; those who travel to the Holy Land (area. To answer this question the author looks at and compares three case studies - Cathedrals in the United Kingdom (point, the Camino de Santiago de Compostela (line, and the Holy Land (area - and summarizes the academic literature pertaining to the characteristics, motivations and expectations of experience of visitors to these locations. Cursory findings show that there are differences regarding the motivations and the ‘expectation of experience’ of people who travel to religious points versus religious lines and religious areas.

  3. Psychobiology of drug-induced religious experience: from the brain "locus of religion" to cognitive unbinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nencini, Paolo; Grant, Kathleen A

    2010-11-01

    The recent interest in the psychopharmacological underpinnings of religious experiences has led to both the laboratory characterizations of drug-induced mystical events and psychobiological models of religious experiences rooted in evolution and fitness. Our examination of this literature suggests that these theories may be congruent only within more modern religious and cultural settings and are not generalizable to all historical beliefs, as would be expected from an evolutionarily conserved biological mechanism. The strong influence of culture on the subjective effects of drugs as well as religious thoughts argues against the concept of a common pathway in the brain uniquely responsible for these experiences. Rather, the role of personal beliefs, expectations and experiences may interject bias into the interpretation of psychoactive drug action as a reflection of biologically based religious thought. Thus, psychobiological research proposing specific brain mechanisms should consider anthropological and historical data to address alternative explanations to the "fitness" of religious thought. A psychobiological model of the religious experience based on the concept of cognitive unbinding seems to accommodate these data better than that of a specific brain locus of religion.

  4. Religious morality (and secular humanism) in Western civilization as precursors to medical ethics: A historic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    In discussing bioethics and the formulation of neuroethics, the question has arisen as to whether secular humanism should be the sole philosophical guiding light, to the exclusion of any discussion (or even mention) of religious morality, in professional medical ethics. In addition, the question has arisen as to whether freedom or censorship should be part of medical (and neuroscience) journalism. Should independent medical journals abstain from discussing certain issues, or should only the major medical journals — i.e., the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) or Lancet — be heard, speaking with one “consensual,” authoritative voice? This issue is particularly important in controversial topics impacting medical politics — e.g., public health policy, socio-economics, bioethics, and the so-called redistributive justice in health care. Should all sides be heard when those controversial topics are discussed or only a consensual (monolithic) side? This historical review article discusses those issues and opts for freedom in medical and surgical practice as well as freedom in medical journalism, particularly in opinion pieces such as editorials, commentaries, or letters to the editor, as long as they relate to medicine and, in our special case, to neuroscience and neurosurgery. After answering those questions, and in response to a critical letter to the editor, this review article then expounds comprehensively on the historical and philosophical origins of ethics and religious morality. Necessarily, we discuss the Graeco-Roman legacy and the Judeo-Christian inheritance in the development of ethics and religious morality in Western civilization and their impact on moral conduct in general and on medical and neuroscience ethics in particular. PMID:26110085

  5. Religious morality (and secular humanism in Western civilization as precursors to medical ethics: A historic perspective

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    Miguel A Faria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In discussing bioethics and the formulation of neuroethics, the question has arisen as to whether secular humanism should be the sole philosophical guiding light, to the exclusion of any discussion (or even mention of religious morality, in professional medical ethics. In addition, the question has arisen as to whether freedom or censorship should be part of medical (and neuroscience journalism. Should independent medical journals abstain from discussing certain issues, or should only the major medical journals - i.e., the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA or Lancet - be heard, speaking with one "consensual," authoritative voice? This issue is particularly important in controversial topics impacting medical politics - e.g., public health policy, socio-economics, bioethics, and the so-called redistributive justice in health care. Should all sides be heard when those controversial topics are discussed or only a consensual (monolithic side? This historical review article discusses those issues and opts for freedom in medical and surgical practice as well as freedom in medical journalism, particularly in opinion pieces such as editorials, commentaries, or letters to the editor, as long as they relate to medicine and, in our special case, to neuroscience and neurosurgery. After answering those questions, and in response to a critical letter to the editor, this review article then expounds comprehensively on the historical and philosophical origins of ethics and religious morality. Necessarily, we discuss the Graeco-Roman legacy and the Judeo-Christian inheritance in the development of ethics and religious morality in Western civilization and their impact on moral conduct in general and on medical and neuroscience ethics in particular.

  6. Preliminary study of religious, spiritual and mystical experiences. Thematic analysis of Poles adult’s narratives

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    Marta Magdalena Boczkowska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine narratives of the personal religious, spiritual and mystical experiences of adult Poles (N = 74 and their impact on narrative identity. The method for collecting qualitative data about individual understandings and spiritual, religious and mystical experiences was the narrative interview, developed on the basis of the Life Story Interview. During the analysis, the following key topics were identified: awareness of the presence/protection of God, a peak experience, the awareness of oneness with nature and the world, and a sense of closeness/contact with a person who has died. This study provides specific information on the spiritual, religious and mystical experiences of the investigated group of Poles.

  7. Revelation, delusion or disillusion : subjective interpretation of religious and spiritual experiences in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, Eva; Wong, Kwok; Boeije, Hennie; Braam, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the interpretation of religious and spiritual experiences during mania, depression and recovery, from the perspective of bipolar clients and to inquire into their expectations of treatment in relation to these experiences. For this purpose, a qualitative pil

  8. Kristendommen og Pave Frans: det religiøse sprog og naturen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristoffanini, Pablo Rolando

    2017-01-01

    The present article analyses ways of speaking and writing about nature in the Judeo-Christian tradition that help to explain and understand the dominating, conquering and exploitative conceptions and behaviors that Western civilization has had of nature. These, are by many researchers consider to...

  9. "Religion Is Not a Monolith": Religious Experience at a Midwestern Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Amy M.; Allis, Sarah; Allman, Nicole; Pettys, Alicia; Quinlan, Meredith; Seifert, Britta

    2013-01-01

    This ethnographic project explored the extent to which the campus culture at a small liberal arts college was open to student experiences and expressions of the spiritual and the religious. The authors found that despite the college's reputation for valuing diversity and a commitment to social justice, students shared a narrative of religious…

  10. MANAGING THE VISITOR EXPERIENCE ON ROMANIAN RELIGIOUS SITES: MONASTERIES ABBOTS’ PERCEPTIONS

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    Mihai Florin BĂCILĂ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For thousands of years, people have been travelling to places considered sacred to meet or to worship Divinity. Religion-motivated tourism is extremely important in many parts of the world. The aim of this paper is to investigate the issue of the religious tourism experience for a religion considered to be conservative and traditionalist in relation to other denominations. In order to achieve this end we distinguish the behavioural characteristics and motivations of the religious sites’ visitors through the abbots’ gaze. The research method of this study is a questionnaire based survey among more than one hundred monasteries’ superiors from different regions of Romania, places known as “holy or sacred” destinations for the Romanian religious people.

  11. Religious Fragmentation, Social Identity and Conflict: Evidence from an Artefactual Field Experiment in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We examine the impact of religious identity and village-level religious fragmentation on behavior in Tullock contests. We report on a series of two-player Tullock contest experiments conducted on a sample of 516 Hindu and Muslim participants in rural West Bengal, India. Our treatments are the identity of the two players and the degree of religious fragmentation in the village where subjects reside. Our main finding is that the effect of social identity is small and inconsistent across the two religious groups in our study. While we find small but statistically significant results in line with our hypotheses in the Hindu sample, we find no statistically significant effects in the Muslim sample. This is in contrast to evidence from Chakravarty et al. (2016), who report significant differences in cooperation levels in prisoners’ dilemma and stag hunt games, both in terms of village composition and identity. We attribute this to the fact that social identity may have a more powerful effect on cooperation than on conflict. PMID:27768713

  12. A Place of Encounter with a Divine. Heidegger on the Spatiality of Religious Experience

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    Nitsche Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores how different models of space articulate the nature of religious experience. Analyses are focused primarily on Heidegger’s phenomenology. Throughout his work, three models of space are determined: an opened, an empty, and a topological space. According to these models, there are three types of sacred places, that is, places of encounter with Divine: 1. a sacred place defined by coordinates materialized in a sacred building or symbolized by a cultic procedure; 2. a negative place, a place of a negative form of encounter; 3. a place as a path-mark, defined by a transitive (wayfaring involvement into a lived environment.

  13. Art, Music and Religious Experience in Libation Pouring of Akan Religion

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    Desmond Ayim-Aboagye

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The Akans of Ghana are traditionally accustomed to celebrating different rituals which are enshrined in their cultural life. Libation pouring, which accompanies the celebration of great rituals, amidst the subsidence of the sound of music and dance, can display a special art in religion. The primary objective of this paper is to examine libation as a ritual experience, and in so doing to draw attention to its art forms and relevance as regards the psychological significance for the Akan society which practises it. What beliefs connect the pouring of libation in Akan society? What are the occasions for practising this ritual? Are there some distinctions in the artistic prayer of libation? These questions lead directly to the proposition which states that libation is able to generate some forms of religious experience. It is then argued that libation ritual has psychological consequences beneficial to the group and the individual who privately engages in it.

  14. Nonlocality and exceptional experiences: a study of genius, religious epiphany, and the psychic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephan A

    2010-01-01

    Two hundred years of reductive materialism has failed to explain the extraordinary experiences we know as moments of genius, religious epiphany, and psychic insight. This paper proposes that these three experiences are in essence the same experience, differentiated only by intention and context. It reaches this conclusion based on well-conducted experimental research across the continuum of science--work that proposes a new interdependent model of consciousness that takes into consideration a nonlocal linkage or entanglement, as an aspect of consciousness not limited by space and time. The paper surveys some of the most important relevant research from quantum biology, physics, psychology, medicine, anthropology, and parapsychology. It proposes that more attention should be paid to the autobiographies, correspondence, and journals of men and women to whom history unequivocally accords the designation of genius, saint, or psychic, offering examples from these sources. And it presents comparisons between ethnohistorical material and spiritual traditions, suggesting they arrive at a similar worldview. Finally, it proposes that meditation research, some examples of which are cited, be seen in the context of psychophysical self-regulation, and that it offers one powerful avenue for producing these exceptional experiences.

  15. Religious capital and religious rewards: A study in the economics of religious life

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    Flere Sergej

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Religious life is studied by way suggested by the rational choice theory and the religious capital theory. The basic contentions of the theory on the nature of religious life having to do with an exchange upon a religious market, by firms offering compensators and rewards, and consumers, is considered. In the empirical analysis, it was validated that the independent (religious capital and dependent (religious rewards of two types were empirically separate constructs. Cross-sectional analysis of survey data indicated a very strong association between religious capital and institutional and ritual experience rewards within religious life, at a cross-cultural analysis, including Bosnian Muslims, Serbian Orthodox, Slovenian Catholics and US Protestants. The association was confirmed as robust at regression inspection with religious socialization. This extends further support for the empirical validity these novel theories of religious life and extensions of economic analysis into religious life.

  16. Values as Predictors of Religious Experience in the Lives of Seminary Students of Philosophy and Students of Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głaz, Stanisław

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to show the preferences of terminal values of personal and social character and the level of religious experience: God's presence and God's absence, as well as to examine the relationship between the two variables in the groups of seminary students of philosophy and students of physics. The following methods were applied in the study: Rokeach Value Survey and Głaz's Scale of Religious Experience. The study was conducted amongst university students in Kraków (Poland). The results of 100 correctly completed sets of questionnaires were analysed. The results analysis proves that seminary students of philosophy have a higher level of religious experience: God's presence and God's absence than students of physics. Seminary students of philosophy most preferred terminal values in personal and in social character. In the group of seminary students of philosophy, from amongst the four most preferred terminal values, two have a significant relation with the experience of God's presence and God's absence, whereas in the group of students of physics only one of them has a significant relation with the experience of God's absence.

  17. Varieties of social experience: The religious cultural context of diverse spiritual exemplars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Pamela Ebstyne; Abo-Zena, Mona M; Weber, Jonathan D

    2017-03-01

    From cultural developmental and relational developmental systems perspectives, the current study employed an exemplar research design along with qualitative content analysis to gain deeper understanding of how adolescents perceived the social influences on their religious and spiritual development (RSD) among religiously and culturally diverse youth. The sample included interviews of 28 highly spiritual youth aged 12-21 years (M = 17.73 years) from six countries and eight different religious traditions. Analysis revealed that 96% of participants reported multiple relational influences on their RSD and that these persons impacted their religiousness and spirituality through various processes such as teaching and encouragement. Portions of the narrative are presented to reveal how the meaning and influence of these interactions are informed by cultural and religious tradition. The narratives testify to the multifaceted nature of spiritual development and how it is embedded within religious, social, and cultural contexts. Statement of contribution Already known Existing research suggests that adolescent relationships are critical in shaping the religious and spiritual attitudes and practices that youth demonstrate (for reviews, see King & Boyatzis, 2015, Social and Emotional Issues; Mahoney, 2010, Journal of Marriage and Family, 72, 805; Roehlkepartain et al., 2006, The handbook of spiritual development in childhood and adolescence). Parents and peers are significant in shaping adolescents' involvement and beliefs in a religious system (i.e., Denton, 2012, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 5, 42; Desrosiers et al., 2011, Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 3, 39; French et al., 2011, Journal of Youth Adolescence, 40, 1623). Other studies have noted the importance of faith communities, mentors, or religious educators (see Schwartz et al., 2006, The handbook of spiritual development in childhood and adolescence; Vaidyanathan, 2011, Journal for

  18. Effects on Daily Spiritual Experiences of Religious Versus Conventional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Harold G; Pearce, Michelle J; Nelson, Bruce; Erkanli, Alaattin

    2016-10-01

    We compared religiously integrated cognitive behavioral therapy (RCBT) versus conventional CBT (CCBT) on increasing daily spiritual experiences (DSE) in major depressive disorder and chronic medical illness. A total of 132 participants aged 18-85 were randomized to either RCBT (n = 65) or CCBT (n = 67). Participants received ten 50-min sessions (primarily by telephone) over 12 weeks. DSE was assessed using the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES). Mixed-effects growth curve models compared the effects of treatment group on trajectory of change in DSE. Baseline DSE and changes in DSE were examined as predictors of change in depressive symptoms. DSE increased significantly in both groups. RCBT tended to be more effective than CCBT with regard to increasing DSE (group by time interaction B = -1.80, SE = 1.32, t = -1.36, p = 0.18), especially in those with low religiosity (B = -4.26, SE = 2.27, t = -1.88, p = 0.07). Higher baseline DSE predicted a decrease in depressive symptoms (B = -0.09, SE = 0.04, t = -2.25, p = 0.025), independent of treatment group, and an increase in DSE with treatment correlated with a decrease in depressive symptoms (r = 0.29, p = 0.004). RCBT tends to be more effective than CCBT in increasing DSE, especially in persons with low religiosity. Higher baseline DSE and increases in DSE over time predict a faster resolution of depressive symptoms. Efforts to increase DSE, assessed by a measure such as the DSES, may help with the treatment of depression in the medically ill.

  19. Experiences and perceptions of Ghanaian midwives on labour pain and religious beliefs and practices influencing their care of women in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziato, Lydia; Ohemeng, Hannah Antwi; Omenyo, Cephas N

    2016-11-14

    Beliefs surrounding pain during childbirth has biblical foundations that contribute to labour pain being viewed as a natural phenomenon. Contemporary health care promotes evidence-based labour pain management but the faith of the midwife may influence her midwifery practice regarding labour pain management. Therefore this study sought to gain in-depth insight into the experiences and perceptions of midwives regarding labour pain and the religious beliefs and practices influencing their care of women in labour in Ghana. The design of the study was an interpretive phenomenology using individual in-depth interviews. The study participants were 27 Ghanaian female midwives of various religious backgrounds. Interviews were conducted in English, audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Colaizzi's qualitative analysis procedures were employed concurrently with data collection. Three major themes were generated: religious beliefs about labour pain, religious practices in labour and religious artefacts used in labour. The midwives' faith and their experiences during their midwifery practice were inter-connected. The midwives believed labour pain was natural and religious practices are important to prevent complications. Religious artefacts used in labour included anointing oil and water, necklaces, rubber bands, bracelets, stickers and beads. It is important that midwives provide an enabling environment for women in labour to practice their faith and they should employ context-appropriate strategies to effectively manage labour pain that takes into account the religious beliefs and practices of women.

  20. A Crucible of Contradictions: Historical Roots of Violence against Children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Examines the religious, political, and socio-economic traditions in the United States that help foster a culture of violence against children. Finds that Judeo-Christian religious beliefs are used to justify corporal punishment; political practice favors family privacy; limited government; and a separation between the public and private spheres.…

  1. God, Moses and Levinas: On being the other and relating to the other. A perspective on transcendence from religious experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.P. Veldsman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Within the context of religious experience, understood as testimony to transcendence (Stoker, this article focus on a specific constitutive element thereof, namely intentionality. It is discussed as concept in relation to three other concepts, namely religious experience, experience and transcendence. To elaborate on the importance of the qualification of the concept of intentionality, three conversation partners are engaged. The French Jewish philosopher and Talmudic commentator Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995 since his view point on “The (Oother” makes the concept of “transcendence” problematic in a very insightful manner. The Dutch philosopher of religion Wessel Stoker and his proposal for “trans-intentionality” as a constitutive element of religious experience, and the experience of Moses with God as narrated in Ex 3. The contributions on transcendence by Levinas and Stoker are finally critically evaluated in relation to the Moses experience.

    And God said to Moses: “I will be who I will be” (Ex 3:14

    For if God is God, then it is impossible for God to be given in any intuition orphenomenal experience, to be contained by any concept governed by any principal. But it is this very impossibility – this infinity and incomprehensibility – that makes God “possible” as God. God alone lets God self be defined by indefinable impossibility, for God begins where human possibility ends. What is impossible for us is precisely God’s characteristic possibility, for with God nothing is impossible (Jean-Luc Marion

    Divinity is not transcendent (“wholly other”, but incarnate; and the incarnation, the event “inaugurating the dissolution of divine transcendence” (Gianni Vattimo.

  2. A Too Liberal Religious Education? A Thought Experiment for Teachers and Theorists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Dan

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes that the ideas of political philosopher John Rawls could be adapted to offer a new starting point for a pedagogy of religious education (RE) in the non-denominational sector. It is argued that contemporary approaches to RE may infringe the liberal principle of freedom of belief by favouring certain methods of interpreting…

  3. Islamic gatherings : experiences of discrimination and religious affirmation across established and new immigrant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliepaard, Mieke; Gijsberts, Mérove; Phalet, Karen

    2015-01-01

    To what extent are perceptions of discrimination associated with religious affirmation among Muslim minorities in the Netherlands? Drawing on recent nationally representative surveys among self-identified Muslims from five ethnic groups in the Netherlands, we test boundary conditions of reactive rel

  4. The Religious Aspects of Diasporic Experience of Muslims in Europe within the Crisis of Multiculturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habti, Driss

    2014-01-01

    The literature on migration has largely covered concepts of diaspora, such as transnationalism, immigration and religious-ethnic minorities. These concepts that concern related factors of social transformation, mainly with reference to Islam in Europe, have been investigated with respect to religion. Major research questions include whether, and…

  5. Islamic gatherings : experiences of discrimination and religious affirmation across established and new immigrant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliepaard, Mieke; Gijsberts, Mérove; Phalet, Karen

    2015-01-01

    To what extent are perceptions of discrimination associated with religious affirmation among Muslim minorities in the Netherlands? Drawing on recent nationally representative surveys among self-identified Muslims from five ethnic groups in the Netherlands, we test boundary conditions of reactive

  6. Froebel and Religious Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marion

    1983-01-01

    Describes the background of Froebel's religious ideas, focusing on experiences gained while a young child at home, an adolescent apprentice, and a young adult at university. Discusses briefly the reaction of the church to Froebel's thought and shows how Froebel's religious ideas influenced his ideas about educating young children. (RH)

  7. Value and Truth as language of religious experience: The “poetic name of God” in the literature of Evangelical Christianities originating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Sudario Cabral

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article affirms, from Paul Ricoeur and Michel de Certeau’s perspective, that the rising Jewish-Christian religious experience in the first century resulted from a historical drama. That is to say, it provided the setting of a crisis of mentality which went beyond the literary elaboration of symbols and mythos of the early  Christianity. Moreover, we seek to assess which sort of mental structure was being generating in the historical, political and religious setting of Christianity in the first century, so that it has been possible the creation of values and truths that has spread allover the Western culture, causing, as a result the German Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche’s visceral and aristocratic rebelion. Keywords:  Religious Experience; Christian Judaism; Ethico-religious Pathos; Values, Truth.

  8. Rituals as Dance and Dance as Rituals. The Drama of Kok Nji and Other Festivals in the Religious Experience of the Ngas, Mupun and Mwaghavul in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Habila Dadem Danfulani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Chadic-speakers perform annual festivals of the ancestors, kok nji; cropping kop; harvesting, dyip and hunting kwat, which are usually accompanied by dancing, singing and other numerous rites and rituals. These ritual dramas symbolically and overtly express the religious experience, feelings and emotions that are deeply buried in the religious consciousness of the people. This article intends to provide a vivid description of some of these festivals, particularly those of the Ngas, Mupun and Mwaghavul.

  9. Religious Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkowski, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Considers that because of an assurance of religious liberty, Americans tend to restrict religious convictions within their private domains even though most consider themselves to be religious or spiritual. Discusses how newspapers and broadcasters do not take religion stories seriously and as a result, student journalists seldom see or read…

  10. Magnus Marsden, Living Islam. Muslim Religious Experience in Pakistan’s North-West Frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Blom

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This pleasure is rarely given to a book reviewer, so I shall put it simply: Living Islam is an important work, and this justifies assessing it in earnest and at length. 'What does it mean to live a Muslim life?' wonders Magnus Marsden. Asking this basic but powerful question has perhaps never been as strong a scientific imperative as today. To be sure, everyone—from the media and think-tanks in the West to religious and political authorities in the Muslim world—claim monopoly over the answer....

  11. RELIGIOUS MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    Ariadna-Ioana JURAVLE (GAVRA); Constantin SASU; Geanina Constanța SPĂTARU (PRAVĂȚ)

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the conceptual delimitation of the term religious marketing. The term religious marketing has caused controversy. There are two currents: that of the theologians, on one hand and that of the marketers, on the other hand. The representatives of each current have their own view regarding the implementation of marketing into the religious sphere. The article concludes with the necessity to adapt the churches’ activities and the ways they must be presente...

  12. Religious narrative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2013-01-01

    Denne artikel er en introduktion til et temanummer i religionslærernes tidsskrift i USA. Den er et udtræk af mit kapitel "Religious Narrative, Cognition and Culture: Approaches and Definitions" udgivet i Religious Narrative, Cognition and Culture: Image and Word in the mind of Narrative, redigeret...

  13. Neurology of ecstatic religious and similar experiences: Ecstatic, orgasmic, and musicogenic seizures. Stendhal syndrome and autoscopic phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M

    2016-06-20

    All human experiences, including mystical and religious ones, are the result of brain functional activity. Thanks to the study of cases of ecstatic epilepsy with structural (MRI) and functional neuroimaging (fMRI, PET, SPECT) and neurophysiological technologies (recording and stimulation with intracranial electrodes), we now have a better knowledge of certain mental states which involve pleasant and affective symptoms and clarity of mind. These ecstatic experiences are thought to be caused by the activation of the anterior insular cortex and some neuronal networks (basically related to mirror neurons and salience) participating in introspection, social cognition, memory, and emotional processes. Thus, neuroscience could explain in a retrospective way some facts surrounding the situations of such relevant figures as Paul the Apostle, Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada, and Dostoevsky, whose origin was previously considered paranormal or supernatural. Ecstatic epilepsy shares symptoms and mechanisms with orgasmic epilepsy (spontaneous orgasms in the course of epileptic seizures), musicogenic epilepsy (epileptic seizures triggered by listening to a certain musical piece), and also with Stendhal syndrome (neuropsychiatric disturbances caused when an individual is exposed to large amounts of art) and some autoscopic phenomena (out-of-body experiences that occasionally take place in imminent death situations). In all these events, there are pleasant and affective symptoms which have a great impact on patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Animal welfare in different human cultures, traditions and religious faiths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szűcs, E; Geers, R; Jezierski, T; Sossidou, E N; Broom, D M

    2012-11-01

    Animal welfare has become a growing concern affecting acceptability of agricultural systems in many countries around the world. An earlier Judeo-Christian interpretation of the Bible (1982) that dominion over animals meant that any degree of exploitation was acceptable has changed for most people to mean that each person has responsibility for animal welfare. This view was evident in some ancient Greek writings and has parallels in Islamic teaching. A minority view of Christians, which is a widespread view of Jains, Buddhists and many Hindus, is that animals should not be used by humans as food or for other purposes. The commonest philosophical positions now, concerning how animals should be treated, are a blend of deontological and utilitarian approaches. Most people think that extremes of poor welfare in animals are unacceptable and that those who keep animals should strive for good welfare. Hence animal welfare science, which allows the evaluation of welfare, has developed rapidly.

  15. Animal Welfare in Different Human Cultures, Traditions and Religious Faiths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Szűcs

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Animal welfare has become a growing concern affecting acceptability of agricultural systems in many countries around the world. An earlier Judeo-Christian interpretation of the Bible (1982 that dominion over animals meant that any degree of exploitation was acceptable has changed for most people to mean that each person has responsibility for animal welfare. This view was evident in some ancient Greek writings and has parallels in Islamic teaching. A minority view of Christians, which is a widespread view of Jains, Buddhists and many Hindus, is that animals should not be used by humans as food or for other purposes. The commonest philosophical positions now, concerning how animals should be treated, are a blend of deontological and utilitarian approaches. Most people think that extremes of poor welfare in animals are unacceptable and that those who keep animals should strive for good welfare. Hence animal welfare science, which allows the evaluation of welfare, has developed rapidly.

  16. RELIGIOUS MARKETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna-Ioana JURAVLE (GAVRA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to establish the conceptual delimitation of the term religious marketing. The term religious marketing has caused controversy. There are two currents: that of the theologians, on one hand and that of the marketers, on the other hand. The representatives of each current have their own view regarding the implementation of marketing into the religious sphere. The article concludes with the necessity to adapt the churches’ activities and the ways they must be presented to the society’s actual characteristics. This can be achieved by using appropriate marketing tools and methods; however, the particularities of religion must be taken into account in order not to alter its religious values.

  17. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE , “déjà vu” phenomenon and religious experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda M. Deme

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A lot of controversies appear regarding temporal lobe epilepsy to bridge the gap between religion and neuroscience. TLE was described in literature in 1869 by Russian writer Dostoievski (who suffered from epilepsy, in his work ”The Idiot”, when the hero Prince Myshkin described his epileptic feelings of sublime sacredness of the inner light. Neurotheology is the science trying to understand the brain activities and to find an integration in religion concepts. TLE aura or psychic crisis is defined by simple or complex hallucinations, mystic divine experience, unpleasant experience of fear and déjà vu phenomenon. Neppe and Funkhouser (2006 described the notion as already seen, but it means also already heard,met, heard or visited. The“déjà vu” phenomenon is always a subjective experience which can appear in normal subjects or in pathologic states like TLE, schizophrenia or other types of psychosis. It can also be a subjective paranormal experience. Neppe’s definition is now universally used, defined as ‘any subjectively inappropriate impression of familiarity of the present experience with an undefined past’ (Neppe, 1983. Déjà vu has an impact on neuroscience and descriptions from history and literature and the multitude of descriptions from experiences demand various scientific explanations.

  18. Cuestiones Epistemológicas Relativas al Estudio Psicológico de la Vivencia Religiosa Epistemological Issues in the Psychological Study of Religious Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Muñoz

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available El estudio psicológico de la vivencia religiosa es una de las posibles alternativas que ofrece el universo científico configurado por las ciencias de las religiones. Esta aproximación multidisciplinar es la más adecuada para la descripción y explicación del hecho religioso. La integración de conclusiones provenientes de diferentes perspectivas y métodos, y la aceptación de la complementariedad de diferentes aportaciones, son aún dos tareas por conseguir, especialmente entre la psicología y la teología. Este artículo establece las bases epistemológicas para una psicología de la religión que respete la identidad y aportes de la teología, mediante el desarrollo de un cuerpo de conocimientos teóricos y empíricos basados en el positivismo lógico, el método experimental, la asunción de la comprensión y la descripción como tareas propias derivadas de la influencia del fenomenalismo filosófico. Este enfoque implica la toma de conciencia que toda experiencia, cognición, o conducta religiosa, adquiere forma y se integra en el conjunto de habilidades, competencias, personalidad, y demás rasgos que definen nuestra identidad humana.Psychological research about religious cognition, behavior, and experience is one of the perspectives that aim to understand the religious dimension of human existence. The multidisciplinary approach is the most relevant way to describe and explain the religious experience. The integration of results that come from different methods and paradigms, and the acceptance of the idea that this perspectives are complementary, is a task that have no ended yet. This is specially important between psychology and theology. This article sets the epistemological foundations for a psychology of religion that considers theology's identity and contributions, through the development of empirical and theoretical knowledge based on logical positivism, experimental method, and the assumption of comprehension and description

  19. Pain and Coping in The Religious Mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jegindø, Else-Marie Elmholdt; Geertz, Armin W.; Roepstorff, Andreas

    of these activities (heart rate variability, blood pressure, cortisol and oxytocin levels). Questionnaires and short interviews will give us a further assessment of the pain experience of the participants, their religious beliefs and practices as well as their previous experience with religious coping strategies. We......Does religion provide placebo analgesia? The purpose of our project is to understand religious coping and specifically how it might be understood a coping strategy for religious people who experience pain. The project is an interdisciplinary study joining different faculties and academic...... resonance imaging) experiments and use experimental pain stimuli to assess how a target group of religious participants react to and experience pain during religious activities/stimuli, prayer and religious symbols. In addition, different biomarkers will be measured to register the somatic response...

  20. Mystical Experience from Religious Community of Qadiriyah wa Naqsyabandiyah Dawe Kudus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atika Ulfia Adlina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to know: 1. Ahwal (mystical experience experienced by followers of Tarekat Qadiriyah wa Naqsyabandiyah in Piji, Dawe, Kudus; 2. The correlation between suluk and their kinds of ahwal; and 3. The different intensity of ahwal for the followers in each stage of the tarekat. This was a field reserch which used purpo- sive sampling tehnique. The data were then analysed qualitatively and phenomeno- logically. The findings of the research showed that there were some factors motivated people to join the Tarekat: the intention to be close to God, preparing themselves for death, charismatic figure, etc. Secondly, the classification of the mystical experi- ences was adjusted with the lataif dzikir stages, they were laţîfah al-qalb, laţîfah ar- rûh, laţîfah as-sirr, laţîfah khafiy, laţîfah akhfa, laţîfah an-nafsi dan laţîfah al-qâlib. There were same ahwal experienced by the followers in some stages. Therefore, it was concluded that there was a relationship between suluk and ahwal experienced by the followers of the tarekat in Piji Dawe Kudus.

  1. Religious diversity and pluralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlin, Lars; Borup, Jørn; Fibiger, Marianne Qvortrup

    2012-01-01

    . Religious diversity has grown in Denmark with the arrival of new immigrant groups and with new forms and interpretations of traditional religious and spiritual traditions. More importantly, the relations and interactions between religious groups -- the hallmarks of religious pluralism -- are still incipient....... Both religious diversity and religious pluralism build on assumptions of stable relationships between religion and religious adherents and clear-cut boundaries between religious groups, assumptions which may be difficult to sustain in late modern societies. This article gives an overview of the Project......'s findings and discusses theoretical challenges related to religious diversity and religious pluralism....

  2. Writing Histories of Disability in India: Strategies of Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Existing historical understandings of disability are dominated by European and American experience and tend to assume Judeo-Christian ideas of stigma and exclusion are universal norms. This paper emphasises the unique experience of disability in India and the role of poverty, gender, caste and community in compounding the marginalisation felt by…

  3. Writing Histories of Disability in India: Strategies of Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Existing historical understandings of disability are dominated by European and American experience and tend to assume Judeo-Christian ideas of stigma and exclusion are universal norms. This paper emphasises the unique experience of disability in India and the role of poverty, gender, caste and community in compounding the marginalisation felt by…

  4. Assessing the Role of Attachment to God, Meaning, and Religious Coping as Mediators in the Grief Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Melissa M.; Chan, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Research has examined the relationship of styles of attachment to others and meaning with grief and the stress-related growth process. Less has been written on styles of attachment to God and patterns of religious coping and how these constructs may impact adjustment in persons dealing with loss. This study examines the roles of attachment to God,…

  5. Assessing the Role of Attachment to God, Meaning, and Religious Coping as Mediators in the Grief Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Melissa M.; Chan, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Research has examined the relationship of styles of attachment to others and meaning with grief and the stress-related growth process. Less has been written on styles of attachment to God and patterns of religious coping and how these constructs may impact adjustment in persons dealing with loss. This study examines the roles of attachment to God,…

  6. Religious Dogma without Religious Fundamentalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik D. Baldwin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: New Atheists and Anti-Theists (such as Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, Christopher Hutchins affirm that there is a strong connection between being a traditional theist and being a religious fundamentalist who advocates violence, terrorism, and war. They are especially critical of Islam. On the contrary, I argue that, when correctly understood, religious dogmatic belief, present in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, is progressive and open to internal and external criticism and revision. Moreover, acknowledging that human knowledge is finite and that humans are fallible and have much to learn, dogmatic religious believers accept that they ought to value and seek to acquire moral and intellectual virtues, including the virtues of temperance and reasonability. Conclusion/Recommendations: While some Muslims advocate violence, terrorism, and war, others accept the concept of dogma articulated here and even speak out against the very things that Dawkins et al abhor. The contentious claims of the New Atheists and Anti-Theists to the contrary, therefore, while popular and rhetorically forceful, are false and do not withstand careful scrutiny.

  7. Vajras€cika-Upanisad. Denial of the Natural and the „Verticalization” of Religious Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Nedu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vajrasucika-Upaniad is a more recent text, belonging to the line of the Sama-Veda. The text demolishes all the religious claims of any phenomenal condition, arguing that spiritual pre-eminence is reached only through the direct realization of the ultimate reality (Brahman as own-identity (atman. The last paragraph of the text offers a presentation of this ultimate reality and of the condition reached by the one who gets dissolved into it.

  8. Religious architecture: anthropological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Verkaaik

    2013-01-01

    Religious Architecture: Anthropological Perspectives develops an anthropological perspective on modern religious architecture, including mosques, churches and synagogues. Borrowing from a range of theoretical perspectives on space-making and material religion, this volume looks at how religious buil

  9. Religious Affiliation, Religious Service Attendance, and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jibum; Smith, Tom W; Kang, Jeong-han

    2015-12-01

    Very few studies have examined the effects of both religious affiliation and religiosity on mortality at the same time, and studies employing multiple dimensions of religiosity other than religious attendance are rare. Using the newly created General Social Survey-National Death Index data, our report contributes to the religion and mortality literature by examining religious affiliation and religiosity at the same time. Compared to Mainline Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and other religious groups have lower risk of death, but Black Protestants, Evangelical Protestants, and even those with no religious affiliation are not different from Mainline Protestants. While our study is consistent with previous findings that religious attendance leads to a reduction in mortality, we did not find other religious measures, such as strength of religious affiliation, frequency of praying, belief in an afterlife, and belief in God to be associated with mortality. We also find interaction effects between religious affiliation and attendance. The lowest mortality of Jews and other religious groups is more apparent for those with lower religious attendance. Thus, our result may emphasize the need for other research to focus on the effects of religious group and religious attendance on mortality at the same time.

  10. Vajras€cika-Upanisad. Denial of the Natural and the „Verticalization” of Religious Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Cristian Nedu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vajrascika-Upaniad is a more recent text, belonging to the line of the Sma-Veda. The text demolishes all the religious claims of any phenomenal condition, arguing that spiritual pre-eminence is reached only through the direct realization of the ultimate reality (Brahman as own-identity (tman. The last paragraph of the text offers a presentation of this ultimate reality and of the condition reached by the one who gets dissolved into it.

  11. 大学生宗教经验触发因素的现状调查%A Survey on Triggers of Religious Experiences in College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋兴川; 刘怀英

    2016-01-01

    采用自编的大学生宗教经验触发因素问卷,对620名大学生宗教经验触发因素进行调查。研究发现:宗教经验触发因素对大学生的总体影响作用接近一般水平;大学生宗教经验触发各因素均值存在显著差异;宗教经验触发因素各个维度上的均值由大到小依次为审美与创造、群体仪式行为、边缘处境、个体仪式行为以及音乐;最容易产生宗教经验的是审美与创造以及群体仪式行为,而个体仪式行为以及音乐的触发作用相对最弱;性别因素在宗教经验触发因素总分上不存在显著的差异,但在边缘处境、音乐上,男生均显著高于女生。%In the current study,the survey on trigger factors of religious experiences was conducted with sample of 620 college students. The results demonstrated that the general effect from trigger factors of religious experiences was close to the average level; while all of the mean of trigger factors was significant different. In addition,the order for the mean of each factor from the largest to smallest was: aesthetic for beauty and creation,communal ritual behaviors,marginal situation,individual ritual behaviors,and music. In other words,the religious experiences was highly possible generated by aesthetic for beauty and creation,relatively less possible to be generated by individual ritual behaviors and music. In term of gender,there was no significant difference on the total score of trigger factors,but female was significantly higher than male subjects on marginal situation and music.

  12. Parents' refusal of medical treatment for cultural or religious beliefs: an ethnographic study of health care professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnard-Palmer, Luanne; Kools, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric nurses working in acute care settings serving religious and culturally diverse families may encounter parents whose beliefs influence treatment decisions. Previous literature describes how these complex situations lead to emotional distress and strained relationships between health care provider and family members. An ethnographic study was conducted to investigate the impact of parental treatment refusal on the bedside interactions between pediatric nurses and parents. Twenty in-depth interviews with nurses were conducted, and extensive field notes were taken during data collection. Emotional feelings associated with possible loss of guardianship and subsequent mandated treatment, the impact of the situation on the nurses' health and stress levels, and functional status were all explored. Three themes were identified following interpretive narrative analysis of transcriptions and field notes: weathering the storm of moral conflict, closeness and involvement versus distance and retreat, and battles between the supportive and oppositional groups. The findings of the study lead to a deeper understanding of the complexities of the ethical dilemma surrounding treatment refusal in pediatrics.

  13. Religiousness, religious coping methods and distress level among psychiatric patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurasikin, M S; Khatijah, L A; Aini, A; Ramli, M; Aida, S A; Zainal, N Z; Ng, C G

    2013-06-01

    Patients having psychiatric diagnoses often experience high level of distress. Religiousness is often used by them as part of their coping mechanism and problem-solving strategies. To determine the level of religious commitment and coping methods in psychiatric patients and its relationship with distress level. Religious commitment and coping patterns were measured with the Duke University Religious Index (DUREL) and Brief RCOPE, respectively. Psychopathology was assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and distress level was assessed with the Depressive, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS). Social support and experiences of recent threatening events were measured with the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and Life Threatening Events (LTE). A total of 228 patients were included in this study with a mean age of 40.2 years. The majority were male, Malay, Muslim, single and with psychotic disorder. The subjects had a high level of religious commitment and had used more positive coping methods. Negative religious coping, psychiatric symptoms and diagnosis of anxiety disorder or major depression were significantly associated with high distress level. Higher religious commitment was significantly associated with lower distress (p < .05). Psychiatric patients were religiously committed and used more positive religious coping methods. Practices of negative religious coping, severe psychiatric symptoms and anxiety/depression were associated with higher distress.

  14. The Linguistic Roots of Religious Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tselkovsky

    2014-08-01

    reveal the variables of religious experience (psycho-linguistics.

  15. Varieties of Religious Pluralism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Noah Olawoyin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Religious Pluralism is one of many forms of pluralism in contemporary globalised world.  Some others include ethnic pluralism, value pluralism, doctrinal pluralism, ethical pluralism, political pluralism.  Religious pluralism is, however, one of the most important in contemporary society, considering globalization and the role of religions in many conflicts.  It has its root in poltitical liberalism. Religious pluralism is a hot debate in social sciences and in Theology and Religious Studies. This paper argues that religious pluralism, which is an acceptance of plurality as normative, is not a monolithic theory. The different religious context in which it is being discussed, the different disciplinary and philosophical influences resulted in various and even contradictory types.  However, this paper is a ‘mapping’ of the contour of contemporary discussions.  Critically reviewing relevant literature, two major theories of religious pluralism were identified: identist and differential/complementary.  Each of these also has subdivision.

  16. Religiosity and Education: The Views of Greek Student Teachers on the Religious Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamouzis, Polikarpos; Athanassiades, Elias

    2011-01-01

    The correlation of student teachers' religiosity with their views on the religious education course that they are called on to teach in Greek public schools is the subject treated in the present survey. The five main features of religiosity, that is, (1) religious faith, (2) religious knowledge, (3) religious experience, (4) participation in a…

  17. Depressie en religie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Botha

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Two contrasting roles regarding the mental health of man have been attributed to religion in the course of history. On the one hand, the presence of religion and faith in a person has been regarded as pathogenic, with the absence the reof as remedial On the other hand religion and faith in a person have been regarded as remedial, with the absence thereof as pathogenic. The most important finding is that depression is an experience of paradoxes. If the person cannot offer any solution for the paradox, he remains trapped in the vicious spiral of depression. Expressed differently, despair is then constituted. The religious individual attempts to offer a solution fo r the paradox through his interpretation of faith on the basis of his concept of God. Through a newly-discovered concept of God an interpretation of faith becomes possible by which the pe rso n discovers sense and meaning. Expressed differently, hope is then constituted.

