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Sample records for jr memorial parkway

  1. Winter Use Plans Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary for the Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks and John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway

    OpenAIRE

    United States, Department of the Interior, National Park Service

    2000-01-01

    This document presents and analyzes seven alternatives for winter use management in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Grand Teton National Park (GTNP), and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway (the Parkway). YNP, encompassing 2.22 million acres, and GTNP, comprising 310,000 acres, form the core of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, described as the last large, nearly intact ecosystem in the northern temperate zone. The approved plan will serve as a management plan for the three na...

  2. The Newest Monument: The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Studies and the Young Learner, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features the newest monument, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial. The memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. will be an engaging landscape experience to convey four fundamental and recurring themes throughout Dr. King's life--democracy, justice, hope, and love. Natural…

  3. 36 CFR 7.21 - John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... include pullouts or parking areas that are groomed or marked similarly to roadways and are adjacent to... vehicle that does not have brakes in good working order. (G) Towing persons on skis, sleds or...

  4. 2015 AMCA Memorial Lecture Honoree: Dr. Richard Floyd Darsie, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jonathan F

    2015-12-01

    Richard Floyd Darsie, Jr. (1915-2014) is the 2015 American Mosquito Control Association Memorial Lecture Honoree. He was one of the greatest mosquito taxonomists of the 20th century and died peacefully on April 10, 2014, in Grove City, PA, at the age of 99 after a professional career that spanned eight decades. Dick's broad areas of interest and training made him a versatile scientist, teacher, and researcher. His intense interest in adult and immature mosquito morphology and taxonomy, as well as mosquito distribution and bionomics, started early in his career at two early academic postings: Franklin and Marshall College (1949-54) and the University of Delaware (1954-62). Dick would take his mosquito interests with him to postings and research projects around the world: Nepal, the Philippines, Atlanta, El Salvador, Guatemala, Fort Collins, South Carolina, Argentina, and Florida. His travels and studies would make him an international expert on mosquito taxonomy. Dick's legacy lives on in the hundreds of students from across the globe who learned mosquito identification skills from this world-renowned mosquito taxonomist. All will proudly profess that, "I learned mosquito identification from Dr. Darsie." And that is all that is needed to prove one's credentials in the field, learning the art from the best there is.

  5. Sawflies (Hymenoptera, Symphyta of three Mid-Atlantic Parks in the George Washington Memorial Parkway, U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Barrows

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A diverse sawfly fauna of 176 species in 66 genera in 10 families occurred in three parks in the George Washington Memorial Parkway – Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve (DMWP, Great Falls Park (GFP, and Turkey Run Park (TRP. Adult sawflies flew from early March through mid-November. They included the rarely-collected Kerita fidala Ross, a leafminer of Mertensia virginica (L. Pers. ex Link (Boraginaceae and an unidentified Caliroa sp. which consumes Staphylea trifolia L. (Staphyleaceae. Nine of the collected species are alien ones in North America. Based on coefficients of community, DMWP was more similar to TRP than GFP, and GFP and TRP were more similar to one another than to DMWP. In DMWP, most species were uncommon in samples. Ninety-five percent of the reported host genera of the collected sawfly species occurred in all three of the parks.

  6. Claim on memory : a political biography of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr., 1914-1988

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Erik Eduard Willem van den

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the political life of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr., the third surviving son of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt. The key question of this study emphasizes how FDR, Jr. interpreted the Roosevelt name and legacy during his life and political career. This book deal

  7. Mapping the Natchez Trace Parkway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Bannister, Terri; Ramsey, Elijah W.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a National Park Service (NPS) landcover classification, a landcover map of the 715-km (444-mile) NPS Natchez Trace Parkway (hereafter referred to as the "Parkway") was created. The NPS landcover classification followed National Vegetation Classification (NVC) protocols. The landcover map, which extended the initial landcover classification to the entire Parkway, was based on color-infrared photography converted to 1-m raster-based digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles, according to U.S. Geological Survey mapping standards. Our goal was to include as many alliance classes as possible in the Parkway landcover map. To reach this goal while maintaining a consistent and quantifiable map product throughout the Parkway extent, a mapping strategy was implemented based on the migration of class-based spectral textural signatures and the congruent progressive refinement of those class signatures along the Parkway. Progressive refinement provided consistent mapping by evaluating the spectral textural distinctiveness of the alliance-association classes, and where necessary, introducing new map classes along the Parkway. By following this mapping strategy, the use of raster-based image processing and geographic information system analyses for the map production provided a quantitative and reproducible product. Although field-site classification data were severely limited, the combination of spectral migration of class membership along the Parkway and the progressive classification strategy produced an organization of alliances that was internally highly consistent. The organization resulted from the natural patterns or alignments of spectral variance and the determination of those spectral patterns that were compositionally similar in the dominant species as NVC alliances. Overall, the mapped landcovers represented the existent spectral textural patterns that defined and encompassed the complex variety of compositional alliances and associations of the Parkway. Based

  8. Philadelphia's Parkway Program: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Joan; Ross, Joanne

    The Parkway Program is the prototype school-without-walls created by the School District of Philadelphia in 1967. The program presently consists of four units of approximately 200 students (chosen by lottery from throughout the city), ten teachers, ten to 12 interns, and a Unit Head and administrative assistant housed in four separate non-school…

  9. Martin Luther King纪念园方案分析%Analysis of Martin Luther King Jr.National Memorial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣; 王瑛

    2005-01-01

    马丁·路德·金(Martin Luther King Jr.)纪念园是美国国家林荫绿地内的在建纪念物.介绍了该纪念物的设计竞赛过程和获选作品ROWA设计组方案的构思及特点,结合美国国家林荫绿地纪念景观风格和纪念景观设计风尚之流变等设计背景,从延续文脉、时间和空间的融合、材料人文含义的运用和塑造场所精神4个方面分析方案设计手法,并进一步归纳美国现代纪念园的设计特点,讨论对我国纪念园设计的启发意义,探索我国现代园林设计借鉴世界先进文化的道路.图2参11

  10. George Washington Memorial Parkway National Parkway Data Landcover Product - NOAA C-CAP Source

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — NPScape CCAP landcover (CCAP_LAC - 1996, 2001 and 2006) and landcover change (CCAP_LCC) products. Landcover change is produced from the 1996-2001 NOAA C-CAP and...

  11. EAARL Topography-Natchez Trace Parkway 2007: First Surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DSM) of a portion of the Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi was produced from remotely...

  12. EAARL Topography-Natchez Trace Parkway 2007: First Surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DSM) of a portion of the Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi was produced from remotely...

  13. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west.

  14. George Washington Memorial Parkway Tract and Boundary Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — These ESRI shape files are of National Park Service tract and boundary data that was created by the Land Resources Division. Tracts are numbered and created by the...

  15. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... lodging accommodations, food and beverage, retail sales, boat rentals, and other services at Crabtree... Doc No: 2011-15060] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-CONC-0511-7182; 2410-OYC] Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior...

  16. Writing, Teaching, and Researching: An Interview with Rene Saldana, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Rene, Jr.; Moore, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Rene Saldana, Jr., an assistant professor at Texas Tech University, is a writer of short stories, poetry, and novels. In order to get his storytelling right, he has relied on his memory when writing memoirs and consulted popular culture and family when writing fiction. In order to get his university teaching right, he reads seminal texts on…

  17. Geology along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Mark W.; Southworth, C. Scott; Tollo, Richard P.; Merschat, Arthur J.; Wagner, Sara; Lazor, Ava; Aleinikoff, John N.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed geologic mapping and new SHRIMP (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe) U-Pb zircon, Ar/Ar, Lu-Hf, 14C, luminescence (optically stimulated), thermochronology (fission-track), and palynology reveal the complex Mesoproterozoic to Quaternary geology along the ~350 km length of the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia. Traversing the boundary of the central and southern Appalachians, rocks along the parkway showcase the transition from the para-autochthonous Blue Ridge anticlinorium of northern and central Virginia to the allochthonous eastern Blue Ridge in southern Virginia. From mile post (MP) 0 near Waynesboro, Virginia, to ~MP 124 at Roanoke, the parkway crosses the unconformable to faulted boundary between Mesoproterozoic basement in the core of the Blue Ridge anticlinorium and Neoproterozoic to Cambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic cover rocks on the western limb of the structure. Mesoproterozoic basement rocks comprise two groups based on SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology: Group I rocks (1.2-1.14 Ga) are strongly foliated orthogneisses, and Group II rocks (1.08-1.00 Ga) are granitoids that mostly lack obvious Mesoproterozoic deformational features.Neoproterozoic to Cambrian cover rocks on the west limb of the anticlinorium include the Swift Run and Catoctin Formations, and constituent formations of the Chilhowee Group. These rocks unconformably overlie basement, or abut basement along steep reverse faults. Rocks of the Chilhowee Group are juxtaposed against Cambrian rocks of the Valley and Ridge province along southeast- and northwest-dipping, high-angle reverse faults. South of the James River (MP 64), Chilhowee Group and basement rocks occupy the hanging wall of the nearly flat-lying Blue Ridge thrust fault and associated splays.South of the Red Valley high-strain zone (MP 144.5), the parkway crosses into the wholly allochthonous eastern Blue Ridge, comprising metasedimentary and meta-igneous rocks assigned to the Wills Ridge, Ashe, and Alligator

  18. 78 FR 71546 - Safety Zone; Belt Parkway Bridge Construction, Gerritsen Inlet, Brooklyn, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Belt Parkway Bridge Construction, Gerritsen Inlet, Brooklyn, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast... Belt Parkway Bridge. This proposed rule would allow the Coast Guard to prohibit all vessel traffic...

  19. The Words of Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today's Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Excerpts from speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., are reprinted. Topics discussed include discrimination, the South, education, nonviolent resistance, poverty, economic opportunity, and world peace. (LH)

  20. Mancur Lloyd Olson, Jr. 1932-1998 Personal Recollections

    OpenAIRE

    Martin C McGuire

    1998-01-01

    This article memorializes the life and professional work of Mancur Lloyd Olson, Jr. The forty-two years of Mancur Olson's scholarly life were devoted to an inspiring pursuit of his vision of "macro." His ideas may occupy the core of macroeconomics fifty or one hundred years from now, or they may signify only one strand, but surely they will be present and influential in all future study of economics, of society and of interactions between them. Here in 1998, we don't know. But we do know that...

  1. Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  2. EAARL Topography - Natchez Trace Parkway 2007: First Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Segura, Martha; Yates, Xan

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi, acquired on September 14, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  3. Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. (1922-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N.; McPherron, Robert L.; Birn, Joachim

    2013-02-01

    Space physicist Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. died on 17 September 2012 at his home in Los Alamos, N. M. He was 90 years old. The cause of death was a heart attack that came following a brief hospitalization.

  4. The Fierce Urgency of now: Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. in and out of the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemek, Francis E.

    1988-01-01

    Explores how educators and their students can best honor Martin Luther King, Jr.'s, memory by using his life and works as a catalyst for acting upon school and society in a way that fosters social change. (Author/BJV)

  5. 78 FR 32442 - Record of Decision for the General Management Plan, Blue Ridge Parkway, Virginia and North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... National Park Service Record of Decision for the General Management Plan, Blue Ridge Parkway, Virginia and... (NPS) announces the availability of the Record of Decision (ROD) for the General Management Plan (GMP... modern-day management realities. Under Alternative C, parkway management would be more integrated with...

  6. "God and Man at Yale" and beyond: The Thoughts of William F. Buckley, Jr. on Higher Education, 1949-1955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James

    2012-01-01

    The March 24, 2008, edition of "National Review" (NR) was dedicated to the memory of its founder: William F. Buckley, Jr., who had passed away on February 27, 2008. It included thirty two different memorials about him written by prominent authors, editors, social commentators, fellow journalists, politicians, and historians. Then NR…

  7. Living history: G. Edgar Folk, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M

    2008-06-01

    In 2005, the American Physiological Society (APS) initiated the Living History Project to recognize senior members who have made significant contributions during their career to the advancement of the discipline and profession of physiology. During 2007, the APS Section of Environmental and Exercise Physiology selected Prof. G. Edgar Folk, Jr., of the University of Iowa to be profiled in Advances in Physiology Education.

