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Sample records for jude medical sjm

  1. Influence of St. Jude medical valve in patients with aortic stenosis and small aortic annulus on cardiac function and late survival result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuaki, Masafumi; Itoh, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Yukio; Takarabe, Kyoumi; Furukawa, Koujirou; Rikitake, Kazuhisa; Ohtubo, Satoshi

    2002-10-01

    This clinical study analyzes our experience of postoperative cardiac function and long-term survival rate in patients with aortic stenosis and small-size St. Jude Medical (SJM) valve. Sixty-eight patients who underwent aortic valve replacement by SJM valve were divided into two groups by preoperative aortic annulus diameter. Group 1 consisted of 44 patients with small aortic annulus and small-size SJM valve (19 mm or 21 mm). In Group 1, small SJM standard valves were implanted in 16 patients, and small SJM Hemodynamic Plus (HP) valves were implanted in 28 patients. Group 2 consisted of 24 patients with large-size SJM standard valve (23 mm or larger). Preoperative left ventricular mass index, left ventricular dimension, the dimension of ascending aorta, and body surface area were significantly smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2. Average age at surgery was older in Group 1 than in Group 2. Effective orifice area index of the SJM valve measured by the manufacturer's data was smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2. Postoperative left ventricular mass indexes of Group 1 (standard valve or HP valve) and Group 2 significantly decreased in comparison with the preoperative mass indexes. Postoperative left ventricular ejection fraction and the peak ejection rate of Group 1 were not different from those of Group 2. The 10 year survival rate of Group 1 was 79%, and the rate of Group 2 was 77%. At 10 years after surgery, freedom from valve-related complication of Group 1 was 80%, and freedom from complication of Group 2 was 81%. Our results demonstrated that small-size SJM valve afforded satisfactory long-term survival rate and valve-related event-free rate for elderly patients with small body surface area and small aortic annulus.

  2. Thrombogenicity and Reoperation of the St. Jude Medical Silzone (R) valve : A comparison with the conventional St. Jude medical valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalenhoef, JE; Mellema, EC; Veeger, NJGM; Ebels, T

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: The St. Jude Medical Silzone(R) valve was withdrawn from the market after an interim analysis of the AVERT study revealed a 2.76% incidence of paravalvar leakage leading to valve re-replacement, compared with only 1.02% in the control group. Additionally, an increase

  3. [Implantable loop recorder of the Confirm family (St. Jude Medical)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujdak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    St. Jude Medical produces the implantable loop recorder (ILR) Confirm AF DM2102 which offers subcutaneous electrodes on both sides of the device, a specific sensing algorithm and extensive storage capacity for up to 147 episodes. The reliability of detection of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been evaluated in the DETECT-AF study. The device is MR-conditional and allows patients an interrogation at home. The data are transferred to the follow-up centre via telephone by the patient activator, although this process is currently rather complex and slow. Therefore, remote monitoring of the Confirm AF DM2102 is rarely an option for elderly patients. St. Jude medical announced the introduction of a new, substantially smaller ILR using more modern technology by the end of 2016.

  4. Effect of hinge gap width of a St. Jude medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve on blood damage potential--an in vitro micro particle image velocimetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Brian H; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Yun, B Min; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-01

    The hinge regions of the bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) can cause blood element damage due to nonphysiological shear stress levels and regions of flow stasis. Recently, a micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) system was developed to study whole flow fields within BMHV hinge regions with enhanced spatial resolution under steady leakage flow conditions. However, global velocity maps under pulsatile conditions are still necessary to fully understand the blood damage potential of these valves. The current study hypothesized that the hinge gap width will affect flow fields in the hinge region. Accordingly, the blood damage potential of three St. Jude Medical (SJM) BMHVs with different hinge gap widths was investigated under pulsatile flow conditions, using a μPIV system. The results demonstrated that the hinge gap width had a significant influence during the leakage flow phase in terms of washout and shear stress characteristics. During the leakage flow, the largest hinge gap generated the highest Reynolds shear stress (RSS) magnitudes (~1000 N/m²) among the three valves at the ventricular side of the hinge. At this location, all three valves indicated viscous shear stresses (VSS) greater than 30 N/m². The smallest hinge gap exhibited the lowest level of shear stress values, but had the poorest washout flow characteristics among the three valves, demonstrating propensity for flow stasis and associated activated platelet accumulation potential. The results from this study indicate that the hinge is a critical component of the BMHV design, which needs to be optimized to find the appropriate balance between reduction in fluid shear stresses and enhanced washout during leakage flow, to ensure minimal thrombotic complications.

  5. In vivo left ventricular assist induced coagulation derangements. Comparison of Sarns-3M and St. Jude Medical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J J; Wagner-Mann, C C; Mann, F A; Demmy, T L; Walls, J T; Schmaltz, R A

    1997-01-01

    An in vitro comparison of centrifugal pumping systems manufactured by Sarns-3M and St. Jude Medical revealed a difference in blood cell derangement. The purpose of this study was to compare in vivo the effects of 96 hr of left ventricular assist (LVA) on indexes of coagulopathy, hemolysis, and complement activation. Two groups of calves (each: n = 5) were instrumented with identical left atrial to thoracic aorta centrifugal pumping circuits using either Sarns-3M or St. Jude centrifugal pumps. Laboratory evaluations were performed pre-assist and at 1, 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr during LVA. Platelet counts dropped significantly by 24 hr (Sarns-3M: 28%; St. Jude: 30%); no significant change in function was noted. Activated clotting time increased slightly (p > 0.05). Prothrombin time increased at 4 and 24 hr of LVA, returning to baseline by 96 hr (p Sarns-3M device never reached significance. No significant changes in lactate dehydrogenase or plasma free hemoglobin were detected. Complement fraction C5a rose by 1 hr of LVA (p Sarns-3M and St. Jude LVA caused coagulation derangement in calves, 2) neither pump demonstrated an advantage regarding coagulation and complement parameters, 3) hemolysis observed with the Sarns-3M pump in vitro was not evidenced in vivo, and 4) in vitro evidenced centrifugal pump differences may not be realized in vivo.

  6. Could Externalized St. Jude Medical Riata® Lead Be a Culture Medium of a Polymicrobial Endocarditis? A Clinical Case

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    Zefferino Palamà

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a man affected by polymicrobial endocarditis developed on a St. Jude Medical Riata lead with a malfunction because of the outsourcing of conductors. The patient was treated with antibiotic targeted therapy and showed different bacteria at the blood cultures and then underwent transvenous leads extraction. Vegetations were highlighted on the caval, atrial, and ventricular tracts of the Riata lead, but the cultures were all negative. The externalization of Riata lead may cause the malfunction but it could also promote bacterial colonies and vegetations. In conclusion, looking for early signs of infection is mandatory during Riata leads follow-up checks.

  7. A Spiritual Victor in Jude the Obscure——Comparing Jude with Two Heroines%A Spiritual Victor in Jude the Obscure-Comparing Jude with Two Heroines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯冬惠

    2007-01-01

    Jude is a final victor in spirit.Jude's leaving Arabella,a conventional-orientation representive and then following Sue's unconventional pursuit are greatly valued in Hardy's novel-Jude the Obscure.Furthermore,Jude's constancy in unconventional belief is valuable,contrasting with Sue's final regression to convention.Compared with Arabella and Jude's spiritual quality,Jude proves a victor.

  8. Evaluation of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic aortic heart valves by rest and dobutamine stress echocardiography

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    Minardi Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prosthesis used for aortic valve replacement in patients with small aortic root can be too small in relation to body size, thus showing high transvalvular gradients at rest and/or under stress conditions. This study was carried out to evaluate rest and Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE hemodynamic response of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJMR-17 mm in relatively aged patients at mean 24 months follow-up. Methods and results The study population consisted of 19 patients (2 men, 17 women, mean age 69.2 ± 7.3 years. All patients underwent rest Doppler echocardiography before and after surgery and basal and DSE at follow up (infused at rate of 5 micrg/Kg/min and increased by 5 microg/Kg/min at 5 min intervals up to 40 microg/Kg/min. The following parameters were evaluated at rest and/or under DSE: heart rate (HR, ejection fraction (EF, cardiac output (CO, peak and mean velocity and pressure gradients (MxV, MnV, MxPG, MnPG, effective orifice area (EOA, indexed EOA (EOAi, left ventricular mass (LVM, indexed LVM (LVMi, Velocity Time Integral at left ventricular outflow tract (VTI LVOT and transvalvular (Aortic VTI, Doppler velocity index (DVI. At rest MxPG and MnPG were 29.2 ± 7.1 and 16.6 ± 5.8mmHg, respectively; EOA and EOAi resulted 1.14 ± 0.3 cm2 and 0.76 ± 0.2 cm2/m2; DVI was normal (0.50 ± 0.1. At follow-up LVM and LVMi decreased significantly from pre-operative value of 258 ± 43g and 157.4 ± 27.7g/m2 to 191 ± 23.8g and 114.5 ± 10.6g/m2, respectively. DSE increased significantly HR, CO, EF, MxGP (up to 83.4 ± 2 1.9mmHg, MnPG (up to 43.2 ± 12.7mmHg. EOA, EOAi, DVI increased insignificantly (from baseline up to 1.2 ± 0.4 cm2, 0.75 ± 0.3cm2/m2 and 0.48 ± 0.1 respectively. Two patients developed significant intraventricular gradients. Conclusion These data show that SJMR 17-mm prostheses can be safely implanted in aortic position in relatively aged patients, offering a satisfactory hemodynamic

  9. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

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    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as percutaneous valves.

  10. Mid-term results of small-sized St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves (21 mm or less) for small aortic annulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Sakaki, Masayuki; Inoue, Kazushige; Iwata, Takashi; Tei, Keikou; Miura, Takuya

    2013-11-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is always of concern when performing aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus. Although bioprosthetic AVR is preferred in patients older than 65 years, we have experienced cases in elderly patients with a small aortic annulus whereby we could not implant small-sized bioprosthetic valves. We have implanted St. Jude Medical Regent (SJMR) mechanical valves (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) as necessary, even in elderly patients with no aortic annulus enlargement. We investigated our experiences of AVR with SJMR mechanical valves of 21 mm or less in size. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 40 patients underwent AVR with SJMR mechanical valves ≤21 mm in size: 9 patients received 21-mm valves, 19 received 19-mm valves, and 12 received 17-mm valves. The mean age was 65.9 ± 9.5 years, and 25 patients (62.5 %) were 65 years or older. We evaluated the clinical outcome and the echocardiographic data for each valve size. There was no operative or hospital mortality. The mean duration of clinical follow-up was 31.2 ± 17.6 months. During follow-up, there were no hospitalizations due to heart failure. The cumulative valve-related event-free survival was 93 % at 33 months, and the cumulative hemorrhagic event-free survival was 93 % at 33 months and 84 % at 43 months, using the Kaplan-Meier method. At follow-up, the mean values of the measured effective orifice area (EOA) for the 21-, 19-, and 17-mm prostheses were 2.00 ± 0.22, 1.74 ± 0.37, and 1.25 ± 0.26 cm(2), and the mean measured EOA index (EOAI) were 1.17 ± 0.12, 1.11 ± 0.21 and 0.90 ± 0.22 cm(2)/m(2), respectively. A PPM (EOAI ≤0.85) was documented in 5 patients, all of whom had received a 17-mm SJMR valve. AVR with SJMR valves of 21 mm or less in size appears to show satisfactory clinical and hemodynamic results.

  11. On the Causes of Jude's Tragedy in Jude the Obscure

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    张杰

    2015-01-01

    Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure is a tragic novel, which shows the fight between flesh and spirit. From which, we can appreciate connotation of the character and environment novels and feel the Victorian period's social factors. This thesis aims at analyzing the real causes of Jude's tragedy from the social institution and his personal limitation hid in the tragic appearance.

  12. Low standard oral anticoagulation therapy for Chinese patients with St.Jude mechanical heart valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓刚; 胡盛寿; 祁国奇; 周玉燕

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the efficacy of the low standard oral anticoagulation therapy following St Jude Medical (SJM) valve implantation for Chinese patients.Methods Totally 805 patients with a mean age of 42.70±11.09 years, enrolled into this study. Among them, 230 underwent aortic valve replacements (AVR), 381 mitral valve replacements (MVR), 189 double valve replacements (DVR) and 5 tricuspid valve replacememts (TVR). All patients received postoperative oral anticoagulation therapy based on a low standard of international normalized ratio (INR, 2.0-2.5). Of the 805 patients, 710 were followed up for 0.25-13 years (a median, 4.15 years). Results Postoperatively, 17 adverse events occurred. Operative mortality was 2.11%. The most frequent cause of operative mortality was a low cardiac output. During follow-up, there were 47 anticoagulant-induced hemorrhages [1.59%/patient-year (pt-yr)], 10 cases of thromboembolism (0.34%/pt-yr), and 3 mechanical valve thromboses (0.19%/pt-yr). There were 44 late deaths and the linearized late mortality rates were 0.51%pt-yr. Estimates of actuarial survival for all patients at 5 and 10 years was 97.45% (0.70%) and 77.96% (17.44%), respectively.Conclusions A low target INR range of 2.0-2.5 is preferable for Chinese patients so as to reduce the severe bleeding complications in those with conventionally higher levels of INR. The long-term results were satisfactory in terms of the numbers of those who suffered thrombosis, embolism and bleeding.

  13. Mid-long-term Clinical Results and Hemodynamic Evaluation of Aortic Valve Replacement with 17 mm St. Jude Medical Regent Valve%17 mm St.Jude Regent瓣术后中远期临床效果和在体血流动力学评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇; 张尔永; 方智; 古君; 钱宏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mid-long-term clinical results of aortic valve replacement with 17 mm St. Jude medical regent valve with hemodynamic evaluation including the measurement of effective orifice area, the occurrence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its affect on heart function. Methods There were 44 patients accepted aortic valve replacement with 17 mm St. Jude medical regent valve because of small aortic annulus. Before the operation and during the postoperative follow-up, color doppler echocardiography was used to measure the hemodynamic parameters, such as left ventricular mass (LVmass), effective orifice area (EOA) and effective orifice area index (EOAI), etc.. Results Transthoracic echocardiographic data were obtained from 39 of 44 patients (88. 6%)at 12-55 months after surgery. One (2. 27%) died of heart failure in 1 year. According to the current standard of PPM (EOAI≤0. 85 cm2/m2) , 33 cases (82. 1%) had PPM, 13 cases (30. 8%) had severe PPM with an EOAI ≤0. 65 cm2/m2. After the operation, there were significant decreases in LVAo-PG (19 ± 8) mmHg and left ventricular mass index (LVmass I ) (86. 6 ± 23. 3) g/m2(P<0. 05). The assessment for physical capacity according to NYHA classification: 41 patients improved to class II or better and 2 patients improved to class Ⅲ (P<0. 05). Conclusion The patients with small aortic annulus may obtain satisfactory clinical results after AVR with 17 mm St. Jude medical regent valve, PPM seems not affect the mid-long-term results.%目的 观察17 mm St.Jude Regent机械瓣置入人体后中远期临床效果,测量其有效瓣口面积,评价是否发生瓣膜-患者不匹配(prosthesis-patient mismatch,PPM)现象,并探索PPM现象对术后患者心功能的影响.方法 44例心脏瓣膜病患者接受二尖瓣及主动脉瓣置换术,所有患者因主动脉瓣环小而置入17 mm St.Jude Regent机械瓣.对该组患者进行随访研究,分别于术前及术后12~55月,运用心

  14. Micro particle image velocimetry measurements of steady diastolic leakage flow in the hinge of a St. Jude Medical® regent™ mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Brian H; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-03-01

    A number of clinical, in vitro and computational studies have shown the potential for thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV), primarily due to the complex and unsteady flows in the valve hinges. These studies have focused on quantitative and qualitative parameters such as velocity magnitude, turbulent shear stresses, vortex formation, and platelet activation to identify potential for blood damage. However, experimental characterization of the whole flow fields within the valve hinges has not yet been conducted. This information can be utilized to investigate instantaneous damage to blood elements and also to validate numerical studies focusing on the hinge's complex fluid dynamics. The objective of this study was therefore to develop a high-resolution imaging system to characterize the flow fields and global velocity maps in a BMHV hinge. In this study, the steady leakage hinge flow fields representing the diastolic phase during the cardiac cycle in a 23 mm St. Jude Medical regent BMHV in the aortic position were characterized using a two-dimensional micro particle image velocimetry system. Diastolic flow was simulated by imposing a static pressure head on the aortic side. Under these conditions, a reverse flow jet from the aortic to the ventricular side was observed with velocities in the range of 1.47-3.24 m/s, whereas low flow regions were observed on the ventricular side of the hinge with viscous shear stress magnitude up to 60 N/m². High velocities and viscous shearing may be associated with platelet activation and hemolysis, while low flow zones can cause thrombosis due to increased residence time in the hinge. Overall, this study provides a high spatial resolution experimental technique to map the fluid velocity in the BMHV hinge, which can be extended to investigate micron-scale flow domains in various prosthetic devices under different hemodynamic conditions.

  15. Churches in Jude the Obscure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jing-jing

    2008-01-01

    In Hardy's novel,Jude the Obscure,many images and scenes relating to churches function to reveal the hero's,or the author's views towards Christian religion.This essay makes an analysis of the church architecture,church scenes and clerical characters in the novel.

  16. 中度瓣膜-患者不匹配对17 mm St.Jude Medical Regent主动脉瓣置换术后中期临床效果的影响%The impact of moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch on midterm outcomes after aortic valve replacement with 17 mm St.Jude Medical Regent valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡佳; 钱宏; 李娅姣; 古君; 方智; 刘勇; 蒙炜; 张尔永

    2014-01-01

    目的 观察术后早期中度瓣膜-患者不匹配现象(prosthesis-patient mismatch,PPM)对应用17 mm St.Jude Medical Regent(SJMR)行主动脉瓣置换术后患者中远期临床效果的影响,并探讨患者个体因素与PPM影响效果的关系.方法 我们对106例应用17 mm SJMR行主动脉瓣置换术的患者进行随访,于术前、出院时及术后29~ 74个月,平均(48.6±11.9)个月,评估患者术后临床指标和Regent瓣膜在体血流动力学参数变化.结果 围手术期死亡比例2.8%,术后1、3、5年免于心脏不良事件相关死亡比例分别为98.1%、95.9%、88.2%.其中45例(43.7%)患者在术后院内末次超声心动图评估发现合并中度PPM.随访期间,患者NYHA心功能分级、主动脉瓣跨瓣压差及左心室质量指数均较术前明显改善,合并中度PPM患者与非PPM患者在各临床指标与血流动力学参数之间并无明显差异.但在术前左心功能受损的患者中(左心室射血分数<0.50),中度PPM会显著增加此亚组患者中远期死亡比例(HR 1.46,P=0.02).多因素回归分析发现,糖尿病与左心室射血分数<0.35是导致全组患者术后中远期死亡比例增加的独立危险因素.结论 17 mm SJMR主动脉瓣置换术后早期出现的中度PPM与左心功能受损患者术后中远期死亡比例增加密切相关.合理选择小主动脉瓣环患者接受17 mm SJMR瓣膜的置入能取得满意的中远期临床效果.%Objective The study was designed to evaluate the effects of moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch(PPM) on midterm outcomes after aortic valve replacement(AVR) with the 17 mm St.Jude Medical Regent valve in a large series of patients,and to determine if these effects are modulated by patient' s confounding variables.Methods Methods One-hundred and six patients with and without moderate PPM after implantation of a 17 mm Regent valve at aortic position were included.Both clinical and echocardiographic assessments were performed

  17. Substituição valvar isolada com próteses metálicas St. Jude Medical em posição aórtica ou mitral: seguimento de médio prazo Sustitución valvular aislada con prótesis metálicas St. Jude Medical en posición aórtica o mitral: seguimiento de medio plazo Isolated mitral and aortic valve replacement with the St. Jude Medical valve: a midterm follow-up

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    Alfredo José Rodrigues

    2009-09-01

    a la sustitución de la válvula mitral o aórtica por prótesis valvular mecánica St. Jude. MÉTODOS: Se analizó retrospectivamente la evolución de los pacientes operados entre enero de 1995 y diciembre de 2003 y seguidos hasta diciembre de 2006. RESULTADOS: Un total de 168 pacientes recibió prótesis valvular mitral y otros 117, aórtica. La edad promedio de ambos grupos fue de 45 años. Entre los mitrales, el 75% tenía hasta 55 años y el 65% era mujeres. Entre los aórticos, el 66% tenía hasta 55 años y el 69% era de varones. Teniendo en cuenta solamente las muertes relacionadas a las prótesis valvulares, la sobrevida fue del 85,6% para los mitrales y del 88,7% para los aórticos (p=0.698. Entre los mitrales, el 97% estaba libre de reoperación, y entre los aórticos el 99% (p=0,335 lo estaba. En cuanto a los eventos tromboembólicos, el porcentaje de pacientes libres fue del 82% entre los mitrales y del 98% entre los aórticos (p=0,049, y para los eventos hemorrágicos fue del 71% y el 86% respectivamente (0,579. En cuanto a la ocurrencia de endocarditis, el 98 % entre los mitrales y el 99% entre los aórticos estaba libre al final de 10 años (p=0.534. CONCLUSIÓN: Nuestra experiencia con prótesis metálicas St. Jude en una población predominantemente joven confirma el buen desempeño de esta prótesis, según otras experiencias publicadas.BACKGROUND: In our country, the biological valvular prostheses predominate, considering the difficulties related to anticoagulation, even in young patients, in spite of the need for repeated operations due to the degeneration of the bioprostheses. OBJECTIVES: To report our consecutive series of recipients of isolated St Jude Medical mechanical valve prosthesis in the mitral (MVR or aortic (AVR position. METHODS: Data from patients operated between January 1995 and December 2003 were revised in order to determine patient survival and prosthesis-related events up to December 2006. RESULTS: One hundred sixty eight

  18. Complete genome sequence of Oscillibacter valericigenes Sjm18-20T (=NBRC 101213T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Yoko; Fujinami, Shun; Kawakoshi, Akatsuki; Nakazawa, Hidekazu; Oji, Syoko; Iino, Takao; Oguchi, Akio; Ankai, Akiho; Fukui, Shigehiro; Terui, Yasuyuki; Kamata, Sachi; Harada, Takeshi; Tanikawa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Oscillibacter valericigenes is a mesophilic, strictly anaerobic bacterium belonging to the clostridial cluster IV. Strain Sjm18-20T (=NBRC 101213T =DSM 18026T) is the type strain of the species and represents the genus Oscillibacter Iino et al. 2007. It was isolated from the alimentary canal of a Japanese corbicula clam (Corbicula japonica) collected on a seacoast in Shimane Prefecture in Japan. Phylogenetically, strain Sjm18-20T is closest to uncultured bacteria in digestive tracts, including the enriched cells thought to represent Oscillospira guilliermondii Chatton and Perard 1913. The isolated phylogenetic position and some distinct characteristics prompted us to determine the complete genome sequence. The 4,410,036 bp chromosome and the 60,586 bp plasmid were predicted to encode a total of 4,723 protein-coding genes. PMID:23408234

  19. Sue's Oppressed Sex in Jude the Obscure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈娟

    2010-01-01

    Using ecofeminist literary criticism.the paper analyzes women's unjustified and dominated sex in Jude the Obscure.Sue,as a"New Woman"in the male-dominated society,is dominated and oppressed in sex.Sue's subordinated position illustrates Hardy's sympathy for Victorian women and his opposition to the unjustified domination of women.He advocates a harmonious relationship among people in the society.

  20. A Study on the Characterization of Jude the Obscure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏焕

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a brief study on the characterization of Jude the Obscure,and will be focus on the chief character Jude Fawley.This novel,first published in 1895,wasThomas Hardy's last and best literary success.There are six main characters in this novel:Jude Fawley,Susanna Bridehead,Arabella Donn,Richard Phillotson,Aunt Drusilla,Little Father Time(Little Jude).This analysis of the distinct depictions of the typical characters will be helpful to the understanding of the gap between the ideal life a man wishes to lead and the squalid existence he is fated to live in such social environment as Jude is confronted with.

  1. The Letter of Jude and Graeco-Roman Invective

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    Alicia J. Batten

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many have attempted to identify the opponents in Jude and have addressed the manner in which the author characterises this group. Moreover, scholars have expended considerable energy on the analysis and explication of Jude’s rhetorical structure and style, and there is wide consensus that as a text, Jude is a sophisticated letter. However, less work has attended to the evaluation of Jude within the tradition of Graeco-Roman invective. In comparing verses from Jude to some examples from such literature, we find similar themes. In particular, the letter of Jude and some Graeco-Roman moralists engage in a particular tactic to undermine, even destroy, the character of their opponents. They both present them as effeminates, which, although a stereotype, is one of the worst insults a writer or orator could wage against an adversary. This article argues that Jude engages in such character assassination, invoking effeminacy in the manner that he describes his opponents’ behaviour, and placing them in a long line of debauched and condemned figures from ages past.

  2. Fatalism in Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun; Gengmei; Zhou; Juntao

    2014-01-01

    Hardy is distinguished for his deep understanding of human nature and his insight of human life and experience.This paper will make an exploration about the theme of Jude the Obscure,which conveys the strong sense of fatalism,to show Hardy’s life outlook and reveal his pessimistic views towards society and human nature.

  3. Fatalism in Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Gengmei; Zhou Juntao

    2014-01-01

    Hardy is distinguished for his deep understanding of human nature and his insight of human life and experience. This paper will make an exploration about the theme of Jude the Obscure, which conveys the strong sense of fatalism, to show Hardy’s life outlook and reveal his pessimistic views towards society and human nature.

  4. 小主动脉瓣环患者行17mm SJM Regent瓣置换术早、中期疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘良彬; 马海涛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigated wheather the patients with small aortic ring(diameter<17mm)were freedom from PPM4 and the early and mid-term outcomes after AVR with 17 mm SJM Regent mechanical prosthesis. Methods Thirteen patients with aortic valve stenosis(the annulus diameter<17mm)underwent AVR with 17mm SJM Regent mechanical prosthesis in our hospital from Jan 2010 to Jan 2013 . The patients were followed up for echocardiogram and cardiac functions,and the results were compared with those of randomly selected thirteen patients receiving 21 mm aortic mechanical prosthesis. Results There was no perioperative death in this group of patients,the follow-up of 6-36 months without valve related complications,3 cases of patients with moderate PPM(EOAI<0.85cm2/m2). The two groups showed significant improvements in the left ventricular mass index,and aortic pressure gradient after operation(P<0.05),and no significant differences were found in the two groups,without statistical difference. Conclusions AVR with 17mm SJM Regent mechanical prosthesis is a reliable choice for the patients with small aortic ring (diameter<17 mm). No obvious prosthesis-patient mismatch occurs and aortic valve ring expansion is not necessary.%目的:探讨小主动脉瓣环(直径<17mm)患者行17mm SJM Regent瓣置换术,术后是否产生不匹配(PPM)现象,以及早、中期疗效。方法13例单纯主动脉瓣狭窄(瓣环直径<17mm)患者置换17mm SJM Regent瓣机械瓣,用彩色多普勒超声仪对左心功能进行术前、术后监测并与13例置换21mm常规机械瓣患者进行对比。结果无围术期死亡,随访6~36个月无瓣膜相关性并发症,3例患者出院时有中度PPM(EOAI<0.85cm2/m2),13例患者术后跨瓣压差及左室心肌质量指数较术前均明显下降(P<0.05),与常规21mm机械瓣患者比较差异无统计学意义。结论对于小主动脉瓣环(直径<17mm)患者行17mm SJM Regent机械瓣置换是一种安全

  5. Echocardiographic and phonocardiographic assessment of the St. Jude cardiac valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, N L; Kotler, M N; Mintz, G S; Lichtenberg, R; Goel, I P; Segal, B L

    1981-09-01

    Forty-three consecutive patients with a St. Jude mitral, aortic, or combined prosthesis were studied by simultaneous phonocardiography and echocardiography. Twenty-eight patients had a mitral prosthesis, 20 an aortic prosthesis, and five had both. No opening click was recorded in any patient; however, a loud aortic or mitral closing click was recorded in all 43 patients. In patients with St. Jude mitral valve prosthesis, an echo-free space separated the two leaflets during diastole; seven of these also had a mid-diastolic closing and late diastolic reopening motion; two of the seven had an associated closing mid-diastolic click. A mid-diastolic rumble was recorded in six of 28 patients with St. Jude mitral valve prosthesis. In patients with a St. Jude aortic valve prosthesis, left atrium leaflet motion was recorded in 17 of 20 patients and was indistinguishable in appearance from echocardiograms obtained with various eccentric monocusp valves. In addition, we report one case of malfunction of a St. Jude mitral valve and one case of a paravalvular leak diagnosed by echophonocardiography. We concluded that the St. Jude cardiac prosthesis has variable normal phonocardiographic-echocardiographic patterns. Knowledge of these variable patterns is important in assessing patients with suspected malfunction of a St. Jude cardiac prosthesis.

  6. The Ideological Questions of Marriage in Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh N.S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As one of the prominent ideologies of the nineteenth-century— in a complex interrelation with other contemporary ideological discourses particularly femininity and marriage—religion adopts a critical stance in Hardy’s presentation of characters. Breaching the religio-conventional image of femininity as “Angel in the House” and “Cow Woman,” Hardy’s Jude the Obscure (1895 is indeed deemed to be his milestone in presenting his anti-Christian attitudes towards the contemporary religion. This study aims to present Hardy’s outright hostility towards the nineteenth-century Christianity through his creation of non-conformist characters, necessitating a parallel study with other contemporary discourses regarding marriage and femininity, and conflict with the religion of the time. Hardy’s magnum opus, the work on which he was to stake his final reputation as a novelist, was clearly Jude the Obscure which as a noticeable socio-religious experimentation of the late nineteenth-century, reveals Hardy’s perception of new ideas about femininity and marriage by presenting the hot contemporary issues of “New Woman” and “Free Union” through the development and presentation of Sue Bridehead and her free union with Jude, respectively. Hardy’s presentation of Sue Bridehead as a “New Woman,” and employing the “Free Union” in marked contrast with the nineteenth-century convention of marriage as a “Bonded Pair” is Hardy’s closing upshot of his final novelistic attempt. The non-conformist Jude and Sue are presented as figures touching the Victorian Christian standards of morality, while, the final tragic destiny of Jude and Sue’s helplessness attest to the writer’s substantial contribution as a Victorian male novelist to the ideologies circulating at the time.

  7. The Ideological Questions of Marriage in Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Saleh, N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the prominent ideologies of the nineteenth-century— in a complex interrelation with other contemporary ideological discourses particularly femininity and marriage—religion adopts a critical stance in Hardy’s presentation of characters. Breaching the religio-conventional image of femininity as “Angel in the House” and “Cow Woman,” Hardy’s Jude the Obscure (1895 is indeed deemed to be his milestone in presenting his anti-Christian attitudes towards the contemporary religion. This study aims to present Hardy’s outright hostility towards the nineteenth-century Christianity through his creation of non-conformist characters, necessitating a parallel study with other contemporary discourses regarding marriage and femininity, and conflict with the religion of the time. Hardy’s magnum opus, the work on which he was to stake his final reputation as a novelist, was clearly Jude the Obscure which as a noticeable socio-religious experimentation of the late nineteenth-century, reveals Hardy’s perception of new ideas about femininity and marriage by presenting the hot contemporary issues of “New Woman” and “Free Union” through the development and presentation of Sue Bridehead and her free union with Jude, respectively. Hardy’s presentation of Sue Bridehead as a “New Woman,” and employing the “Free Union” in marked contrast with the nineteenth-century convention of marriage as a “Bonded Pair” is Hardy’s closing upshot of his final novelistic attempt. The non-conformist Jude and Sue are presented as figures touching the Victorian Christian standards of morality, while, the final tragic destiny of Jude and Sue’s helplessness attest to the writer’s substantial contribution as a Victorian male novelist to the ideologies circulating at the time.