  18. Pluralism and Religious Harmony in Religious Elites Perspectives in Malang City

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    Umi Sumbulah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to understand the religious elite view of pluralism and religious harmony in  Malang. The study was focused on the meaning of pluralism and religious harmony, efforts  and things that support and hinder the realization of religious harmony. Empirical research  data with qualitative-phenomenological approach was collected through interviews and documentation. The results show: first, the meaning of religious pluralism for the religious elites is very varied, which is the same as tolerance, mutual respect, the goal of all religions are the same, and recognize the fact that there are many religions in this world. Second, religiousharmony have meaning as a condition where there is no oppression and domination of one religion over other religions, awakening a deep awareness of diversity, respect for human rights, and the willingness to spread kindness and love for fellow human beings. Third, religious harmony can be achieved through internal efforts to strengthen the faith of each and build awareness to develop a positive attitude towards other religions. In external efforts to create harmony done through emancipatory dialogue and cooperation to resolve humanitarian issues. Fourth, positive attitude that supports the creation of harmony of religions is the willingness and awareness to understand each other and share experiences. Egoism, truth claims, fanaticism, and exclusivism is a negative attitude and expression recognized by the religious elite can interfere with the establishment of inter-religious harmony.

  19. Origins of Religiousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding

    Across 800 regions of the World, this research shows that people are more religious when living in regions that are more frequently razed by natural disasters. This is in line with psychological theory stressing that religious people tend to cope with adverse life events by seeking comfort...... in their religion or searching for a reason for the event; for instance that the event was an act of God. This is termed religious coping. Natural disasters are a source for adverse life events, and thus one way to interpret my findings is by way of religious coping. The results are robust to various measures...... religious people are less likely to move out of disaster areas as they see the disaster as an act of God), I further show that second generation immigrants whose mothers descend from natural disaster areas, are more religious than their counterparts with ancestors from calmer areas. Why should economists...

  20. Origins of Religiousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding

    Across 800 regions of the World, this research shows that people are more religious when living in regions that are more frequently razed by natural disasters. This is in line with psychological theory stressing that religious people tend to cope with adverse life events by seeking comfort...... in their religion or searching for a reason for the event; for instance that the event was an act of God. This is termed religious coping. Natural disasters are a source for adverse life events, and thus one way to interpret my findings is by way of religious coping. The results are robust to various measures...... religious people are less likely to move out of disaster areas as they see the disaster as an act of God), I further show that second generation immigrants whose mothers descend from natural disaster areas, are more religious than their counterparts with ancestors from calmer areas. Why should economists...

  1. Negative Religious Rhetoric in the Lives of Black Cisgender Queer Emerging Adult Men: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett-Walker, Ja'Nina J; Torres, Vanessa M

    2016-12-02

    Given the intersection of racial, religious, and sexual identities for Black queer populations, the current study examines sexuality related religious rhetoric. Twenty Black cisgender queer men were recruited to participate in a qualitative interview. Using thematic analysis, the research team identified four themes: negative religious rhetoric, personal consequences of negative religious rhetoric, social consequences of negative religious rhetoric, and growth from negative religious rhetoric. Participants explained the pervasiveness of negative religious rhetoric within their churches and family structures. Men also conveyed how negative religious rhetoric frames societal ideologies around same-sex behavior often condoning violence toward queer populations. Although men had negative experiences, participants articulated the importance of using oppression as a platform for growth. Black cisgender queer men are present within religious institutions, however, such negative religious rhetoric may negatively affect their mental and physical health. Researchers, clinicians, and clergy should consider the ways negative religious rhetoric marginalizes queer populations.

  2. Geografia das religiões: temas sobre a experiência e o pensamento na ordem dos frades menores capuchinhos = Geography of religious: issues about experience and thoughts of Capuchin Minor Friars Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker, Elsbeth Lisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta temas sobre a experiência e o pensamento na Ordem dos Frades Menores Capuchinhos, que evidenciam a riqueza da perspectiva cultural da Geografia, sua espacialização, sua presença social e espiritual em diferentes fatos históricos. Visa-se a conhecer e a descrever a Ordem dos Frades Menores Capuchinhos, com ênfase à sua presença no estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, descrevendo atitudes, valores, entre outros aspectos, vinculados ao sentido e aos símbolos espiritualizados deste clero. Identificou-se o contexto da imigração italiana, no século XIX, e a con- sequente inserção dessa Ordem no Rio Grande do Sul como ponto de partida. A metodologia consistiu em uma análise documental, em textos de comentadores da filosofia franciscana e de entrevistas realizadas com oito frades Capuchinhos que pertencem à Província Sagrado Coração de Jesus. O artigo, pela complexidade do tema, não pode tratar detalhadamente da descrição da Ordem e dos símbolos em sua profundidade espiritual. Apenas destacou-se a abrangência geográfica dessa Ordem no Estado gaúcho e no Brasil e, também, nos países latino-americanos como Haiti e República Dominicana e evidenciou-se a vida religiosa consagrada, pela sua natureza, inserida na Igreja, contribuindo com sua presença e missão para o bem do povo de Deus. Constatou-se que o simbolismo franciscano está presente na atual sociedade, mesmo que esta não perceba, principalmente, difundido através do presépio e do Tau; e que os votos e a saudação de “Paz e Bem” apresentam maiores significados para aqueles que praticam essa filosofia de vida

  3. Pain and Coping in The Religious Mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jegindø, Else-Marie Elmholdt; Geertz, Armin W.; Roepstorff, Andreas

    Does religion provide placebo analgesia? The purpose of our project is to understand religious coping and specifically how it might be understood a coping strategy for religious people who experience pain. The project is an interdisciplinary study joining different faculties and academic institut......Does religion provide placebo analgesia? The purpose of our project is to understand religious coping and specifically how it might be understood a coping strategy for religious people who experience pain. The project is an interdisciplinary study joining different faculties and academic...... institutions, i.e. the Religion, Cognition and Culture (RCC) research area at The Faculty of Theology, Centre of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience (CFIN) and The Danish Pain Research Centre (DPRC) at the University of Aarhus and Aarhus University Hospital. The team will design fMRI (functional magnetic...... hypothesize that the target group will have a higher pain threshold and pain tolerance during religious practice compared to a non-religious control group, and the fMRI experiments are expected to show reduced neural activity (BOLD) in areas of the brain correlating with pain experience during personal prayer...

  4. Characteristics of Extraordinary Religious Phenomena Accompanying the Christian Religious Experience—Reflection

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    Stanisław Głaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an attempt to discuss in more detail the question of understanding of religious experience in the context of the Christian religion, as well as to show the characteristic extraordinary religious experiences accompanying many people during that experience. The question of experiences evoked by psychedelic drugs, such as the issue of a vision and chemical ecstasy, are not discussed here, and instead the author has chosen to present only typical phenomena accompanying religious experience, which are caused by God’s doing, like visions, ecstasy, glossolalia (speaking in tongues or stigmata. The paper also presents their role and contribution to the process of a human being’s religious development.

  5. Homegrown religious radicalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    It has been reported that a growing number of youngsters from Western Europe are engaging in conflicts motivated by religious and political conflicts in the Middle East. This paper explores the reasons behind this seemingly religious radicalization from the point of view of the youngsters and the...

  6. Parental Divorce, Parental Religious Characteristics, and Religious Outcomes in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E; Ellison, Christopher G

    2012-12-01

    Parental divorce has been linked to religious outcomes in adulthood. Previous research has not adequately accounted for parental religious characteristics or subsequent family context, namely whether one's custodial parent remarries. Using pooled data from three waves of the General Social Survey, we examine the relationships among parental divorce, subsequent family structure, and religiosity in adulthood. Growing up in a single-parent family-but not a stepparent family-is positively associated with religious disaffiliation and religious switching and negatively associated with regular religious attendance. Accounting for parental religious characteristics, however, explains sizable proportions of these relationships. Accounting for parental religious affiliation and attendance, growing up with a single parent does not significantly affect religious attendance. Parental religiosity also moderates the relationship between growing up with a single parent and religious attendance: being raised in a single-parent home has a negative effect on religious attendance among adults who had two religiously involved parents.

  7. Narcisismo reativo e experiência religiosa contemporânea: culpa substituída pela vergonha? Reactive narcissism and contemporary religious experience: a shift from guilt to shame?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Rute Gomes Esperandio

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O texto apresenta um recorte da reflexão desenvolvida na tese de doutorado: "Narcisismo e sacrifício: Modo de subjetivação e religiosidade contemporânea" (Esperandio, 2006. Trata-se de uma análise da experiência religiosa promovida pela Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus (IURD a partir da sua proposta de sacrifício. A abordagem trabalha com a concepção de narcisismo ativo e reativo e defende a idéia de que a prática do sacrifício, tal como proposta pela IURD, articula elementos do narcisismo reativo e estabelece-se como uma tecnologia do eu, usada como remédio para lidar com a experiência contemporânea da vergonha.This text presents part of the reflection developed in my Doctoral Thesis on "Narcissism and sacrifice: Mode of subjectivation and contemporary religiosity" (Esperandio, 2006. It analyses the religious experience supported by the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (UCKG on its proposal of sacrifice. This approach sustains the conception of active and reactive narcissism and defends the idea that such practice of sacrifice proposed by UCKG relates some elements of reactive narcissism and establishes itself as a Technology of Self used as a remedy to deal with the contemporary experience of shame.

  8. Religious Studies, Religious Education and the Aims of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, L. Philip

    2015-01-01

    This article interacts with a recent article by Denise Cush and Catherine Robinson in which they call for a new dialogue between religious studies in universities and religious education, and identify a number of developments in religious studies that have implications for the practice of religious education in schools. Cush and Robinson are…

  9. Religiousness and religious coping in a secular society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Skytthe, Axel;

    2014-01-01

    Women are found to be more religious than men and more likely to use religious coping. Only few studies have explored religious gender differences in more secular societies. This population-based study comprised 3,000 Danish men and women (response rate 45 %) between 20 and 40 years of age...... scored high in the RCOPE exceeded the proportion of women in using positive and especially negative coping strategies. Also, in a secular society, women are found to be more religious than men, but in a subset of the most religious respondents, men were more inclined to use religious coping. Further...... studies on religious coping in secular societies are required....

  10. Homeschooling and religious fundamentalism

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    Robert KUNZMAN

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the relationship between homeschooling and religious fundamentalism by focusing on their intersection in the philosophies and practices of conservative Christian homeschoolers in the United States. Homeschooling provides an ideal educational setting to support several core fundamentalist principles: resistance to contemporary culture; suspicion of institutional authority and professional expertise; parental control and centrality of the family; and interweaving of faith and academics. It is important to recognize, however, that fundamentalism exists on a continuum; conservative religious homeschoolers resist liberal democratic values to varying degrees, and efforts to foster dialogue and accommodation with religious homeschoolers can ultimately helpstrengthen the broader civic fabric.

  11. A Religious Worldview: Protecting One's Meaning System Through Religious Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goplen, Joanna; Plant, E Ashby

    2015-11-01

    For some people, religion strongly influences their worldviews. We propose that religious outgroups threaten the foundational beliefs of people with strong religious worldviews (RWVs) by endorsing alternative belief systems and that this threat contributes to religious prejudice. To examine these ideas, we developed a measure of RWV strength and assessed the role of RWV threat in religious prejudice. Across five studies, strength of RWV was related to religious prejudice, including derogation and denial of alternative religious viewpoints, as well as support for suppressing, avoiding, and even aggressing against religious outgroups. These responses were strongest toward religious outgroups whose worldviews were the most different, and therefore most threatening. Mediational analyses revealed that strong RWV people expressed heightened prejudice because of the worldview threat posed by religious outgroup members. These findings indicate that the avoidance and subjugation of religious outgroups can serve as a worldview protection strategy for some people.

  12. On European Religious Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽娟

    2016-01-01

    Since ancient time,literature has being a hot topic that scholars concern.Latin religious literature is the mainstream of medieval literature.This paper analyzes medieval literature from three aspects which are the religious cultural background,main characteristics and achievements.What’s more,the thesis summarizes its influence to literature afterwards,and provides suggestion to the contemporary literature in China.

  13. Religious pluralism, human rights and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio de Oliveira Ribeiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the results of a research on questions raised up by religious pluralism related to the promotion of human rights, and some aspects around the deepening of democracy. Methodologically, we first focused on the balance of some important questions for ecumenical theology of religions, because they raise new theological perspectives. Then, we highlighted (i some aspects of the contemporary tendency to privatize religious experiences, all of this as impediment to a good balance between religion and human rights. (ii We analyzed the relationship between ecumenical theology and human rights, in a dialogue with Boaventura de Souza Santo’s ‘counter-hegemonic globalization’ concept. In front of religious pluralism it is necessary to give special attention to the articulation between the capability of religious groups to dialogue and the challenges around the promotion of human rights. We also indicate that an ecumenical spirituality emerging from religious pluralism will have alterity as a central dimension, and this will have a direct impact in religious and social processes giving birth to utopian and democratic meaningful perspectives.

  14. Perception of Sacredness at Heritage Religious Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Daniel; Kocher, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Tourism at historic religious sites requires balancing the needs of historic preservation, the tourist experience, and community use of the site. The sacredness of these places is defined by the behaviors that occur there, the experience of users and visitors, and the meanings associated with the place by various groups. This research examines the…

  15. Consciência moral transcendente e experiência religiosa na obra de Viktor Frankl = Transcendent moral conscience and religious experience in the work of Viktor Frankl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, Ivo Studart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, avaliamos como a tese de Viktor Emil Frankl sobre o caráter transcendente da consciência moral [Gewissen] constitui um argumento-chave para elucidar sua visão de experiência religiosa. Trata-se de um debate que toca, de maneira singular, o pensamento teológico do filósofo e psiquiatra vienense, na medida em que, partindo de uma análise do fenômeno da responsabilidade humana, chega-se a uma peculiar noção de relacionamento entre homem e Deus. Nesse sentido, paralelamente, vislumbramos como o pensador em questão refuta as leituras psicológicas sobre a moralidade, ao mesmo tempo em que objeta contra teses centrais da psicanálise sobre o tema

  16. Race/ethnicity, religious involvement, and domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher G; Trinitapoli, Jenny A; Anderson, Kristin L; Johnson, Byron R

    2007-11-01

    The authors explored the relationship between religious involvement and intimate partner violence by analyzing data from the first wave of the National Survey of Families and Households. They found that: (a) religious involvement is correlated with reduced levels of domestic violence; (b) levels of domestic violence vary by race/ethnicity; (c) the effects of religious involvement on domestic violence vary by race/ethnicity; and (d) religious involvement, specifically church attendance, protects against domestic violence, and this protective effect is stronger for African American men and women and for Hispanic men, groups that, for a variety of reasons, experience elevated risk for this type of violence.

  17. Secular, Spiritual and religious Existential concerns during final diagnostics and treatment period – The lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Seibæk, L.; Hvidt, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. This paper deals with secular, spiritual, and religious existential concerns during severe illness. Materials and Methods. Qualitative research interviews were made before and after surgery with women who underwent final diagnostics, surgery, and chemotherapy for ovarian cancer...... a woman with ovarian cancer during her first treatment period. Although the women experienced their health to be seriously threatened, they also felt hope, will, and courage. The diagnostic procedures and treatment had comprehensive impact on their lives. However, hope and spirituality were important...

  18. "Currere" as Transformative Story Telling in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel-Ito, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    This article examines "currere" (a method for autobiographical reflection proposed by William Pinar) as a helpful framework for reflecting on religious educational experiences from a subjective and narrative perspective. The author suggests that this process is important for contemporary religious education as it provokes reflection on the…

  19. The Condition of Religious Modernism among the Youth in Yazd

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    Esmat Salehi

    2014-05-01

    Modernism in religion area is of double significance in our society, especially in Yazd. If religious bases are reconciled by principles such as rationalism and scientism, an ideal situation may appear and we may not experience social disorders anymore, because Islam wants people to accept religious principles thoughtfully and their acceptance is not in conflict with some principles of modernism.

  20. O diagnóstico diferencial entre experiências espirituais e transtornos mentais de conteúdo religioso Differential diagnosis between spiritual experiences and mental disorders of religious content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair de Menezes Júnior

    2009-01-01

    identified in the research in PubMed were examined. RESULTS:Nine criteria were identified for a greater agreement among the researchers that could indicate an appropriate distinction between spiritual experiences and psychotic and dissociative disorders. They are, in relation to the lived experience: lack of psychological suffering, absence of social and occupational impairments, short duration of the experience, critical attitude (to have doubts about the reality of the experience, compatibility with the patient's cultural or religious group, no co-morbidities, control over the experience, personal growth along the time and an attitude to help the other ones. The presence of those conditions suggests a not pathological spiritual experience, but, on the other hand, there is lack of well controlled studies testing these criteria. DISCUSSION: These criteria proposed in the literature, although reaching an expressive consensus among different researchers, still needs to be tested empirically, and methodological directions for future researches about this theme are suggested.

  1. Religious thought and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Ernest Thomas

    2012-09-01

    While earlier approaches to religious thought and practice searched for 'magic bullet' approaches to explain religious thought and behavior, seeing it as an example of irrationality, illusion, integrative force, symbolism, or false explanations of origins, cognitive scientific approaches have suggested that we see it rather as an aggregate of the products of various cognitive mechanisms. Studies in the cognitive science of religion, informed by experimental work, have converged on a standard model of explaining religious thought and behavior by focussing on the role of minimally counter-intuitive concepts, agent and animacy detection, ritual representations, notions of contagion and contamination avoidance, theory of mind, coalitions, and moral intuitions. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012 doi: 10.1002/wcs.1189 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  2. Religious building energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielvogel, L.G.; Rudin, A.

    1988-02-01

    The Interfaith Coalition on Energy (ICE) was organized in 1980 by the Philadelphia area religious community and, funded in 1982 by local private foundations and corporations, began an energy management program for religious buildings whose utility bills are paid by congregations. Since that time, ICE has completed on-site energy audits for 226 congregations with a total of 546 buildings. Each audit report contains a description of the facilities and their energy systems, a baseline year of energy data, a computation of energy use per square foot, and a list of recommendations to reduce energy costs in order of simple payback.

  3. Religious socialization of youth involved in child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jill C; Culbertson, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    Increased religiosity is associated with a variety of improved outcomes, especially for youth in disadvantaged contexts. Although youth involved in child welfare may experience protective effects of religious participation or values, little is known about the impact of maltreatment on religious development. Using the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, a nationally representative study of child welfare involved families, correlates of religious attendance and importance of religion for youth were investigated using weighted logistic regression at two waves 18 months apart. Youth self-reports of religious attendance and their ratings of its importance were associated with religious attendance of their caregivers, whether birth-parents or foster parents. Foster parents were more likely to attend religious services than birth parents. Increases in youth attendance from Wave 1 to Wave 2 were associated with high youth religious importance at Wave 1, whereas decreases in attendance were associated with moving between home and foster placements. Increases in religious importance from Wave 1 to Wave 2 were associated with religious attendance at Wave 1 and with the youth being Black.

  4. UNDERSTANDING RELIGIOUS VIOLENCE IN INDONESIA: Theological, Structural and Cultural Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Salehudin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lately Indonesia is facing a lot of tremendous experience about religious violence. Indonesian Islam which is previously assumed as peaceful religion is suddenly changing to be frightening religion. The destruction in some places such as Bali Bombing, JW Marriot Bombing, and Sampang riot in some places Islam is the trigger of religious violence. This paper discusses the repetition of religious violence in Indonesia especially after New Order era. The writer argues that religious violence in Indonesia is as natural disaster, historical process in human evolution and as close experience that presenting and relating to human history. It may be caused by political condition and the response to economic injustice. In doing so, it is kind of social acceleration toward the process of change and also being a factor of the emergence of new agenda. This is because every disaster, including religious violence, requires an adjustment and a new formulation of the functions that have been damaged.

  5. The Impact of Religious Beliefs on Professional Ethics: A Case Study of a New Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sarah Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This case study of a math and science teacher in a private religious school looks at the impact of a teacher's religious beliefs on her experience of engaging with ethical issues in her practice. A Freirean ethical framework is used to analyze her struggles with differences between her own personal religious convictions and those of the school in…

  6. Connecting biological concepts and religious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beit-Hallahmi, Benjamin

    2012-04-01

    This commentary proposes experiments to examine connections between the presence of out-group members, neurovisceral reactions, religiosity, and ethnocentrism, to clarify the meaning of the correlational findings presented in the target article. It also suggests different ways of describing religious socialization and of viewing assertions about religion and health or about the human ability to detect pathogens.

  7. ABDURRAHMAN WAHID, DEPTH ISLAM, AND RELIGIOUS PLURALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Media Zainul Bahri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay elucidates the idea of religious pluralism of Abdurrahman Wahid (1940-2009, a very important figure in the tradition of Indonesian Islam. Wahis’s ideas  of religious pluralism is based on what the so-called “Depth Islam” (DI. DI is different from the usual theological dogmas that only contains concepts and structures. DI  is  not a literal and superficial forms of religion. It is an understanding  that goes beyond the literal texts to look for the principles and spirit of religion in appreciating humanity, diversity and peace.  DI may have arisen because of the long process of religious internalization within Wahid experiences, but it is also a hybrid form, i.e., it is a result of the process of encountering or learning Wahid’s traditions inter-mingling with cultures of the wider world. 

  8. Fearing religious satire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Dennis Meyhoff

    2015-01-01

    The article examines the history of the fear of religious satire in modern Europe. The article argues that this fear primarily concerns the potential dissolution of 'the social bond of society' or 'the moral and social order'. From the 17th Century until today, censorship measures and blasphemy...

  9. Homeschooling and Religious Fundamentalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the relationship between homeschooling and religious fundamentalism by focusing on their intersection in the philosophies and practices of conservative Christian homeschoolers in the United States. Homeschooling provides an ideal educational setting to support several core fundamentalist principles: resistance to…

  10. Fearing religious satire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Dennis Meyhoff

    2015-01-01

    The article examines the history of the fear of religious satire in modern Europe. The article argues that this fear primarily concerns the potential dissolution of 'the social bond of society' or 'the moral and social order'. From the 17th Century until today, censorship measures and blasphemy l...

  11. A Religious Media Revolution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard-Petersen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    . It argues that the conflict has completely altered the means and modes of Sunni religious communication, transforming classical genres and bypassing them with new ones. It concludes that the lack of formal authority in the messaging of the jihadist groupings, and their failed efforts to build up credible...

  12. Secular Religious Establishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Secularism as a political doctrine claims that religion and politics should be separated. The compatibility question is whether secularism can accept some forms of religious establishment in the form of institutional linkages between state and organised religion. I argue that the answer to the co...

  13. Unpacking religious affiliation: Exploring associations between Christian children's religious cultural context, God image, and self-esteem across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erin I; Crosby, Robert G

    2017-03-01

    In developmental research, religiousness is typically measured with omnibus affiliation or attendance variables that underspecify how the religious cultural contexts and experiences that affiliation represents influence developmental outcomes. This study explores associations between five aspects of a religious cultural context (family religiosity, religious schooling, church-based relationships with peers and adults, and view of God) in 844 seven- to 12-year-old Christian children to examine how they differentially predict self-esteem. Results of a structural equation model (SEM) analysis indicated that God image and peer church relationships directly predicted self-esteem, whereas God image mediated the influence of adult church relationships and family religious practices on self-esteem. A multiple group SEM analysis met the criterion for weak, but not strong, evidence that self-esteem is more related to younger children's adult church relationships but older children's peer church relationships. God image tended to be more related to younger children's family religious practices but older children's adult church relationships. Implications for developmental researchers and practitioners are discussed. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Religious affiliation is an omnibus variable representing multiple contexts of development. Self-esteem is an important outcome variable with different influences across development. Religious affiliation is associated with increased self-esteem. What does this study add? Children's experience in the contexts of religious affiliation influences development differently. It is not just affiliation, but specific religious contexts that influence children's self-esteem. The role of religious contexts in shaping children's self-esteem shifts across development. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Religious ecstasy in classical Sufism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran Ogén

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this essay is to shed some light on the phenomenon of religious ecstasy as met within Islamic mysticism and there particularly during its classical period. In this case, the expression "classical Sufism" refers to the period of Sufi history from about 850 A.D. until circa 1100 A.D. In the Sufi vocabulary there is even a rather differentiated terminology concerning these ecstatic experiences or states; whether different descriptions of one and the same experience are involved or whether the terms actually describe different experiences is a question that we must set aside for the present. There are, however, Sufis expressing the opinion that these different states of mind are based on one single experience in spite of the difference in terms. A generic term for these experiences or states is not to be found in the Sufi terminology however, so the problem of which of these phenomena must be present in order for ecstasy to be evidenced—or which of them would be sufficient— does not therefore arise for the Sufis. So instead of speaking of religious ecstasy in general, they either refer to the single specific terms in question or else use the plural of one of the words employed to designate one of the terms we include in "religious ecstasy". They thus speak of "ecstasies", mawagid from the singular form wagd—if one should at all attempt a translation of this plural. This plural is a genuine Sufi construction and does not otherwise seem to occur in the Arabic language, except as a later borrowing. Psalmody based on the Koranic vocabulary remains the main procedure for putting oneself in ecstasy. If we add 'and listening to psalmody', we then obtain a fairly satisfactory picture of the external conditions for the Sufis' ecstasy until the eleventh century, when various innovations begin to appear. As far as the darwiš-dance is concerned, it is not until the thirteenth century with Rumi that it becomes transformed from an expression

  15. Leaving my religion: Understanding the relationship between religious disaffiliation, health, and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenelon, Andrew; Danielsen, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    Religious disaffiliation-leaving the religious tradition in which one was raised for no religious affiliation in adulthood-has become more common in recent years, though few studies have examined its consequences for the health and well-being of individuals. We use an innovative approach, comparing the health and subjective well-being of religious disaffiliates to those who remain affiliated using pooled General Social Survey samples from 1973 through 2012. We find that religious disaffiliates experience poorer health and lower well-being than those consistently affiliated and those who are consistently unaffiliated. We also demonstrate that the disadvantage for those who leave religious traditions is completely mediated by the frequency of church attendance, as disaffiliates attend church less often. Our results point to the importance of the social processes surrounding religious disaffiliation and emphasize the role of dynamics in the relationship between religious affiliation and health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The emotional and attitudinal consequences of religious hypocrisy: experimental evidence using a cognitive dissonance paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Omar; Gobet, Fernand

    2013-01-01

    We explored the emotional and attitudinal consequences of personal attitude-behavior discrepancies using a religious version of the hypocrisy paradigm. We induced cognitive dissonance in participants (n = 206) by making them feel hypocritical for advocating certain religious behaviors that they had not recently engaged in to their own satisfaction. In Experiment 1, this resulted in higher levels of self-reported guilt and shame compared to the control condition. Experiment 2 further showed that a religious self-affirmation task eliminated the guilt and shame. In Experiment 3, participants boosted their religious attitudes as a result of dissonance, and both religious and non-religious self-affirmation tasks eliminated this effect. The findings provide evidence that dissonance induced through religious hypocrisy can result in guilt and shame as well as an attitude bolstering effect, as opposed to the attitude reconciliation effect that is prevalent in previous dissonance research.

  17. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of a Religious Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Naved; Radulescu, Anca; Bains, Anjuman; Aleem, Sheema

    2017-08-03

    Religious conversion is an important phenomenon in contemporary religious climate, but existing psychology research work is mostly based on quantitative methods. In an attempt to contribute to this field, the present study proposes a qualitative exploration of religious conversion. The in-depth interview of a French woman is examined in order to investigate her experience of religious conversion, 40 years prior. The interview was analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, with the purpose of revealing how the participant experienced the process of religious conversion, what was its impact on her life, identity and personality and how she coped with this impact. The four emerging themes were: conflicted relationship with Judaism, the pursuit of a spiritual quest, changes after conversion and life after conversion. These themes painted the image of a powerful spiritual transformation, a profound and dynamic lifelong process, integrating concepts and practices, life changes and developments. The findings are explained with the help of available literature.

  18. Secular Religious Establishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Secularism as a political doctrine claims that religion and politics should be separated. The compatibility question is whether secularism can accept some forms of religious establishment in the form of institutional linkages between state and organised religion. I argue that the answer...... to the compatibility question is not obvious and requires a systematic analysis of secularism. Based on a distinction between a general concept and specific conceptions of secularism I offer a general structure for conceptions of secularism that incorporates both a) basic values, e.g. political equality and freedom...... of conscience, b) intermediate political principles of separation, e.g. rights to religious liberty, and c) derived normative prescriptions, e.g. that an established church is unacceptable. I illustrate the structure using the conceptions of secularism advocated by Robert Audi and by Charles Taylor and Jocelyn...

  19. Epistemologies of Religious Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette; Osbeck, Christina

    2015-01-01

    to the conference subtheme: Borders between research methods General subject didactics in the Nordic countries has developed in relation to teacher education and the need to bring questions about teaching and learning closer to specific subject-content areas. The discussions started at slightly different times...... in the different countries, for instance in the 1970s in Norway and in the 1980s in Sweden (Kroksmark 1989, Ongstad 2006). However, at that time religious education was already an academic field in the faculties of theology in many of the Nordic countries, namely as religionspedagogik[k] (e.g. Osbeck & Lied 2012...... to the subject didactics of RE in different national contexts in the Nordic sphere.Aim and main questions:The aim of this symposium is to examine different conditions for knowledge re/production concerning Religious Education in the Nordic countries and discuss how disciplines work as frames for ongoing...

  20. Migration and religious (intolerance: Contribution to the studies regarding the impact of international migration and the perception of religious diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Odgers Ortiz

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Mexicans migrating to the United Status confront a very different social space which forces them to re-elaborate multiple identity references, among which religious beliefs and practices stand out. A number of studies have shown that among those who migrate, some on occasion turn to practices of popular religiosity in order to create bridges and maintain links with their communities of origin, in other cases, the migratory experience favors the processes of religious conversion. The subject is reopened in this article in order to bring up a third expression of the impact of migration on religious conversion: the transformation of the idea of religious diversity among those who migrate and consequently, the modification of some attitudes of religious tolerance and intolerance.

  1. Political liberalism and religious claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of 4 important lacunae in political liberalism and identifies, in a preliminary fashion, some trends in the literature that can come in for support in filling these blind spots, which prevent political liberalism from a correct assessment of the diverse nature of religious claims. Political liberalism operates with implicit assumptions about religious actors being either ‘liberal’ or ‘fundamentalist’ and ignores a third, in-between group, namely traditionalist religious actors and their claims. After having explained what makes traditionalist religious actors different from liberal and fundamentalist religious actors, the author develops 4 areas in which political liberalism should be pushed further theoretically in order to correctly theorize the challenge which traditional religious actors pose to liberal democracy. These 4 areas (blind spots) are: (1) the context of translation; (2) the politics of exemptions; (3) the multivocality of theology; and (4) the transnational nature of norm-contestation. PMID:28344375

  2. Religious social capital: Its measurement and utility in the study of the social determinants of health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselko, Joanna; Hughes, Cayce; Cheney, Rose

    2014-01-01

    As a social determinant of health, religiosity remains not well understood, despite the prevalence of religious activity and prominence of religious institutions in most societies. This paper introduces a working measure of Religious Social Capital and presents preliminary associations with neighborhood social capital and urban stressors. Religious social capital is defined as the social resources available to individuals and groups through their social connections with a religious community. Domains covered include group membership, social integration, values/norms, bonding/bridging trust as well as social support. Cross-sectional data come from a convenience sample of 104 community dwelling adults residing in a single urban neighborhood in a large US city, who also provided information on neighborhood social capital, and experiences of urban stressors. Results suggest that religious social capital is a valid construct that can be reliably measured. All indicators of religious social capital were higher among those who frequently attended religious services, with the exception of bridging trust (trust of people from different religious groups). A weak, inverse, association was also observed between religious and neighborhood social capital levels. Levels of religious social capital were correlated with higher levels of reported urban stressors, while neighborhood social capital was correlated with lower urban stressor levels. A significant percent of the sample was unaffiliated with a religious tradition and these individuals were more likely to be male, young and more highly educated. Social capital is a promising construct to help elucidate the influence of religion on population health. PMID:21802182

  3. Key-Phenomenon and Religious Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomuscio Vincenzo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I develop a phenomenology of religious experience through the notion of keyphenomenon. My analysis moves from a general phenomenology of situation, in which we have to relate different phenomena according to a sense. What does “according to a sense” mean? My suggestion is that we should look for a relationship among these data when we find a key-phenomenon (among a series of phenomena that would enlighten all the others. This key-phenomenon would show a non-phenomenal meaning which would make all the others understandable. Each other datum, therefore, becomes the witness of invisible meaning through a key-witness. The key-phenomenon we choose determines the role (i.e., the truth of each datum within its situation. This phenomenological relationship belongs to both the sense of day-life situations, and that one of possible religious situations. If the religious interpretation of a situation depends on our choice of key-phenomenon, or key-witness, we have to define what kind of keyphenomenon constitutes a religious intuition.

  4. Religious Young Adults Recounting the Past: Narrating Sexual and Religious Cultures in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Sarah-Jane; Yip, Andrew Kam-Tuck

    2012-01-01

    Schooling can be a pivotal time in young people's formative experience when identities are negotiated and forged. However, contradictory dominant cultures can operate within the school context, making it very challenging for individuals to negotiate their religious and sexual identities within a sexualised and heteronormative space. This essay…

  5. Developments in Religious Studies: Towards a Dialogue with Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cush, Denise; Robinson, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The early days of non-confessional, multi-faith religious education in Britain benefitted from close collaboration between academics in universities, teacher educators and teachers. This article attempts to initiate a revival of such a dialogue, by summarizing some developments in religious studies at university level and suggesting possible…

  6. RELIGIOUS RESPONSES TO GLOBALISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatib A. Kadir

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Sociological discussion of globalisation is preoccupied with the political, economic, and military dimension of it, with little attention to its religious aspect. This paper attempts to trace the impacts of globalisation on religion and religious responses, the argument of which derives mainly from the so-called “Bridge-Building Program” organised by CRCS & ICRS-UGM in 2008. It argues that though they share a common concern, people of different faiths are at risk of deepening the problems rather than offering solutions in view of their different responses for which we categorise them into different but overlapping categories -ideological, ambivalent, integrative, exclusive, and imitative. It then leads to a more fundamental question of whether interfaith cooperation is possible given those different and sometime opposing responses. [Dalam kajian sosiologi, diskusi mengenai globalisasi kerap kali semata-mata ditinjau dari sisi politik, enonomi dan militer, sementara dimensi agama sering kali dikesampingkan. Artikel ini membahas dampak globalisasi terhadap agama dan respon komunitas agama terhadap globalisasi. Data yang muncul dalam artikel ini diambil dari sebuah workshop berjudul“Bridge- Building Program.” Melalui artikel ini, saya berpendapat bahwa, meskikomunitas agama-agama memiliki keprihatinan yang sama terhadap dampak globalisasi, namun respon mereka cenderung mempertajam persoalan yang diakibatkan globalisasi, ketimbang memberikan solusi. Respon tersebut dalam dikategorikan –meski tidak kaku- dalam: respon ideologis, ambivalen, integratif, ekslusif dan imitatif. Selanjutnya, artikel juga mengulas pada pertanyaan mendasar mengenai apakah kerjasama antar agama mungkin dilakukan menyimak ragam respon yang saling bertentangan tersebut.

  7. Religious beliefs and entrepreneurship among Dutch protestants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Rietveld (Niels); E. van Burg (Elco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractReligious beliefs affect the economic behavior of individuals. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between religious beliefs and entrepreneurship. Empirical evidence that entrepreneurship rates differ among religions suggests that religious beliefs influence the pursuit

  8. Religious beliefs and entrepreneurship among Dutch protestants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Rietveld (Niels); E. van Burg (Elco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractReligious beliefs affect the economic behavior of individuals. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between religious beliefs and entrepreneurship. Empirical evidence that entrepreneurship rates differ among religions suggests that religious beliefs influence the pursuit

  9. Religiøs omvendelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Ida Marie; Geertz, Armin W

    2007-01-01

    Selvom religiøs omvendelse har været gennemanalyseret inden for psykologien og socio­logien er det vor opfattelse at den seneste neurovidenskabelige forskning kan kaste nyt lys på emnet. Det er vor påstand at omvendelse drejer sig om religiøse identitetsdannelsesprocesser, hvor der er tale om gru...

  10. Muslim American adolescents' explanations of changing religious practices: Cultural tools in cultural contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Kathleen M; Schiro, Isabella N; Gregory, Wesley E; Westberg, Lindsay M; Lee, Samantha R; Boyle, Colleen D

    2017-03-01

    To examine the culturally embedded nature of religious practices, we conducted a mixed-methods study in which Muslim American adolescents described how and why their religious practices had changed in recent years (see Etengoff & Daiute, 2013, J. Adolesc. Res., 28, 690). Participants included 201 Muslim adolescents (ages 13-19) from predominantly immigrant families; all were contestants in a Muslim Inter-Scholastic Tournament regional competition. Participants completed surveys including an item regarding whether their religious practices had changed, and for those who answered affirmatively, open-ended questions about the change. Additional measures assessed ethnic identity and perceived discrimination. As hypothesized, the 60% of participants who reported a change in religious practices described this shift as a response to new contexts, people, and religious knowledge. Those who reported a change also reported higher levels of ethnic identity exploration and perceived discrimination. Overall, Muslim American adolescents' descriptions portrayed religious practices as developing through reciprocal interactions with culture. More generally, participants' descriptions point to the viability of a model in which religious practices change and in turn are changed by cultural contexts. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Religious development is viewed as taking place in relational systems with reciprocity between individuals and surrounding contexts. Variations in contexts predict variations in religious development, but mechanisms of development are not well understood. Muslim Americans, including adolescents, show high levels of religious involvement and experience unique cultural and religious contexts. Muslim American emerging adults describe their religious practices as responsive to sociocultural contexts. What does the study add? This study focuses on Muslim American adolescents, a group that has received little research attention

  11. Changes in Religiousness and Spirituality Attributed to HIV/AIDS: Are There Sex and Race Differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Sian; Tsevat, Joel; Szaflarski, Magdalena; Kudel, Ian; Sherman, Susan N; Feinberg, Judith; Leonard, Anthony C; Holmes, William C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Having a serious illness such as HIV/AIDS raises existential issues, which are potentially manifested as changes in religiousness and spirituality. The objective of this study was (1) to describe changes in religiousness and spirituality of people with HIV/AIDS, and (2) to determine if these changes differed by sex and race. METHODS Three-hundred and forty-seven adults with HIV/AIDS from 4 sites were asked demographic, clinical, and religious/spiritual questions. Six religious/spiritual questions assessed personal and social domains of religiousness and spirituality. RESULTS Eighty-eight participants (25%) reported being “more religious” and 142 (41%) reported being “more spiritual” since being diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Approximately 1 in 4 participants also reported that they felt more alienated by a religious group since their HIV/AIDS diagnosis and approximately 1 in 10 reported changing their place of religious worship because of HIV/AIDS. A total of 174 participants (50%) believed that their religiousness/spirituality helped them live longer. Fewer Caucasians than African Americans reported becoming more spiritual since their HIV/AIDS diagnosis (37% vs 52%, respectively; P<.015), more Caucasians than African Americans felt alienated from religious communities (44% vs 21%, respectively; P<.001), and fewer Caucasians than African Americans believed that their religiousness/spirituality helped them live longer (41% vs 68% respectively; P<.001). There were no significantly different reported changes in religious and spiritual experiences by sex. CONCLUSIONS Many participants report having become more spiritual or religious since contracting HIV/AIDS, though many have felt alienated by a religious group—some to the point of changing their place of worship. Clinicians conducting spiritual assessments should be aware that changes in religious and spiritual experiences attributed to HIV/AIDS might differ between Caucasian and African

  12. Religious and Psychological Implications of Positive and Negative Religious Coping in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Nima; Watson, P J; Tahbaz, Sahar; Chen, Zhuo Job

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the religious and psychological implications of religious coping in Iran. University students (N = 224) responded to the Brief Positive and Negative Religious Coping Scales along with measures of Religious Orientation, Integrative Self-Knowledge, Self-Control, Mindfulness, Self-Compassion, Self-Esteem, Guilt, Shame, and Self-Criticism. As in previous research elsewhere, Positive Religious Coping was stronger on average than Negative Religious Coping, and Positive and Negative Religious Coping predicted adjustment and maladjustment, respectively, In addition, this study demonstrated that direct relationships between Positive and Negative Religious Coping appeared to be reliable in Iran; that Positive Religious Copings was broadly compatible with, and Negative Religious Coping was largely irrelevant to, Iranian religious motivations; and that Negative Religious Coping obscured linkages of Positive Religious Coping with religious and psychological adjustment.