  8. Martin Luther King, Jr. Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Civil Rights and Intercultural Relations.

    This resource guide was developed to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday by providing school personnel with background information and hands-on activities for use with students in Grades K-12. The activities in the guide can be implemented throughout the school year to help students become aware of the social, economic, and…

  9. Martin Luther King, Jr. Teacher's Resource Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    This Connecticut teachers' manual on Martin Luther King, Jr. includes: (1) teacher background information; (2) five excerpts from King's speeches; (3) four themes for lesson plans; and (4) sample lesson plans. The teacher's background information provides biographical sketches of King and his precursors. The five speeches reproduced here are…

  10. Views of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alan H.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses views of Martin Luther King, Jr., including concepts of human rights, related counseling approaches, and ethics. Claims King's views provide helpful insights for counselors and clients. Concludes King invited individuals to view challenging life situations as moral opportunities. (Author/ABL)

  11. Books about Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Christina B.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly reviews three recent biographies of Martin Luther King, Jr. that also deal with the civil rights movement. Summarizes contents and identifies reading ability levels appropriate for elementary and junior high students. Recommends six additional King biographies for children. Also endorses two filmstrips on King and the movement. Gives full…

  12. USGS 1:1,000,000-Scale Federal Lands of the United States - Parkways and Scenic Rivers 201506 Shapefile

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays the linear federally owned or administered land features (i.e., national parkways, wild and scenic rivers, etc.) of the United States and...

  13. Parkway公司和Hamilton sundstrand公司在墨西哥合资成立Parkway-HS公司

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Parkway制品公司(Parkway Products Inc.)和Hamilton sundstrand公司共同出资成立了一家名为Parkway-HSL.L.C.的新公司,专门生产低成本的航空航天产品。该公司的工厂位于墨西哥的萨尔提略市,占地面积超过2300m2。

  14. Pragmatic Analyses of Martin Luther King (Jr)'s Speech: "I Have a Dream"--An Introspective Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josiah, Ubong E.; Oghenerho, Gift

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the speech of Martin Luther King (Jr.) titled: "I Have a Dream", presented in 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial. This speech is selected for use because it involves a speaker and an audience who belong to a particular speech community. The speech is about the failed promises by the Americans whose dream advocate…

  15. Tribute to A. W. Castleman, Jr.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knappenberger, Jr., Kenneth L.; Johnson, Grant E.; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

    2014-09-18

    It is with great pleasure that we join our many colleagues who contributed to this special issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry A in dedicating it in honor of Professor A. W. “Will” Castleman, Jr. Will is a pioneer in the field of cluster science, and the far-reaching impact of his career is demonstrated by the broad range of topics covered in this issue. This diversity validates Will’s teaching that “fundamental research in cluster science allows you to explore any problem you want”. This ability to extend to other research areas comes because, as Will has shown both rigorously and elegantly, clusters are an intermediate state of matter that bridge the gap between molecular and bulk levels.

  16. Ultra light weight jet engine JR100; Chokeiryo jet engine JR100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuki, M. [Nippon Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan)

    1999-03-20

    As a part of the jet lift V/STOL research by National Aerospace Laboratory, a study of trial manufacture of ultra light weight jet engine JR 100 started in FY 1964. The study was aimed at obtaining a lift engine for VTOL and founding the base for the future jet lift VTOL, and at taking in the results of the jet engine element study accumulated so far and manufacturing an advanced engine. Decided on the use of domestic materials for JR 100, the materials to be used are almost iron-based ones. Through the efforts for weight reduction in structure and processing, a thrust/weight ratio of 10 was realized. At the same time, the production/processing of light weight materials such as titanium alloys was proceeded with, and by adopting the materials to JR 200 system, a thrust/weight ratio of 15 was realized. Together with these, for the purpose of reducing the fuel consumption rate, studies started on fan for lift fan engine and high temperature turbine (an inlet temperature of 1250 degrees C was achieved), to get low noise/high efficiency fan. By the research results, the basis for jet lift VTOL was established, and it became the basis for the development of turbo fan engine FJR 710. (NEDO)

  17. 76 FR 62832 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan, Blue Ridge Parkway, VA and NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... strategies to ensure protection, access, and enjoyment of the parkway's resources. The document analyzes the... internet on the PEPC website above. An electronic public comment form is provided on this website. You may... submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives...

  18. 1995 Bird survey Foothills parkway section 8B National Park Service, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.C.; Giffen, N.R.; Wade, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Foothills Parkway Section 8B right-of-way (ROW) is a stretch of land between Pittman Center and Cosby, Tennessee that is approximately 14.2 miles long and 1,000 ft wide, with a considerably wider section on Webb Mountain. A breeding bird survey was conducted at selected sample points along the ROW. The intent of the survey was to identify bird communities, area sensitive species (birds dependent on extensive forest systems for all their needs) and endangered, threatened, federal candidate, and state `in need of management` species now using the ROW. The survey also provides baseline data to assess future habitat impacts as well as cumulative impacts of the project.

  19. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 2, Appendices A-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NW, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this EN there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constricting Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER, which consists of Appendices A, B, and C, assesses the potential geologic impacts of the proposed Section 8B construction, presents the results of the Section 8B soil survey, and describes the water quality studies and analyses performed for the ER. The following summary sections provide information for geology, soils, and water quality.

  20. USGS 1:1,000,000-Scale Federal Lands of the United States - Parkways and Scenic Rivers 201506 FileGDB

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays the linear federally owned or administered land features (i.e., national parkways, wild and scenic rivers, etc.) of the United States and...

  1. Draft genome sequence of Therminicola potens strain JR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne-Bailey, K.G.; Wrighton, K.C.; Melnyk, R.A.; Agbo, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Coates, J.D.

    2010-07-01

    'Thermincola potens' strain JR is one of the first Gram-positive dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) for which there is a complete genome sequence. Consistent with the physiology of this organism, preliminary annotation revealed an abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes that are putatively associated with the periplasm and cell surface in a Gram-positive bacterium. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain JR.

  2. Walter Rowe Courtenay, Jr. (1933–2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    WALTER R. COURTENAY, JR., ichthyologist and retired professor, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, died in Gainesville, Florida, on 30 January 2014 at age 80. Walt was born in Neenah, Wisconsin, on 6 November 1933, son of Walter and Emily Courtenay. Walt's interest in fish began at a young age as evidenced by a childhood diary in which at 13 years of age he wrote about his first catch—a two-and-a-half pound “pike” from Lake Winnebago. When Walt turned ten, the family moved from Wisconsin to Nashville, Tennessee, the move precipitated by his father accepting a position as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. During those early days in Nashville, Walt's father would take summers off and travel to Michigan to teach at Camp Miniwanca along the shore of Lake Michigan where father and son honed their angling skills. It was also at that time Walt's father had definite views on what his son should be doing in adult life—in Walt's case it was to become a medical doctor. However, his Woods Hole internship in marine biology and oceanography toward the end of his undergraduate years was a transformative experience for him so much so that he abandoned all ideas of becoming a medical doctor and instead specialized in ichthyology and oceanography. Apart from the inherent interest and opportunities Woods Hole opened to him, being back at the shore of a large body of water, in this case the Atlantic Ocean, was far more interesting than sitting in lectures on organic chemistry. With that, Walt completed his B.A. degree at Vanderbilt University in 1956. In 1960 while in graduate school in Miami, Walt met and married Francine Saporito, and over the next several years had two children, Walter III and Catherine. He went on to receive his M.S. in 1961 from The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami on the systematics of the genus Haemulon (grunts) and his Ph.D. degree in 1965 working under his advisor C. Richard

  3. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 3, Appendix D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER inventories the fishes and benthic macroinvertebrates inhabiting the aquatic ecosystems potentially affected by the proposed construction of Section 8B. Stream biological surveys were completed at 31 stream sites during the Fall of 1994. The sampling strategy for both invertebrates and fish was to survey the different taxa from all available habitats. For benthic invertebrates, a standardized qualitative manual collection technique was employed for all 31 stations. For fish

  4. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 4, Appendices E-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical, resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices E through I (all ecological survey reports), which are summarized individually in the sections that follow. The following conclusions result from the completion of these surveys and the ER impact analysis: (1) Forest clearing should be limited as much as possible; (2) Disturbed areas should be replanted with native trees; (3) Drainages should be bridged rather than leveled with cut and fill; (4) For areas of steep slopes and potential erosion

  5. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW

  6. Obituary: Leverett Davis, Jr., 1914-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii, Jack Randolph

    2004-12-01

    Professor Leverett Davis Jr., Professor of theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology, died on June 15, 2003 after a long illness. He was 89 years old. He contributed many important ideas and concepts to theoretical astrophysics and was a pioneer in the in situ scientific exploration of space using observations from spacecraft. Davis was born in Elgin, Illinois on March 3, 1914, the eldest of four children of Louis Leverett Davis and Susan Gulick Davis. His parents moved several times as he grew up because his father, a mining engineer, became involved in different mining operations in the American West. Leverett married Victoria Stocker in June 1943. They had two children who died in childhood and subsequently adopted a son, Jeffrey. His wife and son survive him. Davis's early education was rather fractured and uneven because of the many family moves, with periods of home schooling alternating with regular school. His high school education was, on the other hand, reasonably normal. It was while in high school that he decided that he wanted to do physics or mathematics. He went on to earn his Bachelor of Science degree at Oregon State College in 1936, after which he started graduate studies at the California Institute of Technology, to pursue a graduate degree in physics. His advisor was William V. Houston and Davis received his PhD in 1941 for a thesis on electrical properties in nerves. He briefly entertained the idea of changing to work in biophysics. During World War II, Davis became an integral member of the Caltech project for rockets, which developed a number of different types of rockets used in the war. As a result of this war work, Davis wrote a book on Exterior Ballistics, published by Van Nostrand in 1958. He joined the faculty at the California Institute of Technology in 1946, after several years on campus as an instructor. In all, he taught there for nearly four decades before retiring as Professor of Theoretical Physics in 1981

  7. Puesta en marcha del sensor fuerza-par JR3

    OpenAIRE

    Hoz Najarro, Carlos de la

    2011-01-01

    Este estudio se engloba dentro de los proyectos realizados por el grupo de trabajo Robotic Lab de la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid para el desarrollo del nuevo Humanoide RH-2. Concretamente, implementaremos sobre software libre (Linux) una aplicación C++ que nos permita obtener de la tarjeta de adquisición de datos de 4 puertos PCI P/N 1593 de JR3 inc., en tiempo real, los valores de fuerza/par del sensor industrial Force Moment Sensor 85M35A3-I40-DH12, de la compañía JR3 inc., que llevará...

  8. Obituary: Ernest Hurst Cherrington, Jr., 1909-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    2003-12-01

    Ernest H. Cherrington, Jr., a long-time member of the AAS, died in San Jose, California on 13 July 1996, following a long illness. He had a short but active career as a research astronomer at Perkins Observatory at Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio before World War II, in which he served as an officer in the Army Air Force. After the war ended he turned to full-time teaching and administration at the University of Akron, and then at Hood College in Frederick, Maryland. Ernest was born on 10 September 1909 in Westerville, Ohio, where his father, Ernest H. Cherrington, Sr., was a leader in the temperance movement and publisher of "American Issue", a Prohibitionist magazine. Ernest Jr.'s mother, Betty Clifford (née Denny) Cherrington, was a homemaker. He was an outstanding student in high school and at Ohio Wesleyan University, which he entered in 1927. The little university's Perkins Observatory with its 69-inch reflector, briefly the second largest telescope in the United States, had just been built and gone into operation. After graduating with a BA magna cum laude in astronomy in 1931, Ernest stayed on one more year and earned his MS with a thesis on the motion of material in the tail of Comet Morehouse, supervised by Nicholas T. Bobrovnikoff. In 1932 Ernest entered the University of California at Berkeley as a graduate student, with a one-year teaching assistantship in the Astronomical Department. This was followed by a two-year Lick Observatory Fellowship. In June 1933 he married Ann McAfee Naylor, who had been a classmate at Delaware High School and Ohio Wesleyan. Ernest did his PhD thesis on spectrophotometry of the Mg I b lines in the solar spectrum, using a high-resolution grating spectrograph on the Berkeley campus, designed by C. Donald Shane, his adviser. In this thesis, Ernest tested and improved the then current theory of strong absorption lines in stellar atmospheres. He also spent several short periods at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton

  9. Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Dream of Peaceful Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Della

    This biography for younger readers depicts the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., the Nobel Peace Prize winner who dedicated himself to the struggle for equal rights for African Americans while embracing the principle of nonviolent resistance. The book presents an overview of the civil rights movement and chronicles King's role as national leader…

  10. Celebrate the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    OpenAIRE

    Lazenby, Jenna

    2006-01-01

    In celebration of the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Virginia Tech will host a variety of educational and cultural programs and community service events Jan. 14-19, 2007. All events are free and open to the public.

