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Sample records for jsc jf1323 bldg

  1. STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron during egress training in JSC's WETF Bldg 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), discusses simulated emergency egress training on the pool side of JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Cameron will be dropped into a simulated ocean, the WETF's 25-ft pool, into which a parachute landing might be made.

  2. Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS) echocardiograph in mockup rack in JSC's Bldg 36

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS) life sciences laboratory equipment (LSLE) echocardiograph is documented in the JSC Bioengineering and Test Support Facility Bldg 36. Displayed on the echocardiograph monitor is a heart image. The echocardiograph equipment is located in Rack 6 and will be used in conjunction with Experiment No. 294 Cardiovascular Adaptation to Zero Gravity during the STS-40 SLS-1 mission.

  3. STS-34 crewmembers train with the IMAX camera in JSC's Bldg 9B mockup area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 crewmembers participate in IMAX camera training session held in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9B. The crew is briefed on the operation and handling of the IMAX camera scheduled to fly aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Standing behind the IMAX camera is Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz with IMAX instructors Grant Ferguson and David Douglas on his left. Commander Donald E. Williams (looking at IMAX lens) is at the right edge of the photo.

  4. STS-26 crew in JSC Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers model the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) for entry and launch phases before a training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Pictured (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, Pilot Richard O. Covey, MS John M. Lounge, and MS George D. Nelson. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew is scheduled to check out the new partial pressure suits and crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  5. Student experimenter stands near middeck lockers in JSC Bldg 9A mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Student experimenter Constantine Costes, STS-42 Commander Ronald J. Grabe, STS-42 Mission Specialist (MS) William F. Readdy, and Integration Engineer Neal Christie discuss Coates' student experiment 83-02 (SE 83-02) entitled 'Zero-G Capillary Rise of Liquid through Granular Porous Media' in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). On FFT middeck, Costes stands behind Readdy (kneeling) as Christie demonstrates experiment setup and Grabe looks on (47326). The team also examines experiment components at middeck stowage locker (47323) and at FFT open side hatch (47324, 47325). The experiment is designed to investigate the capillary and forced flow characteristics of blue-tinted water in three glass tubes with three sizes of glass beads. SE 83-02 is scheduled to be flown on STS-42 aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103.

  6. STS-40 crew trains in JSC's SLS mockup located in Bldg 36

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    STS-40 Payload Specialist Millie Hughes-Fulford along with backup payload specialist Robert Ward Phillips familiarize themselves with Spacelab Life Sciences 1 (SLS-1) equipment. The two scientists are in JSC's Life Sciences Project Division (LSPD) SLS mockup located in the Bioengineering and Test Support Facility Bldg 36. Hughes-Fulford, in the center aisle, pulls equipment from an overhead stowage locker while Phillips, in the foreground, experiments with the baroreflex neck pressure chamber at Rack 11. The baroreflex collar will be used in conjuction with Experiment No. 022, Influence of Weightlessness Upon Human Autonomic Cardiovascular Control. Behind Phillips in the center aisle are body mass measurement device (BMMD) (foreground) and the stowed bicycle ergometer.

  7. STS-26 crew training in JSC Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers use a bit of orchestrated humor to demonstrate the aft (back) zipper feature on the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) before a training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Left to right are Commander Frederick H. Hauck, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, MS David C. Hilmers, MS John M. Lounge, and Pilot Richard O. Covey. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew is scheduled to check out the new partial pressure suits and crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  8. ASTP crewmen in Apollo Command Module Trainer during training session at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The three members of the American ASTP prime crew are photographed inside the Apollo Command Module (CM) trainer in a water tank in bldg 260 during water egress training at JSC. They are, left to right, Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander; Vance D. Brand, command module pilot; and Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot (23430); Slayton attaches his life preserver as he egresses an Apollo Command Module trainer in a water tank in bldg 260 during water egresss training at JSC. Astronauts Brand (on left) and Stafford have already egressed the trainer and are seated in a three-man life raft.

  9. STS-30 crewmembers pose for informal portrait on JSC FB-SMS middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers pause briefly from their training schedule to pose for informal portrait in JSC fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). On FB-SMS middeck are (left to right) Commander David M. Walker, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee, MS Mary L. Cleave, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, and MS Norman E. Thagard. FB-SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  10. Technicians assembly the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mockup at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    At JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A, technicians install a high gain antenna (HGA) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mockup. On the ground a technician operates the controls for the overhead crane that is lifting the HGA into place on the Support System Module (SSM) forward shell. Others in a cherry picker basket wait for the HGA to near its final position so they can secure it on the mockup.

  11. STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), relies on a one-person life raft to get him to 'safety' during a launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

  12. STS-35 Pilot Gardner shoots picture during water egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner shoots picture using a 35mm camera during water egress training conducted in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 at JSC. Gardner is wearing a launch and entry suit and a life jacket.

  13. STS-56 Commander Cameron, in LES, during JSC emergency egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), poses at the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT) side hatch before climbing into the mockup. Cameron, along with the other STS-56 crewmembers, is participating in an emergency egress simulation at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  14. STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Godwin during simulation in JSC's FB-SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin rehearses some phases of her scheduled duties on the middeck of the fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Godwin is inspecting supplies stowed in the middeck lockers during this unsuited simulation.

  15. STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Ross during simulation in JSC's FB-SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Jerry L. Ross 'borrows' the pilots station to rehearse some of his scheduled duties for his upcoming mission. He is on the flight deck of the fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) during this unsuited simulation. The SMS is part of JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  16. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, MS Musgrave on FB-SMS middeck during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) F. Story Musgrave, wearing lightweight headset (HDST), adjusts controls on communications module mounted on a middeck overhead panel. Musgrave is on the middeck of the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. The STS-44 crewmembers are participating in a flight simulation.

  17. STS-31 Pilot Bolden with beverages on the FB-SMS middeck during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Pilot Charles F. Bolden holds three beverage containers while in front of the galley on the middeck of the fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) during a training simulation at JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. From the middeck, Bolden, wearing lightweight headset, simulates a communications link with ground controllers and fellow crewmembers.

  18. STS-31 crewmembers review checklist with instructor on JSC's FB-SMS middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Bruce McCandless II (left) and Pilot Charles F. Bolden (right) discuss procedures with a training instructor on the middeck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). The three are pointing to a checklist during this training simulation in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  19. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, Pilot Henricks in FB-SMS training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Terence T. Henricks, seated at the pilots station on the forward flight deck, reviews checklists before a flight simulation in the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Surrounding Henricks are the seat back, the overhead panels, forward panels, and forward windows.

  20. STS-32 MS Dunbar trains in JSC Manipulator Development Facility (MDF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Mission Specialist (MS) Bonnie J. Dunbar reviews checklist with training personnel in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in JSC's Mockup and Integration Facility (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Dunbar (left) discusses procedures with trainer in front of the aft flight deck onorbit station controls. Overhead window W8 is visible above their heads.

  1. Technicians assist STS-47 MS Jemison prior to JSC bailout training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, assisted by technicians, adjusts a strap on her launch and entry suit (LES) prior to launch emergency egress (bailout) exercises in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Jemison is making her first flight in space.

  2. STS-46 Payload Specialist Malerba sits at the pilots station in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba sits at the pilots station on the forward flight deck of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9. Malerba, wearing a flight suit, is participating in a hardware familiarity training session.

  3. STS-41 MS Akers looks up at mockup prior to egress training in JSC's MAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), looks up at crew compartment trainer (CCT) prior to emergency egress training exercises. The exercises were conducted in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  4. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, MS Brown dons LES in JSC Mockup and Integration Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark N. Brown, wearing communications carrier assembly (CCA) and launch and entry suit (LES), prepares to don launch and entry helmet (LEH). Brown suits up for shuttle emergency egress (bailout) procedures in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A.

  5. STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), relies on a one-person life raft to get him to 'safety' during a launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

  6. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, MS Springer on JSC crew compartment trainer middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing navy blue launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), participates in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) exercises. MS Springer is seated in mission specialist seat on CCT middeck, the position he will occupy during the entry phase of flight. Behind Springer is the closed airlock hatch and stowed treadmill. The crew escape system (CES) pole extends overhead from starboard wall to side hatch. On Springer's left is the galley. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  7. TSGC and JSC Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Humberto

    2013-01-01

    NASA and the SGCs are, by design, intended to work closely together and have synergistic Vision, Mission, and Goals. The TSGC affiliates and JSC have been working together, but not always in a concise, coordinated, nor strategic manner. Today we have a couple of simple ideas to present about how TSGC and JSC have started to work together in a more concise, coordinated, and strategic manner, and how JSC and non-TSG Jurisdiction members have started to collaborate: Idea I: TSGC and JSC Technical Alignment Idea II: Concept of Clusters.

  8. STS-26 crew during MB shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in Bldg 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in motion base (MB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Five veteran astronauts recently named to man the Discovery for the STS-26 mission are pictured prior to a training session in the nearby MB SMS. Commander Frederick H. Hauck (top right) stands next to Pilot Richard O. Covey with (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, MS David C. Hilmers, and MS John M. Lounge on front row.

  9. STS-47 crew extinquishes fire during JSC fire fighting exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers lined up along water hoses direct spray at fire blazing in JSC's Fire Training Pit. At the left are backup Payload Specialist Stan Koszelak, holding the hose nozzle, and Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis. Manning the hose on the right are backup Payload Specialist Takao Doi, holding the hose nozzle, followed by Commander Robert L. Gibson, Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, and MS Jerome Apt. Guiding the teams are MS Mae C. Jemison (front) and a veteran fire fighter and instructor (center). Doi and Mohri represent Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). The Fire Training Pit is located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207.

  10. STS-31 crewmembers during simulation on the flight deck of JSC's FB-SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    On the flight deck of JSC's fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS), Mission Specialist (MS) Steven A. Hawley (left), on aft flight deck, looks over the shoulders of Commander Loren J. Shriver, seated at the commanders station (left) and Pilot Charles F. Bolden, seated at the pilots station and partially blocked by the seat's headrest (right). The three astronauts recently named to the STS-31 mission aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, go through a procedures checkout in the FB-SMS. The training simulation took place in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  11. STS-56 Commander Cameron, in LES, with sky genie during JSC egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), gives the sky-genie escape device a tug as training instructor Kenneth D. Trujillo holds it in position and explains its operation. Cameron, along with the other STS-56 crewmembers, is briefed on emergency egress procedures at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE prior to a training simulation. The sky-genie is carried on all Space Shuttle flights for emergency egress purposes.

  12. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald at CCT hatch during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron (right) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), stand at the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup, prior to entering the mockup. Once inside the CCT, they will don their launch and entry helmets (LEHs) and participate in emergency egress (bailout) procedures. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  13. ASTP crewmen in Docking Module trainer during training session at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    An interior view of the Docking Module trainer in bldg 35 during Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) joint crew training at JSC. Astronaut Donald K. Slayton (right) is the docking module pilot of the American ASTP prime crew. The other man is Cosmonaut Valeriy N. Kubasov, engineer on the Soviet ASTP first (prime) crew. The training session simulated activities on the second day in space. The Docking module is designed to link the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft.

  14. STS-37 crewmembers train in JSC's FB shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Commander Steven R. Nagel (left) and Mission Specialist (MS) Jerry L. Ross rehearse some of their scheduled duties on the flight deck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. During the unsuited simulation, Nagel reviews checklist while seated at the commanders station as Ross looks on from the pilots station.

  15. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers participate in JSC FB-SMS training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Commander Frederick D. Gregory and Pilot Terence T. Henricks are stationed at their appointed positions on the forward flight deck of the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Gregory (left) in the commanders seat and Henricks (right) in the pilots seat look back toward aft flight deck and the photographer. Seat backs appear in the foreground and forward flight deck control panels in the background.

  16. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers participate in FB-SMS training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Commander Frederick D. Gregory (left) and Pilot Terence T. Henricks, positioned at their appointed stations on the forward flight deck, are joined by Mission Specialist (MS) F. Story Musgrave (center) and MS James S. Voss (standing). The crewmembers are participating in a flight simulation in the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. A maze of panel switches appear overhead and in the background.

  17. STS-49 crew in JSC's FB Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) during simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers participate in a simulation in JSC's Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEH) and seated on the FB-SMS middeck are (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, MS Kathryn C. Thornton, and MS Pierre J. Thuot.

  18. STS-46 crewmembers participate in Fixed Base (FB) SMS training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Andrew M. Allen hands Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman checklists from middeck locker MF43E during training session in JSC's fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. European Space Agency (ESA) MS Claude Nicollier outfitted with communications kit assembly headset (HDST) and equipment looks beyond Hoffman to the opposite side of the middeck.

  19. STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer dons EMU in JSC's WETF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), fastens the strap on his communications carrier assembly (CCA) cap during suit donning in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Positioned on the WETF platform at pool side, Springer is preparing for an underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation. During the training exercise, Springer will rehearse contingency EVA procedures for the STS-38 mission aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104.

  20. STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer dons EMU in JSC's WETF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer dons extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) upper torso with technicians' assistance in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Positioned on the WETF platform at pool side, Springer is preparing for an underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation. During the training session, Springer will rehearse contingency EVA procedures for the STS-38 mission aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104.

  1. Technicians complete assembly of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mockup at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    A technician listens to instructions as he operates the controls for the overhead crane that is lifting one of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) high gain antennas (HGAs) into place on the HST Support System Module (SSM) forward shell. Others in a cherry picker basket wait to install the HGA on the SSM mockup. The HST mockup will be used for astronaut training and is being assembled in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  2. STS-29 crewmembers launch/landing procedural training in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot John E. Blaha and Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer participate in launch and landing training on JSC mockup flight deck in the Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Blaha sits at the pilots station controls in front of Springer who is seated on aft flight deck in mission specialist seat. Springer prepares to don communications kit assembly headset.

  3. STS-40 Payload Specialist Millie Hughes-Fulford trains in JSC's SLS mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    STS-40 Payload Specialist Millie Hughes-Fulford conducts Spacelab Life Sciences 1 (SLS-1) Experiment No. 198, Pulmonary Function During Weightlessness, in JSC's Life Sciences Project Division (LSPD) SLS mockup located in the Bioengineering and Test Support Facility Bldg 36. Hughes-Fulford monitors instruments and settings on Rack 8's panels. Behind her in the center aisle are the body mass measurement device (foreground) and the stowed bicycle ergometer.

  4. STS-26 Pilot Covey, wearing launch and entry suit, trains in JSC mockup area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing the orange launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), pauses during a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A crew compartment trainer (CCT). LES, a partial pressure suit to be worn during launch and entry phases of the space shuttle flight, was evaluated and checked out.

  5. STS-34 crewmembers review IFM procedures on JSC's CCT mockup middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 crewmembers review inflight maintenance (IFM) procedures on the middeck of JSC's crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in the Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. IFM trainer, holding cable, discusses procedures with Mission Specialist (MS) Ellen S. Baker (center) and Pilot Michael J. McCulley. An open stowage locker appears in front of the group. Visible on the mockup's middeck are forward and aft stowage lockers, the airlock hatch, and the starboard wall mounted sleep restraints.

  6. STS-26 MS Nelson during training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, wearing navy blue launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is seated in his launch and entry position on crew compartment trainer (CCT) middeck during a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Visible in the background are the airlock, stowed treadmill, and sleep restraints. NOTE: Photo was taken by William H. Bowers, crew photo instructor, with wide angle lens.

  7. STS-46 Payload Specialist Malerba at aft flight deck controls in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba, wearing flight suit, operates controls on the aft flight deck of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9. During the training session, Malerba adjusts a control on the A3 panel closed circuit television (CCTV). Onorbit station panels appear in front of Malerba and payload station controls behind him.

  8. STS-26 crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits, train in JSC mockup area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck (left) and Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing the orange launch and entry suits (LESs), discuss training exercise with technicians in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. During the exercise, the LES, a partial pressure suit to be worn during launch and entry phases of the space shuttle flight, was evaluated and checked out.

  9. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, crewmembers train in JSC Mockup and Integration Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, crewmembers participate in shuttle emergency egress (bailout) procedures in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Wearing orange launch and entry suits (LESs), crewmembers (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Brown, MS David C. Leestma, MS James C. Adamson, Pilot Richard N. Richards, and Commander Brewster H. Shaw pause before training exercise. In the background are training personnel and the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) surrounded by helium-filled mockups.

  10. STS-26 Commander Hauck, wearing launch and entry suit, trains in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, wearing the orange launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), gets assistance from a suit technician prior to participating in a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A crew compartment trainer (CCT). During the exercise, the LES, a partial pressure suit to be worn during launch and entry phases of the space shuttle flight, was evaluated and checked out.

  11. ESA MS Nicollier extends mockup tetherline prior to JSC WETF simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier, turning a crank, extends a tetherline from a reel mounted on a mockup of the forward payload bay (PLB) bulkhead. Nicollier familiarizes himself with the operation of the safety tether system prior to donning an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and participating in an underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) simu- lation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

  12. STS-47 MS Jemison extends side hatch mockup CES pole during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison extends crew escape system (CES) pole through a side hatch mockup during launch emergency egress (bailout) training in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. MS Jerome Apt (right) looks on. The crewmembers practiced extending the CES pole prior to donning their launch and entry suits (LESs) and conducting the simulation in the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT).

  13. At JSC's MCC, CAPCOMs display score cards rating STS-26 Discovery landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    In JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30, astronauts and spacecraft communicators (CAPCOMs) L. Blaine Hammond, Jr, John O. Creighton, Frank L. Culbertson, Jr, and an unidentified man display score cards rating the STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, landing at Edwards Air Force Base(EAFB), California. Flight control room (FCR) front visual displays show world tracking map, EAFB post landing activity, and head alignment cone (HAC).

  14. STS-48 MS Gemar uses laptop during training session in JSC's MB SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-48 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Charles D. Gemar, wearing lightweight headset, enters data into a portable laptop computer on the middeck of JSC's Motion Based (MB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Gemar is participating in a preflight familiarization session in the MB-SMS located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Visible to Gemar's right is a stowed extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and on his left are forward locker mockups.

  15. Engineer Calvin H. Seaman demonstrates STS-49 INTELSAT capture bar at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Project Engineer Calvin H. Seaman (center) briefs news media representatives on the grapple fixture (capture bar) expected to be instrumental in the capture of the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT) VI satellite in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9. Seaman is a JSC engineer who designed the capture bar. After Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, is maneuvered into a tight proximity operations configuration with the errant satellite, two STS-49 crewmembers will attach the grapple device to the aft side of INTELSAT, as demonstrated with this full-scale mockup. The communications satellite will then be mated with a perigee stage, which the crewmembers will carry with them on their May launch, and released into space. Its motor will be fired many hours afterward, sending it on its way to a higher, geosynchronous orbit. The Errant Satellite Simulator is set up on the Air Bearing Floor for the demonstration. Photo taken by NASA JSC contract

  16. STS-26 crew in JSC Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers have donned their new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) for a training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Commander Frederick H. Hauck is in the center foreground. Hauck is flanked by fellow crewmembers (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, MS George D. Nelson, Pilot Richard O. Covey, and MS David C. Hilmers. Astronaut Steven R. Nagel, not assigned as crewmember but assisting in training, is at far right. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew is scheduled to check out the new partial pressure suits and crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  17. Renovation of the outside lighting - Bldg. 112 zone

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Due to the renovation of the outside lighting, the traffic will be disrupted along “Route Feynman”. From the water tower (Bldg. 227) to Restaurant Nr. 2 (Bldg. 504) between 18 and 30 August. We recommend great caution. Thank you for your understanding. SEM Group

  18. Center Innovation Fund: JSC CIF (also includes JSC IRAD) Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JSC provides and applies its preeminent capabilities in science and technology to develop, operate, and integrate human exploration missions.  The Center...

  19. STS-35 Pilot Gardner during fire fighting exercises at JSC fire training pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner extinguishes a small blaze during a fire handling training session for crewmembers at JSC Fire Training Pit across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Wearing a navy blue flight suit, Gardner approaches fire while operating a fire extinguisher as Commander Vance D. Brand (far right) and Payload Specialist Samuel T. Durrance look on. The crew was briefed on types of potential blazes and the correct means of controlling each type. STS-35 will mark the first seven-member crew staffing since the Challenger accident of January 1986.

  20. STS-35 Pilot Gardner and MS Hoffman during egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner (standing) and Mission Specialist (MS) Jeffrey A. Hoffman prepare for egress training at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Gardner and Hoffman, wearing orange launch and entry suits (LESs), adjust their parachute harnesses as they listen to instructions before training begins. The astronaut crewmembers and payload specialists for the scheduled May flight were specifically learning proper measures to take in the event of an emergency on the launch pad necessitating emergency evacuation of the orbiter.

  1. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald on CCT flight deck in JSC's MAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron, (left) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEHs), are seated on the forward flight deck of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup. Cameron mans the commander station controls and Oswald the pilots station controls during an emergency egress (bailout) simulation. The view was taken from the aft flight deck looking forward and includes Cameron's and Oswald's profiles and the forward flight deck controls and checklists. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  2. STS-57 crewmembers train in JSC's FB Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Nancy J. Sherlock, holding computer diskettes and procedural checklist, discusses equipment operation with Commander Ronald J. Grabe on the middeck of JSC's fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Payload Commander (PLC) G. David Low points to a forward locker location as MS3 Peter J.K. Wisoff switches controls on overhead panels MO42F and MO58F, and MS4 Janice E. Voss looks on. The FB-SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  3. STS-35 crewmembers during fire fighting exercises at JSC fire training pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 crewmembers extinguish a small blaze during a fire handling training session at JSC Fire Training Pit across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Wearing navy blue flight suits, Mission Specialist (MS) Robert A.R. Parker (second right) and MS John M. Lounge (third left) approach fire while operating a fire extinguishers. The crew was briefed on types of potential blazes and the correct means of controlling each type. Also pictured are (left to right) Commander Vance D. Brand, Payload Specialist Samuel T. Durrance, Pilot Guy S. Gardner, and training officer Al Putnam. STS-35 will mark the first seven-member crew staffing since the Challenger accident of January 1986.

  4. STS-45 payload specialists with crew escape system (CES) mockup at JSC's MAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Payload Specialist Dirk D. Frimout (European Space Agency (ESA) Belgian crewmember) (left), backup Payload Specialist Charles R. Chappell (center), and Payload Specialist Byron K. Lichtenberg (right) listen to technician explain the operation of the crew escape system (CES) pole. Frimout is engaging the handle which extends the CES pole out the side hatch. The payload specialists along with the other STS-45 crewmembers are participating in side hatch emergency egress exercises in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  5. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck tests cushion outside the crew compartment trainer (CCT) side hatch. Hauck, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, tumbles out CCT side hatch onto cushion as technicians look on. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A.

  6. STS-31 MS Sullivan exits airlock mockup during JSC WETF underwater simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Mission Specialist (MS) Kathryn D. Sullivan, fully suited in an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and holding a semirigid tether (SRT) and ratchet caddy assembly, egresses the airlock (AL) mockup during an underwater simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. The open AL extravehicular (EV) hatch appears in the foreground as Sullivan backs out into the payload bay (PLB). Though no extravehicular activity (EVA) is planned for STS-31, two crewmembers train for contingencies that would necessitate leaving the shirt sleeve environment of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, cabin and performing chores with their Hubble Space Telescope (HST) payload or related hardware in the PLB.

  7. STS-46 Payload Specialist Malerba on the middeck of JSC's FFT mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba with his hand resting on the crew escape system (CES) pole stands on the middeck of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9. Malerba, wearing a flight suit, familiarizes himself with the operation of the CES pole which extends out the shuttle mockup's open side hatch. The CES pole is used if emergency egress is required during the launch or ascent phase of flight.

  8. JSC Design and Procedural Standards, JSC-STD-8080

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punch, Danny T.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides design and procedural requirements appropriate for inclusion in specifications for any human spaceflight program, project, spacecraft, system, or end item. The term "spacecraft" as used in the standards includes launch vehicles, orbital vehicles, non-terrestrial surface vehicles, and modules. The standards are developed and maintained as directed by Johnson Space Center (JSC) Policy Directive JPD 8080.2, JSC Design and Procedural Standards for Human Space Flight Equipment. The Design and Procedural Standards contained in this manual represent human spacecraft design and operational knowledge applicable to a wide range of spaceflight activities. These standards are imposed on JSC human spaceflight equipment through JPD 8080.2. Designers shall comply with all design standards applicable to their design effort.

  9. STS-26 MS Hilmers during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), tries out the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Hilmers to his feet once he reaches the bottom. Watching from floor level at the far left is astronaut Steven R. Nagel. A second crewmember stands in the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) awaiting his turn to slide to 'safety'. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. The CES pole extends out the side hatch just above Hilmers' head.

  10. STS-26 Pilot Covey during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), slides to safety using the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Covey to his feet once he reaches the bottom. The CES pole extends out the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  11. STS-47 crew during fire fighting exercises at JSC's Fire Training Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers line up along water hoses to extinguish a blaze in JSC's Fire Training Pit during fire fighting exercises. Manning the hose in the foreground are Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, holding the hose nozzle, backup Payload Specialist Takao Doi, Mission Specialist (MS) Jerome Apt, and Commander Robert L. Gibson, at rear. Lined up on the second hose are Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr, holding the hose nozzle, followed by MS N. Jan Davis, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee, and backup Payload Specialist Stan Koszelak. A veteran firefighter monitors the effort from a position between the two hoses. In the background, backup Payload Specialist Chiaki Naito-Mukai, donning gloves, and MS Mae C. Jemison look on. The Fire Training Pit is located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Mohri, Doi, and Mukai all represent Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA).

  12. STS-33 crewmembers during training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-33 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers, wearing orange launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEHs), are seated in their launch and entry positions on crew compartment trainer (CCT) flight deck during a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Commander Frederick D. Gregory (far right) is stationed at forward flight deck commanders controls, Pilot John E. Blaha (far left) at the pilots controls and on aft flight deck are mission specialists Manley L. Carter, Jr (left), MS F. Story Musgrave (center, holding clipboard), and MS Kathryn C. Thornton (standing). Overhead forward control panels are visible above the astronauts and aft flight deck onorbit station control panels and windows are visible in the background. Thornton is on the flight deck for this photo but during launch and entry will be seated on the middeck.

  13. STS-29 MS Bagian during post landing egress exercises in JSC FFT mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) James P. Bagian works his way down to 'safety' using a sky-genie device during post landing emergency egress exercises in JSC full fuselage trainer (FFT) located in the Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Bagian, wearing orange launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), lowers himself using the sky genie after egressing from crew compartment overhead window W8. Fellow crewmembers and technicians watch Bagian's progress. Standing in navy blue LES is MS Robert C. Springer with MS James F. Buchli seated behind him on his right and Pilot John E. Blaha seated behind him on his left. Bagian is one of several astronauts who has been instrumental in developing the new crew escape system (CES) equipment (including parachute harness).

  14. STS-26 crewmembers during training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers, wearing navy blue launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEHs), are seated in their launch and entry positions on crew compartment trainer (CCT) flight deck during a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Commander Frederick H. Hauck (far right) is stationed at forward flight deck commanders controls, Pilot Richard O. Covey (far left) at the pilots controls and on aft flight deck are mission specialists John M. Lounge (left) and David C. Hilmers. Overhead forward control panels are visible above the astronauts and aft flight deck onorbit station control panels and windows are visible in the background. NOTE: Photo was taken by William H. Bowers, crew photo instructor, with wide angle lens.

  15. Center Independent Research & Developments: JSC IRAD Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JSC provides and applies its preeminent capabilities in science and technology to develop, operate, and integrate human exploration missions.  The center...

  16. JSC Pharmacy Services for Remote Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Paul S.; Bayuse, Tina

    2005-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center Pharmacy began operating in March of 2003. The pharmacy serves in two main capacities: to directly provide medications and services in support of the medical clinics at the Johnson Space Center, physician travel kits for NASA flight surgeon staff, and remote operations, such as the clinics in Devon Island, Star City and Moscow; and indirectly provide medications and services for the International Space Station and Space Shuttle medical kits. Process changes that occurred and continued to evolve in the advent of the installation of the new JSC Pharmacy, and the process of stocking medications for each of these aforementioned areas will be discussed. Methods: The incorporation of pharmacy involvement to provide services for remote operations and supplying medical kits was evaluated. The first step was to review the current processes and work the JSC Pharmacy into the existing system. The second step was to provide medications to these areas. Considerations for the timeline of expiring medications for shipment are reviewed with each request. The third step was the development of a process to provide accountability for the medications. Results: The JSC Pharmacy utilizes a pharmacy management system to document all medications leaving the pharmacy. Challenges inherent to providing medications to remote areas were encountered. A process has been designed to incorporate usage into the electronic medical record upon return of the information from these remote areas. This is an evolving program and several areas have been identified for further improvement.

  17. JSC Search System Usability Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, David; Berndt, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The advanced nature of "search" has facilitated the movement from keyword match to the delivery of every conceivable information topic from career, commerce, entertainment, learning... the list is infinite. At NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC ) the Search interface is an important means of knowledge transfer. By indexing multiple sources between directorates and organizations, the system's potential is culture changing in that through search, knowledge of the unique accomplishments in engineering and science can be seamlessly passed between generations. This paper reports the findings of an initial survey, the first of a four part study to help determine user sentiment on the intranet, or local (JSC) enterprise search environment as well as the larger NASA enterprise. The survey is a means through which end users provide direction on the development and transfer of knowledge by way of the search experience. The ideal is to identify what is working and what needs to be improved from the users' vantage point by documenting: (1) Where users are satisfied/dissatisfied (2) Perceived value of interface components (3) Gaps which cause any disappointment in search experience. The near term goal is it to inform JSC search in order to improve users' ability to utilize existing services and infrastructure to perform tasks with a shortened life cycle. Continuing steps include an agency based focus with modified questions to accomplish a similar purpose

  18. STS-45 ATLAS-1 pallet and Igloo power unit mating in KSC O and C Bldg

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Atmosphere Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 pallet and Igloo power unit mating completed in Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Operations and Checkout (O and C) Bldg test stand 3. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-91PC-1704.

  19. Status of Low Thrust Work at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Gerald L.

    2004-01-01

    High performance low thrust (solar electric, nuclear electric, variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket) propulsion offers a significant benefit to NASA missions beyond low Earth orbit. As NASA (e.g., Prometheus Project) endeavors to develop these propulsion systems and associated power supplies, it becomes necessary to develop a refined trajectory design capability that will allow engineers to develop future robotic and human mission designs that take advantage of this new technology. This ongoing work addresses development of a trajectory design and optimization tool for assessing low thrust (and other types) trajectories. This work targets to advance the state of the art, enable future NASA missions, enable science drivers, and enhance education. This presentation provides a summary of the low thrust-related JSC activities under the ISP program and specifically, provides a look at a new release of a multi-gravity, multispacecraft trajectory optimization tool (Copernicus) along with analysis performed using this tool over the past year.

  20. Building Footprints, bldg, Published in 2004, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Grand County Road Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Building Footprints dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2004. It is described as 'bldg'....

  1. JSC “ALFA-BANK” marketing policy. problems and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Kirillov, A.; Kuznetcova, E.; Martirosian, M.

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the results of JSC “Alfa-Bank” consumers’ segmentation and the following complex marketing research. The article suggests the ways of the bank’s marketing policy improvement.