  13. An Exploration of Specialist Palliative Care Nurses' Experiences of Providing Care to Hospice Inpatients from Minority Ethnic Groups-Implication for Religious and Spiritual Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrea Henry; Fiona Timmins

    2016-01-01

      The aim of this research study was to gain an understanding of nurses' experiences of providing care to patients from minority ethnic groups within the specialist palliative care inpatient unit of an Irish hospice...

  14. Religiousness and health in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Linda Juel; Möller, Sören; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen

    2017-01-01

    % CI 0.75, 0.98) and depressive symptoms 0.80 (95% CI 0.69, 0.93), whereas being religiously educated lowered odds of poor self-rated health (SRH) 0.81 (95% CI 0.70, 0.93) and long-term health problems 0.84 (95% CI 0.74, 0.95). The more religious had lower odds of limitations with activities of daily...... living 0.76 (95% CI 0.58, 0.99) and depressive symptoms 0.77 (95% CI 0.64, 0.92) than other respondents, and compared to people who only prayed and did not have organizational involvement, they had lower odds of poor SRH 0.71 (95% CI 0.52, 0.97) and depressive symptoms 0.66 (95% CI 0.50, 0.......87). Conversely, people who only prayed had higher odds of depressive symptoms than non-religious people 1.46 (95% CI 1.15, 1.86). Our findings suggest two types of religiousness: 1. Restful religiousness (praying, taking part in a religious organization and being religiously educated), which is associated...

  15. Impact of a near-death experience and religious conversion on the mental health of a criminal: case report and literature review Impacto de uma experiência de quase-morte e conversão religiosa sobre a saúde mental de um criminoso: relato de caso e revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla C. Braghetta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Near-death experiences have been defined as profound psychological events that may occur to a person while close to death or in a situation of extreme physical or emotional distress. These experiences seem to have an important effect on the patients’ mental health and may occur in several situations despite their cultural and religious beliefs. CASE DESCRIPTION: The present case report describes the positive impact of a near-death experience (Greyson scale > 7 followed by religious conversion on the mental health of a former prisoner. COMMENTS: Investigation of the role of near-death experiences by the scientific community could shed light on the coping mechanisms and moral/ethical transformations that take place in these individuals.OBJETIVO: As experiências de quase-morte são definidas como eventos psicológicos profundos, que podem ocorrer quando uma pessoa está em morte iminente ou em situação de intensa crise física ou emocional. Essas experiências parecem ter efeito importante sobre a saúde mental desses pacientes e ocorrem em diversas situações, a despeito de culturas e crenças religiosas. RELATO DE CASO: O presente relato de caso descreve a influência positiva de uma experiência de quase-morte (escala de Greyson > 7 seguida de conversão religiosa sobre a saúde mental de um ex-detento. COMENTÁRIO: A investigação do papel de experiências de quase-morte em âmbito científico poderia ajudar a elucidar os mecanismos de coping e transformações éticas e morais que ocorrem nesses indivíduos.

  16. A study on religious values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robabeh Poorjebelli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate and to compare the adherence rate of religious values between the two ethnic groups of Turkish and Kurdish who live in West Azerbaijan province. The study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale, low, medium and high, and distributes it among a sample of 200 people who live in these two regions. The result of our survey indicates that Azeri people were more religious than Kurdish people were. In addition, the study investigates the relationship between personal characteristics including age, gender and marital status and adherence rate of religious values and detects some meaningful relationships between these two items.

  17. Risk aversion and religious behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jytte Seested; Bech, Mickael; Christensen, Kaare

    2017-01-01

    Economics offers an analytical framework to consider human behaviour including religious behaviour. Within the realm of Expected Utility Theory, religious belief and activity could be interpreted as an insurance both for current life events and for afterlife rewards. Based on that framework, we...... would expect that risk averse individuals would demand a more generous protection plan which they may do by devoting more effort and resources into religious activities such as church attendance and prayer, which seems to be in accordance with previous empirical results. However, a general concern...... regards the problems of spurious correlations due to underlying omitted or unobservable characteristics shaping both religious activities and risk attitudes. This paper examines empirically the demand for religion by analysing the association between risk attitudes on the one hand, and church attandance...

  18. Religious competence as cultural competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Definitions of cultural competence often refer to the need to be aware and attentive to the religious and spiritual needs and orientations of patients. However, the institution of psychiatry maintains an ambivalent attitude to the incorporation of religion and spirituality into psychiatric practice. This is despite the fact that many patients, especially those from underserved and underprivileged minority backgrounds, are devotedly religious and find much solace and support in their religiosity. I use the case of mental health of African Americans as an extended example to support the argument that psychiatric services must become more closely attuned to religious matters. I suggest ways in which this can be achieved. Attention to religion can aid in the development of culturally competent and accessible services, which in turn, may increase engagement and service satisfaction among religious populations. PMID:22421686

  19. Veteran Religious Affiliation by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This dataset provide a count of Veteran by their religious affiliation and state of residence. The dataset set covers all 50 states, District of Columbia and other...

  20. Network Theory and Religious Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collar, Anna

    Collar, A. C. F. ‘Network Theory and Religious Innovation’. In Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean, edited by I. Malkin, C. Constantakopoulou, K. Panagopoulou, 144-157. Abingdon: Routledge......Collar, A. C. F. ‘Network Theory and Religious Innovation’. In Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean, edited by I. Malkin, C. Constantakopoulou, K. Panagopoulou, 144-157. Abingdon: Routledge...

  1. Religiousness and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleś Maria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human religiousness is a complex and multidimensional reality embedded in basic human needs and connected with people’s desires, anxieties, and hopes. The aim of the paper is to assess religiousness, considered in terms of meaning and cognitive emotion regulation strategies, in adolescents. The religious meaning system is a multidimensional construct encompassing convictions, beliefs, emotional connotations, and the rules of worship. In situations of negative events or unpleasant experiences, young people resort to various coping strategies. Cognitive emotion regulation strategies concern relatively stable conscious ways of regulating emotions, which consist in mentally handling the incoming information that evoke emotions. The study concerned young people aged 13 to 16 years (N = 130. Religiousness was assessed using D. Krok’s Religious Meaning System Questionnaire (RMSQ and cognitive coping strategies were measured using the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ by N. Garnefski and V. Kraaij. The results show that there are relations between religiousness, understood in terms of the young participants’ meaning system, and adaptive as well as maladaptive emotion regulation strategies. The results of the study are discussed in the light of theory and research.

  2. Programs of religious/spiritual support in hospitals - five "Whies" and five "Hows".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Marcelo; de Medeiros, Roberta

    2016-08-22

    A contemporary orientation of the hospital experience model must encompass the clients' religious-spiritual dimension. The objective of this paper is to share a previous experience, highlighting at least five reasons hospitals should invest in this direction, and an equal number of steps required to achieve it. In the first part, the text discourses about five reasons to invest in religious-spiritual support programs: 1. Religious-spiritual wellbeing is related to better health; 2. Religious-spiritual appreciation is a standard for hospital accreditation; 3. To undo religious-spiritual misunderstandings that can affect treatment; 4. Patients demand a religious-spiritual outlook from the institution; and 5. Costs may be reduced with religious-spiritual support. In the second part, the text suggests five steps to implement religious-spiritual support programs: 1. Deep institutional involvement; 2. Formal staff training; 3. Infrastructure and resources; 4. Adjustment of institutional politics; and 5. Agreement with religious-spiritual leaders. The authors hope the information compiled here can inspire hospitals to adopt actions toward optimization of the healing experience.

  3. Rawls and religious paternalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David M; Busch, Jacob

    2012-08-01

    MacDougall has argued that Rawls's liberal social theory suggests that parents who hold certain religious convictions can legitimately refuse blood transfusion on their children's behalf. This paper argues that this is wrong for at least five reasons. First, MacDougall neglects the possibility that true freedom of conscience entails the right to choose one's own religion rather than have it dictated by one's parents. Second, he conveniently ignores the fact that children in such situations are much more likely to die than to survive without blood. Third, he relies on an ambiguous understanding of what is "rational" and treats children as mere extensions of their parents. Fourth, he neglects the fact that those in the original position would seek to protect themselves from persecution and enslavement and thus would not allow groups of children to be killed because of their parents' beliefs. Finally, Rawls makes it clear that we should choose for children as we would choose for ourselves in the original position, with no particular conception of the good (such as that held by Jehovah's Witnesses).

  4. Non-religious Christians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Day

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scholars who recently rejected secularisation theses on the grounds that they were insufficiently defined or contextualised now seem to be accepting with unseemly, uncritical haste, the new, in vogue notion of the post-secular. Scholars seem tempted to drop the term ‘post-secular’ into their papers and presentations as if it is a generally accepted and understood term. It is not and nor, as this paper will argue, is it plausible unless applied to a limited and specific range of phenomena. Far from disappearing, religion is often used publicly as a marker of group identity. This is not a return to religion, or a resurgence in spirituality, but a fluctuating form of contextualised religious identity. Christian nominalists may not believe in God or Jesus, at least if belief is understood as ‘faith’. It would be incorrect, however, to dismiss them as ‘unbelievers’, or their nominalist beliefs as not having essential or substantive reality. They believe in many things, usually related to ‘belonging’. By closely examining people’s sense of Christian ‘belonging’, we find other more subtle, interwoven ‘belongings’ related to, for example, history, nation, morality, gender, and ‘culture’.

  5. Religious beliefs and entrepreneurship among Dutch protestants

    OpenAIRE

    Rietveld, Niels; van Burg, Elco

    2013-01-01

    textabstractReligious beliefs affect the economic behavior of individuals. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between religious beliefs and entrepreneurship. Empirical evidence that entrepreneurship rates differ among religions suggests that religious beliefs influence the pursuit of entrepreneurship. However, how and which specific religious beliefs play a role in this relationship remains unknown. Therefore, we study the relation between two key religious beliefs and entre...

  6. “Too Smart to be Religious?” Discreet Seeking Amidst Religious Stigma at an Elite College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateri Boucher

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To advance understandings of how religion manifests in subtle, nuanced ways in secular institutions, we examine student religiosity and spirituality at an elite liberal arts school marked by a strong intellectual collective identity. Using mixed research methods, we examine how the college’s structures and dominant culture influence students’ religiosity and spirituality. Despite an institutional commitment to promoting students’ self-exploration and inclusion of social “diversity,” we found both campus structures and mainstream culture deterred open spiritual and religious exploration and identification. The structure of the college and its dominant secular, intellectual culture reinforced: (1 a widespread stigma against religious and spiritual expression, (2 a lack of dialogue about the sacred, (3 discreetness in exploring and adhering to sacred beliefs and practices, and (4 a large degree of religious and spiritual pluralism. Our findings additionally illustrate that early exposure to the campus culture’s critical regard for religion had a long-lasting impact on students’ religiosity. A majority of students kept their religious and spiritual expressions hidden and private; only a marginalized minority of students embraced their expressions publically. To increase students’ comfort with religious and spiritual exploration, we propose that colleges foster intentional peer dialogues early in the college experience. Furthermore, we recommend that campus communities prioritize religious and spiritual literacy and respect.

  7. Understanding the relationship between religiousness, spirituality, and underage drinking: the role of positive alcohol expectancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer-Zavala, Shannon; Burris, Jessica L; Carlson, Charles R

    2014-02-01

    Research has consistently found that religiousness and spirituality are negatively associated with underage drinking. However, there is a paucity of research exploring the mechanisms by which these variables influence this important outcome. With 344 underage young adults (ages 18-20; 61 % women), we investigated positive alcohol expectancies as a mediator between religiousness and spirituality (measured separately) and underage alcohol use. Participants completed the Religious Commitment Inventory-10, Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale, Alcohol Expectancies Questionnaire, and Drinking Styles Questionnaire. Results indicate less positive alcohol expectancies partially mediate the relationship between both religiousness and spirituality and underage alcohol use. This suggests religiousness and spirituality's protective influence on underage drinking is partly due to their influence on expectations about alcohol's positive effects. Since underage drinking predicts problem drinking later in life and places one at risk for serious physical and mental health problems, it is important to identify specific points of intervention, including expectations about alcohol that rise from religious and spiritual factors.

  8. Religiousness/Spirituality and anger management in community-dwelling older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefford, Linda; Thomas, Sandra P; Callen, Bonnie; Groer, Maureen

    2014-04-01

    Mismanaged anger is associated with adverse health outcomes. This study examined whether dimensions of religiousness/spirituality could predict healthy anger management in a sample of 82 community-dwelling older Americans. A correlational research design was employed using the Deffenbacher Anger Scale and the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality. Higher scores on Forgiveness, Daily Spiritual Experiences, Religiousness/Spirituality as Coping, and Self-Ranking of Religiousness/Spirituality were correlated with healthier anger management; however forgiveness was the only significant predictor in the regression analysis. Interventions to facilitate forgiveness may promote healthy anger management and minimize the adverse health effects of mismanaged anger.

  9. Religious Belonging, Religious Agency, and Women's Autonomy in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agadjanian, Victor; Yabiku, Scott T

    2015-09-01

    Women's autonomy has frequently been linked with women's opportunities and investments, such as education, employment, and reproductive control. The association between women's autonomy and religion in the developing world, however, has received less attention, and the few existing studies make comparisons across major religious traditions. In this study, we focus on variations in levels of female decision-making autonomy within a single religious tradition-Christianity. Using unique survey data from a predominantly Christian area in Mozambique, we devise an autonomy scale and apply it to compare women affiliated to different Christian denominations as well as unaffiliated women. In addition to affiliation, we examine the relationship between autonomy and women's religious agency both within and outside their churches. Multivariate analyses show that women belonging to more liberal religious traditions (such as Catholicism and mainline Protestantism) and tend to have higher autonomy levels, regardless of other factors. These results are situated within the cross-national scholarship on religion and women's empowerment and are interpreted in the context of gendered religious dynamics in Mozambique and similar developing settings.

  10. Resurrected Pigs, Dyed Foxes and Beloved Cows: Religious Diversity and Nostalgia for Socialism in Rural Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasieka, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my paper is to discuss the phenomenon of nostalgia for socialism in rural Poland. More precisely, I discuss how experiences of rurality and diverse religious beliefs intertwine with nostalgia. Depicting the memories of socialism, shared with me by the inhabitants of a multi-religious rural commune in Southern Poland, I aim to…

  11. Resurrected Pigs, Dyed Foxes and Beloved Cows: Religious Diversity and Nostalgia for Socialism in Rural Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasieka, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my paper is to discuss the phenomenon of nostalgia for socialism in rural Poland. More precisely, I discuss how experiences of rurality and diverse religious beliefs intertwine with nostalgia. Depicting the memories of socialism, shared with me by the inhabitants of a multi-religious rural commune in Southern Poland, I aim to…

  12. Converting Bangladesh's influential religious leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaz, A

    1996-01-01

    While the Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB) introduced family planning to Bangladesh in 1953, very little progress was achieved before the 1980s. It was noticed during the 1980s that despite solid service delivery efforts with interpersonal communication at the community level and expanding choices of contraceptive methods, program success was impeded by religious leader opposition. Religious leader claims that family planning was against Islam reinforce male opposition to contraception. In an effort to win the support of religious leaders, the FPAB established an Islamic Research Cell (IRC) in 1984 and launched targeted advocacy and orientation programs. An expert with religious education and background ran the IRC. The leaders were taught that Islam directly or indirectly promotes family welfare from the viewpoint of the health and economic needs of the family, and that the Qur'an nowhere argues that family planning is forbidden. The Qur'an actually encourages prolonged breastfeeding and the avoidance of unwanted births. Orientation courses, seminars, a national conference, and the distribution of educational printed media eventually convinced the religious leaders to support family planning. Male involvement in family planning is essential in such a male-dominated society.

  13. Religiøsitet i livsformen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Steen

    2006-01-01

    Artiklen argumenterer for at mange opfattelser af religiøsitet reducerer fænomenet til en slags moralitet. Med Wittgensteins filosofi som modeksempel, og i lyset af en modstilling mellem Hegel og Kierkegaards opfattelse af religiøsitet, betones religiøsitetens radikale karakter.......Artiklen argumenterer for at mange opfattelser af religiøsitet reducerer fænomenet til en slags moralitet. Med Wittgensteins filosofi som modeksempel, og i lyset af en modstilling mellem Hegel og Kierkegaards opfattelse af religiøsitet, betones religiøsitetens radikale karakter....

  14. One mind or two? How psychiatrists and psychologists reconcile faith and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenfeld-Heintz, Ellen

    2008-09-01

    Utilizing qualitative interviews, this study showed how, to what extent, and why psychiatrists and psychologists of Judeo-Christian religious orientations or nonaffiliated believers in Michigan were willing or reluctant to integrate religious paradigms in their mental health practices. Most of the study participants were found to believe that medical-scientific and religious paradigms are equally important and may coexist or even be integrated in psychotherapeutic practice. However, actual attempts to integrate them usually reflected the practitioners' personal religious backgrounds and initiatives and/or were client driven. Yet these integration initiatives were found to face powerful institutional impediments such as politico-cultural norms of separation of religion from secular institutions and professional norms.

  15. Religious Tolerance in Oman: Addressing Religious Prejudice through Educational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sadi, Fatma H.; Basit, Tehmina N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of a school-based intervention entitled "Our Brothers and Sisters in Humanity" on 10th grade female Omani students' religious tolerance. A questionnaire was administered before and after an intervention to a sample of 241 girls, of whom 116 were in the experimental group and 125 in the control group. A…

  16. The Demystification of Nick Zangwill’s “Myth of Religious Experience”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasko Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The debate about religious experiences has recently been shaped by the question of whether they exist or if they are a myth. One of the most compelling arguments for the non-existence of religious experience was put forward by Nick Zangwill. In his “The myth of religious experience” (2004 he argued that God can be perceived neither by our ordinary five senses nor by some special sixth sense. While I agree with Zangwill that God cannot be perceived with our ordinary five senses (or a sixth religious sense, I do not think his argument shows that religious experience - based on Zangwill’s own understanding of the term - is a myth. In this paper, I offer in two steps a philosophical defence - in the analytical tradition - of the possible existence of religious experience as perceptual experiences. In the first step, I adumbrate Zangwill’s argument for the myth of religious experience, which fails because it ultimately begs the question - as I argue in the second step, by presenting a Berkelean answer to Zangwill’s challenge.

  17. 38 CFR 61.64 - Religious organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., on the basis of religion or religious belief. (f) If a State or local government voluntarily..., practice and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not use direct financial...

  18. RELIGIOUS PLURALISM: BETWEEN SYNCRETISM AND TANTULARISM

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    Moh. Toriqul Chaer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article has several objectives: first, to discover the background of religious pluralism in Javanese society, notably among the communities in Ketanggi; second, to recognize religious practice in Ketanggi; and third, to explore the religious attitudes of Ketanggi people towards religious pluralism. This article is based on field research carried out in Ketanggi sub-district of Ngawi, East Java, which is inhabited by the communities with different religious backgrounds. This paper argues that religious commitment among Ketanggi people is partly based on ‘tantularism’, a sort of ethical principle which emerges as a result of the encounters between religion and local wisdom. The reception of Ketanggi people towards religious and cultural pluralism is expressed through the concept of lilo legowo (voluntary reception towards the other which in turn becomes foundation of religious tolerance in that area.

  19. Defining and Distinguishing Secular and Religious Terrorism

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    Heather S. Gregg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Religious terrorism is typically characterised as acts of unrestrained, irrational and indiscriminant violence, thus offering few if any policy options for counterterrorism measures. This assumption about religious terrorism stems from two challenges in the literature: disproportionate attention to apocalyptic terrorism, and a lack of distinction between religious terrorism and its secular counterpart. This article, therefore, aims to do four things: define and differentiate religiously motivated terrorism from traditional terrorism; investigate three goals of religious terrorism (fomenting the apocalypse, creating a religious government, and establishing a religiously pure state; consider the role of leadership and target selection of religious terrorists; and, finally, suggest a range of counterterrorism strategies based on these observations.

  20. When cognitive scientists become religious, science is in trouble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1990s medical technology has afforded exciting possibilities for studying the brain. Together with knowledge accrued through psychology and psychiatry, it has set the stage for pioneering research and stimulated disciplines such as Social Neuroscience, the Cognitive Science of Religion......, Cognitive Anthropology, and Cognitive Archaeology. Another discipline has arisen, Neurotheology, which is interested in the brain and religious experience. Early proponents such as d'Aquili and Newberg had a religious agenda in their work. Others, such as members of Transcendental Meditation, have used...

  1. Brain Matters: A Journey with Neuroscience and Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroscience continues to enjoy a renaissance of study and a range of responses, both in explorations of religious experience and in educational practice. Neuroscience, as an interdisciplinary field, attained a new ascendancy at the end of the 20th century, known as the decade of the brain. New insights continue to influence education and public…

  2. Experiencing Religious Information Literacy: Informed Learning in Church Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunton, Lyndelle; Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an exploration of religious information literacy in terms of how people use information to learn in the context of church communities. The research approach of phenomenography was used to explore Uniting Church in Australia members' experience of using information to learn as participants in their church communities. Five ways…

  3. Religious Correlates of Male Sexual Behavior and Contraceptive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether religious beliefs could distinguish between older adolescent males of differing sexual experience and to determine whether such beliefs could distinguish between older adolescent males differing in frequency of contraceptive use. Results are discussed and implications for health educators are set forth. (MT)

  4. Experiencing Religious Information Literacy: Informed Learning in Church Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunton, Lyndelle; Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an exploration of religious information literacy in terms of how people use information to learn in the context of church communities. The research approach of phenomenography was used to explore Uniting Church in Australia members' experience of using information to learn as participants in their church communities. Five ways…

  5. Brain Matters: A Journey with Neuroscience and Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroscience continues to enjoy a renaissance of study and a range of responses, both in explorations of religious experience and in educational practice. Neuroscience, as an interdisciplinary field, attained a new ascendancy at the end of the 20th century, known as the decade of the brain. New insights continue to influence education and public…

  6. Schools and Religious Communities' Contributions to the Religious Formation of Christian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kock, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article questions the implications of tribal forms of religious socialization for (religious) schools' and communities' contributions to the religious formation of Christian youth. It clarifies that the religious education of a new generation of young Christians requires authorities and communities to connect in a worldwide pedagogical space…

  7. A non-religious spirituality from a Christian tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià Corbí

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes in the ways of survival in human societies, passing quickly from pre-industrial to industrial societies or industrial societies to knowledge societies, characterized by innovation and constant change, require a kind of a non religious spirituality not tied to beliefs. No need to go to Eastern spiritual traditions, Buddhism, Yoga or Advaita Vedanta to show and experience the possibility of a non-religious spirituality; also within the Christian tradition, we find authors that allow non-religious spirituality. We can count on an important notion of Nicholas of Cusa: The "No-Other" as the  absolute dimension of all reality. The Cusano considers that this term is more appropriate to describe that absolute of all reality then the term God. It is also very convenient to live a spirituality that does not divide reality into two poles: the mundane and the divine, the relative and absolute in this world and the next.

  8. Zambia: Multi-Faith Religious Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Brendan

    2006-01-01

    As countries' populations become more religiously diverse, a need to review the religious education syllabus that operates is often perceived. One such country is Zambia, which was not only traditionally religiously diverse but has become even more so with the advent of Christianity, Islam and Hinduism and other non-African faiths. This article…

  9. Religious beliefs and entrepreneurship among Dutch protestants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, C.A.; Burg, van J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Religious beliefs are known to correlate with a wide range of socio-economic behaviors. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between religious beliefs and entrepreneurship. Empirical evidence that entrepreneurship rates differ among religions suggests that religious beliefs influence

  10. The Case for Humanism in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, David

    2015-01-01

    A dialogic approach to religious education is advanced in which subject matter emerges or transforms in the educational event. An example of religious dialogue is considered, through which it is demonstrated that religious education, in order to be considered educational, must take seriously the possibility of the transformation of its subject…

  11. The Case for Humanism in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, David

    2015-01-01

    A dialogic approach to religious education is advanced in which subject matter emerges or transforms in the educational event. An example of religious dialogue is considered, through which it is demonstrated that religious education, in order to be considered educational, must take seriously the possibility of the transformation of its subject…

  12. Religious beliefs and entrepreneurship among Dutch protestants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, C.A.; Burg, van J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Religious beliefs are known to correlate with a wide range of socio-economic behaviors. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between religious beliefs and entrepreneurship. Empirical evidence that entrepreneurship rates differ among religions suggests that religious beliefs influence

  13. Zambia: Multi-Faith Religious Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Brendan

    2006-01-01

    As countries' populations become more religiously diverse, a need to review the religious education syllabus that operates is often perceived. One such country is Zambia, which was not only traditionally religiously diverse but has become even more so with the advent of Christianity, Islam and Hinduism and other non-African faiths. This article…

  14. Degeneracy and English Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhof, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Nietzsche accused Socrates of being degenerate. The question is posed whether practitioners of contemporary religious education may be suffering from this condition, in particular through the modern practice of associating religion with secular philosophies or "beliefs". Through the examination of tolerance and "respect for all" in the…

  15. Assisted reproductive practice: religious perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Joscph G

    2005-03-01

    It is important to those who practise reproductive techniques to learn about different religious perspectives related to reproductive health problems. Religious groups are active in influencing the public regarding bioethical positions, and this is particularly evident with issues concerning procreation, abortion and infertility therapy. The Jewish attitude towards procreation is derived from the first commandment of God to Adam to 'Be fruitful and multiply'. Judaism allows the practice of all techniques of assisted reproduction when the oocyte and spermatozoon originate from the wife and husband respectively. The attitude toward reproductive practice varies among Christian groups. While assisted reproduction is not accepted by the Vatican, it may be practised by Protestant, Anglican and other denominations. According to traditional Christian views, beginning at conception, the embryo has moral status as a human being, and thus most assisted reproductive technologies are forbidden. According to Islam, the procedures of IVF and embryo transfer are acceptable, although they can be performed only for husband and wife. Developments in science and technology and corresponding clinical applications raise new religious questions, often without clear answers. The role of theology in bioethics is integral to clarify perceived attitudes toward these developments for different religious communities. This paper presents the attitude of monotheistic religions to therapeutic procedures, such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection, reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  16. The DNA of Religious Faith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, David P.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the tensions between science and religion. According to recent books--many of them by prominent biologists--the era of deference to religious belief--belief without evidence--is ending as faith is subjected to gimlet-eyed scrutiny. Like Mark Twain's celebrated comment about stopping smoking, scholars have…

  17. Degeneracy and English Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhof, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Nietzsche accused Socrates of being degenerate. The question is posed whether practitioners of contemporary religious education may be suffering from this condition, in particular through the modern practice of associating religion with secular philosophies or "beliefs". Through the examination of tolerance and "respect for…

  18. Religious Education for Generating Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Frazier, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses how religious education began at Esperanza College in North Philadelphia, one of the poorest counties of the United States. It also is the largest community of returning citizens in Pennsylvania. Student access and success in higher education continues to be impacted by the effects of structural racism and systemic poverty.…

  19. Religious Tourism in Batangas, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonna Marrien U. Asi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed religious tourism in Batangas, Philippines on the following aspects: historical significance, holiness and spirituality, and customs and traditions. The assessments made were also subjected to tests of differences when the respondents are grouped as to either residents or tourists and according to their age, sex, educational attainment and employment. Results show that both tourists and residents generally concurred on all religious tourism indicators presented to them for assessment, although there were also few indicators that had lower mean assessments than the others. While the differences on the assessments made by the different groups of respondents were not statistically significant, the slight differences are still noticeable. In particular, residents had somewhat more favourable assessment than the tourists, older respondents more than the younger, males more than the females, those with higher education more than those with lower education, and government employees more than those who are not in government service. These slight but still noticeable differences, together with religious tourism indicators having lower mean assessments than the others, can serve as bases for making proposals on how to further enrich the religious tourism in Batangas.

  20. Teachers and the religious socialization of adolescents: facilitation of meaningful religious identity formation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Malayev, Maya; Schachter, Elli P; Rich, Yisrael

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of religious education on student religious identity over and above parent religiosity by examining student perceptions of two aspects of teacher functioning: teacher caring and teacher as role-model. We posited that effects of these variables on students' religious identity are mediated by student perceptions that the school provides a non-alienating religious atmosphere and meaningful religious studies. Participants were 2691 male and female students (grades 9-12) in 152 classes of 25 schools from the Jewish public-religious sector in Israel. Results indicate that in addition to their parents' religiosity, adolescents' perceptions of their teachers as role models and their religious studies as meaningful are important variables affecting their religious identity. Moreover, this research suggests that religious identity formation processes flourish in an educational environment which students perceive as accommodating religious exploration. Copyright © 2013 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. (What) do you believe?: Therapist spiritual/religious/non-religious self-disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaldi, Danielle; Trub, Leora

    2016-10-06

    Spiritual/religious/non-religious (S/R/N) identity development is often neglected in psychotherapy training and represents an area where psychotherapists feel they lack competence. Such feelings can become even more pronounced when it comes to S/R/N self-disclosure. This study explores the decisions therapists make regarding self-disclosure, which impacts the psychotherapy process. This grounded theory study explores psychotherapists' S/R/N self-disclosure based on qualitative interviews with 21 psychotherapists representing varied theoretical orientations and spiritual, religious, atheist, and agnostic backgrounds. Findings reveal that while some self-disclosure happens on an explicit level, more often psychotherapists find implicit ways to share S/R/N aspects of the self for purposes of enhancing the therapeutic alliance and to convey openness. Psychotherapists also attempt to avoid the topic altogether, either to protect the therapeutic relationship or because of unresolved S/R/N identity in the therapist. Developing skills related to S/R/N self-disclosure represents an important aspect of multicultural competence, which can impact clients' feelings of safety and comfort discussing their own S/R/N identity. This capacity is strongly influenced by the therapist's self-awareness regarding S/R/N identity. Suggestions for engaging S/R/N identity and disclosure in supervisory experiences and academic preparation are discussed.

  2. The effects of religious socialization and religious identity on psychosocial functioning in Korean American adolescents from immigrant families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Kyoung Ok; Lee, Richard M

    2012-06-01

    This study examined religious identity as a mediator and moderator between religious socialization by parents, peers, and religious mentors and psychosocial functioning (i.e., social competence, internalizing and externalizing behavior problems) among 155 Korean American adolescents. Religious socialization by parents and peers were positively associated with adolescents' religious identity and social competence. Religious identity fully mediated the relationship between religious socialization by parents and social competence, and partially mediated the relationship between religious socialization by peers and social competence. A competing model with religious identity as a moderator found adolescents with low religious identity showed significantly more externalizing behavior problems when they received more religious socialization from parents.

  3. Perfil sociodemográfico e de experiências anômalas em indivíduos com vivências psicóticas e dissociativas em grupos religiosos Sociodemographic and anomalous experiences profile in subjects with psychotic and dissociative experiences in religious groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair Menezes Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Vivências psicóticas e dissociativas não patológicas são comuns na população geral, especialmente em grupos religiosos. Há poucos estudos sobre o perfil da população não clínica com essas vivências, bem como há dúvidas sobre critérios para o diagnóstico diferencial dessas experiências. OBJETIVOS: Identificar o perfil sociodemográfico e de experiências anômalas (EA entre pessoas que buscaram ajuda em centros espíritas. MÉTODOS: Foram entrevistadas 115 pessoas que procuraram auxílio em seis centros espíritas de Juiz de Fora/MG por causa de vivências psicóticas e/ou dissociativas. Entrevista semiestruturada investigou dados sociodemográficos, experiências anômalas apresentadas e a presença de critérios propostos para identificar experiências espirituais não patológicas. RESULTADOS: Predomínio de mulheres (70%, de meia-idade, com alta escolaridade, ativas ocupacionalmente e cujas EA começaram na infância (65% ou adolescência (23%. As EA mais frequentes foram alucinações visuais (63%, auditivas (54%, "percepção espiritual" (53%, "sonhos paranormais" (38% e experiências fora do corpo (31%. Para a maioria da amostra, essas EA não traziam prejuízos sócio-ocupacionais, eram curtas, episódicas e benéficas; entretanto referiram sofrimento emocional e falta de controle sobre elas. CONCLUSÃO: A alta frequência e diversidade de EA encontradas, bem como suas implicações teóricas, clínicas e de saúde pública, indicam a urgência de maior atenção a esse tópico.BACKGROUND: Non-pathological psychotic and dissociative experiences are frequent in the general population, particularly in religious groups. There are few studies on the profile of non-clinical populations with these experiences, and on criteria for differential diagnosis. OBJECTIVES: To identify the sociodemographic profile and anomalous experiences (AE among people who sought help in spiritualist groups. METHODS: We interviewed 115

  4. Why bioethics cannot figure out what to do with race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Olivette R

    2007-02-01

    Race and religion are integral parts of bioethics. Harm and oppression, with the aim of social and political control, have been wrought in the name of religion against Blacks and people of color as embodied in the Ten Commandments, the Inquisition, and in the history of the Holy Crusades. Missionaries came armed with Judeo/Christian beliefs went to nations of people of color who had their own belief systems and forced change and caused untold harms because the indigenous belief systems were incompatible with their own. The indigenous people were denounced as ungodly, pagan, uncivilized, and savage. Hence, laws were enacted because of their perceived need to structure a sense of morality and to create and build a culture for these indigenous people of color. To date bioethics continues to be informed by a Western worldview that is Judeo/Christian in belief and orientation. However, missing from bioethical discourse in America is the historical influence of the Black Church as a cultural repository, which continues to influence the culture of Africans and Blacks. Cultural aspects of peoples of color are still largely ignored today. In attempting to deal with issues of race while steering clear of the religious and cultural impact of the Black Church, bioethics finds itself in the middle of a distressing situation: it simply cannot figure out what to do with race.

  5. Theoretical Views in Inter-religious Dialog in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Jafarian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available   It has almost passed one century from the emergence of the idea of the inter-religious dialog. The idea, being based on the assumption that no religion has the absolute truth, believes that there is the possibility of the dialog between all the existent religions in the social world. The dialog could make the coexistence and peace between the religions possible. The importance of this issue is increasingly growing and different ideas have been presented in the different religion departments worldwide. After the Iranian Islamic Revolution, a new image of Islam was offered to the world. An image whose true exposure made the use of the inter-religious dialog unavoidable. This also caused appearance of different views between the Muslim scholars. This article seeks to provide a presentation of three different approaches to the inter-religious dialog by exploring the works of three eminent scholars in the field; Mohaghegh Damad, Abolhassan Navab and Mohammad Masjed Jamei. These three approaches are:   · Inter-religious dialog as an interaction-oriented action    · Inter-religious dialog as a necessity-oriented action    · Inter-religious dialog as a backgroubd-oriented action    The necessity-oriented action is the approach taken by Mohaghegh Damad. He emphasizes on the acceptance of other religions. The active action referring to this acceptance is the foundation of this approach. This approach, accepting the developmental discourse in the meaning of inter-religious dialog, believes that this kind of dialog has been evolved from defensive and opposing to a new meaning. Hence, the inter-religious dialog in its new meaning possesses three conditions; the existence of common rights, emphasis on mutual respect and the effort for the two sides for religious exchange. This approach­ assumes that we must first establish a pattern from the current experiences of inter-religious dialogs in order to have an ideal cooperation and to fortify it

  6. Religious communication and hegemony of mass media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrushkevych Maria Stefanivna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Religious communication is the complex object of scientific research that involves existential component and the inextricable link with relevant historical trends. Mass culture and the information society put pressure on modern religious communication. Media is actively integrating into the system of religious communication. Hegemony of mass communication is realized through the media and religious communicative system becomes the part of this hegemony. Peculiarities of religious communication processes are conditioned by consciousness of itself impact and the need to integrate into the media system.

  7. Means of Harmonization in Religious Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Ščukina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Means of harmonization of religious discourse are considered by studying communicational behaviour (verbal and nonverbal between the religion institution and believers. The following factors defining specificity of realization of harmonization in Orthodox and other religious texts are taken into account: the communication channel between the author and the reader, a defining speech genre, the command of language (communication code, and extra-linguistic factors. It is shown that sharing the general social, historical and national experience, as well as a lexical overlapping of actors on both sides of the communication channel are the deciding elements of the harmonization process. The analysis also shows that usage of rational argumentation is more likely to lead to harmonisation in comparison to other rhetoric tools (i. e. affective ones or story-telling. Rational and unemotional sermonic discourse is perceived as a sign of respect (namely, for the listener's intelligence. Another successful and much-applied way seems to be evoking a feeling of equality, unity and/or identity between clerics and their flocks.

  8. The Religious in Responses to Mass Atrocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the possibilities and problems pertaining to attempts to bring religious – or semi-religious – allegiances and perspectives to bear in responses to the mass atrocities of our time: When and how can religious language or religious beliefs and practices be either necessary or helpful? And what are the problems......A peculiar and fascinating aspect of many responses to mass atrocities is the creative and eclectic use of religious language and frameworks. Some crimes are so extreme that they “cry out to heaven,” drawing people to employ religious vocabulary to make meaning of and to judge what happened......, to deal with questions of guilt and responsibility, and to re-establish hope and trust in their lives. Moreover, in recent years, religious actors have become increasingly influential in worldwide contexts of conflict-resolution and transitional justice. This collection offers a critical assessment...

  9. Religion and the Political Engagement of Latino Immigrants: Bridging Capital or Segmented Religious Assimilation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Leal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses the Latino Immigrant National Election Study (LINES to better understand the relationship between religion and immigrant political and civic engagement. Over the last half century, both American religion and the immigration landscape have changed in important ways. The LINES, which includes a number of religious questions from the American National Election Study and a rare focus on Latino newcomers, provides the opportunity to better understand the contemporary relationship between the two. We find that measures of religious belongings, beliefs, and behaviors (the Three Bs are not generally associated with the civic and political engagements of Latino immigrants. We posit that such null results may be explained by the varying religious experiences of immigrants—some developing bridging social capital through religious institutions, but others experiencing what might be called segmented religious assimilation.

  10. Varieties of Quest and the Religious Openness Hypothesis within Religious Fundamentalist and Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surrounds

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    P. J. Watson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the Religious Openness Hypothesis, the religious and psychological openness of American Christians is obscured by a defensive ghettoization of thought associated with a Religious Fundamentalist Ideological Surround and can be discovered instead within a Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surround. A test of this claim examined Religious Fundamentalism, Biblical Foundationalism, Quest, and Multidimensional Quest Scales in 432 undergraduates. Christian Religious Reflection, Religious Schema, and Religious Orientation measures clarified these two ideological surrounds. Partial correlations controlling for Biblical Foundationalism described a Religious Fundamentalist Ideological Surround that more strongly rejected Quest and that more generally displayed a failure to integrate faith with intellect. Partial correlations controlling for Religious Fundamentalism revealed a Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surround that was more open to Quest and that offered numerous demonstrations of an ability to unite faith with intellect. These data supplemented previous investigations in demonstrating that Christianity and other traditional religions have ideological resources for promoting a faithful intellect.

  11. Religiousness and religious coping in a secular society: the gender perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Skytthe, Axel; Christensen, Kaare; Hvidt, Niels Christian

    2014-10-01

    Women are found to be more religious than men and more likely to use religious coping. Only few studies have explored religious gender differences in more secular societies. This population-based study comprised 3,000 Danish men and women (response rate 45 %) between 20 and 40 years of age. Information about demographics, religiousness and religious coping was obtained through a web-based questionnaire. We organized religiousness in the three dimensions: Cognition, Practice and Importance, and we assessed religious coping using the brief RCOPE questionnaire. We found substantial gender differences in both religiousness and religious coping. Nearly, 60 % of the women believed in some sort of spirit or in God compared to 40 % of the men. Generally, both men and women scored low on the RCOPE scale. However, for respondents reporting high levels of religiousness, the proportion of men who scored high in the RCOPE exceeded the proportion of women in using positive and especially negative coping strategies. Also, in a secular society, women are found to be more religious than men, but in a subset of the most religious respondents, men were more inclined to use religious coping. Further studies on religious coping in secular societies are required.

  12. Dialogic skills for religious education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Castelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the field of religious education, pedagogies have featured regularly as teachers strive for the most effective methodology to promote pupils’ learning but their current success rate has been called into question by two critical Subject Reports in 2010 and 2013 from the English Government’s Office for Standards in Education (OfSTED. This paper reports on a piece of action research that sets Bloom’s taxonomy within a framework of classroom dialogue skills with the intention of addressing the OfSTED-identified shortcomings. Furthermore, the paper proposes that in a world where young people often hear and see a close relationship between religion and conflict, religious education cannot remain silent and the skills for enhancing dialogue in the classroom may also have a contribution to make to issues around religion, conflict and education.

  13. Viewing India from Religious Angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Yonghui

    2004-01-01

    @@ It would be impossible to understand India without any knowledge about the religions of this country. India is a developing country with many religions, nationalities and languages. This nation has long been noted for its democratic politics and multiculture. India was founded on the principle of secularism, but at the same time it has suffered from religions. Therefore, to have a clear idea about the basic conditions of India's multiple religious beliefs is the foundation for studies of its religions of the country, and is also one key to grasping Indian social politics. In early September 2004, the Indian government published religious data from the 2001 census. Accordingly, we can make some basic judgments about the religions in today's India.