  11. A Conservation with...Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Lynne V.

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview between National Endowment for the Humanities chairman, Lynne V. Cheney, and Harvard professor, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Includes discussion of multiculturalism as it relates to free speech, sexism, racism, hate speech, and ethnocentrism. Emphasizes both the open tradition of Western culture and the recent pressure for…

  12. Celebrate the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    OpenAIRE

    Lazenby, Jenna

    2006-01-01

    In celebration of the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Virginia Tech will host a variety of educational and cultural programs and community service events Jan. 14-19, 2007. All events are free and open to the public.

  13. Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Presents a five-lesson, high school instructional unit on the ideas and activities of Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides quotations by Thoreau and King. (CFR)

  14. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Washington State Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA. Div. of Instructional Programs and Services.

    The Washington State Resource Guide on Martin Luther King, Jr., supplies a wide variety of materials for use with all grade levels in classroom and assembly presentations in public schools. The goal is for every child enrolled in Washington State schools to learn about Dr. King during the days of January 15 to January 17. Resolutions supporting an…

  15. Martin Luther King Jr.: The Crozer Seminary Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Clayborne

    1997-01-01

    As an undergraduate at Morehouse College, Martin Luther King Jr. was not a strong student, although he excelled in oratory, but in his years at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania he applied himself to become a straight-A student. The development of his theological perspective is described. (SLD)

  16. A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum: Playing the Dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Sydney Gurewitz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses curriculum for young children centered around the beliefs and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His works are interpreted in a human rights context in which children find their voice in the peaceable resolution of everyday conflicts. Describes the Child of the Day program. (Author/RWB)

  17. Finding the Right Formula: Edwin H. Walker Jr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Crystal L.

    2005-01-01

    Edwin H. Walker Jr earned his doctorate in chemistry at age 27 and has barely looked back. With 13 publications under his belt before coming out of graduate school, he has also given more than 20 poster presentations in national venues, most recently at the American Chemical Society. He can also include securing a half-million-dollar National…

  18. Martin Luther King Jr. contest winning posters to be displayed in downtown Blacksburg

    OpenAIRE

    Shannon, Kelly Baker

    2010-01-01

    Each year as part of the Martin Luther King Jr. celebration at Virginia Tech area kindergarten through 12th grade students are invited to participate in the annual Martin Luther King Jr. poster contest.

  19. Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Research Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-20

    graduates’ majors, honors/awards and their acceptance to a doctoral program. Also, assisting with securing the keynote speaker, Dr. Jimmie Lee Davis, Jr...experiences during school semesters and in the summers, and scholastic information such as college majors, minors, graduations, degree pursuits, fellowships...climate change. The Morehouse Hopps Alumni Panel included seven graduates who are currently in various levels of graduate school. Their candid

  20. DCEG Symposium to Honor Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr. | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer On May 6, the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) will sponsor a symposium to honor 50 years of leadership from its founding director, Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., M.D., who stepped down from the position in July 2012. The conference, entitled “Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations,” will highlight critical findings in cancer epidemiology from the last 50 years, as well as opportunities for future research directions. Long History of Leadership and Discovery

  1. LANSCE '90: The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes progress that has been made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) during the past two years. Presently, LANSCE provides a higher peak neutron flux than any other pulsed spallation neutron source. There are seven spectrometers for neutron scattering experiments that are operated for a national user program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Two more spectrometers are under construction. Plans have been made to raise the number of beam holes available for instrumentation and to improve the efficiency of the target/moderator system. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and community involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, M M

    1973-07-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients.

  3. Obituary: Benjamin Franklin Peery Jr. (1922-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Charles

    2011-12-01

    Professor Benjamin F. Peery, Jr. died at his home in Silver Spring, MD of natural causes on 30 November 2010. His full life began in St. Joseph, MO (home of the Pony Express) on 4 March 1922. His father was a railway mail clerk, so his family moved frequently. Most of his childhood was spent in southeastern Minnesota. He enlisted in the army in 1942, and served in campaigns in North Africa and Italy. After his discharge in 1945, he enrolled in the University of Minnesota, earning a BS in Physics in 1949. One of his early hobbies was to build and fly model airplanes. His intention to pursue aeronautical engineering changed to physics, but after receiving a MS in physics from Fisk University in 1955, he decided on a career in astronomy. He told the editors of the PBS series The Astronomers (1991, in which his career is highlighted) he thought it was shamefully absurd not to know what made the stars shine. So he began PhD studies in astronomy at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). His dissertation was on the complex eclipsing binary VV Cephei, where a compact hot star passes behind a cool giant star, revealing the structure of that giant's atmosphere. This task was especially demanding because of the complexity of the system's spectrum and the formidable array of observations assembled by Ben's advisor, Dean McLaughlin. Fortunately, Ben's strong physics background enabled him to design and construct one of the first oscilloscope measuring engines, which his fellow students called the PeeryScope. The final (1961) dissertation is an impressive combination of observational and astrophysical analysis. His degree was obtained in 1962; he had already begun a career at the University of Indiana, where he taught and did research (1959--1976). The Indiana years were highly productive. In addition to his own research, he was advisor on six PhD dissertations, and a master's thesis. Several of his students have also had productive careers. An ADS search on his students' names

  4. MILLS B. LANE, JR. AND ENTERPRISE IN A NEW SOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall L. Patton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For a century, Citizens & Southern Bank was a fixture in Georgia. In 1991, the C&S brand name disappeared in a merger with North Carolina National Bank. This was one of the bittersweet consequences of the slow, confusing swirl of bank deregulation after 1970, when institutions such as C&S simply disappeared, swallowed by the “winners” in the new competitive environment of interstate banking in the 1980s and 1990s. Even earlier, however, the Lane family had ceased to control the bank started by Mills Lane, Sr. in 1891. Mills B. Lane, Jr. was the last member of the Lane family to run C&S. After his retirement in 1973, Mills handpicked his successor and tried to retain some influence, but the bank began slipping away from the Lanes. By the early 80s, a decade before Hugh McColl’s NCNB acquired C&S, Mills Lane, Jr. was deeply alienated from the institution that had been, according to many, “Georgia’s cornerstone bank.”

  5. A new nearby PWN overlapping the Vela Jr SNR

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Terrier, R; Renaud, M; Ballet, J

    2011-01-01

    PSR J0855-4644 is an energetic pulsar (Edot = 1.1x10^36 erg/s, P=65 ms) discovered near the South-East rim of the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 (aka Vela Jr) by the Parkes Multibeam Survey. The position of the pulsar is in spatial coincidence with an enhancement in X-rays and TeV gamma-rays, which could represent its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). We have revealed with an XMM-Newton observation the X-ray counterpart of the pulsar together with a surrounding extended emission thus confirming the suggestion of a PWN. The comparison of the absorption column density derived in X-rays from the pulsar with 12CO observations (tracing the dense gas) is used to derive an upper limit to the distance of the pulsar (d< 900 pc) and to discuss a possible association of the pulsar with the Vela Jr SNR. This new distance estimate implies that the pulsar is nearby and could therefore significantly contribute to the observed spectrum of cosmic-ray leptons (e-/e+).

  6. William T. Carpenter Jr: 35 years of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    William T. Carpenter Jr has had a major impact on the design and conduct of clinical trials in schizophrenia. His contributions range from the decisive evaluation of the efficacy of hemodialysis to the development of novel approaches to evaluate new treatments for cognitive impairments and negative symptoms. He has developed innovative dosage reduction strategies. He has led efforts to focus drug development on those illness components that are not responsive to antipsychotic treatment. He has emphasized throughout his career the use of translational science to provide the conceptual framework for clinical trial interventions. This article reviews highlights of his many contributions, with an emphasis on 3 areas: (1) dosage reduction studies; (2) the use of the domains of psychopathology to identify drug development targets; and (3) the use of translational science to guide new drug development.

  7. Gino Marinuzzi Jr: Electronics and Early Multimedia Mentality in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Corbella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I reassess the complexity of the convergence between electronic music and media practices in Rome in the 1950s and 1960s, through the reconstruction of the experience of composer Gino Marinuzzi Jr (1920-96. His engagement with technology as a structuring device of compositional processes is fundamental and inescapable, and brings to the fore crucial issues of ‘applied’ music’s troublesome reputation in the Italian cultural discourse. In reviewing Marinuzzi’s biography over the period 1949-75, my goal is to exemplify the key phases of this transitional period in Italian music history, in which technology, through the spreading of media and their increasing importance in cultural representations, came to constitute a new value of musical activity and at the same time renewed old questions concerning music’s aesthetic autonomy.

  8. Connect the Book. Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, this month's featured book is "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." The book was written by Doreen Rappaport and illustrated by Bryan Collier (Jump at the Sun, 2001. 40p. ISBN 0786807148). This pictorial biography of the world-renowned civil rights leader has one of the most striking…

  9. 78 FR 57105 - Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company; Filing of Color Additive Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company; Filing of Color.... Wrigley Jr. Company, proposing that the color additive regulations be amended to expand the use of... lower the specification limit ] for lead in synthetic iron oxide for human food use. DATES: The...

  10. Obituary: Timothy P. McCullough, Jr., 1910-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Charles

    2007-12-01

    Timothy Pendleton McCullough Jr., 93, a retired research physicist who was a pioneer in the measurement of microwave radiation from planetary surfaces, died of cardiac arrest on 19 November 2004, at Inova Fairfax Hospital. He lived in Springfield, VA. McCullough, who was principally a radio astronomer, published 22 scientific research papers while working in the Atmosphere and Astrophysics Division of NRL, from 1946 until his retirement in 1975. He spent the early part of his career in planetary observation and was among the first in his field to use radio astronomy to measure the surface temperature of Venus. He also studied Mars and Jupiter. Later, his interest turned to supernovas, galaxies and solar flares. He was an emeritus member of the American Astronomical Society and a member of the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society. McCullough was born on 9 December 1910 in Vardaman, Mississippi. His father, Timothy P. McCullough, was a farmer and bookkeeper. His mother, Annie W. McCullough, was a homemaker. Timothy McCullough, Jr.'s parents, as well as two sisters and a brother, are deceased. McCullough graduated from the University of Mississippi in Oxford in 1936 and received a master's degree in physics from North Carolina State University in Raleigh. He taught physics and aviation navigation before entering the Navy during World War II. He instructed Russian sailors on anti-submarine warfare. McCullough left the Navy at the end of the war, but continued to serve in the Naval Reserve. He was recalled to active duty during the Korean War and was stationed at Potomac River Naval Command, where he wrote technical documents on electronic warfare systems. McCullough retired from the Naval Reserve in 1969 with the rank of commander. He was a charter member of First Baptist Church in Springfield and a former deacon and Sunday school teacher at First Baptist Church in Alexandria. Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Virginia Ball McCullough of Springfield; three

  11. The renaissance man of burn surgery: Basil A. Pruitt Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Karel D; Foncerrada, Guillermo; Clayton, R Patrick; Sljivich, Michaela; Voigt, Charles D; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Cambiaso-Daniel, Janos; Porter, Craig; Guillory, Ashley; Herndon, David N

    2017-07-08

    Dr. Basil A. Pruitt Jr., a consummate clinical and translational surgeon-scientist, has been spent over half a century at the forefront of an advancing standard of burn care. Commanding the US Army Institute for Surgical Research in San Antonio, he trained generations of leading burn clinicians and allied scientists. At his direction, there were forged discoveries in resuscitation from shock, treatment of inhalation injury, control of burn-related infections, prevention of iatrogenic complications, and understanding the sympathetic, endocrine, and immune responses to burn injury. Most consequentially, this team was among the first recognize and define alterations in the basal metabolic rate and thermoregulation consequent to burn injury. These investigations prompted groundbreaking insights into the coordinated nervous, autonomic, endocrine, immune, and metabolic outflows that a severely-burned patient uses to remain alive and restore homeostasis. Marking his scientific consequence, many of his reports continue bear fruit when viewed through a contemporary lens. This paper summarizes some of the major findings of his career thus far, and is intended to complement a Festschrift recently held in his honor. Not applicable.