  8. 国产CL-V型双叶人工心脏瓣膜与进口St.Jude双叶瓣的临床疗效比较%Comparison on Clinical Outcomes Between China-made CL-V Bileaflet Prosthesis and St.Jude Bileaflet Prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁亮; 宋兵; 刘瑞生; 唐汉博; 赵宏林; 邢旺; 高百顺

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate early clinical outcomes and short-term follow-up results of CL-V bileaflet prosthesis. Methods From April 2004 to May 2010, 38 patients with valvular heart diseases underwent mechanical heart valve replacement. Eighteen patients received CL-V bileaflet valve replacement (CL group) including 8 males and 10 females with their mean age of (47. 4 ±6. 2) years and mean body weight off 64. 7±11. 9) kg. Preoperatively, 15 patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class Ⅲ, and 2 patients were in NYHA class IV. Mitral valve replacement (MVR) was performed in 16patients, mitral and aortic valve replacement (DVR) in 2 patients. A total of 20 CL-V bileaflet prostheses were implanted. Twenty patients received St. Jude bileaflet valve replacement (SJM group Kncluding 9 males and 11 females with their mean age of (49. 7±7. 6) years and mean body weight of (66. 1±11. 1) kg. Preoperatively,15 patients were in NYHA class Ⅲ, and 3 patients were in NYHA class Ⅳ . MVR was performed in 17 patients, aortic valve replacement (AVR) in 1 patient, and DVR in 2 patients. A total of 22 St. Jude bileaflet prostheses were implanted. Clinical outcomes, hear function, hemodynamics and blood compatibility were measured on the 7th postoperative day and 6 months during follow-up and compared between the two groups. Results There was no early mortality ( < 30 d) or postoperative complication in either group. Follow-up rate was 100% and the mean follow-up duration was 19. 8 (6-61) months. At 6 months after surgery, those patients who were preoperatively in NYHA class Ⅲ or Ⅳall improved to class Ⅰ orⅡ. In CL group, cardiothoracic ratio was 0. 51±0. 05, left atrium diameter (44. 5±7. 8) mm, left ventricular end dias-tolic diameter (LVEDD, 46. 6±4.1) mm, LVEF 65. 3%±7. 7%, and LVFS 35. 0%±7. 1%. In SJM group, cardiothoracic ratio was 0. 51±0. 06, left atrium diameter(45. 8±9. 6)mm, LVEDD(46. 2±9. 8) mm, LVEF 64. l%+9. 0%, and LVFS 34. 9%±4. 7

  9. Hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve has no clinical impact 10 years after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Dorup, Inge; Emmertsen, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Size mismatch and impaired left ventricular function have been shown to determine the hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve early after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We aimed to analyse St. Jude valve hemodynamic function and its clinical impact in the s......OBJECTIVES: Size mismatch and impaired left ventricular function have been shown to determine the hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve early after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We aimed to analyse St. Jude valve hemodynamic function and its clinical impact...... in the survivors of a prospective series 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Forty-three survivors aged 32-90 years from a prospective series attended a follow-up study with Doppler echo and radionuclide cardiography 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. Six patients with significant left sided valve......Hg. In a multilinear regression analysis GOA indexed for LVEDD, hypertension, and LVEF were independently related to peak gradient. CONCLUSION: High gradients of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve 10 years after AVR was primarily related to systemic hypertension and mismatch between valve and left ventricular...

  10. When the dead are alive! The influence of the living dead in the letter of Jude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan J. Joubert

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay investigates the impact of the deceased on  the audience to which the letter of Jude was originally addressed. A construct of the influence of the “living dead” in ancient Babylon, Israel, the Graeco-Roman world and in African tradition serves as a basic cognitive map to come to terms with Jude’s views on the dead. It is argued that, since the wicked dead, who are being physically punished in  the underworld,  are kept alive  in the collective memory of Jude’s community and since their deeds are re-enacted in the sinful behavior  of intruders in their midst, their lives are influenced by  the “presence” of these living dead. On the other hand and, although Jude does not deal with the physical whereabouts of the righteous death, he and his readers know that their postmortem honour is still intact. The righteous in this community is assured that God protects the integrity of the faithful dead.

  11. Subchronic use of the St. Jude centrifugal pump as a mechanical assist device in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J; Wagner-Mann, C; Mann, F; Demmy, T; Walls, J; Turk, J

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the effects of the St. Jude Lifestream centrifugal pump on hemodynamic and hematologic parameters and the incidence of postmortem findings in a subchronic ex vivo left ventricular assist animal model. Five calves were implanted with the pump as a left ventricular assist device (left atrial to thoracic aorta bypass) and studied for 96 h of continuous pumping under identical conditions. Heparin (100 IU/kg) was administered only in the initial saline pump prime. Throughout the protocol, mean arterial and central venous pressures averaged 102.1 +/- 4.6 and 3.4 +/- 2.2 mm Hg, respectively. Pump flow was 47.8 +/- 8.4 ml/kg/min at a mean pump speed of 1,676.3 +/- 106.1 rpm. No clinical abnormalities or mechanical malfunctions attributable to the pump were detected during the 96 h of continuous pumping for each calf. Mean plasma-free hemoglobin after 96 h was 3.9 +/- 3.7 mumol/L (p = 0.337 compared to baseline). At post mortem, renal infarctions were detected in 1 calf. No other pump-associated lesions were detected in any of the other calves. We have concluded that the St. Jude Lifestream centrifugal pump functions reliably during 96 h of continuous left heart bypass in a calf model.

  12. Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Li, Chenghong; Nottage, Kerri A; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Armstrong, Gregory T; Lanctot, Jennifer Q; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Laver, Joseph H; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-09-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), which may be reduced with lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize lifestyle habits and associations with MetSyn among CCS. CCS who were ≥ 10 years from diagnosis, aged > 18 years, and participating in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study completed medical and laboratory tests and a food frequency questionnaire. The Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel criteria were used to classify participants with MetSyn. Anthropometric, food frequency questionnaire, and self-reported physical activity data were used to characterize lifestyle habits according to World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations. Those who met ≥ 4 of 7 recommendations were classified as having followed guidelines. Sex-stratified log-binomial regression models were used to evaluate associations between dietary/lifestyle habits and MetSyn, adjusted for age, age at cancer diagnosis, receipt of cranial radiotherapy, education, and household income. Among 1598 CCS (49.2% of whom were male, with a median age of 32.7 years [range, 18.9 years-60.0 years]), 31.8% met criteria for MetSyn and 27.0% followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. Females who did not follow WCRF/AICR guidelines were 2.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.7-3.3) and males were 2.2 times (95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.0) more likely to have MetSyn than those who followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. Adherence to a heart-healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk of MetSyn among CCS. There is a need to determine whether lifestyle interventions prevent or remediate MetSyn in CCS. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  13. Neurocognitive Outcomes Decades After Treatment for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Kevin R.; Brinkman, Tara M.; Li, Chenghong; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Gurney, James G.; Kimberg, Cara; Krasin, Matthew J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine rates, patterns, and predictors of neurocognitive impairment in adults decades after treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods Survivors of childhood ALL treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital who were still alive at 10 or more years after diagnosis and were age ≥ 18 years were recruited for neurocognitive testing. In all, 1,014 survivors were eligible, 738 (72.8%) agreed to participate, and 567 (76.8%) of these were evaluated. Mean age was 33 years; mean time since diagnosis was 26 years. Medical record abstraction was performed for data on doses of cranial radiation therapy (CRT) and cumulative chemotherapy. Multivariable modeling was conducted and glmulti package was used to select the best model with minimum Akaike information criterion. Results Impairment rates across neurocognitive domains ranged from 28.6% to 58.9%, and those treated with chemotherapy only demonstrated increased impairment in all domains (all P values < .006). In survivors who received no CRT, dexamethasone was associated with impaired attention (relative risk [RR], 2.12; 95% CI, 1.11 to 4.03) and executive function (RR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.20 to 4.91). The impact of CRT was dependent on young age at diagnosis for intelligence, academic, and memory functions. Risk for executive function problems increased with survival time in a CRT dose-dependent fashion. In all survivors, self-reported behavior problems increased by 5% (RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.09) with each year from diagnosis. Impairment was associated with reduced educational attainment and unemployment. Conclusion This study demonstrates persistent and significant neurocognitive impairment in adult survivors of childhood ALL and warrants ongoing monitoring of brain health to facilitate successful adult development and to detect early onset of decline as survivors mature. PMID:24190124

  14. Sue Bridehead:The Girl of the Period in Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐苏

    2014-01-01

    Jude the Obscure was Thomas Hardy’s last novel creation, and he spent eight year from preparation to publication. Al-though this novel received a lot of criticisms instead of praises when it came out, it also can be considered as Thomas Hardy ’s classical works. The theme of this novel is so brave to explore the existing women ’s living circumstances in that time. With the industrial revolution in England, new thoughts and ideas sprang out. Women were no longer belonging to husband and family, and they began to be aware of their social roles and reconsider their identity in society and marriage. The aim of the paper is to analyze this novel from the feministic perspective and re-read the character of Sue Bridehead in the light of the theory“the girl of the period”.

  15. Pseudepigraphy and the Petrine school: Spirit and tradition in 1 and 2 Peter and Jude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Chatelion Counet

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies four “patterns of religion” (E P Sanders in the pseudepigraphic letters of Peter and Jude in order to support the hypothesis of a “Petrine school” (J H Elliott. The first pattern that connects the letters is a Geisttradition (K Aland, guaranteeing continuity of tradition. The second is the interrelationship between faith and ethics (fides quae and fides qua. The combination of sanctification and eschatology is a third pattern connecting the three documents. Finally, two florilegia can be identified (one from the Old Testament and apocrypha, and one from the chokmatic tradition, suggesting a fourth pattern: a warning against ungodliness and infidelity. The existence of a Petrine group could represent a preliminary stage of subsequent Early Catholicism.

  16. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Dong; Wang Chunsheng; Hong Tao; Pan Cuizhen; Guo Changfa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm). Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years) with small aortic annulus (≤19...

  17. Experimental study on the effect of an artificial cardiac valve on the left ventricular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, JiangSheng; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Wang, JinJun

    2017-09-01

    The use of artificial valves to replace diseased human heart valves is currently the main solution to address the malfunctioning of these valves. However, the effect of artificial valves on the ventricular flow still needs to be understood in flow physics. The left ventricular flow downstream of a St. Jude Medical (SJM) bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV), which is a widely implanted mechanical bileaflet valve, is investigated with time-resolved particle image velocimetry in the current work. A tilting-disk valve is installed on the aortic orifice to guarantee unidirectional flow. Several post-processing tools are applied to provide combined analyses of the physics involved in the ventricular flow. The triple jet pattern that is closely related to the characteristics of the bileaflet valve is discussed in detail from both Eulerian and Lagrangian views. The effects of large-scale vortices on the transportation of blood are revealed by the combined analysis of the tracking of Lagrangian coherent structures, the Eulerian monitoring of the shear stresses, and virtual dye visualization. It is found that the utilization of the SJM BMHV complicates the ventricular flow and could reduce the efficiency of blood transportation. In addition, the kinematics of the bileaflets is presented to explore the effects of flow structures on their motion. These combined analyses could elucidate the properties of SJM BMHV. Furthermore, they could provide new insights into the understanding of other complex blood flows.

  18. [Avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2006-04-01

    To minimize the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), we have routinely adopted aortic root enlargement to avoid PPM for patients with small aortic annulus. The aim of this study was to review our strategy of avoiding PPM. The Carpentier-Edwards Perimount (CEP) valves were implanted in 53 patients who were mostly aged over 65 and the St. Jude Medical (SJM) mechanical valves were used in 128 patients aged under 65. A standard 21-mm SJM valve was used in only 3 patients and no 19-mm valves were employed. However, 19-mm CEP valves were used in 12 patients with a small body surface area (1.43 +/- 0.14 m2). Of these, 26 patients (14.4%) who had a small aortic annulus and 24 patients aged under 65 underwent aortic root enlargement. No patient receiving an SJM valve had an projected indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) small annulus, the first choice for avoiding PPM is aortic annular enlargement, which may be avoided by high performance mechanical valves with larger EOA.

  19. Treatment Outcomes in Black and White Children With Cancer: Results From the SEER Database and St Jude Children's Research Hospital, 1992 Through 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Pei, Deqing; Pappo, Alberto S.; Howard, Scott C.; Cheng, Cheng; Sandlund, John T.; Furman, Wayne L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Jeha, Sima; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kun, Larry E.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kocak, Mehmet; Broniscer, Alberto; Metzger, Monika L.; Downing, James R.; Leung, Wing; Evans, William E.; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Treatment outcome for black patients with cancer has been significantly worse than for their white counterparts. We determined whether recent improved treatment had narrowed the gap in outcome between black and white pediatric patients. Patients and Methods In a parallel comparison, we analyzed survival by disease category between black and white patients with childhood cancer registered in one of the 17 cancer registries of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program or treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital, which provides comprehensive treatment to all patients regardless of their ability to pay, from 1992 to 2000 and from 2001 to 2007. Results Analysis of the SEER data indicated that in both study periods, black patients had significantly poorer rates of survival than did white patients, with the exception of a few types of cancer. Despite significantly improved treatment outcomes for patients who were treated from 2001 to 2007, the racial difference in survival has actually widened for acute myeloid leukemia and neuroblastoma. By contrast, in the cohorts treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital, there were no significant differences in survival between black and white patients in either study period, regardless of the cancer type. Importantly, the outcome of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and retinoblastoma has improved in parallel for both races during the most recent study period. Conclusion With equal access to comprehensive treatment, black and white children with cancer can achieve the same high cure rates. PMID:22547602

  20. Misty Life: Nihilism in Jude the Obscure%迷雾人生——《无名的裘德》中的虚无主义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽

    2011-01-01

    Jude the Obscure is the last novel of Thomas Hardy. It is a destructive novel and expresses the idea of nihility. Jude, Sue, Arabella and Phillotson could not have real happiness. The failed career, unhappy marriage, and fragile life are as misty as the fog. The consciousness of dream, loneliness and death through career, marriage and life, and the image of fog all are related with nihility. Returning to Christ is not the real way out for redemption of tragedy and nihility.%《无名的裘德》作为哈代的封山之作,是一部不折不扣的毁灭文学。小说的很多地方都体现了虚无主义,不管是裘德、艾拉白拉、淑,还是费劳孙和小时光老人,都没能拥有实实在在的幸福,事业不得志,爱情不幸福,生命终究灰飞烟灭,一切都如雾一般飘渺。小说在事业、感情、生命方面体现出来的梦幻意识、孤独意识和死亡意识,以及虚无意象“雾”的描写,都与虚无主义有着密切的联系。在悲剧和虚无中,对基督教信仰的回归并不是救赎之道。

  1. "Medical Alley": the rise of the medical device industry in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhees, David J

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the factors that led to the establishment in Minnesota of a thriving network of advanced medical device firms sometimes referred to as "Medical Alley." Factors examined include a favorable "business-technology infrastructure" that included the University of Minnesota, the migration of high-tech professionals from other industries, the emergence of specialized services and suppliers, the availability of capital, government encouragement, and support from trade associations. The seminal role of Medtronic, Inc., founded in 1949, is examined, particularly the invention of the first wearable cardiac pacemaker by the company's co-founder Earl Bakken in 1957 and Medtronic's licensing of the first fully implantable pacemaker developed by Wilson Greatbatch and William Chardack in 1960. Some of the major spin-off's from Medtronic will be examined, particularly CPI (now part of Boston Scientific) and St. Jude Medical. The paper will broadly characterize the evolution of "Medical Alley to the present.

  2. Is modification of the VVI backup mode in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators from St Jude medical required due to increased risk of inappropriate shocks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philbert, Berit T; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Jacobsen, Peter K

    2017-01-01

    a ventricular fibrillation (VF) zone starting at 146 b.p.m., with shock therapy only and changes in sensitivity settings making the ICD more sensitive. In all cases, the reason for the multiple inappropriate shocks was that the VF zone was reached due to exercise-induced sinus tachycardia or due to oversensing...

  3. Chemotherapy-related neuropathic symptoms and functional impairment in adult survivors of extracranial solid tumors of childhood: results from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Kirsten K; Jones, Kendra E; Smith, Webb A; Spunt, Sheri L; Wilson, Carmen L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Gurney, James G

    2013-08-01

    To ascertain prevalence of peripheral sensory and motor neuropathy, and to evaluate impairments in relation to function. St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study, a clinical follow-up study designed to evaluate adverse late effects in adult survivors of childhood cancer. A children's research hospital. Eligibility required treatment for an extracranial solid malignancy between 1962 and 2002, age ≥ 18 years, ≥ 10 years postdiagnosis, and no history of cranial radiation. Survivors (N=531) were included in the evaluation with a median age of 32 years and a median time from diagnosis of 25 years. Not applicable. Primary exposure measures were cumulative doses of vinca-alkaloid and platinum-based chemotherapies. Survivors with scores ≥ 1 on the sensory subscale of the Modified Total Neuropathy Score were classified with prevalent sensory impairment. Those with sex-specific z scores of ≤-1.3 for dorsiflexion strength were classified with prevalent motor impairment. Participants completed the 6-minute walk test (endurance), the Timed Up & Go test (mobility), and the Sensory Organization Test (balance). The prevalence of sensory and motor impairment was 20% and 17.5%, respectively. Vinca-alkaloid exposure was associated with an increased risk of motor impairment (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-2.64) without evidence for a dose response. Platinum exposure was associated with increased risk of sensory impairment (adjusted OR=1.62; 95% CI, .97-2.72) without evidence of a dose response. Sensory impairment was associated with poor endurance (OR=1.99; 95% CI, .99-4.0) and mobility (OR=1.65; 95% CI, .96-2.83). Vincristine and cisplatin exposure may increase risk for long-term motor and sensory impairment, respectively. Survivors with sensory impairment are at increased risk for functional performance limitations. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Influence of Schopenhauer's Voluntarism on Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure%叔本华唯意志论对哈代《无名的裘德》的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙蓬蓬

    2015-01-01

    Schopenhauer's philosophy of voluntarism exert a great influence on Thomas Hardy's creation, espe⁃cially the shape of characters and the increase of tragic awareness in Jude the Obscure. Hardy's portrait of the characters and destinies about Jude, Sue and Arabella, is deeply influenced by Schopenhauer's philosophy. Scho⁃penhauer holds the nature of the world is the will, and will is people's unstoppable impulses and desires, howev⁃er, will has tragical features, so life is painful. At the late period of Hardy's novel creation, due to the impact of Schopenhauer's tragic philosophy, the tragic consciousness of character's personality and destiny further enhanc⁃es, especially the tragical portrait of Jude, Sue and the Little Father Time.%叔本华的唯意志论哲学思想,对哈代《无名的裘德》中的人物形象的塑造和悲剧意识的增强产生了重要影响。哈代对裘德、淑和艾拉白拉人物性格和命运的刻画,深受叔本华意志论哲学的影响。叔本华认为世界的本质是意志,意志是人不可遏止的生命冲动和欲望,而意志又具有悲剧性,所以人生是痛苦的。哈代小说创作后期,由于受叔本华悲剧思想的影响,人物性格和命运的悲剧意识进一步增强,特别是对裘德、淑和小时光老人悲剧形象的刻画。

  5. Battery longevity from cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators: differences between manufacturers and discrepancies with published product performance reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mian Bilal; Munir, Muhammad Bilal; Rattan, Rohit; Adelstein, Evan; Jain, Sandeep; Saba, Samir

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an important treatment for heart failure that requires constant ventricular pacing, placing a high energy burden on CRT defibrillators (CRT-D). Longer battery life reduces the need for device changes and associated complications, thereby affecting patient outcomes and cost of care. We therefore investigated the time to battery depletion of CRT-D from different manufacturers and compared these results with manufacturers' published product performance reports (PPRs). All CRT-D recipients at our institution between January 2008 and December 2010 were included in this study cohort. The patients were followed up to the endpoint of battery depletion and were otherwise censored at the time of death, last follow-up, or device removal for any reason other than battery depletion. A total of 621 patients [173 Boston Scientific (BSC), 391 Medtronic (MDT), and 57 St. Jude Medical (SJM)] were followed up for a median of 3.7 (IQR 1.6-5.0) years, during which time 253 (41%) devices were replaced for battery depletion. Compared with MDT devices, battery depletion was 85 and 54% less likely to happen with BSC and SJM devices, respectively (P battery longevity by more than 20% 6 years after device implantation. Large differences in CRT-D battery longevity exist between manufacturers. Industry-published PPRs significantly overestimate device longevity. These data have important implications to patients, healthcare professionals, hospitals, and third-party payers.

  6. Comparative hemolysis study of clinically available centrifugal pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, K; Suenaga, E; Cao, Z L; Suda, H; Ueno, T; Natsuaki, M; Itoh, T

    1996-06-01

    Centrifugal pumps have become important devices for cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory assistance. Five types of centrifugal pumps are clinically available in Japan. To evaluate the blood trauma caused by centrifugal pumps, a comparative hemolysis study was performed under identical conditions. In vitro hemolysis test circuits were constructed to operate the BioMedicus BP-80 (Medtronic, BioMedicus), Sarns Delphin (Sarns/3M Healthcare), Isoflow (St. Jude Medical [SJM]), HPM-15 (Nikkiso), and Capiox CX-SP45 (Terumo). The hemolysis test loop consisted of two 1.5 m lengths of polyvinyl chloride tubing with a 3/8-inch internal diameter, a reservoir with a sampling port, and a pump head. All pumps were set to flow at 6 L/min against the total pressure head of 120 mm Hg. Experiments were conducted simultaneously for 6 h at room temperature (21 degrees C) with fresh bovine blood. Blood samples for plasma-free hemoglobin testing were taken, and the change in temperature at the pump outlet port was measured during the experiment. The mean pump rotational speeds were 1,570, 1,374, 1,438, 1,944, and 1,296 rpm, and the normalized indexes of hemolysis were 0.00070, 0.00745, 0.00096, 0.00066, 0.00090 g/100 L for the BP-80, Sarns, SJM, Nikkiso, and Terumo pumps, respectively. The change in temperature at the pump outlet port was the least for the Nikkiso pump (1.8 degrees C) and the most with the SJM pump (3.8 degrees C). This study showed that there is no relationship between the pump rotational speed (rpm) and the normalized index of hemolysis in 5 types of centrifugal pumps. The pump design and number of impellers could be more notable factors in blood damage.

  7. Genetic and clinical factors associated with obesity among adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carmen L; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jun J; Kang, Guolian; Ojha, Rohit P; Neale, Geoffrey A; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Gurney, James G; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Ness, Kirsten K

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify treatment and genetic factors associated with obesity among childhood cancer survivors. Participants included 1996 survivors who previously received treatment for cancer at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and who survived ≥10 years from diagnosis (median age at diagnosis, 7.2 years; median age at follow-up, 32.4 years). Obesity was defined as a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) . The factors associated with adult obesity were identified by subgroup-specific (cranial radiation [CRT] exposure status) multivariable logistic regression. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with obesity were identified by subgroup-specific, exploratory, genome-wide association analyses using a 2-stage resampling approach with a type I error rate of 5 × 10(-6) . Forty-seven percent of survivors who received CRT and 29.4% of those who did not receive CRT were obese at evaluation. In multivariable analyses, abdominal/pelvic radiation exposure was associated with decreased prevalence of obesity among survivors regardless of CRT status (P obesity were increased among survivors who received CRT who had also received glucocorticoids (P = .014) or who were younger at diagnosis (P = .013). Among the survivors who had received CRT, 166 SNPs were associated with obesity. The strongest association was observed with reference SNP rs35669975 (P = 3.3 × 10(-8) ) on segment 33.3 of the long arm of chromosome 13 (13q33.3), approximately 30 kb downstream of FAM155A (family with sequence similarity 155, member A). SNPs within the glycine receptor α3 (GLRA3) gene and near the sex-determining region Y box 11 (SOX11) and cadherin 18 type 2 (CDH18) genes also were identified. These genes have been implicated in neural growth, repair, and connectivity. Obesity in childhood cancer survivors remains associated with previous exposure to CRT and glucocorticoids. Genetic variants related to neural connectivity may modify the risk of obesity among

  8. JUDE: An alternative UVIT pipeline

    CERN Document Server

    Murthy, Jayant; Safonova, M; Sutaria, F; Gudennavar, S B; Bubbly, S G

    2016-01-01

    We have written a set of routines to convert the Level 1 data from UVIT into scientifically useful photon lists and images. These routines are in the GNU Data Language (GDL) and are compatible with the IDL software package. We use these programs in our own scientific work will continue to update the programs as we gain an understanding of the UVIT instrument.

  9. 逆水行舟,不进则退--《无名的裘德》文学伦理学解读%An Analysis of“Jude the Obscure”from the Perspective of Ethical Literary Criticism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚建美

    2014-01-01

    Thomas Hardy ’s Jude the Obscure narrates the violation of Victorian traditional ethical concept by the protagonists.It presents us the obstacles that prevent people to pursuit individual personality and true love in transitional period,owing to the influence of conflict between new moral standard and old one.The ethical contradiction between Jude’s fear of ethical taboos and the pursuit of free love results in his difficult ethical choice,which brings Sue with ethical dilemma. This paper is to analyze Jude the Obscure from the perspective of ethical literary criticism ,so as to show the instructing function of the novel.%哈代在《无名的裘德》中,描写了主人公裘德与女主角淑违背维多利亚时期传统伦理观念的故事,展示了19世纪末资本主义过渡时期,新旧道德标准冲突,人们追求个性与真爱所遭受到的阻力。裘德对伦理禁忌的畏惧与对自由爱情的追求形成伦理冲突,体现了他艰难的伦理选择,而裘德的伦理选择也把淑置于伦理困境之中。从文学伦理学角度来分析这一现象,可揭示小说的劝诫和教诲力量。

  10. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm. Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years with small aortic annulus (≤19 mm in diameter underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent mechanical valve. Preoperative mean body surface area, New York Heart Association class, and mean aortic annulus were 1.61 ± 0.26 m2, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 18 ± 1.4 mm respectively. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the implantation of 17 mm SJM Regent mechanical valve (group 1, n = 18 or 19 mm SJM Regent valve (group 2, n = 22. All patients underwent echocardiography examination preoperatively and at one year post-operation. Results There were no early deaths in either group. Follow-up time averaged 36 ± 17.6 months. The mean postoperative New York Heart Association class was 1.3 ± 0.6 (p 2/m2 to 69.8 ± 9.3%, 41.4 ± 8.3%, and 0.92 ± 0.10 cm2/m2 respectively (P 2, 46.1 ± 8.5 mmHg to 86.7 ± 18.2 g/m2 , 13.7 ± 5.2 mmHg respectively. In group 2, the LVEF, LVFS and EOAI increased from 45.9% ± 9.7%, 30.7% ± 8.0%, and 0.81 ± 0.09 cm2/m2 to 77.4% ± 9.7%, 44.5% ± 9.6%, and 1.27 ± 0.11 cm2/m2 respectively, while the LVMI, and the aortic transvalvular pressure gradient decreased from 118.3 ± 27.6 g/m2, 44.0 ± 6.7 mmHg to 80.1 ± 19.7 g/m2, 10.8 ± 4.1 mmHg as well. The prevalence of PPM was documented in 2 patients in Group 1. Conclusions Patients with small aortic annulus and body surface

  11. Analysis of Writing Strategies of Vamp Image in Jude the Obscure%析《无名的裘德》中妖妇形象的书写策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金梅

    2011-01-01

    托马斯·哈代《无名的裘德》中的女性艾拉白拉一直被视为妖妇的代表。但是妖妇形象一直是男性话语世界对女性的一种丑化与诋毁的手段。本文具体分析哈代对艾拉白拉妖妇形象的三种书写策略:动物隐喻化、虚假行为的揭示和文学传统妖妇形象的借用,从而探索作者男权叙述视角下对妖妇型女性的丑化策略。%Arabella, a female character in Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure, has always been considered as a vamp representative. However, the writing of vamp image has been a means to smear and slander women in male discourses. This essay focuses on analyzing Hardy's three writing strategies on Arabella's image that are metaphor of animals, revelation of false action, and analogy of traditional vamp image Delilah to explore Hardy's tactics of smearing woman image from male narrative perspective.

  12. http://sjm06.com/SJM%20ISSN1452-4864/9_2_2014_November_145-292/9_2_2014_159_171.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildikó Marosi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There are explicit, as well as tacit expectations among skills and competencies that are demanded from those newly graduated. My main question of interest is the following: Where do young people learn these skills, knowledge and experience? Present paper is based on literature review and a quantitative research which was conducted among university students aged 18-33, in autumn 2013. The findings prove that a significant part of tacit knowledge is gained through family socialisation, during the process of informal learning rather than via formal education. Hence, family socialisation affects the competence portfolio of young graduates immensely. Present paper endeavours to investigate this influence.

  13. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad- ... Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in hearing loss, ...

  14. 2124-IJBCS-Article-Jude Okoye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Anti-spermatogenic and estrogenic effects of Escravos crude oil in Chinchilla rabbits ... A total of 30 male Chinchilla rabbits within the age range of 12 to 14 weeks and weighing 1.2 .... Nigeria), vitamins and water ad libitum for 28 days. Sample ...

  15. Estimation of viscous dissipative stresses induced by a mechanical heart valve using PIV data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Pei; Lo, Chi-Wen; Lu, Po-Chien

    2010-03-01

    Among the clinical complications of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), hemolysis was previously thought to result from Reynolds stresses in turbulent flows. A more recent hypothesis suggests viscous dissipative stresses at spatial scales similar in size to red blood cells may be related to hemolysis in MHVs, but the resolution of current instrumentation is insufficient to measure the smallest eddy sizes. We studied the St. Jude Medical (SJM) 27 mm valve in the aortic position of a pulsatile circulatory mock loop under physiologic conditions with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Assuming a dynamic equilibrium assumption between the resolved and sub-grid-scale (SGS) energy flux, the SGS energy flux was calculated from the strain rate tensor computed from the resolved velocity fields and the SGS stress was determined by the Smagorinsky model, from which the turbulence dissipation rate and then the viscous dissipative stresses were estimated. Our results showed Reynolds stresses up to 80 N/m2 throughout the cardiac cycle, and viscous dissipative stresses below 12 N/m2. The viscous dissipative stresses remain far below the threshold of red blood cell hemolysis, but could potentially damage platelets, implying the need for further study in the phenomenon of MHV hemolytic complications.

  16. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices.

  17. [Long-term results of conventional aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y; Miyairi, T; Kitamura, T; Kigawa, I; Fukuda, S

    2006-04-01

    We studied cardiac function, clinical outcome and quality of life (QOL) long after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic stenosis. Forty-four patients in small group [St. Jude Medical (SJM) 17 HP, 19 A], and 69 patients in non-small group (19 HP, 21 A, 23 A) operated on from 1984 to 2004 were enrolled in this study. We assessed the clinical data, aortic pressure gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and ejection fraction (EF) by preoperative and postoperative echocardiography. Moreover to evaluate QOL after the operation, we performed SF-36 used for the evaluation of health and QOL worldwide. Mean follow-up is 7.1 +/- 4.8 years in small group, and 6.8 +/- 4.6 years in non-small group. There were 2 hospital deaths in small group, and 1 in non-small group. The actual survival rate at 10-year were 89.2% in small group, and 85.6% in non-small group. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality, LVMI, long-term survival rate, and the scores of SF-36 between the 2 groups. The use of small sized prosthetic valves in patients with small aortic annulus might be justified when there is no patient-prosthesis mismatch.

  18. Medical marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized ...

  19. Abortion - medical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  20. Oral Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  1. 从自我探索到自我否定--论存在主义视域下《无名的裘德》中“苏”的形象%From Self-Exploration to Self-denial:An Existential Analysis of Sue Bridehead in Jude the Obscure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      英国作家托马斯·哈代在《无名的裘德》当中,刻画了女主人公苏·布莱德赫德在追求经济独立、思想解放、爱情自由与婚姻平等上作出积极的尝试。然而现实和自身因素纠缠于女性意识复苏的矛盾当中,苏的自我探索最终走向毁灭。小说借女性生存困境的描写,探讨人类未来命运、人生价值及意义。%This paper focuses on Sue Bridehead in the novel Jude the Obscure to elaborate upon the character of this Victorian woman who pursues self-exploration in economic independence, religious emancipation, freedom of love and equality in marriage. But the bleak reality and hard fate of the protagonist are intervened in the female role awaking. All Sue's efforts lead to her final doom, through which this novel presents a thorough reassessment on human fate, the value and meaning of life.

  2. Medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Medical tourism is a burgeoning industry in our region. It involves patients travelling outside of their home country for medical treatment. This article provides an outline of the current research around medical tourism, especially its impact on Australians. Patients are increasingly seeking a variety of medical treatments abroad, particularly those involving cosmetic surgery and dental treatment, often in countries in South-East Asia. Adverse events may occur during medical treatment abroad, which raises medico-legal and insurance issues, as well as concerns regarding follow-up of patients. General practitioners need to be prepared to offer advice, including travel health advice, to patients seeking medical treatment abroad.

  3. Medical Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine philosophical stances underpinning medical identity and assess the conceptual relationship between physician, medical practice and culture. Argument: Medical identity is about the ideals and moral positions that physicians take when justifying themselves. Medical identity...... hedonistic versus sentimentalist approaches to medical identity. The sociocultural philosophical analysis of medical identity can shed light on what it means conceptually for a physician to harbor beliefs associated with him/her being taken to be an autonomous professional. It is important because it touches...... on the meaning of being a compassionate, good and skilled physician, making its relevance to person-centered medicine self-evident. Conclusion: Medical identity should be analyzed with reference to literature, philosophy and medical practice in order for the physician to exercise a reflective position...

  4. Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  5. Medication safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W

    2008-03-01

    Patient safety is a state of mind, not a technology. The technologies used in the medical setting represent tools that must be properly designed, used well, and assessed on an on-going basis. Moreover, in all settings, building a culture of safety is pivotal for improving safety, and many nontechnologic approaches, such as medication reconciliation and teaching patients about their medications, are also essential. This article addresses the topic of medication safety and examines specific strategies being used to decrease the incidence of medication errors across various clinical settings.

  6. Medical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Projected Employment, 2024 Change, 2014-24 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Medical scientists, except epidemiologists 19- ...

  7. Long-Term Outcomes of Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Medical Therapy after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Jeffrey L; Carroll, John D; Thaler, David E; Smalling, Richard W; MacDonald, Lee A; Marks, David S; Tirschwell, David L

    2017-09-14

    than in the medical-therapy group. Among adults who had had a cryptogenic ischemic stroke, closure of a PFO was associated with a lower rate of recurrent ischemic strokes than medical therapy alone during extended follow-up. (Funded by St. Jude Medical; RESPECT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00465270 .).