  14. Religious culture as a barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine

    2016-01-01

    with their religious and cultural frames of reference? The study uses a case study approach with interviews of ten 13–17-year-old Danish Muslim girls, as well as explorative observations in two football clubs and interviews with five coaches and club leaders. In further developing an analytical model for interpreting......Political interventions, media coverage and research often refer to the underrepresentation of ethnic minorities, particularly girls and women, participating in physical activity and organised sports. In both public and academic debates, reference is made to the religious culture as a particular...... religion as hegemonic, embodied and dynamic cultural phenomena, the analysis points to the diversity through which Muslim girls and women participate and engage in sports. Finally, the article discusses the extent to which counter-narratives may contribute to changing perspectives on so-called hard...

  15. The Influence of Religiously and Scientifically Framed Messages on Agreement with Water Use Restrictions

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    John M. Clements

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent droughts in 2012 and 2013 have increased attention to water use issues in the United States. Cities, government agencies, and environmental nonprofit organizations use scientifically-framed messages to advocate for water conservation. In addition, some religious organizations use messages based on religious teachings to promote water conservation. Because approximately 70% of the U.S. public reports some religious affiliation, it is important to investigate the influence of religious and scientific messages for promoting water conservation. I report the results of an experiment that examines how scientifically- and religiously-framed messages influence attitudes about water use restrictions. I found that Christians were no more or less likely to agree with a policy calling for water use restrictions than non-Christians and non-religious people. However, a Christian religious message negatively influenced agreement with water use restrictions in the entire sample—and in a Christian subsample. Results suggest that religiously framed messages may not increase environmental concern.

  16. Expectations contribute to reduced pain levels during prayer in highly religious participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegindø, Else-Marie Elmholdt; Vase, Lene; Skewes, Joshua Charles; Terkelsen, Astrid Juhl; Hansen, John; Geertz, Armin W; Roepstorff, Andreas; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2013-08-01

    Although the use of prayer as a religious coping strategy is widespread and often claimed to have positive effects on physical disorders including pain, it has never been tested in a controlled experimental setting whether prayer has a pain relieving effect. Religious beliefs and practices are complex phenomena and the use of prayer may be mediated by general psychological factors known to be related to the pain experience, such as expectations, desire for pain relief, and anxiety. Twenty religious and twenty non-religious healthy volunteers were exposed to painful electrical stimulation during internal prayer to God, a secular contrast condition, and a pain-only control condition. Subjects rated expected pain intensity levels, desire for pain relief, and anxiety before each trial and pain intensity and pain unpleasantness immediately after on mechanical visual analogue scales. Autonomic and cardiovascular measures provided continuous non-invasive objective means for assessing the potential analgesic effects of prayer. Prayer reduced pain intensity by 34 % and pain unpleasantness by 38 % for religious participants, but not for non-religious participants. For religious participants, expectancy and desire predicted 56-64 % of the variance in pain intensity scores, but for non-religious participants, only expectancy was significantly predictive of pain intensity (65-73 %). Conversely, prayer-induced reduction in pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were not followed by autonomic and cardiovascular changes.

  17. AS DIMENSÕES ESPIRITUAL E RELIGIOSA DA EXPERIÊNCIA HUMANA: DISTINÇÕES E INTER-RELAÇÕES NA OBRA DE VIKTOR FRANKL The Spiritual and Religious Dimensions of Human Experience: Distinctions and Relations on Viktor Frank's Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achilles Gonçalves Coelho Júnior

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir das contribuições de Viktor Frankl, o artigo discute teoricamente a distinção e as relações entre a dimensão noética (ou espiritual e a dimensão religiosa da experiência humana. Descrevemos a dimensão noética procurando explicitar suas características essencialmente humanas e suas expressões inconscientes. Analisamos que no fenômeno da consciência moral, o homem considera o caráter transcendente desta - através da intuição - podendo dizer Tu a esta transcendência e constituir um relacionamento que se configura como experiência religiosa.Starting from Viktor Frankl’s contributions, the article concerns, theoretically, about the distinctions and relations between the Noetic Dimension (Spiritual and the Religious Dimension of human experience. We have described the Noetic Dimension, trying to explain its essentially human characteristics and unconscious expressions. We have remarked that on the moral conscience, man concerns about its transcendent aspect - by intuition - being able to say YOU to this transcendence and to build a relationship which takes the form of a religious experience.

  18. Religious Desecration and Ethnic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    the very source of the universe (Appleby, 2000, pp. 28-30). The concept of the sacred enables the adherents to understand the world around them and be...represents attempts by primitive man to explain the peculiar nature of the universe . His argument is based on the logic that religious behavior was an...activities, he shifted his headquarters to the hostel complex outside the Golden Temple. Due to increased threats, both from the authorities and rival

  19. Documentary Media and Religious Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Therese Mäder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article considers four spaces where media processes involve religious communities and agents: the spaces of production, of representation, of media communication, and of distribution network and institutional framework for circulation. These three spaces systematise the research question posed to the specific source. Furthermore the concept documentary media as viewed from a semio-pragmatic perspective is introduced. Discussion of the commercial series I’m a Mormon shows how different modes define documentary media according to the three spaces.

  20. Religious aspects of assisted reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, H N; Sallam, N H

    2016-03-28

    Human response to new developments regarding birth, death, marriage and divorce is largely shaped by religious beliefs. When assisted reproduction was introduced into medical practice in the last quarter of the twentieth century, it was fiercely attacked by some religious groups and highly welcomed by others. Today, assisted reproduction is accepted in nearly all its forms by Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism, although most Orthodox Jews refuse third party involvement. On the contrary assisted reproduction is totally unacceptable to Roman Catholicism, while Protestants, Anglicans, Coptic Christians and Sunni Muslims accept most of its forms, which do not involve gamete or embryo donation. Orthodox Christians are less strict than Catholic Christians but still refuse third party involvement. Interestingly, in contrast to Sunni Islam, Shi'a Islam accepts gamete donation and has made provisions to institutionalize it. Chinese culture is strongly influenced by Confucianism, which accepts all forms of assisted reproduction that do not involve third parties. Other communities follow the law of the land, which is usually dictated by the religious group(s) that make(s) the majority of that specific community. The debate will certainly continue as long as new developments arise in the ever-evolving field of assisted reproduction.

  1. Religious aspects of assisted reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, HN; Sallam, NH

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human response to new developments regarding birth, death, marriage and divorce is largely shaped by religious beliefs. When assisted reproduction was introduced into medical practice in the last quarter of the twentieth century, it was fiercely attacked by some religious groups and highly welcomed by others. Today, assisted reproduction is accepted in nearly all its forms by Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism, although most Orthodox Jews refuse third party involvement. On the contrary assisted reproduction is totally unacceptable to Roman Catholicism, while Protestants, Anglicans, Coptic Christians and Sunni Muslims accept most of its forms, which do not involve gamete or embryo donation. Orthodox Christians are less strict than Catholic Christians but still refuse third party involvement. Interestingly, in contrast to Sunni Islam, Shi’a Islam accepts gamete donation and has made provisions to institutionalize it. Chinese culture is strongly influenced by Confucianism, which accepts all forms of assisted reproduction that do not involve third parties. Other communities follow the law of the land, which is usually dictated by the religious group(s) that make(s) the majority of that specific community. The debate will certainly continue as long as new developments arise in the ever-evolving field of assisted reproduction. PMID:27822349

  2. Individual characteristics and religiousness among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joksimović Snežana D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the research data on religiousness collected at different periods in Serbia and former Yugoslavia. The aim of the paper is to point to the tendencies in religious practice and the expansion of religiousness among young people in different periods, as well as individual psychological factors of religiousness. The data shows that the number of young people who declare themselves religious has increased significantly in the last 15 years, compared to the period of a quarter of century ago. In addition to the revival of tradition as an answer to social crisis and uncertainty which affects young people most, the increase in religiousness is connected to certain forms of social democratization as well as it being socially desirable. The data on social-demographic correlates of religiousness shows that the degree of religiousness varies depending on the age, gender, social background and education level. However, the more recent research data shows that these differences have become smaller which indicates a certain homogenization among young people. Religiousness is consistently and positively connected to authoritarianism, conformism and intolerance, while certain changes have occurred in regard to its connection with desirable social values. Similar to the tendency observed in other research on values the data on factors and correlates of religiousness, especially among young people, point to a specific value relativism and confused values.

  3. Pastoral care and religious support as a part of treatment of religious patient with the severe form of osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Đurović Aleksandar; Sovilj Saša; Đokić Ivana; Brdareski Zorica; Vukomanović Aleksandra; Ilić Nataša; Milavić-Vujković Merica

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Religious needs of patients are consistently being neglected in the clinical medicine. Pastoral care is a religious support which a religious patient receives from priests, chaplains, imams, rabbis or other religious authorities. Religious support, in terms of clinical medicine, is a spiritual support which religious patients obtain from religious and trained medical workers. The aim of this report was to present the effects of pastoral care a...

  4. Narcisismo reativo e experiência religiosa contemporânea: culpa substituída pela vergonha? Reactive narcissism and contemporary religious experience: a shift from guilt to shame?

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Rute Gomes Esperandio

    2007-01-01

    O texto apresenta um recorte da reflexão desenvolvida na tese de doutorado: "Narcisismo e sacrifício: Modo de subjetivação e religiosidade contemporânea" (Esperandio, 2006). Trata-se de uma análise da experiência religiosa promovida pela Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus (IURD) a partir da sua proposta de sacrifício. A abordagem trabalha com a concepção de narcisismo ativo e reativo e defende a idéia de que a prática do sacrifício, tal como proposta pela IURD, articula elementos do narcisismo...

  5. Using Religious Capital to Alleviate Poverty? - A Case Study of Cross-Border Migration in South-China (abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Wong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Laurence Iannaccone’s notion of religious capital highlights the capability of individuals to draw on resources from religious- or faith-based practices, and then convert religious capital into human, social and financial capital. The processes of capital accumulation and conversion have significant implications for poverty reduction. However, in its examination of the cross-border experiences of poor female Chinese migrants in South China, this chapter finds that religious capital is severely inequitably distributed within migrant communities. Religious involvement is both time- and resource- demanding, and the very poor face considerable constraints in negotiating access to religious capital. Empirical evidence indicates that while some migrants are successful in improving their material conditions and experience upward social mobility, the failure to address broader, deep-rooted causes of poverty, such as social discrimination, has stymied more systemic change. Worse still, members of the ruling class use religious symbols and rituals to reinforce their domination. This chapter calls for placing greater emphasis on the distributional effect of religious capital, with the aim of offering poor people better support for their religious participation.

  6. Can religious priming induce truthful preference revelation?

    OpenAIRE

    Stachtiaris, Spiros; Drichoutis, Andreas; Nayga, Rodolfo; Klonaris, Stathis

    2011-01-01

    We examine whether religious priming can induce more truthful preference revelation in valuation research. Using induced value second price Vickrey auctions in both hypothetical and non-hypothetical contexts, our results suggest that religious priming can indeed induce more truthful bidding and eliminate hypothetical bias in hypothetical contexts. In non-hypothetical contexts where there are real economic incentives, religious priming induces similar truthful bidding as the absence of religio...

  7. Religious practices, beliefs, and mental health: Variations across Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternthal, Michelle J.; Williams, David R.; Musick, Marc A.; Buck, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether Black Americans and Hispanic Americans experienced greater mental health benefits from religious involvement than White Americans, and whether these benefits would be mediated through three psychosocial factors—social support, meaning and forgiveness. Methods Utilizing data from a probability sample of Chicago-based adults (n=3103), ethnicity-stratified multivariate regression models estimated the association of religiosity with depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and major depressive disorder. Models controlled for potential confounders and psychosocial mediators. Results Contrary to our hypotheses, religiously involved Black Americans and Hispanic Americans did not experience greater mental health benefits than their White counterparts. For White Americans alone, service attendance was inversely related to depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and major depressive disorder. Religious saliency was consistently associated with worse mental health for Hispanic Americans only. However, both meaning and forgiveness conferred mental health benefits for all three groups. Conclusions The benefits of specific aspects of religious involvement vary across ethnicity. Caution is necessary in any effort to bring religion into the health domain. Our findings, if replicated, suggest that initiatives that facilitate a sense of purpose or forgiveness are likely to prove promising in improving mental health, regardless of race or ethnicity. PMID:22296590

  8. Does Religious Involvement Generate or Inhibit Fear of Crime?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Matthews

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In victimology, fear of crime is understood as an emotional response to the perceived threat of crime. Fear of crime has been found to be affected by several variables besides local crime rates and personal experiences with victimization. This study examines the relationship between religion and fear of crime, an underexplored topic in the criminological literature. This gap is rather surprising given the central role religion has been found to play in shaping the attitudes and perceptions of congregants. In particular, religion has been found to foster generalized trust, which should engender lower levels of distrust or misanthropy, including that which is directed towards a general fear of crime. OLS regression was performed using data from the West Georgia Area Survey (n = 380. Controlling for demographic, community involvement, and political ideology variables, frequency of religious attendance was significantly and negatively associated with fear of property crime. This relationship remained even after a perceived neighborhood safety variable was introduced to the model. However, religious attendance was not significantly related to fear of violent crime, and religious orientation was unrelated to fear of property and violent crime. These results suggest that religious involvement conditionally reduces fear of crime, and the authors recommend that future research explore relationships between religion and fear of crime.

  9. Effects of religious setting on cooperative behaviour. A case study from Mauritius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xygalatas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    clear when it comes to observed prosocial behaviors. Experimental studies reveal a link between religious priming and prosocial behaviors, and these effects are evident irrespective of the degree of religiosity of the participant. Building on and combining the strengths of previous field designs, I...... report on the results of a field experiment in Mauritius examining the effects of religious environments on cooperation in a naturalistic setting. These results were consistent with previous findings that religious cues increase cooperation. Importantly, this effect was not dependent on degrees of prior...... religiosity. Plausible interpretations of such effects are discussed....

  10. Traditional Chinese religious beliefs and superstitions in delusions and hallucinations of Chinese schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Kam-Shing

    2003-06-01

    Religious beliefs and superstitions have an important impact on the psychopathology of psychiatric patients. Traditional Chinese religious beliefs and superstitions, such as fortune telling, Buddhist gods, Taoist gods, historical heroic gods and ancestor worship, have important influence on subjective psychotic experiences, in particular delusions and hallucinations. By means of empirical phenomenological case narration, the writer shows that all these traditional Chinese religious beliefs and superstitions tend to affect the contents, manifestation and meaningfulness of delusion and hallucination. They also serve as a means to replace clients' self-identity. They appear in the form of a supernatural force to resolve all difficulties, cause of troubles and misfortune, stress and coping mechanisms.

  11. Is "Learning" Science Enough?--A Cultural Model of Religious Students of Science in an Australian Government School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Joseph Paul; Kameniar, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the cognitive experiences of four religious students studying evolutionary biology in an inner city government secondary school in Melbourne, Australia. The participants in the study were identified using the Religious Background and Behaviours questionnaire (Connors, Tonigan, & Miller, 1996). Participants were…

  12. A psychology of religious plurality: from intra-religious dialogue to intra-psychic reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Joseph M

    2012-09-01

    Panikkar's (The intra-religious dialogue, 1978) classic, re-issued by Paulist Press in 1999, grapples with the theological challenges in the disciplines of comparative theology and the theology of religions through what he terms, "intra-religious dialogue." In this psychology of religious plurality, I use works from a variety of disciplines to highlight the achievements of Panikkar's intra-religious dialogue, as well as to critique his work in the hope of finding categories of understanding that can be profitably used to face the inter-personal crises of the contemporary world, namely religious terrorism.

  13. Unbuckling the Bible Belt: A State-Level Analysis of Religious Factors and Google Searches for Porn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew L; Perry, Samuel L

    2017-02-14

    While the link between individual religious characteristics and pornography consumption is well established, relatively little research has considered how the wider religious context may influence pornography use. Exceptions in the literature to date have relied on relatively broad, subjective measures of religious commitment, largely ignoring issues of religious belonging, belief, or practice. This study moves the conversation forward by examining how a variety of state-level religious factors predict Google searches for the term porn, net of relevant sociodemog raphic and ideological controls. Our multivariate findings indicate that higher percentages of Evangelical Protestants, theists, and biblical literalists in a state predict higher frequencies of searching for porn, as do higher church attendance rates. Conversely, higher percentages of religiously unaffiliated persons in a state predict lower frequencies of searching for porn. Higher percentages of total religious adherents, Catholics, or mainline Protestants in a state are unrelated to searching for porn with controls in place. Contrary to recent research, our analyses also show that higher percentages of political conservatives in a state predicted lower frequencies of porn searches. Our findings support theories that more salient, traditional religious influences in a state may influence residents-whether religious or not-toward more covert sexual experiences.

  14. Including Religious Voices on Disability: Which Ones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaventa, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Religious beliefs and traditions shape cultural and personal understandings of life issues, and, in turn, are shaped by new understanding in other arenas of life, such as medicine, science, and politics. Religious and faith traditions have sometimes enshrined prevailing attitudes about disability and differences but have also challenged them.…

  15. The Spirituality of the Religious Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groome, Thomas H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reflecting upon his own spirituality, Groome states that religious educators must have a passion for people, the gift of hospitality, a love for tradition, and a commitment to educate for God's reign. Following the article are 13 religious educators responses to the author's questions and reflections. (GEA)

  16. The Significance of Postliberalism for Religious Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Gregory C.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that there is a relationship between theology and religious education. Outlines the metaphysical, experiential-expressivism, and cultural linguistic approaches to religious study. Discusses the teaching methodologies of catechism and experiential learning which dominate the various approaches. Examines the impact of postliberalism on…

  17. Is Religious Education Compatible with Science Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education, challenges the popular view that science and religion are compatible or complementary. Discusses differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological, and attitudinal levels. Argues that religious education should be kept…

  18. Humanisme en religie. Controverses, bruggen, perspectieven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyndam, J.; Poorthuis, M.; Wit, Th. de

    2005-01-01

    * Recensie door Peter Henk Steenhuis ('Theologen zoeken met filosofen naar een menselijke God') in Trouw, De Verdieping, Religie en Filosofie, 28-09-2005, zie: http://www.trouw.nl/deverdieping/religie_filosofie/article21697.ece/Theologen+zoeken+met+filosofen+naar+een+menselijke+God#readmore * Bespr

  19. 77 FR 2907 - Religious Freedom Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... call America home and seek to follow their consciences in peace. Our long history of religious... United States of America A Proclamation For nearly four centuries, men and women have immigrated to America's shores in pursuit of religious freedom. Hailing from diverse backgrounds and faiths,...

  20. Religious Syncretism in Mexico. Project Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, David

    This document is an outline for a three-week unit of study focusing on religious syncretism in Mexico as part of a community college course in comparative religions or philosophy of religion. While this outline is intended to give information and direction to the instructor wishing to use Mexico as an example of religious syncretism, unit goals…

  1. Claiming Luther as a Religious Resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Vejrup

    2011-01-01

    The article examines references to a specific religious heritage (Lutheran Christianity) within the debate sections of two national Danish newspapers. The aim of the analysis is to provide empirical data as a background for a discussion of conflicts concerning the connection between religious her...

  2. Awakening the Erotic in Religious Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siejk, Cate

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on exploring and understanding the epistemological significance of eros and the place of the erotic in contemporary religious education. Shows, through concrete examples, how a fully human epistemology makes possible an authentic religious education that promotes both personal and communal transformation. (CAJ)

  3. Secularism, Criticism, and Religious Studies Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Secularization, the idea that religion would gradually diminish over time, was once widely assumed to be true by scholars of religion, but the unexpected resurgence of religious traditions has called it into question. Related debates on the distinction between religion and the secular have destabilized religious studies further. What does the…

  4. Religious Texts as Models of Exclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastfelt, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The chapter analyses the connection between Biblical interpretation and the making of political communities in northern Nigeria in the 20th century. Generally, it studies the use of religious scriptures in developing models of society which can both include and exclude particular religious and et...... and ethnic groups from society....

  5. Duties: Legal? Moral? Religious? or Social?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Ann

    1990-01-01

    Presents activities in which students are asked to (1) identify sources of duties affecting individual behavior; (2) define and give examples of legal, as well as social, religious and moral duties; (3) and compare social, religious, moral, and legal duties and discuss their relationships. (DB)

  6. The concept of body in religious studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Kamppinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently it has become fashionable to speak about embodied religion, religion as bodily processes and embodiment in general. In this article the different uses of the concept of the body are analysed and the different contexts in which the concept can be used in coherent and systematic ways are clarified, and furthermore in such a way that it enhances the methodology of religious studies. Bodies are relevant in religious studies first and foremost for the reason that some bodies support religious beliefs, desires and actions, such as priests in the Catholic Church or members of the organizations of charismatic Christianity. Secondly, bodies are ascribed religious meanings. That is, in addition to a human body x, we have one or more religious actors who ascribe religious meanings to this particular body. Even though bodily issues are important for biological creatures such as human beings, they are not relevant for religious studies if they do not involve secondary theories that attach religious contents to them.

  7. Research on Religious Identity of Orthodoxy Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khukhlaev O.E.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the results of socio-psychological research of Orthodox youth religious identity. The research was carried out in the city of Smolensk, Russian Federation, on 261 respondents, high school pupils (9—10th grades. According to the models of G. Allport and R. Gorsuch & S. E. McPherson, the religious identity as a complex socio-psychological concept contains 4-factor structure basing on personal- social and inner-outer scales but doesn’t seem to be a simple Orthodox affiliation. Different components of the religious identity are studied through their connection with value orientations (according to S. Schwartz. To study the religious identity and value orientations we used the adapted version of 32 items questionnaire based on Individual / Social Religious Identity Measure by D. Van Camp and S. Schwartz’s Portrait Value Questionnaire (PVQ-R2. Almost all values connected with religious identity components seem to be socially motivated. It can be said that contemporary Orthodox youth religious identity is figured out to possess a pronounced social character. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Humanities (project № 15-06-10843 «Religious identity risks and resources in present-day Russia: cross-cultural analysis».

  8. American Involvement in Fringe Religious Cults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intellect, 1977

    1977-01-01

    "Twenty million Americans are involved in fringe religious cults such as spiritualism, Hare Krishna, Scientology, and Black Gospel groups," according to anthropologist Irving Zaretsky of the University of Chicago. He recently completed a 10-year period as a participant-observer of fringe religious groups in the San Francisco Bay area and the…

  9. Challenging Christianity: Leo Tolstoy and Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The religious thought of Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy is a well documented but often overlooked example of unorthodox Christianity. This paper uses the example of Tolstoy's religious thinking to question the integrity of the current representation of Christianity in UK schools. It also uses Tolstoy's criticism of orthodox Christianity to suggest a…

  10. Religious Orientation and Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Eileen K.; Helm, Herbert W., Jr.; McBride, Duane C.

    2011-01-01

    Religion is one of the major forces of control over sexuality, and many studies have observed an inverse relationship between religiosity and sexual permissiveness. The Religious Orientation Scale has been used to study the relationship between religious orientation and sexuality. It has been found that those with intrinsic views are more…

  11. 20 CFR 638.536 - Religious rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Religious rights. 638.536 Section 638.536 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.536 Religious rights. The...

  12. Is the Rule of Law an Antidote for Religious Tension? The Promise and Peril of Judicializing Religious Freedom (SWP 40)

    OpenAIRE

    Moustafa, Tamir; Nelson, Matthew; Schonthal, Ben; Shankar, Shylashri

    2015-01-01

    Does the ‘rule of law’ act as a force of moderation and, in matters of religion, serve as a key tool for mollifying or resolving disputes? Drawing on experiences from Sri Lanka, India, Malaysia, and Pakistan, we provide an alternative account of the link between legal processes and religious tensions, one that considers closely the roles played by constitutional law and legal procedure in perpetuating, deepening, or sustaining conflict. These case studies highlight four mechanisms that facili...

  13. From Religious Practices to Religious Narratives as Sense-Making Models Supporting Solidarity in Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panteleeva Anna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account Durkheim’s declaration about religion as a base for human solidarity, this article aims to trace the dynamics of those mechanisms that allow religion to play this role in transient conditions. The paper demonstrates how E. Durkheim’s theoretical programme is interpreted by one of his followers, the founder of cultural sociology J. Alexander, and how it is used in cultural and sociological methodology. The paper also draws attention to the fact that J. Alexander remains within the paradigm proposed by E. Durkheim, in which cognitive and social structures correlate and interact; however, at the same time he develops the Weberian approach emphasising an important role of such symbolic systems as language, myth, narrative in the organisation of human experience, behaviour and consciousness. J. Alexander draws on both approaches to the understanding of religion, but redefines religion as a discourse or as a series of narratives that transmits, on the one hand, a certain tradition of describing social reality, and, on the other hand, makes possible for this reality to be rewritten and to acquire a different meaning. The paper demonstrates the relevance of E. Durkheim’s basic assumption about the solidifying role of religion and describes the way how the emphasis on the authorising role of religious practices is gradually moving to the sense-building function of religious narratives.

  14. Delay discounting as a function of intrinsic/extrinsic religiousness, religious fundamentalism, and regular church attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N; Plumm, Karyn M

    2012-01-01

    Delay discounting occurs when the subjective value of an outcome decreases because its delivery is delayed. Previous research has suggested that the rate at which some, but not all, outcomes are discounted varies as a function of regular church attendance. In the present study, 509 participants completed measures of intrinsic religiousness, extrinsic religiousness, religious fundamentalism, and whether they regularly attended church services. They then completed a delay-discounting task involving five outcomes. Although religiousness was not a significant predictor of discounting for all outcomes, participants scoring high in intrinsic religiousness tended to display less delay discounting than participants scoring low. Likewise, participants scoring high in religious fundamentalism tended to display more delay discounting than participants scoring low. These results partially replicate previous ones in showing that the process of discounting may vary as a function of religiousness. The results also provide some direction for those interested in altering how individuals discount.

  15. Religious Coping Strategies and Mental Health Among Religious Jewish Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Guy; Yossef, Ifat; Savaya, Riki

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of positive and negative religious coping strategies on the mental health of 113 Israeli gay and bisexual Jewish males with high levels of religiosity, and how sexual identity formation (internalized homophobia and coming out) and societal variables (family and friends' acceptance of sexual orientation and social connections within the LGBT community) mitigated the effects of religious coping strategies on mental health. Findings showed that when dealing with the stress arising from the conflict between religious and sexual identities, individuals used both positive and negative religious coping strategies, but only negative religious coping was associated with poorer mental health. In addition, only in the presence of social resources (social connections with the LGBT community and the acceptance of sexual orientation by friends), did the use of positive religious coping result in better mental health outcomes. These findings underlined the importance of these resilience social factors in the lives of religious Jewish gay and bisexual men.

  16. Spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viftrup, Dorte Toudal; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Buus, Niels

    2013-01-01

    WE SYSTEMATICALLY REVIEWED THE RESEARCH LITERATURE ON SPIRITUALLY AND RELIGIOUSLY INTEGRATED GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING THREE QUESTIONS: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group......, 8 articles were considered eligible for the review. Findings from the evaluation suggested that the concepts of spirituality and religiosity were poorly conceptualized and the way in which spiritual and religious factors were integrated into such group psychotherapies, which distinguished it from...... other types of group psychotherapies, was not fully conceptualized or understood either. However, clear and delimited conceptualization of spiritual and religious factors is crucial in order to be able to conclude the direct influences of spiritual or religious factors on outcomes. Implications...

  17. 7 CFR 16.2 - Rights of religious organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... retain its independence and may continue to carry out its mission, including the definition, practice... and programs without removing religious art, icons, scriptures, or other religious symbols, (2)...

  18. Religiousness and prostate cancer screening in African American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Alexis D; Houston, Tina R; Bjorck, Jeffrey P; Gorsuch, Richard L; Arnold, Harold L

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the relationship between religiousness (organized, nonorganized, and intrinsic) and religious problem solving (collaborative, deferring, and self-directing) in prostate cancer screening (PCS) attitudes and behavior. Men (N = 481) of African descent between the ages of 40 and 70 participated. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that religiousness and self-directed problem solving were associated with PCS attitudes. Intrinsic religiousness was associated with PCS attitudes after controlling for health and organized religiousness. Religiousness was not associated with PCS behavior. Intrinsic religiousness may be an important dimension of religiousness to be considered in tailoring cancer interventions for individuals from faith-based communities.

  19. Negative Religious Coping and Emotional Distress Among College Students: Exploring the Influences of Religiousness, Fading Affect, and Neuroticism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman A Lee; Jeffrey A Gibbons; Andrew Hartzler; Jennifer K Hartzler

    2015-01-01

    .... To extend this line of research, we examined whether neuroticism, fading affect, and religiousness could influence the relationship between negative religious coping and two forms of emotional distress...

  20. Buddhists' religious and health practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiist, W H; Sullivan, B M; St George, D M; Wayment, H A

    2012-03-01

    A web survey of Buddhists' religious practices and beliefs, and health history and practices was conducted with 886 Buddhist respondents. Eighty-two percent were residents of the USA. Ninety-nine percent practiced Buddhist meditation and 70% had attended a formal retreat for intensive meditation practice. Eighty-six percent were converts to Buddhism and had been a Buddhist for a median of 9 years. Sixty-eight percent of respondents rated their health as very good or excellent. A one-point increase on a Buddhist Devoutness Index was associated with a 15% increase in the odds of being a non-smoker and an 11% increase in the odds of being in good to excellent health.

  1. Turning to God in the face of ostracism: effects of social exclusion on religiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Nilüfer; Fischer, Peter; Frey, Dieter

    2010-06-01

    The present research proposes that individuals who are socially excluded can turn to religion to cope with the experience. Empirical studies conducted to test this hypothesis consistently found that socially excluded persons reported (a) significantly higher levels of religious affiliation (Studies 1, 2, and 4) and (b) stronger intentions to engage in religious behaviors (Study 2) than comparable, nonexcluded individuals. Direct support for the stress-buffering function of religiousness was also found, with a religious prime reducing the aggression-eliciting effects of consequent social rejection (Study 5). These effects were observed in both Christian and Muslim samples, revealing that turning to religion can be a powerful coping response when dealing with social rejection. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Religious coping among caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients: main effects and psychosocial mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Michelle J; Singer, Jerome L; Prigerson, Holly G

    2006-09-01

    This study investigated the association between religious coping, mental health and the caring experience, as well as potential explanatory mechanisms, among 162 informal caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. Regression analyses indicated that, controlling for socio-demographic variables, more use of positive religious coping strategies was associated with more burden, yet, also more satisfaction. In contrast, more use of negative religious coping strategies was related to more burden, poorer quality of life and less satisfaction, and correlated with an increased likelihood of Major Depressive Disorder and anxiety disorders. In a number of models, negative religious coping was related to outcomes through its relationship with social support, optimism and self-efficacy. Implications for research and healthcare are discussed.

  3. Who founded Buddhism? Notes on the psychological effectiveness of religious objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David M

    2017-04-01

    Starting with an outline of Buddhist history from a psychoanalytic perspective, this paper uses ideas from philosophy and psychoanalysis to consider the nature of the psychological effectiveness of religious objects. It suggests that the development of the devotional cult of Buddhas 'without form' such as Amitābha, at-first-glance surprising when juxtaposed with the founding vision of Gautama Siddhartha, tells us a great deal about the psychological needs that impel the evolution of religious thinking. Distinguishing religious objects from mythological ones, it argues that 'religious objects' are, more specifically, allegorical objects that can be encountered in the second person; that these may not always be well described as 'illusion'; and that they may in some cases be better understood as providing opportunities for experience that, like the transference in psychoanalysis, may have far-reaching psychological impacts. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  4. Culture and religious beliefs in relation to reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arousell, Jonna; Carlbom, Aje

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of contemporary research publications acknowledge the influence of religion and culture on sexual and reproductive behavior and health-care utilization. It is currently hypothesized that religious influences can partly explain disparities in sexual and reproductive health outcomes. In this paper, we will pay particular attention to Muslims in sexual and reproductive health care. This review reveals that knowledge about devout Muslims' own experience of sexual and reproductive health-care matters is limited, thus providing weak evidence for modeling of efficient practical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care directed at Muslim patients. Successful outcomes in sexual and reproductive health of Muslims require both researchers and practitioners to acknowledge religious heterogeneity and variability, and individuals' possibilities to negotiate Islamic edicts. Failure to do so could lead to inadequate health-care provision and, in the worst case, to suboptimal encounters between migrants with Muslim background and the health-care providers in the receiving country.

  5. Post-traumatic stress and world assumptions: the effects of religious coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukerman, Gil; Korn, Liat

    2014-12-01

    Religiosity has been shown to moderate the negative effects of traumatic event experiences. The current study was designed to examine the relationship between post-traumatic stress (PTS) following traumatic event exposure; world assumptions defined as basic cognitive schemas regarding the world; and self and religious coping conceptualized as drawing on religious beliefs and practices for understanding and dealing with life stressors. This study examined 777 Israeli undergraduate students who completed several questionnaires which sampled individual world assumptions and religious coping in addition to measuring PTS, as manifested by the PTSD check list. Results indicate that positive religious coping was significantly associated with more positive world assumptions, while negative religious coping was significantly associated with more negative world assumptions. Additionally, negative world assumptions were significantly associated with more avoidance symptoms, while reporting higher rates of traumatic event exposure was significantly associated with more hyper-arousal. These findings suggest that religious-related cognitive schemas directly affect world assumptions by creating protective shields that may prevent the negative effects of confronting an extreme negative experience.

  6. Identity and individuality in the nouveau-religious patient: theoretical and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, M H

    1987-02-01

    Revitalized interest in the clinical complexities of psychotherapy with religious patients (for example, Bradford 1984; Lovinger 1984; Spero 1985a; Stern 1985) has drawn attention to the need for perspectives on religious personality development that account for healthy and adaptational aspects as well as psychopathological aspects of particular forms and levels of religious beliefs, enabling more creative, enriching psychotherapy. This search represents movement beyond the significance of infantile wish-fulfillment aspects of religiosity toward the broader domain of ego functioning and quality of object relations. Rizzuto (1976, 1979) and McDargh (1983) emphasize qualitative similarities between interpersonal object representations and God representations. Elkind (1971), using a Piagetian model, views religious beliefs and rituals as forms of constructive adaptation to normal cognitive needs for conservation, representation, symbols of relation, and comprehension. Meissner (1984) highlights the role of God concepts as transitional phenomena. In earlier papers, I have demonstrated the relationship between patients' use of religious themes and legends, quality of psychosexual and object relational achievements, and the consolidation of religious identity (Spero 1982a,b, 1986a,b). Throughout the preceding there is unequivocal recognition that religious development recapitulates many important aspects of healthy psychological development, and that in the case of pathological or dysfunctional religiosity something has gone wrong in an otherwise normal process. There is need to understand and if necessary distinguish between the development of religious belief in individuals whose ideological commitment is relatively constant from earliest childhood and its development in those who adopt or modify religious belief in later life, in conjunction with the many technical implications for psychotherapy. Clinical experience has taught that the process of religious change in

  7. Religious coping methods of Taiwanese folk religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Jung

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore religious coping methods employed by Taiwanese folk religious believers. This study applied qualitative research methods in data collection and data analysis by conducting semi-structured interviews with participants and analyzing the interview contents. We have identified fourteen coping methods that can be categorized into five different religious dimensions: belief, ritual, ethical, emotional and material. The findings not only expanded our knowledge about how believers of Taiwanese folk religion employ the religion to cope with difficulties but also discovered that some coping methods employed by them are also reported in Western countries, only in different forms.

  8. Religious Orientations: The Role of College Environment and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Lee B.; Kelly, Kathryn E.; Dubois, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the influence of college environment and classification on religious orientation. The current study compared private, religious versus public, nonreligious college students to determine if there was a difference over time and environment in religious orientation, as measured by the Religious Orientation Scale. The results…

  9. Religious Life of Tibetan Monks and Lay People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAMGYI&DORQOINBENBA

    2003-01-01

    Since the year of 1979, the Central Government has invested more than 400 million Yuan on the maintenance and construction of monasteries and religious sites in Tibet.At present, there have been 1780 monasteries and religious sites in Tibet, including 130 nunneries. So many religious sites are owned by the 2 million religious

  10. Are Religious Tolerance and Pluralism Reachable Ideals? A Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Straten Waillet, Nastasya; Roskam, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to consider the psychological mechanisms that may prevent individuals from achieving religious tolerance and religious pluralism. After defining these concepts and explaining why they are desirable outcomes, four psychological obstacles to the achievement of religious tolerance and religious pluralism will be explored by…

  11. Meta-concepts, thinking skills and religious education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes that the acquisition of meta-concepts and thinking skills in order to facilitate scholarly religious thought should be the principal aim of religious education in schools. As a result, the aim of religious education is primarily stated in cognitive terms and religious education

  12. From unity to atonement: Some religious correlates of Hans Loewald's developmental theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nields, Jenifer A

    2003-06-01

    Loewald's understanding of ego development offers a way to conceptualise, from a psychoanalytic perspective, those aspects of religious experience that can reflect or contribute to the enrichment of the ego, in contradistinction to the defensive and regressive elements of religious experience that have been well detailed in the psychoanalytic literature in the past. In Loewald's view, a dynamic and metabolic interplay between ego and reality characterises the developmental process. With increasing levels of internalisation, differentiation, individuation and integration, ego and reality are restructured into increasingly resilient and durable forms. An ongoing dialectical tension between separation and reunion provides the driving force for development. Loewald's emphasis on the synthetic rather than defensive aspects of ego functioning forms the basis for his characterisation of sublimation as a 'genuine appropriation' rather than a defence, thus opening up one way to understand non-defensive aspects of religious experience from a psychoanalytic perspective. In the course of this exploration of Loewald's view of ego development and its implications for an understanding of religious experience, the author offers perspectives on Freud's views of religion, on some extreme forms of religious fundamentalism, and on the dynamics of 'mature' faith as illuminated by Loewald's developmental theory.

  13. 85 SECULARISM, SECULAR STATE AND RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    finds that, although more feasible within secular states, religious freedom and human ..... principle of natural morality independent of all revelation and supernatural .... In the Commonwealth Realms, the Head of State is required to take the.

  14. Religious Values In Song Lyrics Tingkilan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sadli Mustafa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This globalization era brought people of East Kalimantan tend to prefer modern music and western music. This cause the local or traditional music art is marginalized. On the other hand, they have a local music art containing a lot of local wisdom. One of them is tingkilan music. Lyrics of tingkilan contain religious values. Therefore, this study intends to find and to describe the religious values in the song lyrics of the tingkilan musical arts. This study uses a qualitative research method. The research shows that in fact some tingkilan song lyrics have a deep religious value. Some of those religious values are thanksgiving favors, learning of the holly Qur’an, the way of eating and drinking in accordance with the Islamic teaching.

  15. 76 FR 3815 - Religious Freedom Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... matters of religion.'' The fundamental principle of religious freedom--guarded by our Founders and... religion as they choose, including the right to believe in no religion at all. However, these liberties...

  16. GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RELIGIOUS TOURISM IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Rot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Croatia has a rich sacral (tangible and intangible heritage, which undoubtedly has great cultural value, and part of the religious heritage has been included in the World Heritage List of UNESCO. The fact is, however, that, except when it comes to top attractions, churches as tourist facilities, are poorly attended and do not get almost no direct tourism income.. In this paper, after the introductory explanations of basic terms related to religious tourism and pilgrimage, we explore the basic features of religious tourism in Croatia, both on tourist attractions, as well as on the tourist demand. It also presents the results of empirical research on the socio-demographic profile of the author, the role of religion in the life of pilgrims and the satisfaction of the visitors to the Shrine of Mary of Bistrica in 2013 among 50 pilgrims in Marija Bistrica. The main objective is to determine how the pilgrims perceived the tourism offer in religious tourism.

  17. School religious education in a liberating perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Meza Rueda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Religious education in Colombia, according to Law 115 of 1994, is an area of fundamental training. However, its purpose of promoting the religious dimension of human beings and understanding the role of religion in culture is far from being achieved, because, in practice, it is considered as an area of second order, is disjointed from the curriculum and is still working as the “religion lesson” of the past. What to do against this? Could it be another way of thinking about religious education? We estimate that, as presuppositions and motivations of both liberation theology and liberating pedagogy are still valid today, they may provide clues in this respect. Consequently, this paper not only makes a detailed reading of this reality in some official educational institutions in Colombia, but also sheds light for the school religious education (ERE to be liberating.

  18. Ethical And Religious Analysis On Euthanasia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdi Omar Shuriye

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an analysis on euthanasia from ethical and religious perspectives. Historically, the classical Greek thinkers including Aristotle had categorically accepted euthanasia with the main reason of minimizing pain...

  19. Religiously oriented mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, William; Tan, Erica

    2009-02-01

    The interface of religiously accommodative and oriented treatments and the cognitive-behavioral tradition is explored. In terms of Hayes' characterization of the evolution of the cognitive-behavioral tradition through three waves, considerable theoretical, clinical, and empirical work emerged to support a religiously accommodative cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) during the second-generation CBTs. Rather than including religion and spirituality, the third-wave CBT traditions have engaged in spiritual themes inspired heavily from Eastern religious traditions. The authors discuss the application of a religiously congruent third-wave cognitive therapy with a depressed conservatively Christian client. Some conceptual challenges and rationales for adopting such treatments with Christian or other theist clients are described.