  12. John Call Dalton, Jr., MD: America's first neurophysiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, E J; Manteghi, T; Sobel, S H; Lohr, L A

    2000-09-26

    Before the discoveries of John Call Dalton, Jr., MD (1824-1889), innervation of laryngeal muscles, long-term effects of cerebellar lesions, and consequences of raised intracranial pressure were poorly understood. Dalton discovered that the posterior cricoarytenoid muscles adducted the vocal cords during inspiration. He confirmed Flourens' observations that acute ablation of the cerebellum of pigeons caused loss of coordination. Dalton observed that properly cared for pigeons gradually recovered "coordinating power." Dalton observed that prolonged raised intracranial pressure caused tachycardia and then fatal bradycardia in dogs. Before Dalton published his photographic atlas of the human brain, neuroanatomy atlases were sketched by Europeans and imported into the United States. Dalton's atlas of the human brain contained precise photographs of vertical and horizontal sections that equal modern works. Before Dalton introduced live demonstrations of animals, physiology was taught by recitation of texts only. Dalton was the first American-born professor to teach physiology employing demonstrations of live animals operated on under ether anesthesia. He wrote an essay advocating experimentation on animals as the proper method of acquiring knowledge of function and that humane animal experimentation would ultimately improve the health of man and animals. His eloquent advocacy for humane experimental physiology quelled attacks by contemporaneous antivivisectionists. Dalton was America's first experimental neurophysiologist.

  13. East Weddell Sea echinoids from the JR275 expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Saucède

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Information regarding the echinoids in this dataset is based on the Agassiz Trawl (AGT and epibenthic sledge (EBS samples collected during the British Antarctic Survey cruise JR275 on the RRS James Clark Ross in the austral summer 2012. A total of 56 (1 at the South Orkneys and 55 in the Eastern Weddell Sea Agassiz Trawl and 18 (2 at the South Orkneys and 16 in the Eastern Weddell Sea epibenthic sledge deployments were performed at depths ranging from ~280 to ~2060 m. This presents a unique collection for the Antarctic benthic biodiversity assessment of an important group of benthic invertebrates. In total 487 specimens belonging to six families, 15 genera, and 22 morphospecies were collected. The species richness per station varied between one and six. Total species richness represents 27% of the 82 echinoid species ever recorded in the Southern Ocean (David et al. 2005b, Pierrat et al. 2012, Saucède et al. 2014. The Cidaridae (sub-family Ctenocidarinae and Schizasteridae are the two most speciose families in the dataset. They comprise seven and nine species respectively. This is illustrative of the overall pattern of echinoid diversity in the Southern Ocean where 65% of Antarctic species belong to the families Schizasteridae and Cidaridae (Pierrat et al. 2012.

  14. 78 FR 25942 - J.R. Simplot Co.; Availability of Petition for Determination of Nonregulated Status of Potato...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service J.R. Simplot Co.; Availability of Petition for Determination... petition from the J.R. Simplot Company (Simplot) seeking a determination of nonregulated status of potatoes... Petition Number 13-022-01p) from the J.R. Simplot Company (Simplot) of Boise, ID, seeking a...

  15. Lonnie R. Snowden Jr.: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy is given to a psychologist who has made a distinguished empirical and/or theoretical contribution to research in public policy, either through a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of work. The 2014 recipient of this award is Lonnie R. Snowden Jr. "Over the past several decades, Lonnie R. Snowden Jr. has systematically built a research agenda on the financing and organization of mental health services that has driven much of our current health policy reform efforts." Snowden Jr.'s award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of J-R Curves Obtained from Precracked Charpy Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    16 3. J-R curves for A723, Class 1, Grade 4 pressure vessel steel . 17 4. J-R curves for HY80 steel . 18 5. J-R curves for HY130 steel . 19 DTIC t,. 1 NV...In HY80 and KY130 steels , it is clear that significant strain-hardening occurred. The effect of strain-hardening could be crack growth at peak load...aimmoSO ff nwoa MW Identify b black nrnmsbm’) 3-R curves were determined for five materials (7075-T651; 2024-T351; HY13O; HY80 ; and A723, Class 1

  17. William D. Harper, Jr, MS, DC: anything can cause anything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Joseph C

    2008-03-01

    Trained as an engineer and a chiropractor, William D. Harper, Jr. made his career in the healing arts as instructor, writer and president of the Texas Chiropractic College (TCC). A native of Texas who grew up in various locales in the Lone Star State, in Mexico and in the Boston area, he took his bachelor's and master's degree in engineering in 1933 and 1934 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his chiropractic degree at TCC in 1942. Dissatisfied with the "foot-on-the-hose" concept of subluxation syndrome (D.D. Palmer's second theory), Dr. Harper studied and wrote about aberrant neural irritation as an alternative explanation for disease and for the broad clinical value he perceived in the chiropractic art. In this he paralleled much of D.D. Palmer's third theory of chiropractic. His often reprinted textbook, Anything Can Cause Anything, brought together much of what he had lectured and written about in numerous published articles. He was well prepared for the defense of chiropractic that he offered in 1965 in the trial of the England case in federal district court in Louisiana. The case was lost when the court ruled that the legislature rather than the judiciary should decide whether to permit chiropractors to practice, but Harper's performance was considered excellent. He went on to guide the TCC as president from 1965 through 1976, its first 11 years after relocating from San Antonio to Pasadena, Texas. Harper built the school - its faculty, staff and facilities - from very meager beginnings to a small but financially viable institution when he departed. Along the way he found fault with both chiropractic political camps that vied for federal recognition as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges in the United States. Dr. Bill Harper was a maverick determined to do things his way, and in many respects he was successful. He left a mark on the profession that merits critical analysis.

  18. Lynn White Jr. and the greening-of-religion hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bron; Van Wieren, Gretel; Zaleha, Bernard Daley

    2016-10-01

    Lynn White Jr.'s "The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis," which was published in Science in 1967, has played a critical role in precipitating interdisciplinary environmental studies. Although White advances a multifaceted argument, most respondents focus on his claim that the Judeo-Christian tradition, especially Christianity, has promoted anthropocentric attitudes and environmentally destructive behaviors. Decades later, some scholars argue contrarily that Christianity in particular and the world's predominant religions in general are becoming more environmentally friendly, known as the greening-of-religion hypothesis. To test these claims, we conducted a comprehensive review of over 700 articles-historical, qualitative, and quantitative-that are pertinent to them. Although definitive conclusions are difficult, we identified many themes and dynamics that hinder environmental understanding and mobilization, including conservative theological orientations and beliefs about the role of divine agency in preventing or promoting natural events, whether the religion is an Abrahamic tradition or originated in Asia. On balance, we found the thrust of White's thesis is supported, whereas the greening-of-religion hypothesis is not. We also found that indigenous traditions often foster proenvironmental perceptions. This finding suggests that indigenous traditions may be more likely to be proenvironmental than other religious systems and that some nature-based cosmologies and value systems function similarly. Although we conclude White's thesis and subsequent claims are largely born out, additional research is needed to better understand under what circumstances and communication strategies religious or other individuals and groups may be more effectively mobilized to respond to contemporary environmental challenges. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Obituary: Raymond Edwin White Jr., 1933-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, James William

    2004-12-01

    Raymond E. White, Jr., died unexpectedly at his home, in the early morning hours of October 12, 2004. Death appears to have been caused by severe diabetic shock. He retired from the Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory in July 1999 with the title of University Distinguished Professor, after serving on the faculty of this institution for over 35 years. He was born in Freeport, Illinois, on 6 May 1933, to Beatrice and Raymond E, Sr. -the latter being a career soldier in the US Army. Ray's early schooling took place in Illinois, New Jersey, Germany and Switzerland, following his father's assignments. He obtained a bachelors degree from the University of Illinois in 1955. Next Ray enlisted in the US Army, but quickly was enrolled in Officer Candidate School. He then served as lst Lt. in the US Army Corps of Engineers. Although military affairs remained a lifelong interest, and he was a member of the Company of Military Historians, Ray decided after three years to return to academia. He entered the astronomy PhD program at the University of Illinois in 1958. His PhD dissertation was supervised by Ivan R. King. Ray accepted a faculty position at the University of Arizona in 1964. First and foremost, Ray White was known at Arizona as an excellent teacher, revered by a large number of former students. When the astronomy major program was begun in 1967, Ray was one of three, original, major advisors. Over the next three decades, he was a leader at the University level in reforming the undergraduate program and courses. He was selected Outstanding University Faculty Member in April 1989 and he served as one of a handful of professors who are Faculty Fellows. These Fellows devote untold hundreds of hours as part-time residents at student dormitories, to give students a friendly face to address their problems. In 1995, Ray was among the first group of faculty to be recognized as University Distinguished Professors. In the year of his retirement, 1999, University

  20. Obituary: Edward W. Burke, Jr. (1924-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Raymond, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Edward W. Burke Jr. passed away on June 15, 2011, after suffering a heart attack. Dr. Burke devoted his professional life to the research and teaching of physics and astronomy at King College in Bristol, Tennessee. Edward W. Burke, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on September 16, 1924. He was a Navy veteran, having been commissioned as an ensign in 1944. He served in the Pacific near the end of World War II. He proceeded to complete his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Presbyterian College in 1947 and pursued the M.S. and Ph.D. in physics (1949 and 1954, respectively) at the University of Wisconsin. Under the direction of Professor Julian Mack, his thesis was titled "Isotope Shift in the Spectra of Boron." Although he did research in atomic spectra in the early part of his career, his interest in astronomy and variable stars in particular were his primary interests during his long academic career. Dr. Burke began his illustrious career at King College in 1949. He initiated the astronomy program there in 1950, included constructing a 12.5 inch Newtonian telescope, homemade as was most everything in those days. Many of his students learned about photometry at the Burke Observatory on the college campus. Burke was known for his trips to the Kitt Peak and Lowell observatories accompanied by undergraduate students on his trips, all of which were made by automobile which he preferred over flying. His initial interest in Ap stars later broadened into variable and especially eclipsing binary stars. His motivation was maintained by his desire to have his students experience basic research and to spark their interest in advanced degrees. Numerous students achieved advanced science and medical degrees because of Burke's encouragement and mentoring. In 1959, Dr. Burke was awarded a Fulbright professorship and traveled to Chile where he taught physics for a year in the Engineering School at the University of Chile in Santiago. He worked to establish a physics

  1. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: J.R. SIMPLOT EX-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY: DINOSEB

    Science.gov (United States)

    The J.R. Simplot Ex-Situ Bioremediation Technology is designed to anaerobically degrade nitroaromatic and energetic compounds in soils and liquids without forming identifiable toxic intermediate compounds produced by other biotreatment methods. This technology was evaluated un...

  2. Week-long celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. legacy continues

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of educational and cultural programs and community service events are underway as Virginia Tech celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Week Jan. 15-20. All events are free (unless otherwise noted) and open to the public.

  3. Leo Piilonen appointed William E. Hassinger, Jr. Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Leo Piilonen, professor of physics in the College of Science at Virginia Tech, was recently appointed the William E. Hassinger, Jr., Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  4. Maya Angelou to speak during Virginia Tech's third annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Meghan

    2008-01-01

    A remarkable woman who is hailed as one of the greatest voices of contemporary literature, Maya Angelou, will be a guest speaker during the third annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration at Virginia Tech.