  8. [Euthanasia: medications and medical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossignol, D

    2008-09-01

    The Belgian law relative to euthanasia has been published in 2002. A physician is allowed to help a patient with intractable suffering (physical or psychological). Legal conditions are clear. However, nothing is said about medical procedures or medications to be used. The present paper will present specific clinical situations at the end of life, practical procedures and medications. A special focus is made on psychological impact of euthanasia.

  9. Medical Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, Dustin; Guilbert, Edith; Bernardin, Jeanne; Black, Amanda; Dunn, Sheila; Fitzsimmons, Brian; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Soon, Judith; Trouton, Konia; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Wiebe, Ellen; Gold, Karen; Murray, Marie-Ève; Winikoff, Beverly; Reeves, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This guideline reviews the evidence relating to the provision of first-trimester medical induced abortion, including patient eligibility, counselling, and consent; evidence-based regimens; and special considerations for clinicians providing medical abortion care. Gynaecologists, family physicians, registered nurses, midwives, residents, and other healthcare providers who currently or intend to provide pregnancy options counselling, medical abortion care, or family planning services. Women with an unintended first trimester pregnancy. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library between July 2015 and November 2015 using appropriately controlled vocabulary (MeSH search terms: Induced Abortion, Medical Abortion, Mifepristone, Misoprostol, Methotrexate). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, clinical trials, and observational studies published from June 1986 to November 2015 in English. Additionally, existing guidelines from other countries were consulted for review. A grey literature search was not required. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force for Preventive Medicine rating scale (Table 1). Medical abortion is safe and effective. Complications from medical abortion are rare. Access and costs will be dependent on provincial and territorial funding for combination mifepristone/misoprostol and provider availability. Introduction Pre-procedure care Medical abortion regimens Providing medical abortion Post-abortion care Introduction Pre-procedure care Medical abortion regimens Providing medical abortion Post-abortion care. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical Malpractice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grembi, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    MM first came to the attention of policy makers primarily in the USA where, from the 1970s, healthcare providers denounced problems in getting insurance for medical liability, pointing out to a crisis in the MM insurance market (Sage WM (2003) Understanding the first malpractice crisis of the 21th...... in the last decades also among European countries (Hospitals of the European Union (HOPE) (2004) Insurance and malpractice, final report. Brussels, www.hope.be; OECD (2006) Medical malpractice, insurance and coverage options, policy issues in insurance n.11; EC (European Commission, D.G. Sanco) (2006) Special...... eurobarometer medical errors)...

  11. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves: quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Petr [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Oosterpark 9, P.O box 95500, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Westers, Paul [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Department of Biostatistics, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mol, Bas A.J.M. de [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Technology Eindhoven, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. A Medtronic Hall tilting disc (MH), and Carbomedics (CM), St Jude (SJM), and ON-X bileaflet valves underwent CT in an in-vitro model using retrospective gating with a 64 detector CT system in stationary and pulsatile conditions. Artifacts and radiopaque component volumes were quantified with thresholds based on surrounding structures and valvular components. Hypodense artifacts volumes (mm{sup 3}) were 1,029 {+-} 147, 535 {+-} 53, 371 {+-} 16, and 366 {+-} 18 for the SJM, MH, CM and ON-X valves (p < 0.001 except for the latter two valves p = 0.43). Hyperdense artifact volumes were 3,546 {+-} 141, 2,387 {+-} 103, 2,003 {+-} 102, and 3,033 {+-} 31 for the SJM, MH, CM and ON-X valve, respectively (all differences p < 0.001). Leaflet motion affected hypodense (F = 41.5, p < 0.001) and hyperdense artifacts (F = 53.7, p < 0.001). Closed and moving leaflets were associated with the least and the most artifacts respectively (p < 0.001, both artifact types). Both valve design and leaflet motion affect PHV-induced artifacts. Best imaging results may be expected for the CM valve during phases in which the leaflets are closed. (orig.)

  12. Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  13. Medical error

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    Michael Berk. Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Australia .... inaccurate and inflammatory media reports their community accepted the ex- ... non-medical situations such as the aviation industry and nuclear power tech- nology ...

  14. Medical Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accredited programs prepare students for a career in academic or research health science centers, industry, or consulting. As members of the health career profession with strong communication skills, medical illustrators work closely with clients to interpret ...

  15. Medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, P

    1992-01-01

    In theory, the Medical Council of India (MCI) determines the standards and qualifications of medical schools. It also sanctions curricula and ensures standards. Yet no standards exist on the mode of selection in medical schools, duration of study, course content, student stipends or period of internship. It takes 4.5 years to finish medical school. Students undergo preclinical, paraclinical, and clinical training. Most courses are in English which tends to favor the urban elite. Students cannot always communicate with patients in local languages. Textbooks often provide medical examples unrelated to India. Pedagogy consists mainly of lectures and rote learning predominates. Curricula tend not to provide courses in community health. Students pick up on the elitist attitudes of the faculty. For example, faculty do not put much emphasis on community health, individual health, equity in health care delivery, and teamwork. Further the education system is not patient oriented, but hospital or disease oriented. Faculty should train students in creating sanitation programs, knowing local nutritious foods, and in making community diagnoses. Yet they tend to be practitioners 1st then educators. Further faculty are not paid well and are not always invited to take part in improving curriculum, so morale is often low. Moreover experience in health planning and management issues is not required for administrators. In addition, medical schools are not well equipped with learning aids, libraries, or teaching staff. Tax revenues finance medical education. 75% of graduating physicians set up a private practice. Further many physicians go to urban areas. 34-57% emigrate to other countries. The problems of medical education will not be solved until the political and economic system becomes more responsive to the health needs of the people.

  16. Medical intellectuals: resisting medical orientalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aull, Felice; Lewis, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose analogies between medical discourse and Edward Said's "Orientalism." Medical discourse, like Orientalism, tends to favor institutional interests and can be similarly dehumanizing in its reductionism, textual representations, and construction of its subjects. To resist Orientalism, Said recommends that critics--"intellectuals"--adopt the perspective of exile. We apply Said's paradigm of intellectual-as-exile to better understand the work of key physician-authors who cross personal and professional boundaries, who engage with patients in mutually therapeutic relationships, and who take on the public responsibility of representation and advocacy. We call these physician-authors "medical intellectuals" and encourage others to follow in their path.

  17. Medical Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology.

  18. Medical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Biscari, C.

    2014-12-19

    The use of accelerators for medical applications has evolved from initial experimentation to turn-key devices commonly operating in hospitals. New applications are continuously being developed around the world, and the hadrontherapy facilities of the newest generation are placed at the frontier between industrial production and advanced R&D. An introduction to the different medical application accelerators is followed by a description of the hadrontherapy facilities, with special emphasis on CNAO, and the report closes with a brief outlook on the future of this field.

  19. Medical emplotment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Troels Sune

    ’. Theoretically the project departs from Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Participatory Design and is informed by Medical Informatics, Design Research and Science and Technology Studies. Methodically the project is founded on collaborative prototyping, ethnographic studies, and design interventions...... philosophy and building on theory on narrative reasoning, the dissertation offers the notions of emplotment and re-emplotment to describe how physicians marshal information from various sources, including the medical record, the patient and coSummary to form a narrative, when making sense of patients...

  20. Medical leasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Leases for medical space can have far-reaching (and sometimes unintentional) consequences for the future of the practice and the costs of the business. In order to prevent hardship and expense down the line, it is especially important to review the lease to make sure that it reflects the practice's goals, needs, and structure. This article provides a number of provisions that are especially crucial to review and negotiate when leasing medical space, including use restrictions, assignment and subleasing clauses, build-out terms, and legal compliance requirements.

  1. Medical emplotment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Troels Sune

    ’. Theoretically the project departs from Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Participatory Design and is informed by Medical Informatics, Design Research and Science and Technology Studies. Methodically the project is founded on collaborative prototyping, ethnographic studies, and design interventions...... philosophy and building on theory on narrative reasoning, the dissertation offers the notions of emplotment and re-emplotment to describe how physicians marshal information from various sources, including the medical record, the patient and coSummary to form a narrative, when making sense of patients...

  2. Medical Transcriptionists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » Major Economic Indicators » Schedules for news Releases » By Month By News ... employed in 2014. Most medical transcriptionists work for hospitals or in ... risk management, legal issues relating to healthcare documentation, and English ...

  3. Glaucoma medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Bora; Cakiner-Egilmez, Tulay; Desai, Manishi

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a common eye condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide, making it the second-leading cause of blindness. Because glaucoma is associated with increased IOP level, the primary goal in treatment of glaucoma includes lowering IOP to prevent further progression of the disease. While various surgical interventions exist, medical therapy is currently the first line of treatment. Medical treatment of glaucoma includes topical beta-blockers, alpha-2 agonists, prostaglandins, parasympathomimetics and CAIs. Anti-glaucoma agents help reduce IOP by affecting the production of aqueous humor or increasing the outflow of aqueous through the trabecular or uveoscleral pathway. Choosing an appropriate medical regimen can be challenging and various factors such as efficacy, safety, cost and patient compliance must be considered. First-line treatment is often topical beta-blockers or prostaglandin analogs. However, beta-blocking agents can be associated with systemic side effects and need to be used cautiously in patients with serious concomitant cardiopulmonary disease. Alpha-2 agonists and parasympathomimetics are often considered second- or third-line treatment options but good adjunctive agents. Oral CAIs are often indicated for patients with elevated IOP in an acute setting or for patients resistant to other glaucoma medications and patients who are not good surgical candidates.

  4. Medic Bleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Medic Bleep is a secure instant messaging app that enables clinicians to discuss patient care quickly, securely and legally. It looks and feels like WhatsApp, but has been designed for the healthcare market to enable staff to communicate with each other, and to help speed up conversations between clinicians to increase efficiency.

  5. Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Proprietary Names (PDF - 146KB) Draft Guidance for Industry: Best Practices in Developing Proprietary Names for Drugs (PDF - 279KB) ... or (301) 796-3400 druginfo@fda.hhs.gov Human Drug ... in Medication Errors Resources for You Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: ...

  6. Medication Errors - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay BC; Nikhitha MK; Patel Sunil B

    2015-01-01

    In this present review article, regarding medication errors its definition, medication error problem, types of medication errors, common causes of medication errors, monitoring medication errors, consequences of medication errors, prevention of medication error and managing medication errors have been explained neatly and legibly with proper tables which is easy to understand.

  7. Medication Errors - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay BC; Nikhitha MK; Patel Sunil B

    2015-01-01

    In this present review article, regarding medication errors its definition, medication error problem, types of medication errors, common causes of medication errors, monitoring medication errors, consequences of medication errors, prevention of medication error and managing medication errors have been explained neatly and legibly with proper tables which is easy to understand.

  8. Medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology almost 25 years ago, non-invasive imaging has become firmly established as an essential tool in the diagnosis of disease. Fully three-dimensional imaging of internal organs is now possible, b and for studies which explore the functional status of the body. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function are available, and scanners which combine anatomical and functional imaging in a single device are under development. Such techniques have been made possible through r ecent technological and mathematical advances. This series of lectures will review both the physical basis of medical imaging techniques using X-rays, gamma and positron emitting radiosiotopes, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and the mathematical methods used to reconstruct three-dimentional distributions from projection data. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simple radiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo biochemistry. They ...

  9. Medical physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, J.A. (Plymouth College (UK))

    1989-01-01

    A book on 'Medical Physics' is written in three parts. Part I discusses the physics of the human body including the expenditure of energy, human mechanics and the human response to light and sound. Part II describes the monitoring of various physiological parameters, such as temperatures and pressure using specialized transducers and systems employing radiotelemetric, ultrasonic and fibre-optic techniques. Part III on ionizing radiations discusses the production, properties and detection of the different radiations and the elements of dosimetry. The different types of radiation detectors are also described. Finally the diagnostic applications of radioactive tracer studies are discussed. The material selected for inclusion in this book reflects the requirements of the Joint Matriculation Board's A-level option on Medical Physics and at the end of each of the 15 chapters, there are questions on the content. Part III of the book has been selected and indexed separately. (UK).

  10. Planul de Amenajare a Teritoriului Judeţean Vrancea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi Niţu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Plan of the Vrancea County is the spatial expression of the socio-economic development of the County. The study will provide a global framework for possibilities and uniform development in regional and national context. P.A.T.J. Vrancea seeks to optimize the use of natural resources, the use of work resources and the distribution of the population in order to create a permanent balance between how to exploit the natural and economic potential, of the one part, and the protection of the environment, on the other hand, through a responsible management of the territory in accordance with the principle of sustainable development. P.A.T.J. Vrancea aimed at solving specific problems of the territory in the context of efficiency, fairness, transparency and the involvement of communities in decision-making.

  11. Medical robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    In this book, we present medical robotics, its evolution over the last 30 years in terms of architecture, design and control, and the main scientific and clinical contributions to the field. For more than two decades, robots have been part of hospitals and have progressively become a common tool for the clinician. Because this domain has now reached a certain level of maturity it seems important and useful to provide a state of the scientific, technological and clinical achievements and still open issues. This book describes the short history of the domain, its specificity and constraints, and

  12. Medical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Voto Bernales, Juan; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Medical Physics is to study the physical phenomena that occur in the body and exert action on the agents. It also addresses the manner taught natural agents in the study and exploration of the human body and in the way in the same agents for use in the treatment of disease can be used. La Física Médica tiene por objeto estudiar los fenómenos físicos que se realizan en el organismo y la acción que sobre el ejercen los agentes. Se ocupa, además, de enseñar la manera cómo pueden utilizarse lo...

  13. Medical revolution in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarin, V L; Isoardi, R A

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the major Argentineans contributors, medical physicists and scientists, in medical imaging and the development of medical imaging in Argentina. The following are presented: history of medical imaging in Argentina: the pioneers; medical imaging and medical revolution; nuclear medicine imaging; ultrasound imaging; and mathematics, physics, and electronics in medical image research: a multidisciplinary endeavor.

  14. Medical robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management.

  15. Smoking cessation medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoking cessation - medications; Smokeless tobacco - medications; Medications for stopping tobacco ... Creating a plan to help you deal with smoking urges. Getting support from a doctor, counselor, or ...

  16. Medical telesensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Trinidad L.; Crilly, P. B.; Smith, S. F.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Britton, Charles L., Jr.; Morrison, Gilbert W.; Ericson, M. N.; Hedden, D.; Bouldin, Donald W.; Passian, A.; Downey, Todd R.; Wig, A. G.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    1998-05-01

    Medical telesensors are self-contained integrated circuits for measuring and transmitting vital signs over a distance of approximately 1-2 meters. The circuits are unhoused and contain a sensor, signal processing and modulation electronics, a spread-spectrum transmitter, an antenna and a thin-film battery. We report on a body-temperature telesensor, which is sufficiently small to be placed on a tympanic membrane in a child's ear. We also report on a pulse-oximeter telesensor and a micropack receiver/long- range transmitter unit, which receives form a telesensor array and analyzes and re-transmits the vital signs over a longer range. Signal analytics are presented for the pulse oximeter, which is currently in the form of a finger ring. A multichip module is presented as the basic signal-analysis component. The module contains a microprocessor, a field=programmable gate array, memory elements and other components necessary for determining trauma and reporting signals.

  17. [MEDICAL CANNABIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna

    2016-02-01

    The cannabis plant has been known to humanity for centuries as a remedy for pain, diarrhea and inflammation. Current research is inspecting the use of cannabis for many diseases, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dystonia, and chronic pain. In inflammatory conditions cannabinoids improve pain in rheumatoid arthritis and:pain and diarrhea in Crohn's disease. Despite their therapeutic potential, cannabinoids are not free of side effects including psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, dependence and abuse. Controlled clinical studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cannabis are few and small, whereas pressure for expanding cannabis use is increasing. Currently, as long as cannabis is classified as an illicit drug and until further controlled studies are performed, the use of medical cannabis should be limited to patients who failed conventional better established treatment.

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and ... Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation ...

  19. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation ...

  20. Medication/Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... immediate or delayed. What Is an Allergy to Medication/Drugs? Allergies to drugs/medications are complicated, because ...

  1. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications ... Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral ...

  2. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    15-001098 Copy Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks Sarah K...other national challenges. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks...noted that the ability of the Military Health System to provide operational healthcare is measured by the readiness of its medical personnel and

  3. Medical muddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis.

  4. MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Drinovec

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to restrictions imposed on a clinical freedom, interest for professionalism in healthcare has been getting bigger not only in medicine literature and various mass media but also in teaching and organisation of healthcare. Professionalism stands not only for a medicine’s contract with society, recognition of a physician status, privilege and monopoly but also for a genuine physician’s commitment to professional responsibilities.Analysis. In 2002 European and American associations approved a document on medical professionalism in the new millenium, so-called Physician Charter. This document includes fundamental principles of professionalism such as altruism, patient autonomy and social justice. In particular, it analyses a physician’s professional competency, honesty with patients, patient confidentiality, appropriate relations with patients, improvements regarding a healthcare quality, healthcare access, just distribution of finite funds, commitment to scientific knowledge, trust maintenance by managing conflicts of interest and a professional responsibility.Conclusions. Physician’s professionalism means philosophycal and sociological analysis of his/her profession and its position in a society. It includes a concern for improvements of his/ her own scientific knowledge, skills, a genuine ethic interest for an individual patient bearing in mind principles of equality and justice in society. Whether performing an organisational and public work or participating in professional health organizations, physician’s interest for a patient must prevail.

  5. Turkish Medical Information System and Medical Librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huriye Çolaklar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, medical information is supported at state level according to national policies. However, although the history of medical libraries in Turkey goes back to the 13th century in Anatolia, modern medical library applications adopted since the 1950s have not received much state support. In the past thirteen years a few medical libraries joined forces under ÜNAK (the Association of University and Research Librarians to contribute to the organization and development of Turkish Medical Information through the establishment of a "Medical Working Group" in 2000.

  6. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will be able to find. Medical identification products can help ensure proper treatment in an ...

  7. Implantable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 16,2016 For Rhythm Control ... a Heart Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack ...

  8. When Medication Is Prescribed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression When Medication Is Prescribed Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... you have about the medicine. —NIMH Types of Medications There are several types of medications used to ...

  9. Medication Use during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Medication Use During Pregnancy Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... are taking only medications that are necessary. What Medications Can Cause Birth Defects? We know that taking ...

  10. Your Pet's Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Your Pet's Medications When your pet has a medical condition, ... authorized. What you can do to keep your pet safe When the medication is prescribed Let your ...

  11. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems. This paper analyses the increased intelligence of the CMDS system, which motivates its use for different medical problem’s solving.

  12. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anthony J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. Last modified on February 23, ...

  13. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anthony J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. Last modified on February 23, ...

  14. MEDICAL ETHICS COURSE IMPROVES MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM: MEDICAL STUDENTS´ OPINIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Sotoodeh Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Training physicians who are expert in many medical aspects is the most improtant mission of medical universities. One of these aspects, is professional behavior achievement. One of the important goals in training of ethics, is recognition of conflicts in different parts of ethics and having logical viewpoint for resolving and analyzing these conflicts. This descriptive and analytical study was done to evaluate the efficacy of medical ethics education in medical students´ professional attitudes improvement. One hundred and two medical students were selected randomly in different steps of education and were questioned and their opinions correlation with stage of education and gender were evaluated. There was a significant difference between female viewpoint (in roles of ethic course which is presented in preclinical step in professional attitude improvement (P = 0.009 and also a significant difference was seen in the viewpoint score between student stage with intern stage (P = 0.031. Medical students in educational student stage believe ethic course improve medical professionalism. Since there is no special course to train medical students in professionalism, some interventions are required in this field to improve this aspect of physicians' professional life.

  15. Medical Informatics For Medical Students And Medical Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai MOHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of incorporating medical (or healthinformatics into the education of medical students andmedical practitioners is being increasingly recognised.The advances in information and communicationtechnology and the pervasion of the Internet intoeveryday life have important implications forhealthcare services and medical education.Students and practitioners should learn to utilisebiomedical information for problem solving anddecision making based on evidence. The extensiveintroduction of electronic health information systemsinto hospitals and clinics and at the enterprise level inMalaysia and elsewhere is driving a demand for healthprofessionals who have at least basic skills in andappreciation of the use of these technologies.The essential clinical informatics skills have beenidentified and should be incorporated into theundergraduate medical curriculum. It is recommendedthat these be introduced in stages and integrated intoexisting programmes rather than taught as a separatemodule. At the same time, medical schools shouldsupport the integration of e-learning in the educationalprocess in view of the numerous potential benefits.

  16. STS-3 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

  17. Machine medical ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Pontier, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The essays in this book, written by researchers from both humanities and sciences, describe various theoretical and experimental approaches to adding medical ethics to a machine in medical settings. Medical machines are in close proximity with human beings, and getting closer: with patients who are in vulnerable states of health, who have disabilities of various kinds, with the very young or very old, and with medical professionals. In such contexts, machines are undertaking important medical tasks that require emotional sensitivity, knowledge of medical codes, human dignity, and privacy. As machine technology advances, ethical concerns become more urgent: should medical machines be programmed to follow a code of medical ethics? What theory or theories should constrain medical machine conduct? What design features are required? Should machines share responsibility with humans for the ethical consequences of medical actions? How ought clinical relationships involving machines to be modeled? Is a capacity for e...

  18. Medical Physics Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

    2006-03-01

    The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

  19. Teaching Medical Sociology in Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Gerard J.; Sobal, Jeffery

    1990-01-01

    Provides 11 teaching guidelines for presentation of sociological material to medical students and addresses the problems of dense scheduling and competition for time in a medical school curriculum. Considers career implications for sociologists in this setting as well as resources available. (NL)

  20. Matching Medical Websites to Medical Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Rak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of medical texts provided to general public on the Internet is a serious issue nowadays. Unfortunately the only feasible way to approve the adequacy of the medical information content is human verification today. Best practices in medicine are systematically captured by medical guidelines (MGLs, which are provided by renowned medical societies. We propose a simple approach to exploiting MGL content as ’gold standard’ for the assessment of content quality in medical web sites (WS, based on the idea that the information content is reflected in the domain terminology used. Concept candidates discovered in a MGL and in the tested web pages are matched to the UMLS terminological system. In a small case study, MGLs and WSs have been analyzed for similarity at term and concept level. The research is a step towards automated evaluation of WS content on the basis of MGLs as the quality standard.

  1. STS-1 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The report includes a review of the health of the crew before, during and immediately after the first Shuttle orbital flight (April 12-14, 1981). Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical kit carried inflight; tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results; hematology and immunology analyses; medical microbiology; food and nutrition; potable water; shuttle toxicology; radiological health; cabin acoustical noise. Also included is information on: environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management; and management, planning and implementation of the medical program.

  2. Medical spa marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Neil S; Dinkes, Adam; Oskin, Larry

    2008-07-01

    Medical spas are different. We are not just selling medical and dermatology services; we are offering clients viable new solutions to their skin care, body care, and hair care challenges. Traditional medical marketing becomes blurred today, as the expansion and acceptance of medical spas helps you to effectively compete with traditional skin care clinics, salons, and spas, while offering more therapeutic treatments from professionally licensed doctors, nurses, aestheticians, massage therapists, spa professionals, and medical practitioners. We recommend that you make the choice to successfully and competitively become a market-driven medical spa with an annual strategic plan, rather than an operationally driven business.

  3. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be readily available over-the-counter, in a pharmacy or grocery store, or limited by prescription only. ... J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, ...

  4. Medications (for IBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be readily available over-the-counter, in a pharmacy or grocery store, or limited by prescription only. ... J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, ...

  5. Medications for Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments > Medications for Memory Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/ ... Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Medications for Memory Treatments for Behavior For Sleep Changes Alternative Treatments ...

  6. American Medical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMA provides to help members save money. Residency & Career Planning Find out resources for a range of medical ... clinical questions using our reference tool View the Career Planning Resource Refinance your medical student loans Find leadership ...

  7. Choosing Your Medical Specialty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMA provides to help members save money. Residency & Career Planning Find resources for a range of medical career ... Fellowships Back to top Home Life & Career Residency & Career Planning Choosing a Medical Specialty Back to top Choosing ...

  8. Tanzania Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal publishes any contribution that advances medical science or ... these core objectives the journal publishes papers on original scientific research, short ... The Tanzania Medical Journal is an international Journal - ISSN: 0856-0719 ...

  9. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  10. Medical Device Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep ...

  11. Medical Treatments for Fibroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Medical Treatments for Fibroids Skip sharing on social media ... Page Content Your health care provider may suggest medical treatments to reduce the symptoms of fibroids or ...

  12. Medical Computational Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Tatar, Deborah Gail; Rosen, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Computational thinking (CT) in medicine means deliberating when to pursue computer-mediated solutions to medical problems and evaluating when such solutions are worth pursuing in order to assist in medical decision making. Teaching computational thinking (CT) at medical school should be aligned...... with learning objectives, teaching and assessment methods, and overall pedagogical mission of the individual medical school in relation to society. Medical CT as part of the medical curriculum could help educate novices (medical students and physicians in training) in the analysis and design of complex...... healthcare organizations, which increasingly rely on computer technology. Such teaching should engage novices in information practices where they learn to perceive practices of computer technology as directly involved in the provision of patient care. However, medical CT as a teaching and research field...

  13. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by a physician who specializes in motility or stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. More complex medication regimens, and ... IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS Take ...

  14. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS ... Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS ...

  15. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During Pregnancy Print ... both moms and their babies. Prenatal Care Before Pregnancy Prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. ...

  16. Polymyositis: Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Polymyositis (PM) is a highly treatable disease. Some ... PM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Find your MDA Care Center Current Clinical ...

  17. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During Pregnancy A ... both moms and their babies. Prenatal Care Before Pregnancy Prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. ...

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression, but rather likely to effects on the brain and the gut. Antidepressant medications can reduce the intensity of pain signals going from gut to brain. Read more about antidepressant medications. Newer IBS-Targeted ...

  19. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... atropine (Lomotil) Read more about antidiarrheal agents. Anti-anxiety medications – can be helpful for some people with ... who specializes in motility or stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. More complex medication regimens, and specialized motility and/ ...

  20. Medications (for IBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ...

  1. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy ... Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy ...

  2. Medications: Myths Versus Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are good, but they should never replace the statins.” Dr. Fletcher said. Natural supplements are better than ... medication . Many include stimulants that can have an adverse reaction with blood pressure medication, Dr. Fletcher said. “ ...

  3. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression, but rather likely to effects on the brain and the gut. Antidepressant medications can reduce the intensity of pain signals going from gut to brain. Read more about antidepressant medications. Newer IBS-Targeted ...

  4. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About IBS Twitter ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications Details Medications ...

  5. Understanding Medical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you hear about the results of a new medical research study. Sometimes the results of one study ... when reading or listening to reports of new medical findings. Some questions that can help you evaluate ...

  6. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to physician counseling and dietary manipulations. What's a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect counts ... the drug package or on your prescription label. Medications for IBS First line treatment has traditionally been ...

  7. Giving Medication to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Giving Medication to Children Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... the upper limit. back to top Q: Are medications that are intended for children clinically tested on ...

  8. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About IBS Twitter ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications Details Medications ...

  9. [Perspectives in medical liability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro W, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The progressive increase of medical negligence law suits requires an updated analysis of the current situation of medical liability in Chile. The application of a new criminal procedure will avoid criminal prosecution of doctors, transferring to the civil courts the pecuniary sanctions for malpractice. Medical negligence and damage inflicted by doctors that require compensation are explained. The most likely evolution of medical liability is proposed, through an increase in civil liability insurance and the necessary standardization of rules applicable to professional liability.

  10. Advanced Medication Dispenser

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Medication dispensing is an important activity that can have major implications if done improperly. Dispensing must be done in the correct time interval, at the correct user, with the correct drug and dose. We propose a smart medication dispenser that can satisfy these needs and provide a mechanism for supervision. In order to ensure that the dispensing process is error free, the concept of a new smart medication container is used. A smart medication container is “smart” ...

  11. [Historiography of medical objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Felip

    2008-01-01

    It has become acceptable among historians of medicine to profess a predilection for the historiography of medical ideas. But it is justified all the same to ask whether the logical connection really caused the origin, the change, or the disappearance of the medical objects. The interaction of ideas and medical objects assure as much objectivity as possible. In consequence, the contents of the museums, medical objects, is an aspect rather that a branch of the history of medicine.

  12. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  13. Medical Physics Data Book,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Medical Physics Data Book is a collection of physical and chemical data useful in medical physics . The information has been extracted from other...ionizing Radiation. Carried out by the Medical Physics Data Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, this compilation is meant to

  14. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Your Medical Records KidsHealth > For Teens > Your Medical Records A ... Records? en español Tus historias clínicas What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a ...

  15. Mission Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  16. MANAGEMENT OF MEDICAL SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARBU MARIA-MAGDALENA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The offer of medical services depends on medical personnel and more than this, on the management in the medical field since any resource not managed well or not managed at all is only a lost one, regardless its value. Management is therefore the key, the

  17. Marijuana: Modern Medical Chimaera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarine, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous…

  18. Medical Issues in Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Medical Issues in Adoption KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Issues in Adoption Print A A A What's ... some things to know about the health and medical care of an adopted child, before, during, and ...

  19. Conducting the Medical History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Martin A.; Alexander, Randell A.

    2011-01-01

    A key portion of the medical evaluation of child sexual abuse is the medical history. This differs from interviews or histories obtained by other professionals in that it is focuses more on the health and well-being of the child. Careful questions should be asked about all aspects of the child's medical history by a skilled, compassionate,…

  20. Medical Assisting Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a medical assisting program. The program guide is designed to relate primarily to the development of those skills needed by individuals in the medical assisting field, such as medical law and ethics, typing,…

  1. Marijuana: Modern Medical Chimaera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarine, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous…

  2. Medical marijuana: Medical necessity versus political agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter A.; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Summary Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative ...

  3. [Research in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    of articles on medical education studies indicate a need for improvement of the quality of medical education research in order to contribute to the advancement of educational practice as well as educational research. In particular, there is a need to embed studies in a conceptual theoretical framework......Research in medical education is a relatively new discipline. Over the past 30 years, the discipline has experienced a tremendous growth, which is reflected in an increase in the number of publications in both medical education journals and medical science journals. However, recent reviews...

  4. Advanced Medication Dispenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Alexan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Medication dispensing is an important activity that can have major implications if done improperly. Dispensing must be done in the correct time interval, at the correct user, with the correct drug and dose. We propose a smart medication dispenser that can satisfy these needs and provide a mechanism for supervision. In order to ensure that the dispensing process is error free, the concept of a new smart medication container is used. A smart medication container is “smart” as it holds the medication dispensing parameters for the drugs it contains: dispensing time and date and name. Based on this information, the actual dispensing is done.

  5. [Research in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Research in medical education is a relatively new discipline. Over the past 30 years, the discipline has experienced a tremendous growth, which is reflected in an increase in the number of publications in both medical education journals and medical science journals. However, recent reviews...... of articles on medical education studies indicate a need for improvement of the quality of medical education research in order to contribute to the advancement of educational practice as well as educational research. In particular, there is a need to embed studies in a conceptual theoretical framework...

  6. [Unravelling medical leadership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, Judith J; van Rensen, Elizabeth L J; Noordegraaf, Mirko; Schneider, Margriet M E

    2015-01-01

    Medical leadership is a popular topic in the Netherlands, and several interest groups now incorporate medical leadership into postgraduate medical education. However, there is no consensus on what this concept entails. By conducting a discourse analysis, a qualitative method which uses language and text to reveal existing viewpoints, this article reveals three perspectives on medical leadership: administrative leadership, leadership within organisations and leadership within each doctor's daily practice. Text analysis shows that the first two perspectives refer to medical leadership mainly in a defensive manner: by demonstrating medical leadership doctors could 'take the lead' once again; patient care only seems to play a small part in the process. These perspectives are not free of consequences, they will determine how the medical profession is constructed. For this reason, it is argued that there should be more emphasis on the third perspective, in which the quality of care for patients is of primary importance.

  7. Technologies for Medical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João; Barbosa, Marcos; Slade, AP

    2012-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced technologies for medical sciences in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders.   The fifteen papers included in this book were written by invited experts of international stature and address important technologies for medical sciences, including: computational modeling and simulation, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, human motion and posture, tissue engineering, design and development medical devices, and mechanic biology. Different applications are treated in such diverse fields as biomechanical studies, prosthesis and orthosis, medical diagnosis, sport, and virtual reality.   This book is of interest to researchers, students and manufacturers from  a wide range of disciplines related to bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational vision, human motion, mathematics, medical devices, medical image, medicine and physics.

  8. Medical Physicists and AAPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amols, Howard

    2006-03-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), a member society of the AIP is the largest professional society of medical physicists in the world with nearly 5700 members. Members operate in medical centers, university and community hospitals, research laboratories, industry, and private practice. Medical physics specialties include radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. The majority of AAPM members are based in hospital departments of radiation oncology or radiology and provide technical support for patient diagnosis and treatment in a clinical environment. Job functions include support of clinical care, calibration and quality assurance of medical devices such as linear accelerators for cancer therapy, CT, PET, MRI, and other diagnostic imaging devices, research, and teaching. Pathways into a career in medical physics require an advanced degree in medical physics, physics, engineering, or closely related field, plus clinical training in one or more medical physics specialties (radiation therapy physics, imaging physics, or radiation safety). Most clinically based medical physicists also obtain certification from the American Board of Radiology, and some states require licensure as well.

  9. Effects of Medications on Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENT Doctor Near You Effects of Medications on Voice Effects of Medications on Voice Patient Health Information ... entnet.org . Could Your Medication Be Affecting Your Voice? Some medications including prescription, over-the-counter, and ...