  2. STS-26 crew poses for group portrait on shuttle mockup middeck in Bldg 9A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers pose on shuttle mockup middeck (port side) in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Clockwise from left foreground are Commander Frederick H. Hauck, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Pilot Richard O. Covey, MS John M. Lounge, and MS David C. Hilmers. Crewmembers are wearing flight coveralls (jump suits). Nelson stands on middeck ladder and Lounge sits in open side hatch. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  3. JSC Case Study: Fleet Experience with E-85 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Kirck

    2009-01-01

    JSC has used E-85 as part of an overall strategy to comply with Presidential Executive Order 13423 and the Energy Policy Act. As a Federal fleet, we are required to reduce our petroleum consumption by 2 percent per year, and increase the use of alternative fuels in our vehicles. With the opening of our onsite dispenser in October 2004, JSC became the second federal fleet in Texas and the fifth NASA center to add E-85 fueling capability. JSC has a relatively small number of GSA Flex Fuel fleet vehicles at the present time (we don't include personal vehicles, or other contractor's non-GSA fleet), and there were no reasonably available retail E-85 fuel stations within a 15-minute drive or within five miles (one way). So we decided to install a small 1000 gallon onsite tank and dispenser. It was difficult to obtain a supplier due to our low monthly fuel consumption, and our fuel supplier contract has changed three times in less than five years. We experiences a couple of fuel contamination and quality control issues. JSC obtained good information on E-85 from the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC). We also spoke with Defense Energy Support Center, (DESC), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and US Army Fort Leonard Wood. E-85 is a liquid fuel that is dispensed into our Flexible Fuel Vehicles identically to regular gasoline, so it was easy for our vehicle drivers to make the transition.

  4. STS-35 DTO 0634 EDO trash compactor demonstration at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Development Test Objective (DTO) 0634 Trash Compaction and Retention System Demostration extended duration orbiter (EDO) trash compactor is operated by Project Engineer Fred Abolfathi of Lockheed Engineering and Space Corporation (left) and JSC Man-Systems Division Subsystems Manager J.B. Thomas. The EDO trash compactor will occupy one middeck locker and consists of a geared mechanism that allows manual compaction of wet and dry trash.

  5. The JSC Engineering Directorate Product Peer Review Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Kenneth C.

    2009-01-01

    The JSC Engineering Directorate has developed a Product Peer Review process in support of NASA policies for project management and systems engineering. The process complies with the requirements of NPR 7120.5, NPR 7123.1 and NPR 7150.2 and follows the guidance in NASA/SP-2007-6105. This presentation will give an overview of the process followed by a brief demonstration of an actual peer review, with audience participation.

  6. Adsorption of Water on JSC-1A Lunar Simulant Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goering, John; Sah, Shweta; Burghaus, Uwe; Street, Kenneth W.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing probes sent to the moon in the 1990s indicated that water may exist in areas such as the bottoms of deep, permanently shadowed craters at the lunar poles, buried under regolith. Water is of paramount importance for any lunar exploration and colonization project which would require self-sustainable systems. Therefore, investigating the interaction of water with lunar regolith is pertinent to future exploration. The lunar environment can be approximated in ultra-high vacuum systems such as those used in thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Questions about water dissociation, surface wetting, degree of crystallization, details of water-ice transitions, and cluster formation kinetics can be addressed by TDS. Lunar regolith specimens collected during the Apollo missions are still available though precious, so testing with simulant is required before applying to use lunar regolith samples. Hence, we used for these studies JSC-1a, mostly an aluminosilicate glass and basaltic material containing substantial amounts of plagioclase, some olivine and traces of other minerals. Objectives of this project include: 1) Manufacturing samples using as little raw material as possible, allowing the use of surface chemistry and kinetics tools to determine the feasibility of parallel studies on regolith, and 2) Characterizing the adsorption kinetics of water on the regolith simulant. This has implications for the probability of finding water on the moon and, if present, for recovery techniques. For condensed water films, complex TDS data were obtained containing multiple features, which are related to subtle rearrangements of the water adlayer. Results from JSC-1a TDS studies indicate: 1) Water dissociation on JSC-1a at low exposures, with features detected at temperatures as high as 450 K and 2) The formation of 3D water clusters and a rather porous condensed water film. It appears plausible that the sub- m sized particles act as nucleation centers.

  7. STS-93 Pilot Ashby takes part in suit check in the O&C Bldg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby has his launch and entry suit checked by a technician in the Operations and Checkout Bldg. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include equipment check and a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew participating are Commander Eileen M. Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  8. Organic Contamination Baseline Study on NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Gloveboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.; Burkett, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Future planned sample return missions to carbon-rich asteroids and Mars in the next two decades will require strict handling and curation protocols as well as new procedures for reducing organic contamination. After the Apollo program, astromaterial collections have mainly been concerned with inorganic contamination [1-4]. However, future isolation containment systems for astromaterials, possibly nitrogen enriched gloveboxes, must be able to reduce organic and inorganic cross-contamination. In 2012, a baseline study was orchestrated to establish the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs.

  9. Human Spaceflight Technology Needs - A Foundation for JSC's Technology Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecklein, Jonette M.

    2013-01-01

    Human space exploration has always been heavily influenced by goals to achieve a specific mission on a specific schedule. This approach drove rapid technology development, the rapidity of which adds risks as well as provides a major driver for costs and cost uncertainty. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is now approaching the extension of human presence throughout the solar system by balancing a proactive yet less schedule-driven development of technology with opportunistic scheduling of missions as the needed technologies are realized. This approach should provide cost effective, low risk technology development that will enable efficient and effective manned spaceflight missions. As a first step, the NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) has identified a suite of critical technologies needed to support future manned missions across a range of destinations, including in cis-lunar space, near earth asteroid visits, lunar exploration, Mars moons, and Mars exploration. The challenge now is to develop a strategy and plan for technology development that efficiently enables these missions over a reasonable time period, without increasing technology development costs unnecessarily due to schedule pressure, and subsequently mitigating development and mission risks. NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC), as the nation s primary center for human exploration, is addressing this challenge through an innovative approach in allocating Internal Research and Development funding to projects. The HAT Technology Needs (TechNeeds) Database has been developed to correlate across critical technologies and the NASA Office of Chief Technologist Technology Area Breakdown Structure (TABS). The TechNeeds Database illuminates that many critical technologies may support a single technical capability gap, that many HAT technology needs may map to a single TABS technology discipline, and that a single HAT technology need may map to multiple TABS technology

  10. Reducing Organic Contamination in NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, M. J.; Allen, C. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic and human spaceflight missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids and comets will require handling and storing astromaterial samples with minimal inorganic and organic contamination to preserve the scientific integrity of each sample. Much was learned from the rigorous attempts to minimize and monitor organic contamination during Apollo, but it was not adequate for current analytical requirements; thus [1]. OSIRIS-REx, Hayabusa-2, and future Mars sample return will require better protocols for reducing organic contamination. Future isolation con-tainment systems for astromaterials, possibly nitrogen enriched gloveboxes, must be able to reduce organic and inorganic cross-contamination. In 2012, a baseline study established the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs [2, 3]. After standard ultra-pure water (UPW) cleaning, the majority of organic contaminates found were hydrocarbons, plasticizers, silicones, and solvents. Hydro-carbons loads (> C7) ranged from 1.9 to 11.8 ng/cm2 for TD-GC-MS wafer exposure analyses and 5.0 to 19.5 ng/L for TD-GC-MS adsorbent tube exposure. Plasticizers included nano grade solution), and heat sterilization at 130degC for 48 hours to reduce organic contamination. In addition, both heat sterilization and peracetic acid sterilization were used in the atmospheric de-contamination (R) cabinets. Later, Lunar curation gloveboxes were degreased with a pressurized Freon 113 wash. Today, UPW has replaced Freon as the standard cleaning procedure, but does not have the degreasing solvency power of Freon. Future Cleaning Studies: Cleaning experiments are cur-rently being orchestrated to study how to degrease and reduce organics in a JSC curation glovebox lower than the established baseline. Several new chemicals in the industry have replaced traditional degreasing solvents such as Freon and others that are now federally

  11. The JSC Research and Development Annual Report 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Issued as a companion to Johnson Space Center's Research and Technology Annual Report, which reports JSC accomplishments under NASA Research and Technology Operating Plan (RTOP) funding, this report describes 47 additional projects that are funded through sources other than the RTOP. Emerging technologies in four major disciplines are summarized: space systems technology, medical and life sciences, mission operations, and computer systems. Although these projects focus on support of human spacecraft design, development, and safety, most have wide civil and commercial applications in areas such as advanced materials, superconductors, advanced semiconductors, digital imaging, high density data storage, high performance computers, optoelectronics, artificial intelligence, robotics and automation, sensors, biotechnology, medical devices and diagnosis, and human factors engineering.

  12. [Taylor and Hill, Incorporated's JSC Cryo Chamber A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rito

    2008-01-01

    NASA commissioned construction of an environmental simulation test chamber which was completed in 1964 at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The facility, Chamber A, was invaluable for testing spacecraft and satellites before deployment to space. By testing spacecraft in an environment similar to the one they would be functioning in, potential problems could be addressed before launch. A new addition to NASA's observatory inventory is called the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), after a former Administrator of NASA. The new telescope will have 7 times the mirror area of the Hubble, with a target destination approximately one million miles from earth. Scheduled for launch in 2013, the JWST will allow scientists the ability to see, for the first time, the first galaxies that formed in the early Universe. Pre-launch testing of JWST must be performed in environments that approximate its final target space environment as closely as possible.

  13. Astronaut Kenneth D. Cameron in T-38A cockpit at Ellington Field near JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Astronaut Kenneth D. Cameron seated in the forward cockpit of a T-38A conducts preflight checkout procedures at Ellington Field near JSC. Cameron is preparing for a flight to Fairchild Air Force Base (AFB) in Spokane, Washington.

  14. Human Thermal Model Evaluation Using the JSC Human Thermal Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Makinen, Janice; Cognata, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Human thermal modeling has considerable long term utility to human space flight. Such models provide a tool to predict crew survivability in support of vehicle design and to evaluate crew response in untested space environments. It is to the benefit of any such model not only to collect relevant experimental data to correlate it against, but also to maintain an experimental standard or benchmark for future development in a readily and rapidly searchable and software accessible format. The Human thermal database project is intended to do just so; to collect relevant data from literature and experimentation and to store the data in a database structure for immediate and future use as a benchmark to judge human thermal models against, in identifying model strengths and weakness, to support model development and improve correlation, and to statistically quantify a model s predictive quality. The human thermal database developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is intended to evaluate a set of widely used human thermal models. This set includes the Wissler human thermal model, a model that has been widely used to predict the human thermoregulatory response to a variety of cold and hot environments. These models are statistically compared to the current database, which contains experiments of human subjects primarily in air from a literature survey ranging between 1953 and 2004 and from a suited experiment recently performed by the authors, for a quantitative study of relative strength and predictive quality of the models.

  15. MODERN RESOURCE-SAVING TECHNOLOGIES IN FOUNDRY PRODUCTION OF JSC «MINSK TRAKTOR PLANT»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Domotenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In article the main world tendencies of development of the production technology of sandy cores and value of this production in complex technology of manufacture of castings are considered. It is established that the most rational way of production technically and economically is manufacture of wafer sandy cores using the Cold-box-amin technology. Scientific, technical, technological and economic aspects of modernization of foundry production of JSC MTZ with complete transition to production of sandy cores on the resource-saving Cold-box-amin technology are provided. The main distinctive feature of this reequipment – all planned works are based on the domestic technological developments and the equipment created in the cooperation by specialists of JSC BELNIILIT and JSC MTZ. Within GNTP essential support to the provided works was given by the state.

  16. Improvement of Operational Reliability Resource for JSC “Beltransgaz” Main Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mayorov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  The paper considers prospects for modernization of the operating linear portion of JSC “Beltransgaz” gas transportation system, various methods and materials which are used while implementing  construction and installation works in the oil and gas sector. It has been shown that in the recent decade one of the most technically, technologically and economically efficient application of the material is double-composite polyurethane coating. The method for coating deposition has been tested and introduced by JSC “Beltransgaz” with significant economic efficiency.

  17. Organic Contamination Baseline Study: In NASA JSC Astromaterials Curation Laboratories. Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for OSIRIS-REx and other future sample return missions concerned with analyzing organics, we conducted an Organic Contamination Baseline Study for JSC Curation Labsoratories in FY12. For FY12 testing, organic baseline study focused only on molecular organic contamination in JSC curation gloveboxes: presumably future collections (i.e. Lunar, Mars, asteroid missions) would use isolation containment systems over only cleanrooms for primary sample storage. This decision was made due to limit historical data on curation gloveboxes, limited IR&D funds and Genesis routinely monitors organics in their ISO class 4 cleanrooms.

  18. 77 FR 31794 - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Imposition of Special Measure Against JSC CredexBank as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... Against JSC CredexBank as a Financial Institution of Primary Money Laundering Concern AGENCY: Financial... that JSC CredexBank is a financial institution of primary money laundering concern pursuant to 31 U.S.C...), Public Law 107-56. Title III of the USA PATRIOT Act amends the anti- money laundering provisions of...

  19. The 2015-2016 SEPMAP Program at NASA JSC: Science, Engineering, and Program Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, L.; Archer, D.; Bakalyar, J.; Berger, E.; Blome, E.; Brown, R.; Cox, S.; Curiel, P.; Eid, R.; Eppler, D.; Fries, M.; Gruener, J.; Haddock, M.; Harder, K.; Hong, T.; McCann, C.; Neiss, K.; Newswander, J.; Odina, J.; Peslier, A.; Quadri, Z.; Ross, S.; Rutovic, M.; Schulte, R.; Thomas, R.; Vos, J.; Waid, M.; William, B.

    2017-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Project Management Advancement Program (SEPMAP) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is an employee development program designed to provide graduate level training in project management and systems engineering. The program includes an applied learning project with engineering and integrated science goals requirements. The teams were presented with a task: Collect a representative sample set from a field site using a hexacopter platform, as if performing a scientific reconnaissance to assess whether the site is of sufficient scientific interest to justify exploration by astronauts. Four teams worked through the eighteen-month course to design customized sampling payloads integrated with the hexacopter, and then operate the aircraft to meet sampling requirements of number (= 5) and mass (= 5g each). The "Mars Yard" at JSC was utilized for this purpose. This project activity closely parallels NASA plans for the future exploration of Mars, where remote sites will be reconnoitered ahead of crewed exploration.

  20. STS-36 crewmembers train in JSC's FB shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-36 Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, seated on the aft flight deck, discusses procedures with Commander John O. Creighton (left) and Pilot John H. Casper during a simulation in JSC's Fixed Based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Casper reviews a checklist at the pilots station on the forward flight deck. The crewmembers are rehearsing crew cabin activities for their upcoming Department of Defense (DOD) mission aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104.

  1. Characterization and Glass Formation of JSC-1 Lunar and Martian Soil Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhayu

    2008-01-01

    The space exploration mission of NASA requires long duration presence of human being beyond the low earth orbit (LEO), especially on Moon and Mars. Developing a human habitat or colony on these planets would require a diverse range of materials, whose applications would range from structural foundations, (human) life support, (electric) power generation to components for scientific instrumentation. A reasonable and cost-effective approach for fabricating the materials needed for establishing a self-sufficient human outpost would be to primarily use local (in situ) resources on these planets. Since ancient times, glass and ceramics have been playing a vital role on human civilization. A long term project on studying the feasibility of developing glass and ceramic materials using Lunar and Martian soil simulants (JSC-1) as developed by Johnson Space Center has been undertaken. The first step in this on-going project requires developing a data base on results that fully characterize the simulants to be used for further investigations. The present paper reports characterization data of both JSC-1 Lunar and JSC Mars-1 simulants obtained up to this time via x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis (DTA, TGA) and chemical analysis. The critical cooling rate for glass formation for the melts of the simulants was also measured in order to quantitatively assess the glass forming tendency of these melts. The importance of the glasses and ceramics developed using in-situ resources for constructing human habitats on Moon or Mars is discussed.

  2. Gas Phase Pressure Effects on the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas phase pressure effects on the apparent thermal conductivity of a JSC-1A/air mixture have been experimentally investigated under steady state thermal conditions from 10 kPa to 100 kPa. The result showed that apparent thermal conductivity of the JSC-1A/air mixture decreased when pressure was lowered to 80 kPa. At 10 kPa, the conductivity decreased to 0.145 W/m/degree C, which is significantly lower than 0.196 W/m/degree C at 100 kPa. This finding is consistent with the results of previous researchers. The reduction of the apparent thermal conductivity at low pressures is ascribed to the Knudsen effect. Since the characteristic length of the void space in bulk JSC-1A varies over a wide range, both the Knudsen regime and continuum regime can coexist in the pore space. The volume ratio of the two regimes varies with pressure. Thus, as gas pressure decreases, the gas volume controlled by Knudsen regime increases. Under Knudsen regime the resistance to the heat flow is higher than that in the continuum regime, resulting in the observed pressure dependency of the apparent thermal conductivity.

  3. Development and Validation of a Model for Hydrogen Reduction of JSC-1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, U.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen reduction of lunar regolith has been proposed as a viable technology for oxygen production on the moon. Hydrogen reduces FeO present in the lunar regolith to form metallic iron and water. The water may be electrolyzed to recycle the hydrogen and produce oxygen. Depending upon the regolith composition, FeO may be bound to TiO2 as ilmenite or it may be dispersed in glassy substrates. Some testing of hydrogen reduction has been conducted with Apollo-returned lunar regolith samples. However, due to the restricted amount of lunar material available for testing, detailed understanding and modeling of the reduction process in regolith have not yet been developed. As a step in this direction, hydrogen reduction studies have been carried out in more detail with lunar regolith simulants such as JSC-1A by NASA and other organizations. While JSC-1A has some similarities with lunar regolith, it does not duplicate the wide variety of regolith types on the moon, for example, it contains almost no ilmenite. Nonetheless, it is a good starting point for developing an understanding of the hydrogen reduction process with regolith-like material. In this paper, a model utilizing a shrinking core formulation coupled with the reactor flow is described and validated against experimental data on hydrogen reduction of JSC-1A.

  4. STS-26 crew trains in JSC full fuselage trainer (FFT) shuttle mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers are briefed during a training exercise in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Seated outside the open side hatch of the full fuselage trainer (FFT) (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey. Astronaut Steven R. Nagel (left), positioned in the open side hatch, briefs the crew on the pole escape system as he demonstrates some related equipment. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. The photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  5. Commissioning of the Liquid Nitrogen Thermo-Siphon System for NASA-JSC Chamber-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, J.; Montz, M.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Garcia, S.; Garza, J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory's (SESL) Chamber A, located at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas has recently implemented major enhancements of its cryogenic and vacuum systems. The new liquid nitrogen (LN2) thermo-siphon system was successfully commissioned in August of 2012. Chamber A, which has 20 K helium cryo-panels (or shrouds ) which are shielded by 80 K nitrogen shrouds, is capable of simulating a deep space environment necessary to perform ground testing of NASA s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Chamber A s previous system used forced flow LN2 cooling with centrifugal pumps, requiring 200,000 liters of LN2 to cool-down and consuming 180,000 liters per day of LN2 in steady operation. The LN2 system did not have the reliability required to meet the long duration test of the JWST, and the cost estimate provided in the initial approach to NASA-JSC by the sub-contractor for refurbishment of the system to meet the reliability goals was prohibitive. At NASA-JSC's request, the JLab Cryogenics Group provided alternative options in 2007, including a thermo-siphon, or natural flow system. This system, eliminated the need for pumps and used one tenth of the original control valves, relief valves, and burst disks. After the thermo-siphon approach was selected, JLab provided technical assistance in the process design, mechanical design, component specification development and commissioning oversight, while the installation and commissioning operations of the system was overseen by the Jacobs Technology/ESC group at JSC. The preliminary commissioning data indicate lower shroud temperatures, 70,000 liters to cool-down and less than 90,000 liters per day consumed in steady operation. All of the performance capabilities have exceeded the design goals. This paper will outline the comparison between the original system and the predicted results of the selected design option, and the commissioning results of thermo-siphon system.

  6. Commissioning of the Liquid Nitrogen Thermo-Siphon System for NASA-JSC Chamber A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, J.; Montz, M.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Garcia, S.; Garza, J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA s Space Environment Simulation Laboratory s (SESL) Chamber A, located at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas has recently implemented major enhancements of its cryogenic and vacuum systems. The new liquid nitrogen (LN) thermo-siphon system was successfully commissioned in August of 2012. Chamber A, which has 20 K helium cryo-panels (or shrouds ) which are shielded by 80 K nitrogen shrouds, is capable of simulating a deep space environment necessary to perform ground testing of NASA s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Chamber A s previous system used forced flow LN cooling with centrifugal pumps, requiring 220,000 liters of LN to cool-down and consuming 180,000 liters per day of LN in steady operation. The LN system did not have the reliability required to meet the long duration test of the JWST, and the cost estimate provided in the initial approach to NASA-JSC by the subcontractor for refurbishment of the system to meet the reliability goals was prohibitive. At NASA-JSC s request, the JLab Cryogenics Group provided alternative options in 2007, including a thermo-siphon, or natural flow system. This system, eliminated the need for pumps and used one tenth of the original control valves, relief valves, and burst disks. After the thermo-siphon approach was selected, JLab provided technical assistance in the process design, mechanical design, component specification development and commissioning oversight, while the installation and commissioning operations of the system was overseen by the Jacobs Technology/ESC group at JSC. The preliminary commissioning data indicate lower shroud temperatures, 68,000 liters to cool-down and less than 91,000 liters per day consumed in steady operation. All of the performance capabilities have exceeded the design goals. This paper will outline the comparison between the original system and the predicted results of the selected design option, and the commissioning results of thermo-siphon system.

  7. Coordinated Analysis 101: A Joint Training Session Sponsored by LPI and ARES/JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, D. S.; Treiman, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) and the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division, part of the Exploration Integration and Science Directorate at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), co-sponsored a training session in November 2016 for four early-career scientists in the techniques of coordinated analysis. Coordinated analysis refers to the approach of systematically performing high-resolution and -precision analytical studies on astromaterials, particularly the very small particles typical of recent and near-future sample return missions such as Stardust, Hayabusa, Hayabusa2, and OSIRIS-REx. A series of successive analytical steps is chosen to be performed on the same particle, as opposed to separate subsections of a sample, in such a way that the initial steps do not compromise the results from later steps in the sequence. The data from the entire series can then be integrated for these individual specimens, revealing important in-sights obtainable no other way. ARES/JSC scientists have played a leading role in the development and application of this approach for many years. Because the coming years will bring new sample collections from these and other planned NASA and international exploration missions, it is timely to begin disseminating specialized techniques for the study of small and precious astromaterial samples. As part of the Cooperative Agreement between NASA and the LPI, this training workshop was intended as the first in a series of similar training exercises that the two organizations will jointly sponsor in the coming years. These workshops will span the range of analytical capabilities and sample types available at ARES/JSC in the Astromaterials Research and Astro-materials Acquisition and Curation Offices. Here we summarize the activities and participants in this initial training.

  8. Configuration Management (CM) Support for KM Processes at NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioletti, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Collection and processing of information are critical aspects of every business activity from raw data to information to an executable decision. Configuration Management (CM) supports KM practices through its automated business practices and its integrated operations within the organization. This presentation delivers an overview of JSC/Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and its methods to encourage innovation through collaboration and participation. Specifically, this presentation will illustrate how SLSD CM creates an embedded KM activity with an established IT platform to control and update baselines, requirements, documents, schedules, budgets, while tracking changes essentially managing critical knowledge elements.

  9. Spectral properties of simulated impact glasses produced from martian soil analogue JSC Mars-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, L. V.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Hiroi, T.; Rout, S. S.; Baither, D.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Yakovlev, O. I.; Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. F.; Rusakov, V. S.; Khramov, D. A.; Zinovieva, N. G.; Arnold, G.; Pieters, C. M.

    2009-07-01

    To simulate the formation of impact glasses on Mars, an analogue of martian bright soil (altered volcanic soil JSC Mars-1) was melted at relevant oxygen fugacities using a pulsed laser and a resistance furnace. Reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ and in some cases formation of nanophase Fe0 in the glasses were documented by Mössbauer spectroscopy and TEM studies. Reflectance spectra for several size fractions of the JSC Mars-1 sample and the glasses were acquired between 0.3 and 25 μm. The glasses produced from the JSC Mars-1 soil show significant spectral variability depending on the method of production and the cooling rate. In general, they are dark and less red in the visible compared to the original JSC Mars-1 soil. Their spectra do not have absorption bands due to bound water and structural OH, have positive spectral slopes in the near-infrared range, and show two broad bands centered near 1.05 and 1.9 μm, typical of glasses rich in ferrous iron. The latter bands and low albedo partly mimic the spectral properties of martian dark regions, and may easily be confused with mafic materials containing olivine and low-Ca pyroxene. Due to their disordered structures and vesicular textures, the glasses show relatively weak absorption features from the visible to the thermal infrared. These weak absorption bands may be masked by the stronger bands of mafic minerals. Positive near-infrared spectral slopes typical of fresh iron-bearing impact or volcanic glasses may be masked either by oxide/dust coatings or by aerosols in the Mars' atmosphere. As a result, impact glasses may be present on the surface of Mars in significant quantities that have been either misidentified as other phases or masked by phases with stronger infrared features. Spectrometers with sufficient spatial resolution and wavelength coverage may detect impact glasses at certain locations, e.g., in the vicinity of fresh impact craters. Such dark materials are usually interpreted as accumulations of mafic

  10. Glassmaking Units and Glass Feeders Production——a New Production Development Stage at JSC "Krastsvetmet"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MALTSEV E. V.; MAMONOV S. N.; DMITRIEV V. A.; KHORIKOV P. A.

    2012-01-01

    JSC "Krastsvetmet" has launched the production of glass melting units (GU) and glass feeders (GF),with the number of bushings being from 200 to 4000,made from platinum-rhodium alloys doped with oxide-forming and reinforcing elements.The proprietary technology for dispersion-stabilized material of PtRh10DS composition having high strength and performance properties has been developed and applied.Combined products production was launched where bushings made of PtRh-20 alloy are welded to the plate of the dispersion-stabilized PtRh10DS material.The manufacture of seamless spinning assemblies has been organized.

  11. Development and Making of New Jewellery Palladium Based Alloys at JSC "Krastsvetmet"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YEFIMOV V. N.; MAMONOV S. N.; SHULGIN D. R.; YELTSIN S. I.

    2012-01-01

    Complex of research and development work aimed at implementation of jewellery palladium based alloys technology has been carried out at JSC Krastsvetmet.A range of palladium alloys jewellery fabrication has been organized.Compositions of a number of jewellery palladium alloys grade 850,900,950 and 990 have been proposed,their production and application in jewellery manufacture has been organized.To produce palladium alloys induction melting in inert atmosphere and melt pouring into a copper mould has been used.The ingots heat treatment conditions,as well as semi-finished jewelry plastic deformation parameters have been determined.

  12. Human spaceflight technology needs-a foundation for JSC's technology strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecklein, J. M.

    Human space exploration has always been heavily influenced by goals to achieve a specific mission on a specific schedule. This approach drove rapid technology development, the rapidity of which added risks and became a major driver for costs and cost uncertainty. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is now approaching the extension of human presence throughout the solar system by balancing a proactive yet less schedule-driven development of technology with opportunistic scheduling of missions as the needed technologies are realized. This approach should provide cost effective, low risk technology development that will enable efficient and effective manned spaceflight missions. As a first step, the NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) has identified a suite of critical technologies needed to support future manned missions across a range of destinations, including in cis-lunar space, near earth asteroid visits, lunar exploration, Mars moons, and Mars exploration. The challenge now is to develop a strategy and plan for technology development that efficiently enables these missions over a reasonable time period, without increasing technology development costs unnecessarily due to schedule pressure, and subsequently mitigating development and mission risks. NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC), as the nation's primary center for human exploration, is addressing this challenge through an innovative approach in allocating Internal Research and Development funding to projects. The HAT Technology Needs (Tech Needs) Database has been developed to correlate across critical technologies and the NASA Office of Chief Technologist Technology Area Breakdown Structure (TABS). The TechNeeds Database illuminates that many critical technologies may support a single technical capability gap, that many HAT technology needs may map to a single TABS technology discipline, and that a single HAT technology need may map to multiple TABS technology disciplines. Th

  13. Isolation and Identification of Microorganisms in JSC Mars-1 Simulant Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Claudia; Garza, Elizabeth; Gulati, Poonam; Morris, Penny A.; Allen, Carlton C.

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms were isolated and identified in samples of JSC Mars-1, a Mars simulant soil. JSC Mars-1 is an altered volcanic ash from a cinder cone south of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. This material was chosen because of its similarity to the Martian soil in physical and chemical composition. The soil was obtained by excavating 40 cm deep in a vegetated area to prevent contamination. In previous studies, bacteria from this soil has been isolated by culturing on different types of media, including minimal media, and using biochemical techniques for identification. Isolation by culturing is successful only for a small percentage of the population. As a result, molecular techniques are being employed to identify microorganisms directly from the soil without culturing. In this study, bacteria were identified by purifying and sequencing the DNA encoding the 16s ribosomal RNA (16s rDNA). This gene is well conserved in species and demonstrates species specificity. In addition, biofilm formation, an indicator of microbial life, was studied with this soil. Biofilms are microbial communities consisting of microbes and exopolysaccharides secreted by them. This is a protective way of life for the microbes as they are more resistant to environmental pressures.

  14. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) proposed dual-use technology investment program in intelligent robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Jon D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the proposed Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) precompetitive, dual-use technology investment project in robotics. New robotic technology in advanced robots, which can recognize and respond to their environments and to spoken human supervision so as to perform a variety of combined mobility and manipulation tasks in various sectors, is an obejective of this work. In the U.S. economy, such robots offer the benefits of improved global competitiveness in a critical industrial sector; improved productivity by the end users of these robots; a growing robotics industry that produces jobs and profits; lower cost health care delivery with quality improvements; and, as these 'intelligent' robots become acceptable throughout society, an increase in the standard of living for everyone. In space, such robots will provide improved safety, reliability, and productivity as Space Station evolves, and will enable human space exploration (by human/robot teams). The proposed effort consists of partnerships between manufacturers, universities, and JSC to develop working production prototypes of these robots by leveraging current development by both sides. Currently targeted applications are in the manufacturing, health care, services, and construction sectors of the U.S. economy and in the inspection, servicing, maintenance, and repair aspects of space exploration. But the focus is on the generic software architecture and standardized interfaces for custom modules tailored for the various applications allowing end users to customize a robot as PC users customize PC's. Production prototypes would be completed in 5 years under this proposal.