  5. Maya Angelou to visit Virginia Tech during third annual Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Meghan

    2007-01-01

    A remarkable woman who is hailed as one of the greatest voices of contemporary literature, Maya Angelou, will be a guest speaker during the third annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration at Virginia Tech.

  6. Case report: massive postpartum transfusion of Jr(a+) red cells in the presence of anti-Jra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S; Armour, R; Reid, A; Abdel-Rahman, K F; Rumsey, D M; Phillips, M; Nester, T

    2005-01-01

    Jr(a) is a high-prevalence antigen. The rare Jr(a-) individuals can form anti-Jr(a) after exposure to the Jr(a) antigen through transfusion or pregnancy. The clinical significance of anti-Jr(a) is not well established. This study reports a case of a 31-year-old woman with a previously identified anti-Jr(a) who required massive transfusion of RBCs after developing life-threatening postpartum disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Despite the emergent transfusion of 15 units of Jr(a) untested RBCs, she did not develop laboratory or clinical evidence of acute hemolysis. The patient's anti-Jr(a) had a pretransfusion titer of 4 and a monocyte monolayer assay (MMA) reactivity of 68.5% (reactivity > 5% is considered capable of shortening the survival of incompatible RBCs). The titer increased fourfold to 64 and the MMA reactivity was 72.5% on Day 10 posttransfusion. Review of laboratory data showed evidence of a mild delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction by Day 10 posttransfusion. Despite rare reports of hemolytic transfusion reactions due to anti-Jr(a) in the literature, most cases, including this one, report that this antibody is clinically insignificant or causes only mild delayed hemolysis. Clinicians should be advised to balance the risks of withholding transfusion with the small chance of significant hemolysis after transfusion of Jr(a+) RBCs in the presence of anti-Jr(a).

  7. Magnetoplasmadynamcis - Portrait of Macon C. 'Mike' Ellis, Jr

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    Portrait of Macon C. 'Mike' Ellis, Jr. James Hansen described Mike Ellis as 'the first and only person to be in charge of Langley's Magnetoplasmadynamcis (MPD) Branch.' He was 'an NACA veteran who was 42 years old when the branch was organized. Ellis had come to work at Langley in 1939, and over the course of his career at the laboratory, he had been involved in pioneering work on the aerodynamics of jet engines, ramjets, and supersonic inlets and nozzles. Fittingly, Ellis had worked for Eastman Jacobs and with Arthur Kantrowitz in the early 1940s, and he had heard firsthand accounts of his former colleagues' attempts to design a fusion reactor in the spring of 1938. By the late 1950s, Ellis was one of Langley's most outspoken believers in MPD's promise of technological benefits. Ellis encouraged Floyd Thompson's enthusiasm for MPD and persuaded Langley's senior staff of mostly engineers that MPD was a field of research vital to the future of NASA. When the time came to pick someone to head the new branch, Ellis was unquestionably the person for the job. 'Ellis was no extraordinary 'scientific brain.' As an aeronautical engineer, his talents were quite respectable, but he possessed no special competency in the physics of fluids beyond his experience in aerodynamics or gas dynamics. He was always the first to admit that the complexities of plasma physics and MPD were such that 'there was no way' that he personally could conduct basic MPD research. That challenge he would leave to minds more suited for it. But Ellis could bring the MPD researchers together as a unit, serve as their strong external advocate, shield them from front-office pressures, and make sure that they received the support they needed to carry out their work. 'I just tried to keep my head above water,' Ellis explains, 'and keep these *mad scientists' from going off on too many tangents, or going mad myself.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From

  8. Parks not Parkways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conley, Jim; Jensen, Ole B.

    2016-01-01

    This case study of a dispute over a project to construct a road through green space in a small Canadian city brings together two hitherto separate theoretical approaches to mobility disputes: “culture stories” and “regimes of engagement”. The stories opponents tell, in interviews and documents, c...... of engagement: a regime of familiarity based in slow mobilities, a regime of planned action based in automobility, and the clash of industrial and green orders of worth in a regime of justification...

  9. Parks not Parkways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conley, Jim; Jensen, Ole B.

    2016-01-01

    This case study of a dispute over a project to construct a road through green space in a small Canadian city brings together two hitherto separate theoretical approaches to mobility disputes: “culture stories” and “regimes of engagement”. The stories opponents tell, in interviews and documents...

  10. Obituary: Harding Eugene (Gene) Smith, Jr., 1947-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Carol; Soifer, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Harding Eugene Smith Junior, or Gene, as he was known to family, friends, and colleagues, passed away after an automobile accident in Encinitas, California, on 16 August 2007. He was 60 years old. Gene had recently retired from UCSD after thirty years of service. A memorial service was held at Quail Botanical Gardens in Encinitas, California, on 23 August 2007. A web page is dedicated to his memory at http://harding.smith.muchloved.com, where contributions of memories are invited. Gene was born in San Jose, California in 1947, to Harding Eugene Smith Senior, and Bernice Smith (nee Smith). Harding Smith Senior was an air-force navigator; therefore Gene spent his childhood moving from one air-force base to another. Although an only child, Gene was very close to his cousin Meg, whom he lived nearby to in Gilroy for a time, and the two were like brother and sister. The elder Harding Smith was lost in action over Cambodia in the mid-sixties. Gene was a dedicated student, a boy scout, and a Presidential Scholar. He majored in Physics at Caltech, where he also took a lively interest in the football team and the Glee Club, and was elected a House Officer. To his close friends, he was known at Caltech as Smitty, and the closest of them was Rob Drew, who gave a glimpse into that period of Gene's life at the memorial: "Gene arrived early at campus his first year, in response to an invitation to join the football team. Gene's size and features reminded the head coach of a long-forgotten player named 'Johnson.' After a few days of confusion, Gene simply replaced the name on his helmet. 'Johnson!' coach would yell, 'get in there!' If Johnson was going to get to play, Gene was going to be the best Johnson available!" Gene spent the summer of 1966 working at Kitt Peak, where his lifetime love of observing with ground-based telescopes began, though he learned some things the hard way, such as the fact that trying to squeeze 40,000 numbers onto a computer that stored only 32

  11. Obituary: Richard L. (Dick) Walker, Jr., 1938-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Jeffrey R.; Mason, Brian

    2005-12-01

    Koch Center for Science, Math, and Technology at Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts. He also consulted with James Turrell, providing astronomical position information for the design of the Roden Crater Project outside of Flagstaff. While he will be remembered for his significant scientific contributions to the field of astronomy, those who knew Dick, both scientists and non-scientists alike, will probably remember him best for his humility, his humanity, and his loyal and abiding friendship. He was a man with a terrific sense of humor and an infectious laugh. It was always an honor and pleasure to be in his company. Richard L. Walker, Jr. is survived by his wife, Patricia, two daughters from his first marriage: Brenda Walker of Las Vegas, NV, and Pamela Hepburn of Holland, OH, as well as four children from Patricia's first marriage: Doug Browning of Lake Havasu City, AZ, Michael Browning of Kingman, AZ, Kim Bructo of Orient, OH, and Jennifer Brown of Lake Havasu City, AZ. He is also survived by ten grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his father Richard, mother Mary, and daughter, Paula Jean Elizabeth Stone.

  12. Obituary: Ralph Robert Robbins, Jr., 1938-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Jefferys, William H.; Lambert, David L.

    2007-12-01

    Ralph Robert Robbins, Jr., died on 2 December 2005, in Kyle, Texas. His wife, Maria Elena Robbins, his daughters Julia Robbins Kelso and Stephanie Juarez Balles, his son Matthew Juarez, and five grandchildren survive him. Bob was on the faculty at the University of Texas from 1968 until his retirement in 2003. Bob was born in Wichita, Kansas, on 2 September 1938, the only son of Mildred and Ralph Robert Robbins, Sr. Guided by his high school's policy to provide a practical education to children of working-class parents, Bob began high school with a heavy dose of vocational courses until the results of a test indicated his special talent in mathematics. He was awarded a full scholarship to Yale University, graduating magna cum laude in mathematics in 1960. He won the Warner Prize in Mathematics at Yale that year. He received his Ph.D. in 1966 with a dissertation entitled "The Triplet Spectrum of Neutral Helium in Expanding Nebulae" from the University of California at Berkeley. His interest in college teaching was ignited at this time through summer teaching positions at San Mateo California Junior College and the Ohio State University. Following a year at Texas as a McDonald Observatory Post-doctoral Fellow, Bob taught for a year in the physics department of the University of Houston before returning to the University of Texas at Austin as an Assistant Professor of Astronomy in 1968. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1972. Bob's research in the early 1970s on theoretical studies of helium was of vital importance to astronomers for over three decades. These pioneering calculations became vital to observational astronomers in the mid-1990s as interest grew in the primordial helium produced by the Big Bang. Bob's interest and influence in education was international in scope. In the summers 1968-1970, he was a government consultant in Mathematics in East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). He consulted with the government that was preparing a master plan for technical

  13. Obituary: George Hamilton Bowen Jr. (1925-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Lee Anne; Struck, Curtis

    2011-12-01

    Our colleague and collaborator George Hamilton Bowen, Jr., passed away November 1, 2009 in Ames, Iowa. George was born June 20, 1925 in Tulsa, Oklahoma to George and Dorothy (Huntington) Bowen. He married Marjorie Brown June 19, 1948 in Redondo Beach, California; they had five children, with eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren at the time of his death. George H. Bowen's third or perhaps his fourth career was in astronomy. He was drafted into the navy in 1944, at the end of his first year as a student at Caltech, and ended his war-time service as an electronic technician on the aircraft carrier Shangri-La. He later said "In just nine months, starting from scratch (Ohm's law!), we learned an amazing amount - not by memorization, of course, but by study and real understanding of the basic function of the most advanced AC circuits then being used for instrumentation, measurements, communications, control systems, and much more." He gained a confidence that he could quickly and accurately diagnose and solve technical problems that stood him well in future work. One accomplishment he took particular pride in was figuring out how the radar control used cams and gears to solve the trigonometry for accurate pointing. He also described how the captain was alarmed when weather conditions changed so that refraction no longer showed them distant, small boats around the curvature of Earth. After the war, George Bowen returned to undergraduate and eventually graduate study at Caltech, where he was recruited to the biophysics research group headed by future Nobel Laureate Max Delbrück. George often described his joy in working with these first-rate scientists and finding himself accepted as a part of the effort. He finished his BS with honors in 1949 and his PhD in 1953 with a thesis on "Kinetic Studies on the Mechanism of Photoreactivation of Bacteriophase T2 Inactivated by Ultraviolet Light" involving work with E Coli. This work was supported by grants from the U

  14. Analysis of the deconstruction of Dyke Marsh, George Washington Memorial Parkway, Virginia-Progression, geologic and manmade causes, and effective restoration scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Pavich, Milan J.; Markewich, Helaine W.; Oberg, Erik; Helwig, Ben; Steury, Brent; Santucci, Vincent L.; Durika, Nancy J.; Rybicki, Nancy B.; Engelhardt, Katharina M.; Sanders, Geoffrey; Verardo, Stacey; Elmore, Andrew J.; Gilmer, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This report is a synthesis of the latest findings from an ongoing study of Dyke Marsh, an eroding freshwater tidal wetland that is scheduled for federal restoration. Its purpose is to provide an accurate and up-to-date temporal and geological framework for the marsh, of which most is new information (plus a compilation of historical and recent information), that is directly relevant to the restoration effort and also is relevant to short-term and long-term land management decisions regarding this natural resource.

  15. A Discourse Analysis of the Centered and Critical Scholar-Activism of Martin Luther King Jr.

    OpenAIRE

    Keatts, Quenton

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the often neglected research concerning the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his scholar-activism. This project is intended to look for evidence of intellectual leadership within Kingâ s writings in an effort to classify King within the Scholar-Activist paradigm in Africana Studies. Further, the aim is to examine Martin Luther King, Jr. from the critical and centered Scholar-Activist paradigm of Africana Studies based on an analysis of ...