  10. Medication Use Before Your Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgical Support Groups Recursos en Español (Spanish Resources) Medication Use Before Your Operation Your medications may have ... restart taking these drugs. (See list.) List of medications that affect blood clotting:* Antiplatelet Medication: Anagrelide (Agrylin®), ...

  11. Medical education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Victor K E

    2008-01-01

    Malaysia has a long history of medical education, with Singapore becoming the first medical school to serve the region after its foundation in 1905. The first school to be established in Kuala Lumpur after independence from the British was the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya in 1963. Whilst today there are 21 public and private medical schools, all offering a 5 year undergraduate programme, some private schools have diversified by developing international collaboration and conduct twinning or credit-transfer programmes. All medical schools require accreditation by the National Accreditation Board and the Malaysian Medical Council. Although the criteria for accreditation is comprehensive and covers a broad range of areas of assessment, it is debatable whether it always matches the needs of the country. The dramatic increase in medical schools in the last two decades has posed challenges in terms of maintenance of quality, physical infrastructure and suitably qualified faculty.

  12. Medical design anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventura, Jonathan; Gunn, Wendy

    Barnard and Spencer define medical anthropology in the Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology as "Medical anthropology is, as the phrase implies, unavoidably concerned with the paradigm of modern Western medicine, whether implicitly or explicitly" (2002: 541). Recently there is a new...... focus in medical sociology and anthropology, which is patient's practices and influence on wider global health environment (see for example vol. 36(2) of Sociology of Health & Illness). While various social science theoreticians have written about agentic abilities of objects, there is a gap...... in literature concerning various levels of socio-cultural influence of the medical environment through medical products. In our research we have outlined the importance of medical design anthropology (MDA) to the practice and theory of design (Ventura and Gunn, 2016). In this paper, we study the ways in which...

  13. Organising medication discontinuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nixon, Michael; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Discontinuing medications is a complex decision making process and an important medical practice. It is a tool in reducing polypharmacy, reducing health system expenditure and improving patient quality of life. Few studies have looked at how general practitioners (GPs) discontinue...... a medication, in agreement with the patients, from a professional perspective. Three research questions were examined in this study: when does medication discontinuation occur in general practice, how is discontinuing medication handled in the GP’s practice and how do GPs make decisions about discontinuing...... medication? Methods: Twenty four GPs were interviewed using a maximum variation sample strategy. Participant observations were done in three general practices, for one day each, totalling approximately 30 consultations. Results: The results show that different discontinuation cues (related to the type...

  14. Fundamentals of Medical Ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    Postema, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    This book sets out the physical and engineering principles of acoustics and ultrasound as used for medical applications. It covers the basics of linear acoustics, wave propagation, non-linear acoustics, acoustic properties of tissue, transducer components, and ultrasonic imaging modes, as well as the most common diagnostic and therapeutic applications. It offers students and professionals in medical physics and engineering a detailed overview of the technical aspects of medical ultrasonic imaging, whilst serving as a reference for clinical and research staff.

  15. Medical tourism in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vijay; Das, Poonam

    2012-06-01

    The term 'medical tourism' is under debate because health care is a serious business and rarely do patients combine the two. India is uniquely placed by virtue of its skilled manpower, common language, diverse medical conditions that doctors deal with, the volume of patients, and a large nonresident Indian population overseas. Medical tourism requires dedicated services to alleviate the anxiety of foreign patients. These include translation, currency conversion, travel, visa, posttreatment care system,and accommodation of patient relatives during and after treatment.

  16. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses: on telephone: 73802 by e-mail: Service.Medical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  17. Reminder from Medical Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2004-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses on telephone: 73802 by e-mail: Service.Medical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  18. Medical waste management plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2004-12-01

    This plan describes the process for managing research generated medical waste at Sandia National Laboratories/California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of medical waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to medical waste.

  19. Medical student-mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Julie; Macnamara, Marina; Groskin, Anna; Petras, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Medical training is challenging and parenting is a full-time responsibility. Balancing a family with the significant demands of medical school is a daunting endeavor. Yet there is little research available to guide students, faculty, or administrators. Using one U.S. medical school as a case study, this article provides a comprehensive overview of the common personal and professional challenges that medical students who are also mothers face during their undergraduate medical education, and practical strategies and resources useful in navigating such challenges. This article is also a resource guide for the faculty and administrators who teach, advise, and mentor medical-student parents. For leaders in medical education, the article concludes with suggestions to better support the health and educational experience of medical student-parents: 1) a systematic network of career advisors, 2) scheduling flexibility, 3) formal breastfeeding policies and workplace support, 4) institutionally supported childcare, and 5) how student-parents may foster the educational health mission of medical schools.

  20. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects.

  1. Medical equipment management

    CERN Document Server

    Willson, Keith; Tabakov, Slavik

    2013-01-01

    Know What to Expect When Managing Medical Equipment and Healthcare Technology in Your Organization As medical technology in clinical care becomes more complex, clinical professionals and support staff must know how to keep patients safe and equipment working in the clinical environment. Accessible to all healthcare professionals and managers, Medical Equipment Management presents an integrated approach to managing medical equipment in healthcare organizations. The book explains the underlying principles and requirements and raises awareness of what needs to be done and what questions to ask. I

  2. [Anxiety--medical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosiak, M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the author presented themes connected with anxiety disorder in general medical practice. Pathogenesis, classification, dependence between anxiety and somatic and psychical diseases were described there.

  3. Medical Certification System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Provides automated risk-based decision making capability in support of medical certification and clearances processing associated fees and supporting surveillance of...

  4. Medical Services: Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Aeromedical Epidemiological Data Repository to support research and clinical studies for aircrew medical standards and policy. (5) Be the designated...Edentulous areas requiring prostheses but not on an immediate basis. (4) Periodontal disease or periodontium exhibiting: (a) Requirement for oral...materials but for which protective coverage is indicated. (3) Periodontal diseases or periodontium exhibiting: (a) Acute gingivitis or pericoronitis. (b

  5. The Intersection of Medical Child Abuse and Medical Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petska, Hillary W; Gordon, John B; Jablonski, Debra; Sheets, Lynn K

    2017-02-01

    Children with medical complexity and victims of medical child abuse may have similar clinical presentations. Atypical or unexplained signs and symptoms due to rare diseases may lead providers to suspect medical child abuse when not present. Conversely, medical child abuse may be the cause of or coexist with medical complexity. Careful consideration of whether or not medical child abuse is present is essential when assessing a child with medical complexity since either diagnosis has significant consequences for children and families.

  6. Medical Equipment Maintenance Programme Overview WHO Medical device technical series

    CERN Document Server

    Organization, World Health

    2011-01-01

    WHO and partners have been working towards devising an agenda an action plan tools and guidelines to increase access to appropriate medical devices. This document is part of a series of reference documents being developed for use at the country level. The series will include the following subject areas: . policy framework for health technology . medical device regulations . health technology assessment . health technology management . needs assessment of medical devices . medical device procurement . medical equipment donations . medical equipment inventory management . medical equipment maint

  7. History of Medical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical…

  8. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 168 by Anthony J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. Last modified on February 23, 2015 at 12:18:55 PM ... Selecting a CAM Practitioner Hypnosis for IBS ...

  9. Catastrophic Medical Expenditure Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Flores (Gabriela); O.A. O'Donnell (Owen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMedical expenditure risk can pose a major threat to living standards. We derive decomposable measures of catastrophic medical expenditure risk from reference-dependent utility with loss aversion. We propose a quantile regression based method of estimating risk exposure from cross-section

  10. Maintaining medical competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. I recently renewed my Arizona medical license and meet all the requirements. I far exceed the required CME hours and have no Medical Board actions, removal of hospital privileges, lawsuits, or felonies. None of the bad things are likely since I have not seen patients since July 1, 2011 and I no longer have hospital privileges. However, this caused me to pause when I came to the question of “Actively practicing”? A quick check of the status of several who do not see patients but are administrators, retired or full time editors of other medical journals revealed they were all listed as “active”. I guess that “medical journalism” is probably as much a medical activity as “administrative medicine” which is recognized by the Arizona Medical Board. This got me to thinking about competence and the Medical Board’s obligation to ensure competent physicians. Medical boards focused on preventing the unlicensed practice …

  11. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  12. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  13. Catastrophic Medical Expenditure Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Flores (Gabriela); O.A. O'Donnell (Owen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMedical expenditure risk can pose a major threat to living standards. We derive decomposable measures of catastrophic medical expenditure risk from reference-dependent utility with loss aversion. We propose a quantile regression based method of estimating risk exposure from cross-section

  14. Medicalized weapons & modern war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    "Medicalized" weapons--those that rely on advances in neuroscience, physiology, and pharmacology--offer the prospect of reducing casualties and protecting civilians. They could be especially useful in modern asymmetric wars in which conventional states are pitted against guerrilla or insurgent forces. But may physicians and other medical workers participate in their development?

  15. South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Medical Journal is published by the South African Medical Association, ... Guest Editorial: Growing wilderness and expedition medicine education in ... Does access to private healthcare influence potential lung cancer cure rates? ... Cardiovascular risk factors and mortality in children with chronic kidney ...

  16. Medical Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kent A.

    1986-01-01

    Description of information services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) highlights a new system for retrieving information from NLM's databases (GRATEFUL MED); a formal Regional Medical Library Network; DOCLINE; the Unified Medical Language System; and Integrated Academic Information Management Systems. Research and development and the…

  17. Continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, D

    1987-04-01

    With the rapid advances in medical science and increasing complexities of patient care, the need for continuing medical education (CME) is widely accepted by the profession. CME follows general and higher professional training, and should be a life long process. Teaching hospitals and postgraduate professional institutions play vital roles in organising, promoting, and monitoring this activity. CME directorates should be established. University authorities must recognise the important role of medical teachers in postgraduate and continuing medical education, and the staff establishment and terms of service should be held regularly. Medical libraries should have easy borrowing facilities. Self-assessment and audio-visual material are particularly helpful to the busy practitioner and inexpensive local or regional journals of quality can provide pertinent and up-to-date information. All charges for attending scientific meetings and educational material should be tax deductible or subsidized. The effectiveness of CME is difficult to assess and participation is almost impossible to enforce. Much depends on the standard of medical practice wanted by society. Recertification of general practitioners or specialists poses many problems. On the other hand, completion of self-assessment programmes, active participation at medical meetings, contributions to scientific literature, and membership of medical societies with built-in peer review could be monitored and regularly used to evaluate professional status.

  18. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... family doctor. When it comes to asking for medical records, different health care providers have different ways of doing things. Some might ... are needed faster — like when a patient needs medical treatment — the health care provider holding the records usually releases them immediately. If ...

  19. Ending pregnancy with medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or an emergency room. Getting Ready for a Medical Abortion The health care provider will: Do a physical exam and ultrasound Go ... vaginal intercourse for about a week after a medical abortion. You can ... care provider about what birth control to use. You should ...

  20. Spectator Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, L

    1992-01-01

    Recent world events-including the fear of terrorism during last year's Super Bowl-illustrate how vulnerable spectators can be to medical emergencies during sporting events. A physician who studies and coordinates crowd care for events ranging from the Super Bowl to local fairs gives tips on planning and executing a spectator medical plan.

  1. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor.For information, call the Nurses- on Telephone73802- by electronic mailInfirmary.Service@cern.chMarion.Diedrich@cern.chJanet.Doody@cern.chMireille.Vosdey@cern.chMedical Service

  2. Medical Virtual Public Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia SURUGIU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The healthcare enterprises are very disconnected. This paper intends to propose a solution that will provide citizens, businesses and medical enterprises with improved access to medical virtual public services. Referred medical services are based on existing national medical Web services and which support medically required services provided by physicians and supplementary health care practitioners, laboratory services and diagnostic procedures, clinics and hospitals’ services. Requirements and specific rules of these medical services are considered, and personalization of user preferences will to be supported. The architecture is based on adaptable process management technologies, allowing for virtual services which are dynamically combined from existing national medical services. In this way, a comprehensive workflow process is set up, allowing for service-level agreements, an audit trail and explanation of the process to the end user. The process engine operates on top of a virtual repository, providing a high-level semantic view of information retrieved from heterogeneous information sources, such as national sources of medical services. The system relies on a security framework to ensure all high-level security requirements are met. System’s architecture is business oriented: it focuses on Service Oriented Architecture - SOA concepts, asynchronously combining Web services, Business Process Management – BPM rules and BPEL standards.

  3. [Ethics in medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The title of this reflection evokes several contents that may encompass from ethics in research; fraud in science; ethics in medical advertising and relations between sponsors and science; and, finally, papers related to ethic content. This paper is limited to the ethic responsibilities of the medical writers or "scriptwriters."

  4. Commercial Crew Medical Ops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinbaugh, Randall; Cole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Provide commercial partners with: center insight into NASA spaceflight medical experience center; information relative to both nominal and emergency care of the astronaut crew at landing site center; a basis for developing and sharing expertise in space medical factors associated with returning crew.

  5. Medical negligence: Criminal prosecution of medical professionals, importance of medical evidence: Some guidelines for medical practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Pandit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The changing doctor-patient relationship and commercialization of modern medical practice has affected the practice of medicine. On the one hand, there can be unfavorable results of treatment and on the other hand the patient suspects negligence as a cause of their suffering. There is an increasing trend of medical litigation by unsatisfied patients. The Supreme Court has laid down guidelines for the criminal prosecution of a doctor. This has decreased the unnecessary harassment of doctors. As the medical profession has been brought under the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986, the patients have an easy method of litigation. There should be legal awareness among the doctors that will help them in the proper recording of medical management details. This will help them in defending their case during any allegation of medical negligence.

  6. Medication safety in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirke, C

    2009-01-01

    Medication error and adverse drug reactions occur frequently, leading to a high burden of patient harm in the hospital setting. Many Irish hospitals have established medication safety initiatives, designed to encourage reporting and learning to improve medication use processes and therefore patient safety. Eight Irish hospitals or hospital networks provided data from voluntary medication safety incident and near miss reporting programmes for pooled analysis of events occurring between 1st January 2006 and 30th June 2007. 6179 reports were received in total (mean 772 per hospital; range 96-1855). 95% of reports did not involve patient harm. Forty seven percent of reports related to the prescribing stage of the medication use process, 40% to the administration stage and 9% to the pharmacy dispensing stage. This data is published to increase awareness of this key patient safety issue, to share learning from these incidents and near misses and to encourage a more open patient safety culture.

  7. Medication-overuse headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Bendtsen, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a debilitating condition in which frequent and prolonged use of medication for the acute treatment of pain results in the worsening of the headache. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature on MOH and discuss future avenues for research....... MOH accounts for a substantial share of the global burden of disease. Prevalence is often reported as 1-2% but can be as high as 7% overall, with higher proportions among women and in those with a low socioeconomic position. Management consists of withdrawing pain medication, focusing on prophylactic...... and nonmedical treatments, and limiting acute symptomatic medication. Stress reduction and lifestyle interventions may support the change towards rational pain medication use. Support, follow up, and education are needed to help patients through the detoxification period. There is fertile ground for research...

  8. SIMULATION IN MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Palés Argullós

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In last twenty years, we are seeing increasingly widespread use of simulations in the training of doctors and other professionals of health sciences at the different stages of their educational continuum (undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education. So much so that the concept of simulations-based medical education has emerged and it is now recognized as a vital tool to ensure the learning of medical students and doctors, and to improve patient safety. This article will describe the reasons for the introduction and development of this new methodology, its advantages and the different models and currently available resources. We will describe also the characteristics of so-called simulation centres or clinical skills laboratories that have been developed worldwide, where the simulation-based medical education take place. Moreover, we will refer briefly to the situation in our country and finally to the principles of a good development of the simulation-based medical education.

  9. Style in medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Smith, D E

    1983-10-15

    A study of medical journals from 1962 showed a constant preoccupation with style. Editors and contributors on both sides of the Atlantic revile unnecessary obscurity and complexity and the use of jargon, barbarisms, vogue words, and weak impersonal constructions. They bewail the pompous use of verbiage and the "medspeak" typified by acronyms and neologisms created by affixation. Suggestions for possible causes of poor medical style range from editorial demands for compression and a general ignorance of the principles of good writing to faulty logic and the subordination of communication to status seeking. The consequences of bad writing may include the fragmentation of knowledge, an increase in the importance of abstracting services, a trend towards free glossy medical newspapers, and, as remedial measures, workshops and courses in medical writing. Some implications for English language teachers working with foreign medical graduates and preclinical students are discussed.

  10. MEDICAL LAW AND ETHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunčica Ivanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of interest in this article is the importance of knowing and connecting medical ethics and medical law for the category of health workers. The author believes that knowledge of bioethics which as a discipline deals with the study of ethical issues and health care law as a legal discipline, as well as medical activity in general, result in the awareness of health professionals of human rights, and since the performance of activities of health workers is almost always linked to the question of life and death, then the lack of knowledge of basic legal acts would not be justified at all. The aim of the paper was to present the importance of medical ethics and medical law among the medical staff. A retrospective analysis of the medical literature available on the indexed base KOBSON for the period 2005-2010 was applied. Analysis of all work leads to the conclusion that the balance between ethical principles and knowledge of medical law, trust and cooperation between the two sides that appear over health care can be considered a goal that every health care worker should strive for. This study supports the attitude that lack of knowledge and non-compliance with the ethical principles and medical law when put together can only harm the health care worker. In a way, this is the message to health care professionals that there is a need for the adoption of ethical principles and knowledge of medical law, because the most important position of all health workers is their dedication to the patient as a primary objective and the starting point of ethics.

  11. Designated Medical Directors for Emergency Medical Services: Recruitment and Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Freeman, Victoria A.; Patterson, P. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Context: Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies rely on medical oversight to support Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the provision of prehospital care. Most states require EMS agencies to have a designated medical director (DMD), who typically is responsible for the many activities of medical oversight. Purpose: To assess rural-urban…

  12. Medical Services: Standards of Medical Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-28

    formation (701.4), if the tendency is marked or interferes with the wearing of military equipment. m. Leprosy (030.9), any type. n. Lichen planus...p. Leukemia cutis or mycosis fungoides or cutaneous T–Cell lymphoma. (See also para 3–42.) q. Lichen planus. Generalized and not responsive to...exam if clinically indicated, and laboratory screening tests for DNA , HIV, and drug/alcohol testing will be accomplished. This medical screening and

  13. Medical devices: US medical device regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Baxley, John H

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Center for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, ensuring the safety of radiation-emitting products, fostering innovation, and providing the public with accurate, science-based information about the products we oversee, throughout the total product life cycle. The FDA was granted the authority to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of medical devices in 1976. It does not regulate the practice of medicine. Devices are classified based on complexity and level of risk, and "pre-1976" devices were allowed to remain on the market after being classified without FDA review. Post-1976 devices of lower complexity and risk that are substantially equivalent to a marketed "predicate" device may be cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. Clinical data are typically not needed for 510(k) clearance. In contrast, higher-risk devices typically require premarket approval. Premarket approval applications must contain data demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and efficacy, and this information typically includes clinical data. For novel devices that are not high risk, the de novo process allows FDA to simultaneously review and classify new devices. Devices that are not legally marketed are permitted to be used for clinical investigation purposes in the United States under the Investigational Device Exemptions regulation.

  14. Medical marijuana: medical necessity versus political agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter A; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-12-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative effects of the drug, and recommend that marijuana be administered to patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. Despite supporting evidence, the DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, which would allow physicians to prescribe marijuana to suffering patients. The use of medical marijuana has continued to gain support among states, and is currently legal in 16 states and the District of Columbia. This is in stark contrast to the federal government's stance of zero-tolerance, which has led to a heated legal debate in the United States. After reviewing relevant scientific data and grounding the issue in ethical principles like beneficence and nonmaleficence, there is a strong argument for allowing physicians to prescribe marijuana. Patients have a right to all beneficial treatments and to deny them this right violates their basic human rights.

  15. Medication counselling: physicians' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Saedder, Eva Aggerholm; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-12-01

    Medication reviews have the potential to lower the incidence of prescribing errors. To benefit from a medication review, the prescriber must adhere to medication counselling. Adherence rates vary from 39 to 100%. The aim of this study was to examine counselling-naive hospital physicians' perspectives and demands to medication counselling as well as study factors that might increase adherence to the counselling. The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews and literature search, and was pilot-tested among 30 physicians before being sent to 669 physicians. The questionnaire consisted of 35 items divided into four categories: attitudes (19 items), behaviours (3 items), assessment (8 items) and demographics (5 items). The response rate was 60% (400/669). Respondents were employed at psychiatric, medical or surgical departments. Eighty-five per cent of respondents agreed that patients would benefit of an extra medication review, and 72% agreed that there was a need for external medication counselling. The most important factor that could increase adherence was the clinical relevance of the counselling as 78% rated it of major importance. The most favoured method for receiving counselling was via the electronic patient record.

  16. Medical Virology in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaw Bing Chua

    2009-01-01

    Virology is a branch of biological science dealing with the study of viruses, and medical virology focuses on the study and control of diseases due to viruses that is of medical importance. The development of medical virology in Malaysia has its beginning in the Institute for Medical Research (IMR), following the establishment of the Division of Medical Zoology and Virus Research in the institute on 23 March 1953. The second institution in the country to establish diagnostic and research work in medical virology was Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya. This was followed by University Kebangsaan Malaysia, University Sains Malaysia and University of Sarawak Malaysia. The National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL) is the latest institution to establish a laboratory in 2003 for virus isolation and services to support country surveillance and outbreak investigation of infectious diseases due to viruses. In the field of medical virology, Malaysia contributed substantially in the areas of virus diagnostic services, development and research ranging from survey and documentation on the existence and prevalence of viruses causing diseases in Malaysia, clinical presentation and epidemiological features of virus diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic tests to pathogenesis of viral diseases. Malaysia contributed to the discoveries of at least 12 new viruses in the world. ASEAN plus Three (China, Japan, Republic of Korea) Emerging Infectious Programme was established to overcome the challenges and impact of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in this region. Malaysia as the co-ordinator of the laboratory component of the programme, contributed to strengthen the regional laboratory capability, capacity, laboratory-based surveillance and networking. The future of medical virology in Malaysia in terms of integration of diagnostic, reference and research to support the country's need will be enhanced and strengthened with the on

  17. Medical Service Information

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    The Medical Service is pleased to inform you that a psychologist specialising in psychotherapy (member of the Swiss Federation of Psychologists- FSP), Mrs Sigrid Malandain, will be starting work at the CERN on 1 November 2010, in the premises of the Medical Service, Building 57-1-024. Members of CERN personnel can request individual consultations, by appointment, in French or in English, on Tuesdays and Thursdays by calling 78435 (Medical Service secretariat) or sending an e-mail to psychologist-me@cern.ch.

  18. Promising Medicated Diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wei

    2009-01-01

    @@ The founding conference of World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies-Special Committee of Medicated Diet & Dietotherapy(WFCMS-SCMDAD).and the first world medicated diet and life nurturing academic seminar was held in the Great Hall of the People.Beijing,China,on August 11.A total of 400 experts and professors on medicated diet and life nurturing from 17 countries and regions including Japan,ROK,U.S.,Canada,U.K.,ect.Honorary President Professor Cai Guangxian delivered a welcoming speech to declare the organization's found.

  19. Medical instruments in museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand....

  20. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Plöckinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs, dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided.

  1. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  2. Medical marijuana and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, Sam

    2014-11-01

    Medical marijuana is legal for use by minors in many states, but not Delaware. Anecdotes have accumulated suggesting efficacy in managing seizures in children and several other conditions in adults. Currently well-designed studies in children are lacking. Challenges to effective pediatric medical marijuana use remain at the level of biochemistry, the individual patient, and society. Appropriate and effective use of medical marijuana in children will require significant legislative changes at the state and federal level, as well as high-quality research and standardization of marijuana strains.

  3. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Self-medication practice was highly prevalent among the medical students, with 87 % reporting that ... The increase in self-medication is due to a number of ..... resistant strains and increased cost and morbidity. ... Conflict of Interest.

  4. Medication wrong-route administrations in relation to medical prescriptions

    OpenAIRE

    GIMENES, Fernanda Raphael Escobar; Marques, Tatiane Cristina; Teixeira,Thalyta Cardoso Alux; MOTA, Maria Lurdemiler Sabóia; Silva,Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the influence of medical prescriptions' writing on the occurrence of medication errors in the medical wards of five Brazilian hospitals. This descriptive study used data obtained from a multicenter study conducted in 2005. The population was composed of 1,425 medication errors and the sample included 92 routes through which medication was wrongly administered. The pharmacological classes most frequently involved in errors were cardiovascular agents (31.5%), medication that...

  5. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be readily available over-the-counter, in a pharmacy or grocery store, or limited by prescription only. ... in treating IBS in multi-center, high quality clinical trials. These are prescription medications intended for specific ...

  6. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Gynecological Aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptom Diary Testing in IBS Changes You Should Not Ignore if ... IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome ( ...

  7. How About Medical Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Cites the increasing need for physicists in medicine. Sketches the qualifications needed to pursue a Master of Science degree (MS) in medical physics fields and provides a brief discussion of Ph.D programs in the field. (CP)

  8. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  9. MDR (Medical Device Reporting)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database allows you to search the CDRH's database information on medical devices which may have malfunctioned or caused a death or serious injury during the...

  10. Kids' Medical Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tendons Word! Tinnitus Word! Tobacco Word! Tonsillectomy Word! Tonsillitis Word! Trachea Word! Tragus Word! Triggers Word! Tympanogram ... purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  11. Medical Issues in Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kids, particularly those who have been living in poverty, to get colds, minor infections, upset stomachs, and ... better you'll be able to make informed decisions about medical care and ease the transition into ...

  12. Secure medical digital libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, I; Chrissikopoulos, V; Polemi, D

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, a secure medical digital library is presented. It is based on the CORBA specifications for distributed systems. The described approach relies on a three-tier architecture. Interaction between the medical digital library and its users is achieved through a Web server. The choice of employing Web technology for the dissemination of medical data has many advantages compared to older approaches, but also poses extra requirements that need to be fulfilled. Thus, special attention is paid to the distinguished nature of such medical data, whose integrity and confidentiality should be preserved at all costs. This is achieved through the employment of Trusted Third Parties (TTP) technology for the support of the required security services. Additionally, the proposed digital library employs smartcards for the management of the various security tokens that are used from the above services.

  13. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What's a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect counts as a medicine. It can be ... When you take something for a long-term therapeutic effect, tell your doctor about it. He or ...

  14. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: March 2, 2017 Key ...

  15. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... IBS Awareness Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About ... IBS Awareness Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications ...

  16. Understanding Medical Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Medical Words Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For ... Medicine that teaches you about many of the words related to your health care Do you have ...

  17. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) The annual flu shot is recommended for ... second or third trimester. Read more about the flu vaccine . Immunotherapy (allergy shots) Allergy shots should not be ...

  18. Mycetoma medical therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welsh, Oliverio; Al-Abdely, Hail Mater; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment...

  19. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... discomfort, usually if the symptoms occur soon after eating. Examples include dicyclomine (Bentyl), and hyoscyamine (Levsin). Read ... who specializes in motility or stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. More complex medication regimens, and specialized motility and/ ...

  20. Medications for Arrhythmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child about this before the doctor visit. Medicine Management Tools For Patients Keeping Track / Developing a System ... while you're out. Some pharmacists will prepare blister packs for daily or weekly medications. Ask your ...

  1. Atrial Fibrillation Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is usually treating the abnormal heart rhythm with medications to restore the heart rhythm to normal (also known as chemical/pharmacological cardioversion). Significant side effects may occur, and your healthcare provider will most ...

  2. Medical problems in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Bhaskar; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of medical problems in pregnancy is increasing because of a complex interplay between demographic and lifestyle factors, and developments in modern medicine. Maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from treatable medical conditions, such as venous thromboembolism, epilepsy and autoimmune disease, have not decreased in recent years. This is despite a marked decrease in overall maternal mortality. It is vital that all physicians acquire a basic knowledge and understanding of medical problems in pregnancy. This includes prepregnancy measures such as counselling and optimisation of medical therapy, as well as multidisciplinary management throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute and chronic illness is of clear benefit, and most drugs and many radiological investigations may be used in pregnancy.

  3. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological ... with healthcare providers are an important part of managing life with a long-term digestive disorder. Working with Your Physician Doctor Visit Worksheet How ...

  4. Catastrophic medical expenditure risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gabriela; O'Donnell, Owen

    2016-03-01

    We propose a measure of household exposure to particularly onerous medical expenses. The measure can be decomposed into the probability that medical expenditure exceeds a threshold, the loss due to predictably low consumption of other goods if it does and the further loss arising from the volatility of medical expenses above the threshold. Depending on the choice of threshold, the measure is consistent with a model of reference-dependent utility with loss aversion. Unlike the risk premium, the measure is only sensitive to particularly high expenses, and can identify households that expect to incur such expenses and would benefit from subsidised, but not actuarially fair, insurance. An empirical illustration using data from seven Asian countries demonstrates the importance of taking account of informal insurance and reveals clear differences in catastrophic medical expenditure risk across and within countries. In general, risk is higher among poorer, rural and chronically ill populations.

  5. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome ( ... limited by prescription only. It might be a drug or a supplement; manufactured or "natural." It might ...

  6. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery ... IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) ...

  7. East- African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol 83 No. 8 August 2006 ... urology, ENT and orthopaedic groups and these ... no significant difference in orthopaedic patients mortality' with standard; we .... applying TRISS analysis to pediatric blunt trauma.

  8. Color Medical Image Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 20th century, medical imaging has been dominated by monochrome imaging modalities such as x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, color information has been overlooked in medical image analysis applications. Recently, various medical imaging modalities that involve color information have been introduced. These include cervicography, dermoscopy, fundus photography, gastrointestinal endoscopy, microscopy, and wound photography. However, in comparison to monochrome images, the analysis of color images is a relatively unexplored area. The multivariate nature of color image data presents new challenges for researchers and practitioners as the numerous methods developed for monochrome images are often not directly applicable to multichannel images. The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the utilization of color information in medical image analysis.

  9. Other Injectable Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... July 17, 2013 Last Edited: February 22, 2017 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: cg-infusion-sets,meds-bg-injectables,cg-injection-aids, In this section Treatment and Care Medication Insulin & ...

  10. Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and specially equipped facilities. You may need care in the hospital emergency room (ER). Doctors and nurses there treat emergencies, ...

  11. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-12-12

    Dec 12, 2004 ... postoperative hospitals stay and mortality results for all patients were obtained. Results: ... co-existing medical illness and providing appropriate nutrition support. INTROD ..... results after simple closure in the elderly. Wurizl.

  12. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome ( ... limited by prescription only. It might be a drug or a supplement; manufactured or "natural." It might ...

  13. Tanzania Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The manuscripts should be prepared in the following order: Title, Abstract, Text, ... Average values must be accompanied by standard errors or standard deviations. .... Authorship: The Tanzania Medical Journal defines an 'author' according to ...

  14. Animals in Medical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    developed and tested in animals, for treatment and management of both human and animal ailments. Medical research ... Animal model experimental is one approach among .... comparative study of male reproductive problems. These and ...

  15. Strengthening Medical Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Mainland and Taiwan negotiators settle on health care cooperation chinese mainland and Taiwan negotiators signed a medical and health care I cooperation agreement in Taipei on December 21 in a move to jointly

  16. Medical Issues: Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > nutrition Nutrition Good nutrition is essential to health and growth. ... must make decisions based on their own needs. Nutrition Considerations Since we are still waiting for clinical ...

  17. Kinking of medical tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, David

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of kinking in medical tubing remains a problem for some applications, particularly critical ones such as transporting gasses or fluids. Design features are described to prevent its occurrence.

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy and IBS Travel and IBS IBS Patients' Experience ...

  19. Mental Health Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The most common anti-anxiety medications are called benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines can treat generalized anxiety disorder. In the case ... panic disorder or social phobia (social anxiety disorder), benzodiazepines are usually second-line treatments, behind SSRIs or ...

  20. Medical management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, S

    2001-10-01

    Obesity has become a major health problem in many countries because of its high prevalence and causal relationship with serious medical complications. Many of the medical complications associated with obesity improve with intentional weight in a dose-dependent fashion, and even a modest weight loss of 50% of initial weight has beneficial effects. This article reviews the nonsurgical approaches for achieving weight loss in obese persons.

  1. The Automated Medical Office

    OpenAIRE

    Petreman, Mel

    1990-01-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a c...

  2. Medical Information Security

    OpenAIRE

    William C. Figg, Ph.D.; Hwee Joo Kam, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Modern medicine is facing a complex environment, not from medical technology but rather government regulations and information vulnerability. HIPPA is the government’s attempt to protect patient’s information yet this only addresses traditional record handling. The main threat is from the evolving security issues. Many medical offices and facilities have multiple areas of information security concerns. Physical security is often weak, office personnel are not always aware of security needs an...

  3. The Automated Medical Office

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a c...

  4. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses - on telephone: 73802 - by e-mail: Service.Médical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  5. Reducing medication errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nute, Christine

    2014-11-25

    Most nurses are involved in medicines management, which is integral to promoting patient safety. Medicines management is prone to errors, which depending on the error can cause patient injury, increased hospital stay and significant legal expenses. This article describes a new approach to help minimise drug errors within healthcare settings where medications are prescribed, dispensed or administered. The acronym DRAINS, which considers all aspects of medicines management before administration, was devised to reduce medication errors on a cardiothoracic intensive care unit.