  20. Religious attitude scale: scale development and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Üzeyir Ok

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a scale of religious attitude (in an Islamic tradition) was constructed and its metric properties were introduced on the basis of its tests on two different samples (ns=930 and 388) of university students. It was found that the scale, which was named as Ok-Religious Attitude Scale, recorded high alpha scores (.81 and .91). Both explanatory and confirmatory factor analyses confirm that the scale with its four subscales (cognitive, emotional, behavioural and relational) form an id...

  1. Ethical And Religious Analysis On Euthanasia

    OpenAIRE

    Abdi Omar Shuriye

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an analysis on euthanasia from ethical and religious perspectives. Historically, the classical Greek thinkers including Aristotle had categorically accepted euthanasia with the main reason of minimizing pain. However, as science develops ethical and religious isuues related to the subject have increasingly created fervent debates on euthanesia. ABSTRAK: Kertas ini mengkaji euthanasia dari perspektif agama dan etika. Sejarah telah melihat para pemikir Greek termasuk Aristotle sec...

  2. Religious needs in the tourism industry

    OpenAIRE

    Weidenfeld, Adi; Ron, Amos

    2008-01-01

    Similar to other tourism subgroups, e.g. elderly, gay, and disabled tourists, the special desires of religious tourists need not be marginalized. Given that religion and tourism can be competitive by nature, it is plausible to question whether tourists who practise their religion at home do so in a similar way while away from home. It is suggested that the relationship between tourism and religion constitutes a valid and important area of research and that satisfying religious needs in the to...

  3. Development of Religious Identity through Doubts among Religious Adolescents in Israel: An Empirical Perspective and Educational Ramifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisherman, Shraga

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have been demonstrating interest in doubts regarding religious faith for thirty years. The current study goal was examining differences between three groups of religious male adolescents in Israel, regarding faith identity, doubts in religious faith (past and present), religious behavior, and the connection between them. Three…

  4. A Retrospective Introduction to Religious Education: An Interpretive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Robert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The author takes a retrospective look at his book Religious Education: An Interpretive Approach, first published in 1997, and now available to readers, open access, via the European Wergeland Centre website (http://www.theewc.org/Content/Library/Research-Development/Literature/Introducing-Religious-Education-an-Interpretive-Approach. He tells a personal story of teaching, broadcasting and research, moving from the design of a methodology for studying the religions of minority groups in Britain to identifying the main concepts used for teaching about religions to children and young people in an engaging way, which relates to their own personal and social experience. The article, explains the key concept of representation – looking, for example, at how religions are often represented in ways that play down their internal diversity. Next the concept of interpretation is considered, emphasising the activity through which learners can compare and contrast the use of language by religious believers with their own nearest equivalent language uses, in trying, with sensitivity, to get as close as possible to their meanings. Finally, the process of reflexivity is explained; this gives learners an opportunity for three activities – to re-assess their understanding of their own world view (called edification in the interpretive approach, to make a distanced critique of beliefs and ideas they have studied, and to evaluate the methods that they have been using to learn about the religious meanings of others. Finally the author illustrates how the key concepts from the interpretive approach have been adapted for use in field research studies on teaching and learning about religions.

  5. Religious Renaissance in China Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Madsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the Reform Era in 1979, there has been a rapid growth and development of religious belief and practice in China. A substantial new scholarly literature has been generated in the attempt to document and understand this. This essay identifies the most important contributions to that literature and discusses areas of agreement and controversy across the literature. Along with new data, new paradigms have developed to frame research on Chinese religions. The paradigm derived from C. K. Yang’s classic work in the 1960s came from structural functionalism, which served to unite research in the humanities and social sciences. However, structural functionalism has been abandoned by the new generation of scholars. In the humanities, the most popular paradigm derives from Michel Foucault, but there are also scholars who use neo-Durkheimian and neo-Weberian paradigms. In the social sciences, the dominant paradigms tend to focus on state-society relations. None of these paradigms fully captures the complexity of the transformations happening in China. We recommend greater dialogue between the humanities and social sciences in search of more adequate theoretical frameworks for understanding Chinese religions today.

  6. Confessional and catechetical nature of religious education in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Mąkosa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at bringing to light a presentation of the nature of religious education in Poland. This study will therefore present a brief historical outline of religious upbringing in Poland, its current organisational regulations and the principles of religious education in schools. In our summary, we will present the level of effectiveness of religious education in Poland, and we will also explore the discussion on the reformation of religious education in Poland which is being worked upon.

  7. The relationship between change and religious movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Suolinna

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available Change constitutes different things for the groups, as the position of one group may improve, but that of another deteriorate. Social change is a consequence of how the different groups act, and their actions again depend on their social and economic interests. In other words, there are groups in society (social classes, professional groups, the agrarian population, industrial workers, which come more or less openly in conflict with each other when looking after their interests. Thus this way of thinking is based on a conflict model. One sees social change as a consequence of people trying to protect their social and economic interests. Viewed this way even religious organizations and movements are involved in protecting the interests of social groups. However, the interesting point in this connection is that religious movements differ from political movements and groups, as the religious movements express the social interests of a group more indirectly than the political movements. The religious movements gather people from similar living conditions, and so to speak, prepare them for political work. They defend and justify the way of living of a group, and thus give ideological material for political groupings. They may also form coalitions with political groups and parties. The author analyzes Laestadianism from this point of view. Before going into the connection between religious dynamics and social change it is necessary to present a few general features of Laestadianism as a religious movement of the peasant population.

  8. Wrath of God: religious primes and punishment.

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    McKay, Ryan; Efferson, Charles; Whitehouse, Harvey; Fehr, Ernst

    2011-06-22

    Recent evidence indicates that priming participants with religious concepts promotes prosocial sharing behaviour. In the present study, we investigated whether religious priming also promotes the costly punishment of unfair behaviour. A total of 304 participants played a punishment game. Before the punishment stage began, participants were subliminally primed with religion primes, secular punishment primes or control primes. We found that religious primes strongly increased the costly punishment of unfair behaviours for a subset of our participants--those who had previously donated to a religious organization. We discuss two proximate mechanisms potentially underpinning this effect. The first is a 'supernatural watcher' mechanism, whereby religious participants punish unfair behaviours when primed because they sense that not doing so will enrage or disappoint an observing supernatural agent. The second is a 'behavioural priming' mechanism, whereby religious primes activate cultural norms pertaining to fairness and its enforcement and occasion behaviour consistent with those norms. We conclude that our results are consistent with dual inheritance proposals about religion and cooperation, whereby religions harness the byproducts of genetically inherited cognitive mechanisms in ways that enhance the survival prospects of their adherents.

  9. No One Expects a Transgender Jew: Religious, Sexual and Gendered Intersections in the Evaluation of Religious and Nonreligious Others

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    Ryan Cragun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While a large body of research has established that there is substantial prejudice against atheists and nonreligious individuals, both in the US and in other countries where nonreligious people are minorities, to date very little research has looked beyond attitudes toward solitary identities (e.g., “atheists” vs. “gay atheists”. Given the growing recognition of the importance of intersectionality in understanding the experiences of minorities, in this article we examined attitudes toward intersected identities, combining five (nonreligious identities (i.e., Christian, Jewish, Muslim, atheist, and nonreligious with four sexual/gender identities (i.e., heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, and transgender using a 100-point thermometer scale (N = 618. We found that sexual/gender identities were more influential in ordering the results than were religious identities, with heterosexual individuals being rated most positively, followed for the most part by: homosexual, bisexual, and then transgender individuals. However, within the sexual/gender identities, (nonreligion ordered the results; Christians and Jewish individuals rated most highly among heterosexuals while nonreligious and atheist individuals rated most highly among transgender individuals. We suggest these results indicate that people believe minority sexual/gender identities “taint” or “pollute” religious identities, unless those religious identities are already perceived as tainted, as is the case for atheists and the nonreligious.

  10. Multiple Religious Belonging: Hermeneutical Challenges for Theology of Religions

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    Oostveen Daan F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of multiple religious belonging is studied from different perspectives, each of which reveals a different understanding of religion, religious diversity and religious belonging. This shows that the phenomenon of multiple religious belonging is challenging the applicability of these central notions in academic enquiry about religion. In this article, I present the different perspectives on multiple religious belonging in theology of religions and show how the understanding of some central scholarly notions is different. In Christian theology, the debate on multiple religious belonging is conducted between particularists, who focus on the uniqueness of religious traditions, and pluralists, who focus on the shared religious core of religious traditions. Both positions are criticized by feminist and post-colonial theologians. They believe that both particularists and pluralists focus too strongly on religious traditions and the boundaries between them. I argue that the hermeneutic study of multiple religious belonging could benefit from a more open understanding of religious traditions and religious boundaries, as proposed by these feminist and post-colonial scholars. In order to achieve this goal we could also benefit from a more intercultural approach to multiple religious belonging in order to understand religious belonging in a nonexclusive way.

  11. Religious and national group identification in adolescence: a study among three religious groups in Mauritius.

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    Ng Tseung-Wong, Caroline; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2013-01-01

    Religious group identification is an important but understudied social identity. The present study investigates religious group identification among adolescents of different faiths (Hindu, Muslim, Christian) living in multicultural Mauritius. It further explores how religious and national group identities come together among religious majority and minority adolescents. For three age groups (11 to 19 years, N = 2152) we examined the strength of adolescents' religious and national group identification, the associations between these two identities, and the relationships to global self-esteem. Across age and religious group, participants reported stronger identification with their religious group than with the nation. Identification with both categories declined with age, with the exception of Muslims, whose strong religious identification was found across adolescence. The association between religious and national identification was positive, albeit stronger for the majority group of Hindus and for early adolescents. We examined the manner in which religious and national identities come together using a direct self-identification measure and by combining the separate continuous measures of identification. Four distinct clusters of identification (predominant religious identifiers, dual identifiers, neutrals, and separate individuals) that were differently associated with global self-esteem were found. Dual identifiers reported the highest level of global self-esteem. The clusters of identification did not fully correspond to the findings for the direct self-identification measure. The results are discussed in terms of the meaning of dual identity and the positive manner in which adolescents can manage their multiple identities while taking into account the ideological framework in which those identities are played out.

  12. Entrepreneurship development in destinations of religious tourism

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    Ivanović Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After the introduction which summarizes the basic guidelines for the development of entrepreneurship in special interest tourism, the author explores the development and application as well as the management of entrepreneurship in religious tourism as a type of special interest tourism. Religious components and motives for visiting shrines as an integral part of human culture and tradition have a strenuous impact on the tourism industry, both on the offering and demanding side. The most visited shrines such as Fatima or Lourdes attract four to eight million visitors per year. Considering the fact that this type of tourism is economically very useful in a particular local environment, many shrines as sites have become centres of religious, commercial and cultural events in certain regions throughout history. Their development was followed by investment in infrastructure, culture, catering and other facilities. The implementation of entrepreneurship is based on various segments that enable the development of religious tourism in a particular area, such as catering industry, hospitality industry, tourist mediation, transportation companies and other complementary activities (agriculture, fishing, wine production, commerce and other services. The author explores the indicators of entrepreneurship development in the field of religious tourism as a type of special interest tourism indicating the possibilities it has on the destination development. The development of special interest tourism should be based on effective investment in tourism offer through entrepreneurial projects (catering and other tourist facilities in accordance with market trends. The investment in tourism offer in the context of religious tourism would result in the growth of religious passengers' consumption as well as the increase in income from religious tourism, and thus the economic development of the sites with religious content. Examples of such shrines in the world are

  13. Imams and other Religious Authorities in Italy

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    Francesco Alicino

    2015-01-01

      SUMMARY: 1. Introduction – 2. The Relationship State-Confessions and Religious Ministers – 2.1. The “Common” Legislation of intese and the 1929 Act – 2.2. State’s Law and Religious Ministers – 3. Imam in Italy. Is that a Religious Minister? – 3.1. The Connection State-Islamic Organizations – 3.2. Islamic Groups as Religious Denominations – 3.3. The Bilateral Legislation – 3.4. A Possible Collaboration – 4. Conclusion.   Abstract: In Italy imams are more than 800 members. As imams, they are almost all self-taught people. As citizens, most of the times they have a precarious job. During the week, they normally take care of things other than religion. They perform religious functions in their spare time. Moreover, to see them working as imams, you have to go down in some underground parking or in apartments converted into mosques, where sometimes you see minaret and other Islamic symbols, but only in either the picture or in the paintings hanging on the wall. In the end of the day, we know little or almost nothing about imams. Besides, the Italian law normally do not recognise them as religious authorities. Nevertheless, as imams they play a very important role in local Muslim communities that, under the pressing process of immigration, hold nowadays more than two millions persons. The paper will analyse the status of Islamic imams in Italy, comparing them with the status of other religious authorities (priests, rabbis, pastors ecc.. In particular, this comparative perspective will be focused on both angles: on the one hand, the research will compare the role of imams with those of religious authorities within their respective community; on the other, we will compare imams with considered the different way through which Italian law treats both imams and other religious authority. This perspective will give us a possibility to underline how both the social context and the Italian legal framework (regulating the State

  14. STATE POLICIES ON RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY IN INDONESIA

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    M. Mujiburrahman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses how Indonesian state manages its religious diversity. The state policies on religious diversity cannot be understood without analyzing the history of how the founding fathers decided to choose Indonesia as neither secular nor Islamic country, but somewhere between the two. The author discusses three topics, namely the recognized religions, Muslim fear of Christianization, and dialogue and inter-religious harmony. Based on the Decree No.1/1965, Confucianism was one of six religions recognized by the state. However, in the Soeharto era, around 1979, this religion was dropped from the list, and only after his fall Confucianism has been rehabilitated, and even the Chinese New Year has been included as one of the national holidays in Indonesia. In terms of Muslim-Christian relations, there were tensions since 1960s, particularly dealt with the issue of the high number of Muslims who converted to Christianity. It was in this situation that in 1967 a newly built Methodist Church in Meulaboh, Aceh, was closed by Muslims, arguing that the Church was a concrete example of the aggressiveness of Christian missions because it was built in a Muslim majority area. Since the Meulaboh case, the Muslims consistently insisted the government to accommodate their four demands: (1 restriction on establishing new places of worship; (2 restriction onreligious propagation, and control of foreign aid for religious institutions; (4 Islamic religion classes should be given to Muslim students studying in Christian schools; (5 inter-religious marriage should not be allowed. Apart from these contested issues, the government and religious leaders have been trying to avoid conflict and to establish cooperation and peace among religious groups in the country through inter-religious dialogues, either organized by the government or sponsored by the leaders of religious groups themselves. The author argues that specific socio-political contexts should be

  15. Profiles of adolescent religiousness using latent profile analysis: Implications for psychopathology.

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    Longo, Gregory S; Bray, Bethany C; Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen

    2017-03-01

    Prior research has documented robust associations between adolescent religiousness/spirituality (R/S) and psychopathology outcomes including externalizing and internalizing symptomatology, yet no previous studies have examined these associations with adolescent R/S profiles using a person-centred approach. We examined whether there are identifiable subgroups characterized by unique multidimensional patterns of R/S experiences and how these experiences may be related to externalizing and internalizing symptomatology. The sample consisted of 220 Appalachian adolescents between 12 and 18 years old who were primarily White and primarily Christian. Latent profile analysis revealed three profiles of adolescent R/S: high religiousness (28.4%), introjectors (47.6%), and low religiousness (24.0%). These profiles were differentially related to internalizing and externalizing symptomatology such that the high religiousness group was significantly lower than the introjectors with respect to internalizing and externalizing symptomatology and lower than the low religiousness group in externalizing symptomatology. Implications and suggestions for future research using person-centred approaches to better understand differential developmental trajectories of religious development are provided. Statement of contribution What is already known Prior research has demonstrated a negative relationship between adolescent religiousness and spirituality (R/S) and psychopathology. Numerous studies document the differential relationships between aspects of R/S and psychopathology; however, few have done so from a person-centred perspective. There are several theories that outline how R/S to study R/S when paying specific attention to culture. Saroglou's Big Four dimensions of religion (believing, bonding, behaving, and belonging) posits that these four dimensions (1) are able to delimit religion from proximal constructs; (2) translate major distinct dimensions of religiousness; (3) can be

  16. Religious aspects of organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, P

    2008-05-01

    No religion formally forbid donation or receipt of organs or is against transplantation from living or deceased donors. Only some orthodox jews may have religious objections to "opting in." However, transplantation from deceased donors may be discouraged by Native Americans, Roma Gypsies, Confucians, Shintoists, and some Orthodox rabbis. Some South Asia Muslim ulemas (scholars) and muftis (jurists) oppose donation from human living and deceased donors because the human body is an "amanat" (trusteeship) from God and must not be desecrated following death, but they encourage xenotransplantation research. No religion formally obliges one to donate or refuse organs. No religion formally obliges one to consider cadaveric organs "a societal resource" or considers organ donation "a religious duty" (except some rabbis and isolated Muslim and Christian scholars) No religion has a formal position on "bonus points," which is priority on the waiting list. Living organ donation is strongly encouraged only between jesus christians (15 of 28 jesus christians worldwide have donated a kidney). No religion forbid this practice. Directed organ donation to people of the same religion has been proposed only by some Orthodox Jews and some Islamic Ulemas/Muftis. Only some Muslim Ulemas/Muftis and some Asian religions may prefer living donation over cadaveric donation. No religion prefers cadaveric over living donation. No religion formally forbid non-heart-beating donors (nhbd) cadaveric donation or cross-over donation. Due to the sacrad of human life, the Catholic Church is against donation from anencephalic donors or after active euthanasia. No religion formally forbid xenotransplantation. Addressing the participants of the First International Congress of the Society for Organ Sharing in 1991, Pope John Paul II said "There are many questions of an ethical, legal and social nature which need to be more deeply investigated. There are even shameful abuses which call for determined action

  17. Religious Belief, Motivation and Moral Commitment

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    zahra khazaei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are two different approaches followed by moral philosophers regarding the motivational role of moral belief. Having restricted the motivating reasons to belief, the internalists consider the relationship between belief and ethical commitment necessary and believe that moral judgmentis inherentlymotivating. While theexternalists by regarding the belief and desire as reasons for action,they believe that the relationship between belief and actin is not necessary. Therefore, the weakness of will is possible, that is, the agent can acts against his best judgment. Now we put religious belief instead of moral judgment and ask about the motivational role of religious beliefs , that is , what is the relationship between religious beliefs and moral commitment? Are religious beliefs sufficient for moral action? Are they inherently motivating? Considering the impact of religious beliefs on committing ethical acts as necessary or contingent may have various and valuable consequences for the believers in different religions. The purpose of this article is to investigate such psychological relationship between religion and moralityand to seek the motivating influence of religious beliefs. The article tries to analyze the relation between the religious belief and ethical commitment and responds to this question that whether religious beliefs are the necessary and sufficientcondition for committing moral action , or they are just necessary conditions or neither necessary nor sufficient.If they are essential, what other elements can be complementary to religious beliefs? In other words, what other elements can substitute religious belief? To answer these questions, the present study will firstly investigate the stimulating influence of ethical beliefs and then will analyze the two approaches of internalism and externalism in ethics and finally will conclude that the approach of externalism is much closer to the reality. The article then will explain the

  18. Religious Belief, Motivation and Moral Commitment

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    zahra khazaei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There are two different approaches followed by moral philosophers regarding the motivational role of moral belief. Having restricted the motivating reasons to belief, the internalists consider the relationship between belief and ethical commitment necessary and believe that moral judgmentis inherentlymotivating. While theexternalists by regarding the belief and desire as reasons for action,they believe that the relationship between belief and actin is not necessary. Therefore, the weakness of will is possible, that is, the agent can acts against his best judgment. Now we put religious belief instead of moral judgment and ask about the motivational role of religious beliefs , that is , what is the relationship between religious beliefs and moral commitment? Are religious beliefs sufficient for moral action? Are they inherently motivating? Considering the impact of religious beliefs on committing ethical acts as necessary or contingent may have various and valuable consequences for the believers in different religions. The purpose of this article is to investigate such psychological relationship between religion and moralityand to seek the motivating influence of religious beliefs. The article tries to analyze the relation between the religious belief and ethical commitment and responds to this question that whether religious beliefs are the necessary and sufficientcondition for committing moral action , or they are just necessary conditions or neither necessary nor sufficient.If they are essential, what other elements can be complementary to religious beliefs? In other words, what other elements can substitute religious belief? To answer these questions, the present study will firstly investigate the stimulating influence of ethical beliefs and then will analyze the two approaches of internalism and externalism in ethics and finally will conclude that the approach of externalism is much closer to the reality. The article then will explain the

  19. Contraception: traditional and religious attitudes.

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    Schenker, J G; Rabenou, V

    1993-04-01

    Humans have tried to control fertility for centuries. Primitive, preliterate societies practiced infanticide and abortion. When primitive women understood the advantages of conception control, they tried, when possible, to use contraception. In the 4th century B.C., Plato and Aristotle advocated a one-child family. Greek medical literature reported a hollow tube inserted through the cervix into the uterus and a potion as contraceptives. Islamic physicians had much knowledge about conception control. The attitudes toward contraception. In the 5th century B.C., Saint Augustine condemned contraception, even among married couples. The condom emerged in the early modern period. Yet, they were usually worn to protect against disease, e.g., bilharzia in Egypt and syphilis in Europe. The cervical cap and the diaphragm are examples of occlusive pessaries. By 1880, contraceptives and spermicides were advertised. In 1928, the IUD joined the existing contraceptives. Today we have combined oral contraceptives. Judaic law requires husbands to fulfill their wives sexual needs, separate from their duty to procreate. It also calls men, not women, to procreate and forbids men from masturbating, thus Judaic law does not forbid women from practicing contraception. The Roman Catholic church forbids contraceptive use because it is a sin against nature. Some Protestant denominations have allowed contraceptive use. Islamic law states that children are gifts from Allah. Some Moslems believe that they must have many children, but Allah and the Prophet state that children have rights to education and future security. These rights allow couples to prevent pregnancy. Neither Hinduism nor Buddhism prohibit contraceptive use. Differences in husband-wife communication, sex roles, access to contraceptives, and traditional family values will have more of an effect on contraceptive use and fertility than theological barriers or the social class of religious groups.

  20. Culpabilisation as a religious function

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    Ivan Davydov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The author continues his study of the functions of religion. The first section is devoted to a description of the various approaches to a functional analysis of religion suggested by members of the Bielefeld School of Sociology (Franz-Xaver Kaufmann, Hans Küng, Niklas Luhmann, by Thomas O’Dea, as well as by Russian experts: Yablokov, Tokarev, and Kagarov. In this context, the author studies the question regarding the functionality specific to religion, particularly in relation to magic. The author suggests that the post-modern paradigm allows him to define and describe a new and specific function of religion: that of culpabilisation. In order to explain and better define this function (that of sensing or placing guilt, the author turns to a study of the origins of the feelings of guilt and the way guilt is defined by semantics and metaphysics. Guilt feelings are described in the works of some of the foremost experts in the fi eld of twentieth century philosophy and theology: René Girard (anthropologist, Gilles Deleuse and Paul Ricoeur (philosophers, Karl Rahner (theologian and Julia Kristeva (semiotician, together with concepts drawn from Freud (psycho-analytics and Pitirim Sorokin (sociology. All these are representative of the post-modern paradigm and worked in the fields of classical or non-classical paradigms. The author concludes that religious culpabilisation precedes the institution of organized religion and the setting apart of a priesthood or professional clergy. Its development is set along the following logical chain of the development of phenomena: Soteriology — Eschatology — Hamartology — Theodicy — Culpabilisation.

  1. Religious Identity and Cultural Diversity: Exploring the Relationships between Religious Identity, Sexism, Homophobia, and Multicultural Competence

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    Balkin, Richard S.; Schlosser, Lewis Z.; Levitt, Dana Heller

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the results from a national study investigating the relationships between religious identity, sexism, homophobia, and multicultural competence. Participants were 111 randomly sampled counseling professionals and graduate students. The results indicated a relationship between religious identity and various…

  2. Religious Identity and Cultural Diversity: Exploring the Relationships between Religious Identity, Sexism, Homophobia, and Multicultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Richard S.; Schlosser, Lewis Z.; Levitt, Dana Heller

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the results from a national study investigating the relationships between religious identity, sexism, homophobia, and multicultural competence. Participants were 111 randomly sampled counseling professionals and graduate students. The results indicated a relationship between religious identity and various…

  3. Religious Doubts and Mental Health in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: The Association with Religious Attitudes

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    Kezdy, Aniko; Martos, Tamas; Boland, Vivian; Horvath-Szabo, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Religious doubts seem to be a part of identity and faith development in adolescence and young adulthood. Such doubts, however, are often linked with psychological distress, though the results in the field are not consistent. It seems important therefore to explore further the relationship between religious doubts and mental health. This study…

  4. Bifactor Models of Religious and Spiritual Struggles: Distinct from Religiousness and Distress

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    Nick Stauner

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Religious and Spiritual Struggles Scale (RSS measures important psychological constructs in an underemphasized section of the overlap between religion and well-being. Are religious/spiritual struggles distinct from religiousness, distress, and each other? To test the RSS’ internal discriminant validity, we replicated the original six-factor measurement model across five large samples (N = 5705 and tested the fit of a restricted bifactor model, which supported the mutual viability of multidimensional and unidimensional scoring systems for the RSS. Additionally, we explored a bifactor model with correlated group factors that exhibited optimal fit statistics. This model maintained the correlations among the original factors while extracting a general factor from the RSS. This general factor’s strong correlations with religious participation and belief salience suggested that this factor resembles religiousness itself. Estimating this general factor seemed to improve Demonic and Moral struggles’ independence from religiousness, but did not change any factor’s correlations with neuroticism, depression, anxiety, and stress. These distress factors correlated with most of the independent group factors corresponding to the original dimensions of the RSS, especially Ultimate Meaning and Divine struggles. These analyses demonstrate the discriminant validity of religious/spiritual struggles and the complexity of their relationships with religiousness and distress.

  5. Secularists, Humanists and Religious Education: Religious Crisis and Curriculum Change in England, 1963-1975

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    Freathy, Rob; Parker, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    With particular reference to religious education, this article provides an account of the campaigns of Secularists and Humanists in England in the 1960s and 1970s and locates them within their broader religious context. These campaigns, which have been both underplayed and overstated in the existing historiography, failed to garner the levels of…

  6. The forms of prophecy

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    Rayco González

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The prophecy is a kind of text holding therefore its own textual marks, differing from other kinds of texts. In order to do a discursive analysis of it, we must bring a semiotic study of its own possible forms. It includes its intertextual connections, as well as the use of typical tropos and topoi. Our aim is to describe the features of a kind of text that seems to appear in every well-known culture. Our analysis is limited to religious prophecies, showing mainly several examples from Judeo-Christian tradition, but also from other cultures, according to our line of argument. Amongst its features we find the use of allusion, forcing to any addressee to expand all possible interpretations. Likewise the prophecy seems to fulfill the double function of threat/promise, depending on each addressee.

  7. Finding meaning in religious practices: the relation between religious holiday rituals and marital satisfaction.

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    Fiese, B H; Tomcho, T J

    2001-12-01

    This study examined the relation between marital satisfaction and religious holiday ritual practices. One hundred twenty couples, married 9 years on average, completed measures of religious holiday practices (current family and family-of-origin) and marital satisfaction. Couples were interviewed about how important religion was to their family life. Marital satisfaction was related to religious holiday rituals beyond a global indication of religiousness. A different pattern was found for husbands and wives, with husbands' satisfaction more closely linked to ritual meaning and wives' satisfaction associated with routine practices. Family-of-origin rituals were connected across generations. Wives' marital satisfaction was related to husbands' report of religious holiday rituals but not the converse. Results are discussed in terms of how rituals affirm relationships, connect values and beliefs, and may have differential meaning for men and women.

  8. Religious dietary rules and the protection of religious freedom: some evidence from practice in Italy

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    Miriam Abu Salem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Italian system freedom of worship provided by the Constitution is safeguarded by unilateral and contractual norms, sanctioned for minority confessions by an agreement, named intesa, that also concerns dietary issues. Muslim communities, however, as they have no intesa with the Italian state, are always compelled to negotiate in respect of their religious norms. Religious freedom concerns- not only ritual acts, but also behaviours including dietary ones, which are based on religious beliefs. The aim of this paper is to critically reconstruct how Italy takes charge of religiously-motivated needs concerning food and beverages, both for those confessions holding an intesa (such as Hebraism and for those not (Islam, in order to trace the real degree to which freedom of worship is guaranteed in Italy. The analysis will be focused on the bargaining for religious dietary rules in schools and in constraining institutes, as they are main social spaces of confrontation between believers and the state.

  9. Religious Coping in Caregivers of Family Members With Dementia.

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    Rathier, Lucille A; Davis, Jennifer Duncan; Papandonatos, George D; Grover, Christine; Tremont, Geoffrey

    2015-12-01

    The degree of depression experienced by caregivers of individuals with dementia was examined in relation to religious coping strategies, religious practice, and spirituality in the framework of the stress and coping model. Caregivers of 191 persons with dementia completed the Religious Coping Scale, self-report measures of religious practices and spirituality, burden, and depression. There was no evidence that any religious coping strategy or religious practice moderated the relationship between caregiving stress and depression. Certain types of religious coping strategies had a direct effect on depression. Higher levels of religious coping working with God were associated with decreased depression, whereas higher levels of religious coping working through God were associated with increased depression. Higher burden, lower overall caregiver health rating, and worse reactions to memory and behavior problems were associated with higher levels of depression. Frequency of prayer and the importance of spirituality were weakly associated with lower levels of depression.

  10. LIFE EVENTS AND NEGATIVE RELIGIOUS COPING

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    sema eryücel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Recently, insufficiency of secular coping methods has drawn the attention of researchers towards religious coping methods. While the parts about theory and model cover an important place in the literature, experimental studies are rapidly going on. Although religious coping was initially interpreted as positive, experimental studies reveal that it also has negative forms. The purpose of this study, in which qualitative research methods were used, is to define the components of religious coping. Semi structured interview was used among 42 participants, 9 war veterans from Association of Turkish Disabled War Veterans, Martyrs, their Widows and Orphans Ankara Branch, and 9 relatives of martyrs from the Association of Martyrs’ Families Ankara Branch, totaling 60 volunteer participants between the ages 25 and 65 with snowball sampling method. It was discovered that 29 of the participants used negative religious coping and the participants who only used negative religious coping were studied in this research. Upon recording the interviews with the aid of a recorder, the researched typed the script of the interviews. The qualitative analysis of the collected data was done in MAXODA 11 computer program.

  11. LIFE EVENTS AND NEGATIVE RELIGIOUS COPING

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    sema eryücel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, insufficiency of secular coping methods has drawn the attention of researchers towards religious coping methods. While the parts about theory and model cover an important place in the literature, experimental studies are rapidly going on. Although religious coping was initially interpreted as positive, experimental studies reveal that it also has negative forms. The purpose of this study, in which qualitative research methods were used, is to define the components of religious coping. Semi structured interview was used among 42 participants, 9 war veterans from Association of Turkish Disabled War Veterans, Martyrs, their Widows and Orphans Ankara Branch, and 9 relatives of martyrs from the Association of Martyrs’ Families Ankara Branch, totaling 60 volunteer participants between the ages 25 and 65 with snowball sampling method. It was discovered that 29 of the participants used negative religious coping and the participants who only used negative religious coping were studied in this research. Upon recording the interviews with the aid of a recorder, the researched typed the script of the interviews. The qualitative analysis of the collected data was done in MAXODA 11 computer program.

  12. DESTINASI WISATA BUDAYA DAN RELIGI DI CIREBON

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    Oda Ignatius Besar Hariyanto

    2016-10-01

    ABSTRACT Ministry of Tourism currently focused on the development of tourism, especially tourist destinations, because the tourism sectors expected to become the responsibility of the economies on non-oil sector. The wealth of Indonesia tourist destinations is a culture tourism, natural tourism, and man-made tourism. Indonesia has a cultural diversity that spread to 34 provinces. Each tribe and region has a diversity of different cultures, influenced by geography, region of origin and historical background and religion are different. It is the uniqueness and attractiveness of cultural and religious tourism in Indonesia. Cirebon is one area in West Java has many unique and appeal to be develops into a cultural and religious tourist destination. Previously Cirebon had been a “Jalur Sutra Perdagangan” of various nationalities who came from China, India, Turkey, Persia, and the Middle East, who transit through the port of Cirebon. Thus, eventually occur of acculturation to the natives Cirebon. It is increased the repertoire of cultural diversity which is owned by the people of Cirebon. The palace of Kasepuhan, Kanoman and Kacirebon, Hindu-Buddhist relics, the history entry and the development of Islam in Cirebon, then Cirebon has the potential to be develops into a cultural and religious tourism. This research used qualitative descriptive method with multi-disciplinary approach for reasons of tourism is part of a culture that is very complex. The aim of research got description of tourist destinations and religious possessed by Cirebon. Keywords: Tourist Destination, Culture, Religious

  13. Ideological conflicts in Slovenia over religious issues

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    Flere Sergej

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since attaining independence, Latin pattern (Martin, 1978 disputes and conflicts have characterized the Slovenian political scene, particularly as to relations between the state and religious communities. Slovenia adopted a law on the issue only in 2006, availing itself of the law from the 1970s. The 2007 Religious Freedom Act contained many privileges for the dominant Roman Catholic Church, including those of a symbolic nature and those of an economic one. The Constitutional Court declared the Act unconstitutional and void, departing from the European Convention of Human Rights and the case law of the European Court of Human Rights. Thus, it set other beliefs at the same level with religious ones, did away with many privileges and obstacles 81 in recognition and registration of new religious communities. However, this decision has legislatively been implemented only in a small portion, remaining to be fully implemented. However, the absence of substantive agreements with the Holy See and the absence of religious instruction in public schools indicate a predominance of liberalism on the public scene.

  14. Inter-Religious Dialogue Models in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Sabri Wan Yusof

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, many organizations have involved in the implementation of inter-religious dialogue in Malaysia. However, there are stillthose who doubt the role and purpose of interreligious dialogue. This might be due to lack of information and understanding regardingthe methodology of dialogue and also about different types that it may take. The present study is aimed at exploring a few models ofinter-religious dialogue that have been practised by some organizations that actively involved in dialogue. The study focuses on a review of selected organizational or institutional dialoguemodels such as Center for Civilizational Dialogue (CCD, Students Representative Council of Malaysia Science University (HealthCampus and Inter-faith Spiritual Fellowship (INSaF. This study provides information concerning the various designs of inter-religiousdialogue model in Malaysia and proposes that different designs of inter-religious dialogue rely on its different types and goals. It is found that, the commonly practiced type of dialogue in Malaysia is educational type which focuses on exploring inter-religious commonalities as well as differences which consequently willincrease understanding and foster meaningful engagement between people of different ethnic and religious background in Malaysia. Thistype of dialogue is distinguished from conflict resolution types of dialogue which aims at identifying issues and generating action plansto conflicts or disputes.

  15. Mystifying moments in Bible interpretation: An exploration of some implied backgrounds to three kinds of unusual Bible readings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffel Lombaard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is part of a series on Methodology and Biblical Spirituality. In this, the fourth contribution, the scope is widened; more practical-analytically oriented, three thoroughly different but nevertheless all unusual kinds of interpretations of the Bible are described, characterised and contextualised. Namely:• In order to explain what are perceived as textual anomalies, some Old Testament authors have been described by US-based medical practitioners as having suffered psychiatric dysfunctions.• The Garden of Eden from Genesis 2 and further has been located by a recently diseased Nigerian scholar as having been in her home country, with a Nigerian race having been the predecessors of biblical Adam and Eve.• Rastafarians, primarily Jamaica-based, regard marijuana as a holy herb and find direct support for their religious use of this plant in the Bible.However strange such ‘mystifying’ interpretations may seem within the theological mainstreams of Judeo-Christianity, there is more to these kinds of interpretations than simple whim. Certain cultural conditions along with personal, particularly spiritual, commitments enable these interpretations, which must be taken seriously in order to come to a fuller understanding of the text–interpreter dynamic. These then can cast at least some form of reflective light on the more usual current biblical-interpretative mainstreams within Judeo-Christianity, posing in a new light the question of what constitutes legitimate interpretations, also within mainstream interpretations, as religiously inclined people try to live their lives in the light of Scripture.

  16. Response of religious groups to HIV/AIDS as a sexually transmitted infection in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrich Gillian L

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination are significant determinants of HIV transmission in the Caribbean island nation of Trinidad and Tobago (T&T, where the adult HIV/AIDS prevalence is 2.5%. T&T is a spiritually-aware society and over 104 religious groups are represented. This religious diversity creates a complex social environment for the transmission of a sexually transmitted infection like HIV/AIDS. Religious leaders are esteemed in T&T's society and may use their position and frequent interactions with the public to promote HIV/AIDS awareness, fight stigma and discrimination, and exercise compassion for people living with HIV/AIDS (PWHA. Some religious groups have initiated HIV/AIDS education programs within their membership, but previous studies suggest that HIV/AIDS remains a stigmatized infection in many religious organizations. The present study investigates how the perception of HIV/AIDS as a sexually transmitted infection impacts religious representatives' incentives to respond to HIV/AIDS in their congregations and communities. In correlation, the study explores how the experiences of PWHA in religious gatherings impact healing and coping with HIV/AIDS. Methods Between November 2002 and April 2003, in-depth interviews were conducted with 11 religious representatives from 10 Christian, Hindu and Muslim denominations. The majority of respondents were leaders of religious services, while two were active congregation members. Religious groups were selected based upon the methods of Brathwaite. Briefly, 26 religious groups with the largest followings according to 2000 census data were identified in Trinidad and Tobago. From this original list, 10 religious groups in Northwest Trinidad were selected to comprise a representative sample of the island's main denominations. In-depth interviews with PWHA were conducted during the same study period, 2002–2003. Four individuals were selected from a care and support

  17. Religious Expression In The Growing Multicultural Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Rollins

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The twentieth century saw incredible growth in the diversity of the American workplace as barriers, especially for women and minorities, were reduced.  In this twenty-first century the effects of globalization are adding to the company’s diversity.  Today, some companies reflect a microcosm of our world as the world’s workers come to America and technology connects organizations worldwide.  With this diverse workplace come not only the obvious differences of gender, race, and national origin, but also differences in religion and religious practices.  This research examines some trends in American workplace diversity, the historical and legal framework into which diverse religions can function in America, and corporate practices necessary to enable religious expression without significantly diminishing the organization’s efficiency.   The research concludes by reporting results of a survey on religious expression difficulties and solutions in the workplace.

  18. Modern religiousness: determinanty, personal touches, progress trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Pivovarova

    2014-01-01

    The existing empirical data show the contemporary religiosity an inhomogeneous, constantly developing polyfunctional and multi­confessional (Christian tradition dominates phenomenon. There is a certain contradiction between its rapid development in quantitative terms and the stagnation in qualitative terms. The major characteristic is contradictory dualism between its open and non­dogmatic character, tolerance, syncretism, loyalty, privatisation, etc. and spiritual entropy, eclecticism, populism, conformity, fragmented character, the focus on the ritual part, prgmatisation, etc. The evolution of religiosity was marked by «abstractisation» of the idea of supernatural  as well as the development  of ethical norms and the religious etiquette, active development of religiosity out of confession or church, de­centralisation of  religious postulates and religious «time­serving».

  19. Religious Education research in welfare state Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with forms of knowledge and types of research interests in scholarly work on Religious Education at the primary and lower secondary levels in Denmark throughout the heyday of the welfare state from the 1960s and up until the 2000s, when the welfare state model not least...... and thus in a changed institutional field. Drawing on the conceptual understanding of the field of educational sciences deriving from Hofstetter and Schneuwly (2002), the article analyzes ways of doing research in and related to Religious Education and the scholarly disciplines involved. Focus...... with regard to education was in transition. The point of departure is the work and oeuvre of K.E. Bugge, for many years – and remaining until now – the last professor of Religious Education in Denmark, namely at the Royal Danish School of Education (Danmarks Lærerhøjskole) which reorganized as Danish...

  20. An Islamic Perspective in Managing Religious Diversity

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    Hilal Wani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the concept of “diversity” as mentioned in the Qur’an and how commonalities in diverse religions may be used as a model for civilizational dialogue towards achieving harmony. This study reveals that religious and cultural diversity are laws of nature which cannot be changed while the concept of “identity” is a contested issue in modern discourse. Results also show that peace may be established among diverse religions through their commonalities and the best way to exploit these commonalities and to reduce the religious divide is through civilizational dialogue. The Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR and other methods for changing the nature of religious differences and reaching a consensus—thus arriving at a peaceful co-existence—are also discussed. It was found that people are often misguided or divided in the name of religion and culture, despite the fact that the philosophy of every religion is based on peace and harmony.

  1. Current religious changes in Serbia and desecularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Mirko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For the contemporary Serbian sociology of religion it is evident that the process of desecularization has been present on the social scene of Serbia in the last fifteen years. Sociologists have provided arguments for this claim based on data gathered in Serbia during this period. The religious changes in question have been empirically recorded in all aspects of attachment to religion (mainly Eastern Orthodoxy and the church (Serbian Orthodox Church, that is, in aspects of religious identification, doctrinal beliefs and religious behavior. Certain political subjects and social scientists feel that social life in Serbia is getting increasingly, and that religion and church are exerting influence within social fields they are not supposed to, if Serbia is to become a secular, democratic state. The paper analyzes some major conditions of the clericalization of the Serbian society.