  16. Has the Dream Been Fulfilled? Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. & President Barack Hussein Obama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nichelle Boyd; Moore, Virginia J.; Williams-Black, Thea H.

    2015-01-01

    Equality for all was the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and he knowingly laid the foundation for and inspired the first African-American President of the United States of America, Barack Hussein Obama, who also had the dream of "Change" for America. These men exhibited how working together can make dreams become reality. For the…

  17. Ability of Lactobacillus plantarum JR64 isolated from noni juice in lowering Cholesterol in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanjar Sumarno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently public’s attention to the importance of healthy food increases rapidly. Probiotic based food exploiting lactic acid bacteria is among the healthy food. Lactobacillus plantarum JR64 isolate from Morinda citrifolia fruit was assessed for its probiotic in-vivo by using Wistar  Rat. The purpose of this research was to study the ability of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum JR64 in lowering serum LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein of Wistar Rat. Twenty Rats were grouped into 4, each group consisted of 5 Rats. First Group was a negative control  given standard normal diet of 20 gr/day plus aquadest. Second Grup was a positive control given cholesterol normal diet 20 gr /day plus Propil Tio Urasil (PTU 60 mg/kg body weight/day. Third Group was supplemented with normal diet 20 gr /day plus Propil Tio Urasil (PTU 60 mg  kg body weight /day and  1012 CFU Lactobacillus plantarum JR64. Fourth Group was the same as third Group unless the probiotic using commercial probiotic Lactobacillus bulgariccus at 1012 CFU. Blood samples were withdrawn for measurement of total cholesterol, triglyceride, High Density Lipoprotein (HDL, and Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol every week and measured by using spectrophotometer with 546 nanometers wavelength. The results show that probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum JR64 isolated from noni juice significantly (p < 0,01 reduce Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL and Triglyceride in vivo  and tend to reduce High Density Lipoprotein (HDL and total cholesterol.

  18. Commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Developed in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this is a short collection of suggested activities to teach black awareness in the elementary and secondary grades through King's philosophy. An introductory biographical sketch of King and an article about his accomplishments are provided. Activities are divided into grade-level ranges for the…

  19. Fighting Fair. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for Kids. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Fran; Friedman, Alice

    This curriculum guide for grades 4 through 9 uses the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., to teach conflict resolution and to explore the philosophy of non-violence for daily life. To enable students to learn and apply non-violence, it must be modeled in a classroom environment that builds trust and a sense of community. Each of the…

  20. Abuse of Power? : J. Edgar Hoover vs. Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksen, Vigdis

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis I have looked at how J. Edgar Hoover came to power as Director of the FBI, and how he later used that power against Attorney General Robert Kennedy and SCLC leader Martin Luther King, Jr. I have further analyzed the reasons and motives for Hoover's actions by, among other things, making a psychological profile on the Director.

  1. Sharing the Gift of Jazz: An Interview with Willie L. Hill Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Brad

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Willie L. Hill Jr., founder and director of the Society for Jazz Education. Currently a professor of music education at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and the director of the UMass Fine Arts Center, Hill has served as director of education for the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz. He is a past…

  2. Addressing Curriculum Deficiencies on Martin Luther King, Jr. through Computer Assisted Instruction and Multimedia Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, James S.

    Students need to see past heroes as real people who struggled with ordinary problems in order to see the relevancy of studying history and to act practically upon the lessons that each leader teaches them. This study attempts to answer two questions relating to Martin Luther King, Jr.: (1) What do we teach our children about King? and (2) Can we…

  3. Steam System Efficiency Optimized After J.R. Simplot Fertilizer Plant Receives Energy Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-07-01

    The J.R. Simplot Company's Don Plant in Pocatello, Idaho, optimized boiler operation, improved condensate recovery, and fixed steam traps and leaks for a simple payback of 6.5 months. Results are being shared with other Simplot facilities and other recommendations identified during the assessment are under consideration.

  4. Steam System Efficiency Optimized After J.R. Simplot Fertilizer Plant Receives Energy Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    This case study describes how the J.R. Simplot company's Don Plant in Pocatello, Idaho, achieved annual savings of $335,000 and 75,000 MMBtu, with a simple payback of 6.5 months, after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment.

  5. "Qualitative Liberalism": Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. and the Persuasive Uses of Definition and History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoe, Stephen P.

    1989-01-01

    Applies the concepts of persuasive definition, ideograph, and ideological history in an analysis of Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.'s, discourse. Uses this analysis to enhance understanding of how the strategic definition of terms such as "liberal" can influence the ongoing struggle to set presumptions in American political life. (SR)

  6. Abuse of Power? : J. Edgar Hoover vs. Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksen, Vigdis

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis I have looked at how J. Edgar Hoover came to power as Director of the FBI, and how he later used that power against Attorney General Robert Kennedy and SCLC leader Martin Luther King, Jr. I have further analyzed the reasons and motives for Hoover's actions by, among other things, making a psychological profile on the Director.

  7. Mounting a Curricular Revolution: An Interview with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Zastrow, Claus

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Harvard professor and cultural critic who has captured 25 million viewers with his PBS documentary series, African American Lives (WNET). Using genealogical research and DNA science, Gates traces the family history of 19 famous African Americans. What results is a rich and moving…

  8. Sharing the Gift of Jazz: An Interview with Willie L. Hill Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Brad

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Willie L. Hill Jr., founder and director of the Society for Jazz Education. Currently a professor of music education at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and the director of the UMass Fine Arts Center, Hill has served as director of education for the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz. He is a past…

  9. Has the Dream Been Fulfilled? Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. & President Barack Hussein Obama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nichelle Boyd; Moore, Virginia J.; Williams-Black, Thea H.

    2015-01-01

    Equality for all was the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and he knowingly laid the foundation for and inspired the first African-American President of the United States of America, Barack Hussein Obama, who also had the dream of "Change" for America. These men exhibited how working together can make dreams become reality. For the…

  10. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Lesson with Interdisciplinary Connections for Middle-Level Music Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Mary Frances; Terry, Cynthia

    This lesson begins with a very brief biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. The lesson identifies its educational objectives; addresses National Standards for Music Education; lists materials needed; details six step-by-step classroom procedures for lesson implementation; and provides curriculum connections for language arts, visual art, physical…

  11. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Power of Nonviolence. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    This lesson plan introduces students in grades 6-8 to Martin Luther King Jr.'s philosophy of nonviolence and the teachings of Mohandas K. Gandhi that influenced King's views. After considering the political impact of this philosophy, students explore its relevance to personal life. In these 6 lessons students will: (1) examine the philosophy of…

  12. Let Freedom Ring: The Life & Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    This lesson plan teaches students about the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, and read a portion of King's "I Have a Dream" speech. After studying Dr. King's use of imagery and allusion, students create original poetic phrases about freedom and…

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila JR32 and Lp01 Laboratory Strains Domesticated in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, Chinatsu; Matushita, Mizue; Okubo, Torahiko; Matsuo, Junji; Miyake, Masaki; Nagai, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two Legionella pneumophila variant strains (JR32 and Lp01_666) originally derived from a Philadelphia-1 clinical isolate, domesticated in Japan, with distinct susceptibility to amoebae. Detailed genomic analysis will allow us to better understand Legionella adaptation and survival mechanisms in host cells. PMID:27491976

  14. Henry David Thoreau, Martin Luther King Jr., and the American Tradition of Protest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. fundamentally altered the tradition of protest and reform. Compares and contrasts the role of each man in U.S. social and constitutional history. Concludes that while Thoreau lacked the broad influence of King, his writings influenced both King and Mohandas Gandhi. (CFR)

  15. The Rhetorical Construction of Time in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ronald E.

    1991-01-01

    Explores the rhetorical use of time in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail." Offers an explanation of the ideological heritage that temporarily unifies the discourse. Describes the letter's recent, historical, and spiritual time frames, accounts for the ideological purpose each serves, and explains on what ground they…

  16. Martin Luther King, Jr. Borrows a Revolution: Argument, Audience, and Implications of a Secondhand Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Keith D.

    1986-01-01

    Examines features of and sources for the discourse of Martin Luther King, Jr., as they relate to the language and assumptions favored by his listeners and readers in an effort to understand how speakers and writers can successfully argue from premises that audiences accept. Indicates how an understanding of King can help in composition…

  17. Children's Books on Martin Luther King, Jr. Offer a One-Dimensional View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Beryle

    1985-01-01

    Reviews children's books, teacher references, mini-plays, and curriculum resources that relate to the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. Reports that most of these sources ignore growth and changes within King's life and thought, the role models who shaped his philosophy, or his participation in issues such as the Vietnam War and poverty. (KH)

  18. 78 FR 10172 - Lisa Anne Cornell and G. Ware Cornell, Jr. v. Princess Cruise Lines, Ltd. (Corp), Carnival PLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... Lisa Anne Cornell and G. Ware Cornell, Jr. v. Princess Cruise Lines, Ltd. (Corp), Carnival PLC, and..., Jr., hereinafter ``Complainants,'' against Princess Cruise Lines, Ltd (Corp), Carnival plc, and... common carrier for hire of passengers from ports in the United States;'' Respondent Carnival plc ``is...

  19. J.R. SIMPLOT EX-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT OF TNT-CONTAMINATED SOILS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the findings of the second evaluation of the J.R. Simplot Ex-situ Bioremediation Technology also known as the Simplot Anaerobic Bioremediation (SABRE™) process. This technology was developed by the J.R. Simplot Company to biologically degrade nitroaromatic...

  20. J.R. SIMPLOT EX-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT OF DINOSEB-CONTAMINATED SOILS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the J.R. Simplot Ex-Situ Bioremediation Technology on the degradation of dinoseb (2-set-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) an agricultural herbicide. This technology was developed by the J.R. Simplot Company (Simplot) to biologically ...

  1. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Memory Matters KidsHealth > For Kids > Memory Matters A A ... of your complex and multitalented brain. What Is Memory? When an event happens, when you learn something, ...

  2. MEMORY MODULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evidence from both animal and human research indicates that emotionally significant experiences activate hormonal and brain systems that regulate the consolidation of newly acquired memories. These effects are integrated through noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala which regulates memory consolidation via interactions with many other brain regions involved in consolidating memories of recent experiences. Modulatory systems not only influence neurobiological processes underlying the consolidation of new information, but also affect other mnemonic processes, including memory extinction, memory recall and working memory. In contrast to their enhancing effects on consolidation, adrenal stress hormones impair memory retrieval and working memory. Such effects, as with memory consolidation, require noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala and interactions with other brain regions. PMID:22122145

  3. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    a decade. His scrupulous integrity and forthright honesty served him, and the Society, well. Despite his scathing intolerance for administrative stupidity, he also managed to complete successfully a term as Chair of the Department of Astronomy. (This author, who currently holds the Chair and shares the intolerance, has yet to fathom the gracious equanimity Norm displayed.) His early interest in brewing beer during graduate school at Cornell (where he co-founded the Old Undershirt Brewing Company) was transformed in later life into an expertise in German wines. The precision that marked his research extended to every aspect of his private life. I had the distinct pleasure of subletting his apartment during my first year on the faculty at Columbia while he was on leave in Europe. We spent most of the year trying to imagine how we could ever restore it to the state of perfect organization in which we found it. Norm is survived by his wife and constant companion of thirty years, psychiatrist Doris Blum Nagel, by his sister Dr. Jean Trousdale, and brother Dr. Richard C. Baker, two nieces, three nephews, and by several generations of undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, and colleagues who hold fond memories of his patience, kindness, humor, and quiet "joie de vivre".

  4. Mattoso Câmara Jr. e a palavra prosódica Mattoso Câmara Jr. and the prosodic word

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leda Bisol

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo que se detém no conceito de palavra fonológica, fundamentando-se na Teoria Prosódica (Booij 1983, (Nespor & Vogel 1986, relembra Mattoso Câmara Jr., o primeiro entre nós a fazer específica diferença entre dois tipos de palavra, a que diz respeito aos morfemas, a que diz respeito à presença de um acento. Discutem-se a interação entre as duas unidades, a dimensão e as funções da palavra fonológica. Nestas simples linhas, nossa homenagem ao grande mestre de quem tivemos a felicidade de ser aluna.The subject of this paper is the phonological word and its interaction with the morphological word. The dimension, the domain and the functions of the phonological word are discussed following the principles of Prosodic Theory (Booij 1983, (Nespor & Vogel 1986. Câmara Jr's statements regarding Brazilian Portuguese are the basis of the considerations.