  6. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses - on telephone: 73802 - by e-mail: Service.Médical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  7. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor.For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802 or by electronic mail:Infirmary.Service@cern.chMarion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.chMedicalService

  8. Reminder from Medical Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, contact the nurses on telephone: 73802 by e-mail: Service.Médical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  9. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses - on telephone: 73802 - by e-mail:Service.Médical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  10. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on telephone: 73802. by electronic mail to: Infirmary.Service@cern.chMarion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Medical Service

  11. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service médical

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites,be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor.For information, call the Nurseson telephone: 73802.by electronic mail to:Infirmary.Service@cern.chMarion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.chMedicalService

  12. Journal of Medical Laboratory Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Medical Laboratory Science is a Quarterly Publication of the Association of ... It Publishes Original Research and Review Articles in All Fields of ... Covering Medical Microbiology, Medical Parasitology, Clinical Chemistry, ...

  13. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intracraneal en Espanol. STORE Shop the IHRF Store Medication and Surgery Medication and Surgery Both drugs and surgery are used ... to treat the headache that accompanies chronic IH. Medications for chronic headache like tricyclic anti-depressants, beta- ...

  14. Medical coding in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deven Babre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data generated in all clinical trial are recorded on the data collection instrument Case report Form / Electronic Case Report Form by investigators located at various sites in various countries. In multicentric clinical trials since different investigator or medically qualified experts are from different sites / centers recording the medical term(s uniformly is a big challenge. Medical coders from clinical data management team process these terms and perform medical coding. Medical coding is performed to categorize the medical terms reported appropriately so that they can be analyzed/reviewed. This article describes process which is used for medical coding in clinical data management and two most commonly used medical dictionaries MedDRA and WHO-DDE in brief. It is expected to help medical coders to understand the process of medical coding in clinical data management. Few common issues which the medical coder faces while performing medical coding, are also highlighted.

  15. Osteoporosis Treatment: Medications Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis treatment: Medications can help Osteoporosis treatment may involve medication along with lifestyle change. A Mayo Clinic specialist answers some of the most common questions about osteoporosis ...

  16. Medication safety during your hospital stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five-rights - medication; Medication administration - hospital; Medical errors - medication; Patient safety - medication safety ... Medication safety means you get the right medicine, the right dose, at the right times. During your ...

  17. Polymeric materials in medication

    CERN Document Server

    Carraher, Charles

    1985-01-01

    The art of using chemical agents for medication dates back into antiquity, although most of the earliest examples used plants, herbs, and other natural materials. The old Egyptian medical papyri, which date from before 1400 B. C. , contain dozens of examples of such medicinal plants and animal extracts. In the Old Testament of the Bible, we can find references to using oil to soften the skin and sores (Isaiah 1:6), the use of tree leaves for medicine (Ezekiel 47:12) and various medical balms (Jeremiah 8:22). Not all these recipes were effective in curing the ailments for which they were used and sometimes the treatment was worse than the disease. Nevertheless, the art of using chemical derived agents for medicines continued to develop and received great impetus during the present century with the rise of synthetic organic chemistry. One of the most vexing problems has always been to achieve specifici­ ty with the medications. While some medical agents do indeed possess a relatively high degree of specificity...

  18. Standards for medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Nigel; Lloyd-Jones, Gaynor

    2003-02-01

    In the current UK socio-political climate of mounting regulation of professional practice, a debate on the topic of standards amongst medical teachers seems timely. The role of teacher is increasingly recognised as a core professional activity for all doctors and one that cannot be left to chance, aptitude or inclination. As a consequence, faculties have developed a plethora of teacher training programmes for medical teachers. But what is good medical teaching? Unless we know what it is, how can we develop it? One possible approach is to develop clear and comprehensive standards, defining what we mean by competent or effective clinical teaching. In this article we have evaluated and compared two models of standards for clinical educators. The first is the outcome-based approach developed at Dundee Medical School and the second is the scholarship model devised initially by Boyer and then elaborated by Glassick and Fincher et al. The key features of both models are briefly described and their comparative strengths and problematic aspects explored. Both models offer interesting and stimulating ideas and together they provide an instructive contrast. They make a valuable contribution to the ongoing process of improving the provision of medical education.

  19. Medical education in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Stefan; Brännström, Thomas; Hanse, Eric; Ledin, Torbjörn; Nilsson, Gunnar; Sandler, Stellan; Tidefelt, Ulf; Donnér, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education in Sweden has moved from nationally regulated, subject-based courses to programmes integrated either around organ systems or physiological and patho-physiological processes, or organised around basic medical science in conjunction with clinical specialities, with individual profiles at the seven medical schools. The national regulations are restricted to overall academic and professional outcomes. The 5½ year long university undergraduate curriculum is followed by a mandatory 18 months internship, delivered by the County Councils. While quality control and accreditation for the university curriculum is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, no such formal control exists for the internship; undergraduate medical education is therefore in conflict with EU directives from 2005. The Government is expected to move towards 6 years long university undergraduate programmes, leading to licence, which will facilitate international mobility of both Swedish and foreign medical students and doctors. Ongoing academic development of undergraduate education is strengthened by the Bologna process. It includes outcome (competence)-based curricula, university Masters level complying with international standards, progression of competence throughout the curriculum, student directed learning, active participation and roles in practical clinical education and a national assessment model to assure professional competence. In the near future, the dimensioning of Swedish undergraduate education is likely to be decided more by international demands and aspects of quality than by national demands for doctors.

  20. Financing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersdorf, R G

    1991-02-01

    The cost of a medical education may dissuade qualified young people from entering the medical profession or may so load them with debt that they cannot pursue relatively low-paid careers in primary care or clinical investigation. Three aspects of this problem are examined: (1) the cost of medical school, (2) the magnitude of student indebtedness, and (3) the effects of this indebtedness on career choices. High tuition and fees require many students to assume sizable educational debts, some of which are so large that the trainees will be unable to repay them unless they enter highly remunerative specialties. Also, high levels of indebtedness may increase default levels once graduates feel the full impact of scheduled repayments. Several steps would help to alleviate this problem, but are unlikely to solve it. First, medical schools should lower tuition or at least declare a moratorium on increases. Second, limits should be imposed on the amount of total education debt a student is allowed to assume. Third, hospitals with extensive residency programs should assume some responsibility for helping trainees manage their finances. Fourth, the government should institute a loan forgiveness program that addresses the need for physician-investigators, primary care physicians, those willing to practice in underserved areas, and those from underrepresented minorities. And fifth, all institutions involved in medical training and its finance should work together to advise students on managing their debts.

  1. Accounting for Medication Particularities: Designing for Everyday Medication Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Lea Gulstav; Grönvall, Erik; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2013-01-01

    Several projects have shown that self-management of medication in private homes can be challenging. Many projects focused on specific illness-related approaches (e.g. diabetes) or practical issues such as how to handle medication while travelling. However, designing for everyday medication...... management involves more than just specific illness-related strategies and should take into account the broad set of activities conforming people’s everyday life. This study investigates how older adults manage their medication in everyday life. To inform the design of pervasive healthcare medication...... management systems (PHMMS), the study calls for attention to medication-specific particularities that account for: according to need medication, the heterogeneous care network, the substitute medication, the medication informational order, the shared responsibility and the adjustment of medication intake...

  2. Personalized Medical Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Suarez Coloma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increasing needs in telemedicine and healthcare, accentuate the need of well-adapted medical alert systems. Such alert systems may be used by a variety of patients and medical actors, and should allow monitoring a wide range of medical variables. This paper proposes Tempas, a personalized temporal alert system. It facilitates customized alert configuration by using linguistic trends. The trend detection algorithm is based on data normalization, time series segmentation, and segment classification. It improves state of the art by treating irregular and regular time series in an appropriate way, thanks to the introduction of an observation variable valid time. Alert detection is enriched with quality and applicability measures. They allow a personalized tuning of the system to help reducing false negatives and false positives alerts.

  3. The medicalization of love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Brian D; Sandberg, Anders; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-07-01

    Pharmaceuticals or other emerging technologies could be used to enhance (or diminish) feelings of lust, attraction, and attachment in adult romantic partnerships. Although such interventions could conceivably be used to promote individual (and couple) well-being, their widespread development and/or adoption might lead to the 'medicalization' of human love and heartache--for some, a source of a serious concern. In this essay, we argue that the medicalization of love need not necessarily be problematic, on balance, but could plausibly be expected to have either good or bad consequences depending upon how it unfolds. By anticipating some of the specific ways in which these technologies could yield unwanted outcomes, bioethicists and others can help to direct the course of love's medicalization--should it happen to occur--more toward the 'good' side than the 'bad.'

  4. Refusal to medical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, G; Herreros, B; Pacho, E

    2014-10-01

    Refusal to medical interventions is the not acceptance, voluntary and free, of an indicated medical intervention. What the physician should do in case of refusal? It is understandable that the rejection of a validated medical intervention is difficult to accept by the responsible physician when raises the conflict protection of life versus freedom of choice. Therefore it is important to follow some steps to incorporate the most relevant aspects of the conflict. These steps include: 1) Give complete information to patients, informing on possible alternatives, 2) determine whether the patient can decide (age, competency and level of capacity), 3) to ascertain whether the decision is free, 4) analyze the decision with the patient, 5) to persuade, 6) if the patient kept in the rejection decision, consider conscientious objection, 7) take the decision based on the named criteria, 8) finally, if the rejection is accepted, offer available alternatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [Seniors and cardiovascular medications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesová, H Matejovská; Weber, P; Meluzínová, H; Matejovský, J

    2011-06-01

    Authors analyze the situation in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases--unsatisfactory situation especially from the dyslipidaemia point of view. Different groups of medications are discussed and their risks for elderly patients. Angiotensin converting enzyme blockers and their influence on the endothelial dysfunction, but the risk of hyperpotassemia are showed. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding during the treatment with antiagregants and anticoagulants, the risk of bradycardia in beta-blockade, possible interactions with other medications lowering the heart rate are discussed. Attention is paid to calcium channel blockers, diuretics and digoxin. The table containing possible clinical symptoms of unwanted side effect of most frequently used cardiovascular medications in elderly is added as the conclusion of the article.

  6. Photosensitizing medications and photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Susan M; Murphy, Gillian M

    2014-02-01

    Photosensitivity is an exaggerated or abnormal response to ultraviolet (UV) or visible light exposure. Many current medications are known photosensitizers; however, the effects of the sensitization can be subclinical and go unnoticed by the person affected. While some of these drugs are used for short and defined periods, others are used indefinitely for the treatment of chronic disease. The question of whether either of these practices translates into an increased risk of skin cancer is an important one. Numerous medications have real, distinct and well-elucidated mechanisms that potentiate the development of skin cancer, while with some medications the mechanism for the observed carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this article we will discuss the clinical, mechanistic and epidemiological evidence supporting photochemical genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

  7. Exploring medical identity theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Desla; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2009-09-16

    The crime of medical identity theft is a growing concern in healthcare institutions. A mixed-method study design including a two-stage electronic survey, telephone survey follow-up, and on-site observations was used to evaluate current practices in admitting and registration departments to reduce the occurrence of medical identity theft. Survey participants were chief compliance officers in acute healthcare organizations and members of the Health Care Compliance Association. Study results indicate variance in whether or how patient identity is confirmed in healthcare settings. The findings of this study suggest that information systems need to be designed for more efficient identity management. Admitting and registration staff must be trained, and compliance with medical identity theft policies and procedures must be monitored. Finally, biometric identity management solutions should be considered for stronger patient identification verification.

  8. Medical Yoga Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Medical yoga is defined as the use of yoga practices for the prevention and treatment of medical conditions. Beyond the physical elements of yoga, which are important and effective for strengthening the body, medical yoga also incorporates appropriate breathing techniques, mindfulness, and meditation in order to achieve the maximum benefits. Multiple studies have shown that yoga can positively impact the body in many ways, including helping to regulate blood glucose levels, improve musculoskeletal ailments and keeping the cardiovascular system in tune. It also has been shown to have important psychological benefits, as the practice of yoga can help to increase mental energy and positive feelings, and decrease negative feelings of aggressiveness, depression and anxiety. PMID:28208599

  9. Adolf Hitler's medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, D

    2005-02-01

    For the last nine years of his life Adolf Hitler, a lifelong hypochondriac had as his physician Dr Theodor Morell. Hitler's mood swings, Parkinson's disease, gastro-intestinal symptoms, skin problems and steady decline until his suicide in 1945 are documented by reliable observers and historians, and in Morell's diaries. The bizarre and unorthodox medications given to Hitler, often for undisclosed reasons, include topical cocaine, injected amphetamines, glucose, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosteroids. In addition, he was given a preparation made from a gun cleaner, a compound of strychnine and atropine, an extract of seminal vesicles, and numerous vitamins and 'tonics'. It seems possible that some of Hitler's behaviour, illnesses and suffering can be attributed to his medical care. Whether he blindly accepted such unorthodox medications or demanded them is unclear.

  10. Medical database security evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangalos, G J

    1993-01-01

    Users of medical information systems need confidence in the security of the system they are using. They also need a method to evaluate and compare its security capabilities. Every system has its own requirements for maintaining confidentiality, integrity and availability. In order to meet these requirements a number of security functions must be specified covering areas such as access control, auditing, error recovery, etc. Appropriate confidence in these functions is also required. The 'trust' in trusted computer systems rests on their ability to prove that their secure mechanisms work as advertised and cannot be disabled or diverted. The general framework and requirements for medical database security and a number of parameters of the evaluation problem are presented and discussed. The problem of database security evaluation is then discussed, and a number of specific proposals are presented, based on a number of existing medical database security systems.

  11. Medical uses of nitinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelton, A.R.; Stoeckel, D.; Duering, T.W. [Nitinol Devices and Components - Cordis Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The growth of nitinol in the medical industries has exploded in the past ten years. Patients and care providers have encouraged the transition from traditional open-surgical procedures, which require long hospital stays, to less-invasive techniques, which are often performed in out-patient clinics. This demand for minimally invasive procedures has allowed novel instrumentation and implants to be designed. An increasing number of these devices use nitinol as the critical component. Examples of medical applications range from orthodontic archwires and endoscopic instruments to endovascular stents. This paper will focus on key performance attributes of nitinol that make it an ideal material for medical applications. Specific applications will be introduced through their use of the enabling features. (orig.)

  12. Medical Practitioners Act 2007: the increased medical record burden.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, D

    2010-03-01

    New medical record keeping obligations are implemented by the Medical Practitioners Act (2007), effective July 2009. This audit, comprising review of 347 medical entries in 257 charts on one day, investigated compliance with the Act together with the general standard of medical record keeping. The Medical Council requirement was absent all but 3 (0.9%) of entries; there was no unique identifier or signature in 28 (8%) and 135 (39%) of entries respectively. The case for change is discussed.

  13. Medical Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The MD Image System, a true-color image processing system that serves as a diagnostic aid and tool for storage and distribution of images, was developed by Medical Image Management Systems, Huntsville, AL, as a "spinoff from a spinoff." The original spinoff, Geostar 8800, developed by Crystal Image Technologies, Huntsville, incorporates advanced UNIX versions of ELAS (developed by NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory for analysis of Landsat images) for general purpose image processing. The MD Image System is an application of this technology to a medical system that aids in the diagnosis of cancer, and can accept, store and analyze images from other sources such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  14. Paternalism and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, R

    1985-06-29

    In one of a series of articles on philosophical medical ethics, Gillon considers various moral arguments in support of medical paternalism. He maintains that the utilitarian principle of maximizing happiness by improving health, minimizing suffering, and prolonging life is not promoted by granting physicians the authority to deceive patients or to make decisions for them in areas of moral and subjective choice. If one wants to do good for a patient, one generally needs to find out what the patient wants one to do. Gillon concludes that many utilitarians agree with deontologists that respect for autonomy is required if human welfare really is to be maximized.

  15. Religion and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ronald M

    2013-01-01

    Religious traditions of medical ethics tend to differ from more secular approaches by stressing limitations on autonomous decision-making, by more positively valuing the experience of suffering, and by drawing on beliefs and values that go beyond empiric verification. I trace the impact of these differences for some of the world's great religious traditions with respect to four issues: (1) religious conscientious objection to medical treatments; (2) end-of life decision-making, including euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and the withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining treatments; (3) definitions of moral personhood (defining life's beginning and end); and (4) human sexuality.

  16. Solid medical waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udofia, Emilia Asuquo; Gulis, Gabriel; Fobil, Julius

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Solid medical waste (SMW) in households is perceived to pose minimal risks to the public compared to SMW generated from healthcare facilities. While waste from healthcare facilities is subject to recommended safety measures to minimize risks to human health and the environment, similar......-demographic characteristics, medication related practices, the belief that one is at risk of diseases associated with SMW, SMW disposal practices and reported harm associated with SMW at home and in the community. RESULTS: Eighty percent and 89% of respondents discarded unwanted medicines and sharps in household refuse bins...

  17. Readmissions of medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooksley, T.; Nanayakkara, P. W. B.; Nickel, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    of readmission but have not been validated in international populations. AIM: To perform an external independent validation of the HOSPITAL and LACE scores. DESIGN: An unplanned secondary cohort study. METHODS: Patients admitted to the medical admission unit at the Hospital of South West Jutland (10...... power of both scores decreased with increasing age. CONCLUSION: Readmissions are a complex phenomenon with not only medical conditions contributing but also system, cultural and environmental factors exerting a significant influence. It is possible that the heterogeneity of the population and health...

  18. Medical Sensor Network Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob

    is required, such as taking a blood sample, mailing it to a lab, where it is analysed and the result returned by mail. Due to the continuing size and cost reduction of electronic equipment, future medical sensors will be much smaller, cheaper and often disposable. Furthermore, integration of these sensors...... a short while. This tension between simple use and security in a low-power clinical environment is the main theme of this dissertation. Un-secure medical equipment will never pass official certification by national health authorities, but on the other hand, experience shows that if using the equipment...

  19. Classification in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen

    Classification is extensively used in the context of medical image analysis for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. In order to classify image content correctly, one needs to extract efficient features with discriminative properties and build classifiers based on these features. In addition...... to segment breast tissue and pectoral muscle area from the background in mammogram. The second focus is the choices of metric and its influence to the feasibility of a classifier, especially on k-nearest neighbors (k-NN) algorithm, with medical applications on breast cancer prediction and calcification...

  20. The automated medical office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petreman, M

    1990-08-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a clinic shows that practical thinking linked to advanced technology can greatly improve office efficiency.

  1. Medical applications of accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Sandro

    1998-01-01

    At Present, about five thousands accelerators are devoted to biomedical applications. They are mainly used in radiotherapy, research and medical radioisotopes production. In this framework oncological hadron-therapy deserves particular attention since it represents a field in rapid evolution thanks to the joint efforts of laboratories with long experiences in particle physics. It is the case of CERN where the design of an optimised synchrotron for medical applications has been pursued. These lectures present these activities with particular attention to the new developments which are scientifically interesting and/or economically promising.

  2. Merton and medical sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes E.D.

    2007-01-01

    The article is about the main contributions of the North-American sociologist Robert King Merton (1910-2003), particularly those related to the field of medical sociology. Merton was first to conduct research on medical education, and the working team he formed was fundamental for the introduction of social thought in the medicine field (Patrícia Kendall, Renée Fox, Samuel Bloom and others). Of particular importance are Merton's vocation for sociology and the unique trajectory of his research...

  3. Medical pedagogical resources management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliquen, Bruno; Le Duff, Franck; Delamarre, Denis; Cuggia, Marc; Mougin, Fleur; Le Beux, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to help the management of training resources for students using a pedagogical network available at the Medical School of Rennes. With the increase of the number of connections and the number of medical documents available on this network, the management of new contents requires a lot of efforts for the webmaster. In order to improve the management of the resources, we implemented an automatic web engine for teachers, able to manage the links for the most interesting resources for their practice.

  4. Medical Imaging and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Infertility affects many couples, and medical imaging plays a vital role in its diagnosis and treatment. Radiologic technologists benefit from having a broad understanding of infertility risk factors and causes. This article describes the typical structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, as well as congenital and acquired conditions that could lead to a couple's inability to conceive. Medical imaging procedures performed for infertility diagnosis are discussed, as well as common interventional options available to patients. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  5. [Accreditation of medical laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Andrea Rita; Ring, Rózsa; Fehér, Miklós; Mikó, Tivadar

    2003-07-27

    In Hungary, the National Accreditation Body was established by government in 1995 as an independent, non-profit organization, and has exclusive rights to accredit, amongst others, medical laboratories. The National Accreditation Body has two Specialist Advisory Committees in the health care sector. One is the Health Care Specialist Advisory Committee that accredits certifying bodies, which deal with certification of hospitals. The other Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Laboratories is directly involved in accrediting medical laboratory services of health care institutions. The Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Laboratories is a multidisciplinary peer review group of experts from all disciplines of in vitro diagnostics, i.e. laboratory medicine, microbiology, histopathology and blood banking. At present, the only published International Standard applicable to laboratories is ISO/IEC 17025:1999. Work has been in progress on the official approval of the new ISO 15189 standard, specific to medical laboratories. Until the official approval of the International Standard ISO 15189, as accreditation standard, the Hungarian National Accreditation Body has decided to progress with accreditation by formulating explanatory notes to the ISO/IEC 17025:1999 document, using ISO/FDIS 15189:2000, the European EC4 criteria and CPA (UK) Ltd accreditation standards as guidelines. This harmonized guideline provides 'explanations' that facilitate the application of ISO/IEC 17025:1999 to medical laboratories, and can be used as a checklist for the verification of compliance during the onsite assessment of the laboratory. The harmonized guideline adapted the process model of ISO 9001:2000 to rearrange the main clauses of ISO/IEC 17025:1999. This rearrangement does not only make the guideline compliant with ISO 9001:2000 but also improves understanding for those working in medical laboratories, and facilitates the training and education of laboratory staff. With the

  6. Medication Overuse Headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munksgaard, Signe B; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication overuse headache (MOH) affects between 1% and 2% of the general population but is present in up to 50% of patients seen in headache centers. There are currently no internationally accepted guidelines for treatment of MOH. METHODS: A review of the current literature on MOH...... treatment and pathophysiology. RESULTS: We conclude that headache frequency can be reduced to episodic headache in more than 50% of the patients by simple detoxification and information. Approximately half the patients will not have need for prophylactic medication after withdrawal. Pain perception...

  7. Political and medical views on medical marijuana and its future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubens, Muni

    2014-01-01

    The policies, laws, politics, public opinions, and scientific inferences of medical marijuana are rapidly changing as the debate on medical use of marijuana has always been political, rather than scientific. Federal law has barred the use of medical marijuana though 18 state governments and Washington, DC, support the medical use of marijuana. Unfortunately, not many studies exist on medical marijuana to back these laws and policies. The judiciary, on the other hand, has elicited a diverse response to medical marijuana through its rulings over several decades. Some rulings favored the federal government's opinion, and others supported the larger public view and many state governments with legalized medical marijuana. Public opinion on legalizing medical marijuana has always favored the use of medical marijuana. The movement of scientific knowledge of medical marijuana follows an erratic, discontinuous pathway. The future place of medical marijuana in U.S. society remains unknown. The three forces-scientific knowledge, social-political acceptance, and laws-play a role in the direction that medical marijuana takes in society. Overcoming political-social forces requires a concerted effort from the scientific community and political leaders. The results of scientific research must guide the decisions for laws and medical use of marijuana. This article aims to trace the political dilemma and contradictory views shared by federal and state governments and predict the future of medical marijuana by tracing the past history of medical marijuana with its bumpy pathway in the social-political arena.

  8. Primary Medical Care in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    Primary medical care in Chile: accessibility under military rule [Front Cover] [Front Matter] [Title Page] Contents Tables Figures Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: The Restructuring of Medical Care Financing in Chile Chapter 3: Inflation and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 4: Help......-Seeking Behavior of the Urban Poor Chapter 5: Spatial Organization and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 6: Conclusion...

  9. Self‐medication patterns among medical students in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitasha Bhat

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSelf-medication results in wastage of resources, increases resistance of pathogens and generally causes serious health hazards such as adverse drug reactions, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was undertaken to determine the reasons for self-medication and the pattern of self-medication among medical students.MethodThis cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the K.S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore. The participants were medical students from first to final year. Medical students were selected through convenience sampling. The data was collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS version 16 and the results expressed as proportions.ResultsA total of 200 students, 121 (60.5% female and 79 (39.5% male, were included in the study. Of the medical students surveyed, self-medication was reported among 92%. The respondents who used self-medication found it to be time-saving in providing relief from minor ailments. The most common ailments for which self-medication were used were: the common cold (69%, fever (63% and headache (60%. The students consulted their textbooks (39% and seniors or classmates (38% for the medications. Antipyretics (71%, analgesics (65%, antihistamines (37% and antibiotics (34% were the most common self-medicated drugs. Of the respondents, 33% were unaware of the adverse effects of the medication and 5% had experienced adverse reactions. The majority (64% of students advised medications to others, more often to family and friends.ConclusionThe prevalence of self-medication among medical students is high, facilitated by the easy availability of drugs and information from textbooks or seniors. A significant number of students are unaware of the adverse effects of the medication that they themselves take and suggest to others. Therefore, potential problems of self-medication should be emphasised to the students.

  10. Features of Medical English Vocabulary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翠萍

    2015-01-01

    Medical English is relatively more difficult than general English,especially its vocabulary.Those medical English words are long and complex,making it hard to remember.But medical English vocabulary has its own features,which would help us in learning vocabulary.On the basis of many medical English materials,the paper explores the features of etymology,affixes and roots of medical English.

  11. Features of Medical English Vocabulary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翠萍

    2015-01-01

    Medical English is relatively more difficult than general English,especially its vocabulary.Those medical English words are long and complex,making it hard to remember. But medical English vocabulary has its own features,which would help us in learning vocabulary.On the basis of many medical English materials,the paper explores the features of etymology,affixes and roots of medical English.

  12. Factors Affecting Medical Service Quality.

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of factors influencing quality of medical service can pinpoint better strategies for quality assurance in medical services. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the quality of medical services provided by Iranian physicians.Exploratory in-depth individual interviews were conducted with sixty-four physicians working in various medical institutions in Iran.Individual, organizational and environmental factors enhance or inhibit the quality of medical services. Qu...

  13. Shipboard Medical Backpack: Engineering Drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    7 A-36804 SHIPBOARD MEDICAL BACKPACK : ENGINEERING DRAWINGS(U) 1/l NAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SAN DIEGO CA R W KATAOKA JUN 83 NOSC/Tfl-603...Document 603 SHIPBOARD MEDICAL BACKPACK : ENGINEERING DRAWINGS R. W. Kataoka June 1983 Prepared for Naval Medical Research and Development Command CL. (Code...Commande Technical Director ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION This report is one in a series on the Shipboard Medical Backpack sponsored by the Naval Medical

  14. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Larry D. Gruppen; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international tr...

  15. [straus: The Two Medical Sociologies].

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Robert Straus' pioneer work, The nature and status of Medical Sociology, written in 1957, was reviewed. Straus, one of the founders of medical sociology, made major contributions to this field and created the first department of behavior sciences in a medical school. In the work reviewed, Straus establishes the differences between sociology in medicine and medical sociology. Comments are made on the current perspective of medical sociology and about the author.

  16. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  17. Medical Spending in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene; Gørtz, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Using full population longitudinal data from merged administrative registers for Denmark, we document that medical spending is highly concentrated in the population, and persistent through time at the individual level. In addition, we provide overviews of institutional details of the Danish health...

  18. Motivation in medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusurkar, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis wer

  19. Communication in medical encounters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide a theoretical and empirical basis for the concept of communication as the core instrument in the medical encounter. Adequate communication, embedded in a warm and caring relationship, has always been recognized as essential to the concept of good doctoring, but

  20. Medical applications of colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Matijevic, Egon

    2008-01-01

    The first book of its type on the medical and biomedical applications of colloids, although there are some related titles on different topicsDiscusses the effects of uniform particles in drug formulations and releaseEvaluates particle transport and deposition in the human body.

  1. Inpatients’ medical prescription errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Melo Santos Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and quantify the most frequent prescription errors in inpatients’ medical prescriptions. Methods: A survey of prescription errors was performed in the inpatients’ medical prescriptions, from July 2008 to May 2009 for eight hours a day. Rresults: At total of 3,931 prescriptions was analyzed and 362 (9.2% prescription errors were found, which involved the healthcare team as a whole. Among the 16 types of errors detected in prescription, the most frequent occurrences were lack of information, such as dose (66 cases, 18.2% and administration route (26 cases, 7.2%; 45 cases (12.4% of wrong transcriptions to the information system; 30 cases (8.3% of duplicate drugs; doses higher than recommended (24 events, 6.6% and 29 cases (8.0% of prescriptions with indication but not specifying allergy. Cconclusion: Medication errors are a reality at hospitals. All healthcare professionals are responsible for the identification and prevention of these errors, each one in his/her own area. The pharmacist is an essential professional in the drug therapy process. All hospital organizations need a pharmacist team responsible for medical prescription analyses before preparation, dispensation and administration of drugs to inpatients. This study showed that the pharmacist improves the inpatient’s safety and success of prescribed therapy.

  2. Medical decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, A.M.; Vries, M. de; Scherer, L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the field of medical decision making. It distinguishes the levels of decision making seen in health-care practice and shows how research in judgment and decision making support or improve decision making. Most of the research has been done at the micro level, par

  3. Antidepressant medications and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, J-Y

    2012-01-01

    Use of antidepressant medications that act on the serotonin system has been linked to detrimental impacts on bone mineral density (BMD), and to osteoporosis. This article reviews current evidence for such effects, and identifies themes for future research. Serotonin receptors are found in all major...

  4. Misconduct in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengoechea, Jaime; Moreno, Socorro; Ruiz, Alvaro

    2008-12-01

    Medical students, subject to unique challenges and stressors, frequently engage in misconduct. In this observational study, carried out in a medical school in Colombia, we developed a survey to explore the association between misconduct and stress, potential stressors and other possible contributing factors, such as sex, age and academic year. Of the 433 students that responded to our survey, 97.9% did not fully disagree with at least one of the mentioned misconducts and 99.8% admitted to at least one transgression. Based on a scale we developed, 61.4% of the students consistently agreed with misconduct and 44.9% frequently engaged in misconduct. A logistic regression model suggests that being male (OR 1.90, CI 95% 1.27-2.84) and stress (OR 1.04, CI 95% 1.01-1.06) may increase the likelihood of misconduct. In a subgroup of students, excluding those in their last year of studies, higher academic semester (OR 1.25, CI 95%: 1.10-1.42) may also be a risk factor for misconduct. Most of the observed variation in the data, however, is not explained by these factors. Other modifiers, such as student personality and sub-culture, may play a greater role in determining misconduct. The proportion of medical students that engage in misconduct is very high and warrants the attention of the medical education community.

  5. Denying Medical Students' Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    USA Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

  6. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  7. Mycetoma Medical Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Oliverio Welsh; Hail Mater Al-Abdely; Mario Cesar Salinas-Carmona; Ahmed Hassan Fahal

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  8. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliverio Welsh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  9. A Medical Delivery Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical delivery device comprising at least two membrane electrode assembly units each of which comprises three layers: an upper and a lower electrode and a selective ionic conductive membrane provided there-between. At least one of the three layers are shared...

  10. Innovation of Medical Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Per; Bach, Karin Friis; Schmiegelow, Merete

    2016-01-01

    , the pharmaceutical industry, universities, payers, and patient organizations. Regulatory science is the science of developing new tools, standards, and approaches to evaluate the efficacy, safety, quality, and performance of medical products in order to assess benefit/risk and facilitate a sound and transparent...

  11. Motivation in medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusurkar, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis

  12. Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Segerink, L.I.; Segerink, Loes Irene; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices for point of care diagnostics have been present in clinics for several years now. Alongside their continual development, research is underway to bring the organs and tissue on-a-chip to the patient, amongst other medical applications of microfluidics. This book provides the

  13. [Medical mythology and etymologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albou, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The lecture is an allusion to Sournia's work and his book "Mythologies de la médecine moderne". (P.U.F 1969). The author evokes the origins of medical terms such as psyche, hermaphrodite, nymphomania, aphrodisiac, marcissism, hypnotism, etc.

  14. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Oliverio; Al-Abdely, Hail Mater; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2014-10-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  15. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliverio Welsh; Hail Mater Al-Abdely; Mario Cesar Salinas-Carmona; Ahmed Hassan Fahal

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  16. A Medical Delivery Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical delivery device comprising at least two membrane electrode assembly units each of which comprises three layers: an upper and a lower electrode and a selective ionic conductive membrane provided there-between. At least one of the three layers are shared...

  17. [Medical emergency teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, G.; Lund, C.; Petersen, John Asger

    2008-01-01

    The aim of medical emergency teams (MET) is to identify and treat deteriorating patients on general wards, and to avoid cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission and death. The effectiveness of METs has yet to be proven, as the only two randomised, controlled trials on the subject...