  2. Religión y moral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Velasco, Juan

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available Not available.

    Religión y moralidad son hechos estrechamente relacionados a lo largo de la historia. Esta relación da lugar a contenidos éticos convergentes en la mayor parte de las tradiciones religiosas. Existen sin embargo tensiones entre la moral y la religión que culminan en la ruptura operada por los movimientos «ilustrados». Operada esta ruptura, religión y moralidad aparecen como distintas formas de relación con el absoluto, llamadas a dialogar, desde la base de la ética civil de lassociedades pluralístas, para buscar soluciones a los problemas de la humanidad actual

  3. Cultural Protestantism and Nordic Religious Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Is there a Nordic model for Religious Education? The article explores how Cultural Protestantism and Liberal Theology influenced the ways in which Religious Education developed in Sweden, Denmark and Norway from the late 19th century until the mid-20th century as part of the transformation...... in the question of education, namely Nathan Söderblom (1866-1931), Edvard Lehmann (1862-1930) and Eivind Berggrav (1884-1959), who serve as prisms for the transnational historical analysis of what takes place between states and social fields. The article suggests that Nordic Cultural Protestantism contributed...... to a model of religious education which in complex ways combines secularization in the meaning of division of the church-state relation with sacralization of the state and its so-called culture....

  4. Religious characteristics and the death penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Monica K; Hayward, R David

    2008-04-01

    Using one mock trial scenario, this study investigated whether religious and demographic factors were related to death penalty attitudes and sentencing verdicts. Those who favored the death penalty differed from those who had doubts about the penalty in gender, affiliation, fundamentalism, evangelism, literal Biblical interpretism, beliefs about God's attitudes toward murders, and perceptions of how their religious groups felt about the death penalty. These relationships generally held after mock jurors were death qualified. Gender, fundamentalism, literal interpretism, beliefs about God's death penalty position, and perceptions of how one's religious group felt about the death penalty predicted death penalty sentencing verdicts. Future research could determine whether using peremptory challenges to exclude potential jurors based on religion can help lawyers choose a more favorable jury.

  5. Religious Freedoms In Republic Of Macedonia

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    Metaj-Stojanova Albana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the independence of Republic of Macedonia and the adoption of the Constitution of Macedonia, the country went through a substantial socio-political transition. The concept of human rights and freedoms, such as religious freedoms in the Macedonian Constitution is based on liberal democratic values. The Macedonian Constitution connects the fundamental human rights and freedoms with the concept of the individual and citizen, but also with the collective rights of ethnic minorities, respecting the international standards and responsibilities taken under numerous international human rights conventions and treaties, of which the country is a party. Republic of Macedonia has ratified all the so called “core human right treaties” and now the real challenge lies in the implementation of the international standards. Some of these international conventions and treaties of the United Nations and of the Council of Europe are inherited by succession from the former Yugoslavian federation. Religious freedoms are guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of human rights (1948, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966, the European Convention on Human Rights (1953, the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief (1981 (all documents ratified by the Republic of Macedonia. According to the Constitution of the Republic of Macedonia “The freedom of religious confession is guaranteed. The right to express one's faith freely and publicly, individually or with others, is guaranteed„. After the conflict of 2001 the Ohrid Framework Agreement secured group rights for ethnicities that are not in majority in the Republic of Macedonia. The present Law on the legal status of the church, religious communities and religious groups of 2007, repealed the Law on religion and religious groups of 1997.

  6. Religiöses Lernen und religiöse Sozialisation in der Sekundarstufe 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Benesch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ENGLISH: This article builds a connection between Huber‘s centrality scale and Bucher‘s scale of efficiency for religious education, while both scales have been modified. The two scales can be considered as a one dimensional factor in a factor-analytical approach. In addition to demographic variables the survey used further items as co-variables (e.g. „Do you think you obtain a religious education?”, „Do you like to read in Sacred Scriptures such as the Bible or the Quran?”. The religious education is relevant in case of the centrality scale as well as of religious learning. During the research for the prediction of religious learning by bivariate regression (corrected coefficient of determination is 75.8 percent it can be pointed out the relevance of the centrality scale (p<0,001 and of the interest in the Holy Scriptures (p=0,006.DEUTSCH: Der Artikel bringt die modifizierte Zentralitätsskala nach Huber mit einer modifizierten Skala der Effizienz des Religionsunterrichts nach Bucher in Verbindung. Beide Skalen können als eindimensionaler Faktor anhand einer faktoren-analytischen Betrachtung angesehen werden. Neben den demographischen Variablen wurden Items als Co-Variablen (z.B. „Findest du, dass du religiös erzogen wirst?“, „Liest du gerne in Heiligen Schriften z.B. Bibel, Koran?“ erhoben. So hat die religiöse Erziehung auf die Zentralitätsskala und auf das religiöse Lernen eine entscheidende Rolle. Bei der Frage einer Vorhersage des religiösen Lernens mittels bivariater Regression (korrigiertes Bestimmtheitsmaß ist 75,8 Prozent ergab sich die Wichtigkeit der Zentralitätsskala (p<0,001 und des Interesses an der Heiligen Schrift (p=0,006.

  7. Sexual Politics and Religious Actors in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pecheny

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of religious actors in sexual politics in Argentina. Sexual politics has become a critical battlefield when it comes to the role of religion in the Argentinean liberal-democratic regime, while gender and sexuality have been the main political targets of religious institutions since the 1980s and 1990s. In this context, progressive legislation on gender, sexual, and reproductive rights was passed, including same-sex marriage and the recognition of transgender identities, despite the opposition of the Catholic Church. Paradoxically, abortion remains largely illegal, allowed only in exceptional circumstances.

  8. Cultural Protestantism and Nordic Religious Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Is there a Nordic model for Religious Education? The article explores how Cultural Protestantism and Liberal Theology influenced the ways in which Religious Education developed in Sweden, Denmark and Norway from the late 19th century until the mid-20th century as part of the transformation...... in the question of education, namely Nathan Söderblom (1866-1931), Edvard Lehmann (1862-1930) and Eivind Berggrav (1884-1959), who serve as prisms for the transnational historical analysis of what takes place between states and social fields. The article suggests that Nordic Cultural Protestantism contributed...

  9. Ethical And Religious Analysis On Euthanasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdi Omar Shuriye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an analysis on euthanasia from ethical and religious perspectives. Historically, the classical Greek thinkers including Aristotle had categorically accepted euthanasia with the main reason of minimizing pain. However, as science develops ethical and religious isuues related to the subject have increasingly created fervent debates on euthanesia. ABSTRAK: Kertas ini mengkaji euthanasia dari perspektif agama dan etika. Sejarah telah melihat para pemikir Greek termasuk Aristotle secara kategorinya menerima Euthanasia dengan sebab utama untuk mengurangkan kesakitan. Bagaimanapun, apabila sains berkembang, perbahasan mengenai isu-isu agama dan etika tentang Euthanasia telah meningkat dengan nyata.KEYWORDS: mercy killing; religion; ethics; morality; euthanasia

  10. Development Professionals at Religiously Based Nonprofit Organizations

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    Jim Pinder

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of why a fundraising professional would choose to leave his or her employer is critical to the ongoing success of religiously based nonprofit organizations as they work to achieve their mission. Without continuity in the donor relationship, donors will likely leave the organization or become disenfranchised. This study focuses on development professionals at Seventh-Day Adventist institutions across North America. The results of this study are applicable to other religiously based nonprofit organizations. The present article reveals the reasons affecting employee retention and proposes approaches to mitigate the loss of valuable employees. Data were gathered using a structured online survey and analyzed for its descriptive outcomes.

  11. Therapeutic and redemptive aspects of religious confession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, S

    1995-03-01

    Religious confession provides a forum for the expression of individual identity and relational needs. As a ritual that gives public sanction to personal transformation and redemption, confession also connects the faithful to the larger community. Greek Orthodox, Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish ways of confession are surveyed to examine their historical and contemporary significance. Religious confession not only reflects meaning; it also creates meaning filtered through our psychological understanding of what constitutes sin. Clinical examples illustrate the need for therapists to become more aware of the relationship of their own values and countertransference in spiritual disclosure.

  12. Dommere og religiøse symboler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtug, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Om politiske kontroverser, der angår religiøse symboler i det offentlige rum i Danmark, og den måde, hvorpå idéer, der undfanges på den nationalistiske højrefløj......Om politiske kontroverser, der angår religiøse symboler i det offentlige rum i Danmark, og den måde, hvorpå idéer, der undfanges på den nationalistiske højrefløj...

  13. Religious Networks in Post-conflict Democratic Republic of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-11-15

    Nov 15, 2006 ... Abstract. The role of religion and religious networks in public life is gaining ... religious groups wield enormous influence in the public space as providers ..... to garner support for the Inter-Congolese Dialogue (ICD) which was.

  14. Religious Networks in Post-conflict Democratic Republic of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Religious Networks in Post-conflict Democratic Republic of the Congo: A Prognosis. ... The role of religion and religious networks in public life is gaining increasing attention in contemporary social science discourses against ... Article Metrics.

  15. Religious Conversion, Models and Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Boz, Tuba

    2012-01-01

    This papers examines the experiences of converts to Islam among Australian women in the milieu of polemic views and debates such as ‘Islam versus the west', which is most visible in the image of the ‘eastern' ‘oppressed' Muslim woman. Employing the experiences of Australian Muslim women converts in Melbourne, issues concerning identity politics, and the individuals and social dimensions of conversion are investigated. While there is an array of literature about Muslim women from various disci...

  16. Religion as culture: religious individualism and collectivism among american catholics, jews, and protestants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam B; Hill, Peter C

    2007-08-01

    We propose the theory that religious cultures vary in individualistic and collectivistic aspects of religiousness and spirituality. Study 1 showed that religion for Jews is about community and biological descent but about personal beliefs for Protestants. Intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity were intercorrelated and endorsed differently by Jews, Catholics, and Protestants in a pattern that supports the theory that intrinsic religiosity relates to personal religion, whereas extrinsic religiosity stresses community and ritual (Studies 2 and 3). Important life experiences were likely to be social for Jews but focused on God for Protestants, with Catholics in between (Study 4). We conclude with three perspectives in understanding the complex relationships between religion and culture.

  17. Through the Looking Glass: Reflections on a Gift to Religious Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durka, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the author's experience of James Fowler's theory of faith development, from her first exposure to the idea in 1973 until the present. She cites Fowler?s consistent emphasis on the necessity and significance of conversation among religious communities. Throughout his research, Fowler has had to acknowledge its plurality and…

  18. Physician-Assisted Dying: Are Education and Religious Beliefs Related to Nursing Students' Attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalith, Ilana; Musgrave, Catherine F.; Goldschmidt, Lydia

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 190 Israeli nursing students found that just over half were opposed to legalization of physician-assisted dying. Exposure to theory about euthanasia or clinical oncology experience had a small effect on these attitudes. Religious beliefs and degree of religiosity were significant determinants of these attitudes. (Contains 23…

  19. Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Thanatology: Through a Prism of Religious Faiths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandan, Monica

    2005-01-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an increase in thanatology education in colleges and universities. However, the infusion into thanatology curricula of religious faiths as they affect behaviors, experiences and emotions of dying individuals and survivors is still in its infancy. In this article I describe an effective approach I have used to…

  20. Zone of Proximal Development, Liminality, and Communitas: Implications for Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Debora B. Agra

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to understand religious education as a process of communal endeavor that prioritizes and considers the learning experience intrinsically connected to its social and cultural contexts. Two authors will be of help to develop this pursuit: Lev Vygotsky, whose work emphasizes learning as constructed through interactions and in…

  1. How the Collegiate Religious and Spiritual Climate Shapes Students' Ecumenical Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockenbach, Alyssa Bryant; Mayhew, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the collegiate religious and spiritual climate survey, this study examined the relationship between campus climate and ecumenical orientation. Space for spiritual support and expression, provocative encounters with worldview diversity, and challenging curricular experiences are associated with ecumenical orientations, but some…

  2. Religious Education and Religious Pluralism in the New Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah-Gyadu, J. Kwabena

    2010-01-01

    This article examines some of the pertinent challenges arising out of personal experiences encountered through teaching religion and theology within an African environment. What the author describes as the "new Africa" in his title is a continent that has transitioned from slavery and colonialism into a global fraternity of democratic…

  3. Descriptions of euthanasia as social representations: comparing the views of Finnish physicians and religious professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jylhänkangas, Leila; Smets, Tinne; Cohen, Joachim; Utriainen, Terhi; Deliens, Luc

    2014-03-01

    In many western societies health professionals play a powerful role in people's experiences of dying. Religious professionals, such as pastors, are also confronted with the issues surrounding death and dying in their work. It is therefore reasonable to assume that the ways in which death-related topics, such as euthanasia, are constructed in a given culture are affected by the views of these professionals. This qualitative study addresses the ways in which Finnish physicians and religious professionals perceive and describe euthanasia and conceptualises these descriptions and views as social representations. Almost all the physicians interviewed saw that euthanasia does not fit the role of a physician and anchored it to different kinds of risks such as the slippery slope. Most of the religious and world-view professionals also rejected euthanasia. In this group, euthanasia was rejected on the basis of a religious moral code that forbids killing. Only one of the religious professionals - the freethinker with an atheist world-view - accepted euthanasia and described it as a personal choice, as did the one physician interviewed who accepted it. The article shows how the social representations of euthanasia are used to protect professional identities and to justify their expert knowledge of death and dying.

  4. Health-related religious rituals of the Greek Orthodox Church: their uptake and meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouka, Georgia; Plakas, Sotirios; Taket, Ann; Boudioni, Markella; Dandoulakis, Michael

    2012-12-01

    To examine the uptake of religious rituals of the Greek Orthodox Church by relatives of patients in critical condition in Greece and to explore their symbolic representations and spiritual meanings. Patients and their relatives want to be treated with respect and be supported for their beliefs, practices, customs and rituals. However nurses may not be ready to meet the spiritual needs of relatives of patients, while the health-related religious beliefs, practices and rituals of the Greek Orthodox Christian denomination have not been explored. This study was part of a large study encompassing 19 interviews with 25 informants, relatives of patients in intensive care units of three large hospitals in Athens, Greece, between 2000 and 2005. In this paper data were derived from personal accounts of religious rituals given by six participants. Relatives used a series of religious rituals, namely blessed oil and holy water, use of relics of saints, holy icons, offering names for pleas and pilgrimage. Through the rituals, relatives experience a sense of connectedness with the divine and use the sacred powers to promote healing of their patients. Nurse managers should recognize, respect and facilitate the expression of spirituality through the practice of religious rituals by patients and their relatives. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Religious Background and Gambling Among Young Adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E; Stokes, Charles E

    2016-03-01

    Despite the rapid growth of the gambling industry over the last 40 years, there have been few large-scale, nationally representative longitudinal studies of gambling among young adults. We use data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health to investigate whether and how the gambling behavior of young adults is associated with their religious beliefs and practices during adolescence. We find that young adults who grew up as conservative Protestants, mainline Protestants, Mormons, and Jehovah's Witnesses; those were raised in a community with a higher percentage of conservative Protestants; and those who attended religious services weekly are less likely to have ever gambled. Among gamblers, young adults who attended religious services up to three times per month as adolescents are more likely to experience gambling problems than those who never attend. Notably, accounting for a young adult's propensity for risk-taking behavior does not explain the associations between religion and gambling.

  6. Higher Education and Religious Liberalization among Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrl, Damon; Uecker, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    Going to college has long been assumed to liberalize students' religious beliefs. Using longitudinal data from the National Study of Youth and Religion, we compare change in the content of religious beliefs of those who do and do not attend college. We find that, in general, college students are no more likely to develop liberal religious beliefs…

  7. The Place of Love in the Special Religious Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalwell, Kaye

    2016-01-01

    Special Religious Education is faith-based single tradition religious education taught in many Australian public schools by volunteer teachers who are adherents of the faith they are teaching. This paper derives from a qualitative study of the pedagogy of Christian Special Religious Education teachers that took place between 2010 and 2014. Love is…

  8. Religious Choices and Preferences: North Carolina's Baskin Robbins Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wortham

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The marketing of religion has become a big business. Wortham examines the current religious scene and shows that Americans want religious plurality, rather than religious homogamy. Just like shopping for ice cream, Americans want 57 choices when shopping for religion

  9. Coming Out Religiously : Life Orientation in Public Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Cok; ter Avest, Ina

    2014-01-01

    In the post-pillarized society of the Netherlands, formal religious education still is structured according to religious dividing lines. "Religion" in confessional schools is a compulsory subject; in public schools, taking a so-called neutral position with regard to religious traditions, "Religion"

  10. Healing the Wounds: St. Augustine, Catechesis, and Religious Education Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    St. Augustine of Hippos' writing on education offers a fresh lens through which the conceptual framework of religious education in the Catholic school can be understood. Recent teaching of the Magisterium of the Catholic Church on the distinctive nature of religious education and catechesis has challenged religious educators to find an alternative…

  11. Does Religious Belief Promote Prosociality? A Critical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, Luke W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous authors have suggested that religious belief has a positive association, possibly causal, with prosocial behavior. This article critiques evidence regarding this "religious prosociality" hypothesis from several areas of the literature. The extant literature on religious prosociality is reviewed including domains of charity,…

  12. Religious Education as a Tool for Enhancing Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Birkelund; Laudrup, Carin

    2010-01-01

    . This paper raises the question of how such theories are reflected in religious education in the Danish school system. Based on analyses of a survey among pupils in their final year in upper secondary schools, it is argued that non-confessional religious education is one way of enhancing religious tolerance....

  13. Healing the Wounds: St. Augustine, Catechesis, and Religious Education Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    St. Augustine of Hippos' writing on education offers a fresh lens through which the conceptual framework of religious education in the Catholic school can be understood. Recent teaching of the Magisterium of the Catholic Church on the distinctive nature of religious education and catechesis has challenged religious educators to find an alternative…

  14. School Counseling Programs as Spiritual and Religious Safe Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stloukal, Merit E.; Wickman, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a model for creating spiritual and religious safe zones in school counseling programs that implements the Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling's (ASERVIC; 2009) "Competencies for Addressing Spiritual and Religious Issues in Counseling" in a school setting. The authors frame the model within the…

  15. Adolescent Religiousness as a Protective Factor against Pornography Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sam A.; Steelman, Michael A.; Coyne, Sarah M.; Ridge, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined mediators of relations between adolescent religiousness and pornography use. The sample consisted of 419 adolescents (ages 15-18 years; M age = 15.68, SD = 0.98; 56% male). It was hypothesized that religiousness (religious internalization and involvement) would protect adolescents from pornography use (accidental and…

  16. Religious Education in Syria: Unity and Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Monique C.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the almost identical syllabuses of the Christian and Muslim religious education programmes of the Syrian Arab Republic. Content analysis of the students' textbooks and teachers' guides (in Arabic) reveals common themes of citizenship education and national unity. Classroom observations in Damascus also highlight how…

  17. Religiousness and preoperative anxiety: a correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimollahi Mansoureh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major life changes are among factors that cause anxiety, and one of these changes is surgery. Emotional reactions to surgery have specific effects on the intensity and velocity as well as the process of physical disease. In addition, they can cause delay in patients recovery. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety. Methods This survey is a correlational study to assess the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety of patients undergoing abdominal, orthopaedic, and gynaecologic surgery in educational hospitals. We used the convenience sampling method. The data collection instruments included a questionnaire containing the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and another questionnaire formulated by the researcher with queries on religious beliefs and demographic characteristics as well as disease-related information. Analysis of the data was carried out with SPSS software using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results were arranged in three tables. Results The findings showed that almost all the subjects had high level of religiosity and moderate level of anxiety. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between religiosity and intensity of anxiety, though this was not statistically significant. Conclusion The results of this study can be used as evidence for presenting religious counselling and spiritual interventions for individuals undergoing stress. Finally, based on the results of this study, the researcher suggested some recommendations for applying results and conducting further research.

  18. Religiousness and mental health: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira-Almeida Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship between religiosity and mental health has been a perennial source of controversy. This paper reviews the scientific evidence available for the relationship between religion and mental health. METHOD: The authors present the main studies and conclusions of a larger systematic review of 850 studies on the religion-mental health relationship published during the 20th Century identified through several databases. The present paper also includes an update on the papers published since 2000, including researches performed in Brazil and a brief historical and methodological background. DISCUSSION: The majority of well-conducted studies found that higher levels of religious involvement are positively associated with indicators of psychological well-being (life satisfaction, happiness, positive affect, and higher morale and with less depression, suicidal thoughts and behavior, drug/alcohol use/abuse. Usually the positive impact of religious involvement on mental health is more robust among people under stressful circumstances (the elderly, and those with disability and medical illness. Theoretical pathways of the religiousness-mental health connection and clinical implications of these findings are also discussed. CONCLUSIONS: There is evidence that religious involvement is usually associated with better mental health. We need to improve our understanding of the mediating factors of this association and its use in clinical practice.

  19. Intersections of gender with religious diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    2009-01-01

    countries: The Danish High Court decision (in 2005) gave private employers the right to ban headscarves for employees under specific conditions, if it concerns all religious symbols and refers to a general dress-code. This contrasts with the Norwegian Equality Ombud's decision stating that a ban...

  20. On Three Ways to Justify Religious Beliefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brümmer, V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares the ways in which revealed theology, natural theology and philosophical theology justify religious belief. Revealed theology does so with an appeal to revelation and natural theology with an appeal to reason and perception. It is argued that both are inadequate. Philosophical the

  1. Technology in Nonsectarian and Religious Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosen, Anthony J.; Gibbs, Michael G.; Guerrero, Rosalie; McDevitt, Patrick J.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors report the results of a survey on technology access and use in both religious and nonsectarian schools in the state of Illinois. Four hundred surveys were sent to a cross section of private schools, with a response rate of 45%. The study demonstrates there were only minimal differences between sectarian and…

  2. Carnival: A Religious Rite of Passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Clement B. G.

    1979-01-01

    In this article, historical aspects of the pre-Lenten celebration of Carnival are discussed and the Carnival is examined in terms of its meaning as a "rite of passage." One of the most important functions of Carnival is its original one of being a ritual with profound secular and religious implications. (Author/MC)

  3. RELIGIOUS DRESS AT SCHOOL: A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rajm

    is therefore one of the most important challenges to creating and maintaining a ... school officials may implement to maintain safe and orderly learning environments, .... 45 Onions Shorter Oxford English Dictionary 1697. ..... 110 Section 31(1) SA Constitution: persons belonging to a cultural, religious or linguistic community.

  4. Religious Imagery in Popular Music Theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigtved, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen undersøger hvordan religiøse billeder, narrative strategier og andre elementer er en del af musicalgenren. Der foretages en mere indgående analyse af Richard Rodgers' og Oscar Hammersteins forestilling Carousel samt af Andrew LLoyd Webber og Tim Rices forestilling Evita....

  5. Teaching Dystopias: The Value of Religious Questioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabury, Marcia Bundy

    1995-01-01

    Argues that a true general education should encourage the exploration of religious questions. Describes the author's use of works showing dystopian societies based on existing values, such as Huxley's "Brave New World," to encourage students to rethink their assumptions and develop openness toward the questions that religions address. (22…

  6. The Religious Meaning in "Waiting for Godot"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    "Waiting for Godot" is one of the classic works of theater of the absurd. The play seems absurd but with a deep religious meaning. This text tries to explore the theme in four parts of God and man, breaking the agreement, repentance and imprecation and waiting for salvation.

  7. Religious and professional commitment in pastoral ministry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilderman, J.B.A.M.; Felling, A.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    In this contribution, we clarify the pastoral commitment of Dutch Roman-Catholic pastors by describing it as the interplay of religious and professional commitment, which we analyze both analytically and empirically. Our main research question regards an empirical and theological inquiry into the re

  8. Might Astrobiological Findings Evoke a Religious Crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, T.; Froehlig, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    What might be the likely impact of confirmed discovery of extraterrestrial life—microbial or intelligent life—on terrestrial religion? Many have speculated that the anthropo-centrism and earth-centrism which allegedly have characterized our religious traditions would be confronted with a crisis. Would new knowledge that we are not alone in the universe lead to a collapse of traditional religious belief? This presentation will summarize the results of the Peters Religious Crisis Survey of 1325 respondents. This survey shows that the majority of adherents to Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism demonstrate little or no anxiety regarding the prospect of contact with extraterrestrial life, even if they express some doubts regarding their respective religious tradition and the traditions of others. This presentation will also show that theological speculation regarding other worlds has sparked lively debate beginning as far back as the middle ages and continuing into our present era. Ted Peters is a research and teaching scholar with the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. He is co-editor of the journal, Theology and Science, and author of the books, The Evolution of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Life (Pandora 2008) and Playing God? Genetic Determinism and Human Freedom (Routledge, rev. ed., 2003).

  9. Religious Dialogue, World Peace and Social Harmony

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE XIAOWEN

    2007-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ. The World Peace Requires Religious Dialogues Peace, development and cooperation are the mainstay of the times in the present world, but there are unseen tricky and atrocious flows. The increasing opposition and conflicts are raging between different countries, nations and religions, which are challenging the wisdom and civilization of mankind.

  10. International Religious NGOs at the United Nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marie Juul

    2010-01-01

    Religious organizations are increasingly visible in development and humanitarian aid, something which has been reflected in the emergence of a new strand of research, focusing on these organizations and their involvement in the provision of development and humanitarian aid. However, most of this ...

  11. Relationship between religiosity, religious coping and socio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tive religious coping was greater among older people with depression than among older people with diabetes(t=2.31 ... and disability measured in Disability Adjusted Life Years ... overall health (physical and mental) and better quality of life.19 ...

  12. RELIGIOUS EXTREMISM AS A CHALLENGE TO TERTIARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IK

    2016-07-01

    Jul 1, 2016 ... reality of religious extremism in Nigeria is a challenge to tertiary ... Apparently the trends of suicide bombing, for instance in Pakistan, India, Iraq and Afghanistan, .... relation to this, Tarimo (2009) argues: “The model of a single religion ... Nigeria tend to use the media, abuse other Churches even the Bible in ...

  13. Is religious education compatible with science education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-04-01

    This paper tackles a highly controversial issue: the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education respectively. We challenge the popular view that science and religion are compatible or even complementary. In order to do so, we give a brief characterization of our conceptions of science and religion. Conspicuous differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological and attitudinal level are noted. Regarding these aspects, closer examination reveals that science and religion are not only different but in fact incompatible. Some consequences of our analysis for education as well as for education policy are explored. We submit that a religious education, particularly at an early age, is an obstacle to the development of a scientific mentality. For this and other reasons, religious education should be kept away from public schools and universities. Instead of promoting a religious world view, we should teach our children what science knows about religion, i.e., how science explains the existence of religion in historical, biological, psychological and sociological terms.

  14. Spousal Religiosity, Religious Bonding, and Pornography Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Samuel L

    2017-02-01

    Religiosity and pornography use are often closely connected. Relatively few studies, however, have examined how this religion-pornography connection plays out within the context of committed romantic relationships. Moreover, virtually all studies of religion and pornography use conceptualize religiosity as a quality intrinsic to the person that typically reduces pornography viewing. Focusing on married Americans, this study shifted the focus to consider whether the religiosity of one's spouse relates to one's own pornography viewing and under what circumstances. Analyses of the nationally representative Portraits of American Life Study (N = 1026) revealed that spousal religiosity was strongly and negatively related to participants viewing pornography, controlling for participants' own religious or sociodemographic characteristics or sexual satisfaction. This relationship held whether spousal religiosity was measured with participants' evaluations of their spouses' religiosity or spouses' self-reported religiosity. The association between spousal religiosity and pornography use was also moderated by participants' religious service attendance, gender, and age. Considering mechanisms, the association between spousal religiosity and pornography use was mediated by frequent participation in religious bonding activities as a couple, suggesting that spousal religiosity may decrease pornography viewing among married Americans by promoting greater religious intimacy and unity between the couple, consequently decreasing one's interest or opportunities to view pornography.

  15. 'promoted' or 'demoted'?: Symbols as religious phenomena

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... thought process which takes place by indicating how a symbol (a word or an ... The scope of this research is within the field of symbols as religious phenomena. ..... between the forms and the content is secondary in nature.

  16. Religious Language: Problems and Meaning Emeka Ugwueye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    This paper examines religious language by x-raying both its meaning and the ... essentially contains predicate about God and His nature, also have or show some .... clearly where people of diverse dialects converge in a place. Religion has ...

  17. From a religious view of madness to religious mania: the Encyclopédie, Pinel, Esquirol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneman, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    This paper focuses on the shift from a concept of insanity understood in terms of religion to another (as entertained by early psychiatry, especially in France) according to which it is believed that forms of madness tinged by religion are difficult to cure. The traditional religious view of madness, as exemplified by Pascal (inter alia), is first illustrated by entries from the Encyclopédie. Then the shift towards a medical view of madness, inspired by Vitalistic physiology, is mapped by entries taken from the same publication. Firmed up by Pinel, this shift caused the abandonment of the religious view. Esquirol considered religious mania to be a vestige from the past, but he also believed that mental conditions carrying a religious component were difficult to cure.

  18. Inter-religious feelings of Sunni and Alevi Muslim minorities : The role of religious commitment and host national identification

    OpenAIRE

    Martinovic, Borja; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines inter-religious attitudes from the perspective of Muslim minorities living in Western Europe. We examine both Sunni and Alevi Muslims of Turkish origin living in Germany and the Netherlands, and focus on their global feelings towards multiple religious out-groups (Christians, Jews, Muslim out-group, and non-believers). We hypothesize that Sunnis would dislike religious out-groups more than Alevis, and that these group differences in religious out-group feelings can be expl...

  19. How healthcare professionals respond to parents with religious objections to vaccination: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijs Wilhelmina LM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years healthcare professionals have faced increasing concerns about the value of childhood vaccination and many find it difficult to deal with parents who object to vaccination. In general, healthcare professionals are advised to listen respectfully to the objections of parents, provide honest information, and attempt to correct any misperceptions regarding vaccination. Religious objections are one of the possible reasons for refusing vaccination. Although religious objections have a long history, little is known about the way healthcare professionals deal with these specific objections. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the responding of healthcare professionals to parents with religious objections to the vaccination of their children. Methods A qualitative interview study was conducted with health care professionals (HCPs in the Netherlands who had ample experience with religious objections to vaccination. Purposeful sampling was applied in order to include HCPs with different professional and religious backgrounds. Data saturation was reached after 22 interviews, with 7 child health clinic doctors, 5 child health clinic nurses and 10 general practitioners. The interviews were thematically analyzed. Two analysts coded, reviewed, discussed, and refined the coding of the transcripts until consensus was reached. Emerging concepts were assessed using the constant comparative method from grounded theory. Results Three manners of responding to religious objections to vaccination were identified: providing medical information, discussion of the decision-making process, and adoption of an authoritarian stance. All of the HCPs provided the parents with medical information. In addition, some HCPs discussed the decision-making process. They verified how the decision was made and if possible consequences were realized. Sometimes they also discussed religious considerations. Whether the decision-making process was

  20. Religious Identity Development of Adolescents in Christian Secondary Schools: Effects of School and Religious Backgrounds of Adolescents and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram-Troost, Gerdien D.; de Roos, Simone A.; Miedema, Siebren

    2007-01-01

    This study examines religious identity development of pupils at Dutch schools for secondary education (mean age 16.4). With the help of a theoretical conceptualization of "religious identity development" empirical research is carried out. Main question is whether differences in terms of religious commitment and exploration between pupils…

  1. The Future of Religious Education on the Flemish School Curriculum: A Plea for Integrative Religious Education for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Leni; Loobuyck, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    After an elaboration of the paradigm shift concerning religious education in Europe, we will give a critical presentation of the Belgian and Flemish system of religious education. The article continues with a discussion of diverse proposals to change the religious education system in Flanders, and concludes that the introduction of an independent,…

  2. Religiosity Gap Reversed: How Religious Counsellors' Belief System Presents When Working with Clients in a Non-Religious Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motalová, Katarína; Rihácek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Most studies exploring the religiosity gap are concerned with non-religious counsellors and religious clients. Approaching this phenomenon from a reversed perspective, this study explores how counsellors' religiosity presents when working with clients in a predominantly non-religious environment. Semi-structured interviews with 11 Czech…

  3. Religious Affect among Adolescents in a Multi-Faith Society: The Role of Personality and Religious Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Village, Andrew; Francis, Leslie J.; Brockett, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    A sample of 3783 11- to 16-year-old secondary school pupils completed the Astley-Francis Scale of Attitude toward Theistic Faith and the abbreviated form of the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised together with information on personal religious practice (prayer), public religious practice (attendance) and religious identity (secular,…

  4. Identity and Intimacy in Religiously Observant and Non-Religiously Observant Adolescents and Young Adults in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisherman, Shraga

    2008-01-01

    Ego identity and intimacy are two sequential stages, according to Erikson's theory. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between ego identity and intimacy, as two continuous multidimensional variables among religious and non-religious individuals. Eight sample groups (age x gender x religious observance) comprising 308…

  5. Parent-Adolescent Relationship Quality as a Moderator for the Influences of Parents' Religiousness on Adolescents' Religiousness and Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen; Longo, Gregory S.; McCullough, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Prior investigations have demonstrated that parents' religiousness is related inversely to adolescent maladjustment. However, research remains unclear about whether the link between parents' religiousness and adolescent adjustment outcomes--either directly or indirectly via adolescents' own religiousness--varies depending on relationship context…

  6. Dimensions of religious involvement and leukocyte telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Terrence D; Ellison, Christopher G; Burdette, Amy M; Taylor, John; Friedman, Katherine L

    2016-08-01

    Although numerous studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with a wide range of favorable health outcomes, it is unclear whether this general pattern extends to cellular aging. In this paper, we tested whether leukocyte telomere length varies according to several dimensions of religious involvement. We used cross-sectional data from the Nashville Stress and Health Study (2011-2014), a large probability sample of 1252 black and white adults aged 22 to 69 living in Davidson County, TN, USA. Leukocyte telomere length was measured using the monochrome multiplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction method with albumin as the single-copy reference sequence. Dimensions of religious involvement included religiosity, religious support, and religious coping. Our multivariate analyses showed that religiosity (an index of religious attendance, prayer frequency, and religious identity) was positively associated with leukocyte telomere length, even with adjustments for religious support, religious coping, age, gender, race, education, employment status, income, financial strain, stressful life events, marital status, family support, friend support, depressive symptoms, smoking, heavy drinking, and allostatic load. Unlike religiosity, religious support and religious coping were unrelated to leukocyte telomere length across models. Depressive symptoms, smoking, heavy drinking, and allostatic load failed to explain any of the association between religiosity and telomere length. To our knowledge, this is the first population-based study to link religious involvement and cellular aging. Although our data suggest that adults who frequently attend religious services, pray with regularity, and consider themselves to be religious tend to exhibit longer telomeres than those who attend and pray less frequently and do not consider themselves to be religious, additional research is needed to establish the mechanisms underlying this association.

  7. Cardiovascular risk assessment of South Asian populations in religious and community settings: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Sophie V; Rait, Greta; Bhattacharyya, Mimi; Nair, Devaki R; Walters, Kate

    2013-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality, and South Asian groups experience worse outcomes than the general population in the UK. Regular screening for CVD risk factors is recommended, but we do not know the best settings in which to deliver this for ethnically diverse populations. Health promotion in religious and community settings may reduce inequalities in access to cardiovascular preventative health care. To use stakeholders' and attendees' experiences to explore the feasibility and potential impact of cardiovascular risk assessment targeting South Asian groups at religious and community venues and how health checks in these settings might compare with general practice assessments. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were used. The settings were two Hindu temples, one mosque and one Bangladeshi community centre in central and north-west London. Twenty-four participants (12 stakeholders and 12 attendees) were purposively selected for interview. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Themes from the data were generated using thematic framework analysis. All attendees reported positive experiences of the assessments. All reported making lifestyle changes after the check, particularly to diet and exercise. Barriers to lifestyle change, e.g. resistance to change from family members, were identified. Advantages of implementing assessments in religious and community settings compared with general practice included accessibility and community encouragement. Disadvantages included reduced privacy, organizational difficulties and lack of follow-up care. Cardiovascular risk assessment in religious and community settings has the potential to trigger lifestyle change in younger participants. These venues should be considered for future health promotional activities.

  8. Religious Coping and Psychological and Behavioral Adjustment After Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henslee, Amber M; Coffey, Scott F; Schumacher, Julie A; Tracy, Melissa; Norris, Fran H; Galea, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Positive and negative religious coping are related to positive and negative psychological adjustment, respectively. The current study examined the relation between religious coping and PTSD, major depression, quality of life, and substance use among residents residing in Mississippi at the time of Hurricane Katrina. Results indicated that negative religious coping was positively associated with major depression and poorer quality of life and positive religious coping was negatively associated with PTSD, depression, poorer quality of life, and increased alcohol use. These results suggest that mental health providers should be mindful of the role of religious coping after traumatic events such as natural disasters.

  9. Post-secular religious practices entering traditional religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Pękala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays we can observe complex interactions between the religious and secular spheres. Several different processes take place simultaneously: the traditionally religious elements function in the secular sphere as if they were part of secular culture; elements of the secular sphere build a specific kind of post-secular religiosity; finally, this post-secular religiosity influences traditional religions. This article focuses on the last stage of these changes. The author's purpose is to describe and interpret the practices we can observe. Because of the complexity of this issue, the analyses are limited to examples taken from the Catholic Church in Germany, where this process seems to be as popular as it is paradoxical. Catholicism realises that the post-secular forms of religiosity are very popular and that many people choose them instead of the traditional Church. It could offer them spirituality based on ages of experience. But instead of making its own spiritual tradition competitive on the spiritual market, Catholicism seems to offer Christianised post-secular goods, or its own traditional elements represented in a secularised form. It seems difficult to predict how it will all end. However, we observe an interesting encounter and interaction between an ‘old’ religion and a new religiosity, which will certainly have impact on further presence of the Church in the society.

  10. ANOMIE DEVELOPMENT IN RELIGIOUS SPHERE OF POSTSOVIET SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pletnev Alexander Vladislavovich

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current article the author analyzes influence of amendments in the religious sphere of postsoviet society for the increase of anomie in it. He indicates main factors that influence the anomie and charactarize specific features of religious sphere of modern Russian society. They are religious variety, caused by missionery activity and restore of traditional confessions (Orthodox, Islam, Judiasm, Buddism, Lutheranism, and also actualization of the religious identity matter, the phenomen of “out of confession herecy” and religious conflicts. According to the researcher opinion, amendments in the spiritual sphere influence the studied phenomen as well as trasnformation of political and economic system, caused by transfer from communism to democracy and from planning to market economy. The possible ways of anomie decrease via religious sphere of the society such as increase of Orthodox church belivers, adaptation of its tradition and practics, new religious cult inctitualization are indicated in this article as well.

  11. Religious Activities and their Tourism Potential in Sukur Kingdom, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka Okonkwo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Religious tourism is a form of tourism whereby people of the same faith travel individually or in groups for religious purposes. This form of tourism comprises many facets of the travel industry ranging from pilgrimages, missionary travel, leisure (fellowship, vacations, faith-based cruising, crusades, conventions and rallies, retreats, monastery visits and guest-stays, Christian and faith-based camps, to religious tourist attractions. In Sukur Kingdom, most tourists embark on religious travel for the primary purpose of sharing faith and fellowship together as they explore the various religious sites within Sukur and Adamawa State at large. Others still seek inspiration and desire to witness significant religious events while assisting others with humanitarian and spiritual needs. This paper examines the tourism potentials of religion/religious sites and belief systems in Sukur Kingdom with a view to harnessing them for sustainable tourism development. The study uses ethnographic methods to elicit information and analyze the data collected from respondents.

  12. To die, to sleep: US physicians' religious and other objections to physician-assisted suicide, terminal sedation, and withdrawal of life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlin, Farr A; Nwodim, Chinyere; Vance, Jennifer L; Chin, Marshall H; Lantos, John D

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzes data from a national survey to estimate the proportion of physicians who currently object to physician-assisted suicide (PAS), terminal sedation (TS), and withdrawal of artificial life support (WLS), and to examine associations between such objections and physician ethnicity, religious characteristics, and experience caring for dying patients. Overall, 69% of the US physicians object to PAS, 18% to TS, and 5% to WLS. Highly religious physicians are more likely than those with low religiosity to object to both PAS (84% vs 55%, P physicians' religious characteristics, ethnicity, and experience caring for dying patients.