  5. William Pepper Jr, MD (1843-1898): portrait of a nineteenth-century medical educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Re, Vincent; Bellini, Lisa M

    2006-08-01

    Dr William Pepper Jr was a prominent Philadelphia physician whose contributions to medicine in the late 19th century are not widely known. As a young physician he rose in stature rapidly due to his abilities as a diagnostician, teacher, writer and researcher. His primary interest, however, was to improve the education of physicians. He orchestrated the creation of America's first university-controlled teaching hospital, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, enabling substantial improvements in clinical training. Pepper later became Provost of the University of Pennsylvania and ambitiously transformed the curriculum of the medical school, providing greater basic science and clinical training. He also worked to establish several institutes and museums in Philadelphia in order to promote academic pursuits, particularly in medicine. William Pepper Jr was one of the 19th century's foremost medical educators and his accomplishments helped reshape the way medicine was taught throughout the United States.

  6. An Analysis of the Tvergaard Parameters at Low Initial Stress Triaxiality for S235JR Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kossakowski Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the influence of the Tvergaard parameters, qi, which are basic constants of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN material model, on the numerically simulated load-carrying capacity of tensile elements made of S235JR steel. The elements were considered to be under static tension at low initial stress triaxiality σm/σe = 1/3. Two sets of the Tvergaard parameters qi were analyzed: those typical of structural steels and those dependent on material strength properties. The results showed that the Tvergaard parameters, qi, had influence on the load-carrying capacity of tensile elements at low initial stress triaxiality. They affected the strength curves and the changes in the void volume fractions determined for S235JR steel elements

  7. Left to right, astronauts John H. Casper, mission commander, and Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, get

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Left to right, astronauts John H. Casper, mission commander, and Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, get help with the final touches of suit donning during emergency bailout training for STS-77 crew members in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Casper and Brown will join four other astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  8. 最后消息:Bodies of JFK Jr.,Wife,Sister-in-Law Found

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tony; Munroe

    1999-01-01

    Searchers have found the bodies of John F. Kennedy Jr., his wife CarolynBessette Kennedy and her sister Lauren as well as a large piece of their crashedplane off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard, officials said Wednesday. Massachusetts Sen. Edward Kennedy and his two sons headed for the crashsite on a U. S. Coast Guard vessel after the bodies and wreckage (残骸) were

  9. Cicero's de legibus and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Stride toward freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boleslav s. Povšič

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available He who reads carefully Cicero'sDe Legibus and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Stride Toward Freedom is surprised to find, mutatis mutandis, on how many points these two great men agree. The historical circumstances are different, but the essential ideas are very similar. The purpose of this paper is to show on what precisely they agree and on what they differ.

  10. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  11. Rock slope stability analysis along the North Carolina section of the Blue Ridge Parkway: Using a geographic information system (GIS) to integrate site data and digital geologic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, R.S.; Wooten, R.M.; Cattanach, B.L.; Merschat, C.E.; Bozdog, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) completed a five-year geologic and geohazards inventory of the 406-km long North Carolina segment of the Blue Ridge Parkway (BRP). The ArcGIS??? format deliverables for rock slopes include a slope movement and slope movement deposit database and maps and site-specific rock slope stability assessments at 158 locations. Database entries for known and potential rock slope failures include: location data, failure modes and dimensions, activity dates and levels, structural and lithologic data, the occurrence of sulfide minerals and acid-producing potential test results. Rock slope stability assessments include photographs of the rock cuts and show locations and orientations of rock data, seepage zones, and kinematic stability analyses. Assigned preliminary geologic hazard ratings of low, moderate and high indicate the generalized relative probability of rock fall and/or rock slide activity at a given location. Statistics compiled based on the database indicate some general patterns within the data. This information provides the National Park Service with tools that can aid in emergency preparedness, and in budgeting mitigation, maintenance and repair measures. Copyright 2009 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association.

  12. Jules Verne Voyager, Jr: An Interactive Map Tool for Teaching Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Meertens, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present an interactive, web-based map utility that can make new geological and geophysical results accessible to a large number and variety of users. The tool provides a user-friendly interface that allows users to access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales. The map tool, dubbed 'Jules Verne Voyager, Jr.', allows users to interactively create maps of a variety of study areas around the world. The utility was developed in collaboration with the UNAVCO Consortium for study of global-scale tectonic processes. Users can choose from a variety of base maps (including "Face of the Earth" and "Earth at Night" satellite imagery mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others), add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays (coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, etc.), and then superimpose both observed and model velocity vectors representing a compilation of 2933 GPS geodetic measurements from around the world. A remarkable characteristic of the geodetic compilation is that users can select from some 21 plates' frames of reference, allowing a visual representation of both 'absolute' plate motion (in a no-net rotation reference frame) and relative motion along all of the world's plate boundaries. The tool allows users to zoom among at least three map scales. The map tool can be viewed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/Earth. A more detailed version of the map utility, developed in conjunction with the EarthScope initiative, focuses on North America geodynamics, and provides more detailed geophysical and geographic information for the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The ‘EarthScope Voyager’ can be accessed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/EarthScope. Because the system uses pre-constructed gif images and overlays, the system can rapidly create and display maps to a large number of users

  13. J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Large Food Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-09-01

    This DOE Industrial Program case study describes how the J.R. Simplot Company saved energy and money by increasing the efficiency of the steam system in its potato processing plant in Caldwell, Idaho.

  14. J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Large Food Processing Plant (Steam)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This DOE Industrial Program case study describes how the J.R. Simplot Company saved energy and money by increasing the efficiency of the steam system in its potato processing plant in Caldwell, Idaho.

  15. J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Large Food Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-09-01

    This DOE Industrial Program case study describes how the J.R. Simplot Company saved energy and money by increasing the efficiency of the steam system in its potato processing plant in Caldwell, Idaho.

  16. J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Large Food Processing Plant (Steam)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This DOE Industrial Program case study describes how the J.R. Simplot Company saved energy and money by increasing the efficiency of the steam system in its potato processing plant in Caldwell, Idaho.

  17. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evi

  18. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain that actually make memories harder to recall. previous continue Signs of a Memory Problem A person might — or might not — be ... A doctor will test the person's ability to recall events, names, or places by ... . If the person has memory loss from a head injury, the doctor will ...

  19. THE AMERICAN PROPHET: THE INFLUENCE OF THE PROPHETIC ON MARTIN LUTHER KING JR

    OpenAIRE

    Ritchie, David T.

    2010-01-01

    The foundations of U.S. civil rights pioneer Martin Luther King Jr.’s thought are as variedand diverse as his vision for a new American society. As a Baptist minister his ideas were of courseshaped by the Christian ideals of that faith. He was also influenced, however, by religious and secularideals from other traditions. In this article I discuss the effect of the work of the Jewish theologian andsocial philosopher Martin Buber on King’s philosophy. In particular, I examine how Buber’s notio...

  20. In Memoriam of John T. Yates Jr. (August 3, 1935 - September 26, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, John N.; Beebe, Thomas P.

    2016-10-01

    John T. Yates, Jr., Professor of Chemistry at the University of Virginia, member of the US National Academy of Sciences, and a pioneer of modern surface science, passed away at his home on Saturday morning September 26, 2015, from a recurring glioblastoma. John was both courageous, pragmatic and forthright about his diagnosis right to the end. His wife, Kerin, related that John, upon learning of his diagnosis, said that he had had a great life and was not going to 'let the last 1.25%' define him. It did not. He had a wonderful family and a stellar career.

  1. Memory protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Accidental overwriting of files or of memory regions belonging to other programs, browsing of personal files by superusers, Trojan horses, and viruses are examples of breakdowns in workstations and personal computers that would be significantly reduced by memory protection. Memory protection is the capability of an operating system and supporting hardware to delimit segments of memory, to control whether segments can be read from or written into, and to confine accesses of a program to its segments alone. The absence of memory protection in many operating systems today is the result of a bias toward a narrow definition of performance as maximum instruction-execution rate. A broader definition, including the time to get the job done, makes clear that cost of recovery from memory interference errors reduces expected performance. The mechanisms of memory protection are well understood, powerful, efficient, and elegant. They add to performance in the broad sense without reducing instruction execution rate.

  2. Suzaku observations of the hard X-ray spectrum of Vela Jr

    CERN Document Server

    Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tashiro, Makoto S; Katsuda, Satoru; Yamazaki, Ryo; Ohira, Yutaka; Iwakiri, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of Suzaku observations of the young supernova remnant, Vela Jr.\\ (RX J0852.0$-$4622), which is known to emit synchrotron X-rays, as well as TeV gamma-rays. Utilizing 39 Suzaku mapping observation data from Vela Jr., a significant hard X-ray emission is detected with the hard X-ray detector (HXD) from the north-west TeV-emitting region. The X-ray spectrum is well reproduced by a single power-law model with the photon index of 3.15$^{+1.18}_{-1.14}$ in the 12--22 keV band. Compiling this with the soft X-ray spectrum simultaneously observed with the X-ray imaging spectrometer (XIS) onboard Suzaku, we find that the wide-band X-ray spectrum in the 2--22 keV band is reproduced with a single power-law or concave broken power-law model, which are statistically consistent with each other. Whichever the model of a single or broken power-law is appropriate, clearly the spectrum has no rolloff structure. Applying this result to the method introduced in \\citet{yama2014}, we find that one-zone synchro...

  3. The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunicardi, F Charles; Cotton, Ronald T; Cole, George W; Martinez, George

    2007-01-01

    In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  4. Current Perioperative Management of Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Use in Neuroendovascular Therapy: Analysis of JR-NET1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENOMOTO, Yukiko; YOSHIMURA, Shinichi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; EGASHIRA, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate current perioperative antithrombotic management in neuroendovascular therapy in Japan, we analyzed perioperative anticoagulant and antiplatelet use in various procedures and examined their relationships with periprocedural adverse events. Patient's data from nationwide surveys administered by the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) between January 2005 and December 2007 (JR-NET1) and January 2008 and December 2009 (JR-NET2) were retrospectively analyzed. Compared to JR-NET1, the frequency of perioperative antiplatelet therapy and dual or triple therapy were increased for either aneurysm coiling and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or stenting in JR-NET2. Although ischemic complications were significantly decreased (4.2% vs. 2.1%, p antiplatelet therapy (preoperative: 5.3% vs. 9.2%, p therapy was performed more frequently and intensively in neuroendovascular therapy in Japan. While ischemic complications were decreased, hemorrhagic complications and severe adverse events were increased. These results suggest that intensive antithrombotic therapy has a potential risk of hemorrhagic complications for Japanese patients. PMID:24305029

  5. Memory design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sisse

    Mind and Matter - Nordik 2009 Conference for Art Historians Design Matters Contributed Memory design BACKGROUND My research concerns the use of memory categories in the designs by the companies Alessi and Georg Jensen. When Alessi's designers create their products, they are usually inspired...... by cultural forms, often specifically by the concept of memory in philosophy, sociology and psychology, while Danish design traditionally has been focusing on form and function with frequent references to the forms of nature. Alessi's motivation for investigating the concept of memory is that it adds...... a cultural dimension to the design objects, enabling the objects to make an identity-forming impact. Whether or not the concept of memory plays a significant role in Danish design has not yet been elucidated fully. TERMINOLOGY The concept of "memory design" refers to the idea that design carries...

  6. Disputed Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The world wars, genocides and extremist ideologies of the 20th century are remembered very differently across Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe, resulting sometimes in fierce memory disputes. This book investigates the complexity and contention of the layers of memory of the troubled 20th...... century in the region. Written by an international group of scholars from a diversity of disciplines, the chapters approach memory disputes in methodologically innovative ways, studying representations and negotiations of disputed pasts in different media, including monuments, museum exhibitions......, individual and political discourse and electronic social media. Analyzing memory disputes in various local, national and transnational contexts, the chapters demonstrate the political power and social impact of painful and disputed memories. The book brings new insights into current memory disputes...