  15. ANALYSIS OF TRAIN SHEET IN THE INFORMATION SYSTEM OF JSC «UKRZALIZNYTSIA»: PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Ovcharenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The system of train sheet analysis (TSA in the information system of JSC «Ukrzaliznytsia» provides work with passenger and suburban trains and has considerable potential. Therefore it is necessary to establish the prospects of development of the system. Methodology. Departments’ setup and the train delay causes should be carried out at every station and span, where such delays took place. This requires the fixation of condition deviations of infrastructure from normal and other adverse factors. In the sector of freight transportations the train schedule analysis is insufficient, since this analysis does not account for deviations from the terms of delivery. Therefore it also is necessary to analyze the delivery graphs. The basis for monitoring the cargo delivery is the method of control time points (CTP of technological operations performed with cargo at railway stations. On the basis of CTP to assess the quality of the transport process one should calculate the values of the analysis of cargo delivery schedule (performance level of the cargo delivery schedule, the coefficient of ahead of schedule/delay delivery. Findings. The article proposes to develop the system TSA using the input and display of the train delay causes on-line by transportation service employees, expansion of statistical databases and processing of the input delay causes during its calculation train sheet analysis of freight trains and quality assessment of the delivery schedule fulfillment. It is also appropriate before the new operator companies had appeared to make changes in the instructions TSCHU-TSD-0002 on the list of departments, which include delayed trains, by adding «the department» «The fault of operator companies» and corresponding causes of delays. Originality. The scheme of automated TSA in the information system of JSC «Ukrzaliznytsia» was improved. The author proposes to determine the cargo delivery quality on the certain polygon using the

  16. Technology Development and Production of Certain Chemical Platinum Metals Compounds at JSC "Krastsvetmet"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ILYASHEVICH V.D.; PAVLOVA E.I.; KORITSKAYA N.G.; MAMONOV S.N.; SHULGIN D.R.; MALTSEV E.V.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years JSC "Krastsvetmet" has successfully developed the production of chemically pure compounds of precious metals.Currently methods have been developed and facilities have been provided for industrial production of the following platinum metals compounds:- Rhodium (Ⅲ) chloride hydrate,rhodium (Ⅲ) chloride solution,rhodium ( Ⅲ) nitrate solution,rhodium ( Ⅲ)iodide,rhodium ( Ⅲ) sulfate,hydrated rhodium ( Ⅲ) oxide,ammonium hexachlororodiate,rhodium ( Ⅲ)phosphate solution,rhodium electrolytes;Iridium (Ⅳ) chloride hydrate,iridium (Ⅲ) chloride hydrate,ammonium hexachloroiridate (Ⅳ),hexachloriridium acid solution,hexachloriridium crystalline acid;- Ruthenium (Ⅲ) chloride hydrate,ruthenium (Ⅳ) hydroxide chloride,ruthenium (Ⅳ) hydroxide chloride solution,ammonium hexachlororuthenate,ruthenium (Ⅲ) chloride solution,potassium,diaquaoctachloronitrido diruthenate.The quality of the production meets the requirements of Russian and foreign consumers.

  17. Measurement of Apparent Thermal Conductivity of JSC-1A Under Ambient Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    The apparent thermal conductivity of JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant was measured experimentally using a cylindrical apparatus. Eleven thermocouples were embedded in the simulant bed to obtain the steady state temperature distribution at various radial, axial, and azimuthal locations. The high aspect ratio of a cylindrical geometry was proven to provide a one-dimensional, axisymmetric temperature field. A test series was performed at atmospheric pressure with varying heat fluxes. The radial temperature distribution in each test fit a logarithmic function, indicating a constant thermal conductivity throughout the soil bed. However, thermal conductivity was not constant between tests at different heat fluxes. This variation is attributed to stresses created by thermal expansion of the simulant particles against the rigid chamber wall. Under stress-free conditions (20 deg C), the data suggest a temperature independent apparent conductivity of 0.1961 +/- 0.0070 W/m/ deg C

  18. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  19. Leak Rate Performance of Silicone Elastomer O-Rings Contaminated with JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravec, Heather Ann; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of spacecraft components with planetary and foreign object debris is a growing concern. Face seals separating the spacecraft cabin from the debris filled environment are particularly susceptible; if the seal becomes contaminated there is potential for decreased performance, mission failure, or catastrophe. In this study, silicone elastomer O-rings were contaminated with JSC- 1A lunar regolith and their leak rate performance was evaluated. The leak rate values of contaminated O-rings at four levels of seal compression were compared to those of as-received, uncontaminated, O-rings. The results showed a drastic increase in leak rate after contamination. JSC-1A contaminated O-rings lead to immeasurably high leak rate values for all levels of compression except complete closure. Additionally, a mechanical method of simulant removal was examined. In general, this method returned the leak rate to as-received values.

  20. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Internal Corporate Controls in Coal Mines Illustrated By the Example of JSC “SUEK-Kuzbass”

    OpenAIRE

    Kucherova Elena; Ponkratova Tamara; Tyuleneva Tatiana; Cherepanova Natalia

    2017-01-01

    The article gives reasons for the need to develop the mechanism and tools of performance evaluation based on the implementation of specific management functions, as well as the integrated evaluation of the effectiveness of internal corporate controls. It presents the approbation of the proposed assessment methodology on the example of JSC “SUEK-Kuzbass”. The monitoring role as one of the functions of management is constantly increasing in the market economy. The participation of Russian compa...

  1. Enhanced removal of Zn(2+) or Cd(2+) by the flocculating Chlorella vulgaris JSC-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Asraful; Wan, Chun; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Chen, Li-Jie; Chang, Jo-Shu; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2015-05-30

    Microalgae are attracting attention due to their potentials in mitigating CO2 emissions and removing environmental pollutants. However, harvesting microalgal biomass from diluted cultures is one of the bottlenecks for developing economically viable processes for this purpose. Microalgal cells can be harvested by cost-effective sedimentation when flocculating strains are used. In this study, the removal of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) by the flocculating Chlorella vulgaris JSC-7 was studied. The experimental results indicated that more than 80% Zn(2+) and 60% Cd(2+) were removed by the microalgal culture within 3 days in the presence up to 20.0mg/L Zn(2+) and 4.0mg/L Cd(2+), respectively, which were much higher than that observed with the culture of the non-flocculating C. vulgaris CNW11. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon was explored by investigating the effect of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) on the growth and metabolic activities of the microalgal strains. It was found that the flocculation of the microalga improved its growth, synthesis of photosynthetic pigments and antioxidation activity under the stressful conditions, indicating a better tolerance to the heavy metal ions for a potential in removing them more efficiently from contaminated wastewaters, together with a bioremediation of other nutritional components contributed to the eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Characterization of the flocculating agent from the spontaneously flocculating microalga Chlorella vulgaris JSC-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Asraful; Wan, Chun; Guo, Suo-Lian; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Huang, Zih-You; Yang, Yu-Liang; Chang, Jo-Shu; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2014-07-01

    High cost of biomass recovery is one of the bottlenecks for developing cost-effective processes with microalgae, particularly for the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals through biorefinery, and microalgal biomass recovery through cell flocculation is a promising strategy. Some microalgae are naturally flocculated whose cells can be harvested by simple sedimentation. However, studies on the flocculating agents synthesized by microalgae cells are still very limited. In this work, the cell flocculation of a spontaneously flocculating microalga Chlorella vulgaris JSC-7 was studied, and the flocculating agent was identified to be cell wall polysaccharides whose crude extract supplemented at low dosage of 0.5 mg/L initiated the more than 80% flocculating rate of freely suspended microalgae C. vulgaris CNW11 and Scenedesmus obliquus FSP. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis revealed a characteristic absorption band at 1238 cm(-1), which might arise from PO asymmetric stretching vibration of [Formula: see text] phosphodiester. The unique cell wall-associated polysaccharide with molecular weight of 9.86×10(3) g/mol, and the monomers consist of glucose, mannose and galactose with a molecular ratio of 5:5:2. This is the first time to our knowledge that the flocculating agent from C. vulgaris has been characterized, which could provide basis for understanding the cell flocculation of microalgae and breeding of novel flocculating microalgae for cost-effective biomass harvest.

  3. JSC Advanced Curation: Research and Development for Current Collections and Future Sample Return Mission Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M. D.; Allen, C. C.; Calaway, M. J.; Evans, C. A.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    Curation of NASA's astromaterials sample collections is a demanding and evolving activity that supports valuable science from NASA missions for generations, long after the samples are returned to Earth. For example, NASA continues to loan hundreds of Apollo program samples to investigators every year and those samples are often analyzed using instruments that did not exist at the time of the Apollo missions themselves. The samples are curated in a manner that minimizes overall contamination, enabling clean, new high-sensitivity measurements and new science results over 40 years after their return to Earth. As our exploration of the Solar System progresses, upcoming and future NASA sample return missions will return new samples with stringent contamination control, sample environmental control, and Planetary Protection requirements. Therefore, an essential element of a healthy astromaterials curation program is a research and development (R&D) effort that characterizes and employs new technologies to maintain current collections and enable new missions - an Advanced Curation effort. JSC's Astromaterials Acquisition & Curation Office is continually performing Advanced Curation research, identifying and defining knowledge gaps about research, development, and validation/verification topics that are critical to support current and future NASA astromaterials sample collections. The following are highlighted knowledge gaps and research opportunities.

  4. NASA-JSC Protocol for the Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Material Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Hadjiev, Victor; Holmes, William; Devivar, Rodrigo; Files, Bradley; Yowell, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the raw as well as purified single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material always contain certain amount of impurities of varying composition (mostly metal catalyst and non-tubular carbon). Particular purification method also creates defects and/or functional groups in the SWCNT material and therefore affects the its dispersability in solvents (important to subsequent application development). A number of analytical characterization tools have been used successfully in the past years to assess various properties of nanotube materials, but lack of standards makes it difficult to compare these measurements across the board. In this work we report the protocol developed at NASA-JSC which standardizes measurements using TEM, SEM, TGA, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR absorption techniques. Numerical measures are established for parameters such as metal content, homogeneity, thermal stability and dispersability, to allow easy comparison of SWCNT materials. We will also report on the recent progress in quantitative measurement of non-tubular carbon impurities and a possible purity standard for SWCNT materials.

  5. Evaluating the effectiveness of the use of fixed assets defense enterprises (by the example of JSC “Concern ‘Sozvezdie’”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Khorev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the problem of sustainable development of enterprises of the Russian military-industrial complex has not only military, but economic importance. The article provides an analysis of the availability, scope, composition and structure of the basic production assets of JSC "Concern "Sozvezdie" for 2013-2015, and analysis of efficiency of use of the basic production assets in JSC "Concern "Sozvezdie" for 2013-2015. JSC "Concern "Sozvezdie" JSC approved the program of innovative development and technological modernization, the development objective of which is the proved choice of the list and content of activities, the implementation of which should ensure the development of the Concern as a scientific and industrial socio-economic system – a holistic entity. Assessment of the dynamics of the basic production assets has shown that the security of JSC "Concern "Sozvezdie" OPF for 2013-2015 increased by 89,81%. The degree of updating of production assets during the period was 50.7%. The analysis of the efficiency of the basic production assets in JSC "Concern "Sozvezdie" has shown that for every 1% increase in revenue major funds have grown by 0.65%. The rate of fondamenti decreased by 18.2%. The assessment of efficiency of use of the basic production assets of JSC "Concern "Sozvezdie" shows that the total technical re-equipment of scientific and technological, testing and production and technological base of the enterprises of the Concern is directed on creation of production capacities to ensure serial production of advanced weapons, military and special equipment in the framework of the state defense order, as the main activity of the majority of the companies of the Group, and reconstruction, the expansion and creation of production to the production of innovative civilian products.

  6. 20 K Helium Refrigeration System for NASA-JSC Chamber-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, J.; Redman, R.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhelef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Norton, R.; Lauterbach, J.; Linza, R.; Vargas, G.

    2013-01-01

    A new 20 K helium refrigerator installed at NASA Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) was successfully commissioned and tested in 2012. The refrigerator is used to create a deep space environment within SESL s Chamber A to perform ground testing of the James Webb Space Telescope. The chamber previously and currently still has helium cryopumping panels (CPP) and LN2 shrouds used to create Low Earth Orbit environments. Now with the new refrigerator and new helium shrouds (45 x 65 ) the chamber can create a deep space environment. The process design, system analysis, specification development, and commissioning oversight were performed by the cryogenics department at Jefferson Labs, while the contracts and system installation was performed by the ESC group at JSC. Commissioning data indicate a inverse coefficient of performance better than 70 W/W for a 18 KW load at 20 K (accounting for liquid nitrogen precooling power) that remains essentially constant down to 1/3 of this load. Even at 10 percent of the maximum capacity, the performance is better than 140 W/W at 20K. The refrigerator exceeded all design goals and demonstrated the ability to support a wide load range from 10kW at 15 K to 100 kW at 100K. The refrigerator is capable of operating at any load temperature from 15K to ambient with tight temperature stability. The new shroud (36 tons of aluminum) can be cooled from room temperature to 20 K in 24 hours. This paper will outline the process design and commissioning results.

  7. Additive Manufacturing, Design, Testing, and Fabrication: A Full Engineering Experience at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusack, Steven

    2016-01-01

    I worked on several projects this term. While most projects involved additive manufacturing, I was also involved with two design projects, two testing projects, and a fabrication project. The primary mentor for these was Richard Hagen. Secondary mentors were Hai Nguyen, Khadijah Shariff, and fabrication training from James Brown. Overall, my experience at JSC has been successful and what I have learned will continue to help me in my engineering education and profession long after I leave. My 3D printing projects ranged from less than a 1 cubic centimeter to about 1 cubic foot and involved several printers using different printing technologies. It was exciting to become familiar with printing technologies such as industrial grade FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling), the relatively new SLA (Stereolithography), and PolyJet. My primary duty with the FDM printers was to model parts that came in from various sources to print effectively and efficiently. Using methods my mentor taught me and the Stratasys Insight software, I was able to minimize imperfections, hasten build time, improve strength for specific forces (tensile, shear, etc...), and reduce likelihood of a print-failure. Also using FDM, I learned how to repair a part after it was printed. This is done by using a special kind of glue that chemically melts the two faces of plastic parts together to form a fused interface. My first goal with SLA technology was to bring the printer back to operational readiness. In becoming familiar with the Pegasus SLA printer, I researched the leveling, laser settings, and different vats to hold liquid material. With this research, I was successfully able to bring the Pegasus back online and have successfully printed multiple sample parts as well as functional parts. My experience with PolyJet technology has been focused on an understanding of the abilities/limits, costs, and the maintenance for daily use. Still upcoming will be experience with using a composite printer that uses FDM

  8. Sustainable development through innovation (the example of JSC «Concern» Constellation»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Ovchinnikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the «economic growth» theoretical approaches to the terms and «sustainable development». It is indicated that «sustainable development» is related to the introduction of new technologies and innovations, as well as the mechanisms of perfection economic activity. The concept of «sustainable development» includes the principles of sustainability and balanced-ness, while economic growth is associated with the dominant country economic policy objectives, including innovative factors, with the well-being of its population level: the development of the social structure, from the labor market level and other factors. Prospects of development of the country based on the justification of the socio-economic model of its translational movement in the world civilization. Excessive political risks and economic sanctions have shown that Russia should not rely on foreign imports of high-tech, and the need to develop import substitution. Change the vector of development of the Russian economy made their adjustments to the development of the Voronezh region economy slowed down the speed of displacements, of capital, the regional financial centers develop poorly, due to lack of investment has slowed the growth of innovational and information development. There is a growing dependence of the region on the processes taking place at the international and national levels. In the example of the Voronezh area are considered factors of sustainable development such as the coordination of organizational efforts and financial resources in order to achieve a new quality of the region's population lives, and necessity of formation of a new development paradigm of management in the region, based on the modernization of diversified bath economy and the introduction of mechanisms to ensure the implementation of sustainable development. In view of the innovative-investment activity of JSC «Concern» Constellation «steady growth

  9. Propulsion Systems Laboratory, Bldg. 125

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) is NASAs only ground test facility capable of providing true altitude and flight speed simulation for testing full scale gas...

  10. INCREASE OF FIRMNESS OF FETTLING OF DSP-2 AT USING THE BURNED MAGNESIA CALCIC FLUX IN CONDITIONS OF JSC «BMZ» – MANAGEMENT COMPANY OF HOLDING «BMK»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Bondarenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the burned magnesia calcic flux of JSC “Complex “Magnesite” production is recommended for industrial use on all steel-smelting units of JSC “BMZ —management company BMK holding” on the basis of positive results on increase in firmness of fettling DSP-2.

  11. Analysis of financial potential of engineering enterprises the example of JSC «TEMP»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Stasiuk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is the disclosure of theoretical foundations and methodological aspects regarding calculation of basic performance indicators of financial capacity building enterprises using the balance sheet Khmelnytskii JSC «Temp» for the period of 2009-2011 years. The results of the analysis. Intensification of competition between companies is becoming increasingly important. The financial potential of the company determines the competitiveness of business cooperation opportunities, assesses as far as are guaranteed economic interests of the company and its partners in the financial and production relationship. In the current economic conditions the company must improve production efficiency, product competitiveness on the basis of effective forms of management and production management, business revitalization. This generally determines the importance of control over the economic activities of enterprises, which is why determining the financial condition of the company and its optimization is one of the main conditions for successful development. The main objective of financial potential of the company is to optimize financial flows in order to increase the positive financial result. The main factor in shaping the financial capacity of serving the financial position of the company. Determining the financial condition of the company and its optimization is one of the basic conditions for its successful development. Analysis of the financial condition of the company involves determining the estimated characteristics, choice of methods of measurement and characterization of these features on certain principles, assessment of deviations from the standard, generally accepted values. The main target of financial analysis is its assessment and identification of reserves, its stabilization and improvement. Means of implementation of this setup is the organization of economic and financial policy. There is a need to

  12. USE OF METAL RESERVOIRS – JET DAMPERS ON MNLZ-3 OF JSC «BMZ – MANAGEMENT COMPANY OF HOLDING «BMK» AFTER RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Bondarenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the period from 2010 to 2013 MNLZ-3 of JSC BMZ has completely solved the problem of metal discharge from pouring boxes at their filling on the first melting in line at pouring of all assortment of steels due to use of metal reservoir jet damper of optimal design and chemical composition.

  13. Partnering with NASA JSC for Community Research Needs; Collaborative and Student Opportunities via Jacobs and Psams Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.; Draper, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Division houses a unique combination of laboratories and other assets for conducting cutting-edge planetary research. These facilities have been accessed for decades by outside scientists; over the past five years, the 16 full time contract research and technical staff members in our division have hosted a total of 223 visiting researchers, representing 35 institutions. We intend to submit a proposal to NASA specifically for facilities support and establishment of our laboratories as a collective, PSAMS, Planetary Sample Analyses and Mission Science, which should result in substantial cost savings to PIs who wish to use our facilities. JSC is a recognized NASA center of excellence for curation, and in future will allow PIs easy access to samples in Curation facilities that they have been approved to study. Our curation expertise could also be used for a collection of experimental run products and standards that could be shared and distributed to community members, products that could range from 1 bar controlled atmosphere furnace, piston cylinder, multi-anvil, to shocked products. Coordinated analyses of samples is one of the major strengths of our division, where a single sample can be prepared with minimal destruction for a variety of chemical and structural analyses, from macro to nano-scale. A CT scanner will be delivered August 2016 and installed in the same building as all the other division experimental and analytical facilities, allowing users to construct a 3 dimensional model of their run product and/or starting material before any destruction of their sample for follow up analyses. The 3D printer may also be utilized to construct containers for diamond anvil cell experiments. Our staff scientists will work with PIs to maximize science return and serve the needs of the community. We welcome student visitors, and a graduate semester internship is available through Jacobs.

  14. Cross-Linkable, Solvent-Resistant Fullerene Contacts for Robust and Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells with Increased JSC and VOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Brian L; Rolston, Nicholas; Bush, Kevin A; Leijtens, Tomas; McGehee, Michael D; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2016-10-05

    The active layers of perovskite solar cells are also structural layers and are central to ensuring that the structural integrity of the device is maintained over its operational lifetime. Our work evaluating the fracture energies of conventional and inverted solution-processed MAPbI3 perovskite solar cells has revealed that the MAPbI3 perovskite exhibits a fracture resistance of only ∼0.5 J/m(2), while solar cells containing fullerene electron transport layers fracture at even lower values, below ∼0.25 J/m(2). To address this weakness, a novel styrene-functionalized fullerene derivative, MPMIC60, has been developed as a replacement for the fragile PC61BM and C60 transport layers. MPMIC60 can be transformed into a solvent-resistant material through curing at 250 °C. As-deposited films of MPMIC60 exhibit a marked 10-fold enhancement in fracture resistance over PC61BM and a 14-fold enhancement over C60. Conventional-geometry perovskite solar cells utilizing cured films of MPMIC60 showed a significant, 205% improvement in fracture resistance while exhibiting only a 7% drop in PCE (13.8% vs 14.8% PCE) in comparison to the C60 control, enabling larger VOC and JSC values. Inverted cells fabricated with MPMIC60 exhibited a 438% improvement in fracture resistance with only a 6% reduction in PCE (12.3% vs 13.1%) in comparison to those utilizing PC61BM, again producing a higher JSC.

  15. Development of an IVE/EVA Compatible Prototype Cold-Gas Cubesat Propulsion System at NASA/JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Christopher; Studak, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Cold-gas propulsion systems are well suited for some applications because they are simple to design and build, have low operating costs, and are non-toxic. The inherent tradeoff, however, is their relatively low impulse density. Nevertheless, a modest propulsion system, sized for Cubesats and designed for affordability, presents an attractive system solution for some missions, such as an on-orbit inspection free-flyer. NASA has a long-standing effort to develop propulsion systems appropriate for very high delta-V cubesat missions, such as geo transfer orbits, and there are commercially available Cubesat propulsion systems with considerably more impulse capability, but, these are both prohibitively expensive for some development customers and face compatibility constraints for crewed applications, such as operation within ISS. A relatively conventional cold-gas system has been developed at NASA/JSC taking advantage of existing miniature industrial components, additive manufacturing techniques and in-house qualification of the system. The result is a nearly modular system with a 1U form factor. Compressed nitrogen is stored in a small high-pressure tank, then regulated and distributed to 12 thrusters. Maneuvering thrust can be adjusted, with a typical value of 40 mN, and the delta-V delivered to a 3U Cubesat would be approximately 7 m/s. These values correspond to the performance parameters for an inspection mission previously established at JSC for inspection of the orbiter prior to reentry. Environmental testing was performed to meet ISS launch and workmanship standards, along with the expected thermal environment for an inspection mission. Functionality has been demonstrated, and performance in both vacuum and relevant blow down scenarios was completed. Several avenues for further improvement are also explored. Details of the system, components, integration, tests, and test data are presented in this paper.

  16. Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6 with swine wastewater for simultaneous nutrient/COD removal and carbohydrate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Guo, Wanqian; Yen, Hong-Wei; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Lo, Yung-Chung; Cheng, Chieh-Lun; Ren, Nanqi; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-12-01

    Swine wastewater, containing a high concentration of COD and ammonia nitrogen, is suitable for the growth of microalgae, leading to simultaneous COD/nutrients removal from the wastewater. In this study, an isolated carbohydrate-rich microalga Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6 was adopted to perform swine wastewater treatment. Nearly 60-70% COD removal and 40-90% NH3-N removal was achieved in the mixotrophic and heterotrophic culture, depending on the dilution ratio of the wastewater, while the highest removal percentage was obtained with 20-fold diluted wastewater. Mixotrophic cultivation by using fivefold diluted wastewater resulted in the highest biomass concentration of 3.96 g/L. The carbohydrate content of the microalga grown on the wastewater can reach up to 58% (per dry weight). The results indicated that the microalgae-based wastewater treatment can efficiently reduce the nutrients and COD level, and the resulting microalgal biomass had high carbohydrate content, thereby having potential applications for the fermentative production of biofuels or chemicals.

  17. Assessment of business customers satisfaction with the products and service of Pnevmostroimashina, jsc, on the B2B market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kapustina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dedicated to development of a methodology for assessment of customer satisfaction with the products and services on the b2b market. The study of customer satisfaction is aimed at building strong and mutually beneficial supplier-customer relationship. The authors focus on the importance of customer satisfaction continuous monitoring intended for improvement of the company’s market performance. The research based on the works by Kano N., Lamben J.-J., Carter R., Parashuraman A., Zeitaml V. A., Berry L. L. and others, describes an algorithm study of consumers and offers a methodology to evaluate customer satisfaction with the industrial products. Based on the analysis of the economic crisis effects on the machine-building industry, the authors determine the performance of “Pnevmostroimashina”, JSC, on the road and construction equipment market and illustrate an example of practical use of the customer satisfaction assessment technique in the company. At the end of the paper some recommendations for development of an efficient customer satisfaction measurement procedure are introduced.

  18. Effects of Lunar Dust Simulant (JSC-1A-vf) on WI-38 Human Embryonic Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Stephen; Hammond, Dianne; Jeevarajan, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop appropriate countermeasures for NASA's return mission to the moon, the potential toxicity of lunar dust needs to be examined. Due to its abrasiveness, reactivity, composition and small size, lunar dust may pose a serious health risk to astronauts who inhale it. This project focuses on the toxicity of lunar dust simulant (JSC-1A-vf) using WI-38 human embryonic lung cells. Past results show that the simulant has toxic effects on small animals using intratracheal instillation. Earlier studies in this lab suggest that the dust remaining in media after low speed centrifugation is toxic. In order to better assess its toxicity, the simulant has been diluted in media, filtered with a 5 micron filter before combining it with media. This filtered dust is compared with dust centrifuged in media. Whole dust toxicity is also tested. Toxicity is estimated using a 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) toxicity test which measures the activity of reducing enzymes in the mitochondria of viable cells. Preliminary results suggest that simulant which is diluted in media at different concentrations is slightly toxic. Interestingly, the cells appear to sweep up and collect the simulant. Whether this contributes to its toxicity is unclear. This project provides possible toxicity testing protocols for lunar dust and contributes to the knowledge of nanosize particle toxicity.

  19. Enhancing bio-butanol production from biomass of Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6 with sequential alkali pretreatment and acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Guo, Wanqian; Cheng, Chieh-Lun; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nanqi

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a successful butanol production method using alkali and acid pretreated biomass of Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6. The butanol concentration, yield, and productivity were 13.1g/L, 0.58mol/mol sugar, 0.66g/L/h, respectively. Nearly 2.93L/L of biohydrogen was produced during the acidogenesis phase in ABE fermentation. The hydrogen yield and productivity were 0.39mol/mol sugar and 104.2g/L/h respectively. In addition, the high glucose consumption efficiency (97.5%) suggests that the hydrolysate pretreated with NaOH (1%) followed by H2SO4 (3%) did not contain inhibitors to the fermentation. It was also discovered that an excess amount of nitrogen sources arising from hydrolysis of highly concentrated microalgal biomass negatively affected the butanol production. This work demonstrates the technical feasibility of producing butanol from sustainable third-generation feedstock (i.e., microalgal biomass).

  20. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Internal Corporate Controls in Coal Mines Illustrated By the Example of JSC “SUEK-Kuzbass”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherova Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives reasons for the need to develop the mechanism and tools of performance evaluation based on the implementation of specific management functions, as well as the integrated evaluation of the effectiveness of internal corporate controls. It presents the approbation of the proposed assessment methodology on the example of JSC “SUEK-Kuzbass”. The monitoring role as one of the functions of management is constantly increasing in the market economy. The participation of Russian companies in the international economy requires the organisation of internal company control. Moreover, with the enacting of the Law “On Accountings» № 402-FZ, for the majority of economic agents the organising of internal control became mandatory. Thus, the internal control means the process carried out by the Board of Directors and other staff of the organisation aimed at providing reasonable assurance that the objectives of the organisation such as ensuring the effectiveness and efficiency of operations, reliability of financial reporting and compliance with the legislation in force will be achieved.

  1. A novel marine bacterium Isoptericola sp. JS-C42 with the ability to saccharifying the plant biomasses for the aid in cellulosic ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, Velayudhan Satheeja; Gupta, Ashutosh; Saranya, Somasundaram; Jebakumar, Solomon Robinson David

    2014-06-01

    The ever growing demands for food products such as starch and sugar produces; there is a need to find the sources for saccharification for cellulosic bioethanol production. This study provides the first evidence of the lignocellulolytic and saccharifying ability of a marine bacterium namely Isoptericola sp. JS-C42, a Gram positive actinobacterium with the cocci cells embedded on mycelia isolated from the Arabian Sea, India. It exhibited highest filter paper unit effect, endoglucanase, exoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, xylanase and ligninase effect. The hydrolytic potential of the enzymes displayed the efficient saccharification capability of steam pretreated biomass. It was also found to degrade the paddy, sorghum, Acacia mangium and Ficus religiosa into simple reducing sugars by its efficient lignocellulose enzyme complex with limited consumption of sugars. Production of ethanol was also achieved with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Overall, it offers a great potential for the cellulosic ethanol production in an economically reliable and eco-friendly point-of-care.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF RELIABILITY AND RISK DEGREE FOR ACCIDENT INITIATION AT SLIME STORAGES OF 4th MINING ADMINISTRATION, JSC “BELARUSKALI”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Bohaslauchyk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition of reliability for dams of slime storage embankment is given on the basis of reliability theory and characteristics of reliability and their analysis are presented in the paper. The paper specifies qualitative indices for earth dams which are subdivided in two groups: applicability factors and structural reliability factors. A short analysis of all possible causes for accident initiation at earth dams has been made and the analysis has permitted to pinpoint eleven main objects for diagnosis for slime storage dams. In order to assess risk degree of accident initiation at JSC “Belaruskali” slime storages all possible causes of emergency cases and their probability of occurrence have been analyzed in the paper. The paper acknowledges the fact that dam malfunction is possible, as a rule, due to violation of operational rules and regulations. Main parameters of slime storage state which are to be controlled regularly in the process of its operation have been noted in the paper. Observation results over slime storages, calculations of dam slope stability for normal operation (a principal calculation case and operating irregularities in water seals (a special calculation case. As a stability margin factor is close to 1.0 for a special calculation case, an extreme position of depression curve has been determined for all design sections. It has been recommended to carry out a constant control over its position, and in the case when it reaches its peak value it is necessary to undertake appropriate measures in order to reduce its value. Final expert estimations on probability of accident initiation at the investigated slime storage dams of the 4th Mining Administration, JSC “Belaruskali” have been prepared on the basis of the analysis comprising all the required factors. A conclusion has been made about low risk degree of their destruction.

  3. CERN Shop - Christmas Sale in Bldg. 33

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    Looking for Christmas present ideas? The CERN Shop will give the CERN card holders a special reduction of 10 % on all CERN Shop articles from Friday 11.12.2009 to Thursday 17.12.2009. Come to visit the CERN Shop at the Reception, Building 33. PH-EDU-PO

  4. CERN Shop - Christmas Sale in Bldg. 33

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    Looking for Christmas present ideas? The CERN Shop will give CERN card holders a special reduction of 10 % on all CERN Shop articles from Monday 13.12.2010 to Saturday 18.12.2010. Come and visit the CERN Shop in the Reception Building 33.

  5. Dynamic metabolic profiling together with transcription analysis reveals salinity-induced starch-to-lipid biosynthesis in alga Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Nakanishi, Akihito; Kato, Yuichi; Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Chang, Jo-Shu; Misawa, Naomi; Hirose, Yuu; Minagawa, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel production using microalgae would play a pivotal role in satisfying future global energy demands. Understanding of lipid metabolism in microalgae is important to isolate oleaginous strain capable of overproducing lipids. It has been reported that reducing starch biosynthesis can enhance lipid accumulation. However, the metabolic mechanism controlling carbon partitioning from starch to lipids in microalgae remains unclear, thus complicating the genetic engineering of algal strains. We here used “dynamic” metabolic profiling and essential transcription analysis of the oleaginous green alga Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 for the first time to demonstrate the switching mechanisms from starch to lipid synthesis using salinity as a regulator, and identified the metabolic rate-limiting step for enhancing lipid accumulation (e.g., pyruvate-to-acetyl-CoA). These results, showing salinity-induced starch-to-lipid biosynthesis, will help increase our understanding of dynamic carbon partitioning in oleaginous microalgae. Moreover, we successfully determined the changes of several key lipid-synthesis-related genes (e.g., acetyl-CoA carboxylase, pyruvate decarboxylase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, acetyl-CoA synthetase and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase) and starch-degradation related genes (e.g., starch phosphorylases), which could provide a breakthrough in the marine microalgal production of biodiesel. PMID:28374798

  6. A novel marine bacterium Isoptericola sp. JS-C42 with the ability to saccharifying the plant biomasses for the aid in cellulosic ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velayudhan Satheeja Santhi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ever growing demands for food products such as starch and sugar produces; there is a need to find the sources for saccharification for cellulosic bioethanol production. This study provides the first evidence of the lignocellulolytic and saccharifying ability of a marine bacterium namely Isoptericola sp. JS-C42, a Gram positive actinobacterium with the cocci cells embedded on mycelia isolated from the Arabian Sea, India. It exhibited highest filter paper unit effect, endoglucanase, exoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, xylanase and ligninase effect. The hydrolytic potential of the enzymes displayed the efficient saccharification capability of steam pretreated biomass. It was also found to degrade the paddy, sorghum, Acacia mangium and Ficus religiosa into simple reducing sugars by its efficient lignocellulose enzyme complex with limited consumption of sugars. Production of ethanol was also achieved with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Overall, it offers a great potential for the cellulosic ethanol production in an economically reliable and eco-friendly point-of-care.