  13. To Die, to Sleep: US Physicians’ Religious and Other Objections to Physician-Assisted Suicide, Terminal Sedation, and Withdrawal of Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlin, Farr A.; Nwodim, Chinyere; Vance, Jennifer L.; Chin, Marshall H.; Lantos, John D.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes data from a national survey to estimate the proportion of physicians who currently object to physician-assisted suicide (PAS), terminal sedation (TS), and withdrawal of artificial life support (WLS), and to examine associations between such objections and physician ethnicity, religious characteristics, and experience caring for dying patients. Overall, 69% of the US physicians object to PAS, 18% to TS, and 5% to WLS. Highly religious physicians are more likely than those with low religiosity to object to both PAS (84% vs 55%, P physicians’ religious characteristics, ethnicity, and experience caring for dying patients. PMID:18198363

  14. Religião e espiritualidade: experiência de famílias de crianças com Insuficiência Renal Crônica Religiosidad y espiritualidad: la experiencia de familias de niños con Insuficiencia Renal Crónica Religion and spirituality: the experience of families of children with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Simpionato de Paula

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever as manifestações de religiosidade e espiritualidade de famílias de crianças com Insuficiência Renal Crônica em diálise peritoneal. MÉTODO: Trata-se de uma pesquisa qualitativa, com a característica de estudo de caso com múltiplos sujeitos. A análise de conteúdo adotada foi a de significados, optando-se pelo tipo temático, tendo como referência a promoção de saúde em enfermagem familiar. RESULTADOS: Participaram do estudo quatro famílias, totalizando quatorze participantes. A religião e a espiritualidade se apresentam como recursos importantes para os familiares no enfrentamento da doença crônica, principalmente diante de prognósticos ameaçadores. CONCLUSÃO: Destacamos a importância de compreender a religião e a espiritualidade da família no processo de adoecimento, para o enfermeiro atuar na promoção da saúde.OBJETIVO: Describir las manifestaciones de religiosidad y espiritualidad de familias de niños con Insuficiencia Renal Crónica en diálisis peritoneal. MÉTODOS: Se trata de una investigación cualitativa, con la característica de estudio de caso con múltiples sujetos. El análisis de contenido adoptado fue el de significados, eligiendo el tipo temático, teniendo como referencia la promoción de salud en enfermería familiar. RESULTADOS: Participaron del estudio cuatro familias, totalizando catorce participantes. La religión y la espiritualidad se presentan como recursos importantes para familiares en el enfrentamiento de la enfermedad crónica, principalmente ante pronósticos amenazadores. CONCLUSIÓN: Destacamos la importancia de comprender la religión y la espiritualidad de la familia en el proceso de adolecer, para el enfermero actuar en la promoción de la salud.OBJECTIVE: To describe the manifestations of religiosity and spirituality in families of children with Chronic Kidney Failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis. METHODS: This qualitative research is a case study with

  15. Intersections of gender with religious diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    2009-01-01

    The paper chapter examines the labour market, both private and public, and where different countries draw the lines between the right of the employers and the religious freedom of employees. Starting from an analysis of the debates about the Islamic headscarves, she asks why the labour market...... on headscarves would be direct religious discrimination and indirect gender discrimination of employees. The paper raises general questions about the meanings of and shifts in the framings of gender with religion on different sites on the basis of the European VEIL-project ( http://www.univie.ac.at/veil/Home3....../ ). Why has Scandinavia generally had an accommodating approach to veiling on the public arena in contrast to continental countries with restrictive regulation of veiling in the public arena, referring to principles of neutrality of public employees - for example banning headscarves France for pupils...

  16. Religious quest orientation: Rising against fundamentalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeshma Haji

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quest, or a journey-oriented approach to religion, is one dimension of religiosity that has been consistently related to positive outgroup attitudes. The present research assessed the extent to which individual differences in quest religiosity moderated the effects of a religiosity prime on attitudes toward an outgroup religion. Christian identifying participants (N = 55 completed a scale measure of quest religiosity. They then read a vignette that primed quest religiosity or religious fundamentalism. Attitudes toward Muslims and Jews were assessed with evaluation thermometers. Quest religiosity interacted with the prime such that those high in quest appeared to react against the fundamentalism prime by expressing particularly positive outgroup attitudes. Trait quest religiosity appears to buffer against situational factors that are typically associated with negative outgroup attitudes. In addition, implications for research on intergroup relations of religious groups are discussed.

  17. Review of clinical medicine and religious practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William C; Adams, Michelle P; Stewart, Jeanette A; Nelson, Lindsay A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose was to evaluate faith-based studies within the medical literature to determine whether there are ways to help physicians understand how religion affects patients’ lives and diseases. We reviewed articles that assessed the influence of religious practices on medicine as a primary or secondary variable in clinical practice. This review evaluated 49 articles and found that religious faith is important to many patients, particularly those with serious disease, and patients depend on it as a positive coping mechanism. The findings of this review can suggest that patients frequently practice religion and interact with God about their disease state. This spiritual interaction may benefit the patient by providing comfort, increasing knowledge about their disease, greater treatment adherence, and quality of life. The results of prayer on specific disease states appear inconsistent with cardiovascular disease but stronger in other disease states.

  18. Religiousness of Ukrainians: tendencies of decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Pivovarova

    2014-04-01

    The conclusion is that for the vast majority of modern Ukrainian citizens identification «believer» is desirable, is based on conformists’ position. Over the last decade, there has been a certain increase in the number of believers through representatives of other ideological groups, but most of all a decrease in those who hesitate between belief and disbelief. In modern mass consciousness of Ukrainian happened illogical extending the concept of «Orthodox», which now includes the concept of a «believer». There is a development of outside the Church, outside of the confessional religiosity, significant part of which is ideological uncertainty of a substantial part of modern Ukrainians. «The Churchanity» has acquired the features of socio legitimize and encourage characteristics of a person that strengthens religious behavior and temple activity. Takes place temple­nominal or nominal­ritual exercise of religious practices with strong dominant features of conformism.

  19. `... for more and better religious education'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Michael

    1996-04-01

    Mahner and Bunge argue that (1) ‘science and religion are incompatible’, in order to develop their thesis, that (2) ‘a religious education ... is an obstacle to the development of a scientific mentality’, and that therefore we should only teach our children (3) ‘how science explains the existence of religion in historical, biological, psychological and sociological terms’, and that (4) ‘religious education should be kept away from public schools ...’ I offer brief comments on each of these strands of their argument. ‘Religionists’, to use Mahner and Bunge's term, generally come from a specific stance so I shall make it clear, from the outset, that these remarks come from a Christian standpoint, even though many of them are much more widely applicable. Although I agree with some of the observations which Mahner and Bunge make, my conclusions are generally opposite to theirs on each of the four points.

  20. Cultural Protestantism and Nordic Religious Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2015-01-01

    of the relations between church and state. Situated between history of education and curriculum, church history and transnational welfare state history, the article focuses on three transnationally acting theologians, early historians and psychologists of religion and public debaters who involved themselves...... in the question of education, namely Nathan Söderblom (1866-1931), Edvard Lehmann (1862-1930) and Eivind Berggrav (1884-1959), who serve as prisms for the transnational historical analysis of what takes place between states and social fields. The article suggests that Nordic Cultural Protestantism contributed......Is there a Nordic model for Religious Education? The article explores how Cultural Protestantism and Liberal Theology influenced the ways in which Religious Education developed in Sweden, Denmark and Norway from the late 19th century until the mid-20th century as part of the transformation...

  1. LGBTQ adolescents and young adults raised within a Christian religious context: positive and negative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Angie L; Galliher, Renee V

    2012-12-01

    Religious contexts have traditionally been understood as protective for a variety of psychosocial health outcomes. However, the generalizability of these findings to youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ) is questioned due to denominational teachings on same-sex attractions and sexual behavior. Eight adolescents (15-17 years) and 11 young adults (19-24 years) who identify as LGBTQ raised in Christian religious affiliations (16 participants raised in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 2 participants raised Catholic and 1 participant raised Presbyterian) participated in individual in-depth interviews, journal writings, and focus groups to provide greater insight into the lived experiences of LGBTQ individuals raised within a Christian religious environment. Findings suggest the religious context is related to both positive and negative outcomes. Eight themes are explored using participant's own words and experiences. Directions for future research and implications are discussed. Copyright © 2012 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Roots of American Religious Liberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Haynes

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available From the colonial era to the present, religions and religious beliefs have played a significant role in the political life of the United States. Religion has been at the heart of some of the best and some of the worst movements in American history. The guiding principles that the framers intended to govern the relationship between religion and politics are set forth in Article VI of the Constitution and in the opening sixteen words of the First Amendment.

  3. Social Support, Religious Involvement and Alcohol Use among Students at a Conservative Religious University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Wendy E

    2017-05-24

    The misuse of alcohol among college students remains a significant public health concern in the United States. Excessive drinking among college students has been linked to numerous negative consequences, including rape, impaired academic performance, absenteeism from work and school and damaged social relations. This study examined whether religious involvement and social support played a role in reducing the frequency of alcohol use. A non-random convenience sample of 364 students from a larger study of 760 college students-18 years old and older-were recruited over a 2 month period. The survey used in this study consisted of 124 items and collected information on areas such as substance misuse, sexual activity, use of pornography, relationships, personal religious practices, and social support. A descriptive analysis and chi-square were performed to determine if there was a relationship between frequency of alcohol use and gender, marital status, student class, GPA, religion, ethnicity and age. Linear regression was conducted to determine if social support and religious involvement were predictors of frequency of alcohol misuse. Multivariate regression analysis was used for predicting religious involvement when including social support while controlling for gender, age, ethnicity and grade. The present study revealed that religious involvement was a predictor for reduced frequency of alcohol use, while social support was not a predictor of lower frequency of alcohol use.

  4. THE POSSIBLE INFLUENCE OF RELIGIOUS IDEOLOGY ON THE FORMATION OF RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kurmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of the influence of religious thought on imaginative, semiotic cult decision space. This describes the process of creating the iconic space. The main part that creates it is the architect, philosophy of religion, physical ability construction. To create an iconic space, the architect should pass in the structure of the essence of religion, its thinking and ideas. Religious worldview through the canonical regulations creates a model of religious space in the form of schemes. It comes out of the world of ideas in the figurative world, has an effect for the purpose of transmitting information and teaching. All this does not affect the freedom of creativity of the architect, because the inside of the canons he is free to decide the design space of worship in accordance with his skills. The model space is specified by Canon gives the possibility of building both simple and complex design of buildings. The above situation demonstrates the dominant role and influence of religious ideology on the formation of religious architecture. It provides the ideological basis for the model space of worship, fixing them in the symbolism of forms and their mutual arrangement. Such findings are important for the theory of culture and architecture, because not only the architect and its shape can determine the life and importance of architecture, but also a worldview.

  5. Religious Studies and Anti-Religious Propaganda in USSR in 1920-1930s

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    Marianna M. Shakhnovich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article shows, that in 1920- 1930s simultaneously with the anti-religious propaganda, the history of world religions and religious movements, anthropological and sociological studies of religion, the history of religious freethinking and atheism were carried out. The systematic work on the study of the religious beliefs and practices in everyday life has been designed and created on the basis of large scale field research in accordance with the achievements of modern theoretical works. There were two groups inside the academic community with opposite views on the nature and sense of religious studies: one group, explored the opportunity to make the research without clerical censorship, wanted to study religion as a cultural phenomenon, using different methodological approaches including Marxism, and understood the expression “critique of religion” in the philosophical sense as a historical and sociological analysis. The majority of them did not deny the Marxist idea of the gradual disappearance of religion in secularized world. Another group ‒ of left political radicals ‒ sought only to expose religion, looking for evidence of possible exposure. Among the works on the history of religion, published in the Soviet period, it is necessary to distinguish between the works done with the exclusive purpose for propaganda, from the works in which the free investigation and academic research might be found inside the ideologically and politically correct chains of that time.

  6. Religion and decolonial feminism: The protagonisms and the new religious assemblages of women in the twenty-first centur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anete Roese

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Religions and the research about them were significantly affected by the feminist practices and studies in the twentieth century. In the religious context that has been presented in this third millennium, marked by the autonomy of women and their role in society, further studies are necessary to understand the religious phenomenon that occurs in the silent protagonism of women. One has to ask how to research and to think religion from a feminist perspective at this time; what religion is for women, how women experience religion and appropriate of it in the third millennium. The new religious practices, the connection of women to religion or the ruptures with religions, spearheaded by them, the resistances, their active subjectivity, as alternatives to the traditional spaces circumscribed by religious patriarchy, as well as the issue of autonomy and responsibility of the women in the construction of spiritual and religious alternatives in the contemporary society deserve attention. This text aims to present signs of these protagonist movements of women, especially in the Christian context in the current Brazil, stating hypotheses and presenting reflections on this reality. The text dialogues with the de-colonial feminism and has implications for the ways of conceptualizing and studying religion from the institutionalized religious forms.

  7. WHO ARE MORE RELIGIOUS: WOMEN OR MEN?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Üzeyir OK

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study whether the robust finding regarding the superiority of women on men in terms of religiosity reported in studies done in Christian tradition is valid for Muslim society or not was researched. The data obtained from 11 different studies conducted mostly with university samples were studied. Religiosity was tracked in three main variables: Absolute Religiosity (or faith/worldview, Religious Tension (or tension in faith/worldview, and Religious Openness (or openness in faith/worldview. In terms of Absolute Faith, whilst nearly half of the studies were found statistically non significant, the other half confirmed that women are more religious than man as it was reported in Christian tradition. In addition, women were found to be experiencing more tension and uncertainty on their religion (but not on faith/worldview and are more tolerant and open to the faith or religion of those who do not belong to their own. However, men tend to be experiencing more transformation, tension and uncertainty concerning their faith/or wordview. The results indicate, with less certainty, that men are interested in cognitive and wholistic aspect of their religion or faith whilst women are more interested in emotional and relational dimensions of their faith.

  8. Religious Ecstatics, "Deep Listeners," and Musical Emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Penman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to begin to provide an explanation for the worldwide linkage of music and ecstatic religious ceremonies. The basic hypothesis is that the physiological ability to respond to musical stimuli with strong emotional responses is one of the pre-conditions for the propulsion into ecstasy. A second hypothesis is that a sub-set of the music-loving community, the "deep listeners" who are profoundly moved (chills, tears by musical listening will have emotional reactions similar to those of religious ecstatics. 60 participants, divided into five groups, were tested using galvanic skin response and heart rate measurements. The results seem to support the hypotheses by demonstrating 1 a correlation between being a religious ecstatic and having a strong GSR while listening to favorite music, in comparison with control groups, and 2 a correlation between being a secular "deep listener" and having a similarly strong GSR listening to favorite music, in comparison with control groups.

  9. The European Extreme Right and Religious Extremism

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    Jean-Yves Camus

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The ideology of the Extreme Right in Western Europe is rooted in Catholic fundamentalism and Counter-Revolutionary ideas. However, the Extreme Right, like all other political families, has had to adjust to an increasingly secular society. The old link between religion and the Extreme Right has thus been broken and in fact already was when Fascism overtook Europe: Fascism was secular, sometimes even anti-religious, in its essence. Although Catholic fundamentalists still retain strong positions within the apparatus of several Extreme Right parties (Front National, the vote for the Extreme Right is generally weak among regular churchgoers and strong among non-believers. In several countries, the vote for the Extreme Right is stronger among Protestant voters than among Catholics, since while Catholics may support Christian-Democratic parties, there are very few political parties linked to Protestant churches. Presently, it also seems that Paganism is becoming the dominant religious creed within the Extreme Right. In a multicultural Europe, non-Christian forms of religious fundamentalism such as Islamism also exist with ideological similarities to the Extreme Right, but this is not sufficient to categorize Islamism as a form of Fascism. Some Islamist groups seek alliances with the Extreme Right on the basis of their common dislike for Israel and the West, globalization and individual freedom of thought.

  10. Kipling’s Ecclectic Religious Identity

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    Serdar Ozturk

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Rudyard Kipling (1865 -1936 is one of the most popular writers in English, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Rudyard Kipling does not subscribe to any particular religion, but he is deeply a religious man because he believes in one absolute God, and the divine purpose behind the creation of man. Although Rudyard Kipling uses a lot of Christian symbols in his works, he is not a Christian. In some of his stories, he shows a unique insight into the redeeming power of love, which is the main pillar of Sufism. He also accepts some of the Islamic precepts however he is not a Muslim. He is very sympathetic to Buddhism and Hinduism and always alludes to Hindu gods and goddesses, but he does not believe in Hinduism or Buddhism. Rudyard Kipling uses a lot of religious themes, motives and symbols in his Works but he does not subscribe to any particular religious views at all.

  11. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Timm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At the margins of modern medical practice, pushing the very limits of science, and indefatigably rendering the precincts of public discourse, still functional remnants of Christian civilization continue to provide care for the hopeless, perform healing sacraments for the incurable, and curate objects of votive devotion for the suffering and needy. These public services go largely unaccounted for, though they secure an ordered world, structure perception, and serve as ontological anchors. Lost in the vague, scientifically unrarified notions of spirituality that brace a general, undifferentiated worldwide metaphysical experience and disregard immense cultural, functional, geographic and performative distinctness, Catholic sacramental practices aimed at alleviating suffering and promoting healthy lifestyles are receiving only marginal mention in scientific literature(1, despite the fact that they make up daily reality in large parts of contemporary Europe and Latin America. Writing this editorial from the Northeast of Brazil, where traditional religious practice has sustained generations through the calamities of severe droughts, slavery, extreme poverty, high child mortality, failed political orders, and a harsh global economic reality, it is difficult to underestimate the power of sacramental experience to sustain a cultural identity. It was defined the concept of care of the sick in the context of the religious experience of the Northeast of Brazil which is historically relevant to health promotion. Until the emergence of national health care in the late nineteenth century, it was largely the order of the Franciscan friars that was charged with promoting healthy lives in the region. The Catholic concept of care that guided their efforts structures three procedural reality principles: the psychological reality of the transference to the person in one’s charge (care/caritas, the performative practice of religious sacrament such as the anointment

  12. Change and Stability in Religiousness and Spirituality in Emerging Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Laura B

    2015-01-01

    The author investigated the change and stability of different aspects of religiousness and spirituality, as well as whether personality traits may help explain why individuals increase or decrease in religiousness and spirituality during emerging adulthood. Self-report measures of childhood and current religiousness were completed by 224 college-aged participants. A subset of participants also completed a measure of personality and measures of religious and spiritual belief trajectories by rating the importance of each belief at successive age brackets across their lifespan. Analyses of mean-level, rank-order, and individual-level stability and change in religiousness indicated that while average religiousness scores decreased, there was still moderate to high rank-order stability in scores. Additionally, service attendance was less stable and decreased more than importance of religion in daily life. Examination of the trajectories of religiousness and spirituality over time showed similar differences: religiousness decreased, on average, whereas spirituality increased slightly, but significantly, across successive age brackets. Personality traits did not significantly predict change in religiousness over time, although openness predicted change in spirituality. Conclusions include the idea that religiousness in emerging adulthood is comprised on different components that change at different rates.

  13. Religious congregations, education and school in Italy in the nineteenth century

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    Roberto Sani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the origins and development of about 140 new religious male and female congregations, established in Italy during the Nineteenth century. Starting from the Restoration period, the article frames the actions and choices of the new religious congregations with reference to the new scenarios produced by the revolutionary experience and by the changes introduced in ecclesiastical legislation and in the relations between State and Church during the Napoleonic era. At the same time, it deals with the unusual challenges the Church had to face due to both the secularization of mentality and customs and the increased educational needs and welfare of the post-revolutionary period. The author analyses some characteristics of these new religious institutions, most of which chose as privileged —and sometimes exclusive— activity of their apostolate the assistance (of poor and sick people, and of abandoned children and youth, the catechesis and animation of religious life in the parishes and, above all, the education of youth of both sexes and of different social classes. Firstly, the author describes the aspect related to the general adoption of the structure of religious congregations, which provides unequivocal evidence of the prevalence, also on the female side, of the traditional monastic model, of a vocation to religious life understood essentially as an active life devoted to charity, a synthesis between action and prayer, a commitment in the world through the assistance of others. The author’s reconstruction also shows how the idea of charity promoted by the new religious congregations was understood not simply as a commitment to provide assistance, but also, and above all, as an educational responsibility. Indeed, the new religious congregations considered education, school and parish catechesis as the most effective tools for Christians’ education. At the same time, school and education were also seen as the most direct

  14. Women's reproductive health: monotheistic religious perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, J G

    2000-07-01

    It is important to those who practice reproduction techniques to learn about the different religious attitudes related to reproductive health problems. Religion exerts an influence on civil authorities in the field of reproduction such as prevention or procreation and in issues such as abortion and infertility therapy. The Jewish attitude towards reproduction can be learned from the fact that the first commandment of God to Adam was be fruitful and multiply. Judaism allows the practice of all techniques of assisted reproduction when the oocyte and sperm originate from the wife and husband, respectively. All Rabbinical rulings permit the use of contraception for medical indications. Economic difficulties and inconveniences of raising children are not indications for birth control practice. According to Judaism abortion on demand is forbidden but it may be performed if the mother's life is in danger. The attitude toward reproductive practice is different among the different divisions of Christianity. The practice of assisted reproduction is not accepted by the Vatican, however, it may be practiced by Protestant, Anglican and other Denomination's. According to the Roman Catholic doctrine the primary purpose of marriage is procreation. The contraceptive act destroys the potential of producing new life by sexual intercourse and violates the purpose of marriage and, therefore, is a sin against nature. The Christian tradition views the embryo as a human being since conception and, therefore, abortion is strictly forbidden. According to Islam, the procedure of IVF and ET is acceptable, however, it can be preformed only if it involves the husband and the wife. It allows contraception practice only under some circumstances and only in some special cases abortion can be preformed. Religion, being concerned with affairs that are regarded as extraordinary and as having unique importance in life, is an intrinsic aspect of the culture of all societies, religious groups, however

  15. "Mothering through Islam": Narratives of Religious Identity in London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Ryan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws upon research with mothers of diverse Muslim backgroundsin London to explore how these women use ‘conservative’ interpretations ofIslamic beliefs and practices to underpin their parenting strategies. In particularthe paper looks at how mothers use religion as a frame to make sense of andgive meaning to their experiences and encounters in Britain. We suggest thatthe women use Islam in four key ways: (i as a framework for teaching theirchildren right and wrong, (ii as a means of protecting children from the ‘moral’dangers of British society, (iii as an authoritative voice that reinforces parentingand (iv as a means of critiquing specific aspects of both the traditional andBritish culture in which they live and daily negotiate their different cultural andreligious belonging. In attempting to instil religious values in their London-basedchildren, these mothers have to negotiate the hostility that Islam increasinglyprovokes in British society’s public arenas.

  16. Political liberalism and religious claims: Four blind spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    This article gives an overview of 4 important lacunae in political liberalism and identifies, in a preliminary fashion, some trends in the literature that can come in for support in filling these blind spots, which prevent political liberalism from a correct assessment of the diverse nature of religious claims. Political liberalism operates with implicit assumptions about religious actors being either 'liberal' or 'fundamentalist' and ignores a third, in-between group, namely traditionalist religious actors and their claims. After having explained what makes traditionalist religious actors different from liberal and fundamentalist religious actors, the author develops 4 areas in which political liberalism should be pushed further theoretically in order to correctly theorize the challenge which traditional religious actors pose to liberal democracy. These 4 areas (blind spots) are: (1) the context of translation; (2) the politics of exemptions; (3) the multivocality of theology; and (4) the transnational nature of norm-contestation.

  17. The Benford law behavior of the religious activity data

    CERN Document Server

    Mir, Tariq Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    An important aspect of religious association is that adherents, as part of their religious duty, carry out various activities. One religious group known for keeping the elaborate records of day-to-day activities of its members is the Jehovah's Witnesses (JWs)-a worldwide Christian religious group. We analyze the historical records of the country-wide data associated with twelve different religious activities of JWs to see if there are any patterns in the distribution of the first digits as predicted by Benford's law. This law states that the first digits of numbers in data sets are not uniformly distributed but often, not always, follow a logarithmic distribution such that the numbers beginning with smaller digits appear more frequently than those with larger ones. We find that the data on religious activities like peak publishers, pioneer publishers, baptizations, public meetings, congregations, bible studies, time spent in door-to-door contacts, attendances at the memorial services, total literature and ind...

  18. Prayful Practics in the Pentecostal Environment: Religious Communication 'Up-Down´

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    Klyueva Vera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main tendencies in evolution of Protestantism, taking into account variety of its currents are analyzed: an individualization of personal religious experience, high intensity of religious life, an actual inclusiveness in life of community of believers, strengthening of mystical orientation of cult practice. Factors of increase in missionary potential of Protestantism are defined. The concept of religious communication as two-way communication between the person and God on the example of praying practices of the Russian Pentecostals in communities of classical and new Pentecostals of the Urals, Tyumen district and Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug-Yugra is specified. The main vectors of religious communication are defined. The ratio of prayers, readings the Bible and glorification is established. Specifics of Pentecostal prayers, taking into account existence appellative (prayers about healing and blessings and explicative (a prayer in languages, a glossolaliya parts are marked out. Classification praying practices in forms (individual and collective and to types is made (general/abstract or target. Specifi cs and a ratio of individual and collective prayers are especially analyzed. The special attention is paid to a glossolaliya as a peculiar feature of the Pentecostal movement, both classical, and a charismatic version. Rate of pronouncing prayers of a different target orientation is investigated. Basic formulas for prayers of blessings and gratitude are defi ned. Specifi c character of a prayer about healing in the Pentecostal environment is marked out. The role of the mystical address to God as unique emotion for this type of the communication giving the chance of personal contact with the sacral is considered. It is noted that participation in prayful practicians carries out the adapting function, realizing need of the believer for implementation of religious experience within community of believers, and compensatory, liquidating a

  19. Recent Religious Accommodations: Have We Gone Too Far Too Fast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    length of head hair for both men and women , making certain allowances for women to wear longer hairstyles. The regulation prohibits the wear of beards...exceptions in order to further religious sensitivity. 10 Review of Canada, United Kingdom, and Netherlands Policy on Head and Facial Hair Some...militaries have religious accommodations for males who maintain facial and head hair for religious purposes. In addition, one nation allows soldiers to

  20. Alternative Schooling Strategies and the Religious Lives of American Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Uecker, Jeremy E.

    2008-01-01

    I analyze the effects of Catholic schooling, Protestant schooling, and homeschooling on adolescents’ religious lives and test three mechanisms through which these schooling strategies might influence religiosity: friendship networks, network closure, and adult mentors. Data from Wave 1 of the National Survey of Youth and Religion suggest that Catholic schoolers attend religious services more frequently and value their faith more highly than public schoolers, but attend religious education cla...

  1. Conditions for religious discourse in secularized ethical health care deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nistelrooy, Inge; Vosman, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Religious discourse is no longer self-evident in professional health care ethical deliberation in the North Atlantic cultural sphere. However, in a world of pluralism, care professionals still seek substantive views of good care. Religious and non-religious beliefs should not be excluded from ethical deliberation. They offer patients and professionals a helpful language for expressing values and beliefs. Chaplains have a role to play as allies in sense-making processes and resourcing care.

  2. Neuroticism and intensity of religious attitudes among clergy in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, L J

    1992-10-01

    Ninety-two male and 20 female clergy completed the short-form Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (Eysenck, Eysenck, & Barrett, 1985) and the Francis Scale of Attitude Towards Christianity (Francis & Stubbs, 1987). The findings support Eysenck's central theory regarding an inverse relationship between psychoticism scores and religious attitudes, and they confirm the view that neuroticism scores are also implicated in predicting the intensity of religious attitudes among the religiously committed.

  3. Effects of Religious Priming Concepts on Prosocial Behavior Towards Ingroup and Outgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batara, Jame Bryan L; Franco, Pamela S; Quiachon, Mequia Angelo M; Sembrero, Dianelle Rose M

    2016-11-01

    Several studies show that there is a connection between religion and prosociality (e.g., Saroglou, 2013). To investigate whether there is a causal relationship between these two variables, a growing number of scholars employed priming religious concepts and measure its influence on prosocial behavior (e.g., Pichon, Boccato, & Saroglou, 2007). In the recent development of religious priming, Ritter and Preston (2013) argued that different primes (agent prime, spiritual/abstract prime, and institutional prime) may also have varying influence on prosocial behavior specifically helping an ingroup or an outgroup target. With this in mind, a 2 (social categorization of the target of help) by 3 (agent prime, institutional prime, spiritual prime) experiment was conducted to directly investigate this hypothesis. Results suggest that priming religious concepts especially the spiritual prime can increase prosocial behaviors. However, no significant effect was found on the social categorization which implies that Filipino participants elicit prosocial behavior regardless of the social categorization (be it ingroup or outgroup) of the target of help. The present study's findings contribute to further the literature on religious priming and its influence on prosocial behavior.

  4. Dialogue of Life and Its Significance in Inter-Religious Relation in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraya Sintang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dialogue of life is a form of inter-religious dialogue which commonly takes place at any place and any time. It is a dialogical relation to promote amicable relation with people from different religions. It begins when one encounters, lives and interacts with the others and participates in daily life activities together. It is a social interaction which shows the involvement of non-elite participants in the inter-religious dialogue at the grass roots level. The non-elite participation in the inter-religious dialogue is necessary to accommodate the challenge of pluralistic society. This kind of process which involves the social interaction in everyday activity is known as a dialogue of life. Those activities can be seen in the life experience of living together with mix-faith family, celebrating festivities and wedding ceremony as well as doing (running business with the other religious communities. The aim of this paper is to elucidate the concept of dialogue of life and how this dialogue has a significant impact on encouraging positive interaction among people of different religions in Malaysia.

  5. Religious and Spiritual Struggles as Concerns for Health and Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Stauner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available People struggle with religion and spirituality in several ways, including challenges in trusting God, confronting supernatural evil, tolerating other perspectives on religion, maintaining moral propriety, finding existential meaning, and managing religious doubt. These religious and spiritual (R/S struggles relate to both physical and mental health independently of other religious and distress factors. Causality in this connection needs further study, but evidence supports many potential causes and moderators of the link between R/S struggle and health. These include personality, social, and environmental influences, including traumatic experiences and subcultural differences. Many theoretical questions remain unresolved, including how change in R/S struggle can predict or be predicted by change in health and other connected constructs, and how one might intervene to aid those who struggle with religious or spiritual challenges. Nonetheless, research momentum has grown, having already produced a wealth of information that underscores the need for greater attention to this domain. R/S struggle poses an important exception to generally positive overall associations between religion and well-being, though even R/S struggle may promote growth. This review offers a brief introduction to emerging psychological theory and research on R/S struggle with an emphasis on its relevance to wellness and illness.

  6. Religious Education in Germany and England: The Recent Work of Hans-Georg Ziebertz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Religious education in England and Germany is similar in many respects and different in others. In both countries the subject must embrace religious plurality, and in both there are questions about the role of the religious communities in their relation to religious education. In recent his book, "Religious Education in a Plural, Western…

  7. Familial resemblance in religiousness in a secular society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Petersen, Inge; Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    generally considered more religious than the very secular northern European countries. Comparisons of the results are complicated by diverse definitions of religiousness, but several studies indicate that the influence of the family environment is most predominant in early life, whereas genetic influences...... increase with age. We performed a population-based twin study of religiousness in a secular society using data from a Web-based survey sent to 6,707 Danish twins born 1970-1989, who were identified in the Danish Twin Registry. We applied Fishman's three conceptual dimensions of religiousness: cognition...

  8. A tale of two congresses: the psychological study of psychical, occult, and religious phenomena, 1900-1909.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taves, Ann

    2014-01-01

    In so far as researchers viewed psychical, occult, and religious phenomena as both objectively verifiable and resistant to extant scientific explanations, their study posed thorny issues for experimental psychologists. Controversies over the study of psychical and occult phenomena at the Fourth Congress of International Psychology (Paris, 1900) and religious phenomena at the Sixth (Geneva, 1909) raise the question of why the latter was accepted as a legitimate object of study, whereas the former was not. Comparison of the Congresses suggests that those interested in the study of religion were willing to forego the quest for objective evidence and focus on experience, whereas those most invested in psychical research were not. The shift in focus did not overcome many of the methodological difficulties. Sub-specialization formalized distinctions between psychical, religious, and pathological phenomena; obscured similarities; and undercut the nascent comparative study of unusual experiences that had emerged at the early Congresses.

  9. Liberal Equality and Toleration for Conservative Religious Minorities. Decreasing Opportunities for Religious Schools in the Netherlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maussen, Marcel; Vermeulen, Floris

    2015-01-01

    Liberal democratic states face new challenges in balancing between principles of religious freedom and non-discrimination and in balancing these constitutional principles with other concerns, including social cohesion, good education, and immigrant-integration. In a context of increased prominence of secular and anti-Islamic voices in political…

  10. Religious socialization and non-religious volunteering: A Dutch panel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, P.; Scheepers, P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Despite the fact that churches are still important sources of social capital in the Netherlands, the ongoing secularization of Dutch society has as yet not resulted in a drop of non-religious volunteering. In order to account for this apparent paradox, panel data are used to test the hypo

  11. Liberal equality and toleration for conservative religious minorities. Decreasing opportunities for religious schools in the Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maussen, M.; Vermeulen, F.

    2015-01-01

    Liberal democratic states face new challenges in balancing between principles of religious freedom and non-discrimination and in balancing these constitutional principles with other concerns, including social cohesion, good education, and immigrant-integration. In a context of increased prominence

  12. Divorce, Religious Coping, and Depressive Symptoms in a Conservative Protestant Religious Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Amy Pieper; Ellison, Christopher G.; McFarland, Michael J.; Lee, Jerry W.; Morton, Kelly; Walters, James

    2010-01-01

    A long tradition of research demonstrates that divorce is a risk factor for depressive symptoms. Although a growing literature examines links between religious factors and marital quality and stability, researchers have neglected the role of religion in successful or problematic coping following divorce. Building on Pargament's seminal work on…

  13. Liberal equality and toleration for conservative religious minorities. Decreasing opportunities for religious schools in the Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maussen, M.; Vermeulen, F.

    2015-01-01

    Liberal democratic states face new challenges in balancing between principles of religious freedom and non-discrimination and in balancing these constitutional principles with other concerns, including social cohesion, good education, and immigrant-integration. In a context of increased prominence o

  14. Religious Events as Special Interest Tourism. A Spanish Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Angeles Rubio Gil; Javier de Esteban Curiel

    2008-01-01

    Este artículo contribuye al desarrollo de la comprensión teórica en el campo de la gestión del turismo religioso, considerando el Peregrinaje del Rocío como paradigma alternativo de análisis, el cuál se ha constituido en un destino capaz de recibir un gran número de viajeros (peregrinos), en un período corto de tiempo (3 días), sin causar daños en el medio ambiente, tanto ecológico como social, debido a sus características antropológicas como forma de viaje que dan prioridad a la ...

  15. Religious Events as Special Interest Tourism. A Spanish Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeles Rubio Gil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo contribuye al desarrollo de la comprensión teórica en el campo de la gestión del turismo religioso, considerando el Peregrinaje del Rocío como paradigma alternativo de análisis, el cuál se ha constituido en un destino capaz de recibir un gran número de viajeros (peregrinos, en un período corto de tiempo (3 días, sin causar daños en el medio ambiente, tanto ecológico como social, debido a sus características antropológicas como forma de viaje que dan prioridad a la experiencia humana más que al consumo de mercado. Así, el modelo investigado en este artículo a través del concepto de “capital social” es oportuno debido a la confluencia en el análisis de diversas ciencias sociales (antropología, economía y sociología y de la teoría y de la técnica del turismo, concluyendo que el mantenimiento de la autenticidad y de la continuidad de esta forma de turismo religioso se debe planificar no en base a un modelo de bienes inmuebles como así ha sido hasta ahora, sino en la “no estacionalidad” y en la mejora de la regulación de la calidad de los servicios proporcionados

  16. When Violence Hits the Religious Home: Raising Awareness about Domestic Violence in Seminaries and amongst Religious Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullin, Steve; Nason-Clark, Nancy; Fisher-Townsend, Barbara; Holtmann, Cathy

    2015-06-01

    The focus of this article by our research team looks specifically at the teaching of domestic violence classes in a seminary or religious context, as well as the ongoing professional education of religious leaders, such as pastors. It also considers ways to introduce therapeutic staff to the unique vulnerabilities of highly religious clients who have been abused or who act abusively. Based on data that we have collected at North American theological seminaries and in congregations, we explain some of the challenges of including instruction about domestic violence in a religious context.

  17. The Challenges of the Local Management of Ethnic-Religious Diversity in Montreal: The Case of the Fitting Out of Places of Worship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annick Germain

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the case of Montreal, the author reviews the set of experiences of public intervention in the area of management of ethnic-religious diversity, which has led to the formulation of new debates with regard to the fit of this plurality in the urban space. The challenges posed by the incorporation of these new religious references in the configuring of the urban fabric also opens up questions on the meaning of cohabitation in increasingly plural neighbourhoods.

  18. A voice in the wilderness: gay and lesbian religious groups in the Western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a study of gay and lesbian religious groups located in the United States between the Mississippi River and the Pacific Ocean between March of 1989 and June of 1993. The researcher found 684 groups to have existed at some time in the region and conducted interviews to document 468 of these groups. While a history of these groups dates back to the 1930s in the region, large groups still existing today did not begin to form until the late 1960s. The six most common goals of the groups were social and support needs, worship, denominational and social politics, community service, and leadership in the gay and lesbian community. Being focused on gay and lesbian issues has an influence on when and how they came into existence (in the beginnings of the gay and lesbian movement, in response to the AIDS crisis, in response to anti-gay legislative initiatives), has an influence on the kinds of key themes addressed (ordination of gay and lesbian people, same-sex marriage, service for people with AIDS, sexual ethics in scripture), and has an influence on relationships with the larger community (shunning or inclusion in the larger society and in the larger religious community). However, the stronger influence is their identity as religious (and, therefore, social) institutions. They experience the same pressures of mainstream religion and as social institutions by facing issues of diversity, gender, age, politics, race, and disease. They face the same challenges as any religious institution today of being prophetic, responsive, changing, traditional, true, relevant, and even noticed. A distinct feature is their role on the fringes. They are on the fringe of religious life and on the fringe of gay and lesbian life.

  19. TRADISI MENGEMIS DI TEMPAT WISATA RELIGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umi Supraptingsih

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Umi Supraptingsih (Penulis, dosen STAIN Pamekasan, Jl. Raya Panglegur Km. 04 Pamekasan     Abstract The act of begging of beggar appears tradition for generations and it becomes inheritant profession. Social and  economic characteristics of beggar are influenced by several factors---natural and human resources. Places of beggar to do begging, Api Tak Kunjung Padam (eternal flame and Batu Ampar, are distinctive. The former is the common tourism spot, but the later is the religous tourism place. The factors cause the begging are the natural setting condition that does not support the  beggar to earn sufficient income, the low level of education, inedequate parenting pattern, less religious teaching comprehension, the extinct of abahsment, and instant needs.  Establishing an actual cultural  communication and asking the participation of stake holders---philantropist, academician, public figure, religious scholar, and government, will hopefully decrease the number of beggar. Kata-kata kunci tradisi, mengemis, dan kebutuhan hidup

  20. Religious Diversity and Islam in America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Uddin Khan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Diversity is the essence and spirit of America or the West both as a place and a people. Islam also allows for diversity within its concept of unity and oneness of God. Muslims, therefore, have no problem co-existing in peace with the Jews, Christians and the followers of other religions. Problems arise (a when secular values or principles disturb the working balance of the otherwise mutually exclusive religious diversity and harmony in America; (b when one follows opportunist policies, practices double standards, and is moved by mere worldly or political interests; and (c when war against the Zionist-and-neoconservative-manufactured terrorism turns into war against Islam. Such misleading and mischievous tendencies or policies prevent peace from prevailing, which ultimately tarnish the image of religions in the eyes of their followers and those of the rest making a mockery of the idea of religious diversity even in the so-called most democratic country called the United States of America!

  1. Neuromodulation of group prejudice and religious belief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Colin; Izuma, Keise; Deblieck, Choi; Fessler, Daniel M T; Iacoboni, Marco

    2016-03-01

    People cleave to ideological convictions with greater intensity in the aftermath of threat. The posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) plays a key role in both detecting discrepancies between desired and current conditions and adjusting subsequent behavior to resolve such conflicts. Building on prior literature examining the role of the pMFC in shifts in relatively low-level decision processes, we demonstrate that the pMFC mediates adjustments in adherence to political and religious ideologies. We presented participants with a reminder of death and a critique of their in-group ostensibly written by a member of an out-group, then experimentally decreased both avowed belief in God and out-group derogation by downregulating pMFC activity via transcranial magnetic stimulation. The results provide the first evidence that group prejudice and religious belief are susceptible to targeted neuromodulation, and point to a shared cognitive mechanism underlying concrete and abstract decision processes. We discuss the implications of these findings for further research characterizing the cognitive and affective mechanisms at play.

  2. New Forms of Religious Internet-Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Рожило, Марія Андріївна; Rozhylo, Mariia A.

    2012-01-01

    Проаналізовано актуальні проблеми релігійної комунікації в інформаційному просторі мас-медіа. Досліджено сучасні форми релігійної Інтернет-комунікації. The issue of the day of religious communication is analysed in informative space of mass-medias. The modern forms of religious Internet-communication are investigational.

  3. Religious Values and Conflict of Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tonolo

    2016-02-01

    Abstract: The wide evolution of private international law is currently recalling attention to the general aspects of the discipline. Europeanization and globalisation of sources of private international law do not preclude the chance that conflict of laws should also deal with individual identities. To the extent that the European systems have hitherto offered to the application of foreign laws, we are faced with the problem of survival in Europe of an idea of the personality of laws. In fact it’s generally accepted that conflict of laws faces the individual identities of people involved in international relations. Cultural identity may be considered collective and individual at the same time, because each member of the group has an identity of its own. Religious values ontribute to defining the cultural identity of individuals: be it in Europe or other countries, cultures, values, civilization, religion, are never absent from the solutions of personal status. Stepping back from the analysis of some cases where religious values are relevant, this Article aims at a theoretical analysis of the subject, involving the contrast between value pluralism, conflict of laws and fundamental rights.