  18. Tactical emergency medical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnert, Kathy J; Hall, William L

    2002-11-01

    As increases in criminal activity collide with more aggressive law enforcement postures, there is more contact between police officers and violent felons. Civilian law enforcement special operations teams routinely engage suspects in these violent, dynamic, and complex interdiction activities. Along with these activities comes the substantial and foreseeable risk of death or grievous harm to law officers, bystanders, hostages, or perpetrators. Further, law enforcement agencies who attempt to apprehend dangerous, heavily armed criminals with a special operations team that lacks the expertise to treat the medical consequences that may arise from such a confrontation may be negligent of deliberate indifference. Meanwhile, evidence exists within the military, civilian law enforcement, and medical literature that on-scene TEMS serves to improve mission success and team safety and health, while decreasing morbidity and mortality in the event of an injury or illness suffered during operations. National professional organizations within law enforcement and emergency medicine have identified and support the fundamental need for mission safety and the development of a standard model to train and incorporate TEMS into law enforcement special operations. The overall objective of TEMS is to minimize the potential for injury and illness and to promote optimal medical care from the scene of operations to a definitive care facility. The design, staffing, and implementation of a TEMS program that maximally uses the community resources integrates previously disparate law enforcement, EMS, and emergency medical/trauma center functions to form a new continuum of care [55].

  19. Medical nutrition therapy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torović Ljilja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diet has vital, preventive and therapeutic functions. Medical nutrition therapy is a part of the Standardized Nutrition Care Process integrated in health care systems. Material and methods. An overview of the Nutrition Care Process model and the application of nutrition guidelines based on literature, reports, documents and programmes of international health, food and physical activity authorities was done. Results. The Nutrition Care Process model requires registered dieticians, standardized terminology as well as nutrition diagnosis categorization. It consists of four distinct, but interrelated and connected steps: (a nutrition assessment, (b nutrition diagnosis, (c nutrition intervention, and (d nutrition monitoring and evaluation. An individual approach is essential for successful medical nutrition therapy. Nutrition guidelines facilitate the process of understanding and application of medical nutrition therapy. Conclusion. The Nutrition Care process provides dietetic professionals information on high-quality client nutrition care. The success of medical nutrition therapy rests not only upon the advice of the dietician, but also upon the client’s compliance.

  20. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  1. Pain medications - narcotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it can make the pain difficult to control. Taking narcotics to control the pain of cancer or other medical problems does not itself lead to dependence. Store narcotics safely and securely ... When taking a narcotic, do not drink alcohol, drive, or ...

  2. Sahel Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to international conferences in medical and health sciences in Nigeria, and (4) to promote ... Other websites related to this journal: http://www.smjonline.org/ ... Effect of physical activity on body water in sedentary young underweight and obese ... The effect of aerobic exercise on some diabetic risk factors in obese women ...

  3. Professionalism in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  4. Fomepizole (orphan medical).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantson, P

    2001-06-01

    Orphan Medical has developed fomepizole as a potential treatment for both ethylene glycol and methanol poisoning. The drug was launched as Antizol in January 1998 for the treatment of ethylene glycol poisoning [273949] after US marketing approval was grantedin December 1997 [271563]. It has also received US approval for methanol poisoning [393217] and UK approval for ethylene glycol poisoning [329495]. In 1999, Orphan Medical's partner, Cambridge Laboratories, intended to pursue European approval under the mutual recognition procedure [329495]. However, by September 2000, Cambridge Laboratories had discontinued their involvement with fomepizole and IDIS World Medicines had licensed the rights to distribute the drug in the UK [412142]. In February 2000, the Canadian Therapeutic Products Programme (TPP) granted fomepizole Priority Review, provided that an NDA was submitted by March 14, 2000 [354665]. In August 2000, the TPP accepted this NDA and set a target date for approval in the fourth quarter of 2000 [379474]. The TPP granted fomepizole a Notice of Compliance permitting the sale of fomepizole in Canada in December 2000. The company's marketing partner in Canada, Paladin Labs had launched fomepizole by January 2001 [396953]. In June 2000, Tucker Anthony Cleary Gull stated that the Orphan Drug status which Orphan Medical had obtained for fomepizole would provide marketing exclusivity through December 2004. The analysts also stated that fomepizole had accounted for 40% of Orphan Medical's revenue in financial year 1999, although +/- 30% of sales were estimated to be due to stockpiling [409606].

  5. Medical Errors Reduction Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    additional37 subjects were consented. The research with the bedside medication administration system has revealed an increase of near miss occurrences...as well as documentation changes for the nurse. These efforts have resulted in a significant decrease in near miss occuiTences as well as a 50

  6. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  7. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  8. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  9. Medications and International Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-12

    This podcast answers a listener's question about her medications and an international trip she's planning.  Created: 4/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/12/2011.

  10. Medications: Using Them Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... young children. Store a medication syringe in a safe place out of the reach of kids. Other options ... Keep this number posted in an easily visible place in case you need it. Safe Disposal Do not give leftover medicine to others. ...

  11. Advances in Medical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Buzug, Thorsten M

    2007-01-01

    Presents research and development trends of physics, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences in biomedical engineering. This work uses contributions from industry, clinics, universities and research labs with foci on medical imaging, computer-assisted surgery, and others to give insight to engineering, clinical and mathematical studies.

  12. Architecture and Design of Medical Processor Units for Medical Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ahamed, Syed V; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2602

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces analogical and deductive methodologies for the design medical processor units (MPUs). From the study of evolution of numerous earlier processors, we derive the basis for the architecture of MPUs. These specialized processors perform unique medical functions encoded as medical operational codes (mopcs). From a pragmatic perspective, MPUs function very close to CPUs. Both processors have unique operation codes that command the hardware to perform a distinct chain of subprocesses upon operands and generate a specific result unique to the opcode and the operand(s). In medical environments, MPU decodes the mopcs and executes a series of medical sub-processes and sends out secondary commands to the medical machine. Whereas operands in a typical computer system are numerical and logical entities, the operands in medical machine are objects such as such as patients, blood samples, tissues, operating rooms, medical staff, medical bills, patient payments, etc. We follow the functional overlap betw...

  13. Attitudes Toward Medical Cannabis Legalization Among Serbian Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujcic, Isidora; Pavlovic, Aleksandar; Dubljanin, Eleonora; Maksimovic, Jadranka; Nikolic, Aleksandra; Sipetic-Grujicic, Sandra

    2017-07-29

    Currently, medical cannabis polices are experiencing rapid changes, and an increasing number of nations around the world legalize medical cannabis for certain groups of patients, including those in Serbia. To determine medical students' attitudes toward medical cannabis legalization and to examine the factors influencing their attitudes. Fourth-year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, had participated in a cross-sectional study. Data were collected by an anonymous questionnaire. Overall, 63.4% students supported medical cannabis legalization, and only 20.8% supported its legalization for recreational use. Students who previously used marijuana (p marijuana recreational use was also related to prior marijuana (p cancer (90.4%) and chronic pain (74.2%) were correctly reported approved medical indications by more than half the students. Students who supported medical cannabis legalization showed better knowledge about indications, in contrast to opponents for legalization who showed better knowledge about side effects. Beliefs that using medical cannabis is safe and has health benefits were correlated with support for legalization, and previous marijuana and alcohol use, while beliefs that medical cannabis poses health risks correlated most strongly with previous marijuana use. Conclusions/Importance: The medical students' attitudes toward medical cannabis legalization were significantly correlated with previous use of marijuana and alcohol, knowledge about medical indications and side effects, and their beliefs regarding medical cannabis health benefits and risks.

  14. Automated Medical Literature Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hawking

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The constantly growing publication rate of medical research articles puts increasing pressure on medical specialists who need to be aware of the recent developments in their field. The currently used literature retrieval systems allow researchers to find specific papers; however the search task is still repetitive and time-consuming. Aims In this paper we describe a system that retrieves medical publications by automatically generating queries based on data from an electronic patient record. This allows the doctor to focus on medical issues and provide an improved service to the patient, with higher confidence that it is underpinned by current research. Method Our research prototype automatically generates query terms based on the patient record and adds weight factors for each term. Currently the patient’s age is taken into account with a fuzzy logic derived weight, and terms describing blood-related anomalies are derived from recent blood test results. Conditionally selected homonyms are used for query expansion. The query retrieves matching records from a local index of PubMed publications and displays results in descending relevance for the given patient. Recent publications are clearly highlighted for instant recognition by the researcher. Results Nine medical specialists from the Royal Adelaide Hospital evaluated the system and submitted pre-trial and post-trial questionnaires. Throughout the study we received positive feedback as doctors felt the support provided by the prototype was useful, and which they would like to use in their daily routine. Conclusion By supporting the time-consuming task of query formulation and iterative modification as well as by presenting the search results in order of relevance for the specific patient, literature retrieval becomes part of the daily workflow of busy professionals.

  15. The Medical Physics Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D

    2017-02-01

    The medical physics workforce comprises approximately 24,000 workers worldwide and approximately 8,200 in the United States. The occupation is a recognized, established, and mature profession that is undergoing considerable growth and change, with many of these changes being driven by scientific, technical, and medical advances. Presently, the medical physics workforce is adequate to meet societal needs. However, data are emerging that suggest potential risks of shortages and other problems that could develop within a few years. Some of the governing factors are well established, such as the increasing number of incident cancers thereby increasing workload, while others, such as the future use of radiation treatments and changes in healthcare economic policies, are uncertain and make the future status of the workforce difficult to forecast beyond the next several years. This review examines some of the major factors that govern supply and demand for medical physicists, discusses published projections and their uncertainties, and presents other information that may help to inform short- and long-term planning of various aspects of the future workforce. It includes a description of the general characteristics of the workforce, including information on its size, educational attainment, certification, age distribution, etc. Because the supply of new workers is governed by educational and training pathways, graduate education, post-doctoral training, and residency training are reviewed, along with trends in state and federal support for research and education. Selected professional aspects of the field also are considered, including professional certification and compensation. We speculate on the future outlook of the workforce and provide recommendations regarding future actions pertaining to the future medical physics workforce.

  16. MEDICAL TOURISM : Demand for Cuban Medical Tourism by Russian Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Ulanova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Medical tourism, often addressed as health tourism, is a new concept in terms of tourism industry in general, and it is also one of the rapidly developing and growing ones. This thesis gives information on the medical tourism in general and its history. It also revises the development stages of the medical tourism in the world. Cuban medical tourism is analyzed on its own, as well as Russian medical tourism and the demand for it. Medical tourism is rather popular among Russians due to various...

  17. Emphasizing humanities in medical education: Promoting the integration of medical scientific spirit and medical humanistic spirit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peipei; Tang, Wei

    2017-05-23

    In the era of the biological-psychological-social medicine model, an ideal of modern medicine is to enhance the humanities in medical education, to foster medical talents with humanistic spirit, and to promote the integration of scientific spirit and humanistic spirit in medicine. Throughout the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), other Western countries, and some Asian countries like Japan, many medical universities have already integrated the learning of medical humanities in their curricula and recognized their value. While in China, although medical education reform over the past decade has emphasized the topic of medical humanities to increase the professionalism of future physicians, the integration of medical humanity courses in medical universities has lagged behind the pace in Western countries. In addition, current courses in medical humanities were arbitrarily established due to a lack of organizational independence. For various reasons like a shortage of instructors, medical universities have failed to pay sufficient attention to medical humanities education given the urgent needs of society. The medical problems in contemporary Chinese society are not solely the purview of biomedical technology; what matters more is enhancing the humanities in medical education and fostering medical talents with humanistic spirit. Emphasizing the humanities in medical education and promoting the integration of medical scientific spirit and medical humanistic spirit have become one of the most pressing issues China must address. Greater attention should be paid to reasonable integration of humanities into the medical curriculum, creation of medical courses related to humanities and optimization of the curriculum, and actively allocating abundant teaching resources and exploring better methods of instruction.

  18. Optimization of Medical Teaching Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the goal of medical education, medicine and adapt to changes in the way doctors work, with the rapid medical teaching methods of modern science and technology must be reformed. Based on the current status of teaching in medical colleges method to analyze the formation and development of medical teaching methods, characteristics, about how to achieve optimal medical teaching methods for medical education teachers and management workers comprehensive and thorough change teaching ideas and teaching concepts provide a theoretical basis.

  19. Status of medical mycology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, William J; Mitchell, Thomas G; Schell, Wiley A; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Coico, Richard F; Walsh, Thomas J; Perfect, John R

    2003-12-01

    The number of immunocompromised patients and subsequent invasive fungal infections continues to rise. However, the education of future medical mycologists to engage this growing problem is diminishing. While there are an increasing number of publications and grants awarded in mycology, the time and detail devoted to teaching medical mycology in United States medical schools are inadequate. Here we review the history in medical mycology education and the current educational opportunities. To accurately gauge contemporary teaching we also conducted a prospective survey of microbiology and immunology departmental chairpersons in United States medical schools to determine the amount and content of contemporary education in medical mycology.

  20. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D.; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history. PMID:23631405

  1. Architecture and Design of Medical Processor Units for Medical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed V. Ahamed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper1 introduces analogical and deductive methodologies for the design medical processor units(MPUs. From the study of evolution of numerous earlier processors, we derive the basis for thearchitecture of MPUs. These specialized processors perform unique medical functions encoded as medicaloperational codes (mopcs. From a pragmatic perspective, MPUs function very close to CPUs. Bothprocessors have unique operation codes that command the hardware to perform a distinct chain of subprocessesupon operands and generate a specific result unique to the opcode and the operand(s. Inmedical environments, MPU decodes the mopcs and executes a series of medical sub-processes and sendsout secondary commands to the medical machine. Whereas operands in a typical computer system arenumerical and logical entities, the operands in medical machine are objects such as such as patients, bloodsamples, tissues, operating rooms, medical staff, medical bills, patient payments, etc. We follow thefunctional overlap between the two processes and evolve the design of medical computer systems andnetworks.

  2. Prescription opiate medications: medical uses and consequences, laws and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Norman S

    2004-12-01

    The proposed analysis and evaluation of the data elements in the OPP and other similar regulatory programs will support the following potential impact on the patients and physicians in Michigan and other states: Reduced rates of addictive use of prescriptions of Schedule II medications. Reduced rates of addictive patterns of prescribing of Schedule II medications. Improved the prescribing of Schedule II medication for pain disorders. Improved the prescribing of Schedule II medications in addictive disorders. Establish the need and direction for development of curriculum for Schedule II drugs for undergraduate medical education and continuing medical education. Establish the need and direction for development of curriculum for use of Schedule II medications in patients with addictive and pain disorders. Explore the need and direction for development of the monitoring system medical curriculum for Schedule III, IV, and V drugs. Demonstrate link between diversion and adverse effects on health caused by an addictive pattern of use and prescribing of Schedule II drugs

  3. Nonsecular Medical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, Ian; Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2016-01-01

    A nonsecular medical anthropology insists on the ways medicine and science have constituted 'the secular' itself through the 'secular self'-how medical knowing has been used to craft the secular political subject. As James Boon noted, too often in social theory, "religion gets safely tucked away-restricted theoretically to 'meaning' rather than power" (1998:245). The authors of the six articles in this special issue 'untuck' religiosity from within the norms and numbers of medicine itself, and examine how 'secular' medicine has relied on religious traditions to produce political secularity. These articles demonstrate that 'secular' medicine relies on religious others whose exclusion bespeaks latent religious commitments of citizenship in the modern political realm of health.

  4. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  5. [Medical politics. Graffiti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugelli, P

    1991-03-20

    If doctors want to play a role in future health promotion, they have to leave their citadel, and come closer to life and society. Modern preventive medicine cannot be dissociated from basic political, cultural and religious values and processes. Genetic counseling and engineering, influencing lifestyle, community intervention and changing the health culture among patients and doctors all require ethical and political competence rather than traditional medical skills. The author advocates the development of a new discipline, medical politics, with two major commitments: -To define basic health rights -To study the public health consequences of political systems and decisions. In a polemic and provocative style the article enlightens the potentials and dangers associated with an expanded concept of preventive medicine.

  6. [Medical quality assurance today].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Both the quality and performance of health systems are strongly influenced by the number and the qualification of the professional staff. Quality assurance programs help to analyse causalities which are responsible for medical malpractice. On the basis of the experiences gained by the performance of established Quality Assurance Programs (QAP) in the North Rhine area since 1982 various aspects of the efficiency of these programs will be discussed. The implementation of legal regulations making these programs mandatory is criticised not only for its bureaucratic effect but also for the attempt to exclude professional experts from the interpretation of results. It is recommended to liberalize these regulations in order to facilitate improvement of methods and participation of the medical profession.

  7. Classification in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen

    Classification is extensively used in the context of medical image analysis for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. In order to classify image content correctly, one needs to extract efficient features with discriminative properties and build classifiers based on these features. In addition......, a good metric is required to measure distance or similarity between feature points so that the classification becomes feasible. Furthermore, in order to build a successful classifier, one needs to deeply understand how classifiers work. This thesis focuses on these three aspects of classification...... to segment breast tissue and pectoral muscle area from the background in mammogram. The second focus is the choices of metric and its influence to the feasibility of a classifier, especially on k-nearest neighbors (k-NN) algorithm, with medical applications on breast cancer prediction and calcification...

  8. Medical therapy in acromegaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) and increased circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations. The disease is associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, but these effects can be reduced if GH levels are decreased to <2.5 μg\\/l and IGF-1 levels are normalized. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and IGF-1 levels, ameliorating patients\\' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, radiotherapy and medical therapies, such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant. Medical therapy is currently most widely used as secondary treatment for persistent or recurrent acromegaly following noncurative surgery, although it is increasingly used as primary therapy. This Review provides an overview of current and future pharmacological therapies for patients with acromegaly.

  9. MEDICAL MANUFACTURING INNOVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Sorin Cosmin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of these studies was to improve the design and manufacturing process by selective laser melting, of new medical implants. After manufacturing process, the implants were measured, microscopically and mechanical analyzed. Implants manufactured by AM can be an attractive option for surface coatings to improve the osseointegration process. The main advantages of customized implants made by AM process are: the precise adaptation to the region of implantation, better cosmesis, reduced surgical times and better performance over their generic counterparts. These medical manufacturing changes the way that the surgeons are planning surgeries and engineers are designing custom implant. AM process has eliminated the constraints of shape, size, internal structure and mechanical properties making it possible for fabrication of implants that conform to the physical and mechanical requirements of implantation according to CT images. This article will review some custom implants fabricated in DME using biocompatible titanium.

  10. Medical consequences of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Victor J; Kopelman, Peter G

    2004-01-01

    The obese are subject to health problems directly relating to the carriage of excess adipose tissue. These problems range from arthritis, aches and pains, sleep disturbance, dyspnea on mild exertion, and excessive sweating to social stigmatization and discrimination, all of which may contribute to low quality of life and depression (Table 1). The most serious medical consequences of obesity are a result of endocrine and metabolic changes, most notably type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of cancer. Not all obesity comorbidities are fully reversed by weight loss. The degree and duration of weight loss required may not be achievable by an individual patient. Furthermore, "weight cycling" may be more detrimental to both physical and mental health than failure to achieve weight loss targets with medical and lifestyle advice.

  11. Justice and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, R

    1985-07-20

    Justice, in the sense of fair adjudication between conflicting claims, is held to be relevant to a wide range of issues in medical ethics. Several differing concepts of justice are briefly described, including Aristotle's formal principle of justice, libertarian theories, utilitarian theories, Marxist theories, the theory of John Rawls, and the view--held, for example, by W.D. Ross--that justice is essentially a matter of reward for individual merit.

  12. Commercializing medical technology

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, Kevin J.; Lieberman, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880’s, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical i...

  13. Emergency Medical Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Lewis Research Center helped design the complex EMS Communication System, originating from space operated telemetry, including the telemetry link between ambulances and hospitals for advanced life support services. In emergency medical use telemetry links ambulances and hospitals for advanced life support services and allows transmission of physiological data -- an electrocardiogram from an ambulance to a hospital emergency room where a physician reads the telemetered message and prescribes emergency procedures to ambulance attendants.

  14. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802 by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch  

  15. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    iFor medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  16. Medical emergencies in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddichha Sahoo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most emergencies in Goa arise due to road traffic accidents and drowning, which have been compounded by the rise in number of recorded accidents in 2007 to be above 4000. It is believed that 11 people meet with an accident on Goa′s roads every day and this is expected to rise by 10% by next year. Similar is the case with drownings and other medical emergencies. We therefore aimed to conduct a cross-sectional survey of medical emergencies and identify various types of emergencies presenting to emergency departments. Materials and Methods: Using a stratified random sampling design, all emergencies presenting to the three government hospitals in Goa, which handle 90% of all emergencies currently, were studied on specially designed data sheets in order to collect data. Emergency medical technicians (ETs were placed in the Casualty Ward of the medical colleges and they recorded all emergencies on the data sheet. The collected data were then analyzed for stratification and mapping of emergencies. Results: GMC Hospital attended to majority of emergencies (62%, which were mainly of the nature of accidents or assaults (17% and fever related (17%. Most emergencies were noncritical and about 1% expired. Maximum emergencies also presented from Salcette and Bardez, and occurred among young males in the age group of 19-45 years. Males were also more prone to accidents while females had pregnancies as emergencies. Conclusion: Potential emergency services need to target young males with higher concentrations required in Salcette in South Goa and Bardez in North Goa.

  17. Branding your medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Catherine; Baum, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Branding is the process of differentiating your medical practice from all other practices in the industry. Branding takes into account the "look and feel" of your office, you and your staff your materials, and every other detail that gives your patients clues as to who you are and what you value. This article will review the strategies that go into building your own solid brand so your existing patients, as well as prospective ones, are attracted and loyal to you and your brand.

  18. Capturing medical students' idealism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Janice K; Weaver, Donna B

    2006-01-01

    Students' idealism and desire to work with underserved populations decline as they progress from preclinical training through clerkships and residency. With an increasingly diverse population and increasing health disparities, academic health centers need to incorporate changes in their curricula to train socially responsible and idealistic physicians. International electives can provide valuable learning experiences to help achieve these goals. Sixty-six preclinical medical students at the University of Texas Medical Branch participated in an international elective from 1997 to 2005. After 1 week of didactics, they spent 3 weeks as part of a multidisciplinary medical team in rural Nicaragua. Postelective questionnaires were administered. From students' responses, we identified common learning themes and grouped them under the categories of attitudes, awareness, and skills. Limitations included a self-selection bias, lack of a control group, and limited follow-up. After the elective, students had an increased interest in volunteerism, humanitarian efforts, and working with underserved populations both in the United States and abroad, as well as more compassion toward the underserved. Students also reported a heightened awareness of social determinants of health and public health, and a broadened global perspective, as well as increased self-awareness. Our findings illustrate that a well-structured, mentored experience in international health can have a positive impact on preclinical students' attitudes, including their compassion, volunteerism, and interest in serving under-served populations, all measures of idealism.

  19. Capturing Medical Students’ Idealism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Janice K.; Weaver, Donna B.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Students’ idealism and desire to work with underserved populations decline as they progress from preclinical training through clerkships and residency. With an increasingly diverse population and increasing health disparities, academic health centers need to incorporate changes in their curricula to train socially responsible and idealistic physicians. International electives can provide valuable learning experiences to help achieve these goals. METHODS Sixty-six preclinical medical students at the University of Texas Medical Branch participated in an international elective from 1997 to 2005. After 1 week of didactics, they spent 3 weeks as part of a multidisciplinary medical team in rural Nicaragua. Postelective questionnaires were administered. From students’ responses, we identified common learning themes and grouped them under the categories of attitudes, awareness, and skills. Limitations included a self-selection bias, lack of a control group, and limited follow-up. RESULTS After the elective, students had an increased interest in volunteerism, humanitarian efforts, and working with underserved populations both in the United States and abroad, as well as more compassion toward the underserved. Students also reported a heightened awareness of social determinants of health and public health, and a broadened global perspective, as well as increased self-awareness. CONCLUSIONS Our findings illustrate that a well-structured, mentored experience in international health can have a positive impact on preclinical students’ attitudes, including their compassion, volunteerism, and interest in serving under-served populations, all measures of idealism. PMID:17003160

  20. Training medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, W R; Ramakrishna, J

    1987-09-01

    Nigerian 4th year medical students from University of Ibadan spend 8 weeks training in primary health care and public health in the rural Ibarapa Community Health Programme in Oyo State, with ORT as part of the training. Their course of study there includes epidemiological projects, collecting data on diarrhea prevalence, cultural and behavioral practices, assessment and treating children with diarrhea, and teaching ORT to the community. Students worked on the ORT unit on a rotating basis, preparing ORS, monitoring children and talking to mothers. They learned that most mothers recognized diarrhea symptoms, 2/3 had heard about ORS, but less than 1/5 considered it a first step in managing diarrhea. Most would eliminate beans from the child's diet, substituting bland maize porridge. Talking with mothers made them realize that teething children put dirty objects into their mouths and that presence of visible children's feces is associated with diarrhea. Use of soap for hand washing, and availability of clean tap water, rather than well water, decreased incidence of diarrhea. After their training, medical students knew how to prepare ORS correctly, and understand its efficacy. This should increase the acceptance by the medical professionals of ORT as a desirable part of diarrhea control.

  1. Medical treatment of hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Hahn, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Hirsutism is usually the result of an underlying adrenal, ovarian, or central endocrine abnormality mainly due to polycystic ovary syndrome but may also be idiopathic or drug induced. The aim of medical treatment of hirsutism is to rectify any causal hormonal balance, slow down or stop excessive hair growth, and improve the aesthetic appearance of hirsutism, thereby positively affecting the patient's quality of life. Today, for the majority of women, a monotherapy with oral contraceptives that have antiandrogenic activity is recommended as a first-line treatment for hirsutism. Combining an oral contraceptive pill with an antiandrogen is recommended if clinical improvement of hirsutism is insufficient after 6-9 months' monotherapy. In women who present with hirsutism, hyperandrogenism, and insulin resistance, insulin sensitizers are effective for the hirsutism as well as the hyperinsulinemia, hyperandrogenism, and infertility but there is no convincing evidence that they are effective for hirsutism alone. Topical eflornithine is a medical therapy that can be a useful adjuvant for hirsutism when used in conjunction with systemic medications or with laser/photoepilation.

  2. Medical genetics in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascurra de Duarte, Marta

    2004-01-01

    Paraguay is a developing country with low levels of health coverage, with 81% of the population without health insurance, a proportion that reaches 98.1% among the poor, 93% among the rural population and 91.7% among the mainly Guarani-speaking population. The infant mortality rate is 19.4 per 1,000, although there is gross under-reporting. Maternal mortality rate is alarmingly high at 110.9 per 100,000 livebirths, reaching 420.5 in rural areas. There are only two clinical geneticists and four biochemists trained in human genetics, and virtually all genetic services in the country are concentrated in the 'Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud' (IICS) from the National University. The teaching of medical genetics in medical schools is included in physiology and pathology courses, while at the postgraduate level, training in medical genetics is limited to pediatrics and gynecology. In 1999, a pilot newborn screening program was initiated to determine the frequency of congenital hypothyroidism and phenylketonuria and to provide early treatment for affected babies. Another pilot project recently launched by the Ministry of Health is the Program for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects, mandating folic acid fortification of flour, but as of the end of 2003 it had not been implemented. Paraguay lacks adequate resources to provide accurate diagnoses and treatment of genetic conditions.

  3. [Merton and medical sociology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2007-01-01

    The article is about the main contributions of the North-American sociologist Robert King Merton (1910-2003), particularly those related to the field of medical sociology. Merton was first to conduct research on medical education, and the working team he formed was fundamental for the introduction of social thought in the medicine field (Patrícia Kendall, Renée Fox, Samuel Bloom and others). Of particular importance are Merton's vocation for sociology and the unique trajectory of his research, which was marked by studies on subjects that were not common in the early XX century, particularly the relationships between science, technology, and society. We provide the most important theoretical ad conceptual contribution brought by the author, as well as the expressions he created and which were soon adopted by researchers, such as 'focused interview', 'Matthew effects, 'Pygmalion effect', 'nonplanned consequences of social actions', 'manifest function', and 'latent function'. The highlight in the field of medical sociology is his work on the socialization process of the student of medicine.

  4. High Performance Medical Classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoukis, S. G.; Bekakos, M. P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, parallelism methodologies for the mapping of machine learning algorithms derived rules on both software and hardware are investigated. Feeding the input of these algorithms with patient diseases data, medical diagnostic decision trees and their corresponding rules are outputted. These rules can be mapped on multithreaded object oriented programs and hardware chips. The programs can simulate the working of the chips and can exhibit the inherent parallelism of the chips design. The circuit of a chip can consist of many blocks, which are operating concurrently for various parts of the whole circuit. Threads and inter-thread communication can be used to simulate the blocks of the chips and the combination of block output signals. The chips and the corresponding parallel programs constitute medical classifiers, which can classify new patient instances. Measures taken from the patients can be fed both into chips and parallel programs and can be recognized according to the classification rules incorporated in the chips and the programs design. The chips and the programs constitute medical decision support systems and can be incorporated into portable micro devices, assisting physicians in their everyday diagnostic practice.

  5. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division

    1998-03-01

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country`s main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  6. Whatever happened to medical politics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    This paper argues the case for coming to see 'medical politics' as a topic or subject within medical education. First, its absence is noted from the wide array of paramedical subjects (medical ethics, history of medicine, the medical humanities, etc) currently given attention in both the medical education literature and in specific curricula. Second the author suggests that 'the political' is implicitly recognisable in the historical roots of medical ethics education, specifically in certain of the London Medical Group's activities, and also that the medical profession, or indeed any profession, cannot be understood as an apolitical form of social organisation either in its institutional or scientific (epistemic) forms. Some brief suggestions for introductory and advanced topics in medical politics are discussed and the degree to which medical politics ought to be taken seriously and delivered as part of medical education is considered. Ultimately the author concludes that medical politics might be considered a useful subject within medical education, but it is perhaps best understood as a perspective or approach that can contribute to the development of a more expansive perspective within the extant paramedical subjects.

  7. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  8. [The mandatory medical insurance through eyes of medical personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, V Yu; Lakunin, K Yu; Livshits, S A

    2014-01-01

    The article considers the results of sociological survey carries out among medical personnel of the Moscowskaya oblast in August-September 2013. The purpose of the study was to examine opinions of medical personnel about system of mandatory insurance in conditions of implementation of the new law regulating system of mandatory medical insurance during last three years. The sampling included 932 respondents that corresponds approximately 1% of all medical personnel in the oblast. It is established that even 20 years later after the moment of organization of the system of mandatory medical insurance not all medical personnel is oriented in it. More than 70% of respondents consider this system too convoluted and over bureaucratized and only 22.2% of respondents assume that medical insurance organizations defense interests of patient and 25.8% feel no impact of mandatory medical insurance funds on functioning of medical organizations. Most of respondents consider functions of mandatory medical insurance organizations and mandatory medical insurance funds as controlling only. Only 31% of respondents support the actual system of mandatory medical insurance.

  9. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  10. Commercializing medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Kevin J; Lieberman, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880's, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical industries. The impact of those new employees and their groundbreaking compounds had a profound influence on medicine and medical education in Germany between 1880 and 1930. Germany dominated international science during this period and was a training center for scientists worldwide. This model of synergy between education and business was envied and admired in Europe, Asia and America. British science soon after evolved to dominate the field of science during the prewar and post World War (1930's-1970's) because the German scientists fled Hitler's government. These expatriated scientists had a profound influence on the teaching and training of British scientists, which lead to advances in medicine such as antibiotics. After the Second World War, the US government wisely funded the development of the medical infrastructure that we see today. British and German scientists in medicine moved to America because of this bountiful funding for their research. These expatriated scientists helped drive these medical advances into commercialized products by the 1980's. America has been the center of medical education and advances of biotechnology but will it continue? International scientists trained in America have started to return to Europe and Asia. These American-trained scientists and their governments are very aware of the commercial potential of biotechnology. Those governments are now more prepared to play an active role this new science. Germany, Ireland, Britain, Singapore

  11. Hyperglycemia and antipsychotic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, D W; Newcomer, J W

    2001-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance are associated with antipsychotic treatment. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance include abdominal adiposity, age, ethnic status, and certain neuropsychiatric conditions. While impaired glucose metabolism was first described in psychotic patients prior to the introduction of antipsychotic medications, treatment with antipsychotic medications is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, exacerbation of existing type 1 and 2 diabetes, new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus, and diabetic ketoacidosis, a severe and potentially fatal metabolic complication. The strength of the association between antipsychotics and diabetes varies across individual medications, with the largest number of reports for chlorpromazine, clozapine, and olanzapine. Recent controlled studies suggest that antipsychotics can impair glucose regulation by decreasing insulin action, although effects on insulin secretion are not ruled out. Antipsychotic medications induce weight gain, and the potential for weight gain varies across individual agents with larger effects observed again for agents like chlorpromazine, clozapine, and olanzapine. Increased abdominal adiposity may explain some treatment-related changes in glucose metabolism. However, case reports and recent controlled studies suggest that clozapine and olanzapine treatment may also be associated with adverse effects on glucose metabolism independent of adiposity. Dyslipidemia is a feature of type 2 diabetes, and antipsychotics such as clozapine and olanzapine have also been associated with hypertriglyceridemia, with agents such as haloperidol, risperidone, and ziprasidone associated with reductions in plasma triglycerides. Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality due to both acute (e.g., diabetic ketoacidosis) and long-term (e.g., cardiovascular disease) complications. A progressive relationship between plasma glucose levels and

  12. Medical Microbiology: Deficits and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabridge, Michael G.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiology is a typical medical science in which basic information can have direct application. Yet, surveys and questionnaires of recent medical school graduates indicate a serious lack of retentiion in regard to basic biological science. (Author)

  13. Current issues in medical education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ing, virtual reality, the use ol' simulated subjects, e learn- ing, and the new .... leges (AAMCÏ proposed a group oi' leaming objectives as guide- lines for medical schools. .... Suggestions for action research studies of cli- mates in medical ...