  7. JSC interactive basic accounting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Design concepts for an interactive basic accounting system (IBAS) are considered in terms of selecting the design option which provides the best response at the lowest cost. Modeling the IBAS workload and applying this workload to a U1108 EXEC 8 based system using both a simulation model and the real system is discussed.

  8. JSC Wireless Sensor Network Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Sensor nodes composed of three basic components... radio module: COTS radio module implementing standardized WSN protocol; treated as WSN modem by main board main board: contains application processor (TI MSP430 microcontroller), memory, power supply; responsible for sensor data acquisition, pre-processing, and task scheduling; re-used in every application with growing library of embedded C code sensor card: contains application-specific sensors, data conditioning hardware, and any advanced hardware not built into main board (DSPs, faster A/D, etc.); requires (re-) development for each application.

  9. WAYS TO INCREASE PLASTIC PROPERTIES OF A WIRE IN THE CONDITIONS OF DRAWING OF HARDWARE PRODUCTION OF JSC «BSW MANAGEMENT COMPANY OF HOLDING «ВМС»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Voytenkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During production of a wire of high groups of durability the problem of ensuring rather high level of ductility is actual. One of options for the prevention of embrittlement of a wire and as, the consequence, increases of plastic properties is use of the device of stabilization of internal tension in a wire. The guidestraightener device improves redistribution of the stretching tension in wire blankets by means of a sign-variable bend. The device of stabilization of internal tension in a wire finds the increasing practical application in the conditions of drawing shop of JSC BSW-management Company of Holding BMC and shows positive results on decrease in number of attacks on reversible twisting.

  10. Isolation of Rhp-PSP, a member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family with antiviral properties, from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pin; Feng, Tuizi; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Songbai; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Ju'e; Luo, Yuanhua; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-04

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b isolated from a water canal adjacent to a vegetable field produces a protein that was purified by bioactivity-guided fractionation based on ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange absorption and size exclusion. The protein was further identified as an endoribonuclease L-PSP (Liver-Perchloric acid-soluble protein) by shotgun mass spectrometry analysis and gene identification, and it is member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family. Herein, this protein is designated Rhp-PSP. Rhp-PSP exhibited significant inhibitory activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in vivo and in vitro. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the antiviral activity of a protein of the YER057c/YjgF/UK114 family and also the first antiviral protein isolated from R. palustris. Our research provides insight into the potential of photosynthetic bacterial resources in biological control of plant virus diseases and sustainable agriculture.

  11. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 9 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. Nakada (CERN) CP Violation: Asymmetry Between Particle and Antiparticle (2/4) 10:15 - 11:00 J.-J. Gomez-Cadenas (IFIC) Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 J. Lesgourgues (CERN) Introduction to Cosmology (1/4) Tuesday 10 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. Nakada (CERN) CP Violation: Asymmetry Between Particle and Antiparticle(3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 J.-J. Gomez-Cadenas (IFIC) Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 J.-J. Gomez-Cadenas (IFIC) T. Nakada (CERN) Discussion Session Wed. 11 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. Nakada (CERN) CP Violation: Asymmetry Between Particle and Antiparticle(4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 J. Lesgourgues (CERN) Introduction to Cosmology (2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Landua (CERN) Antimatter in the Laboratory (1/2) 14:00 - 15:00 P. Le Brun (CERN) Superconductivity and cryogenics in particle accelerators Thursday 12 August 09:15 - 10:00 J. Lesgourgues (CERN) Introduction to Cosmology (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Landua (CERN) Antimatter in th...

  12. 1 Ft. x 1 Ft. Supersonic Wind Tunnel, Bldg. 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x), located in the Engine Research Building, is one of the most active test facilities at the Glenn Research Center. Used...

  13. Evaluation of Accident Frequencies at the Canister Storage Bldg (CSB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POWERS, T.B.

    2000-03-20

    By using simple frequency calculations and fault tree logic, an evaluation of the design basis accident frequencies at the Canister Storage Building has been performed. The following are the design basis accidents: Mechanical damage of MCO; Gaseous release from the MCO; MCO internal hydrogen deflagration; MCO external hydrogen deflagration; Thermal runaway reactions inside the MCO; and Violation of design temperature criteria.

  14. STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Chang-Diaz dons EMU during WETF exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz dons extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA) contingency exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. This closeup shows Chang-Diaz straightening his EMU sleeve.

  15. STS-26 MS Hilmers on fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers prepares to ascend a ladder representing the interdeck access hatch from the shuttle middeck to the flight deck. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  16. STS-26 MS Lounge in fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, wearing comunications kit assembly headset and crouched on the aft flight deck, performs checklist inspection during training session. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  17. STS-26 crew on fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck (left) and Pilot Richard O. Covey review checklists in their respective stations on the foward flight deck. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  18. SE83-9 'Chix in Space' student experimenter monitors STS-29 onboard activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Student experimenter John C. Vellinger watches monitor in the JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Customer Support Room (CSR) during the STS-29 mission. Crewmembers are working with his Student Experiment (SE) 83-9 Chicken Embryo Development in Space or 'Chix in Space' onboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The student's sponsor is Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

  19. Vitamin D: Spaceflight, Antarctic, and JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Locke, J.; Zwart, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining vitamin D is critical for space travelers because they lack ultraviolet light exposure and have an insufficient dietary supply of vitamin D. Despite the provision of vitamin D supplements to International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers, vitamin D status is consistently lower after flight than before flight, and in several crewmembers has decreased to levels considered clinically significant. Vitamin D has long been known to play a role in calcium metabolism, and more recently its non-calcitropic functions have been recognized. According to the results of several recent studies, functionally relevant measures indicate that the lower limit of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (a marker of vitamin D status) should be raised from the current 25 nmol/L to 80 nmol/L. The sub-optimal pre- and postflight vitamin D status is an issue that needs to be addressed, to allow NASA to better define the appropriate amount of supplemental vitamin D to serve as a countermeasure against vitamin D deficiency in astronaut crews. This is very important for long-duration crewmembers, and is critical for exploration-class missions. Ground-based models with limited sunlight exposure could be valuable for evaluating vitamin D supplementation efficacy. One such model is subjects spending the winter in Antarctica, where UV-B radiation levels are zero during the winter. Data from a study of such subjects will enable us to provide long-duration space flight crewmembers with evidence-based recommendations for vitamin D supplementation to achieve optimal vitamin D status before, during, and after flight. We report here results from a vitamin D supplementation study conducted in 2007 in Antarctica at McMurdo Station, and plans for a study to be implemented over the course of 2009. Additionally, in 2008, a study was initiated (and is ongoing) to assess efficacy and safety of supplementing with 2000 IU daily, 10,000 IU weekly, or 50,000 IU weekly for a month and then monthly after that. The data from these studies will enable us to provide space crews with evidence-based recommendations for vitamin D supplementation. The findings also have implications for other persons with limited UV light exposure, including polar workers and the elderly.

  20. JSC Director's Discretionary Fund 1992 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lyle (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Annual report of the Johnson Space Center Director's Discretionary Fund documenting effective use of resources. The $1,694,000 funding for FY92 was distributed among 27 projects. The projects are an overall aid to the NASA mission, as well as providing development opportunities for the science and engineering staff with eventual spinoff to commercial uses. Projects described include space-based medical research such as the use of stable isotopes of deuterium and oxygen to measure crew energy use and techniques for noninvasive motion sickness medication. Recycling essentials for space crew support is conducted in the Regenerative Life Support and the Hybrid Regenerative Water Recovery test beds. Two-phase fluid flow simulated under low-gravity conditions, hypervelocity particle impact on open mesh bumpers, and microcalorimetry to measure the long-term hydrazine/material compatibility were investigated. A patent application was made on a shape-memory-alloy release nut. Computer estimate of crew accommodations for advanced concepts was demonstrated. Training techniques were evaluated using multimedia and virtual environment. Upgrades of an electronic still camera provide high resolution images from orbit are presented.

  1. STARDUST Curation and Science at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bastien, R.; See, T. H.; Warren, J. L.; Bevill, T. J.; Todd, N.; Fletcher, L.; Horz, F.; Allen, C. C.; Westphal, A. J.; Snead, C.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D.

    2007-01-01

    Dust particles released from comet 81P/Wild-2 were captured in silica aerogel on-board the STARDUST spacecraft and returned to Earth on January 15, 2006. STARDUST recovered thousands of particles ranging in size from 1 to 100 micrometers. During the six month Preliminary Examination period an international consortium of 180 scientists investigated their mineralogy/petrology, organic/inorganic chemistry, optical properties and isotopic compositions. Stardust samples are now available for research by the entire research community.

  2. JSC Simulations of ADR Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orbital debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is an international problem that threatens the success of all future Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space and exploration...

  3. Student Lloyd C. Bruce listens to MS John M. Lounge in CSR during STS-26

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Seated in the customer support room (CSR) of JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30, student experimenter Lloyd C. Bruce listens to Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge onboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, during the STS-26 mission. Bruce's student experiment 82-4 (SE82-4) 'The Effects of Weightlessness on Grain Formation and Strength in Metals' is onboard OV-103. Lounge is visible in the television (TV) monitor on the left.

  4. STS-26 Commander Hauck in fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, wearing comunications kit assembly headset and seated in the commanders seat on forward flight deck, looks over his shoulder toward the aft flight deck. A flight data file (FDF) notebook rests on his lap. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  5. STS-38 MS Springer climbs through CCT side hatch prior to egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), climbs through the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Springer will practice emergency egress through the side hatch using the crew escape system (CES) pole (at Springer's left). The inflated safety cushion under Springer will break his fall as he rolls out of the side hatch.

  6. KSC Press Site Transformer Bldg. (K7-1205c) SWMU 074 Interim Measure Work Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, A. Scott; Applegate, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This document presents and discusses the Interim Measure (IM) Work Plan for the Press Site Transformer Building (K7-1205C). The purpose of the proposed IM activities is to remove soil affected with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) greater than the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) residential direct-exposure Soil Cleanup Target Level (R-SCTL) of 0.5 milligrams per kilogram and encapsulate concrete exhibiting PCB concentration greater than the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) threshold of 50 milligrams per kilogram.

  7. Environmental Assessment for Replacement Acquisition Management Facility (Bldg 1600) Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Additional materials diverted from the waste stream on an annual basis include: 516 tons of wood waste (pallets, packaging), 67 tons of compost /organic...4.3.1.2 Wastewater There would be an insignificant short-term increase in demand for sewage treatment during construction. Portable toilets would

  8. Acoustical Evaluation of Bucking Bars during Riveting Operations in Bldg 9001, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    bar can be either a formed piece of metal used alone, see Figure 1, or the dolly portion of a dampened bucking bar, see Figure 2. c. Sample...bucking bars, 135 total rivets for each of the three processes. Dolly 4 Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is...Industrial Tool TP111R (handle) TP1510A ( dolly ) 4. RESULTS: Assessment data for all three processes are displayed in Figures 3, 4, and 5

  9. STS-47 Endeavour, OV-105, crew eats preflight breakfast at KSC O and C Bldg

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 crewmembers who will be aboard for Endeavour's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105's, second trip into space are about to have a light breakfast prior to the prelaunch suiting up process in the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout (O and C) Building. Sitting around table (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee, Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr, Commander Robert L. Gibson, MS Jerome Apt, MS Mae C. Jemison, and Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri. Mohri represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). STS-47 will be devoted to the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) payload, a joint effort between Japan and the United States. A cake decorated with the STS-47 mission insignia is in the center of the table.

  10. The 1989 JSC bibliography of scientific and technical papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Nancy (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    This document is a compilation of Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center contributions to the scientific and technical literature in aerospace and life sciences made during calendar year 1989. Citations include NASA formal series reports, journal articles, conference and symposium presentations, papers published in proceedings or other collective works, and seminar and workshop results.

  11. National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) JSC Summer Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, Forrest Ryan

    2014-01-01

    This project optimized the calorie content in a breakfast meal replacement bar for the Advanced Food Technology group. Use of multivariable optimization yielded the highest weight savings possible while simultaneously matching NASA Human Standards nutritional guidelines. The scope of this research included the study of shelf-life indicators such as water activity, moisture content, and texture analysis. Key metrics indicate higher protein content, higher caloric density, and greater mass savings as a result of the reformulation process. The optimization performed for this study demonstrated wide application to other food bars in the Advanced Food Technology portfolio. Recommendations for future work include shelf life studies on bar hardening and overall acceptability data over increased time frames and temperature fluctuation scenarios.

  12. NASA JSC EV2 Intern Spring 2016 - Jennie Chung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    Exploration Mission 2 (EM-2) is a mission to resume the manned exploration of the Solar System. This mission is the first crewed mission of NASA’s Orion on the Space Launch System. The target for EM-2 is to perform a flyby of a captured asteroid in lunar orbit, which NASA plans to launch in 2023. As an intern working with EV-2 – Avionics Systems Division in Johnson Space Center, we are developing flight instrumentation systems for EM-2 (MISL & RFID). The Modular Integrated Stackable Layer (MISL) is a compact space-related computer system that is modular, scalable and reconfigurable. The RFID (radio frequency identification) sensors are used to take lower frequency (TC) type measurements and be able to stream data real-time to an RF (radio frequency) interrogator upon demand. Our job, in EV-2, is to certify, test, manufacture/assemble and deliver flight EM-2 DFI System (MISL & RFID). Our goal is to propose a development effort to design low-mass wire and wireless data acquisition and sensor solutions for EM-2 DFI (Development Flight Instrumentation). The team is tasked to provide the most effective use of 75 pounds to acquire DFI data and to collect sensor data for 100-200 high priority DFI channels (mass driven).

  13. JSC Safety and Mission Assurance Data Analysis Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelant, Henk

    2010-01-01

    These slides describe the data analysis methods that are used to determine inputs for probabilistic risk models supporting the Space Shuttle Program. Other applications can follow a similar path probably using different data sources. Statistical approaches are different and not addressed here. Topics included here: 1) Prior Distribution; 2) Likelihood Data; 3) Bayesian Updating; and 4) Uncertainty and Error. Note: This is a high-level discussion and is not intended to be a tutorial.

  14. STS-34 Mission Specialists Chang-Diaz and Baker with EVA tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and MS Ellen S. Baker (right) examine extravehicular activity (EVA) tools along with Rockwell Space Operations (RSO) technician Wayne J. Wedlake prior EVA contingency exercise (underwater simulation) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chang-Diaz and Baker will practice using the EVA tools and rehearse chores which would require manual action outside the spacecraft in the event of failure of remote systems in the WETF's 25 ft pool.

  15. American ASTP prime crew participate in photography mission briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The three American ASTP prime crew astronauts participate in a photography mission briefing in bldg 5 with Dr. Farouk El-Baz (wearing face mask) during Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) pre-flight activity at JSC. They are, left to right, Thomas P. Stafford, commander; Vance D. Brand, command module pilot; Dr. El-Baz; and Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot. Dr. El-Baz is with the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution. The face mask is to protect the crewmen from possible exposure to disease prior to launch time.

  16. STS-65 PLC Hieb at mockup side hatch prepares to egress via an inflated slide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Mission Specialist and Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), sits at the top of the inflated slide at the crew compartment trainer (CCT) side hatch and listens to a crew training staffer's instructions. Hieb practiced post landing emergency escape procedures along with his six STS-65 crewmates. The CCT is located in the Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE. Hieb will join five NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, later this year.

  17. OSS-1 Payload Pallet processing after arrival at O and C bldg at KSC for STS-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    OSS-1 Payload Pallet and vehicle changing and potential experiment being checked out by techicians after arrival at the Operations and Checkout (O and C) building at Kennedy Space Center for STS-3 mission. Photos include high view of OSS-1 payload pallet in the Cargo Integration Test Equipment (CITE) work stand, which simulates the orbiter's cargo bay (39285); view of technicians examing the Vehicle Charging and Potential (VCAP) experiment (39286); view of the Thermal Canister Experiment (39287).

  18. Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO) Improved Waste Collection System (IWCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This high angle overall view shows the top side components of the Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO) Waste Collection System (WCS) scheduled to fly aboard NASA's Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, for the STS-54 mission. Detailed Test Objective 662, Extended duration orbiter WCS evaluation, will verify the design of the new EDO WCS under microgravity conditions for a prolonged period. OV-105 has been modified with additional structures in the waste management compartment (WMC) and additional avionics to support/restrain the EDO WCS. Among the advantages the new IWCS is hoped to have over the currect WCS are greater dependability, better hygiene, virtually unlimited capacity, and more efficient preparation between shuttle missions. Unlike the previous WCS, the improved version will not have to be removed from the spacecraft to be readied for the next flight. The WCS was documented in JSC's Crew Systems Laboratory Bldg 7.

  19. ?Smart COPVs? - Continued Successful Development of JSC IR&D Acoustic Emissions (AE) SHM Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop and apply promising quantitative pass/fail criteria to CPV using acoustic emission (AE) and lay the foundation for continued development of an automated...

  20. Space Weathering in Houston: A Role for the Experimental Impact Laboratory at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintala, M. J.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Hoerz, F.

    2015-01-01

    The effective investigation of space weathering demands an interdisciplinary approach that is at least as diversified as any other in planetary science. Because it is a macroscopic process affecting all bodies in the solar system, impact and its resulting shock effects must be given detailed attention in this regard. Direct observation of the effects of impact is most readily done for the Moon, but it still remains difficult for other bodies in the solar system. Analyses of meteorites and precious returned samples provide clues for space weathering on asteroids, but many deductions arising from those studies must still be considered circumstantial. Theoretical work is also indispensable, but it can only go as far as the sometimes meager data allow. Experimentation, however, can permit near real-time study of myriad processes that could contribute to space weathering. This contribution describes some of the capabilities of the Johnson Space Center's Experimental Impact Laboratory (EIL) and how they might help in understanding the space weathering process.

  1. MODELING OF THE BASIC PARAMETERS OF ECONOMIC STABILITY (BY THE EXAMPLE OF JSC “BOGUCHAROVO”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Serebriakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The article describes the author's vision of the process of management of economic stability of the enterprise by means of simulation of the main parameters of its activity and justified the relevance of the theme of the study. Studied theoretical and methodical bases of economic stability of the enterprise in accordance with the Russian development of a market economy, as well as practical recommendations on modeling of the main parameters of the economic sustainability of the organization. Currently, management of economic stability is one of the most important factors of functioning and development of the enterprises in conditions of the global financial crisis. The relevance of this trend is increasing in line with the increasing complexity of economic ties, changing external environment. A comprehensive approach to the development of the most appropriate variants of the mechanism of management of economic sustainability taking into account the experience of developed countries, industry and sector of factors of external environment can become the basis for developing a common long-term economic development strategy of the enterprise. Problems of economic stability of enterprises caused by the fact that normally carried out in a changing environment operational measures allow for a short time to keep the state of the enterprise is stable, but not change the situation radically. That is, they are associated, on the one hand, with a lack of vision of development of the enterprises, with another - the narrowness of the approach applied to the diagnosis of the existing situation and forecasting of changes in external factors.

  2. Hydrogen and Storage Initiatives at the NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Miguel; Woods, Stephen S.

    2006-01-01

    NASA WSTF Hydrogen Activities: a) Aerospace Test; b) System Certification & Verification; c) Component, System, & Facility Hazard Assessment; d) Safety Training Technical Transfer: a) Development of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Practices; b) Support of National Hydrogen Infrastructure Development.

  3. Ubiquitous Wireless Smart Sensing and Control. Pumps and Pipes JSC: Uniquely Houston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Need new technologies to reliably and safely have humans interact within sensored environments (integrated user interfaces, physical and cognitive augmentation, training, and human-systems integration tools).Areas of focus include: radio frequency identification (RFID), motion tracking, wireless communication, wearable computing, adaptive training and decision support systems, and tele-operations. The challenge is developing effective, low cost/mass/volume/power integrated monitoring systems to assess and control system, environmental, and operator health; and accurately determining and controlling the physical, chemical, and biological environments of the areas and associated environmental control systems.

  4. Elemental Analysis of the JSC Mars-1 Soil Simulant using Laser Ablation and Magnetic Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasab, Ahab S.

    2005-01-01

    Future long-duration missions to Mars require capabilities in terms of manufacture of structures and chemical compounds essential for human habitat and exploratory activities. Currently, it is not feasible to import all the required raw and finished materials from Earth. In fact, essential items such as structural members as well as various gases for human consumption and material processing need to be largely extracted from the available planetary resources. The resources on Mars include its soil and rocks, its atmosphere and the polar caps. Mars atmosphere consists of 95% carbon dioxide and the balance contains small percentages of oxygen, nitrogen, and argon. The Mars regolith contains many metal oxides in various mineralogical forms. Presently, Martian soil samples are not available. However, a closely matched Martian soil simulant developed by the Johnson Space Center has been available for scientific research and engineering studies. The chemical makeup of this simulant is compared with the data from Viking Lander and Path Finder missions are shown..

  5. Plant growth modeling at the JSC variable pressure growth chamber - An application of experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam M.; Edeen, Marybeth; Sirko, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the approach and results of an effort to characterize plant growth under various environmental conditions at the Johnson Space Center variable pressure growth chamber. Using a field of applied mathematics and statistics known as design of experiments (DOE), we developed a test plan for varying environmental parameters during a lettuce growth experiment. The test plan was developed using a Box-Behnken approach to DOE. As a result of the experimental runs, we have developed empirical models of both the transpiration process and carbon dioxide assimilation for Waldman's Green lettuce over specified ranges of environmental parameters including carbon dioxide concentration, light intensity, dew-point temperature, and air velocity. This model also predicts transpiration and carbon dioxide assimilation for different ages of the plant canopy.

  6. 7 CFR Appendix A to Part 661 - Availability of Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conservationist, 200 4th St., SW., P.O. Box 1357, Huron, S. Dak. 57350. State Conservationist, Federal Office Bldg... Bldg., P.O. Box 1458, Bismarck, N. Dak. 58501. State Conservationist, Federal Bldg., 101 South Main...

  7. 75 FR 13347 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... asbestos/lead paint, most recent use--entomology facility, offsite use only Bldg. 1007 Ft. George G. Meade...--medical res bldg., off-site use only Bldg. E3300 Aberdeen Proving Grounds Aberdeen Co: Harford, MD...

  8. 76 FR 12227 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ...--plant, off-site use only Bldg. 01150 Hunter Army Airfield Savannah GA 31409 Landholding Agency: Army...: 21200420050 Status: Excess Comments: 7356 sq. ft., most recent use--heat plant bldg., off-site use only Bldg.... ft., most recent use--warehouse, off-site use only Bldg. 08585 Hunter Army Airfield Savannah GA 31409...

  9. 75 FR 51535 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ...., most recent use--plant, off-site use only Bldg. 01150 Hunter Army Airfield Savannah Co: Chatham GA... Comments: 7356 sq. ft., most recent use--heat plant bldg., off-site use only Bldg. T924 Fort Stewart Ft.... ft., most recent use--warehouse, off-site use only Bldg. 08585 Hunter Army Airfield Savannah Co...

  10. 76 FR 8571 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Status: Excess Comments: 7356 sq. ft., most recent use--heat plant bldg., off-site use only Bldg. T924..., off-site use only Bldg. 08585 Property Number: 21200530078 Hunter Army Airfield Savannah Co: Chatham GA 31409 Status: Excess Comments: 165 sq. ft., most recent use--plant, off-site use only Bldg. 01150...

  11. Extant and Extinct Lunar Regolith Simulants: Modal Analyses of NU-LHT-1M and -2m, OB-1, JSC-1, JSC-1A and -1AF,FJS-1, and MLS-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Christian; Rickman, Doug; McLemore, Carole; Fikes, John; Wilson, Stephen; Stoeser, Doug; Butcher, Alan; Botha, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    This work is part of a larger effort to compile an internally consistent database on lunar regolith (Apollo samples) and lunar regolith simulants. Characterize existing lunar regolith and simulants in terms of: a) Particle type; b) Particle size distribution; c) Particle shape distribution; d) Bulk density; and e) Other compositional characteristics. Evaluate regolith simulants (Figure of Merit) by above properties by comparison to lunar regolith (Apollo sample) This presentation covers new data on lunar simulants.

  12. The fluid dynamic and shear environment in the NASA/JSC rotating-wall perfused-vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, C. M.; Kleis, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The rotating-wall perfused-vessel (RWPV) bioreactor, used for both microgravity and Earth-based cell science experiments, is characterized in terms of the fluid dynamic and fluid shear stress environment. A numerical model of the flow field is developed and verified with laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. The effects of changes in operating conditions, including rotation rates and fluid perfusion rates, are investigated with the numerical model. The operating conditions typically used for ground-based experiments (equal rotation of the inner and outer cylinders) leads to flow patterns with relatively poor mass distribution characteristics. Approximately 50% of the inlet-perfused fluid bypasses the bulk of the fluid volume and flows to the perfusion exit. For operating conditions typical in microgravity, small differential rotation rates between the inner and outer cylinders lead to greatly improved flow distribution patterns and very low fluid shear stress levels over a large percentage of the fluid volume. Differences in flow patterns for the different operating conditions are explored. Large differences in the hydrodynamic environments for operating conditions typical of true microgravity and ground-based "microgravity simulations" are demonstrated.

  13. 77 FR 31434 - Finding That JSC CredexBank Is a Financial Institution of Primary Money Laundering Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ....82% owned by Vicpart Holding SA, based in Fribourg, Switzerland.\\9\\ With 169 employees \\10\\ and a..._047.htm ). The facts surrounding these transactions are consistent with typical ``red flags... centers.\\29\\ \\29\\ See ``Money Laundering Red Flags: Wire Transfers,'' Federal Financial...

  14. MODERNIZATION OF AUTOMATION SYSTEM OF THE STEEL CONTINUOUS CASTING MACHINE NO 3 OF JSC «BMZ»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Eroshenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown, that the introduction of a new technological automation system for continuous casting machines allowed a full control of product quality and provided cutting blooms in line with production targets.

  15. Behavioral Health and Performance at NASA JSC: Recent Successes and Future Plan for BHP Research and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveton, L. B.; VanderArk, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    The Behavioral Health and Performance discipline at NASA Johnson Space Center is organized into two distinct Divisions (Biomedical Research and Environmental Science Division and Space and Clinical Operations Division) but is integrated and interrelated in its day-to-day work. Ongoing operations supporting NASA's spaceflight goals benefit from the research portfolios that address risks to mission success. Similarly, these research portfolios are informed by operations to ensure investigations stay relevant given the dynamic environment of spaceflight. There are many success stories that can be presented where initial work begun as a BHP Research project, and funded through the Human Research Program, was fully implemented in operations or addressed an operational need. Examples include improving effectiveness of the debriefings used within Mission Control by the Mission Operations Directorate and countermeasures for fatigue management. There is also ongoing collaboration with research and operations for developing selection methods for future generation astronauts, and to enhance and inform the current family support function. The objective of this panel is to provide examples of recent success stories, describe areas where close collaboration is benefitting ongoing research and operations, and summarize how this will come together as NASA plans for the one year ISS mission - a unique opportunity for both BHP operations and research to learn more about preparing and supporting crewmembers for extended missions in space. The proposed panel will be comprised of six presentations, each describing a unique aspect of research or operations and the benefits to current and future spaceflight.

  16. Radiation Test Results on COTS and non-COTS Electronic Devices for NASA-JSC Space Flight Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allums, Kimberly K.; O'Neill, P. M.; Reddell, B. D.; Nguyen, K. V.; Bailey, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation reports the results of recent proton and heavy ion Single Event Effect (SEE) testing on a variety of COTS and non-COTs electronic devices and assemblies tested for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS) and Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV).

  17. THERMOMECHANICAL PROCESSING OF CHROMOMOLIBDENUM ROLLING IN THE CONDITIONS OF JSC BMZ – MANAGEMENT COMPANY OF HOLDING BMK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lutsenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that after thermo-mechanical processing of chrome-molybdenic rolled metal including cooling with a speed of 0,6-0,8 ° C / sec, the quantity of bainite increases to 75% and the amount of lamellar pearlite decreases to 5-10% in structure that promotes reduction of the mode of subsequent softening processing. It is established that at cooling with a specified speed the transformations in chrome-molybdenic steel come to an end at temperatures of 350-370 ° C. The offered technology of the reduced mode of thermomechanical processing provides necessary quality of rolled metal and promotes decrease of energy resources consumption.

  18. GEODESIC MONITORING OF VERTICAL MOVEMENT OF JSC «GRODNO AZOT» BUILDINGS USING DIGITAL DNA 03 LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Mikhailov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents peculiar features and methodology pertaining to application of digital DNA 03 level for monitoring vertical movement of load-carrying structures in the workshops and foundations of various capacities, exhaust pipes and granulation towers having height from 100 to150 meters. The proposed methods presuppose usage of the results of engineering and geological investigations and highly accurate geodesic measurements considered in the process of hydro- and pneumatic tests of an isothermic storage of liquid ammonia and a production “Ammonia” shop taken as an example. 

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 228425 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ILNSSGNLVTSNTVPLRSTNEGTLTESINAILDAGTYFIRVFPGPPADPANPAGTTPSTNYTLDVRADNGITNEIVWRYYAANVATNGIWRFDGTTFLSGEALNPSTP... Oscillatoriales cyanobacterium JSC-12 MPFHGVIAAMPDSIGNTLNDAQSIIIGTATKRFSDSVEFGDNDYFRFTLNSSSGFSLTLFGLSANADVE

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 459430 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DRAFT_0673 Oscillatoriales cyanobacterium JSC-12 MSIPEKLFVGSIVVGWAAELVNLSLSHFKYKKFLPYLHKIFVLIDPIIKSNLPHMSSNDVYSLVEKAAIAVADETLSPKEISELVSTVLKTFKVDLAANSNVVTQTDKPISTQIDEAIDRYKNSAKELFSS ...

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 255911 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in Fischerella sp. JSC-11 MLTETRQVKDLMTTDPVTVKPTDSVETVLRCLEENHISGLPVVDETGKVVGVVSEADLLFRERPVRLPLYLSFLGGIIYLEPLDHFVQQLKKSLGILVQDVMTPDPITIAPDAPISQAADLMLEKRVNRLPVVDETGALVGIITRDDLLRALKSD ...

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 129527 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing protein Oscillatoriales cyanobacterium JSC-12 MLLIDTSVWISVFRDRTGQVRQKLETLIDARDIFLTRFTQLKLLQGSLNEKEWTLLSTYLETQDYVEPVGNSWRAAARIYYDLRRRGLTVRSPIDCCIAQAALENDLLLIHNDRDFETIAQVRSLQHFRFQP ...

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497073171 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical protein Fischerella sp. JSC-11 MHYYVHPFQLELHKLENMIVHVQHVNNQEVKQIADSRLFTSQAIGEEGGDTVTTKAIGEEGGDTVTTQAIGEEGGDTVTTKAIGEEGGDTVTTQAIGEEGGDTVTTQAIGEEGGDTVTTKAIGEEGGDTVTTLAFGEEGGF

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 290214 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oscillatoriales cyanobacterium JSC-12 MPSQPQQNHLLIIEDDKGRREFLLDAPLYSIGRDPKCDIRLVSQFVSRHHATLVQSANDDGTFYYRIVDGNAKGRVSANGLLINGRKLQAHDLRNEDEVVFGPKVRAIYYLLRRDAVVTVPPDEFDITLISPNMIGDPEDD ...