  4. The Influence of the Bible on Religious Reformation Under the Tudors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金辉; 唐岩

    2013-01-01

    Henry VIII is famous for his bold and thorough religious revolution. Henry took in the idea of religious reformation from the English version of the Bible. This thesis explores the influence of the Bible on religious reformation under the Tudors.

  5. Plurality in Unity: Challenges toward Religious Education in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baring, Rito V.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the challenges provided by a plural condition toward doing religious education in the Philippines. The problem of Philippine religious education hinges on the fact that the growing plural condition in the educational system remains until now "un-discussed"; or integrated in many schools. Not much is heard about proposing a…

  6. The "Affirmative Action Hire": Leading Inclusively in Diverse Religious Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanne M.; Marsh, Tyson E. J.

    2016-01-01

    This case tells the story of a new principal who wants to lead inclusively by including people of all religious and non-religious beliefs. When she questions some of the existing practices in her school, she faces resistance from school members and from the community, who question her identity, her intentions, and her authority. The case is…

  7. 22 CFR 41.58 - Aliens in religious occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aliens in religious occupations. 41.58 Section... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.58 Aliens in religious occupations. (a) Requirements for “R” classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA...

  8. The Interpretive Approach to Religious Education: Challenging Thompson's Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In a recent book chapter, Matthew Thompson makes some criticisms of my work, including the interpretive approach to religious education and the research and activity of Warwick Religions and Education Research Unit. Against the background of a discussion of religious education in the public sphere, my response challenges Thompson's account,…

  9. 31 CFR 515.566 - Religious activities in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Religious activities in Cuba. 515.566..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.566 Religious activities in Cuba. (a) Specific license... involving transactions (including travel-related transactions) in which Cuba or a Cuban national has...

  10. Religious Instruction for Turkish Students of Muslim Faith in Bavaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Gerhart

    1989-01-01

    Discusses difficulties of providing religious instruction for Muslim school children in the Federal Republic of Germany. Notes the lack of a united Islamic religious community that could assist in the development and implementation of such an instruction. Explains and analyzes the Bavarian Ministry of Education's guidelines concerning such…

  11. Fostering Critical Religious Thinking in Multicultural Education for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-hsing

    2013-01-01

    Religious diversity as a consequence of global immigration has become a cultural phenomenon of pluralism in society. The fear of indoctrination and the desire for religious freedom fuel the debate on whether to remove religion from school education. Freire's "Pedagogy of the Oppressed" offers a positive perspective on the debate by…

  12. The Dynamics and Correlates of Religious Service Attendance in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Jessica Halliday; Pearce, Lisa D.; Denton, Melinda Lundquist

    2016-01-01

    This study examines changes in religious service attendance over time for a contemporary cohort of adolescents moving from middle to late adolescence. We use two waves of a nationally representative panel survey of youth from the National Study of Youth and Religion (NSYR) to examine the dynamics of religious involvement during adolescence. We…

  13. Family Religious Involvement, Parenting Practices and Academic Performance in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae Seong; Bonner, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This project investigated the impacts of family religious involvement and family religious affiliations on parenting practices and academic performance. This study utilized data from the base-year and first follow-up of the Education Longitudinal Study: 2002/2004 (ELS). A series of statistical techniques were incorporated to examine the nature of…

  14. Parental Involvement in Elementary Children's Religious Education: A Phenomenological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Peter Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The issue of parental involvement in religious education is an important one for the family, the church, the Christian school, and society. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe parents' concepts and practices of involvement in their children's religious education as evangelical Christian parents in Midwestern communities.…

  15. The Effects of Denomination on Religious Socialization for Jewish Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony G.; Lester, Ashlie M.; Brooks, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The transmission model of religious socialization was tested using a sample of American Jewish parents and adolescents. The authors expected that measures of religiousness among parents would be associated with those among their children. Interaction effects of denominational membership were also tested. Data were collected from a sample of 233…

  16. Lives Worth Living: Religious Education and Social Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    When people of faith participate in movements for social change, how are their religious and moral identities formed, challenged, and transformed? Although they have explicit and tangible goals as they participate in advocacy, protest, and boycotts, religious social activists also, James Jasper argues, craft "lives worth living" (1997).…

  17. Wittgenstein og respekten for det religiøse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albinus, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Fremstilling af den tidlige og den sene Wittgensteins forhold til det religiøse med særligt henblik på tabet af umiddelbarhed.......Fremstilling af den tidlige og den sene Wittgensteins forhold til det religiøse med særligt henblik på tabet af umiddelbarhed....

  18. Study on the Translation of Religious Culture in Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉荣

    2015-01-01

    The effect of religious culture on literature is everywhere whether in Chinese or Western countries.Therefore,the religious culture or elements in literature should be paid more attentions during the practice of Chinese to English or English to Chinese translation.The translation strategies will be discussed with examples to provide useful and meaningful references for the following researchers and practices.

  19. Study on the Translation of Religious Culture in Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉荣

    2015-01-01

    The effect of religious culture on literature is everywhere whether in Chinese or Western countries. Therefore,the religious culture or elements in literature should be paid more attentions during the practice of Chinese to English or English to Chinese translation.The translation strategies will be discussed with examples to provide useful and meaningful references for the following researchers and practices.

  20. Identity and Inter Religious Understanding in Jewish Schools in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipgrave, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This article sets up a dialogue between "auto"-referential (looking to self) and "allo"-referential (looking to the other) approaches to religious difference and applies these to education for inter religious understanding in Jewish schools. It begins by arguing that the multiculturalism of the 1980s and 1990s set up a duality…

  1. The Dynamics and Correlates of Religious Service Attendance in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Jessica Halliday; Pearce, Lisa D.; Denton, Melinda Lundquist

    2016-01-01

    This study examines changes in religious service attendance over time for a contemporary cohort of adolescents moving from middle to late adolescence. We use two waves of a nationally representative panel survey of youth from the National Study of Youth and Religion (NSYR) to examine the dynamics of religious involvement during adolescence. We…

  2. The Interpretive Approach to Religious Education: Challenging Thompson's Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In a recent book chapter, Matthew Thompson makes some criticisms of my work, including the interpretive approach to religious education and the research and activity of Warwick Religions and Education Research Unit. Against the background of a discussion of religious education in the public sphere, my response challenges Thompson's account,…

  3. Relations among and between Career Values and Christian Religious Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Miller; Hardin, Susan I.

    2002-01-01

    Empirical research and vocational theory indicate that values are important in career counseling and vocational choice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of career values to Christian religious values as they might be assessed in career counseling. Results indicate that there was some overlap between religious and…

  4. The Relationship between Spirituality, Religiousness, and Career Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Blustein, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between spirituality, religiousness, and career adaptability using a sample of undergraduate students (N=144). We proposed that higher levels of religiousness and spirituality would predict higher levels of career adaptability, defined in this study by career decision self-efficacy and career choice…

  5. [Latino Religious Leadership Project of the Latino Commission on AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, G

    1996-01-01

    The Latino community has strong religious and spiritual traditions, and there is a need for spiritual leadership. To address these needs, the Latino Leadership Project of the Latino Commission on AIDS offers prevention and education activities. The Commission refers religious leaders to the Latino community. Churches offer food and clothing banks, and counseling services to persons living with HIV/AIDS.

  6. Is Self-Assessment in Religious Education Unique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Val; Fancourt, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the question: is self-assessment in religious education unique? It first presents an overview of some challenges for assessment from subject differences, and then reviews the generic literature on self-assessment. It builds on earlier empirical research on self-assessment in religious education, carried out in an English state…

  7. American television fiction transforming Danish teenagers' religious imaginations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    2010-01-01

    of religion is strengthened by three dominating factors: the absence of a homogenous religious worldview in Danish culture, the importance of high production values and visual credibility to supernatural concepts in these shows, and the appeal of transformed religious content in open-structured serial...

  8. Religious Influences on the Risk of Marital Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaaler, Margaret L.; Ellison, Christopher G.; Powers, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined multiple dimensions of religious involvement and the risk of divorce among a nationwide sample of 2,979 first-time married couples. Multivariate proportional hazards modeling was used to analyze two waves of the National Survey of Families and Households. Results indicated that although each partner's religious attendance bore…

  9. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the...

  10. The Intersectionality of Religious Belief and Sexual Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadron, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The potential for conflict or tension between the cultural variables of sexual identity and religious belief for counselors, clients, and counseling students is well-documented by the counseling literature. The tension has existed primarily due to competing religious values for counselors and clients most often with respect to the phenomena of…

  11. Relations among and between Career Values and Christian Religious Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Miller; Hardin, Susan I.

    2002-01-01

    Empirical research and vocational theory indicate that values are important in career counseling and vocational choice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of career values to Christian religious values as they might be assessed in career counseling. Results indicate that there was some overlap between religious and…

  12. Taking religious pluralism seriously: arguing for an institutional turn: introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, V.M.

    2003-01-01

    Discussions of the relations between religions, society, politics, and the state in recent political philosophy are characterized, firstly, by a strong US American bias focusing on limitations of religious arguments in public debate. Even if the restriction or radical exclusion of religious reasons

  13. Language Planning as an Element of Religious Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Language is central to the practice of religion and decisions about language use characterise the ways in which religious practice is constructed. In the religious domain, language is often viewed as having more than a communicative function and languages themselves may have the status of holy artefacts. This attribution of holiness plays a…

  14. Principles for Effective Asynchronous Online Instruction in Religious Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Beverley

    2017-01-01

    Asynchronous online instruction has become increasingly popular in the field of religious studies. However, despite voluminous research on online learning in general and numerous articles on online theological instruction, there has been little discussion of how to effectively design and deliver online undergraduate courses in religious studies.…

  15. Is Self-Assessment in Religious Education Unique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Val; Fancourt, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the question: is self-assessment in religious education unique? It first presents an overview of some challenges for assessment from subject differences, and then reviews the generic literature on self-assessment. It builds on earlier empirical research on self-assessment in religious education, carried out in an English state…

  16. Reconsidering the Role of Memory in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancatelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the importance of memory in the Hebrew bible and how memory lay at the center of Ancient Israel's religious faith and cultural identity. It argues for a similar, albeit nuanced, memory-based approach to contemporary Christian religious education. It analyzes memory through the lens of Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutic of…

  17. Religious and Spiritual Education in Disability Situations in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Valeria; Caldin, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    In this short article, the authors focus on religious and spiritual education's potential to offer social and spiritual inclusion for students with a disability. They take the view that the religious and spiritual education teacher in such situations is positioned better when seeing such teaching as a special vocation. They use Italy as the case…

  18. Religious Fundamentalism among Young Muslims in Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaddel, Mansoor; Karabenick, Stuart A.

    2008-01-01

    Religious fundamentalism is conceived as a distinctive set of beliefs and attitudes toward one's religion, including obedience to religious norms, belief in the universality and immutability of its principles, the validity of its claims, and its indispensability for human happiness. Surveys of Egyptian and Saudi youth, ages 18-25, reveal that…

  19. Conceptualization and Linguistic Expression: Using Religious Poetry in ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amrita

    2014-01-01

    Religious poetry is, a heightened and impregnated form of expression. There is a marriage of form and sense. Linguistically speaking, religious poetry has a conceptual interface between syntax and semantics; a strong relationship between language and thought; universality and cultural specificity; the discourse context and the psychological…

  20. Sustainability in Multi-Religious Societies: An Islamic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grine, Fadila; Bensaid, Benaouda; Nor, Mohd Roslan Mohd; Ladjal, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    The question of sustainability in multi-religious societies underscores interrelating theological, moral and cultural issues affecting the very process of social co-existence, cohesion and development. This article discusses Islam's understanding of the question of sustainability in multi-religious contexts while highlighting the contribution of…

  1. Influencers of Religious Engagement in the First Year of College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Harold V., III

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence a deepening of students' religious engagement in the first year of college. Recent studies have challenged the findings of more than three decades of research that found attending college leads to a decline in students' religious beliefs and practices. This study extends those recent…

  2. The Delphi Method: Gathering Expert Opinion in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumfield, Vivienne M.; Conroy, James C.; Davis, Robert A.; Lundie, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The "Does Religious Education work?" project is part of the Religion and Society programme funded by two major research councils in the UK. It sets out to track the trajectory of Religious Education (RE) in secondary schools in the UK from the aims and intentions represented in policy through its enactment in classroom practice to the…

  3. Reconsidering the Role of Memory in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancatelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the importance of memory in the Hebrew bible and how memory lay at the center of Ancient Israel's religious faith and cultural identity. It argues for a similar, albeit nuanced, memory-based approach to contemporary Christian religious education. It analyzes memory through the lens of Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutic of narration…

  4. Single Mothers' Religious Participation and Early Childhood Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petts, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Using data on 1,134 single mothers from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, this study examined trajectories of religious participation among single mothers and whether these trajectories were associated with early childhood behavior. The results suggested that single mothers experienced diverse patterns of religious participation…

  5. Single Mothers' Religious Participation and Early Childhood Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petts, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Using data on 1,134 single mothers from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, this study examined trajectories of religious participation among single mothers and whether these trajectories were associated with early childhood behavior. The results suggested that single mothers experienced diverse patterns of religious participation…

  6. The Effect of Religious Membership on Teen Abortion Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomal, Annette

    2001-01-01

    Studied abortion rates among teenagers in 1,024 counties in 18 states that report abortion numbers. Results show that counties with high levels of religious membership were more likely to be in a state with a parental involvement law for teenage abortions. Both religious membership level and a parental involvement law were negatively related to…

  7. Enhancing Religious Identity: Best Practices from Catholic Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, John, Ed.; King, Irene, Ed.

    This collection contains essays on enhancing religious identity at Catholic institutions of higher education. The essays are: (1) "Preface. Religious Identity: A Critical Issue in Catholic Higher Education" (John R. Wilcox); (2) "Introduction" (to the section "Overview: Defining a Catholic University") (Irene King); (3) "What Is a Great Catholic…

  8. Why education in public schools should include religious ideals

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    de Ruyter, D.J.; Merry, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to open a new line of debate about religion in public schools by focusing on religious ideals. The article begins with an elucidation of the concept ‘religious ideals’ and an explanation of the notion of reasonable pluralism, in order to be able to explore the dangers and positive

  9. The Promise of Mobile Technology for Public Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Eileen M.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the history of public religious education in the United States with an eye to its learning outcomes, contexts, and approaches. That history suggests that public religious education is still needed today but that informal learning contexts may be more appropriate than public schools. Recent trends in learning habits are then…

  10. RELIGIOUS COMMUNICATION IN THE CONTEXT OF CULTURE MEDIA

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    Maria S. Petrushkevych

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the work is to determine the features of media culture that bind it with mass culture and mass communications and have the most significant effect on the general principles of the religious mass communication. In addition, the objective is to identify the skills system and traits of mass human that are necessary for using media culture. Methodology. The methodological basis is related to structuring, analytical analysis and synthesis of media features; highlighting phenomena that illustrate modern communicative situation; characteristics of media trends influence for the specific functioning of religious communication. Scientific novelty. Main part of the work is devoted to the analysis of the progressive media culture, mass-media and their main features, design of religious communication in this culture. Media gradually form the appearance of religious communication quietly, especially the mass one, they adapt the modern religious discourse to rates of transfer and perception of information. Modern believer gets a lot of different kinds of religious information, on any subject, any explanation of the religious question, with respect to any religion. Such volume of religious information and the speed with which a person receives it, does not usually make it religious or spiritually advanced, but only informed. Spiritual perfection and religious development, religious communication is possible only when the customer is aware of media culture and way of seeing the ultimate goal of such communications using the Mass Media. So far these mechanisms are perfectly designed in traditional religious communication. Phenomena, that reflects the dramatic changes in the communicative environment are: mediatization of body and mind, the new practice of processing / reading information, the phenomenon of simultaneous perception of a large number of information channels – similar or different. Features of media culture that connect it with

  11. The Influence of Divine Rewards and Punishments on Religious Prosociality

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    Saleam, James; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    A common finding across many cultures has been that religious people behave more prosocially than less (or non-) religious people. Numerous priming studies have demonstrated that the activation of religious concepts via implicit and explicit cues (e.g., ‘God,’ ‘salvation,’ among many others) increases prosociality in religious people. However, the factors underlying such findings are less clear. In this review we discuss hypotheses (e.g., the supernatural punishment hypothesis) that explain the religion-prosociality link, and also how recent findings in the empirical literature converge to suggest that the divine rewards (e.g., heaven) and punishments (e.g., hell) promised by various religious traditions may play a significant role. In addition, we further discuss inconsistencies in the religion-prosociality literature, as well as existing and future psychological studies which could improve our understanding of whether, and how, concepts of divine rewards and punishments may influence prosociality. PMID:27536262

  12. Religious processes as intercultural interaction: Contours of a sociological discourse

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    Lebedev Sergej

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During 'cyclic' historical periods it would be correct to interpret religious processes in terms of interaction of two essentially different, but substantially, structurally and functionally comparative types of integrating cultural complexes that, in historical perspective, compete with each other on the effect on individuals and society in general. Such complexes represent secular and religious culture. Contemporary socio-cultural situation can be defined as an asymmetric representativeness of both secular and religious cultures. In a modern secular society, dominance of a secular culture over a religious one can be manifested in three basic dimensions: substantial, regulative and subjective ones. Secular culture is adopted during the primary socialization process. However, religious culture is still adopted through conscious, voluntary selection in younger or more mature age. It may be possible to determine two basic attitudes of the contemporary ('secularized' man towards religion. The first attitude may be called 'reversive' and the other one 'conversive'.

  13. Religious fundamentalism: Aspects of a comparative framework of understanding

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    J S Kr�ger

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the outline of a comparative framework for the understanding of religious fundamentalism. The argument is developed around the interrelated aspects of macro-historical religious context, socio-religious context, and the context of religious tradition as a primary dimension of religion. In those overlapping contexts, the possibility of fundamentalism is explained with refe-rence to pre-disposing, precipitating and perpetuating conditions. In terms of the dimension of religious tradition, fundamentalism is expounded in terms of the following three aspects: education, inter-pretation and identity-definition. Fundamentalism emerges as an awkward mix (not a creative synthesis of traditional and modernist elements in the present breach - with its peculiar characteristics, crises and threats - between epochs.�

  14. Religious networking organizations and social justice: an ethnographic case study.

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    Todd, Nathan R

    2012-09-01

    The current study provides an innovative examination of how and why religious networking organizations work for social justice in their local community. Similar to a coalition or community coordinating council, religious networking organizations are formal organizations comprised of individuals from multiple religious congregations who consistently meet to organize around a common goal. Based on over a year and a half of ethnographic participation in two separate religious networking organizations focused on community betterment and social justice, this study reports on the purpose and structure of these organizations, how each used networking to create social capital, and how religion was integrated into the organizations' social justice work. Findings contribute to the growing literature on social capital, empowering community settings, and the unique role of religious settings in promoting social justice. Implications for future research and practice also are discussed.

  15. Sex, secularism and religious influence in US politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Elizabeth; Jakobsen, Janet R

    2010-01-01

    Through an analysis of alliances between secular and religious actors in US politics and a specific case study on anti-trafficking policy, we show that the intertwining of religion and politics in the US comes from two sources: 1) the secular political and cultural institutions of American public life that have developed historically out of Protestantism, and which predominantly operate by presuming Protestant norms and values; and 2) the direct influence on US politics of religious groups and organisations, particularly in the past quarter-century of lobby groups and political action committees identified with conservative evangelical Christianity. The sources of policies that promote gender and sexual inequality in the US are both secular and religious and we conclude that it is inaccurate to assume that religious influence in politics is necessarily conservative or that more secular politics will necessarily be more progressive than the religious varieties.

  16. Relationships between Local Patterns of Religious Practice and Young People's Attitudes to the Religiosity of Their Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipgrave, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This contribution reports research into young people's attitudes to religion and religious diversity in secondary schools across the UK. The data indicate that students' respect for the religiosity of their peers, or their lack of it, is due less to the influence of classroom RE (multi-faith or otherwise) than to the experience of religion in the…

  17. Being hopeful and continuing to move ahead: religious coping in Iranian chemical warfare poisoned veterans, a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Taleghani, Fariba; Mills, Jane; Birks, Melanie; Francis, Karen; Ahmadi, Fazlolah

    2010-09-01

    There is a substantial number of Iranian war veterans, exposed to sulfur mustard, who suffer from serious long term progressive health problems involving their respiratory organs, eyes, and skin. Little is known, however, about these casualties' experiences of living with the consequences of sulfur mustard poisoning. This qualitative study aims to provide greater insight into how war veterans live with the consequences of the poisoning and involved 17 Iranian war veterans who had been poisoned by sulfur mustard during the Iran-Iraq conflict. Each participant was interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule and the data generated through this process was analyzed using constant comparative data analysis technique. Data analysis resulted in "religious beliefs and practices" as a main category, which included two sub-categories: religious value centered life and religious support. Findings suggest that religious belief assists veterans to accept the impact of poisoning on their lives and adapt their lifestyles accordingly, to participate in religious social activities and feel socially supported, and to be hopeful about the future and live their lives as fully as possible.

  18. Inter-religious feelings of Sunni and Alevi Muslim minorities : The role of religious commitment and host national identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinovic, Borja; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines inter-religious attitudes from the perspective of Muslim minorities living in Western Europe. We examine both Sunni and Alevi Muslims of Turkish origin living in Germany and the Netherlands, and focus on their global feelings towards multiple religious out-groups (Christians, Jew

  19. The Many Face of Religious Truth : Developing Hilary Putnam's Pragmatic Pluralism into an Alternative for Religious Realism and Antirealism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunsveld, N.

    2012-01-01

    The question this study addresses is whether, on a conceptual level, religious propositions can have truth-value. It reflects on this question from a philosophy of religion perspective that stands in philosophy of language and mind. It analyzes paradigmatic religious realist and antirealist perspect

  20. The Many Face of Religious Truth : Developing Hilary Putnam's Pragmatic Pluralism into an Alternative for Religious Realism and Antirealism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunsveld, N.

    2012-01-01

    The question this study addresses is whether, on a conceptual level, religious propositions can have truth-value. It reflects on this question from a philosophy of religion perspective that stands in philosophy of language and mind. It analyzes paradigmatic religious realist and antirealist

  1. Terminating a Child’s Life? Religious, Moral, Cognitive, and Emotional Factors Underlying Non-Acceptance of Child Euthanasia

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    Csilla Deak

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Is opposition to child euthanasia motivated only by ideology, or also by other personality characteristics and individual differences? In Belgium, the first country to legalize child euthanasia (in 2014, we investigated religious, moral, emotional, and cognitive factors underlying the (disapproval of this legalization ('N' = 213. Disapproval was associated with religiousness, collectivistic morality (loyalty and purity, and prosocial dispositions, in terms of emotional empathy and behavioral generosity, but not values (care and fairness. It was also associated with low flexibility in existential issues and a high endorsement of slippery slope arguments, but not necessarily low openness to experience. A regression analysis showed that in addition to religiousness, low flexibility in existential issues and high empathy and generosity distinctly predicted opposition to child euthanasia. Whereas most of the findings parallel those previously reported for adult euthanasia, the role of prosocial inclinations in predicting moral opposition seems to be specific to child euthanasia.

  2. Comparative Theology and Religious Studies in a Non-religious Environment

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    Jacques Scheuer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The intellectual landscape of Europe bears the marks of a long history of cultural perceptions of, and scientific approaches to, religions. The sciences of religions had to establish their autonomy from churches and theologies. However, the cultural context and the institutional set-up of ‘laïcité’ did not foster the development of comparative religion, much less comparative theology. However, this situation may have an advantage: it should discourage the exercise of comparative theology as a sectarian endeavour apart from broader anthropological perspectives and concerns. Comparative theology should not become the last refuge for religious nostalgia. In Europe, interreligious relationships (and hence comparative theologies should not be isolated from simple or more sophisticated forms of indifference, agnosticism, or atheism. The active presence of a non-religious environment as well as the growing interest in Buddhism, are challenges to comparative theology: its contents, its approach, its intended audience.

  3. Change in religious beliefs, parental pressure, and attitudes of college students toward higher education as related to religious fundamentalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebby, Rickard A; Schaefer, Lisa

    2008-02-01

    Men (n = 55) and women (n = 99) college students (M age = 22.3 yr., SD = 6.1, range 18 to 58 years), from a moderate-sized midwestern university reported attitudes toward the goals and purposes of higher education, perceptions of parental pressure and support, and change in religious beliefs. The Religious Fundamentalist Scale, the Quest Scale, Faith-keeping, and Obedience to Parents Scales were also administered. Students classified as religious fundamentalists had more negative attitudes toward the goals and purposes of higher education goals and toward faculty. An interaction of Sex x Fundamentalist Classification indicated that nonfundamentalist college men reported greater change in their religious beliefs, relative to other groups. Perceptions of parental pressure or support were unrelated to scores on fundamentalism. The implications of students' religious backgrounds in relation to academic success were discussed.

  4. MENGUNJUNGI TEMPAT SUCI; RAGAM MOTIVASI WISATA RELIGIOUS

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    Ah. Fawaid Ah. Fawaid

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available   Ah. Fawaid (Penulis, dosen STAIN Pamekasan, Jl. Pahlawan Km. 04 Pamekasan, Kontak, fawaid.sjadzili@gmail.com     Abstract The journey to the sacred place is a fairly old tradition. In the history of ancient civilization, the sacred place became a magnet for religious believers to do the pilgrimage and magical rituals. The sacred place has become a tourist object from generation to generation. To visit the sacred place is not always identical with rural communities, communities that often are identified as followers of khurafat. Visiting the sacred place is also a city-educated public interest. Like the form of tourism in general, visiting the sacred place may be just pure entertainment, education, or indeed release a spiritual thirst for community. Kata-kata kunci tourism, wisata religius, migrasi, travel

  5. RELIGIOUS SLAUGHTER: EXAMPLES OF PRACTICES IN ITALY

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    B. Catanese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at identifying the procedures for current methods of religious slaughter. It consisted of spot visits in abattoirs carried out from October 2008 to March 2009 in Italy. The species covered were cattle, sheep and poultry. During this period, five abattoirs in three different Italian regions were assessed. All the animals were slaughtered without stunning. A reliable protocol was developed to record each animal during slaughter, to get 329 minutes and 28 seconds of video. 313 animals were observed by video image analysis for both halal slaughter and shechita. Observed parameters are discussed in the light of animal welfare. Remarks on restraining methods as well as post-cut clinical indicators of consciousness are considered.

  6. Logistic Modeling of a Religious Sect Features

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    Ausloos, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The financial characteristics of sects are challenging topics. The present paper concerns the Antoinist Cult community (ACC), which has appeared at the end of the 19-th century in Belgium, have had quite an expansion, and is now decaying. The historical perspective is described in an Appendix. Although surely of marginal importance in religious history, the numerical and analytic description of the ACC growth AND decay evolution per se should hopefully permit generalizations toward behaviors of other sects, with either longer life time, i.e. so called religions or churches, or to others with shorter life time. Due to the specific aims and rules of the community, in particular the lack of proselytism, and strict acceptance of only anonymous financial gifts, an indirect measure of their member number evolution can only be studied. This is done here first through the time dependence of new temple inaugurations, between 1910 and 1940. Besides, the community yearly financial reports can be analyzed. They are legal...

  7. José Luis Aranguren. Religión pensada, religión vivida

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    Cortina, Adela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In Aranguren’s work the religious dimension is crucial, when he deals with it from the point of view of the “religious studies” and also when he deals with it from the ethical perspective. In the second case Aranguren speaks about an “ethics open to religion”. The article tries to show that in the second case there is an evolution in Aranguren’s thought with two stages. In the first one, religion appears as the satisfaction of human aspirations, rooted in an ethics which is grounded in metaphysics. In the second one God appears as a possible answer to questions open from the perspective of a hermeneutic- narrative ethics.En la obra de Aranguren la dimensión religiosa es crucial, cuando la trata desde la perspectiva de los “estudios religiosos” y cuando se ocupa de ella desde la perspectiva ética. En este segundo caso, Aranguren habla de una “ética abierta a la religión”. El artículo trata de mostrar que en este segundo caso se produce una evolución en el pensamiento de Aranguren, en la que cabe distinguir dos etapas. En la primera de ellas la religión se presenta como la culminación de todas las aspiraciones del hombre desde una ética fundamentada en la metafísica. En la segunda etapa Dios aparece como posible respuesta a preguntas abiertas desde una ética hermenéutico-narrativa.

  8. Religious Identity, Religious Participation, and Psychological Well-Being in Asian American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Richard F; Kiang, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Religiosity plays a prominent spiritual and social role in adolescents' lives. Yet, despite its developmental salience, few studies have examined normative changes in religiosity or the implications of these changes for psychological well-being. We explored longitudinal variation in and associations between religiosity, as defined by private regard, centrality, and participation in religious activities, and diverse indicators of well-being including self-esteem, depressive symptoms, positive and negative affect, and both the presence of and search for meaning in life. The participants were two cohorts of Asian American high school students (N = 180; 60 % female) followed for 4 years and living in the southeastern US. Using hierarchical linear modelling and controlling for gender and generational status, results revealed that religious identity (i.e., regard, centrality) did not normatively increase or decrease over time, but participation increased. Religious identity was significantly associated with higher self-esteem, greater positive affect, the presence of meaning in life, and reduced depressive symptoms (for females), and participation was positively associated with positive affect and the presence of meaning. Our results and discussion emphasize the utility of further examining how religion plays a role in health and well-being, particularly among immigrant youth.

  9. Religious pluralism into Lusophony: a question of freedom

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    Lisete S. Mendes Mónico

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute with a reflection about religious pluralism and religious freedom into Lusophony. Reviving pieces of history since the 15th century to the current post-colonial Portuguese society, Lusophony is analyzed in two complementary perspectives: That of the colonizing people and that of the colonized nations. Evangelization, colonization and Lusophony are, and always will be, inseparable. In addition to linguistic uniformity, Lusophony gave its distinctiveness in acculturation, miscegenation, plasticity, and Christianization policy. Using the census data in the 90’s, 2000’s, and 2010’s, with a documentary approach, it is established a general overview of religious affiliation in Lusophony. Moving from a faith of obligation to a faith of conviction, Lusophony is nowadays characterized by a pluralist position in religious matters. The current situation of religious freedom is analyzed from the AIS report and the GRI (Government restriction index and SHI (social hostilities involving religion indexes. From multiculturalism to acculturation, the plasticity, eclecticism, and religious syncretism acted as moderators towards the imposition of a new belief. The article ends by appealing to the inclusion of religious freedom in the political agenda, in order to defend human rights and peace in the world.

  10. Performing, Representing, and Archiving Belief: Religious Expressions among Jazz Musicians

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    Vaughn A. Booker

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The archives of African American jazz musicians demonstrate rich sites for studying expressions of religious belief and daily religious practice in public and private arenas, in professional and personal capacities. Highlighting print material from the archives of Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (1899–1974 and Mary Lou Williams (1910–1981, this article examines the ways that these musicians worked to articulate their beliefs in print and to make meaning of their routine practices. Ellington and Williams produced written records of their aspirations for non-clerical religious authority and leadership, novel notions of religious community, and conceptions of quotidian writing tasks as practices with devotional value in the middle decades of the twentieth century. In preparation for his Sacred Concert tours of American and Western European religious congregations, Ellington theologized about the nature of God and the proper language to address God through private hotel stationery. Following her conversion to Roman Catholicism, Williams managed a Harlem thrift shop and worked to create the Bel Canto Foundation for musicians struggling with substance abuse and unemployment. This study of the religious subjectivity of African Americans with status as race representatives employs archival historical methods in the effort to vividly approximate complex religious interiority.

  11. Positive effects of Religious and Spiritual Coping on Bereavement

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    Laura Yoffe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonovsky (1987 coined the term “salutogenesis” in opposition to “pathogenesis”, with the intention to point out to cientific researchers ways and mechanisms that could promote health, well -being and life satisfaction. The area of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality began both in Europe and in the United States at the beginning of the twenth century. The research done in this field -since the last two decades- has focused on the relationships between religion, spirituality and health; and on the ways in which religious people cope with negative life events. We could think this area as a complementary one to the Positive Psychology; as both share certain common points of view about health, coping and well-being. In the field of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, Pargament and Koenig (1997 used the term “coping” -coined by Lazarus and Folkman (1986- referring to different styles of “religious coping” as “ways and mechanism by which religious people apply their religious beliefs and behaviours to prevent and /or moderate negative consequences of stressful life events, in order to solve their problems as well”. Each religion promotes ways to overcome negative life events, such as the death of loved ones. By using faith, prayers, meditations, religious rituals and beliefs about life, death and afterlife, religious persons try to cope with their grief and enhance positive feelings of emotional ,mental and spiritual well-being. Clergy of different religions are trained in religious practices, knowledge and skills to provide social support to those ones who face pain and loss. Religious groups can provide different types of emotional, practical, intelectual and spiritual support that can help diminish feelings of loneliness and grief. Being and feeling part of a religious community can promote ways to reconect to life and positive feelings that can help to overcome the grief of the death of loved ones and make

  12. The future size of religiously affiliated and unaffiliated populations

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    Conrad Hackett

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: People who are religiously unaffiliated (including self-identifying atheists and agnostics, as well as those who say their religion is "nothing in particular" made up 16.4Š of the world's population in 2010. Unaffiliated populations have been growing in North America and Europe, leading some to expect that this group will grow as a share of the world's population. However, such forecasts overlook the impact of demographic factors, such as fertility and the large, aging unaffiliated population in Asia. Objective: We project the future size of religiously affiliated and unaffiliated populations around the world. Methods: We use multistate cohort-component methods to project the size of religiously affiliated and unaffiliated populations. Projection inputs such as religious composition, differential fertility, and age structure data, as well as religious switching patterns, are based on the best available census and survey data for each country. This research is based on an analysis of more than 2,500 data sources. Results: Taking demographic factors into account, we project that the unaffiliated will make up 13.2Š of the world's population in 2050. The median age of religiously affiliated women is six years younger than unaffiliated women. The 2010-15 Total Fertility Rate for those with a religious affiliation is 2.59 children per woman, nearly a full child higher than the rate for the unaffiliated (1.65 children per woman. Conclusions: The religiously unaffiliated are projected to decline as a share of the world's population in the decades ahead because their net growth through religious switching will be more than offset by higher childbearing among the younger affiliated population.

  13. The Impact of Religious Tourism on Nepalese Economy

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    Pandey, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Religious tourism is one of the main contributors to the Nepalese tourism industry. It has not only generated thousands of jobs but also has been one of the main media to promote Nepalese culture, lifestyle and traditions. At the same time, it has grown as a strong contributor to the Nepalese economy. The main aim of this thesis was to point out the impact of religious tourism on the Nepalese economy, to find out the main factors affecting religious tourism and to get views of people about th...

  14. THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF RELIGIOUS ORIENTATION TYPES ON AMBIVALENT SEXISM

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    Fatih Ozdemir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to predict ambivalent sexism (including hostile sexism and benevolent sexism with religious orientation types as intrinsic religiosity, extrinsic religiosity and quest religiosity. In addition, the effect of demographic variables (including age, gender, education on sexist attitudes was tested. 583 (N_female= 318; N_male= 265 university students who study in different universities of Ankara/Turkey (M_age= 22.10; SD = 2.33 completed Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, and Religious Orientation Scale. Findings indicated significant gender differences on study variables and significant associations between ambivalent sexism and religious orientation types within university students sample in Turkey.

  15. A Filosofia da Religião: Percurso de Identidade

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, José Rui

    2010-01-01

    Após um percurso histórico sobre a relação entre filosofia e religião, bem como sobre a dificuldade em acolher a validade de uma qualquer "filosofia da religião", assumimos aqui que a filosofia da religião, apoiando-se exclusivamente na razão, deve buscar resposta às perguntas últimas que acompanham e configuram o existir humano, deve decifrar o enigma do humano e do divino, da vida, do mundo e da história. E deve igualmente avaliar criticamente as diversas respostas dadas pelas diferentes r...

  16. Economic Impact of Religious Tourism in Mardin, Turkey

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    Istvan Egresi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a worldwide trend, the number of religious tourists to the province of Mardin, in Southeastern Turkey has increased continuously during the last decade. Using a combination of methods this study aimed to assess the impact of religious tourism development on the local community and economy. We found that the effect is mainly positive. The hotels have high occupancy rates throughout the year and many new hotels have been built during the last five years. Also most visitors eat in local restaurants at least once a day and patronize local shops and businesses. The development of religious tourism has also led to the creation of many new jobs.

  17. Technology. Theosophy. Theology: The Religious Character of UFO Movements

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    Danijel Sinani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the most important factors that have played a role in the emergence and development of UFO religiosity and UFO alternative religious movements, from occult, spiritualist and theosophical teachings, to alternative ideas and debates on the origin of mankind. By analyzing the basic theological premises, the paper discusses the basic religious and culturological paradigms to be found in UFO movements. It also shows how a major part of their corpus can be recognized in existing "traditional" religious groups, and suggests that UFO religions represent just another variation on the numerous concepts that offer answers to key existential questions.

  18. Islamic Counselling Model to Increase Religious Commitment (Study of Students at the University UIN Bandung

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    Fenti Hikmawati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to test the effectiveness of Islamic counseling model for helping the students to tight their religious commitment. The religious commitment is covered in three major Islamic teachings: Iman (faith, Islam (surrender to Allah, and lhsan (state of being observed by Allah. The model of Islamic counseling aims to tight students' religious commitment must to be applied immediately because the preface study reveals some students' religious commitment were not strong enough, their behavior and thinking symptoms tend to not appropriate yet with Islam norm among their association and conception toward the truth of God. To achieve the aim, the study was carried out with three steps: (1 designing a model of counseling; (2 trying out field study, using pretest-post test control group experimental design with 140 students of Islamic Religion Education, the Faculty of Tarbiyah and Teaching, State Islamic University, Sunan Gunung Djati, Bandung. Of 140 students, 70 students are from the classes: A (32 people, B (38 people, involved in control group and the test; 37 people from class C, and 33 students from class D involved in the experiment group, and; (3 designing a final model by revising the model tried-out. The variable involved three major Islamic dimensions: the iman, Islam, and ihsan of the students. The model was designed based on the theory put forward by Musfir bin Said Az-Zalmmi, that is, an integrated counseling model. The model combines and employs the ideas from other concepts into a tightly united concept, called Islamic concept. Upon completing analysis, it was found that the new concept is significantly effective to enhance students' religious commitment. A Model of Islamic Counseling (MIC is an alternative-counseling model that can be employed for teenagers/ students to enhance their religious commitment. The study recommends that: (1 MIC can be applied to fifth semester students in the Faculty of Tarbiyah State Islamic

  19. Religious Participation is Associated with Increases in Religious Social Support in a National Longitudinal Study of African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Daisy; Holt, Cheryl L; Hosack, Dominic P; Huang, Jin; Clark, Eddie M

    2016-08-01

    This study reports on the association between religious beliefs and behaviors and the change in both general and religious social support using two waves of data from a national sample of African Americans. The Religion and Health in African Americans (RHIAA) study is a longitudinal telephone survey designed to examine relationships between various aspects of religious involvement and psychosocial factors over time. RHIAA participants were 3173 African American men (1281) and women (1892). A total of 1251 men (456) and women (795) participated in wave 2 of data collection. Baseline religious behaviors were associated with increased overall religious social support from baseline to wave 2 (p social support from baseline to wave 2 in each of the following religious social support subscales: emotional support received (p negative interaction (p social support. African Americans who are active in faith communities showed increases in all types of religious social support, even the negative aspects, over a relatively modest longitudinal study period. This illustrates the strength of the church as a social network and the role that it plays in people's lives.

  20. Religious ritual contested: anti-religious activities and women’s ritual practice in rural Soviet Karelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja-Liisa Keinänen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available After the October Revolution, the Bolsheviks sought to establish a new atheistic order which would eradicate from the public consciousness all vestiges of "religious prejudices", which were regarded as a residue from the imperial era and an instrument used to exploit the masses. Even though it was generally held that religion would automatically disappear from socialist society when its material precondition, the class society, was abolished, the regime made concentrated efforts to speed up the process by means of virulent anti-religious propaganda. The ultimate goal was to wipe out the persistent remains of the bourgeois system of values. No force was to be used since it was feared this would merely offend the religious sentiments of the people and strengthen their adherence to religion. Theoretically, the ultimate goal was to be achieved through education and information, but in practice, anti-religious activities were at times quite brutal. These attacks were successful in curtailing the activities of religious institutions in Karelia, but did not bring to an end the religious practices of lay people, which were continued, in one form or another, throughout the entire Soviet period. One fundamental reason for the survival of religious rituals, both Christian and indigenous, was the fact that they were so deeply embedded in people's consciousness and intimately integrated with their everyday lives. Every important phase and turn in human life was sanctified by rituals. The goal of the present paper is to examine what forms anti-religious attacks took in Soviet Karelia and how people reacted to them. The focus is on the attacks against the very fundaments of the ritual complex of the church and, by extension, on the effects of these attacks on the indigenous ritual complex, which co-existed in parallel with that of the "official" religious institutions.