  14. Medical Dictionary: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/mplusdictionary.html Medical Dictionary To use the sharing features on this ... Search term GO GO Visit the tutorial, Understanding Medical Words You may also be interested in these ...

  15. Medical Encyclopedia: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/encyclopedia.html Medical Encyclopedia To use the sharing features on this ... please enable JavaScript. The A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia includes over 4,000 articles about diseases, ...

  16. Medical Microbiology: Deficits and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabridge, Michael G.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiology is a typical medical science in which basic information can have direct application. Yet, surveys and questionnaires of recent medical school graduates indicate a serious lack of retentiion in regard to basic biological science. (Author)

  17. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...

  18. Managing High Blood Pressure Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make to work with your medication. Medicine Management Tools For Patients Keeping Track / Developing a System ... while you're out. Some pharmacists will prepare blister packs for daily or weekly medications. Ask your ...

  19. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management.

  20. Advanced Capabilities for Combat Medics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Convertino, Victor A; Cooke, William H; Salinas, Jose; Holcomb, John B

    2004-01-01

    The US Army Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR) has the lead for directing the Research Program Area for Advanced Triage Capabilities for Combat Medics in the Medical Research and Materiel Command (MRMC...

  1. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 293

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    at Moi Teaching and Referrall-lospital, J. Kosgei, Medical student (5th year), A. J. Rerimoi Medical ... by increasing awareness and strengthening recognition skills of myocardial infarction .... crushing or squeezing; often there is radiation down.

  2. Exploration Medical System Technical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, K.; Middour, C.; Cerro, J.; Burba, T.; Hanson, A.; Reilly, J.; Mindock, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element systems engineering goals include defining the technical system needed to implement exploration medical capabilities for Mars. This past year, scenarios captured in the medical system concept of operations laid the foundation for systems engineering technical development work. The systems engineering team analyzed scenario content to identify interactions between the medical system, crewmembers, the exploration vehicle, and the ground system. This enabled the definition of functions the medical system must provide and interfaces to crewmembers and other systems. These analyses additionally lead to the development of a conceptual medical system architecture. The work supports the ExMC community-wide understanding of the functional exploration needs to be met by the medical system, the subsequent development of medical system requirements, and the system verification and validation approach utilizing terrestrial analogs and precursor exploration missions.

  3. Regression methods for medical research

    CERN Document Server

    Tai, Bee Choo

    2013-01-01

    Regression Methods for Medical Research provides medical researchers with the skills they need to critically read and interpret research using more advanced statistical methods. The statistical requirements of interpreting and publishing in medical journals, together with rapid changes in science and technology, increasingly demands an understanding of more complex and sophisticated analytic procedures.The text explains the application of statistical models to a wide variety of practical medical investigative studies and clinical trials. Regression methods are used to appropriately answer the

  4. Factors Affecting Medical Service Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background A better understanding of factors influencing quality of medical service can pinpoint better strategies for quality assurance in medical services. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the quality of medical services provided by Iranian physicians. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual interviews were conducted with sixty-four physicians working in various medical institutions in Iran. Results Individual, organizational and environmental factors enhance or inhib...

  5. Thromboprophylaxis in immobilized medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkus, Paul T

    2004-03-30

    Venous thromboembolism accounts for a large number of preventable deaths. The majority of these events occur in medical patients, but medical thromboprophylaxis remains underutilised in this population. The purpose of this review is to examine the results of recent clinical trials of low molecular weight heparins in the prevention of venous thromboembolic disease in medical patients. The available data make a compelling case in favor of widespread use of low molecular weight heparin in medical patients.

  6. Triathlon Medical Coverage: A Guide for Medical Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Chad A; Miller, Thomas K; Creswell, Lawrence; Getzin, Andrew; Hunt, Andrew; Martinez, John; Diehl, Jason; Hiller, William D; Berlin, Paul

    Interest and participation in triathlon has grown rapidly over the past 20 yr and with this growth, there has been an increase in the number of new events. To maximize the safety of participation, triathlons require medical directors to plan and oversee medical care associated with event participation. Provision of proper medical care requires knowledge of staffing requirements, common triathlon medical conditions, impact of course design, communication skill, and a familiarity of administrative requirements. These guidelines serve as a tool for triathlon medical and race directors to improve race safety for athletes.

  7. Beyond "medical tourism": Canadian companies marketing medical travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Leigh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite having access to medically necessary care available through publicly funded provincial health care systems, some Canadians travel for treatment provided at international medical facilities as well as for-profit clinics found in several Canadian provinces. Canadians travel abroad for orthopaedic surgery, bariatric surgery, ophthalmologic surgery, stem cell injections, “Liberation therapy” for multiple sclerosis, and additional interventions. Both responding to public interest in medical travel and playing an important part in promoting the notion of a global marketplace for health services, many Canadian companies market medical travel. Methods Research began with the goal of locating all medical tourism companies based in Canada. Various strategies were used to find such businesses. During the search process it became apparent that many Canadian business promoting medical travel are not medical tourism companies. To the contrary, numerous types of businesses promote medical travel. Once businesses promoting medical travel were identified, content analysis was used to extract information from company websites. Company websites were analyzed to establish: 1 where in Canada these businesses are located; 2 the destination countries and health care facilities that they market; 3 the medical procedures they promote; 4 core marketing messages; and 5 whether businesses market air travel, hotel accommodations, and holiday tours in addition to medical procedures. Results Searches conducted from 2006 to 2011 resulted in identification of thirty-five Canadian businesses currently marketing various kinds of medical travel. The research project began with what seemed to be the straightforward goal of establishing how many medical tourism companies are based in Canada. Refinement of categories resulted in the identification of eighteen businesses fitting the category of what most researchers would identify as medical tourism

  8. Beyond "medical tourism": Canadian companies marketing medical travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-06-15

    Despite having access to medically necessary care available through publicly funded provincial health care systems, some Canadians travel for treatment provided at international medical facilities as well as for-profit clinics found in several Canadian provinces. Canadians travel abroad for orthopaedic surgery, bariatric surgery, ophthalmologic surgery, stem cell injections, "Liberation therapy" for multiple sclerosis, and additional interventions. Both responding to public interest in medical travel and playing an important part in promoting the notion of a global marketplace for health services, many Canadian companies market medical travel. Research began with the goal of locating all medical tourism companies based in Canada. Various strategies were used to find such businesses. During the search process it became apparent that many Canadian business promoting medical travel are not medical tourism companies. To the contrary, numerous types of businesses promote medical travel. Once businesses promoting medical travel were identified, content analysis was used to extract information from company websites. Company websites were analyzed to establish: 1) where in Canada these businesses are located; 2) the destination countries and health care facilities that they market; 3) the medical procedures they promote; 4) core marketing messages; and 5) whether businesses market air travel, hotel accommodations, and holiday tours in addition to medical procedures. Searches conducted from 2006 to 2011 resulted in identification of thirty-five Canadian businesses currently marketing various kinds of medical travel. The research project began with what seemed to be the straightforward goal of establishing how many medical tourism companies are based in Canada. Refinement of categories resulted in the identification of eighteen businesses fitting the category of what most researchers would identify as medical tourism companies. Seven other businesses market regional, cross

  9. Beyond "medical tourism": Canadian companies marketing medical travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite having access to medically necessary care available through publicly funded provincial health care systems, some Canadians travel for treatment provided at international medical facilities as well as for-profit clinics found in several Canadian provinces. Canadians travel abroad for orthopaedic surgery, bariatric surgery, ophthalmologic surgery, stem cell injections, “Liberation therapy” for multiple sclerosis, and additional interventions. Both responding to public interest in medical travel and playing an important part in promoting the notion of a global marketplace for health services, many Canadian companies market medical travel. Methods Research began with the goal of locating all medical tourism companies based in Canada. Various strategies were used to find such businesses. During the search process it became apparent that many Canadian business promoting medical travel are not medical tourism companies. To the contrary, numerous types of businesses promote medical travel. Once businesses promoting medical travel were identified, content analysis was used to extract information from company websites. Company websites were analyzed to establish: 1) where in Canada these businesses are located; 2) the destination countries and health care facilities that they market; 3) the medical procedures they promote; 4) core marketing messages; and 5) whether businesses market air travel, hotel accommodations, and holiday tours in addition to medical procedures. Results Searches conducted from 2006 to 2011 resulted in identification of thirty-five Canadian businesses currently marketing various kinds of medical travel. The research project began with what seemed to be the straightforward goal of establishing how many medical tourism companies are based in Canada. Refinement of categories resulted in the identification of eighteen businesses fitting the category of what most researchers would identify as medical tourism companies. Seven other

  10. Primary Medical Care in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    Primary medical care in Chile: accessibility under military rule [Front Cover] [Front Matter] [Title Page] Contents Tables Figures Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: The Restructuring of Medical Care Financing in Chile Chapter 3: Inflation and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 4: Help...

  11. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest percen

  12. Medical Technology Base Master Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    action of candidate mnedical1 countermeasures - Analysis and characterization of candidate compounds and their inetabolites - Application of molecular ...expected that research in molecular biology will lead to medical ,.vphylaes and treatments that ofter improved speclicity and potency, thus increasing...Disease Hazards Research (Inlectious Disease, Medical Biologia Defense, and Military AIDS), Conbat Casualty Care Research, Medical Chem"ca Defense Research

  13. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest percen

  14. Medical Care and Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your Newborn A A A What's ... doctor of the birth. If you had any medical problems during pregnancy, if your baby might have ...

  15. Blended Learning in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing pedagogical advancements in medical education across the globe have gained the attention of academicians for the preparation of well-educated and competent physicians to address the healthcare issues facing today. The integration of technology into medical pedagogy has proved effective in many ways. This has made the medical education…

  16. Community-Oriented Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Community-orientated medicine is a topical area for debate in the current discussions about medical education, but it can be argued that medical education has always been in the community because medical practice is located therein. It is widely accepted that community settings provide a wealth of learning opportunities for students and trainees…

  17. Medical Care and Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Medical Care and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your Newborn Print A A A ... doctor of the birth. If you had any medical problems during pregnancy, if your baby might have ...

  18. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest

  19. Emergency Medical Services Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard emergency medical services curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the emergency medical services field, and includes job skills in six emergency medical services divisions outlined in the national curriculum:…

  20. [Involvement of medical representatives in team medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirotsu, Misaki; Sohma, Michiro; Takagi, Hidehiko

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, chemotherapies have been further advanced because of successive launch of new drugs, introduction of molecular targeting, etc., and the concept of so-called Team Medical Care ,the idea of sharing interdisciplinary expertise for collaborative treatment, has steadily penetrated in the Japanese medical society. Dr. Naoto Ueno is a medical oncologist at US MD Anderson Cancer Center, the birthplace of the Team Medical Care. He has advocated the concept of ABC of Team Oncology by positioning pharmaceutical companies as Team C. Under such team practice, we believe that medical representatives of a pharmaceutical company should also play a role as a member of the Team Medical Care by providing appropriate drug use information to healthcare professionals, supporting post-marketing surveillance of treated patients, facilitating drug information sharing among healthcare professionals at medical institutions, etc.

  1. The Medical Ethics Curriculum in Medical Schools: Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubilini, Alberto; Milnes, Sharyn; Savulescu, Julian

    2016-01-01

    In this review article we describe the current scope, methods, and contents of medical ethics education in medical schools in Western English speaking countries (mainly the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia). We assess the strengths and weaknesses of current medical ethics curricula, and students' levels of satisfaction with different teaching approaches and their reported difficulties in learning medical ethics concepts and applying them in clinical practice. We identify three main challenges for medical ethics education: counteracting the bad effects of the "hidden curriculum," teaching students how to apply ethical knowledge and critical thinking to real cases in clinical practice, and shaping future doctors' right character through ethics education. We suggest ways in which these challenges could be addressed. On the basis of this analysis, we propose practical guidelines for designing, implementing, teaching, and assessing a medical ethics program within a four-year medical course.

  2. Stability Analysis of ISS Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that medications degrade over time, and that extreme storage conditions will hasten their degradation. The temperature and humidity conditions of the ISS have been shown to be within the ideal ranges for medication storage, but the effects of other environmental factors, like elevated exposure to radiation, have not yet been evaluated. Current operational procedures ensure that ISS medications are re-stocked before expiration, but this may not be possible on long duration exploration missions. For this reason, medications that have experienced long duration storage on the ISS were returned to JSC for analysis to determine any unusual effects of aging in the low- Earth orbit environment. METHODS Medications were obtained by the JSC Pharmacy from commercial distributors and were re-packaged by JSC pharmacists to conserve up mass and volume. All medication doses were part of the ISS crew medical kit and were transported to the International Space Station (ISS) via NASA's Shuttle Transportation System (Space Shuttle). After 568 days of storage, the medications were removed from the supply chain and returned to Earth on a Dragon (SpaceX) capsule. Upon return to Earth, medications were transferred to temperature and humidity controlled environmental chambers until analysis. Nine medications were chosen on the basis of their availability for study. The medications included several of the most heavily used by US crewmembers: 2 sleep aids, 2 antihistamines/decongestants, 3 pain relievers, an antidiarrheal and an alertness medication. Each medication was available at a single time point; analysis of the same medication at multiple time points was not possible. Because the samples examined in this study were obtained opportunistically from medical supplies, there were no control samples available (i.e. samples aged for a similar period of time on the ground); a significant limitation of this study. Medications were analyzed using the HPLC/MS methods described in

  3. The role of medical museums in contemporary medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreez, Yehia M A-H; Willems, Luuk N A; Wells, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    From the early 19th century until the most recent two decades, open-space and satellite museums featuring anatomy and pathology collections (collectively referred to as "medical museums") had leading roles in medical education. However, many factors have caused these roles to diminish dramatically in recent years. Chief among these are the great advances in information technology and web-based learning that are currently at play in every level of medical training. Some medical schools have abandoned their museums while others have gradually given away their museums' contents to devote former museum space to new classrooms, lecture halls, and laboratories. These trends have accelerated as medical school enrollment has increased and as increasing interest in biological and biomedical research activities have caused medical schools to convert museum space into research facilities. A few medical schools, however, have considered the contents of their museums as irreplaceable resources for modern medicine and medical education and the space these occupy as great environments for independent and self-directed learning. Consequently, some medical schools have updated their medical museums and equipped them with new technologies. The Anatomical Museum of Leiden University Medical Center in The Netherlands and the Medical Museum of Kawasaki Medical School in Kurashiki, Okayama, Japan, are two examples of such upgraded museums. Student surveys at Leiden University have indicated that all students (100%) found audio-guided museum tours to be useful for learning and majorities of them found guided tours to be clinically relevant (87%). However, 69% of students felt that museum visits should be optional rather than compulsory within the medical training curriculum.

  4. Generic medications in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zore, Matt; Harris, Alon; Tobe, Leslie Abrams; Siesky, Brent; Januleviciene, Ingrida; Behzadi, Jennifer; Amireskandari, Annahita; Egan, Patrick; Garff, Kevin; Wirostko, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the process of genericisation of medications in the US and Europe with a focus on ophthalmic drugs. Regulatory guidelines of the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency will be discussed, and the advantages and concerns of genericisation will be explored. We will look at various studies concerning the safety and efficacy of generic drugs compared to their branded counterparts. In particular, the challenges of assuring bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence in topical ophthalmic drugs will be examined.

  5. [Crisis in medical ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellamor, K

    1996-01-01

    There is a disproportion between diagnostic and therapeutic medical achievements and the doctor/patient relationship. Are we allowed to do everything we are able to do in medicine? People are concerned and worried (genetic technology, invasive medicine, embryos in test tubes etc.). The crisis of ethics in medicine is evident. The analysis of the situation shows one of the causes in the shift of the paradigma-modern times to postmodern following scientific positivism-but also a loss of ethics in medicine due to an extreme secularism and to modern philosophical trends (Hans Jonas and the responsibility for the future and on the other hand modern utilitarism).

  6. Mosquito inspired medical needles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Hesselberg, Thomas; Drakidis, Alexandros Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    The stinging proboscis in mosquitos have diameters of only 40-100 μm which is much less than the thinnest medical needles and the mechanics of these natural stinging mechanisms have therefore attracted attention amongst developers of injection devises. The mosquito use a range of different...... strategies to lower the required penetration force hence allowing a thinner and less stiff proboscis structure. Earlier studies of the mosquito proboscis insertion strategies have shown how each of the single strategies reduces the required penetration force. The present paper gives an overview...

  7. [Medical and surgical language].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensi-Pérez, Josep; Villalba-Ferrer, Francisco; Roig-Vila, José V

    2008-07-01

    Medical language contains many faults. One of them is the use of cultured and elegant words without knowing its proper significance. A second error is the recourse to using foreign words or phrases (foreignisms), particularly Anglicisms, both in their original spelling (raw foreignisms) and Hispanicised (adapted word); an overlapping mode of foreignism are so-called "calques" or loan translations. Thirdly, there is the use of words that do not exist in Spanish, palabros. Finally, the words are not correctly pronounced. In this article some examples of these errors are demonstrated and it is directed towards the appropriate use of language.

  8. Preventing medical device recalls

    CERN Document Server

    Raheja, Dev

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Medical Device RequirementsIntroductionThe ChallengesSources of ErrorsUnderstanding the Science of Safety     Overview of FDA Quality System Regulation     Overview of Risk Management Standard ISO 14971     Overview of FDA Device Approval Process     Overview of Regulatory Requirements for Clinical TrialsSummaryReferencesPreventing Recalls during Specification WritingIntroductionConduct Requirements Analysis to Identify Missing RequirementsSpecifications for Safety, Durability, and

  9. New Zealand's medical manslaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D B

    1992-01-01

    Doctors in New Zealand may be prosecuted for manslaughter if patients die as a consequence of the doctor's failure to exercise reasonable knowledge, skill and care. The requirement to use reasonable knowledge, skill and care has been held to be breached in New Zealand if a doctor is merely careless. No distinction is made between 'criminal negligence' and the negligence standard applicable in civil law. This article examines New Zealand's law relating to medical manslaughter with particular reference to the case of R v Yogasakaran [1990] 1 NZLR 399 which was the subject of a petition to the Privy Council on 30 January 1991.

  10. Medical data breaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    notification law in the US to be characterized by less government intrusions, while the revised EU Privacy Directive, 2009/136/EC calls for tougher privacy protection for data held by electronic communication providers. While the EU law sets a global de facto standard, the law remains toothless without strong......The EU and the United States have implemented data breach notification rules that cover the health sectors. Nevertheless, data breach incidents involving medical data continue to rise, especially in the US and the UK. The HITECH Act, Pub. L. 111-5 Title XIII is the first federal health breach...

  11. Medical Marijuana for Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolikonda, Murali K; Srinivasan, Kavitha; Enja, Manasa; Sagi, Vishwanath; Lippmann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-refractory epilepsy remains an important clinical problem. There is considerable recent interest by the public and physicians in using medical marijuana or its derivatives to treat seizures. The endocannabinoid system has a role in neuronal balance and ictal control. There is clinical evidence of success in diminishing seizure frequencies with cannabis derivatives, but also documentation about exacerbating epilepsy or of no discernible effect. There are lay indications and anecdotal reports of success in attenuating the severity of epilepsy, but without solid investigational corroboration. Marijuana remains largely illegal, and may induce adverse consequences. Clinical applications are not approved, thus are restricted and only recommended in selected treatment unresponsive cases, with appropriate monitoring.

  12. [Assessment in Medical Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Martha Delgado; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of medical education is fundamental for proper feedback and evaulation of students. The overall purpose of the evaluation is numerically and formatively revised. The suggested evaluation processes is described taking into account the Miller competence pyramid as a tool for designing evaluations and concepts of validity and reproducibility in assessments. The utility of student and the teacher is also raised. The issue of assessment should leave the knowledge parameters that are usually used. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Latex medical gloves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palosuo, Timo; Antoniadou, Irini; Gottrup, Finn

    2011-01-01

    properties of NRL and synthetic gloves and the role of glove powder. The review shows that NRL medical gloves, when compared with synthetic gloves, tend to be stronger, more flexible and better accepted by clinicians. The introduction of powder-free gloves has been associated with reductions in protein...... content and associated allergies. Recently, new methods to quantify clinically relevant NRL allergens have enabled the identification of gloves with low allergenic potential. The use of low-protein, low-allergenic, powder-free gloves is associated with a significant decrease in the prevalence of type I...

  14. Three Suggestions to Improve Medical English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄佳丽

    2012-01-01

    As a kind of ESP,medical English teaching has an important impact on both English teachers and medical students.A good medical English teaching can help the medical students to improve themselves smoothly and easily in the medical area.In this article,three suggestions were provided for the medical English teachers to improve their English teaching in medical field.

  15. [Discussion on logistics management of medical consumables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sutong; Wang, Miao; Jiang, Xiali

    2011-09-01

    Management of medical consumables is an important part of modern hospital management. In modern medical behavior, drugs and medical devices act directly on the patient, and are important factors affecting the quality of medical practice. With the increasing use of medical materials, based on practical application, this article proposes the management model of medical consumables, and discusses the essence of medical materials logistics management.

  16. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  17. Electronic medical record and glaucoma medications: connecting the medication reconciliation with adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacon TS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas S Bacon, Kenneth C Fan, Manishi A Desai Department of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: To evaluate consistency in documentation of glaucoma medications in the electronic medical record and identify which regimen patients adhere to when inconsistencies exist. Factors contributing to medication nonadherence are also explored.Methods: Retrospective chart review of medication adherence encompassing 200 patients from three glaucoma physicians at a tertiary referral center over a 1-month period. Adherence was determined by the consistency between a patients stated medication regimen and either the active medication list in the electronic medical record, or the physicians planned medication regimen in the preceding clinic visit. Patient charts were also reviewed for patient sex, age, primary language, race, and total number of medications.Results: A total of 160 charts showed consistency in documentation between the physician note and electronic medication reconciliation. Of those patients, 83.1% reported adherence with their glaucoma medication schedule. When there was a discrepancy in documentation (40 charts, 72.5% patients followed the physician-stated regimen vs 20% who followed neither vs 7.5% who followed the medical record (P<0.01. No difference in adherence was observed based on sex (P=0.912 or total number of medications taken (P=0.242. ­Language, both English- (P=0.075 and Haitian (P=0.10 -speaking populations, as well as race, ­Caucasian (P=0.31, African-American (P=0.54, and Hispanic (P=0.58, had no impact on medication adherence. Patients over 80 years of age were more nonadherent as compared to other decades (P=0.04.Conclusion: Inconsistent documentation between the electronic medical record physician note and medication regimen may contribute to patient medication nonadherence. Patients over 80 years of age were associated with higher rates of nonadherence

  18. Medical writing, revising and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of science makes medical writing, editing and revision a rapidly growing field of linguistic study and practice. Medical science texts are written according to uniform, general guidelines and medical genres have become highly conventionalized in terms of structure and linguistic...... form. Medical editing often takes the form of peer review and mainly addresses issues of contents and overall validity. Medical revision incorporates the checking of the macrostructure and the microstructure of the text, its language and style and its suitability for the target reader or client...

  19. Medical writing, revising and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of science makes medical writing, editing and revision a rapidly growing field of linguistic study and practice. Medical science texts are written according to uniform, general guidelines and medical genres have become highly conventionalized in terms of structure and linguistic...... form. Medical editing often takes the form of peer review and mainly addresses issues of contents and overall validity. Medical revision incorporates the checking of the macrostructure and the microstructure of the text, its language and style and its suitability for the target reader or client...

  20. Proteomics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, P

    2000-04-01

    The techniques of proteomics (high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein characterisation) are widely used for microbiological research to analyse global protein synthesis as an indicator of gene expression. The rapid progress in microbial proteomics has been achieved through the wide availability of whole genome sequences for a number of bacterial groups. Beyond providing a basic understanding of microbial gene expression, proteomics has also played a role in medical areas of microbiology. Progress has been made in the use of the techniques for investigating the epidemiology and taxonomy of human microbial pathogens, the identification of novel pathogenic mechanisms and the analysis of drug resistance. In each of these areas, proteomics has provided new insights that complement genomic-based investigations. This review describes the current progress in these research fields and highlights some of the technical challenges existing for the application of proteomics in medical microbiology. The latter concern the analysis of genetically heterogeneous bacterial populations and the integration of the proteomic and genomic data for these bacteria. The characterisation of the proteomes of bacterial pathogens growing in their natural hosts remains a future challenge.

  1. Wavelets in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahra, Noor e; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H. [Sharda University, SET, Department of Electronics and Communication, Knowledge Park 3rd, Gr. Noida (India); University of Kocaeli, Department of Mathematics, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Istanbul Aydin University, Department of Computer Engineering, 34295 Istanbul (Turkey); Sharda University, SET, Department of Mathematics, 32-34 Knowledge Park 3rd, Greater Noida (India)

    2012-07-17

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  2. [Medical induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettahar, K; Pinton, A; Boisramé, T; Cavillon, V; Wylomanski, S; Nisand, I; Hassoun, D

    2016-12-01

    Updated clinical recommendations for medical induced abortion procedure. A systematic review of French and English literature, reviewing the evidence relating to the provision of medical induced abortion was carried out on PubMed, Cochrane Library and international scientific societies recommendations. The effectiveness of medical abortion is higher than 95% when the protocols are adjusted to gestational age (EL1). Misoprostol alone is less effective than a combination of mifepristone and misoprostol (EL1). Gemeprost is less effective than misoprostol (EL2). The dose of 200mg of mifepristone should be preferred to 600mg (NP1, Rank A). Mifepristone can be taken at home (professional agreement). The optimum interval between mifepristone and misoprostol intake should be 24 to 48 hours (EL1, grade A). Before 7 weeks LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol should be given orally (EL1, grade A) eventually repeated after 3hours if no bleeding occurs. For optimal effectiveness between 7 and 14 LMP, the interval between mifepristone and misoprostol should not be shortened to less than 8hours (grade 1). An interval of 24 to 48hours will not affect the effectiveness of the method provided misoprostol dosage is 800μg (EL1). Vaginal, sublingual or buccal routes of administration are more effective and better tolerated than the oral route, which should be abandoned (EL1). An amount of 800μg sublingual or buccal misoprostol route has the same effectiveness than the vaginal route but more gastrointestinal side effects (EL1, grade A). Between 7 and 9 LMP, it does not seem necessary to repeat misoprostol dose whereas it should be repeated beyond 9 SA (grade B). Between 9 and 14 LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol given either vaginally, buccally or sublingually should be repeated every 3hours if needed (with a maximum of 5 doses) (EL2, grade B). There is no strong evidence supporting routine antibiotic prophylaxis for medical abortion (professional agreement). Rare contraindications

  3. The medicalization of beauty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Poli Neto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Concern with body image and medical interventions related to physical beauty has greatly increased in the past few years. The purpose of this study is to investigate how medicine is dealing with the theme of beauty. The 2003/2004 editions of the periodicals Aesthetic Surgery Journal and Aesthetic Plastic Surgery were analyzed, in order to investigate the rationality buttressing their discourse. Three categories were prioritized for this study: definition of aesthetic plastic surgery's study object; beauty patterns guiding interventions; and understanding popular demand for aesthetic corrections. Discourse is sustained by biomedical rationality, structured around a disease theory and a dual construction between normal and pathological, with emphasis on biology. In the articles, the beauty patterns guiding therapeutic practices are anchored in biological norms defined through several anthropometric measures, which refer to abstract concepts of beauty, harmony, proportionality and symmetry. In this discourse, there are no references to patterns or to social norms of beauty; motivation for aesthetic intervention appears to be rooted in low self-esteem related to the aging process or to some bodily nonconformity. As per the meaning of 'medicalization' adopted herein, biomedical rationality appropriates variations or anomalies of physical appearance, thus allowing the theme to be dealt with in terms of health and disease, normal and pathological.

  4. MEDICAL SERVICE - URGENT CALLS

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA: EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME: Open 24h/24h 748-49-50 AMG- Association Of Geneva Doctors: Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 CHILDREN'S EMERGENCIES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112   FRANCE: EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ...

  5. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  6. Quo Vadis, Medical Genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeizel, Andrew E.

    The beginning of human genetics and its medical part: medical genetics was promising in the early decades of this century. Many genetic diseases and defects with Mendelian origin were identified and it helped families with significant genetic burden to limit their child number. Unfortunately this good start was shadowed by two tragic events. On the one hand, in the 1930s and early 1940s the German fascism brought about the dominance of an unscientific eugenics to mask vile political crimes. People with genetic diseases-defects were forced to sterilisation and several of them were killed. On the other hand, in the 1950s lysenkoism inhibitied the evolution of genetics in the Soviet Union and their satelite countries. Lysenko's doctrine declared genetics as a product of imperialism and a guilty science, therefore leading geneticists were ousted form their posts and some of them were executed or put in prison. Past decades genetics has resulted fantastic new results and achieved a leading position within the natural sciences. To my mind, however, the expected wider use of new eugenics indicates a new tragedy and this Cassandra's prediction is the topic of this presentation.

  7. Medical ultrasound systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-08-06

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue.

  8. Islamic medical ethics: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I

    2007-03-01

    Modern medical practice is becoming increasingly pluralistic and diverse. Hence, cultural competency and awareness are given more focus in physician training seminars and within medical school curricula. A renewed interest in describing the varied ethical constructs of specific populations has taken place within medical literature. This paper aims to provide an overview of Islamic Medical Ethics. Beginning with a definition of Islamic Medical Ethics, the reader will be introduced to the scope of Islamic Medical Ethics literature, from that aimed at developing moral character to writings grounded in Islamic law. In the latter form, there is an attempt to derive an Islamic perspective on bioethical issues such as abortion, gender relations within the patient-doctor relationship, end-of-life care and euthanasia. It is hoped that the insights gained will aid both clinicians and ethicists to better understand the Islamic paradigm of medical ethics and thereby positively affect patient care.

  9. Prioritising interventions against medication errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Marianne; Pape-Larsen, Louise; Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Authors: Lisby M, Larsen LP, Soerensen AL, Nielsen LP, Mainz J Title: Prioritising interventions against medication errors – the importance of a definition Objective: To develop and test a restricted definition of medication errors across health care settings in Denmark Methods: Medication...... errors constitute a major quality and safety problem in modern healthcare. However, far from all are clinically important. The prevalence of medication errors ranges from 2-75% indicating a global problem in defining and measuring these [1]. New cut-of levels focusing the clinical impact of medication...... errors are therefore needed. Development of definition: A definition of medication errors including an index of error types for each stage in the medication process was developed from existing terminology and through a modified Delphi-process in 2008. The Delphi panel consisted of 25 interdisciplinary...

  10. MEDICAL MALPRACTICE. THE MALPRACTICE INSURANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra-Cristina DUȚESCU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, complaints about medical malpractice ocure extreme situations such as the death of the person or the occurrence of irreparable injuries. Professional misconduct in the exercise of the medical or medical-pharmaceutical act generating harm to the patient implies the civil liability of medical personnel and the provider of medical, sanitary and pharmaceutical products and services. Law no. 95/2006 on the health reform stipulates the obligation of the medical staff to conclude a malpractice insurance for the cases of professional civil liability for the damages created by the medical act, the indemnities being the responsibility of the insurer, within the limits of the liability established by the insurance policy.

  11. Exploration Medical System Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, D. A.; McGrath, T. L.; Reyna, B.; Watkins, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    A near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) mission will present significant new challenges including hazards to crew health created by exploring a beyond low earth orbit destination, traversing the terrain of asteroid surfaces, and the effects of variable gravity environments. Limited communications with ground-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation of medical events require increased crew autonomy when diagnosing conditions, creating treatment plans, and executing procedures. Scope: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will be a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to show an end-to-end medical system assisting the Crew Medical Officers (CMO) in optimizing medical care delivery and medical data management during a mission. NEA medical care challenges include resource and resupply constraints limiting the extent to which medical conditions can be treated, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and rendering of medical care by a non-clinician. The system demonstrates the integration of medical technologies and medical informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making. Project Objectives: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a) Reduce and possibly eliminate the time required for a crewmember and ground personnel to manage medical data from one application to another. b) Demonstrate crewmember's ability to access medical data/information via a software solution to assist/aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c) Develop a common data management architecture that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all crew health and life sciences activities. d) Develop a common data management architecture that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. e) Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management f) Provide

  12. [The use of medical journals by medical students. Which medical journals are read?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algra, Annemijn M; Dekker, Friedo W

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of scientific medical journals in Dutch medical curricula. Descriptive questionnaire study. In 2013, medical students (from year 3 onwards) at the Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), were invited to respond to an online questionnaire. They were presented with 28 multiple-choice questions and 11 statements about the use of scientific medical journals in the medical curriculum. We calculated the frequencies of the answers per question and analysed differences between medical students using two-by-two tables. The questionnaire was completed by 680 (53.0%) of 1277 invited medical students enrolled at the LUMC. Most of the respondents were those doing clinical rotations (56.6%) and 60.1% had research experience. More than half of the students read at least one scientific journal a few times per month; this percentage was 38.8% among third-year students, 49.3% among fourth-year students, 60.0% among those on clinical rotation, and was higher among students with research experience (63.3%) than among those without research experience (44.1%). Nearly 90% of students agreed with the statement that the development of academic and scientific education should take place in the bachelor's phase of medical school. Medical students start to read scientific medical journals at an early phase in the medical curriculum and this increases further when students start to undertake research projects or go on clinical rotation. Medical curricula should be constructed in such a way that medical students learn to select and interpret research findings adequately for themselves before they turn to articles from scientific medical journals.