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 290226 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RIVDGDAKGKPSSNGLMINGRKLAAHDLKNEDEVVFGPQVRAIYYLLKRDTMPPGQADVSEYDITLINPGMTDDLED ... ...erella sp. JSC-11 MAENNSKQFLIHKTSTDFSNDLSMAAENHESHILIVEDDQGRKEFTLERPIYSIGRDRECDIRLVSQFVSRRHATLVRLPRDDNSKSYYY

  6. 76 FR 31307 - Notice of Intent To License Government-Owned Inventions; Intent To License Exclusively

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ....mcgill@us.army.mil , US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), AMSRD-ECB-PI-BP-TT, Bldg E3330... Research and Technology Applications, US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, AMSRD-ECB-PI-BP-TT, Bldg...

  7. 75 FR 14612 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...: 88200940004 Status: Unutilized Reasons: Extensive deterioration New Mexico Bldg. 1016 Kirtland AFB Bernalillo... Force Property Number: 18200930008 Status: Unutilized Reasons: Secured Area New Mexico Bldg. 30143.... 88A Navy Information Operations Command Sugar Grove WV 26815 Landholding Agency: Navy Property...

  8. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  9. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF THE PERSPECTIVE REINFORCING MATERIALS FOR CONCRETE ON JSC «BSW – MANAGEMENT COMPANY OF HOLDING «BMC»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Akhmetov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main stages of establishing and development of manufacture techniques for production of cold-shaped reinforcing steel in reels and a steel fiber in StPTs-3 (innovative processes in the Republic of Belarus are considered in the article. 

  11. Effect of surface plasma treatments on the adhesion of Mars JSC 1 simulant dust to RTV 655, RTV 615, and Sylgard 184.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouzeh Sabri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dust accumulation on surfaces of critical instruments has been a major concern during lunar and Mars missions. Operation of instruments such as solar panels, chromatic calibration targets, as well as Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA suits has been severely compromised in the past as a result of dust accumulation and adhesion. Wind storms with wind speeds of up to 70 mph have not been effective in removing significant amounts of the deposited dust. This is indeed an indication of the strength of the adhesion force(s involved between the dust particles and the surface(s that they have adhered to. Complications associated with dust accumulation are more severe for non-conducting surfaces and have been the focus of this work. METHODOLOGY: Argon plasma treatment was investigated as a mechanism for lowering dust accumulation on non-conducting polymeric surfaces. Polymers chosen for this study include a popular variety of silicones routinely used for space and terrestrial applications namely RTV 655, RTV 615, and Sylgard 184. Surface properties including wettability, surface potential, and surface charge density were compared before and after plasma treatment and under different storage conditions. Effect of ultraviolet radiation on RTV 655 was also investigated and compared with the effect of Ar plasma treatment. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Gravimetric measurements proved Ar plasma treatment to be an effective method for eliminating dust adhesion to all three polymers after short periods of exposure. No physical damage was detected on any of the polymer surfaces after Ar plasma treatment. The surface potential of all three polymers remained zero up to three months post plasma exposure. Ultraviolet radiation however was not effective in reducing surface and caused damage and significant discoloration to RTV 655. Therefore, Ar plasma treatment can be an effective and non-destructive method for treating insulating polymeric surfaces in order to eliminate dust adhesion and accumulation.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF TAILING UNDERWATER SEDIMENTS AND LIQUID INDUSTRIAL WASTES IN STORAGE TANK ON THE BASIS OF ECHOLOCATION AND GPS-SYSTEMS AT JSC “BELARUSKALI”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Mikhailov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach to calculate volume of tailing underwater sediments and liquid industrial wastes on the basis of innovative technologies. Two theodolites which are set at various points and a boat with a load for measuring water depth have been traditionally used for topographic survey of slime storage bottom. Horizontal directions have been simultaneously measured on the boat marker while using theodolites. Water depth has been determined while using  a 2-kg circular load which was descended into brine solution with the help of rope. In addition to rather large time and labour costs such technology has required synchronization in actions on three participants involved in the work: operators of two theodolites and boat team in every depth measuring point. Methodology has been proposed for more efficient solution of the problem. It presupposes the use of echolocation together with space localization systems (GPS-systems which can be set on a boat with the purpose to measure depth of a storage tank bed. An echolocation transducer has been installed under the boat bottom at the depth of 10 cm from the brine solution level in the slime storage.  An aerial of GPS-receiver has been fixed over the echo-sounder transducer. Horizontal positioning of bottom depth measuring points have been carried out in the local coordinate system. Formation of digital model for slime storage bottom has been executed after data input of the coordinate positioning that corresponded to corrected depths in the software package LISCAD Plus SEE. The formation has been made on the basis of a strict triangulation method.  Creation of the digital model makes it rather easy to calculate a volume between a storage bottom and a selected level (height of filling material. In this context it is possible to determine a volume and an area not only above but also lower of the datum surface. For this purpose it is recommended to use digital models which are developed for various time periods of slime  storage operation. 

  13. OPTIMIZATION MODEL OF CONSUMER LOANS PORTFOLIO IN COMMERCIAL BANKS ACCORDING TO CURRENT PROBLEMS ON THE EXAMPLE OF JSC “RUSSIAN STANDARD” BANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iremadze, E.O.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to work out practical recommendations for the formation of bank liabilities, optimization of their structure and the use of credit resources in the commercial bank "Russian Standard". The objective of the study is to find ways for optimization of the loan portfolio to get maximum profit. Practical recommendations, given for optimizing the formation and the use of credit resources in the commercial bank "Russian Standard" can be used in different bank organizations.

  14. Description of the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) for the OSS-1 Shuttle mission and JSC plasma chamber test in conjunction with the fast pulse electron gun (FPEG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawhan, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives, equipment, and techniques for the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) carried by the OSS-1 instrument payload of the STS-4 and scheduled for the Spacelab-2 mission are described. The goals of the first flight were to examine the Orbiter-magnetoplasma interactions by measuring the electric and magnetic field strengths, the ionized particle wakes, and the generated waves. The RMS was employed to lift the unit out of the bay in order to allow characterization of the fields, EM interference, and plasma contamination within 15 m of the Orbiter. The PDP will also be used to examine plasma depletion, chemical reaction rates, waves, and energized plasma produced by firing of the Orbiter thrusters. Operation of the PDP was carried out in the NASA Space Environment Simulation Laboratory test chamber, where the PDP was used to assay the fields, fluxes, wave amplitudes, and particle energy spectra. The PDP instrumentation is also capable of detecting thermal ions, thermal electrons suprathermal particles, VHF/UHF EMI levels, and the S-band field strength.

  15. Metabolic and cardiovascular adaptation, monkey. NASA SMD 3, project 76, experiment 44 conducted at NASA/JSC, 14-25 May 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Mains, R. C.; Kodama, A. M.; Mccutcheon, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    The biomedical results from an experiment on a monkey subjected to space flight conditions are reported. A background history of the development and testing of an experiment system designed to permit measurement of physiological parameters in subhuman primates during continuous, comfortable, couch restraint for periods of up to 30 days is reviewed. Of major importance in the experimental design of the system was the use of a fiberglass pod, which could be sealed and subdivided into upper and lower parts, to monitor and control the physiological responses for various parts of the animal's body. The experiment was conducted within the Spacelab Simulator for a period of 11 days. Data recorded includes: Spacelab Simulator cabin temperature; ventilation rate; pod internal temperature; fraction percent oxygen; fraction percent carbon dioxide; oxygen consumption rate; carbon dioxide production rate; respiratory quotient; intrathoracic temperature; heart rate; mean aortic pressure; mean ventricular pressure; diurnal variation of parameters measured; comparison of mean preflight, flight, and postflight values of the parameters measured; and correlation matrix for the parameters measured.

  16. Restaurant closures: summer 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Restaurant 2 Table service/brasserie: closed from Monday 28 July to Friday 12 September (open upon reservation for groups of 20+)   Snack bars Bldg. 54: closed from Monday 7 July to Friday 12 September (self-service Nespresso machine available) Bldg. 40: closed every day at 4.30 p.m instead of 5 p.m. from Monday 7 July to Friday 12 September   Jeûne Genevois Restaurant 2, Restaurant 3, Bldg. 6, Bldg. 13, Bldg. 30 and Bldg. 54 will all be closed 11 and 12 September 2014 Bldg. 40 and Restaurant 1 will remain open

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 104415 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DRAFT_2616 Fischerella sp. JSC-11 MKGKFLTLTGTALTLALTSNIAAAQITKFPELSQQQTETTAKTPEIKLSPEGMKILCQYFPLNSRCQGTSSNTTTPDSTTTPAPDSTTPAPDST...TTPAPDSTTPEDTTPSPDSTSPTQITPAPDSTVPAPDSTTPSPDSTSPTQITPAPDSTVPAPDSTTPSPDSMNPTQMTPGSGTGTGN ...

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497071528 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utathione S-transferase domain protein Fischerella sp. JSC-11 METLRLYDFLPSGNGYKIRLLLSQIGMPFERVEVNILKNETRTPEFLSKNPNGKIPLLEVKPDKYLAESNA...ILVYLSEGTEFLPYDRFLRAQVMQWLFFEQCSLKPFIEPLRFWISILGKAEEYKEAIEQKRESGYAALKLMENHLQSHNFFVGERYTIADIALFA

  19. Information from the central stores

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    All items sold in the CERN shop (Bldg. 33) are now available in the central stores (Bldg. 73) and can be purchased on-line via EDH “Material Request” or at the “Emergency Desk” of the stores on the ground floor of Bldg. 73. These items are visible in the CERN catalogue under the “SCEM” codes beginning with 92. Department of General Infrastructure Services (GS) GS-SEM Group

  20. 75 FR 33321 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Bldgs. Aberdeen Proving Ground Aberdeen MD 21005 Landholding Agency: Army Property Number: 21201020012...: Unutilized Reasons: Secured Area Indiana Bldg. 481 Jefferson Proving Ground Madison IN 47250...

  1. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  2. 75 FR 33760 - Information Collection; Virtual Incident Procurement (VIPR) System Existing Vendor Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Acquisition Management Systems; 2150 Centre Ave., Bldg. A, Suite 317; Fort Collins, CO 80526. The public may... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Larry Bowser, Washington Office Acquisition Management Systems Branch...

  3. Geopolymers from lunar and Martian soil simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiadis, Alessio; Alberini, Federico; Meyer, Marit E.

    2017-01-01

    This work discusses the geopolymerization of lunar dust simulant JSC LUNAR-1A and Martian dust simulant JSC MARS-1A. The geopolymerization of JSC LUNAR-1A occurs easily and produces a hard, rock-like, material. The geopolymerization of JSC MARS-1A requires milling to reduce the particle size. Tests were carried out to measure, for both JSC LUNAR-1A and JSC MARS-1A geopolymers, the maximum compressive and flexural strengths. In the case of the lunar simulant, these are higher than those of conventional cements. In the case of the Martian simulant, they are close to those of common building bricks.

  4. Users Office - Removal

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    As of 8 December 2010 and until the end of February 2011, the Users Office will move from Bldg. 60. New Location : Bldg. 510-R-033 Opening Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday : 08.30 – 12.30 Monday to Friday: 14.00 – 16.00 Closed Wednesday mornings.

  5. Defense Infrastructure: Department of Defense Renewable Energy Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    AZ Solar PV (Bldg 1958) Clearwell Solar Photovoltaic Fully Operational May-10 No 2010 194 $ 448 $ 448 Appropriated 303...Dept Navy MCAS Yuma AZ Solar PV (Bldg 1958) Clearwell 194 194 Limited Contributes Contributes Contributes Contributes 303 Dept Navy MCAS Yuma AZ Solar

  6. Computational Modeling of Multicomponent Diffusion Using Fortran

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    58 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 410-278-6114 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 iii Contents List of...ARDEC SFAE AMO CAS J RUTKOWSKI BLDG 171 M PICATINNY ARSENAL NJ 07806-5000 1 US ARMY ARDEC AMSRD AAR AEI W B BRODMAN BLDG

  7. 76 FR 17841 - Notice of Intent To License Government-Owned Inventions; Intent To License Exclusively

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Center (ECBC), AMSRD-ECB-PI-BP-TT, Bldg E3330/Rm 241 5183 Blackhawk Road, APG, MD 21010-5424. Any... Chemical Biological Center, AMSRD-ECB-PI-BP-TT, Bldg E3330/Rm 241 5183 Blackhawk Road, APG, MD 21010-5424...

  8. 75 FR 46932 - Notice of Receipt of Requests to Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. Deliveries are only accepted during the Docket... (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. The hours of operation of this Docket Facility are...- (trifluoromethyl)- 2- pyridinyl)oxy)phe noxy)-, butyl ester, R- WA060003 Subdue Maxx D-Alanine,...

  9. 76 FR 14024 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam Risk Assessment: A CGMP Framework...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... non- penicillin beta-lactam antibiotics. The draft guidance is intended to assist manufacturers in... Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to... Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 4370,...

  10. Strategies for Monitoring the Performance of DNAPL Source Zone Remedies. Technical/Regulatory Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Bldg C-400 ERH Sand and gravel overlying interbedded sand/silt/clay...oversee groundwater cleanup at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant located in Paducah , Kentucky – the subject of Case Study #5. The Department of... DIFFUSION PLANT , BLDG C-400 PADUCAH , KENTUCKY TECHNOLOGY: Electrical resistance heating (six-phase heating) SCALE: Prototype demonstration GEOLOGY:

  11. 38 CFR 14.501 - Functions and responsibilities of Regional Counsels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Dakota; (ADDRESS) VA Medical Center, One Veterans Drive, Bldg. 73, Minneapolis, MN 55417. (16) Region 16.... (12) Region 12: (JURISDICTION) Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska; (ADDRESS) 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, St... Drive, Bldg. 12, Waco, TX 76711. (14) Region 14: (JURISDICTION) Louisiana, Southern Texas;...

  12. Academic Training: Search for Dark Matter - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    28, 29, 30 June, 1 & 2 July ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - 28, 29 June, 1, 2 July, Main Auditorium bldg. 500. 30 June, Council Chamber bldg. 503 Search for Dark Matter B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  13. DEFINITION OF CAUSES OF DESTRUCTION OF KNIVES FOR THE CHOPPING OF SCRAP METAL ON RS-1200 PRESS SCISSORS IN DROP-HAMMER PLANT OF THE JSC «BELARUSIAN STEEL WORKS – MANAGEMENT COMPANY OF HOLDING «BMС»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kovaleva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches of the reasons of broken knives for the chopping of scrap metal of RS-1200 press scissors are conducted, the reasons of breakage are defined and it is established that premature failure of knives is connected with low values of hardness steel which have been a result of violations of technology of heat treatment at the producer’ plant.

  14. Protocol Development for the NASA-JSC Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project (LMLSTP) Phase 3 Project: A Report on Baseline Studies at KSC for Continuous Salad Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, G. D.; Yorio, N. C.; Vivenzio, H. R.

    1998-01-01

    The Phase 3 Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project (LMLSTP) was conducted in a 20-foot chamber at Johnson Space Center. The overall objective of the Phase 3 project was to conduct a 90-day regenerative life support system test involving 4 human subjects to demonstrate an integrated biological and physicochemical life support system. A secondary objective of the Phase 3 LMLSTP was to demonstrate the ability to produce salad-type vegetable by integration of a small benchtop growth chamber located within the crew habitat area. This small chamber, commercially manufactured as the Controlled Environment Research Ecosystem (CERES 2010(TM)), functioned as a means to continuously provide fresh lettuce crops for crew members. The CERES 2010(TM) growth chamber utilized hardware components developed for effective plant biomass production in spaceflight applications. These components included: (1) LED lighting; (2) Astroculture(TM) Root Trays; and (3) Zeoponic media. In planning for the LMLSTP Phase 3, a request was put forward for KSC scientists to generate a protocol for successful continuous planting, culturing, and harvesting of the salad-crop, lettuce. By conducting baseline tests with components of the CERES 2010(TM), a protocol was developed.

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND CREATION OF THE «CLASSIFICATION OF DEFECTS OF HOT ROLLED SEAMLESS PIPE PRODUCTION OF JSC «BMZ – MANAGEMENT COMPANY OF HOLDING «BMK»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kovaleva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of a new process for the production of seamless hot-rolled pipes, specialists of the enterprise encountered difficulties in determining the causes of unsatisfactory quality of pipes, determining their nature and causes. In this regard, this article contains created and developed «Classification of defects of hot rolled seamless pipes made of OJSC «BSW – management company of «BMC» holding».

  16. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 152 - Guidance to the Joint Service Committee (JSCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ordinarily be referred to the JSC Working Group (WG) for study. The WG assists the JSC in staffing various... amendments to the MCM. (E) Internal Rules and Record-Keeping. (1) In furthering DoD policy, studying...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497242008 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2:1589 ... Co-chaperonin GroES Oscillatoriales cyanobacterium JSC-12 MNFQSHALLFHFCRILSSPHPPKERRGAKPFQSPSNKLGEGLRARAKVKCTRTDNGIFLPASVQEKPQVGEITAISSGKFSKNGSGQQADVKVGDNILYSMYRGTEIYLGNERM

  18. Safety Awareness & Communications Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Zanani

    2015-01-01

    The projects that I have worked on during my internships were updating the JSC Safety & Health Action Team JSAT Employee Guidebook, conducting a JSC mishap case study, preparing for JSC Today Close Call success stories, and assisting with event planning and awareness.

  19. Indoor and outdoor elemental mercury: a comparison of three different cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupa, G; Polyzou, C; Zarogianni, A M; Ouzounis, K; Rapsomanikis, S

    2017-02-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentrations were determined in three different indoor environments: an office in a building with no indoor sources of mercury (Bldg. I), an office affected by indoor mercury emissions from an adjacent laboratory (Bldg. II), and finally, an office where an outdoor mercury spill occurred accidentally (Bldg. III). The maximum recorded indoor GEM concentrations, with the largest variation in time, were observed in Bldg. II, with a continuous indoor mercury source (lower to upper quartile 15 to 62 ng m(-3)). The lowest values were recorded in Bldg. I (lower to upper quartile 3 to 5 ng m(-3)), where indoor GEM levels were affected mainly by the exhaust of vehicles in the parking lot of the building. The monitoring of GEM indoors (lower to upper quartile 15 to 42 ng m(-3)), and outdoors (in several heights) of the Bldg. III, revealed that the cleaning up procedure that followed the spill was not adequate. Auxiliary measurements in the first two cases were the indoor microclimatic conditions, as well as the indoor CO2 concentrations, and in the third case the outdoor meteorological data. The exhaust of vehicles, the chemical reagents, and an outdoor mercury spill were found to mainly affect the observed indoor GEM levels. People in Bldg. II and people walking through the area, where Hg(0) was spilled, were found to be exposed to concentrations above some guide values.

  20. 2000-2001 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    2nd Term : 15 January to 30 March 2001 LECTURE SERIES       Experimentation in Space by M. Spiro, CEA, France 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Tracking at the LHC by K. Safarik, CERN-EP 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Issues in Arms Control by F. Calogero, Univ. Roma, It. 12. 13, 14, 15, 16 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Telecommunication for the future by R. Parker, CERN-IT 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering by J. G. Weisend, Stanford, USA 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 ­ 19, 20, 21 February, Council Chamber 22, 23 February Heavy Ion Physics at the CERN SPS by M. Gonin, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, F. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics by P.F. Harrison, QMW, London, GB 26, 27, 28 February 1, 2 March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 ...

  1. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  2. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  3. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, 2007 is a very special year for CERN. I would like to review the status of our activities with you, and I invite you to a presentation on Wednesday 27 June 2007 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  4. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    As Friday, April 18 and Monday, April 21, 2003 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (AVENANCE : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, April 19 - 20. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 22 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30.

  5. A Business Case Analysis (BCA) of the One Box - One Wire (OB1) Joint Combined Technology Demonstration (JCTD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    BLDG A - SECRET Rei ana Below " Internet G Main Distribution Type-1 Frame ( MDF )Encryptor ••CIPR OB1 - SwitchNIPR Router B .,....UNCLASS Type-1 Router...Encryptor G OB1-PC G Switch Router Router Coalition Server SECRET RELFarm COALITION Enclave BLDG B - SECRET ana Below Router " MDF Switch " G B Server...Server Switch Below EnclaveFarm Router US Only SCIF BLDG C - TS/SCI and Below Switch Server Rm MDF ., OB1 - Switch G Router B ~~~~~torG " B" JWICS G Server

  6. 77 FR 61768 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Pkwy., Gaithersburg, MD 20877. The hotel's telephone number is 301-977-8900. Contact Person: LCDR Avena...., Bldg. 66, rm. 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-3805, Avena.Russell@fda.hhs.gov , or...

  7. Astronaut Neil Armstrong participates in simulation of moon's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit, deploys a lunar surface television camera during lunar surface simulation training in bldg 9, Manned Spacecraft Center. Armstrong is the prime crew commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission.

  8. Astronaut John Young in Command Module Simulator during Apollo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, command module pilot, inside the Command Module Simulator in bldg 5 during an Apollo Simulation. Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot are out of the view.

  9. 77 FR 20574 - Notice of Meeting for the Indian Oil Valuation Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... Indian oil royalty administrative process; (2) an identification of issues to be addressed by the.... ADDRESSES: ONRR will hold the meetings at the Denver Federal Center, 6th Ave and Kipling, Bldg. 85...

  10. 76 FR 57906 - New Animal Drugs; Gamithromycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... application (NADA) filed by Merial, Ltd. The NADA provides for the veterinary prescription use of... Ltd., 3239 Satellite Blvd., Bldg. 500, Duluth, GA 30096-4640 filed NADA 141-328 that provides for the...

  11. 77 FR 23813 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ...: Unutilized Comments: Off-Site Removal Only, 14,528 sq. ft.; wood structure; recent use; Army lodging; off... sq. ft., most recent use--gen purp, off-site use only Bldg. 02483 Aberdeen Proving Ground Harford...

  12. 77 FR 4399 - Actions Taken Pursuant to Executive Order 13382

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ..., inter alia, of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706) (``IEEPA''), issued..., 4th Floor, c/o Persia International Bank PLC, The Gate Bldg, Dubai City, United Arab Emirates;...

  13. 78 FR 59344 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... Installations Command, N3AT Technology Officer, ATTN: Sharon Burch- Martin, Bldg 196, Rm. 123, 1325 10th Street...: Charles Pierce/Le'Ron Lawrence, 3000 Marine Corps Pentagon Rm. 4A324, Washington, DC 20350-3000, or...

  14. 75 FR 30847 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ...., presence of asbestos/lead paint, off-site use only Belmont Cty Memorial USAR Ctr 5305 Guernsey St. Bellaire...: 41201020007 Status: Excess Reasons: Extensive deterioration Secured Area Indiana Bldg. 18 Grissom AFB Peru...

  15. 78 FR 22529 - Notice of Availability of Government-Owned Inventions; Available for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ...: HARVESTING ROTATIONAL ENERGY USING LINEAR-BASED ENERGY HARVESTERS//Navy Case No. 101501: RECONFIGURABLE... Technology Applications, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, Code 72120, 53560 Hull St, Bldg...

  16. 76 FR 11460 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Potomac Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. The hours of operation of this Docket...)-, butyl ester, R- WA060003 Subdue Maxx D-Alanine, N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N- (methoxyacetyl)-methyl...

  17. 76 FR 14023 - Determination that ROCEPHIN (Ceftriaxone Sodium) Injection, 250 Milligrams, 500 Milligrams, 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...., Bldg. 51, rm. 6368, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301- 796-3522. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In 1984... sodium) is a semisynthetic cephalosporin antibiotic for intravenous or intramuscular administration...

  18. 77 FR 2985 - National Institute on Aging; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... Bldg., 2C212, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814, (301) 402- 7701, nakhaib@nia.nih.gov . Name of... Office, Gateway Building 2C-212, 7201 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD 20814, (301) 402-7704, crucew@nia.nih...

  19. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  20. 78 FR 21347 - Marine Mammals; File No. 17344

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ...; fax (301) 713-0376; and Northwest Region, NMFS, 7600 Sand Point Way NE., BIN C15700, Bldg. 1, Seattle... commercial vessel traffic. The primary research method is the collection of opportunistic fecal...

  1. 78 FR 47000 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ...: Off-site removal only; 1,959 sf.; office; poor conditions; asbestos, fluorescent lighting; Contact...; poor conditions; lead, asbestos and fluorescent lights; contact Agriculture for more info. Colorado... Number: 71201330010 Status: Unutilized Directions: Temp. Bldg.; Sewage Treatment Plant 15;...

  2. 78 FR 16685 - Impax Laboratories, Inc.; Withdrawal of Approval of Bupropion Hydrochloride Extended-Release...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... Huntwood Ave., Hayward, CA 94544, and marketed under the name BUDEPRION XL. Impax has voluntarily requested... Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, Rm. 6282, Silver Spring,...

  3. 75 FR 60129 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Investigators on Safety Reporting Requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Management (HFA- 305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. Submit... Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 6324, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301- 796-2500; or Laura Rich, Center...

  4. 76 FR 32863 - Guidance for Industry and Investigators on Enforcement of Safety Reporting Requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ...- ] 305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER..., 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 6323, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301- 796-4836; or Laura...

  5. 77 FR 51546 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... appropriate landholding agencies at the following addresses AIR FORCE: Mr. Robert Moore, Air Force Real... Alan Bible Federal Bldg. 600 S. Las Vegas Blvd. Las Vegas NV 89101 Landholding Agency: GSA...

  6. 77 FR 75606 - Renewal of the Plant Variety Protection Board Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Renewal of the Plant Variety Protection Board Charter AGENCY: Agricultural..., USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), 1400 Independence Ave. SW.; Rm. 4512-South Bldg., Mail Stop..., Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service. BILLING CODE 3410-02-P...

  7. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influence Blood Pressure Gene Linked to Optimism and Self-Esteem Designing New Diabetes Drugs Connect with Us Subscribe to get NIH Research Matters by email RSS Feed Facebook Email us Mailing Address: NIH Research Matters Bldg. ...

  8. 75 FR 24802 - Lead; Amendment to the Opt-Out and Recordkeeping Provisions in the Renovation, Repair, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... speech-challenged individuals may access the numbers in this unit through TTY by calling the toll-free... located in the EPA Docket Center (EPA/DC) at Rm. 3334, EPA West Bldg., 1301 Constitution Ave.,...

  9. 77 FR 7245 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ...: Unutilized Comments: 3148 sq. ft., presence of asbestos/lead paint, most recent use--entomology facility... Status: Unutilized Comments: 592 sq. ft., needs rehab, most recent use--medical res bldg., off-site...

  10. 76 FR 38809 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ...., presence of asbestos/lead paint, most recent use--entomology facility, off-site use only Bldg. 1007 Ft... Status: Unutilized GSA Number: Comments: 592 sq. ft., needs rehab, most recent use--medical res...

  11. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Volume 3. Air Force Abstracts of Phase 1 Awards 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    FEATURES. CARE WILL BE TAKEN SO THAT OPTIMIZATIONS ARE NOT SPECIFIC TO PARTI- - . CULAR TARGET MACHINES. TAU CORP 485 ALBERTO WY - BLDG D LOS GATOS , CA...CORPORATION’S INTEGRATED NAVIGATION SYSTEM SIMULATION. TAU CORP 485 ALBERTO WY - BLDG D LOS GATOS , CA 95030 CONTRACT NUMBER: F33615-87-C-0193 PATRICK CIGANER...PENETRATED BY BACTERIA AND SAFELY REMOVED FROM THE ALUMINUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS AS WELL AS OTHER CARBON FIBER OR COMPOSITE MATERIALS. TECHNOCHEM CO PO BOX

  12. CERN Shuttle

    CERN Multimedia

    General Infrastructure Services Department

    2011-01-01

    As of Monday 21 February, a new schedule will come into effect for the Airport Shuttle (circuit No. 4) at the end of the afternoon: Last departure at 7:00 pm from Main Buildig, (Bldg. 500) to Airport (instead of 5:10 p.m.); Last departure from Airport to CERN, Main Buildig, (Bldg. 500), at 7:30 p.m. (instead of 5:40 p.m.). Group GS-IS

  13. CERN Infirmary closed for building work

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Infirmary (Bldg 57, ground floor) will be closed from 11 December 2013 to 19 January 2014 due to building work.   A minimum service will be provided during this period by nurses and doctors, on the first floor of the Medical Service, bldg. 57. For any questions, please contact the nurses (73802) or the secretariat (73186 / 78435). Note: no complementary examination (audio, visiotest, EFR, etc.) will be possible. Thank you for your understanding and seasons greetings! Medical Service Team

  14. CERN Infirmary closed for building work

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Infirmary (Bldg 57, ground floor) will be closed from 11 December 2013 to 19 January 2014 due to building work.   A minimum service will be provided during this period by nurses and doctors, on the first floor of the Medical Service, bldg. 57. For any questions, please contact the nurses (73802) or the secretariat (73186 / 78435). Note: no complementary examination (audio, visiotest, EFR, etc.) will be possible. Thank you for your understanding and seasons greetings! Medical Service Team

  15. User Evaluation of a Bone Conduction Communication Headset During the Patriot 2007 Joint Field Training Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    cognitive readiness of military personnel participating in the annual Patriot Field Training Exercise (FTX) at Volk Field and Fort McCoy, Wisconsin...in the exercise. The goal of the ARL/HRED study was to assess the degree to which cognitive readiness metrics can be used as a predictor of Soldier...DURBIN BLDG 4506 ( DCD ) RM 107 FORT RUCKER AL 36362-5000 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY – HRED RDRL HRM CK J REINHART 10125 KINGMAN RD BLDG

  16. 2002-2003 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME, 2nd Term : 20 January to 31 March 2003, LECTURE SERIES

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    20, 21, 22, 23, 24 January High Performance Networking by A. Van Praag, CERN-IT 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 January Cosmology : The Homogeneous Universe and the Evolution of Structures by R. Durrer, Univ. of Geneva, CH 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 on 27, 28, 30, 31 January. Council Room on 29 January 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 February Searching for Supersymmetry at the LHC by F. Gianotti (CERN-EP) and G. Ridolfi, Univ. di Genova, I 10:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 February Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes by T. Damour, IHES, Bures-su-Yvette, F 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 24, 25, 26 February Physics at a Future Collider beyond the LHC and TeV Class Linear Collider by M. Battaglia, (CERN-EP) 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 5, 6, 7 March Modern Project Management by R. Sauter, STS, CH 10:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 17, 18, 19 March Internet Networking Technologies by R. D. Cowles, SLAC 11:00-12:00 ...

  17. 2002 - ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    2nd Term : 14 January to 30 March 2002 LECTURE SERIES 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets by D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 February 11:00-12:00 - Council room on 4 February Auditorium, Bldg 500 on 5, 6, 7, 8 February Reliability issues at the LHC by P. Kafka / RelConsult, D 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Particle identification at the LHC by P. Eerola / Lund Univ. SE 25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 on 25, 26, 27 February and 1st March, Council room on 28 February Cosmology and the origin of structure by E.W. Kolb / CERN-TH 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 on 4, 5, 6, 8, March Council room on 7 March Data Challenges for the LHC by P. Vande Vyvre / CERN-EP and B. Segal / CERN-IT 12, 13, 14 March 11...

  18. Influence of optical interference and carrier lifetime on the short circuit current density of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Hai-Long; Zhang Chun-Fu

    2009-01-01

    Based on simple analytical equations, short circuit current density (Jsc) of the organic bulk heterojunction solar cells has been calculated. It is found that the optical interference effect plays a very important role in the determination of JSC;and obvious oscillatory behaviour of Jsc was observed as a function of thickness. At the same time, the influence of JSC only increases the carrier lifetime on JSC also cannot be neglected. When the carrier lifetime is relatively short, at the initial stage and then decreases rapidly with the increase of active layer thickness. However, for a relatively long carrier lifetime, the exciton dissociation probability must be considered, and Jsc behaves wave-like with the increase of active layer thickness. The validity of this model is confirmed by the experimental results.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1996. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to (1) further the professional knowledge qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague.

  20. Rapid and high yield biogas production from Jatropha seed cake by co-digestion with bagasse and addition of Fe2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Kalyani; Mahalingam, Shanthi; Sen, Biswarup

    2013-01-01

    Co-digestion and metal ion addition strategies to improve the biogas production potential of Jatropha seed cake (JSC) by anaerobic digestion were evaluated in the present study. Initially, batch experiments were carried out to obtain the maximum JSC concentration for optimum biogas yield, followed by co-digestion with bagasse, and addition of Fe2+. The optimum JSC concentration of 15% (w/v) gave biogas production rate (BPR) of 66.4 mL/d, specific BPR of 9.7 mL/d/gVS and biogas yield of 0.064 m3/kgVS. The co-digestion strategy increased the carbon/nitrogen of feed (10% JSC + 5% Bagasse, w/v) to 26.5 from 14 (JSC alone), resulting in biogas yield of 0.136 m3/kgVS of JSC, a 2.1-fold increase. Addition of Fe2+ to JSC and bagasse mixture led to biogas yield of 0.203 m3/kgVS, with methane content of 66% and methane production of 8.8 L/L reactor. With short digestion time of 15 days, co-digestion of JSC with bagasse and addition of Fe2+ showed 3.2-fold higher biogas yield than JSC alone.

  1. Taxonomy, Ontology and Semantics at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Sarah Ann

    2011-01-01

    At NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Chief Knowledge Officer has been developing the JSC Taxonomy to capitalize on the accomplishments of yesterday while maintaining the flexibility needed for the evolving information environment of today. A clear vision and scope for the semantic system is integral to its success. The vision for the JSC Taxonomy is to connect information stovepipes to present a unified view for information and knowledge across the Center, across organizations, and across decades. Semantic search at JSC means seemless integration of disparate information sets into a single interface. Ever increasing use, interest, and organizational participation mark successful integration and provide the framework for future application.

  2. Academic Training: 2nd Term - 09.01.2006 - 31.03.2006

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005 - 2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES The world quantum matter by M. Weidemüller, Univ. Freiburg, D 23, 24, 25, 26 January 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Deep space telescopes by G. Bignami, CNRS, Toulouse, F 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Bioinformatics: analysing the genome by V. Jongeneel, O. Michielin, S. Antonorakis A. Thomas and P. Descombes 27, 28 February, 1, 2, 3 March11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challengesby A. de Roeck,CERN-PH, D. Bortoletto, Purdue Univ. USA R. Wigmans, Texas Tech. Univ. USA, W. Riegler, CERN-AT, W. Smith, Univ. of Wisconsin, USA 13, 14, 15, 16, March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Supersymmetry and the LHC by M. Drees, Univ. of Bonn, D 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be...

  3. 2005 - 2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME From 1st of May to 30 June

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES Physics at the Tevatron by B. Heinemann Univ. of Liverpool - Fermilab 15, 16, 17, 18 May 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500, 18 May - Council Chamber Pulsed SC Magnets by M. Wilson, 29, 30, 31 May, 1, 2 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Exploring planets and moons in our solar system by H.O. Rucker / Academy of Sciences, Graz, A 6, 7, 8, 9 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Technological challenges of CLIC by R. Corsini, S. Doebert, S. Redaelli, T. Lefevre / CERN-AB, G. Arnau Izquiedo, H. Mainaud / CERN-TS 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry by A. Ferrari, CERN-AB, M. Silari, CERN-SC, F. Salvat, Facultat de Fisica, Univ. Barcelona, E. 26, 27, 28 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, room 3-006 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place ...

  4. Academic Training - 2nd Term: 08.01.2007 - 31.03.2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 2nd Term : 08.01.2007 - 31.03.2007 LECTURE SERIES Applied Superconductivity by V. Palmieri, INFN, Padova, It. 17, 18, 19 January 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 String Theory for Pedestrians by B. Zwiebach, M.I.T. Cambridge, USA 29, 30, 31 January 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 29, 30 January TH Auditorium on 31 January Introduction to Supersymmetry by D. Kaplan, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA 12, 13, 14, 15 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 The Hunt for the Higgs Particle by F. Zwirner, University of Padova, It 27, 28 February, 1st March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming by F. Fernandez de Vega 15, 16, March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the WWW, and ...

  5. Academic Training - 2nd Term: 08.01.2007 - 31.03.2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 2nd Term : 08.01.2007 - 31.03.2007 LECTURE SERIES Applied Superconductivity by V. Palmieri, INFN, Padova, It. 17, 18, 19 January 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 String Theory for Pedestrians by B. Zwiebach, M.I.T. Cambridge, USA 29, 30, 31 January 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 on 29, 30 January TH Auditorium on 31 January Introduction to Supersymmetry by D. Kaplan, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA 12, 13, 14, 15 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The Hunt for the Higgs Particle by F. Zwirner, University of Padova, It 27, 28 February, 1st March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic by F. Fernandez de Vega 15, 16, March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, an...

  6. Academic Training: 2005 - 2006 Academic Training Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    1st Term : 03.10. 2005 - 16.12.2005 LECTURE SERIES Einstein's impact on the physics of the Twentieth Century by N. Straumann / Univ. Zürich, CH 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 October 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Surviving in space: the challenges of a manned mission to Mars by L. S. Pinsky / Univ. Houston, USA 26, 27, 28 October 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Climate change and challenges for the environment by C. Schluechter, Univ. Ber, CH 14, 15, 16 November 11:00-12:00 - TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, 3rd Floor Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering by Goran Perinic, CERN- AT 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 December 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Predicting natural catastrophes by E. Okal, Northwestern Univ. , USA 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 December 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before ea...

  7. Effects of Acute Exposures to Carbon Dioxide upon Cognitive Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, V. E.; Scully, R. R.; Alexander, D. J.; Lam, C. W.; Young, M.; Satish, U.; Basner, M.

    2017-01-01

    groups. Exposures occurred in the 20-foot environmental chamber in Bldg 7 at JSC. Each group was exposed to each of four concentrations of CO2 (600, 1200, 2500, and 5000 ppm), and the exposure order was balanced across the groups which were randomly assigned to 4 possible complete exposure orders. Study participants and investigators were blinded to the exposure order. Each exposure lasted 4 hours and occurred on the same day each week for 4 consecutive weeks. Testing included the Strategic Management Simulation (SMS) methodology and the Cognition battery of psychometric measures that are being utilized aboard the ISS. Subjects participated in a familiarization session one week prior to the start of exposure sessions. Each exposure session followed the schedule noted in Figure 1 below. On the morning of each exposure, subjects completed the Cognition battery in a conference room at indoor ambient CO2 levels. Subjects then entered the exposure chamber and were acclimated to the environment for 15 minutes before completing another round of the Cognition battery. After a 20 minute rest, subject completed the approx.80 minute SMS. Subjects were allowed another 20 minute rest period before completing the final Cognition test battery in the exposure chamber. Subjects then returned to the conference room where they completed one final round of Cognition. Data from both testing methodologies are currently being analyzed and will be presented. Study investigators have not yet been unblinded to the coded exposure concentrations, but preliminary results suggest differences.

  8. Astronauts Conrad and Kerwin practice Human Vestibular Function experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission, goes over a checklist. The two men are in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC.

  9. Curation of Asteroid Bennu Samples for the OSIRIS-REx Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Nakumara-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    The OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission will collect approximately150 g of material from carbonaceous asteroid Bennu and return it to Earth in 2023. The sample will be curated along with NASA's other astromaterials sample collections at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston. As part of the mission planning, JSC will be engaged in the following four general activities.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) /American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The 1996 JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to (1) further the professional knowledge qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1996.

  11. A comparative study of bio-oils from pyrolysis of microalgae and oil seed waste in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Won; Koo, Bon Seok; Lee, Dong Hyun

    2014-06-01

    The pyrolysis of Scenedesmus sp. and Jatropha seedshell cake (JSC) was investigated under similar operating condition in a fluidized bed reactor for comparison of pyrolytic behaviors from different species of lipids-containing biomass. Microalgae showed a narrower main peak in differential thermogravimetric curve compared to JSC due to different constituents. Pyrolysis liquid yields were similar; liquid's oil proportion of microalgae is higher than JSC. Microalgae bio-oil was characterized by similar carbon and hydrogen contents and higher H/C and O/C molar ratios compared to JSC due to compositional difference. The pyrolytic oils from microalgae and JSC contained more oxygen and nitrogen and less sulfur than petroleum and palm oils. The pyrolytic oils showed high yields of fatty oxygenates and nitrogenous compounds. The microalgae bio-oil features in high concentrations of aliphatic compounds, fatty acid alkyl ester, alcohols and nitriles. Microalgae showed potentials for alternative feedstock for green diesel, and commodity and valuable chemicals.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are as follows: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1994, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard; Sickorez, Donn G.

    1995-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to: (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1994.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993 is presented.

  15. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  16. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    As Friday, March 29 and Monday, April 1st, 2002 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, March 30 - 31. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 2 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday, March 28, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.   Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  17. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    As Friday 29 March and Monday 1st April 2002 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP, bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance, bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday 30-31 March. They will reopen on Tuesday 2 April at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR, bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday 28 March, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning. Restaurant Supervisory Committee Tel. 77551

  18. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    As Friday, April 18 and Monday, April 21, 2003 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (AVENANCE : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, April 19 - 20. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 22 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday, April 17, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.

  19. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEK-END

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As Friday April 9 and Monday April 12 2004 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday and Sunday, April 10 - 11. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 13 at 7 a.m. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.

  20. RESTAURANT AND CAFETERIA SERVICES ARRANGEMENTS FOR 1 MAY 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    1. Restaurants As Wednesday 1 May is an official CERN holiday, restaurants no. 2 (DSR: bldg. 504 - Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance: bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed as from Tuesda 30 April at 18h00. They will reopen on Thursday 2 May at 6h30 (rest. no. 2) and at 7h00 (rest. no. 3). On 1 May, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 1 (COOP: bldg. 501 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. 2. Decentralised services No decentralised services (satellite cafétérias etc.) will operate. 3. Newspaper stand The newspaper kiosque in building 501 will be closed. Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  1. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20 & 21 February 2008 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1: 18, 19, 21 February 2008 - 11:00-12:00 Council Chamber, bldg 503-1-001: 20 February 2008 - 11:00-12:00 Council Chamber, bldg 503-1-001: 21 February 2008 - 14:00-15:00 QCD Phenomenology at High Energy Prof. Bryan WEBBER, Cambridge University, UK Whatever kind of physics may be found at the LHC, strongly-interacting particles will be involved and therefore quantum chromodynamics will play a crucial role. For processes at high energy scales, perturbation theory remains the most powerful approach. These lectures will review the foundations and limitations of perturbative QCD and its application to high-energy processes, including jet production and fragmentation, deep inelastic scattering, and heavy quark and Higgs boson production.

  2. 2007-2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES QCD Phenomenology at High Energy Prof. Bryan WEBBER, Cambridge University, UK18, 19, 20 & 21 February 2008 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1: 18, 19, 21 February 2008 - 11:00-12:00 Council Chamber, bldg 503-1-001: 20 February 2008 - 11:00-12:00 Council Chamber, bldg 503-1-001: 21 February 2008 - 14:00-15:00 Whatever kind of physics may be found at the LHC, strongly-interacting particles will be involved and therefore quantum chromodynamics will play a crucial role. For processes at high energy scales, perturbation theory remains the most powerful approach. These lectures will review the foundations and limitations of perturbative QCD and its application to high-energy processes, including jet production and fragmentation, deep inelastic scattering, and heavy quark and Higgs boson production.

  3. CERN celebrates a double anniversary

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A symposium will celebrate the double anniversary of the observation of neutral currents in 1973 and the discovery of W and Z bosons in 1983. The symposium will also provide an opportunity to discuss future discoveries at CERN. The symposium will be held on 16 September in the Main Auditorium from 9:00 hrs and will be open to the public. If you cannot access the Main Auditorium, the symposium will be broadcast live in the following conference rooms: AB Auditorium II (Bldg 864) in Prévessin IT Auditorium (Bldg 31) AT Auditorium (Bldg 30) You can also follow it online with the Webcast accessible from the CERN home page. See the complete programme under Seminars.

  4. 2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME - 3rd Term: From 1st of May to 30 June 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES QCD and high energy nuclear collisions D. Kharzeev / BNL, Upton, USA 7, 8, 9 May 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 9 May - Council Chamber Acceleration of particles in plasma J. Faure / Ecole Polytechnique ENSTA, Palaiseau, F. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 May 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Nanotechnologies by C. Bottani / Polytechnic of Milano, I., M. Ferrari, Univ. of Texas, Health Science Center, Houston, USA, A. Li Bassi, Polytechnic of Milano, I. 11, 12, 13 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 11 June - Council Chamber The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  5. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 300: Surface Release Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 300 is located in Areas 23, 25, and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 300 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 as Surface Release Areas and is comprised of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), which are associated with the identified Building (Bldg): {sm_bullet} CAS 23-21-03, Bldg 750 Surface Discharge {sm_bullet} CAS 23-25-02, Bldg 750 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 23-25-03, Bldg 751 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-60-01, Bldg 3113A Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-60-02, Bldg 3901 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-62-01, Bldg 3124 Contaminated Soil {sm_bullet} CAS 26-60-01, Bldg 2105 Outfall and Decon Pad The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 23-21-03, 23-25-02, and 23-25-03 is no further action. As a best management practice, approximately 48 feet of metal piping was removed from CAS 23-25-02 and disposed of as sanitary waste. The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 25-60-01, 25-60-02, 25-62-01, and 26-60-01, is clean closure. Closure activities for these CASs included removing and disposing of soil impacted with total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel range organics (TPH-DRO), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and cesium (Cs)-137, concrete impacted with TPH-DRO, and associated piping impacted with TPH-DRO. CAU 300 was closed in accordance with the NDEP-approved CAU 300 Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006). The closure activities specified in the CAP were based on the recommendations presented in the CAU 300 Corrective Action Decision Document (NNSA/NSO, 2005). This Closure Report documents CAU 300 closure activities. During closure activities, approximately 40 cubic yards (yd3) of low-level waste consisting of TPH-DRO-, PCB

  6. Workshop and Conference on Clay Microstructure: The Microstructure of Fine-Grained Terrigenous Marine Sediments - From Muds to Shale Held in Stennis, Mississippi on October 4-7, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-07

    IN 47907 (371 494-5028 ANDERSON, DR. A. DEPT. OF OCNY TAMU COLLEGE STATION, TX 77843 [409] 845-7211 ASPER DR VERNON USM/CMS BLDG 1105 STENNIS SPACE... SOMERSET TAl 4XW UK KODAMA, DR KENNETH P. DEPT GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES LEHIGH UNIV BETHLEHEM, PA 18015 [215] 758-3663 KNAUER DR GEORGE A m USM/CMS BLDG...CONCENTRATION SUSPENSIONS R. Kirby Ravensrodd Consultants Ltd 6 Queens Drive l n Taunton, Somerset TAl 4XW UK Latest findings on the behaviour of fine sediment

  7. Changes to the shuttle circuits

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    To fit with passengers expectation, there will be some changes to the shuttle circuits as from Monday 10 October. See details on http://cern.ch/ShuttleService (on line on 7 October). Circuit No. 5 is cancelled as circuit No. 1 also stops at Bldg. 33. In order to guarantee shorter travel times, circuit No. 1 will circulate on Meyrin site only and circuit No. 2, with departures from Bldg. 33 and 500, on Prévessin site only. Site Services Section

  8. Handbook for Evaluating Ecological Effects of Pollution at DARCOM Installations. Volume 6. Unexpected Declines in Animal Populations,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    should be notified. 3. Animal Rescue: If injured animals are present, they may require care or euthanasia . 4. Investigation of Cause: If the cause of the...Manager 602 261-3656 New Mexico U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Suite 704, Americo Towers Bldg. 2721 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (continued) 2-27...NV 89502 New Mexico Director 505 988-6217 BLM State Office U.S. Post Office and Federal Bldg. S. Federal Place P.O. Box 1449 Santa Fe, NM 87501

  9. Managing Space Situational Awareness Using the Space Surveillance Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    Spencer and Patrick S. Williams Department of Aerospace Engineering The Pennsylvania State University 229 Hammond Bldg...Department of Aerospace Engineering  The  Pennsylvania   State  University  229 Hammond Bldg.                         University Park, PA 16802...information between the state before and after a particular observation occurs, was derived by Hershey et al. [66] for Gaussian posterior and prior

  10. Forecast Model and Product Assessment Project User’s Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Location System Configuration Operating System Carson Room 106, Bldg. 1622 Dell Precision T7400 Minitower, 2XQuad Core, 2.66 GHz processors, 8 GB DDR2 ...Dual Core, 2.40 GHz processors, 2 GB DDR2 RAM, 140 GB SATA Disk Red Hat LINUX, 64 Bit Stokes Room 104, Bldg 1622 Dell Optiplex 745 Small form...Factor, Dual Core, 2.40 GHz processors, 2 GB DDR2 RAM, 140 GB SATA Disk Red Hat LINUX, 32 Bit Harold HPC facility, Aberdeen, MD HPC UNIX MJM HPC

  11. Achieving Workplace Health through Application of Wellness Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: 1) Understand and measure JSC workplace health: a) levels, sources, indicators & effects of negative, work-related stress; b) define leading indicators of emerging issues. 2 Provide linkage to outcomes: a) Focus application of wellness strategies & HR tools; b) Increase quality of work life and productivity. 3) Current effort will result in: a) Online assessment tool; b) Assessment of total JSC population (civil service & contractors); c) Application of mitigation tools and strategies. 4) Product of the JSC Employee Wellness Program. 5) Collaboration with Corporate Health Improvement Program/University of Arizona.

  12. A Practitioner's Perspective on Taxonomy, Ontology and Findability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the presenters perspective on developing a taxonomy for JSC to capitalize on the accomplishments of yesterday, while maintaining the flexibility needed for the evolving information of today. A clear vision and scope for the semantic system is integral to its success. The vision for the JSC Taxonomy is to connect information stovepipes to present a unified view for information and knowledge across the Center, across organizations, and across decades. Semantic search at JSC means seamless integration of disparate information sets into a single interface. Ever increasing use, interest, and organizational participation mark successful integration and provide the framework for future application.

  13. Direct Analysis of JV-Curves Applied to an Outdoor-Degrading CdTe Module (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D; Kurtz, S.; Ulbrich, C.; Gerber, A.; Rau, U.

    2014-03-01

    We present the application of a phenomenological four parameter equation to fit and analyze regularly measured current density-voltage JV curves of a CdTe module during 2.5 years of outdoor operation. The parameters are physically meaningful, i.e. the short circuit current density Jsc, open circuit voltage Voc and differential resistances Rsc, and Roc. For the chosen module, the fill factor FF degradation overweighs the degradation of Jsc and Voc. Interestingly, with outdoor exposure, not only the conductance at short circuit, Gsc, increases but also the Gsc(Jsc)-dependence. This is well explained with an increase in voltage dependent charge carrier collection in CdTe.

  14. Incorporation of a light and carrier collection management nano-element array into superstrate a-Si:H solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Nam, Wook; Ji, Liming; Benanti, Travis L.; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Wagner, Sigurd; Wang, Qi; Nemeth, William; Neidich, Douglas; Fonash, Stephen J.

    2011-08-01

    Superstrate a-Si:H solar cells incorporating a nano-column array for light and photocarrier collection have been fabricated and evaluated. It is found that the short circuit current density (JSC) is significantly increased while the open circuit voltage and fill factor are not detrimentally affected by this architecture. Numerical analysis of JSC matches experiment and shows that the enhanced JSC observed is due to both effective absorber thickness and photonic-plasmonic effects. Further analysis shows that this nano-column architecture can lead to a 42% increase in conversion efficiency over that of the planar control for a 200 nm absorber thickness cell.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14.

  16. The LSR/2 Optically Coupled Signal Transmission Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    PARK ATTN DR. SHERMAN KARP ATTN DR. MELVIN L. PRICE, MS-44 ARCHITECT BLDG HUNTSVILLE, AL 35807 1400 WILSON BLVD ARLINGTON, VA 22209 ENGINEERING...COMMANDER ATTN EL, ELECTRONICS DIV NAVAL WEAPONS CENTER ATTN COL GERALD P. CHAPMAN ATTN 315, LASER/INFRARED SYS DIV KIRTLAND AFB, NM 87117 ATTN 394

  17. An Advanced 500-MHZ-Bandwidth Fiber-Optic Signal Link for EMP and General Laboratory Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    ATTN R-13, H. HOEHN, N. GROVE ATTN DR. SHERMAN KARP FORT GEORGE G. MEADE, NO 20755 ARCHITECT BLDG 1400 WILSON BLVD DIRECTOR ARLINGTON, VA 22209 DEFENSE...COMMANDER ATTN M2/2145, S. KIMBLE AFWL/DYC REDONDO BEACH, CA 90278 ATTN EL, ELECTRONICS DIV ATTN COL GERALD P. CHAPMAN KIRTLAND AFB, NM 87117 HUGHES

  18. PENSION FUND

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 Annual Report of the Pension Fund, which was approved by Council at its session of 22 June 2007, is now available from Departmental secretariats. Pension beneficiaries who wish to obtain this document should contact the Administration of the Fund (tel. 004122 767 9194/8798), bldg 5, 1-030.

  19. Pension fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Annual Report of the Pension Fund, which was approved by Council at its session of 23 June 2006, is now available from Departmental secretariats. Pension beneficiaries who wish to obtain this document should contact the Administration of the Fund (tel. 00 41 22 767 91 94), bldg 5, 1-030.

  20. PENSION FUND

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 Annual Report of the Pension Fund, which was approved by Council at its Session of 22 June 2007, is now available from Departmental secretariats. Pension beneficiaries who wish to obtain this document should contact the Administration of the Fund (tel. 004122 767 9194/8798), Bldg 5, 1-030.

  1. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 Annual Report of the Pension Fund, which was approved by Council at its session of 17 June 2004, will be available as of beginning of July from Department secretariats. Pension beneficiaries who wish to obtain this document should contact the Administration of the Fund (tel. 004122 767 9194), bldg 5, 1-030.

  2. Change of offices for the FAP Department

    CERN Multimedia

    FAP Department

    2016-01-01

    The FAP Department would like to inform personnel that, due to office renovation work, a number of FAP services currently located on the third floor of building 4 and on the first floor of building 33 will move to temporary offices in building 653 as from late June.   The following services will be relocated to: Accounting services (J. Robinson): FAP-ACC-AP – Accounts Payable, to bldg 653-R-008 – C. Marme FAP-ACC-GA – General Accounting, to bldg 653-1-007 – C. Poncet FAP-ACC-PA – Salary Office, to bldg 653-R-011 – S. Baudat FAP-ACC-PA – Claims, to bldg 653-R-007 – S. Baudat   And the section FAP-TPR-MI - Monitoring and reporting (L. Lockwood) will be located in the office 653-1-016.   The removals will take place from Thursday 30 June until Tuesday 5 July 2016 inclusive and during this period, telephone and e-mail contact may be disrupted. Temporary office number...

  3. Development of a Framework for Multimodal Research: Creation of a Bibliographic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    103. 67 Rojas , D. C. Alternating and Divided Attention in Dual Task Performance: Auditory, Visual, and Inter-Modal Event Related Potentials...ARL HR MF MR C HERNANDEZ BLDG 3040 RM 220 FORT SILL OK 73503-5600 10 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY - HRED ATTN AMSRD ARL HR MW E

  4. The Importance of Secondary Electron Collisional Ionization (Avalanche) for X-Ray Pulses Incident on Missiles-in-Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-14

    CODE F31 K CAUDLE 3 CYS ATTN: DOCUMENTS SECTION BLDG 4484 ATTN: CODE H20 ATTN: DRCPM.PE.EA W WAGNER ATTN: CODE H23 R SMITH ATTN: HAWK PROJ OFCR...CORP ATTN: R CASEY ATTN: A EDENFELD ATTN: TECH LIB ATTN: N HADDAD GENERAL ELECTRIC CC ATTN: G GATi MD-E184 41 DEPT OF DEFENSE CONTRACTORS (CONTINUED

  5. ETT Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Monday 4 March, at 10h00 - SL Auditorium, Prévessin, bldg. 864 Radioisotopes in Medicine: Requirements, Production and Application by Gerd-J.BEYER / University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology (see details at page 7 of the Weekly Bulletin nr 10/2002).  

  6. Modeling human muscle disease in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Steffen, Leta S; Howell, Melanie H.; Pusack, Timothy J; Lawrence, Chris; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Modeling human muscle disease in zebrafish correspondence: Corresponding author. Children's Hospital Boston, Enders Bldg, Rm 570, 300 Longwood Ave Boston, MA 02115. Tel.: +1 617 355 7576. (Kunkel, Louis M.) (Kunkel, Louis M.) Program in Genomics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Children's Hospital Boston - Boston--> , MA 02115--> - UNITED STATES (Guyon, Jeffrey R.) Program in Genomics a...

  7. In Situ Corrosion and Heat Loss Assessment of Two Nonstandard Underground Heat Distribution System Piping Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    the U.S. Army Engineer Re- search and Development Center was COL Kevin J. Wilson and the Director was Dr. Jeffery P. Holland. ERDC/CERL TR-11-14 ix...Few small rocks. Significant root and construction debris (wood planks ). 8. Depth of Burial: 60” below grade to conduit top (line to Bldg 646). 9

  8. Astronaut Neil Armstrong participates in lunar surface simulation training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), participates in lunar surface simulation training on April 18, 1969 in bldg 9, Manned Spacecraft Center. Armstrong is the prime crew commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Here, he is standing on Lunar Module mockup foot pad preparing to ascend steps.

  9. Astronaut Neil Armstrong participates in lunar surface siumlation training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Suited Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit, participates in lunar surface simulation training on April 18, 1969, in bldg 9, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Armstrong is the prime crew commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Here, he simulates scooping up a lunar surface sample.

  10. 78 FR 77697 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ..., Washington, DC 20024, (202) 720-8873; Air Force: Ms. Connie Lotfi, Air Force Real Property Agency, 2261.... bldg.; bathroom; major repairs required; contamination; asbestos; contact GSA for more info. Siphon...-1983; entry by appointment with USAR/GSA; asbestos and lead based paint; contact GSA for...

  11. 76 FR 18194 - Notice of Patent Application Deadline for Advanced Battery Technology Related Patents for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... Department of the Army Notice of Patent Application Deadline for Advanced Battery Technology Related Patents for Exclusive, Partially Exclusive, or Non- Exclusive Licenses; Battery Day Patent Licensing Meeting... patent licensing meeting was subsequently held February 16, 2011 at the SAIC Enterprise Bldg...

  12. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  13. Management of Leadchate from Army Sanitary Landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    C0ONTAINNENT X x X X X COLLECTION SYSTEM LEACHATE TREATMENTxx -PROCESSES A GAS CONTROL SYSTEMS x x x GROUNDWATER RENOVATION TECHNOLOGIES x x x x 28 5 LEACHATE...Horace R. Collins Director Ohio Div. of Geol. Survey Servicio Geologico de P.R. Fountain Square, Bldg. B Dept. de Recursos Naturales Columbus, OH

  14. 77 FR 25189 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    .../gate New Mexico Two River Project US Army COE Rosewell NM 88201 Landholding Agency: COE Property Number... ] Status: Unutilized Comments: Parcel was in agricultural production three yrs. ago; now reseeded in native... access denied & no alternative method to gain access w/out comprising security Reasons: Secured Area Bldg...

  15. 76 FR 70448 - Publication of Inaccurate or Inactive Ocean Common Carrier Tariffs; Order to Show Cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ..., PR 00908-6620... 017333 MP Line de Mexico, Bosque de Duraznos 69-1105 Torre 019817 B, Bosques de las Lomas, Mexico City, Mexico Olympic International Ltd., Room 1217, World Trade Center 009647 Bldg., 2-4-1, Hamamatsucho, Minato-Ku, Tokyo 105, Japan..... Omnium Brasil Line, LLC, 2353 St. Johns Bluff Road, South 018968...

  16. 77 FR 52397 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Roberts Monterey CA 93451-5000 Landholding Agency: Army Property Number: 21200130081 Status: Excess GSA... of asbestos/lead paint, most recent use--lab, off-site use only ] Bldg. 219 Ft. George G. Meade Ft.... 294 Ft. George G. Meade Ft. Meade MD 20755 Landholding Agency: Army Property Number: 21200140081...

  17. 78 FR 53821 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... damage; needs major repairs California Bldgs. 18026, 18028 Camp Roberts Monterey CA 93451-5000...; lead-based paint; asbestos; contact Army for more info. 22 Buildings Hwy. 101, Bldg. 109 Camp Roberts.... George G. Meade Ft. Meade MD 20755 Landholding Agency: Army Property Number: 21200140078 Status...

  18. Demolition work

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Because of demolition work inside Bldg. 251, two containers will be placed on the route Démocrite. For security reasons, the part of this road in front of barrack 553 will be closed to circulation from 5 to 12 November. Thank you, in advance for your understanding. PH-SMI

  19. The Gordon Research Conference on Electron Spectroscopy Held in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire on 18-22 July 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-22

    University of Maryland), K.T. Leung (University of Waterloo) M15 XPS-AES Analysis of CdTe Thin Films Grown by Rf Sputtering J.L. Pena, CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad...Maryland BM Zurich Research Laboratory IPST- CSS Bldg. 8803 Ruschhikow College Park, MD 20742 Switzerland Dehmer, Joseph L. Brown-8 First, Phillip N. Strg

  20. Item Construction and Psychometric Models Appropriate for Constructed Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Satistics Universit of Illinois Newtowns. PA 191W00 101 Ilin Hall Depar-n of Paycl-loV 725 Soth Wright SL. 603 E. Daniel SL. Dr. Arne Beland Chaimpaign...Schorr AFOSRANL Bldg, 410 Pqeoloica* &Quantitative Bolling, AFM DC =033.44W Dr. Ronald A. Weawanm Foundations Box 146 Coiqe of Educaion Dr IKiktUei TaSUo

  1. 76 FR 72617 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Eprinomectin; N-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... reflect approval of an original new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Merial Ltd. The NADA provides... Blvd., Bldg. 500, Duluth, GA 30096-4640 filed NADA 141-327 that provides for veterinary prescription... control of internal and external parasites of cattle on pasture with persistent effectiveness. The NADA is...

  2. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  3. Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium Proceedings Held in Austin, Texas on August 9-11, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    di Produzione 1611 Headway Circle, Bldg 2 Austin TX 78712 Ed Economia DeirAzienda Austin TX 78754 Corso Duca Abruzzi 24 512 339-2922J fax: 512 339...Street Aeronautical Engineering & Mechanics Ed Economia DellAzienda Tucson AZ 85713 Troy NY 12180 Corso Duca Abruzzi 24 602 792-2616/ fax: 602 792

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES: Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    10, 11, 12, 13, 14 February ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes by T.DAMOUR, IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, F - Physical motivation behind Einstein's theory. - Mathematical formalism of General Relativity. - Experimental confirmations of Einstein's theory. - Introduction to Black Holes physics.