  13. THE USE OF SCRIPTURE IN THE LETTER OF JUDE Felix Opoku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Felogyy

    But to the ancient minds, the above terms may sound unfamiliar and ambiguous even where .... refer to any specific passage concerning the migration from Egypt to ..... For Josephus, Cain is the greatest sleaze of human beings because „he.

  14. Long-term performance of the St Jude Riata 1580-1582 ICD lead family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.D.A. Valk (Suzanne); D.A.M.J. Theuns (Dominic); L.J.L.M. Jordaens (Luc)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective Safety concerns about the Riata ICD shock lead were recently raised, with insulation failure due to conductor externalisation. Its incidence and presentation were assessed, and predictors of insulation failure and lead survival of the Riata 1580-1582 were studied, retrospective

  15. Survival of pediatric patients after relapsed osteosarcoma: the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Sarah E. S.; Wozniak, Amy W.; Billups, Catherine A.; Wu, Jianrong; McPherson, Valerie; Neel, Michael D.; Rao, Bhaskar N.; Daw, Najat C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy has improved the outcome of patients with newly diagnosed osteosarcoma, but its role in relapsed disease is unclear. Methods We reviewed the records of all patients who were treated for relapsed high-grade osteosarcoma at our institution between 1970 and 2004. Post-relapse event-free survival (PREFS) and post-relapse survival (PRS) were estimated, and outcome comparisons were made using the exact log-rank test. Results The 10-year PREFS and PRS of the 110 patients were 11.8% ± 3.5% and 17.0% ± 4.3%, respectively. Metastasis at initial diagnosis (14%), and relapse in lung only (75%) were not significantly associated with PREFS or PRS. Time from initial diagnosis to first relapse (RL1) ≥18 months (43%), surgery at RL1 (76%), and ability to achieve second complete remission (CR2, 56%) were favorably associated with PREFS and PRS (p≤0.0002). In patients without CR2, chemotherapy at RL1 was favorably associated with PREFS (p=0.01) but not with PRS. In patients with lung relapse only, unilateral relapse and number of nodules (≤3) were associated with better PREFS and PRS (p≤0.0005); no patients with bilateral relapse survived 10 years. The median PREFS after treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and ifosfamide was 3.5 months (95% CI, 2.1-5.2) and median PRS 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.2-15.1). Conclusions Late relapse, surgical resection, and unilateral involvement (in lung relapse only) favorably impact outcome after relapse. Surgery is essential for survival; chemotherapy may slow disease progression in patients without CR2. These data are useful for designing clinical trials that evaluate novel agents. PMID:23625626

  16. Survival of pediatric patients after relapsed osteosarcoma: the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Sarah E S; Wozniak, Amy W; Billups, Catherine A; Wu, Jianrong; McPherson, Valerie; Neel, Michael D; Rao, Bhaskar N; Daw, Najat C

    2013-07-15

    Chemotherapy has improved the outcome of patients with newly diagnosed osteosarcoma, but its role in relapsed disease is unclear. We reviewed the records of all patients who were treated for relapsed high-grade osteosarcoma at our institution between 1970 and 2004. Postrelapse event-free survival (PREFS) and postrelapse survival (PRS) were estimated, and outcome comparisons were made using an exact log-rank test. The 10-year PREFS and PRS of the 110 patients were 11.8% ± 3.5% and 17.0% ± 4.3%, respectively. Metastasis at initial diagnosis (14%), and relapse in lung only (75%) were not significantly associated with PREFS or PRS. Time from initial diagnosis to first relapse (RL1) ≥18 months (43%), surgery at RL1 (76%), and ability to achieve second complete remission (CR2, 56%) were favorably associated with PREFS and PRS (P  ≤  0.0002). In patients without CR2, chemotherapy at RL1 was favorably associated with PREFS (P = 0.01) but not with PRS. In patients with lung relapse only, unilateral relapse and number of nodules ( ≤ 3) were associated with better PREFS and PRS (P  ≤  0.0005); no patients with bilateral relapse survived 10 years. The median PREFS after treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and ifosfamide was 3.5 months (95% confidence interval, 2.1-5.2), and the median PRS was 8.2 months (95% confidence interval, 5.2-15.1). Late relapse, surgical resection, and unilateral involvement (in lung relapse only) favorably impact outcome after relapse. Surgery is essential for survival; chemotherapy may slow disease progression in patients without CR2. These data are useful for designing clinical trials that evaluate novel agents. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  17. Learning Organizations. Studiu exploratoriu asupra Consiliilor Judeţene din România

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana GHIURA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of an ample study centered on the concept of learning organizations, more precisely on the degree in which Romanian County Councils are learning organizations. In order to analyze this, a research instrument has been sent to every County Council. This tool has been developed by three Harvard professors: David A. Garvin, Amy C. Edmondson and Francesca Gino who also published, in 2008, an article in Harvard Business Review ‘Is Yours A Learning Organization?’. Their article is fundamental for this study. Approximately 26 out of 41 County Councils participated to the study and the findings are summarized in this article. The results were really interesting and according to them, Romanian County Councils are learning organizations only in terms of leadership that encourages learning. Regarding the other two blocks – learning environment and learning processes, the findings revealed that the County Councils act like learning organizations in a very small degree. As a consequence, the organizations that participated to the study still have many things to improve in order to become learning organizations.

  18. Initiatives for Medical Education Research at the International Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chandra Jutti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical Education research is a relativelynew field but one that is progressing rapidly worldwide.This article is an attempt to take stock of the currentstatus of Medical Education research in InternationalMedical University and to explore the various factorsthat have influenced its direction. It also shares some ofthe initiatives that have been instituted or intended tobe instituted at our university.

  19. Accounting for Medication Particularities: Designing for Everyday Medication Management

    OpenAIRE

    Dalgaard, Lea Gulstav; Grönvall, Erik; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2013-01-01

    Several projects have shown that self-management of medication in private homes can be challenging. Many projects focused on specific illness-related approaches (e.g. diabetes) or practical issues such as how to handle medication while travelling. However, designing for everyday medication management involves more than just specific illness-related strategies and should take into account the broad set of activities conforming people’s everyday life. This study investigates how older adults ma...

  20. Medical Sensor Network Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob

    is required, such as taking a blood sample, mailing it to a lab, where it is analysed and the result returned by mail. Due to the continuing size and cost reduction of electronic equipment, future medical sensors will be much smaller, cheaper and often disposable. Furthermore, integration of these sensors...... with the electronic health record (EHR) IT-systems will save a lot of work (and human errors), as the sensor readings will be directly recorded in the patient’s records by the sensors themselves, rather than by a transcription performed by a busy clinician. Although this development has been going on for at least...... a decade, most sensors are still quite big, heavy and difficult to operate, and a lot of research is revolving around minimising the instruments and making them easier to use. Several research experiments have demonstrated the utility of such sensors, but few of these experiments consider security...

  1. Lossless Medical Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagashree G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Image compression has become an important process in today‟s world of information exchange. Image compression helps in effective utilization of high speed network resources. Medical Image Compression is very important in the present world for efficient archiving and transmission of images. In this paper two different approaches for lossless image compression is proposed. One uses the combination of 2D-DWT & FELICS algorithm for lossy to lossless Image Compression and another uses combination of prediction algorithm and Integer wavelet Transform (IWT. To show the effectiveness of the methodology used, different image quality parameters are measured and shown the comparison of both the approaches. We observed the increased compression ratio and higher PSNR values.

  2. Radiotracers for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayudu, G.A.S.

    1983-01-01

    This book discusses the medical applications of radiotracers. Diagnostic uses and pharmacokinetics of isotopes and radiopharmaceuticals is emphasized. The volume one covers the following topics: Radiohalogenated compounds, including radioiodine; Tc-labeled compounds; and in-house prepared radiopharmaceuticals. The charge particle range vs. energy in every element is tabulated for protons for cyclotrons users. Discussions are also provided on nonimaging radiotracer methods; /sup 11/C, /sup 13/N, /sup 15/O, /sup 67/Ga. /sup 111/In, /sup 75/Se, /sup 123m/Te compounds; radioactive noble gases; and miscellaneous radiotracers for imaging. Vol. II: Pertinent nuclear science data such as radiation dosimetry, radionuclide production modes, radionuclides for therapy, human experimentation regulations and consent forms, and radiotracer laboratory designs are presented. 272 pp., 7 x 10, 1983, ISBN-0-8493-6016-1.

  3. Medical imaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is a relatively young discipline that started with Conrad Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of the x-ray in 1885. X-ray imaging was rapidly adopted in hospitals around the world. However, it was the advent of computerized data and image processing that made revolutionary new imaging modalities possible. Today, cross-sections and three-dimensional reconstructions of the organs inside the human body is possible with unprecedented speed, detail and quality. This book provides an introduction into the principles of image formation of key medical imaging modalities: X-ray projection imaging, x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and radionuclide imaging. Recent developments in optical imaging are also covered. For each imaging modality, the introduction into the physical principles and sources of contrast is provided, followed by the methods of image formation, engineering aspects of the imaging devices, and a discussion of strengths and limitations of the modal...

  4. Medical Image Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Rafizadeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in medical imaging in the past two decades have enable radiologists to create images of the human body with unprecedented resolution. MRI, PET,... imaging devices can quickly acquire 3D images. Image fusion establishes an anatomical correlation between corresponding images derived from different examination. This fusion is applied either to combine images of different modalities (CT, MRI or single modality (PET-PET."nImage fusion is performed in two steps:"n1 Registration: spatial modification (eg. translation of model image relative to reference image in order to arrive at an ideal matching of both images. Registration methods are feature-based and intensity-based approaches."n2 Visualization: the goal of it is to depict the spatial relationship between the model image and refer-ence image. We can point out its clinical application in nuclear medicine (PET/CT.

  5. [Gaubius and medical chemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2011-01-01

    Hieronymus David Gaub (1705-1780) was the son of a protestant cloth merchant in Heidelberg. Disliking a pietistic boarding school in Halle, Germany, he came to stay with a paternal uncle who was a physician in Amsterdam. Hieronymus studied medicine in Harderwijk and in Leiden, under the guidance of Herman Boerhaave (1668-1738). In 1731 he was appointed reader (and in 1734 professor) in chemistry at the Leiden medical faculty. After Boerhaave's death he also taught medicine, but without access to hospital beds. Gaubius correctly envisaged that chemistry would become an important discipline in medicine, but was limited by the technical constraints of his time. In his textbook of general pathology (1758) he attributed disease to disturbances of not only fluids, but also solid parts, although symptoms remained the basis of his classification. The book would remain influential for several decades, until the advent of pathological anatomy.

  6. Medical Litigation Across Specialties

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2013-07-01

    Medical negligence is a major cause of fear and anxiety for doctors. The threat of malpractice consists of 3 factors, the risk of a claim, the probability of a claim leading to a payment, and the size of the payment. The Clinical Indemnity Scheme (CIS) insures against indemnity payments but it cannot protect the doctor against the indirect consequences of litigation including stress, the long hours mounting a defence against the allegation, and the damage to one’s reputation. The adversarial tort system focuses on punishment, blame and compensation. The emotional anguish and potential damage to the doctor’s reputation can be considerable. Doctors subjected to malpractice suits regardless of the outcome may experience depression, anger, frustration and excessive use of alcohol

  7. MEDICAL GENETICS AND ETHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir TRAJKOVSKI

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Fast development of medical genetics and it’s subdisciplines is noticed in last thirty years. Modern diagnostic methods made possible to establish human genome and its impairment. In human genetics, ethic is main principle in working. Ethic is science about biggest goodness for human or society, and its aim pro­tecting human health.Today's conditions for leaving and science development open a wide way for ethical approaches, but also for non-ethical manipulations with human even before his conception. We must keep to attitude that without law, with our behavior will must conduct our conscience. It is best to have neutral eugenetic attitude, which allows free ethical choice of each individual, in any case, for the well being of man.

  8. Conflicting medication information: prevalence, sources, and relationship to medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Delesha M; Elstad, Emily A; Blalock, Susan J; DeVellis, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Conflicting medication information has been defined as contradictory information about a medication topic from two or more sources. The objective of this study was to determine whether arthritis patients are exposed to conflicting medication information, to document sources of conflicting information, and to explore whether conflicting information is associated with sociodemographic factors, clinical characteristics, and medication adherence. Using an online survey, arthritis patients (N = 328) reported how often they received conflicting information about 12 medication topics as well as sources of conflicting information, demographic/clinical characteristics, and medication adherence. A linear regression model, which controlled for various demographic/clinical factors, determined whether conflicting information was associated with medication adherence. The majority of patients (80.1%) received conflicting information and were most likely to receive conflicting information about medication risks. Physicians, media sources, and the Internet were the most common sources of conflicting information. Less conflicting information (B =-0.13, p information source use (B = 0.22, p information is pervasive, comes from a variety of sources, and may negatively affect patient health outcomes. To potentially decrease exposure to conflicting information, providers should direct patients to high-quality medication information sources.

  9. Advanced medical video services through context-aware medical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Charalampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Pliakas, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a framework for advanced medical video delivery services, through network and patient-state awareness. Under this scope a context-aware medical networking platform is described. The developed platform enables proper medical video data coding and transmission according to both a) network availability and/or quality and b) patient status, optimizing thus network performance and telediagnosis. An evaluation platform has been developed based on scalable H.264 coding of medical videos. Corresponding results of video transmission over a WiMax network have proved the effectiveness and efficiency of the platform providing proper video content delivery.

  10. Satellite medical centers project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  11. [Euthanasia and medical act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Right to life -as the prohibition of intentionally and arbitrarily taking life, even with authorization of the concerned one- is an internationally recognized right. In many countries, debate regarding euthanasia is more centered in its convenience, social acceptability and how it is regulated, than in its substantial legitimacy. Some argue that euthanasia should be included as part of clinical practice of health professionals, grounded on individual's autonomy claims-everyone having the liberty to choose how to live and how to die. Against this, others sustain that life has a higher value than autonomy, exercising autonomy without respecting the right to life would become a serious moral and social problem. Likewise, euthanasia supporters some-times claim a 'right to live with dignity', which must be understood as a personal obligation, referred more to the ethical than to the strictly legal sphere. In countries where it is already legalized, euthanasia practice has extended to cases where it is not the patient who requests this but the family or some healthcare professional, or even the legal system-when they think that the patient is living in a condition which is not worthy to live. Generalization of euthanasia possibly will end in affecting those who need more care, such as elder, chronically ill or dying people, damaging severely personal basic rights. Nature, purpose and tradition of medicine rule out the practice of euthanasia, which ought not be considered a medical act or legitimately compulsory for physicians. Today's medicine counts with effective treatments for pain and suffering, such as palliative care, including sedative therapy, which best preserves persons dignity and keeps safe the ethos of the medical profession.

  12. An upcoming program for medical humanities education in Fudan University's School of Basic Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Cheng, Xunjia

    2017-05-23

    Ideal medical care requires professional skills as well as appropriate communication skills. However, traditional medical education in medical schools mostly emphasizes the former. To remedy this situation, medical humanities education will be incorporated into education for medical students at Fudan University. Comprehensive medical education that includes both medical skills and humanities may greatly improve medical care.

  13. Radiation physics for medical physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-01-01

    This book summarizes the radiation physics knowledge that professionals working in medical physics need to master for efficient and safe dealings with ionizing radiation. It contains eight chapters, each chapter covering a specific group of subjects related to radiation physics and is intended as a textbook for a course in radiation physics in medical-physics graduate programs. However, the book may also be of interest to the large number of professionals, not only medical physicists, who in their daily occupations deal with various aspects of medical physics and find a need to improve their understanding of radiation physics. The main target audience for this book is graduate students studying for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in medical physics, who have to possess the necessary physics and mathematics background knowledge to be able to follow and master the complete textbook. Medical residents, technology students and biomedical engineering students may find certain sections too challenging or esoteric, yet they...

  14. Reflective writing in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Philip; Stewart, Rosalyn

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of reflection and the use of reflective writing assignments is commonplace in medical school education. There is a preponderance of research in medical education, which appraises and discusses new ways of teaching reflection. Students often complain about having to write about their experience with that patient. This work explores some of the reasoning between the variability of student acceptance of reflection in medical education. The method is based on available literature as well as a personal perspective regarding reflective writing in medical education. Reflection is a skill that requires teaching and practice. It is within the explicit process of teaching reflection in medical education that reflective learners can be developed. Reflection includes the take-home lesson from patient encounters. Its use can help learners become better physicians in terms of medical and humanistic effectiveness and support personal growth.

  15. Medical education... meet Michel Foucault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Brian D; Martimianakis, Maria A; McNaughton, Nancy; Whitehead, Cynthia

    2014-06-01

    There have been repeated calls for the greater use of conceptual frameworks and of theory in medical education. Although it is familiar to few medical educators, Michel Foucault's work is a helpful theoretical and methodological source. This article explores what it means to use a 'Foucauldian approach', presents a sample of Foucault's historical-genealogical studies that are relevant to medical education, and introduces the work of four researchers currently undertaking Foucauldian-inspired medical education research. Although they are not without controversy, Foucauldian approaches are employed by an increasing number of scholars and are helpful in shedding light on what it is possible to think, say and be in medical education. Our hope in sharing this Foucauldian work and perspective is that we might stimulate a dialogue that is forward-looking and optimistic about the possibilities for change in medical education. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Sensor Networks for Medical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Shnayder, Victor; Chen, Bor-rong; Lorincz, Konrad; Fulford-Jones, Thaddeus R. F.; Welsh, Matt

    2005-01-01

    Sensor networks have the potential to greatly impact many aspects of medical care. By outfitting patients with wireless, wearable vital sign sensors, collecting detailed real-time data on physiological status can be greatly simplified. However, there is a significant gap between existing sensor network systems and the needs of medical care. In particular, medical sensor networks must support multicast routing topologies, node mobility, a wide range of data rates and high degrees of reliabilit...

  17. Medical applications of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Agah, Arvin

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced, more reliable, and better understood than in the past, artificial intelligence (AI) systems can make providing healthcare more accurate, affordable, accessible, consistent, and efficient. However, AI technologies have not been as well integrated into medicine as predicted. In order to succeed, medical and computational scientists must develop hybrid systems that can effectively and efficiently integrate the experience of medical care professionals with capabilities of AI systems. After providing a general overview of artificial intelligence concepts, tools, and techniques, Medical Ap

  18. Cultural initiation of medical doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsinkó-Szabó, Zoltán; Lázár, Imre

    2013-12-01

    Eighteen years experience of teaching medical anthropology at a Hungarian medical school offers insight into the dynamics of interference between the rationalist epistemological tradition of biomedicine as one of the central paradigms of modernism and the cultural relativism of medical anthropology, as cultural anthropology is considered to be one of the generators of postmodern thinking. Tracing back the informal "prehistory" of our Institute, we can reveal its psychosomatic, humanistic commitment and critical basis as having represented a kind of counterculture compared with the technocrats of state-socialist Hungary's health ideology. The historical change and socio-cultural transition in Hungary after 1989 was accompanied by changes in the medical system as well as in philosophy and in the structure of the teaching of social sciences. The developing pluralism in the medical system together with the pluralism of social ideologies allowed the substitution of the dogmatic Marxist-Leninist framework with the more pragmatic and empiricist behavioral sciences including medical sociology and medical anthropology. The conflict between the initiation function of the hard preclinical training of the first two years, and the reflective, relativistic and critical narrative on "biomedicine as culture bound entity" constructed by medical anthropology during the second year of medical training is discussed. We also submit our fieldwork data gained as a result of a two year investigation period focusing on diverse initiation types of "would be" physicians. The main proportion of our data derives from individual semi structured deep interviews together with focus group interviews carried out with medical students of upper years. Finally, the role of medical anthropology in the "rite of passage" of becoming a medical doctor is summarized, paying attention to their field work reports and the risks and gains in this process.

  19. Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Allison; Green, Rochelle; Cunningham, Thomas V; Eisenberg, Leah R; Hester, D Micah

    2016-01-01

    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests that current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students' ethical reasoning. This article discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical students that we have devised: the Medical Ethics Bowl (MEB). Finally, we suggest the pedagogical advantages of the MEB when compared to other ethics curricula.

  20. Medical applications of artificial olfactometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor); Kelso, David M. (Inventor); Munoz, Beth C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for detecting the presence of an analyte indicative of various medical conditions, including halitosis, periodontal disease and other diseases are also disclosed.

  1. Augmented reality in medical education?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-01-01

    .... Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer...

  2. [Medical applications of systems biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demongeot, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    We illustrate in this review some applications of systems biology in the medical and biological areas. After a brief summary of time scales experienced by medical -observations and of the general scheme of dynamic systems, we describe how some techniques underlying the complex systems theory can be applied to model medical issues in immunology, medical genetics, developmental morphogenesis, biochemistry, epidemiology, telemedecine and multiple platforms of expertise. In concluding, we will discuss the issue of "clinomics" coupling clinical and -omics data in a unique patient-specific file.

  3. Medication use among Canadian seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Mark; Ji, Hong; Hunt, Jordan; Ranger, Rob; Gula, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    As they age, many seniors develop a progressively more complex mix of health conditions. Multiple prescription medications are often required to help manage these conditions and control symptoms, with the goal of maintaining seniors' health for as long as possible. This article explores trends in the number and types of medications used by seniors on public drug programs in Canada. Our findings suggest that a high proportion of Canadian seniors are taking several medications, highlighting the need for medication management systems focusing on this population.

  4. Medical Secretaries’ Care of Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Witt, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    We describe the cooperative work of medical secretaries at two hospital departments, during the implementation of an electronic health record system. Medical secretaries' core task is to take care of patient records by ensuring that also do information gatekeeping and articulation work. The EHR...... implementation stressed their importance to the departments' work arrangements, coupled their work more tightly to that of other staff, and led to task drift among professions. information is complete, up to date, and correctly coded. Medical secretaries While medical secretaries have been relatively invisible...

  5. Medication adherence in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Frances Yap, BSc (Pharm (Hons

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence is a crucial component in the treatment of chronic diseases. In the elderly, clinicians are faced with a unique set of problems associated with adherence that they may not have been adequately trained for. In this paper, we demonstrate the importance of medication adherence in the elderly through a case study. The different factors affecting medication adherence in the elderly are highlighted: patient, medication, health care providers, health care system, and socioeconomic factors. Lastly, we have proposed various ways to address these factors. In doing so, clinicians can better understand the problems that the elderly face, thus achieving better therapeutic outcomes.

  6. Fostering international undergraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The severe lack of human resources in the health care field in many countries has resulted in avid interest in global undergraduate medical education. Christian medical missionaries have, thus, a unique opportunity to contribute to transformative, holistic development through the training of future physicians for resource-limited settings. Starting a new medical school is, however, a complex process which requires significant resources and intellectual investment. This paper outlines some of the challenges encountered in faith-based individuals’ engagement in undergraduate medical education, as well as suggesting some practical solutions and recommendations.

  7. Medical emergencies in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, M H

    2009-06-01

    Serious medical emergencies are fortunately a rare occurrence in the dental practice environment; however, if an emergency situation is encountered a delay in treatment may result in potentially avoidable consequences. The risk of mortality or serious morbidity can be reduced by ensuring that basic emergency equipment and medications are in place, and that the dental team is appropriately trained in basic life support measures. This article aims to provide an overview of the basic emergency medications and equipment that should be present in dental practices, and to discuss specific responses to some of the more common adverse medical events that can present while providing dental treatment.

  8. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Memoriam Sections All Sections (listing) Accelerator AIRRS Decommissioning Environmental/Radon Homeland Security Instrumentation Medical Health Physics Military Health Physics Nonionizing Radiation Power Reactor Affiliates ...

  9. Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Projected Employment, 2024 Change, 2014-24 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Emergency medical technicians and paramedics ...

  10. A Review of Medical Education and Medical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, R. Brian; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Information technology may help physicians to manage information more effectively through more accessible clinical indexes, databases of diagnostic test characteristics, computerized audits of clinical activities, on-line access to medical literature, etc. Medical informatics, a new discipline dedicated to the solution of information problems in…

  11. The Role of Medical Museums in Contemporary Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreez, Yehia M. A-H.; Willems, Luuk N. A.; Wells, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    From the early 19th century until the most recent two decades, open-space and satellite museums featuring anatomy and pathology collections (collectively referred to as "medical museums") had leading roles in medical education. However, many factors have caused these roles to diminish dramatically in recent years. Chief among these are the great…

  12. The Current State of Medical Education in Chinese Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosik, Russell Oliver; Huang, Lei; Cai, Qiaoling; Xu, Guo-Tong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Li; Tang, Wen; Chen, Qi; Fan, Angela Pei-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Today's doctor is as much a humanist as a scientist. Medical schools have responded to this change by introducing a variety of courses, most notably those concerning the humanities and ethics. Thus far, no one has examined the extent of use of these subjects in Chinese medical schools. The goal of this study is to determine how many and in…

  13. The Impact of the Clinical Medical Librarian on Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkis, Jeanne; Hamburger, Stephen

    1981-01-01

    A University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine team approach is described that combines the knowledge and skills of the physician, nurse, clinical pharmacist, clinical medical librarian, etc., into a cooperative unit to provide health education and health care delivery. The impact of the clinical medical librarian is discussed. (MLW)

  14. Competency-based medical education in postgraduate medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iobst, William F.; Sherbino, Jonathan; Ten Cate, Olle; Richardson, Denyse L.; Dath, Deepak; Swing, Susan R.; Harris, Peter; Mungroo, Rani; Holmboe, Eric S.; Frank, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction of Tomorrow's Doctors in 1993, medical education began the transition from a time-and process-based system to a competency-based training framework. Implementing competency-based training in postgraduate medical education poses many challenges but ultimately requires a demonstr

  15. [Medical imaging: its medical economics and recent situation in Japan.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    Two fields of radiology, medical imaging and radiation therapy, are coded separately in medical fee system, and the health care statistics of 2003 shows that expenditure on the former was 5.2% of the whole medical cost and the latter 0.28%. Introduction of DPC, an abbreviation of Diagnostic Procedure Combination, was carried out in 2003, which was an essential reform of medical fee payment system that have been managed on fee-for-service base throughout, and 22% of beds for acute patients care are under the control of DPC payment in 2006. As medical imaging procedures are basically classified in inclusive payment in DPC system, their accurate statistics cannot be figured out because of the lack of description of individual procedures in DPC bills. Policy-making of medical economics will suffer a great loss from the deficiency of detailed data in published statistics. Important role in clinical diagnoses of CT and MR results an increase of fee paid for them up to more than half of total expenditure on medical imaging. So, dominant reduction of examination fee has been done for MR imaging, especially in 2002, to reduce the total cost of medical imaging. Follows could be featured as major topics of medical imaging in health insurance system, (a) fee is newly assigned for electronic handling of CT-and-MR images, and nuclear medicine, and (b) there is still a mismatch between actual payment and quality of medical facilities. As matters related to medical imaging, the followings should be stressed; (a) numbers of CT and MR units per population are dominantly high among OECD countries, but, those controlled by qualified radiologists are at the average level of those countries, (b) there is a big difference of MR examination quality among medical facilities, and (c) 76% of newly-installed high-end MR units are supplied by foreign industries. Hopefully, there will be an increase in the concern to medical fee payment system and health care cost because they possibly

  16. Radiation physics for medical physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B. [McGill Univ. Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2006-07-01

    This book summarizes the radiation physics knowledge that professionals working in medical physics need to master for efficient and safe dealings with ionizing radiation. It contains eight chapters, each chapter covering a specific group of subjects related to radiation physics and is intended as a textbook for a course in radiation physics in medical-physics graduate programs. However, the book may also be of interest to the large number of professionals, not only medical physicists, who in their daily occupations deal with various aspects of medical physics and find a need to improve their understanding of radiation physics. The main target audience for this book is graduate students studying for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in medical physics, who have to possess the necessary physics and mathematics background knowledge to be able to follow and master the complete textbook. Medical residents, technology students and biomedical engineering students may find certain sections too challenging or esoteric, yet they will find many sections interesting and useful in their studies. Candidates preparing for professional certification exams in any of the medical physics subspecialties should find the material useful, and some of the material would also help candidates preparing for certification examinations in medical dosimetry or radiation-related medical specialties. Numerous textbooks are available covering the various subspecialties of medical physics but they generally make a transition from the elementary basic physics directly into the intricacies of the given medical physics subspecialty. The intent of this textbook is to provide the missing link between the elementary physics on the one hand and the physics of the subspecialties on the other hand. (orig.)

  17. Consultation of medical narratives in the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tange, H J

    1999-12-01

    This article presents an overview of a research project concerning the consultation of medical narratives in the electronic medical record (EMR). It describes an analysis of user needs, the design and implementation of a prototype EMR system, and the evaluation of the ease of consultation of medical narratives when using this system. In a questionnaire survey, 85 hospital physicians judged the quality of their paper-based medical record with respect to data entry, information retrieval and some other aspects. Participants were more positive about the paper medical record than the literature suggests. They wished to maintain the flexibility of data entry but indicated the need to improve the retrieval of information. A prototype EMR system was developed to facilitate the consultation of medical narratives. These parts were divided into labeled segments that could be arranged source-oriented and problem-oriented. This system was used to evaluate the ease of information retrieval of 24 internists and 12 residents at a teaching hospital when using free-text medical narratives divided at different levels of detail. They solved, without time pressure, some predefined problems concerning three voluminous, inpatient case records. The participants were randomly allocated to a sequence that was balanced by patient case and learning effect. The division of medical narratives affected speed, but not completeness of information retrieval. Progress notes divided into problem-related segments could be consulted 22% faster than when undivided. Medical history and physical examination divided into segments at organ-system level could be consulted 13% faster than when divided into separate questions and observations. These differences were statistically significant. The fastest divisions were also appreciated as the best combination of easy searching and best insight in the patient case. The results of our evaluation study suggest a trade-off between searching and reading: too much

  18. Effect of Medical Education on Empathy in Osteopathic Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTighe, Adam J; DiTomasso, Robert A; Felgoise, Stephanie; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2016-10-01

    Empathy is an integral component of the patient-physician relationship and involves a cognitive ability to connect with others in a meaningful fashion. Multiple longitudinal studies have shown that self-reported allopathic medical student empathy declines significantly during year 3. However, to date, only 4 cross-sectional studies have been published on osteopathic medical students' empathy. Whereas studies of allopathic medical students reported a decline in empathy, similar results were not found in osteopathic studies. To investigate (1) self-reported empathy through years 1 to 3 of osteopathic medical students and (2) whether empathy declines during year 3. Design included cross-sectional and test-retest data collection. Private osteopathic medical school in the Northeast region of the United States. Osteopathic medical students. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy medical student version. Respondents (N=717) included 383 women (53%) and 334 men (47%). When empathy levels were examined by demographics, the only significant finding was that women reported significantly higher empathy levels than men (112.3 vs 109.3; P<.001). Cross-sectional results indicate that mean empathy levels were significantly lower for third-year students at the end of the year (108.7) compared with first- and second-year students at the beginning of the year (111.3 and 112.4, respectively; P<.05). Test-retest analyses of year 3 indicated significantly lower empathy levels from the beginning to the end of the academic year (111.2 and 108.7, respectively; P<.05). Osteopathic medical students' empathy declined significantly during year 3, which is consistent with the findings from allopathic samples but differs from findings from osteopathic samples. More research is needed to build the data on osteopathic medical student samples and to achieve a better understanding of changes in empathy in osteopathic and allopathic medical students.

  19. Medical marijuana for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Joan L

    2015-03-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Marijuana has been used for centuries, and interest in its medicinal properties has been increasing in recent years. Investigations into these medicinal properties has led to the development of cannabinoid pharmaceuticals such as dronabinol, nabilone, and nabiximols. Dronabinol is best studied in the treatment of nausea secondary to cancer chemotherapy and anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for those indications. Nabilone has been best studied for the treatment of nausea secondary to cancer chemotherapy. There are also limited studies of these drugs for other conditions. Nabiximols is only available in the United States through clinical trials, but is used in Canada and the United Kingdom for the treatment of spasticity secondary to multiple sclerosis and pain. Studies of marijuana have concentrated on nausea, appetite, and pain. This article will review the literature regarding the medical use of marijuana and these cannabinoid pharmaceuticals (with emphasis on indications relevant to oncology), as well as available information regarding adverse effects of marijuana use. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  20. Medical device alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Matthias; Görges, Matthias; Fried, Roland; Such, Olaf; Wrede, Christian; Imhoff, Michael

    2011-04-01

    The high number of false positive alarms has long been known to be a serious problem in critical care medicine - yet it remains unresolved. At the same time, threats to patient safety due to missing or suppressed alarms are being reported. The purpose of this paper is to present results from a workshop titled "Too many alarms? Too few alarms?" organized by the Section Patient Monitoring and the Workgroup Alarms of the German Association of Biomedical Engineering of the Association for Electrical, Electronic and Information Technologies. The current situation regarding alarms and their problems in intensive care, such as lack of clinical relevance, alarm fatigue, workload increases due to clinically irrelevant alarms, usability problems in alarm systems, problems with manuals and training, and missing alarms due to operator error are outlined, followed by a discussion of solutions and strategies to improve the current situation. Finally, the need for more research and development, focusing on signal quality considerations, networking of medical devices at the bedside, diagnostic alarms and predictive warnings, usability of alarm systems, education of healthcare providers, creation of annotated clinical databases for testing, standardization efforts, and patient monitoring in the regular ward, are called for.