  5. Direction Finding With Mutually Orthogonal Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    banded spread spectrum signals in code-division multiple access ( CDMA ) cellular telephone systems. Their analysis begins by first formulating the...Attn: Dr. Charles Cerny 2241 Avionics Circle, Bldg 620 WPAFB OH 45433-7318 (937) 255-2620 x4067 ( DSN 785-2620), charles.cerny@wpafb.af.mil 11

  6. 77 FR 24587 - Addition of Certain Persons to the Entity List; and Implementation of Entity List Annual Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Ali Bldg., Al Nakheel St., Deira, P.O. Box 171978, Dubai, U.A.E. B. Modifications to the Entity List... Economic Powers Act. BIS continues to carry out the provisions of the Export Administration Act, as... (including potential economic, environmental, public health and safety effects, distributive impacts,...

  7. An Investigation of Knowledge Transfer and Retention in a Government Procurement Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    residencies of the medical field and paralegal assistance in the judicial system are not only common but more over expected if an individual seeks...Communications Systems Wing Brig Gen Samuel Greaves 483 N. Aviation Blvd Area B Bldg 8 El Segundo AFB, CA 90245-2808 310- 653-9001 10

  8. 77 FR 9610 - Gastroenterology-Urology Devices; Reclassification of Sorbent Hemoperfusion Devices for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... prolonged and costly hospital stays. In 2009, there were approximately 43,500 patients hospitalized in the... CONTACT: Melissa Burns, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, rm. 1646, Silver Spring, MD 20993, 301-796-5616, melissa.burns@fda.hhs...

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  10. 5 CFR Appendix A to Part 581 - List of Agents Designated To Accept Legal Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...—South Bldg., PO Box 2415, Washington, DC 20013, (202) 720-5964 Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Chief, Labor Relations Branch, Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, Consolidated Farm Service Agency, Room 6732... Environment Forest Service Washington Office Director, Personnel Management, 900 RP-E, PO Box 96090...

  11. 77 FR 71404 - Notice of Intent to License Government-Owned Inventions; Intent to License on a Partially...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ...-436-8467, eric.s.mcgill.ctr@mail.mil , US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), AMSRD-ECB... Center, AMSRD-ECB-PI-BP-TT, Bldg E3330/Rm 241 5183 Blackhawk Road, APG, MD 21010-5424, telephone: 410-436...

  12. 76 FR 17840 - Notice of Intent To License Government-Owned Inventions; Intent To License Exclusively

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ...-436-8467, eric.s.mcgill@us.army.mil , U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), AMSRD-ECB... Center, AMSRD-ECB-PI-BP-TT, Bldg E3330/Rm 241 5183 Blackhawk Road, APG, MD 21010-5424, telephone: 410-436...

  13. A Comparison of Various Types of Head-Related Transfer Functions for 3-D Sound in the Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    or her with a robotic footpad under each foot. The footpads passively follow the movement of each foot to provide support directly related to the...B KASPAR 3701 N FAIRFAX DR ARLINGTON VA 22203-1714 ARL HRED AVNC FIELD ELEMENT ATTN AMSRL HR MJ (R ARMSTRONG) PO BOX 620716 BLDG514 FTRUCKER AL

  14. Proceedings of the DoD/Industry Technical Information Conference 7-8 December 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    P.o. ao 226015 Dallas, W 75206 128 Virginia lLsh-Dvrbln William Fradrick manager, Special Projects Director, Market Research and Analysis Amrican...Technology, Corporate Office Manager, market Research and Analysis Hughes Aircraft Company TRW Defense System Group Centinela & Teals, Bldg. 4006/1845 Z1

  15. RESTAURANT NO. 2: PRICE INCREASES

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    'DSR', the concession holder of Restaurant no. 2 (bldg. 504 - Meyrin site), has submitted to the Restaurant Supervisory Committee a request to increase certain prices. After close examination, the Committee has established that the proposed increases are compatible with the relevant price indexing mechanisms and other contractual conditions. The new prices will apply as from Monday, June 30, 2003.

  16. RESTAURANT NO. 3: PRICE INCREASES

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    'AVENANCE', the concession holder of Restaurant no. 3 (bldg. 866 - Prévessin site), has submitted to the Restaurant Supervisory Committee a request to increase its prices. After close examination, the Committee has established that the proposed increases are compatible with the relevant price indexing mechanisms and other contractual conditions. The new prices will apply as from Monday, June 2, 2003.

  17. 76 FR 6144 - Positron Emission Tomography; Notice of Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... to submit applications for marketing approval. FDA recognizes that many PET drug producers are..., Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 6164, Silver Spring, MD... literature \\1\\ to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the PET drugs in widespread use for...

  18. 77 FR 14411 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This Notice... Colorado Kitchen Center Prep AF Academy USAF CO 80840 Landholding Agency: Air Force Property Number...: vacant; bldg. has no heat Kitchen Center Prep AF Academy USAF CO 80840 Landholding Agency: Air...

  19. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 16, Number 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    have Bldg., Box 9, College of Engineering, University of the opportunity to become familiar with these tech- Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 - (602) 621-3054...603 Elsentraut, O.K ............ 1629 Derecho , A.T ................ 134 Dowdell, J.K ............... 1217 Elshima, K

  20. 75 FR 445 - In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices and Products Containing the Same; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... complainant is: Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Sumsung Main Bldg., 250, 2-ga, Taepyeongno, Jung-gu, Seoul..., 2009, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337, on behalf of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. of Korea. A supplement to the complaint was filed on December 16, 2009. The complaint...

  1. 76 FR 39897 - In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices and Products Containing the Same; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ..., as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337, on behalf of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. of Korea. Letters... upon which this notice of investigation shall be served: (a) The complainant is: Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Samsung Electronics Bldg., 1320-10, Seocho 2-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Korea 137- 857. (b) The...

  2. 78 FR 51177 - Notice of Intent To Grant Partially Exclusive Patent License; ICAP Patent Brokerage, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... No. 6,384,953: Micro-Dynamic Optical Device.//U.S. Patent No. 6,433,465: Energy- Harvesting Device... September 4, 2013. ADDRESSES: Written objections are to be filed with the Office of Research and Technology... Technology Applications, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, Code 72120, 53560 Hull St, Bldg...

  3. 77 FR 5525 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ....; current use: Fee booth; need repairs--walls contaminated with mold Kansas Shower/Latrine Stockdale Park...-site removal only; 576 sq. ft.; current use: Shower/ toilet; need repairs--bldg. deteriorating 2 Single... GSA Number: 1-X-MN-0595-AA Comments: 2,368 sq. ft.; current use: Office, garage, cold storage...

  4. 76 FR 20357 - Determination That KEFLEX (Cephalexin) Capsule, Equivalent to 333 Milligrams Base, Was Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, Rm. 6368, Silver...-mg strength was approved on May 12, 2006. KEFLEX is a cephalosporin antibiotic indicated for the... previous instances (see 72 FR 9763, March 5, 2007; 61 FR 25497, May 21, 1996), the Agency has...

  5. TRADOC Annual Command History, 1 January to 31 December 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    RADOC Crisis Actionr Team ... 22)ý,. * Resource Mgt & Plans Dir OC, MITER EV A AUDIT COMIII . COiMMAD HISTORIA OTCINE ATBO-K. Bldg 5 16ý# -MBSATN...Arms command LTG LP Wishart IIf 6 Aug 90 - 15 Aug 91 LTG WA shoffner 16 Aug 91 - DCG/CDR combined Arms support Command LTG LE Salomon 6 Aug 90 - DCG

  6. 78 FR 62639 - National Institute on Aging; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ..., Gateway Bldg., 2c212, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814, 301-402-7701, nakhaib@nia.nih.gov . Name... Building 2c212, 7201 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD 20814, 301-402- 7704, crucew@nia.nih.gov . Name of... Institute on Aging, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2c212, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-9666, markowsa@nia.nih...

  7. Hubble Space Telescope mock-up in use in the MDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    View of helium filled mock-up of the Hubble Space Telescope in use in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in bldg 9A. The mock-up is being maneuvered on the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The Space Shuttle full fuselage trainer is seen in the background, to the left.

  8. Employee Turnover and Absenteeism: A Future Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Department (NMPC-6) Washington, DC 20350 Naval Training Analysis and Evaluation Group Orlando, FL 32813 Commanding Officer ATTN: TIC , Bldg. 2068 Naval...RD-i Washington, DC 20380 Educacion Advisor Education Center (E031) MCDEC Quantico, VA 22134 Commanding Officer Education Center (E031) MCDZC Quantico

  9. Gulf Coast. Ports for Naval Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    604 - - MOTOR RAILCARS CONTAINERS 30 OTERMINAL HIGHWAY INPROCIESSING CAPABILITY HANDLING VHA 20,000 HIGHWAY 15,000...Director U.S. Army Technical Center for Explosive Safety ATTN: SMCAC- ESL Savanna, IL 61074 (1) P DIA TRANSCOM DET/DCX7B Bldg 213 Washington, DC

  10. Interfon

    CERN Multimedia

    Interfon

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative open to international civil servants. We welcome you to discover the advantages and discounts negotiated with our suppliers either on our website www.interfon.fr or at our information office located at CERN, on the ground floor of bldg. 504, open Monday through Friday from 12.30 to 15.30.

  11. 75 FR 6656 - SFIREG Pesticide Operations and Management Working Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... AGENCY SFIREG Pesticide Operations and Management Working Committee Meeting AGENCY: Environmental... (AAPCO)/State FIFRA Issues Research and Evaluation Group (SFIREG), Pesticide Operations and Management... Potomac Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. The hours of operation of this...

  12. 75 FR 2549 - Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, rm. 5618, Silver Spring, MD 20993, 301- 796-6152, FAX: 301...) medications and other substances that interfere with the technologies the devices employ. Each session will..., emergency response units, nursing homes, and physicians' offices. Some in the clinical and patient...

  13. Command, Control, and Communications: Techniques for the Reliable Assessment of Concept Execution (C3TRACE) Modeling Environment: The Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    that a specific communication event determines the task execution order. A user-defined tactical decision type means that an algebraic expression...ARL HRED AVNC FLD ELMT ATTN AMSRD ARL HR MJ D DURBIN BLDG 4506 (DCD) RM 107 FT RUCKER AL 36362-5000 1 ARL HRED AMCOM AUN FLD ELMT

  14. Optimization of Army-Navy/Portable Special Search (AN/PSS)-14 Operator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    44 6050403020100 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 Beyond Calculus Calculus Strong School Algebra Weak School Algebra Years Since Last Algebra Pe rc en...40121 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY - HRED AVNC FIELD ELEMENT ATTN AMSRD ARL HR MJ D DURBIN BLDG 4506 (DCD) RM 107 FT RUCKER AL 36362

  15. 75 FR 34630 - Iranian Transactions Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    .... 2461 note); Pub. L. 106-387, 114 Stat. 1549; Pub. L. 110-96, 121 Stat. 1011; E.O. 12613, 52 FR 41940, 3..., 20 Pedder St, Central, Hong Kong; Bank Melli Iran Bldg, 111 St 24, 929 Arasat, Baghdad, Iraq; PO...

  16. 77 FR 71435 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This Notice... Directions: T077 & T078; NASA Shuttle Storage Warehouses Comments: off-site removal only; approx. 3,200 sf...: Surplus GSA Number: 7-I-UT-0528 Directions: includes 6,192 sf. office bldg.; 4,800 sf. warehouse; 1,120...

  17. STS-26 Commander Hauck poses on shuttle mockup aft flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck poses on shuttle mockup aft flight deck in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Hauck's right hand is propped on Onorbit Station control panel A2 remote manipulator system (RMS) translation hand control. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  18. Astronaut Neil Armstrong participates in lunar surface siumlation training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil Armstrong, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), participates in lunar surface siumlation training on April 18, 1969 in bldg 9, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Armstrong is prime crew commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Here, he is opening a sample return container. At the right is the Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) and the Lunar Module Mockup.

  19. Static Aeroelastic Response of an Aircraft With Asymmetric Wing Planforms Representative of Combat Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    FIBRA ATTN: Christopher E. White 1 Southwest Research Institute Bldg. 45 ATTN: Wiede K. Cutshall 2130 Eighth St., Suite 11 Mechanical and Fluids...Engineering Division Wright Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7552 6220 Culebra Rd. San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 WL/ FIBRA ATrN: CPT Steve Pitrof Wright Patterson AFB, OH

  20. Academic Training: The cosmic microwave background - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 The cosmic microwave background M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  1. Development of an Information Sheet for Intermediary Users of the Defense Technical Information Center’s Defense RDT&E Online System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Avenue, MS 2-0212 Mountain View, CA 94042 Ms. Betty Fogler USAFA/ EFSELD" Library USAF Academy Colorado Springs, CO 80840-5721 Ms. Judith N. Hecht...AB Bldg. 3323, West Wing Redstone Arsenal, AL 35897-6280 -47- S-7. Mr. Wayne McCollom Air Weather Service Technical Library Scott AFB, IL 62225-5438

  2. 75 FR 31807 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless; Republication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... Engineering & Construction Management, MA-50, 1000 Independence Ave, SW., Washington, DC 20585: (202) 586..., Asset Management Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Washington Navy Yard, 1330 Patterson... hall; 2,519 sq. ft.--maint. shop South Dakota Camp Crook Bldg. No. 2002 Camp Crook Co: Harding SD...

  3. Astronaut Russell Schweickart inside simulator for EVA training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 9 (Spacecraft 104/Lunar Module 3/Saturn 504) space mission, is seen inside Chamber 'A', Space Environment Simulation Laboratory, bldg 32, participating in dry run activity in preparpation for extravehicular activity.

  4. Academic Training: A walk through the LHC injector chain - POSTPONED!

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 14, 15, 16 February from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 A walk through the LHC injector chain M. BENEDIKT, P. COLLIER, K. SCHINDL /CERN-AB The lectures are postponed. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  5. Interfon

    CERN Multimedia

    Interfon

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative open to international civil servants. We welcome you to discover the advantages and discounts negotiated with our suppliers either on our website www.interfon.fr accueil or at our information office located at CERN, on the ground floor of bldg. 504, Monday through Friday from 12.30 to 15.30.

  6. Interfon

    CERN Multimedia

    Interfon

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative open to international civil servants. We welcome you to discover the advantages and discounts negotiated with our suppliers either on our website www.interfon.fr accueil or at our information office located at CERN, on the ground floor of bldg. 504, Monday through Friday from 12.30 to 15.30

  7. Interfon

    CERN Multimedia

    Interfon

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative open to international civil servants. We welcome you to discover the advantages and discounts negotiated with our suppliers either on our website http://www.interfon.fr/accueil or at our information office located at CERN, on the ground floor of bldg. 504, Monday through Friday from 12.30 to 15.30

  8. Eielson Air Force Base Infrastructure Development in Support of RED FLAG-Alaska Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    MAAS Colonel, USAF Vice Commander Date EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT IN SUPPORT OF RED FLAG-ALASKA...Name Address1 Address2 Address3 City State Zip Governor of Alaska Palin The Honorable Sarah 240 Main St., Ste. 300 Court Plaza Bldg. Juneau AK 99801

  9. Hot-Metal Simulating Igniter for In-Bed Thermal Initiation of Granular Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    simulator, primers, MIC , thermite, shipping container 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 14 19a...65N PICATINNY ARSENAL NJ 07806-5000 1 PM TMAS SFAE ASM TMA MS R KOWALSKI BLDG 171A PICATINNY ARSENAL NJ 07806-5000 1

  10. Verification of Use of IBHVG In Screening of High-Metal Loading Igniter Materials for Optimum Ignition of JA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    primers, MIC , thermite 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 28 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...5000 1 PM TMAS SFAE ASM TMA MS R KOWALSKI BLDG 171A PICATINNY ARSENAL NJ 07806-5000 1 ST MARKS POWDER GENERAL DYNAMICS

  11. Navy Recruit’s Expectations of Productivity, Liking, and Intentions to Quit under Different Supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    20360 ATTN: TIC , Bldg. 2068 Naval Training Equipment Centeraval Matrial Comand Orlando, nL 32813 Director, Productivity Management Office MAT-OOK Chief...Barnes-Farrell Dr. J. Richard Heaman Department of Psychology School of Organizacion University of Hawaii and Management 2430 Campus Road Box 1A, Yale

  12. Employee Commitment to Organizations: A Conceptual Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    35 Exhibit 3 Hypothesized Antecedents and Outcomes of Organizacional Commitment (adopted from Steers, 1977a) Personal characteristics...characteristics Retention tics _Job effort W exencl- I IIf r - Exhibit 4 Comparison of Within versus Between Organization Comitment Scores Organizational State...Naval Training Analysis and Evaluation Group Orlando, FL 32813 Commanding Officer ATTN: TIC , Bldg. 2068 Naval Training Equipment Center Orlando, FL

  13. Human-Robot Interface Controller Usability for Mission Planning on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    sponsored by the Robotics Collaboration Army Technology Objective (RCATO) and the High-Definition Cognition (HD-COG) in Operational Environments Army...FORT KNOX KY 40121 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY – HRED AWC FIELD ELEMENT RDRL HRM DJ D DURBIN BLDG 4506 ( DCD ) RM 107 FORT RUCKER AL

  14. CE-SAM: A Conversational Interface for ISR Mission Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    apps – which has also determined their success – is that they typically do not require training to be used. In general they pose low cognitive overhead... DCD ) RM 107 FORT RUCKER AL 36362-5000 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY – HRED (PDF) RDRL HRM CK J REINHART 10125 KINGMAN RD BLDG 317 FORT

  15. Biomechanical and Physiological Validation of the Omni-Directional Treadmill Upgrade as a Mobility Platform for Immersive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    would enhance the U.S. Army’s ability to gain insight into the physical, physiological, and cognitive processes of dismounted Soldiers when placed in...1467B RM 336 FORT KNOX KY 40121 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY – HRED AWC FIELD ELEMENT RDRL HRM DJ D DURBIN BLDG 4506 ( DCD ) RM 107

  16. Tactical Airspace Integration System Situation Awareness Integration Into the Cockpit: Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    information verbally relayed to the pilots by an air traffic controller (ATC). The cognitive decision aiding system had to provide a workload...LABORATORY – HRED (PDF) AWC FIELD ELEMENT RDRL HRM DJ D DURBIN BLDG 4506 ( DCD ) RM 107 FORT RUCKER AL 36362-5000 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY

  17. 75 FR 59610 - Implantation and Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Firocoxib

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... original new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Merial Ltd. The NADA provides for the veterinary...: Merial Ltd., 3239 Satellite Blvd., Bldg. 500, Duluth, GA 30096-4640 filed NADA 141-313 that provides for... inflammation associated with osteoarthritis. The NADA is approved as of August 20, 2010, and the...

  18. 76 FR 46300 - Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997: Modifications to the List of Recognized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send two self-addressed adhesive labels to assist... safety and essential performance of pulse oximeter equipment. B. Dental/ENT: 4-195 Dentistry-Implants-Dynamic fatigue test for ISO 14801 Second Edition 2007-11-15. endosseous dental implants. C. General: ] 5...

  19. 2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    1st Term: 02.10. 2006 - 15.12.2006 LECTURE SERIES Practical statistics for particle physicists by L. Lyons, Univ. Oxford, GB 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October 11:00 -12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg 500 Gravitational waves by M. Landry, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA 16, 17, 18 October 11:00-12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg 500 Neutrino physics, past and future by B. Kayser, FERMILAB, Batavia, USA 27, 28, 29, 30 November, 1 December 11:00-12:00 - TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, 3rd Floor QCD: are we ready for the LHC by S. Frixione, INFN, Genoa, It 4, 5, 6, 7 December 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  20. 76 FR 51056 - Notice of Random Assignment Study To Evaluate the YouthBuild Program; Request for Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    .... Telephone number: (202) 693-3647 (this is not a toll-free number). Individuals with hearing or speech..., Office of Policy Development and Research, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Frances Perkins Bldg., Room N... Policy Development and Research at (202) 693-3700 (this is not a toll-free number). You may also...

  1. 77 FR 5850 - Notice of Random Assignment Study To Evaluate Workforce Investment Act Adult and Dislocated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Development and Research, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Frances Perkins Bldg., Room N-5641, Washington, DC, 20210. Telephone: (202) 693-3647 (this is not a toll-free number) or email: pederson.eileen@dol.gov . Individuals with hearing or speech impairments may access the telephone number above via TTY by calling...

  2. 76 FR 43729 - Notice of Random Assignment Study To Evaluate Workforce Investment Act Adult and Dislocated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    .... Telephone number: (202) 693-3647 (this is not a toll-free number). Individuals with hearing or speech... Policy Development and Research, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Frances Perkins Bldg., Room N-5641... Development and Research at (202) 693-3700 (this is not a toll-free number). You may also contact this...

  3. Joint Center for Operational Analysis Quarterly Bulletin. Volume 7, Issue 3, June 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    War Conflicts. (San Francisco: Jossey- Bass Publishers, 2001), 211. 2"Coalition Building,” op.cit 4 Joint Center for Operational Analysis and Lessons...Lessons Learned (CALL) 10 Meade Avenue Bldg. 50 Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027 user name phone# COL Larry Saul , Director (Lawrence.saul) x2255 Mr. Larry

  4. St. Regis Paper Mill: Architectural and Environmental Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    also be used to whiten the fibers. Caustic soda along with chlorine is used to wash the pulp of impurities and also con- tributes to bleaching...133 Power Plant ...center), hydraulic power plant (lower left), paper mill (lower right), and new boiler bldg (right center) 77 70 Exterior of northeast elevation

  5. Academic Training: Climate change and challenges for the environment / POSTPONED!!!

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 20, 21, 22 June 20, 21, 22 June, from 11:00 to 12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Climate change and challenges for the environment C. SCHLUECHTER / Univ. Bern, CH The Academic Training is postponed.

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 226713 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_11391649.1 1117:4288 1150:1696 44887:2263 864702:2263 protein involved in biosynthesis of mitomycin antib...iotics/polyketide fumonisin Oscillatoriales cyanobacterium JSC-12 MTLTKFPASEKDAIKNY

  7. Microgravity Multi-Phase Flow Experiment for Suborbital Testing (MFEST) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD), had previously developed an orbital flight experiment to 1) test the feasibility of a...

  8. Astronaut Dale Gardner rehearses control of MMU during EVA practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, 51-A mission specialist, rehearses control of manned maneuvering unit (MMU) during a practice for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Gardner is in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC.

  9. OAO Sibur-Russian Tires Taking New Measures to Be Listed in Top 15 En- terprises in the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Recently, OAO Sibur-Russian Tires formally renamed to JSC "Cordiant". The new company takes some new key measures to further expand the market shares and occupy the top place in Russian tire enterprises.

  10. Brig. Gen. Richard F. Abel and Col. Natan J. Lindsay answering questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Brigadier General Richard F. Abel, right, director of public affairs for the Air Force, and Colonel Nathan J. Lindsay of the USAF's space division, answer questions concerning STS-4 during a press conference at JSC on May 20, 1982.

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497240127 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WP_009554378.1 NZ_CM001633 1117:8815 ... 1150:40691 1301283:60601 44887:26 ... 864702:43 ... putative low-comple...xity protein Oscillatoriales cyanobacterium JSC-12 MCVLKSLLGFFLSLVLLLPFTSPVYAASSAAI

  12. Christa McAuliffe during her training ride in the T-38 jet trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Payload specialist Sharon Christa McAuliffe egresses the rear station of a NASA T-38 jet trainer at Ellington Field near JSC, where the Teacher in Space participant is in training for the STS 51-L mission.

  13. LOX/Methane Regeneratively-Cooled Rocket Engine Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design, build, and test a 5,000 lbf thrust regeneratively cooled combustion chamber at JSC for a low pressure liquid oxygen/methane engine. The engine demonstrates...

  14. Production technology of high strength reinforcement rod

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ At present JSC "ZSMK" is the largest producer of building reinforcement steel in Russia. One of the most essential conditions for holding our positions on this products market is the increase of assortment and quality of rolled metal.

  15. Инвестиции, инновации, энергосбережение - главные факторы в развитии предприятия

    OpenAIRE

    Борщов, С.; Сугойдь, А.

    2013-01-01

    Currently JSC “BMZ” carries out an active innovation and investment work directed at the development of new production capacity and creating of new energy saving productions. The large projects concerning steel, section rolling, hardware productions are considered.

  16. Developing Tools and Techniques to Increase Communication Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Linda A.; Peterson, Doug

    1997-01-01

    The Public Affairs Office (PAO) of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for communicating current JSC Space Program activities as well as goals and objectives to the American Public. As part of the 1996 Strategic Communications Plan, a review of PAO' s current communication procedures was conducted. The 1996 Summer Faculty Fellow performed research activities to support this effort by reviewing current research concerning NASA/JSC's customers' perceptions and interests, developing communications tools which enable PAO to more effectively inform JSC customers about the Space Program, and proposing a process for developing and using consistent messages throughout PAO. Note that this research does not attempt to change or influence customer perceptions or interests but, instead, incorporates current customer interests into PAO's communication process.

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497242523 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2:1902 ... 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine reductase Oscillatoriales cyanobacterium JSC-12 MNRPITESNMKETYGEEKYGERLIAEG... WP_009556745.1 NZ_CM001633 1117:4682 ... 1150:39727 1301283:59529 44887:1731 ... 86470

  18. Testbed For Aerothermal Test Technique Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed that a very low cost wind tunnel could be developed at JSC to provide engineers with the ability to directly run small tests focused on improving...

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1998. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC, under ASEE. The objectives of the program are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants; and contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the fellows' research projects performed during the summer of 1998. Volume 1, current volume, contains the first reports, and volume 2 contains the remaining reports.

  20. Textile Strain Gauge for Inflatable Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project was completed via a multi-division collaboration within JSC and university partnerships. A number of device concepts were developed and tested that...

  1. Large Scale Inert Anode for Molten Oxide Electrolysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Molten oxide electrolysis is a demonstrated laboratory-scale process for producing oxygen from the JSC-1a lunar simulant; however, critical subsystems necessary for...

  2. Advanced Modeling Tools for Controlling Complex Assets Across Time Delay Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a hybrid simulation module to replace the current "Behavioral Sim" in JSC's Predictive Interactive Graphical Interface (PIGI). PIGI helps...

  3. Automatic Classification of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasue, J.; Stepinski, T. F.; Bell, S. W.

    2010-03-01

    We present an automatic classification of the IDPs collected by NASA-JSC based on their EDS spectra. Agglomerative clustering and the Sammon's map algorithms are used to visualize relationships between the clusters.

  4. Automated Classification of Stratospheric Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S. W.; Lasue, J.; Stepinski, T.

    2010-03-01

    We have applied data mining techniques to the JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog Volume 16 cluster particles. We have demonstrated a technique capable of reproducing the separation between cosmic and contaminant particles.

  5. Astronaut Judith Resnik in the Shuttle mission simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Judith A. Resnik, 41-D mission specialist, prepares to climb some steps leading to the flight deck portion of JSC's Shuttle mission simulator (SMS) in preparation for training for her 41-D mission.

  6. Experimental Study of Water Exchange Between Regolith and Atmosphere Under Martian Conditions: Thermodynamics and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommerol, A.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2008-03-01

    We have designed a facility to measure near-infrared reflectance spectra of martian regolith analogs under martian surface temperature and humidity. We present adsorption isotherm and exchange kinetics between water and JSC Mars-1 regolith simulant.

  7. High Efficiency Refrigeration Process Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It has been proposed by NASA JSC studies, that the most mass efficient (non-nuclear) method of Lunar habitat cooling is via photovoltaic (PV) direct vapor...

  8. CONTROLLING AS A MECHANISM TO INCREASE THE EFFICIENCY OF MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISES OF FUEL-ENERGY COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ostashkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibility of application of controlling as mechanism of increasing the efficiency of management of enterprises of fuel- energy complex. The research was conducted on the materials of the JSC «Gazprom».

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports 1 through 12.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document contains reports 13 through 24.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  15. Study of LED Lighting to Replace Fluorescent Tubes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Energy consumption and cost are a continuing issue in the world, including JSC Buildings.  New technologies and designs in the commercial world have made...

  16. Preparing to Receive and Handle Martian Samples When They Arrive on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, Francis M.

    2017-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Under the governing document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 7100.10F+ derivative NPR 'Curation of Extraterrestrial Materials', JSC is charged with 'The curation of all extraterrestrial material under NASA control, including future NASA missions. 'The Directive goes on to define Curation as including'...documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for research, education, and public outreach."

  17. Strengthen Bearing Test, Prevent Locomotive Fault%加强轴承检测,防止机车故障

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    达正雄; 朱元高; 陆玮

    2001-01-01

    总结了几年来使用JSC-206轴承检测仪的经验、教训及取得的成效,对保证机车运行安全起到了很大的作用。%This Paper sums up the experiences, lectures and achievement of using “JSC-206 Diagnosis Instrument for Bearing Fault", the instrument does very important function for ensuring the safety of locomotive.

  18. Pharmacy in a New Frontier - The First Five Years at the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, Tina

    2008-01-01

    A poster entitled "Space Medicine - A New Role for Clinical Pharmacists" was presented in December 2001 highlighting an up-and-coming role for pharmacists at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. Since that time, the operational need for the pharmacy profession has expanded with the administration s decision to open a pharmacy on site at JSC to complement the care provided by the Flight Medicine and Occupational Medicine Clinics. The JSC Pharmacy is a hybrid of traditional retail and hospital pharmacy and is compliant with the ambulatory care standards set forth by the Joint Commission. The primary charge for the pharmacy is to provide medication management for JSC. In addition to providing ambulatory care for both clinics, the pharmacists also practice space medicine. A pharmacist had been involved in the packing of both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station Medical Kits before the JSC Pharmacy was established; however, the role of the pharmacist in packing medical kits has grown. The pharmacists are now full members of the operations team providing consultation for new drug delivery systems, regulations, and patient safety issues. As the space crews become more international, so does the drug information provided by the pharmacists. This presentation will review the journey of the JSC Pharmacy as it celebrated its five year anniversary in April of 2008. The implementation of the pharmacy, challenges to the incorporation of the pharmacy into an existing health-care system, and the current responsibilities of a pharmacist at the Johnson Space Center will be discussed.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program - 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and 1964 nationally, are to (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with her/his interests and background, and worked in collabroation with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 2000.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1995.. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at JSC, including the White Sands Test Facility, by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. In addition to the faculty participants, the 1995 program included five students. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows and visiting students during the summer of 1995. The reports of two of the students are integral with that of the respective fellow. Three students wrote separate reports.

  1. Novel Thermotolerant Siderophilic Filamentous Cyanobacterium that Produces Intracellular Iron-Rich Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broun, Igor I.; Bryant, Donald A.; Casamatta, Dale; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; Shen, Gaozhang; Graham, Joel E.; Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.; Garrison, Daniel H.; McKay, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are the main producers of organic compounds in iron-depositing hot springs despite photosynthetically generated-oxygen and the abundance of reduced iron (Fe2+) that likely leads to enormous oxidative stress within cyanobacterial cells. Therefore, the study of cyanobacterial diversity, phylogeny, and biogeochemical activity in iron-depositing hot springs will not only provide insights into the contribution of CB to iron redox cycling in these environments, but it could also provide insights into CB evolution. This study characterizes the phylogeny, morphology, and physiology of isolate JSC-1, a novel filamentous CB isolated from an iron-depositing hot spring. While isolate JSC-1 is morphologically similar to the CB genus Leptolyngbya, 16S rDNA sequence data indicated that it shares 95 percent sequence similarity to the type strain L. boryanum. Strain JSC-1 fixes N2 and exhibited an unusually high ratio between photosystem (PS) I and PS II and was capable of complementary chromatic adaptation. Further, it synthesized only chlorophyll a and a unique set of carotenoids. Strain JSC-1 not only required high levels of Fe for growth (greater than or equal to 40 microM), but it also accumulated large amounts of extracellular ferrihydrite and generated intracellular ferric phosphates. Strain JSC-1 was found to secrete 2-oxoglutaric acid and possesses one ortholog and one paralog of bacterioferritin. Surprisingly, the latter has 70.13 % identity with a bacterioferritin in marine-proteobacterium HTCC 2080 and has joint node with bacterioferritins found in enterobacteria. Collectively, these observations provide insights into the physiological strategies that might have allowed CB to develop and proliferate in Fe-rich environments. Based on its genotypic and phenotypic characterization of strain, JSC-1 represents a new operational taxonomical unit (OTU) JSC-1.

  2. Novel Thermotolerant Siderophilic Filamentous Cyanobacterium that Produces Intracellular Iron-Rich Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broun, Igor I.; Bryant, Donald A.; Casamatta, Dale; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; Shen, Gaozhang; Graham, Joel E.; Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.; Garrison, Daniel H.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are the main producers of organic compounds in iron-depositing hot springs despite photosynthetically generated-oxygen and the abundance of reduced iron (Fe2+) that likely leads to enormous oxidative stress within cyanobacterial cells. Therefore, the study of cyanobacterial diversity, phylogeny, and biogeochemical activity in iron-depositing hot springs will not only provide insights into the contribution of CB to iron redox cycling in these environments, but it could also provide insights into CB evolution. This study characterizes the phylogeny, morphology, and physiology of isolate JSC-1, a novel filamentous CB isolated from an iron-depositing hot spring. While isolate JSC-1 is morphologically similar to the CB genus Leptolyngbya, 16S rDNA sequence data indicated that it shares 95 percent sequence similarity to the type strain L. boryanum. Strain JSC-1 fixes N2 and exhibited an unusually high ratio between photosystem (PS) I and PS II and was capable of complementary chromatic adaptation. Further, it synthesized only chlorophyll a and a unique set of carotenoids. Strain JSC-1 not only required high levels of Fe for growth (greater than or equal to 40 microM), but it also accumulated large amounts of extracellular ferrihydrite and generated intracellular ferric phosphates. Strain JSC-1 was found to secrete 2-oxoglutaric acid and possesses one ortholog and one paralog of bacterioferritin. Surprisingly, the latter has 70.13 % identity with a bacterioferritin in marine-proteobacterium HTCC 2080 and has joint node with bacterioferritins found in enterobacteria. Collectively, these observations provide insights into the physiological strategies that might have allowed CB to develop and proliferate in Fe-rich environments. Based on its genotypic and phenotypic characterization of strain, JSC-1 represents a new operational taxonomical unit (OTU) JSC-1.

  3. Cern Academic Training programme 2011 - Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES   4, 5, 6 and 7 April 2011 Flavour Physics and CP Violation Dr. Yosef Nir (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel 11:00-12:00 - 4, 6 and 7 April - Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant 5 April - Bldg. 80-1-001 - Globe 1st Floor   The B-factories have led to significant progress in our understanding of CP violation and of flavour physics. Yet, two flavour puzzles remain. The standard model flavour puzzle is the question of why there is smallness and hierarchy in the flavour parameters. The new physics flavour puzzle is the question of why TeV-scale new physics was not signalled in flavour changing neutral current processes. The high pT experiments, ATLAS and CMS, are likely to shed light on these puzzles. As concerns CP violation, the LHC will lead to progress on the puzzle of the baryon asymmetry as well.  

  4. 2007-2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 10 & 11 March 2008 10 March 2008, 11:00-12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 11 March 2008, 11:00-12:00, 14:00-15:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 Warped Extra-Dimensional Opportunities and Signatures Prof. Lisa RANDALL, Harvard University, USA I plan to discuss ways of searching for warped geometry and other extra-dimensional scenarios, with emphasis on the general lessons for search strategies. We will consider RS geometry on the brane and in the bulk, as well as possible black hole or quantum gravity signatures. If time permits, we will also consider fermion masses and/or precision Higgs measurements.

  5. Academic Training: QCD: are we ready for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 4, 5, 6, 7 December, from 11:00 to 12:00 4, 5, 6 December - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 7 December - TH Auditorium, bldg. 4 - 3-006 QCD: are we ready for the LHC S. FRIXIONE / INFN, Genoa, Italy The LHC energy regime poses a serious challenge to our capability of predicting QCD reactions to the level of accuracy necessary for a successful programme of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In these lectures, I'll introduce basic concepts in QCD, and present techniques based on perturbation theory, such as fixed-order and resummed computations, and Monte Carlo simulations. I'll discuss applications of these techniques to hadron-hadron processes, concentrating on recent trends in perturbative QCD aimed at improving our understanding of LHC phenomenology.

  6. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - 25, 26, 27 February and 1 March at Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 28 February at Council Chamber, bldg. 503 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos.

  7. Academic Training: String Theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 June from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 6, 7, 8 & 10 June, TH Auditorium, bldg. 4, 3rd floor on 9 June String Theory by C. Johnson / Univ. of Southern California, USA ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  8. 2002 - 2003 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    1st TERM : November - December 2002   LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November 2002 Telling the Truth with Statistics by R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500     REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 2, 3, 4, 5 December 2002 Introduction to String Theory by W. Lerche / CERN-TH 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures. Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  9. Academic Training: Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, TH Auditorium, bldg 4, 3rd floor, on 13 October Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists L. LYONS, University of Oxford, GB Lecture 1: Learning to love the errror matrix Introductory remarks. Conditional probability. Statistical and systematic errors. Combining results Binomial, Poisson and 1-D Gaussian 2-D Gaussian and the error matrix. Understanding the covariance. Using the error matrix. Estimating the error matrix. Combining correlated measurements Lecture 2: Parameter determination by likelihood: Do's and don'ts Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate. Simple examples: (1) Breit Wigner (2) Lifetime binned and unbinned likelihood several parameters extended maximum likelihood. Common misapprehensions: Normalisation delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage Integrating the likelihood Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit Punzi effect Lecture 3: Chi-squared and hypothesis test...

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    21, 22, 23 November LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 21 November Auditorium, bldg 500 on 22, 23 November Introduction to symmetry breaking phenomena in physics E. Brezin / ENS, Paris, F. The notion of broken symmetries started slowly to emerge in the 19th century. The early studies of Pasteur on the parity asymmetry of life, the studies of Curie on piezoelectricity and on the symmetries of effects versus the symmetry of causes (which clearly excluded spontaneous symmetry breaking), are important historical landmarks. However the possibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking within the usual principles of statistical mechanics, waited for the work of Peierls and Onsager. The whole theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena, as well as the construction of field theoretic models as long distance limit of yet unknown physics, relies nowadays on the concept of criticality associated to spontaneous symmetry breaking. The phenomena of Goldstone bosons, of Meissn...

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    21, 22, 23 November LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 21 November Auditorium, bldg 500 on 22, 23 November Introduction to symmetry breaking phenomena in physics E. Brezin / ENS, Paris, F. The notion of broken symmetries started slowly to emerge in the 19th century. The early studies of Pasteur on the parity asymmetry of life, the studies of Curie on piezoelectricity and on the symmetries of effects versus the symmetry of causes (which clearly excluded spontaneous symmetry breaking), are important historical landmarks. However the possibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking within the usual principles of statistical mechanics, waited for the work of Peierls and Onsager. The whole theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena, as well as the construction of field theoretic models as long distance limit of yet unknown physics, relies nowadays on the concept of criticality associated to spontaneous symmetry breaking. The phenomena of Goldstone bosons, of Meissn...

  12. Information for pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    Ph. Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, Many of you have accepted the Director-General's invitation to the fête on October 15. We are very pleased to be able to welcome all those who have replied to this invitation. The meeting will take place in the Main Auditorium and will be transmitted by television to the Council Chamber and to the four meeting rooms of bldg. 40 (40-S2-A01, 40-S2-B01, 40-SS-C01, 40-SS-D01). It will start promptly at 9 a.m. and we ask you to come very early so that all may find their seats in the various rooms. The reception offered by the Director-General will take place in bldg. 40 at around 12 o'clock. Ph. Bernard Chairman, GAC Committee

  13. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 February REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - 19, 20 and 21 February Main Auditorium bldg. 500, 22 and 23 February Council Chamber, bldg 503 Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering J.G. Weisend / SLAC, Stanford, USA Cryogenic engineering is an important speciality at CERN. With the construction of LHC, this technology will have an even greater impact on machine operations. The goal of the course is to give people not working in cryogenics an appreciation of the basic principals and problems associated with the field. The course will also provide a foundation for future learning in cryogenics. Topics to be covered will include: properties of cryogenic fluids and materials, refrigeration, cryostat design, instrumentation, safety and propertiesof He II. Examples of working cryogenic systems, many of them from high energy physics, will be presented.

  14. Academic Training: String Theory for Pedestrians

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 29, 30, 31 January 2007, from 11:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 29 and 30 January, TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, 3-006, on 31 January String Theory for Pedestrians B. ZWIEBACH, MIT, Cambridge, USA In this 3-lecture series I will discuss the basics of string theory, some physical applications, and the outlook for the future. I will begin with the main concepts of the classical theory and the application to the study of cosmic superstrings. Then I will turn to the quantum theory and discuss applications to the investigation of hadronic spectra and the recently discovered quark-gluon plasma. I will conclude with a sketch of string models of particle physics and showing some avenues that may lead to a complete formulation of string theory.

  15. Academic Training: Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, TH Auditorium, bldg 4, 3rd floor, on 13 October Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists L. LYONS, University of Oxford, GB Lecture 1: Learning to love the errror matrix Introductory remarks. Conditional probability. Statistical and systematic errors. Combining results Binomial, Poisson and 1-D Gaussian 2-D Gaussian and the error matrix. Understanding the covariance. Using the error matrix. Estimating the error matrix. Combining correlated measurements Lecture 2: Parameter determination by likelihood: Do's and don'ts Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate. Simple examples: (1) Breit Wigner (2) Lifetime binned and unbinned likelihood several parameters extended maximum likelihood. Common misapprehensions: Normalisation delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage Integrating the likelihood Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit Punzi effect Lecture 3: Chi-squared and hypothesis test...

  16. Academic Training: Particle Identification at the LHC - Lecture Series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 10, 11, 12, 13 May From 11:00 to 12:00 hrs Main Auditorium, bldg 500 on 10 and 11 May, TH Auditorium, bldg 4, on 12 and 13 May Particle Identification at the LHC D. FOURNIER / LAL, Orsay, France After a short introduction on specific features of hadron collisions at the LHC (proton-proton and heavy ions), particle identification in soft collisions is addressed taking examples from Alice and LHCb. Turning to high transverse momentum interactions, the capability of ATLAS and CMS to identify reactions containing photons, electrons muons or taus is analyzed. Some emphasis is put on the necessity, and means to identify particles at the trigger level. Using the above signatures, plus some others (missing ET, identified B-jets), the role of particle id for some key physics discoveries (Higgs search, supersymmetry) is illustrated.ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127academic.training@cern.ch

  17. Laboratory Research: A Question of When, Not If.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    satisiaction. Journal of Applied Psychoiov. 64, i57-iE.5. - &unkel, F. j., & McGrath. J. E. t?7L). Research on human oehavior: A svstematic aulae to...Arlington Annex Washington, D.C. 20350 LIST 4 NAVMAT & NPRDC Program Administrator for Manpower, Naval Material Command Personnel, and Training... Material Coummand Management Training Center Naval Personnel R&D Center (4) NAVMAT 09M32 Technical Director Jefferson Plaza, Bldg #2, Rm 150 Director

  18. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 13 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 Student Session (3/3) Course Review Course Review Tuesday 14 August 16:00 Poster Session Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: Summer Student Lecture ProgrammeSummer Student Lectures are available at: http://agenda.cern.ch/SSLP2001

  19. Atlas/Data Abstract for the United States and Selected Areas: Fiscal Year 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    AIRFIELD STRUCTURES 8,526 3. VISAC 4,472 RADIO & TV COMM EQUIPMENT, EXCEPT AIRBORNE 4,472 4. INSTATUTO DE RECURSOS 3,857 ELECTRICITY SERVICES 3,857 5...3,004 2. SOCIEDADE DE EMPREITADAS E TRA 2,509 MAINT-REPAIR-ALTER/OTHER NON-BLDG FAC 1,361 3. EMPRESA DE VIACAO TERCEIRENSE 2,328 MOTOR PASSENGER

  20. PENSION FUND

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Amendment No 17 to the Rules and Regulations of the Pension Fund relating to the technical adjustment of the coefficients C made necessary by the integration of the members of the CERN personnel into the new career structure on 1.9.2001 can be obtained from Divisional secretariats or, in the case of pensioners, directly from the Administration of the Fund (tel. 767-91 94/27 38), bldg 5, 1-030.

  1. Western Naval Task Force Operation Plan No. 7 - 43

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-08-14

    AOUILA M B( 33 FROSINONE A9-lB 42 ISOLETTA 28 FOGGIA N e 3. MB 0 F ’ , Q 2 AQUINO 25 FOGGIA/GINO LISA i 46 LITTORIA(SEZZE ROMANO) 9 BOVINO 78 SESSA...2 mi. I. of Bovino emergeny L/O. Rectangular strip K/ · SW 1450 yd. NIW/SSI 250 dU. Lraelled agriculturel land. Farm bldg near Alt. 800 ft. 32. FOLIlO

  2. Corrosion Prevention and Control Planning Guidebook Spiral 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    cycle value chain, employing • Lean to eliminate all types of waste, • Six Sigma to optimize process variation, and • Theory of Constraints to...personnel in the field are motivated and trained to identify and report corrosion and recognize the importance of employing prescribed corrosion control...AMSRD-AMR-PS-AM/R Herron Bldg 7103 Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898 (256) 876-5061 (256) 842-1359 (fax) robert.a.herron@us.army.mil Eric Herzberg

  3. Information from the Registration Service

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    Please note that the Registration Service (Bldg 55-1st floor) will be exceptionally open during the annual end of year closure from 10:00 to 12:00 on the following days: 22, 23, 26, 27,28, 29 et 30 December 2011 and 2,3, et 4 January 2012. All the activities related to the Registration Service will be operational: registration for contractors’ personnel; registrations for professional visits; access cards; car stickers; biometric registration. The Registration Service

  4. Monitoring Tidal Currents with a Towed ADCP System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    throughout the water column were corrected for boat motion, using both bottom-tracking and GPS coordinates available at 1-s resolution, and then...successful selection of technology and devices to be deployed. However, site selection is not simply a case of identifying areas with strong tidal currents... Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, Bldg. 1009, Mississippi, MS 39529, USA Ocean Dynamics (2016) 66:119–132 DOI 10.1007/s10236-015-0913-z

  5. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, FY 1992. Program Solicitation 92.1, Closing Date: 10 January 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    identified by DoD designed in part, to provide incentives for the conversion Components. The guidelines presented in this solicitation of federally...system distributed operating system, and provide detailed specification guidelines and a model specification meeting Navy guidelines for a combat...SBIR Program Manager) (505) 844-4565 Bldg 523, Rm 305 Norton AFB CA 92409-6468 (Della Hinesley, 714-382-5371) AF92-100 thru 108 WL/ AAOP Terry Rogers

  6. IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference on Accelerator Science and Technology Held in San Francisco, California on 6-9 May 1991. Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    W. Jones, and M. J. Jakobson ...... 893 User control of the proton beam injection trajectories into the AGS booster - T. D’Ottavio, A. Kponou, A...Baird, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn , Roman Tai’chyn, Herman lWinick, Alan S. Fisher, Juan C. Gallardo, and Claudio Pellegrini...LIVERMORE CA 945W50 9700 S CASS AVENUE USA ARGONNE IL 60439 USA ROMAN J. NAWROCKY BROOKHAVEN NATL LAB WILLIAM E. JR. NEXSEN BLDG. 725B LLNL VALERIJ

  7. Phase II Private Sector Financed Military Family Housing Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    NFA. SS35 Paxson Park Site, bordered by fire station, Mt. Illiamna School, Orion Elementary School, Aurora School, Bldg 5091 and park pavilion...Pacific Coast, western hemlock-sitka spruce forest and the interior boreal forests of white spruce, paper birch, and aspen. The species associations...indications of overall ecosystem health. On Elmendorf AFB, moose and snowshoe hare are key species for terrestrial habitats in the boreal forest

  8. Development and Testing of an Anti-Scale/Corrosion Resistant Coating for Domestic Hot Water Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    Fort Bragg 23 10 Closeup of Scale- Incrusted Heat Exchanger Tube Bundle from Fort Bragg 24 11 Removal of Heat Exchanger Tube Bundle from Bldg 421, Fort...or vertical cylindrical tank (Figure 3). The tube bundle is usually made of copper or a copper alloy, and the tank is usually steel with a cement ...side of the solid barrier. The fouling factor includes the effects of corrosion and scale incrustation , and also the effect of protective coatini-s such

  9. Environmental Assessment for Implementation of the Updated Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan Homestead Air Reserve Base, Homestead, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    the exception of the Hush House and Southeast Triangle areas, wetlands are predominate land use features. These wetland areas, in part, are used for...airfield drainage. The enclosed structures of the Hush House area are l.lSed for noise reduction for aircraft engine testing. The Southeast Triangle...ROD (1998) OU-19 AGE Shop (Bldg. 208) Closure Ltr. (200 l ) OU-25 Hush House Area ROD (2006) OT:J-27 Jet Engine Test Cell Facility ROD (2006) AOC-3

  10. Assessing Dimensionality of a Set of Items - Comparison of Different Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-10

    Paychologe Progam for Measurement Box 40 Tulan University University of Iowa X,%to’.n. PA 19400040 Ne Orleans, LA 70118 Iowa Cty. IA 52242 Dr. Williamn 0...University Dr. Osisneh Dodand Eshstios Fairfax, VA 2203 Educaional Testng Service Snoai Bldg. Ras. 123OP Princeton. NJ 06541 Uniiesity of Marylandl Dr...Haia 3199 Educationall Test Serviice Pittsburght. PA 15260 ISRAEL PrInceton NJ 08341 Dr. Susan R. Goldman Dr. Gregoty Candel11 Dr. Pik Drasgow, Peabody

  11. ONR Chair in Arctic Marine Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    his measurements of ice thickness and heat/salt flux in Terra Nova Bay Polynya should pave the way for new parameterizations of ice growth/ melt in...SEP 1999 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1999 to 00-00-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ONR Chair in Arctic Marine Science 5a. CONTRACT... Arctic Marine Science Robert H. Bourke Department of Oceanography Naval Postgraduate School 833 Dyer Road, Bldg. 232, Rm. 328 Monterey, CA 93943

  12. 75 FR 32754 - Certain New Chemicals; Receipt and Status Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ...-0832 04/16/10 03/31/10 (S) Fatty acids, palm-oil, me esters P-06-0833 04/16/10 03/19/10 (S) Fatty acids... comments to docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPPT- 2010-0408. EPA's policy is that all comments received will be..., EPA West Bldg., 1301 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC. The EPA/DC Public Reading Room hours...

  13. Intrusive and Non-Intrusive Instruction in Dynamic Skill Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Bachrach Environmental Stress Program Center I Dr. Lloyd Hitchcock Naval Medical Research Institute Human Factors Engineering Bethesda, MD 20014 Division...22217 Washington, DC 20350 5 Personnel & Training Research Programs 1 Dr. Alfred F. Smode (Code 458) Training Analysis & Evaluation Group Office of... Alfred R. Fregly Arlington, VA 22217 AFOSR/NL, Bldg. 410] Bolling AFB 1 DR. A.L. SLAFKOSKY Washington, DC 20332 SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR (CODE RD-i) HO

  14. Enhanced Preliminary Assessment Report: Jefferson Proving Ground Madison, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    that I was covered over with asphalt or tar. Red lead is a heavy metal, which may be mobile under certain conditions. Excavation work done in these...020 JPG-020 is an approximately 1/2-acre Macadam ( asphalt ) lined test pond (Figure 9). The pond was drained and no munitions-related materials were...mixtures- 55-gal drums Polyols and polymeric isocyanates 110 gal Barium sulfate 8,600 lbs Petroleum wax I i. I (Bldg 227) W eapons Maintenance

  15. Titanium Alloys for Critical Ordnance Components. Producers Coordination Meeting on Titanium Materials for Davy Crockett and Other Weapon Systems Held at Watertown Arsenal, Watertown 72, Mass., 14 Apr 60 and Fabricators Coordination Meeting on Titanium Materials for Davy Crockett and Other Weapon Systems Held at Watervliet Arsenal, Watervliet, NY, 15 Apr 1960

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    requirements5 industrial engineering projects in metallurgical, processing to facilitate production and reduce costo Demonstration - Bldg» 311 Pressure...be recorded by implication or other- wise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation, or conveyinc any richte or...implication or otherwise eta in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation, or conveying any rights or permission to

  16. Academic Training Lecture: Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Programme 30, 31 March and 1 April  2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  Bldg. 40-S2-A01 - Salle Andersson Jets at Hadron Colliders by Gavin Salam These three lectures will discuss how jets are defined at hadron colliders, the physics that is responsible for the internal structure of jets and the ways in which an understanding of jets may help in searches for new particles at the LHC.

  17. Import/Export Service of Radioactive Material and Radioactive Sources Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the Import/Export Service of radioactive material (http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping/ - e-mail : service-rp-shipping@cern.ch) and the Radioactive Sources Service (http://cern.ch/service-radioactive-sources - e-mail : service-radioactive-sources@cern.ch) at bldg. 24/E-024 will be closed on FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 2004. Tel. 73171

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 New Developments in Supersymmetry S. Raby / CERN-TH Introduction to supersymmetric grand unified theories. An introduction to the MSSM and different mechanisms for supersymmetry breaking. Then the details of SU(5) and SO(10) unification, the new gauge sector beyond the standard model, representations of quarks and leptons. Gauge and Yukawa coupling unification and some predictions.

  19. Functionalized MEMS Sensors for Capacity-Based Residual Life Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-09

    changing resistance as the cantilever deflects from analyte interaction with the surface coating. Sensitivity to sub- nanogram quantities are predicted. Our...sandia.gov Submitted to: Greg W. Peterson ECBC/CBR Filtration Branch 5183 Blackhawk Road, Bldg. 3549 Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 Telephone...MCL) respond to changes in surface stress by changing resistance as the cantilever deflects from analyte interaction with the surface coating

  20. 76 FR 19795 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... local flow indicator (FI- 225-2) and close V-15-52. 7 OB-FZ-8C Office Bldg. A/B Locally read 2 Battery.... Manually trip 1 125V DC Battery 4160V 1D Room C Elev. 23'- Breakers and 6''. control USS 1B2 and 1B3 480V... control transient combustible materials and ignition sources in the areas. The fire areas included in...

  1. The Cell Cycle Inhibitor p27KIP1: A Key Mediator of G1 Arrest by Androgen Ablation an dby Vitamin D3 Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Thomas Director, Research Administration Sunnybrook Health Science Centre Reichmann Research Building, S-130 2075 Bayview Avenue Toronto, Ontario M4N...Administration or subcontracting of a PHS-supported activity by this institution. Room S-133, S-Wimg Reichmann Res Bldg. II. Institutional Policy Tel: (416) 480...Research Administration Address: Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Reichmann Research Building, S-130 2075 Bayew Av u Toronto. ON 4N 3M5 Phone: 416-480-5720

  2. COMBIC, Combined Obscuration Model for Battlefield Induced Contaminants: Volume 2 - Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Battalino Point Mugu CA 93042-5000 Redstone Scientific Info Ctr Attn AMSMI-RD-CS-R Bldg 4484 Redstone Arsenal AL 35898 Science & Technology 101...Computational and Information Sciences Directorate Scarlett D. Ayres Survivabilty/Lethality Analysis Directorate Approved for public release; distribution...source, one simply uses 15St in the stored cloud tables. Similarly, when one finds the average mass per unit downwind concentration, the average mass

  3. RESTAURANT NO. 3 : PRICE INCREASES

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    'AVENANCE', the concession holder of Restaurant no. 3 (bldg. 866 - Prévessin site), has submitted to the Restaurant Supervisory Committee a request to increase its prices. After close examination, the Committee has established that the proposed increases are compatible with the relevant price indexing mechanisms and other contractual conditions. The new prices will apply as from Monday, June 3, 2002. Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  4. Automated Control of Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure during Simulated Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    711th Human Performance Wing U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Int’l Expeditionary Educ & Training Dept Air Force Expeditionary Medical ...International Expeditionary Education & Training Dept Air Force Expeditionary Medical Skills Institute/C-STARS Cincinnati 2510 Fifth St., Bldg. 840...AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2016-0008 Automated Control of Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure during Simulated Flight Thomas C. Blakeman

  5. Proceedings of the CASE Management Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    workshop, and to reviewers of this paper, in particular, Sandy Brenner , Bill Curtis, Richard Martin, Joe Morin, Jock Rader, Dave Kitson, Anita ...Hart, Grace Downey, Wendy Gissendanner, Helen Joyce, Wendy Rossi, Tracy Lewis, Attilio Marini, Frank Authenreith, Jeff Herman, Ed Morris, Sandy Brenner ...CASE Tools/Environments OO-ALC/TISAC Bldg. 100 Hill AFB, UT 84056 (801)777-8045 FAX: (801) 777-8069 Sandy Brenner Secretary III, Case & SAE

  6. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 25 & Wednesday 26 May 2010 from 11:00 to 12:30 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe by Prof. Hitoshi Murayama (University of California, Berkeley) In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  7. CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 9, 10 11 & 12 March 2010 11:00-12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500 The Dark Side of the Universe: Dark Matter and Dark Energy by Prof. Michael Turner Tuesday 9 June 2009 Lecture 1 : State of Cosmology Today Wednesday 10 June 2009 Lecture 2: Particle Dark Matter Thursday 11 June 2009 Lecture 3: Cosmic Acceleration and Dark Energy Friday 12 June 2009 Lecture 4: Future Direction and Challenges Organiser: Maureen Prola-Tessaur/PH-EDU

  8. Magnetoelectric Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    08-2015 Publication Magnetoelectric Energy Harvesting Peter Finkel et al Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell Street, Bldg...NUWC 102287 Distribution A An energy harvesting device for harvesting energy from a moving structure includes a housing allowing transmission of...MAGNETOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the

  9. Space Based Infrared System High (SBIRS High)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Aviation Blvd Bldg 271 Los Angeles Air Force Base (LAAFB) El Segundo, CA 90245-2808 michael.guetlein@us.af.mil Phone: 310-653-3018 Fax: 310-653-4414 DSN...mission areas: Missile Warning , Missile Defense, Technical Intelligence and Battlespace Awareness. The constellation architecture for SBIRS High...Integrated Tactical Warning /Attack Assessment (ITW/AA) mission in November 2008 and technical intelligence mission in August 2009. The SBIRS GEO 1

  10. Supervisory Control of Unmanned Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Interacting With Autonomy) 2007, 22 (2), 52–59. Daily, M.; Cho, Y.; Martin , K.; Payton, D. World Embedded Interfaces for Human-Robot Interaction...D. D.; Tittle, J.; Feil , M.; Roesler, A. Envisioning Human-Robot Coordination in Future Operations. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and...RDRL HRM A J MARTIN MYER CENTER BLDG 2700 RM 2D311 FORT MONMOUTH NJ 07703-5601 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY – HRED RDRL HRM C A

  11. United States Air Force Graduate Student Research Program. 1989 Program Technical Report. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    just enough alignment in the organism passively along the field lines. Many animals, such as insects, fish, birds , reptiles , and mammals , have been...STUDENT RESEARCH PROGRAM 1989 PROGRAM TECHNICAL REPORT UNIVERSAL ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. VOLUME III of III Program Director, UES Program Manager , AFOSR...Bldg. Assigned: Flight Dynamics Laboratory Wilberforce, OH 45384 (513) 376-6435 Dagmar Fertl Degree: BS Texas A&M Univ. Specialty: Biology Wildlife

  12. 2010 Joint Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear (CBRN) Conference and Exhibition (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    warfighter.” Fourth Day: Emerging Technology for the Warfighter Thurs June 24 Location: USO Bldg FORT LEONARD WOOD Plenary I Chair: James Jensen, U.S...from NDIA Corporate Membership consisting of team members representing ten various segments of the industrial base • Permanent members include: – JPEO...Global Partnership’s current mandate is ten years, with an initial focus on Russia and the former Soviet Union • 2010: Extend GP beyond 2012

  13. Women's Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Women's Club

    2012-01-01

     Coffee Morning Tuesday 7th February 2012, 9:00 – 11:00 Bldg 504 (Restaurant n°2 – DSR) 1st Floor, Club Room 3 Presentation of cheque to Terre des Hommes Those interested in helping should come along. New arrivals and all members are cordially invited.You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://club-womensclub.web.cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/

  14. Cern Women's Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club des Cernoises

    2011-01-01

    Coffee Morning Tuesday 8th November 2011, 9:00 - 11:00 Bldg 504 (Restaurant No 2 - DSR) 1st Floor, Club Room 3 Organization of our Christmas Sale In favour of “Terre des Hommes” Those interested in helping should come along. New arrivals and all members are cordially invited. You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://club-womensclub.web.cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/

  15. CERN Women's Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Women's Club

    2011-01-01

    Coffee Morning Tuesday 10th January 2012, 9:00 – 11:00 Bldg 504 (Restaurant No 2 – DSR) 1st Floor, Club Room 3 Epiphany (French tradition – “Tirer les rois”) Those interested in helping should come along. New arrivals and all members are cordially invited. You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://club-womensclub.web.cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/

  16. Neural Network-Based Hyperspectral Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Neural Network-Based Hyperspectral Algorithms Walter F. Smith, Jr. and Juanita Sandidge Naval Research Laboratory Code 7340, Bldg 1105 Stennis Space...our effort is development of robust numerical inversion algorithms , which will retrieve inherent optical properties of the water column as well as...validate the resulting inversion algorithms with in-situ data and provide estimates of the error bounds associated with the inversion algorithm . APPROACH

  17. Computational Thermodynamics Characterization of 7075, 7039, and 7020 Aluminum Alloys Using JMatPro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams. The main approach utilizes the well- known Johnson -Mehl-Avrami (2, 7) equation as follows: ⁄ 1 , (27) where is...BLDG 655 RM 115 2230 TENTH ST WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH 45433-7817 1 AIR FORCE ARMAMENT LAB AFATL DLJW W COOK EGLIN AFB FL 32542...1 FOSTER-MILLER R SYKES 195 BEAR HILL RD WALTHAM MA 02451 1 RMI TITANIUM CO W PALLANTE PO BOX 269 1000 WARREN AVE NILES

  18. CERN Women's Club

    CERN Document Server

    Club des cernoises

    2011-01-01

    Coffee Morning Tuesday 11th October, 9:00 – 11:00 Bldg 504 (Restaurant No 2) 1st Floor, Club Room 3 Presentation of the charity to benefit from the Christmas Sale TERRE DES HOMMES New arrivals and all members are cordially invited. You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://club-womensclub.web.cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/

  19. Crude Oil Remote Sensing, Characterization and Cleaning with ContinuousWave and Pulsed Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Oceanography Division Stennis Space Center, MS 39529-5004 NRL/JA/7330--14-2317 NASA Headquarters Attn: Laurie Friederich Mail Code 210.H, Bldg. 17, Rm...N111 Greenbelt, MD NASA Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. We demonstrate a successful combination of several optical methods of...pulsed lasers SPIE meeting of The Optics and Photonics 17-AUG - 21-AUG-14, San Diego, CA, Unclassified SPIE meeting of The Optics and Photonics

  20. Experimental Examination of the Enhancement of Gyrotron Efficiencies by use of Profiled Magnetic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-04

    Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (1) Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Laboratory of Electronics Attn: Dr. G. Bekefi Bldg. 36, Rm. 36-225 Cambridge...92260 Fontenay-auix Roses France (1) Thompson C.S.F./DET/ TDH Attn: Dr. G. Mourier 2 Rue Latecoere 78140 Velizy Villa conblay France (1) UKAEA Culham Laboratory Attn: Dr. A.C. Riviere Abingdon Oxfordshire United Kingdom 20