  7. Main Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Boncz, Peter; Liu, Lei; Özsu, Tamer, M.

    2008-01-01

    Primary storage, presently known as main memory, is the largest memory directly accessible to the CPU in the prevalent Von Neumann model and stores both data and instructions (program code). The CPU continuously reads instructions stored there and executes them. It is also called Random Access Memory (RAM), to indicate that load/store instructions can access data at any location at the same cost, is usually implemented using DRAM chips, which are connected to the CPU and other peripherals (di...

  8. Book review: Martin’s dream: my journey and the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, Roger

    2013-01-01

    "Martin’s Dream: My Journey and the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr." Clayborne Carson. Palgrave Macmillan. January 2013. --- \\ud Written with the unique perspective of someone who has, for three decades, been involved with Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy, Clayborne Carson gives readers an insider’s account of what transpired after the Dream speech, and beyond. A rich and engrossing memoir of black empowerment at a unique moment in time, this is an undoubtedly special contribution to King’s m...

  9. Flavor Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, Jos; Köster, Ep

    2016-01-01

    Odor, taste, texture, temperature, and pain all contribute to the perception and memory of food flavor. Flavor memory is also strongly linked to the situational aspects of previous encounters with the flavor, but does not depend on the precise recollection of its sensory features as in vision and

  10. Memory integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweegers, C.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to characterize the neural mechanisms underlying memory integration. In chapter 2, we studied the neural underpinnings of regularity extraction across hippocampus-dependent episodic memories. We found higher connectivity between the hippocampus and the mPFC for the

  11. Shared Memories?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses how the memory of the Holocaust has been addressed in the European Parliament from 1989 to 2009. I identify two major changes that occurred in the 1990s and after the 2004 enlargement of the European Union respectively. In the 1990s the war in Bosnia and the question of restit......This paper analyses how the memory of the Holocaust has been addressed in the European Parliament from 1989 to 2009. I identify two major changes that occurred in the 1990s and after the 2004 enlargement of the European Union respectively. In the 1990s the war in Bosnia and the question...... of restitution universalised the memory of the Holocaust and made it present. The 2004 enlargement brought the memory of Soviet Communism into the Union and made it a central task to construct a community of memory that includes both the memory of the Holocaust and of Soviet Communism. The analysis also...... identifies what seems to be a political memory split between Left and Right; and it shows that the time might not be ripe for a shared European memory....

  12. Collaging Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  13. Main Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); L. Liu (Lei); M. Tamer Özsu

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractPrimary storage, presently known as main memory, is the largest memory directly accessible to the CPU in the prevalent Von Neumann model and stores both data and instructions (program code). The CPU continuously reads instructions stored there and executes them. It is also called Random

  14. An initial survey of the cattle grub Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr.) in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarino, Mario A; Garcia, Omar; Fussell, Weyman; Preston, Kelly; Wagner, Gale G

    2003-12-12

    After the civil war and the Hurricane-Mitch disaster, cattlemen in Nicaragua were forced to transport their cattle from lowland areas to higher, dryer areas of the country. These areas are natural ecological niches for the cattle grub Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr.) (Diptera: Cuterebridae). To determine the importance of this infestation, the Agricultural and Livestock-Forestry Ministry selected a central area of Nicaragua to run a pioneer survey program to acquire information about hosts involved, number of cases, treatments applied and general knowledge of 42 farmers about the life cycle of the parasite. The subjects were either farm owners or farm managers. Ninety-five percentage of the farms indicated cases of D. hominis infestation in their animals, with cattle being the most affected host (100% of the affected farms). There was poor understanding of the D. hominis life cycle, vectors and control methods. A misuse of insecticides for the treatment of larval infestation by D. hominis was indicated.

  15. Possessing History and American Innocence: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robert McClure

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 1965 debate at Cambridge University between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr., posed the question: “Has the American Dream been achieved at the Expense of the American Negro?” Within the contours of the debate, Baldwin and Buckley wrestled with the ghosts of settler colonialism and slavery in a nation founded on freedom and equality. Framing the debate within the longue durée, this essay examines the deep cultural currents related to the American racial paradox at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Underscoring the changing language of white resistance against black civil rights, the essay argues that the Baldwin and Buckley debate anticipated the ways the U.S. would address racial inequality in the aftermath of the civil rights era and the dawn of neoliberalism in the 1970s.

  16. Collected Papers in Structural Mechanics Honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr. (Compiler); Nemeth, Michael P. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    This special publication contains a collection of structural mechanics papers honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr. presented at the 46th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference held in Austin, Texas, April 18-21, 2005. Contributors to this publication represent a small number of those influenced by Dr. Starnes' technical leadership, his technical prowess and diversity, and his technical breath and depth in engineering mechanics. These papers cover some of the research areas Dr. Starnes investigated, which included buckling, postbuckling, and collapse of structures; composite structural mechanics, residual strength and damage tolerance of metallic and composite structures; and aircraft structural design, certification and verification. He actively pursued technical understanding and clarity, championed technical excellence, and modeled humility and perseverance.

  17. Julius H. Comroe, Jr., distinguished lecture: central chemoreception: then ... and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattie, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Julius H. Comroe, Jr., Lecture of the American Physiological Society focuses on evolving ideas in chemoreception for CO₂/pH in terms of what is "sensed," where it is sensed, and how the sensed information is used physiologically. Chemoreception is viewed as involving neurons (and glia) at many sites within the hindbrain, including, but not limited to, the retrotrapezoid nucleus, the medullary raphe, the locus ceruleus, the nucleus tractus solitarius, the lateral hypothalamus (orexin neurons), and the caudal ventrolateral medulla. Central chemoreception also has an important nonadditive interaction with afferent information arising at the carotid body. While ventilation has been viewed as the primary output variable, it appears that airway resistance, arousal, and blood pressure can also be significantly affected. Emphasis is placed on the importance of data derived from studies performed in the absence of anesthesia.

  18. Gunshot wounds to the hand. The Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, P; Hansraj, K K; Cox, E E; Ashley, E M

    1995-01-01

    This article is a retrospective review of patients who presented to Martin Luther King, Jr./Drew Medical Center with gunshot wounds and had either isolated or associated injuries to the hand. The following is an account of those injuries noting the location, soft-tissue or bony involvement, and interventional methods that were implemented in the treatment of these patients who resided primarily in South Central Los Angeles. Prompt evaluation and initiation of treatment is essential in the management of both high- and low-velocity gunshot wounds so as to decrease the potential morbidity that often follows. Society must also look at the prevalence of these injuries and address the underlying issues that often are the root of the acts of violence.

  19. Memory conformity affects inaccurate memories more than accurate memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Daniel B; Villalba, Daniella K

    2012-01-01

    After controlling for initial confidence, inaccurate memories were shown to be more easily distorted than accurate memories. In two experiments groups of participants viewed 50 stimuli and were then presented with these stimuli plus 50 fillers. During this test phase participants reported their confidence that each stimulus was originally shown. This was followed by computer-generated responses from a bogus participant. After being exposed to this response participants again rated the confidence of their memory. The computer-generated responses systematically distorted participants' responses. Memory distortion depended on initial memory confidence, with uncertain memories being more malleable than confident memories. This effect was moderated by whether the participant's memory was initially accurate or inaccurate. Inaccurate memories were more malleable than accurate memories. The data were consistent with a model describing two types of memory (i.e., recollective and non-recollective memories), which differ in how susceptible these memories are to memory distortion.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of polyphenol oxidase from Juglans regia (jrPPO1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zekiri, Florime; Bijelic, Aleksandar; Molitor, Christian; Rompel, Annette, E-mail: annette.rompel@univie.ac.at [Universität Wien, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Wien (Austria)

    2014-05-28

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a plant PPO exhibiting monophenolase activity from J. regia (jrPPO1) in its active form (Asp{sup 101}–Arg{sup 445}) are reported. Tyrosinase is a type 3 copper enzyme that catalyzes the ortho-hydroxylation of monophenols to diphenols as well as their subsequent oxidation to quinones, which are precursors for the biosynthesis of melanins. The first plant tyrosinase from walnut leaves (Juglans regia) was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. During the purification, two forms of the enzyme differing only in their C-termini [jrPPO1(Asp{sup 101}–Pro{sup 444}) and jrPPO1(Asp{sup 101}–Arg{sup 445})] were obtained. The most abundant form jrPPO1(Asp{sup 101}–Arg{sup 445}), as described in Zekiri et al. [Phytochemistry (2014 ▶), 101, 5–15], was crystallized, resulting in crystals that belonged to space group C121, with unit-cell parameters a = 115.56, b = 91.90, c = 86.87 Å, α = 90, β = 130.186, γ = 90°, and diffracted to 2.39 Å resolution. Crystals were only obtained from solutions containing at least 30% polyethylene glycol 5000 monomethyl ether in a close-to-neutral pH range.

  1. Health Care Fraud: Characteristics, Sanctions, and Prevention. Briefing Report to the Honorable William V. Roth, Jr., U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Accounting and Financial Management Div.

    At the request of Senator William Roth, Jr., the General Accounting Office (GAO) reviewed Medicare and Medicaid fraud investigations that agency inspectors general referred to the Department of Justice for prosecution to identify characteristics of alleged fraud against the government and to determine actions taken against those caught defrauding…

  2. The Limits of Master Narratives in History Textbooks: An Analysis of Representations of Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alridge, Derrick P.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, I argue that American history textbooks present discrete, heroic, one-dimensional, and neatly packaged master narratives that deny students a complex, realistic, and rich understanding of people and events in American history. In making this argument, I examine the master narratives of Martin Luther King, Jr., in high school history…

  3. Toward a Modern Synthesis of Immunity: Charles A. Janeway Jr. and the Immunologist’s Dirty Little Secret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    This essay chronicles the major theoretical and experimental contributions made by Charles A. Janeway, Jr. (1943-2003), Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Yale Professor of Immunobiology, who established the fundamental role of the innate immune system in the induction of the adaptive arm. PMID:21698045

  4. Toward a Modern Synthesis of Immunity: Charles A. Janeway Jr. and the Immunologist’s Dirty Little Secret

    OpenAIRE

    Gayed, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    This essay chronicles the major theoretical and experimental contributions made by Charles A. Janeway, Jr. (1943-2003), Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Yale Professor of Immunobiology, who established the fundamental role of the innate immune system in the induction of the adaptive arm.

  5. Fetal and neonatal anemia associated with anti-Jr(a) : a case report showing a poorly hemolytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Naoko; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Nagamine, Keisuke; Oshida, Machiko; Kashiwagi, Hirokazu; Koyama, Shinsuke; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Arahori, Hitomi; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Tadashi

    2011-08-01

    Although recently published case reports suggest the significance of Jr(a) alloimmunization in the obstetric setting, the involved mechanism still remains unclear. Here we report a case of severe fetal and neonatal anemia associated with anti-Jr(a) alloimmunization, which was successfully managed using Doppler assessment of peak systolic velocity of the fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA-PSV). A Japanese woman with anti-Jr(a) (titer 1024) was referred to our department at 20 weeks' gestation. As fetal MCA-PSV exceeded 1.5 multiple of median, labor was induced and a female neonate of 1998 g was delivered vaginally at 33 weeks and 5 days of gestation. The infant's hematocrit and hemoglobin levels were 25.4% and 82 g/L, respectively, but her total bilirubin level (15 µmol/L; 0.9 mg/dL) and reticulocyte counts (4.5%) were low. During the course, the infant showed no apparent signs of hemolysis. Jr(a) alloimmunization should be recognized as a possible cause of fetal anemia with no direct hemolytic process. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2011 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Human Progress Never Rolls in on Wheels of Inevitability: Biographies of Martin Luther King, Jr., in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemek, Francis E.

    1990-01-01

    Presents resources for teaching about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Outlines criteria for selecting biographies for children and young adults. Identifies problems in certain biographies of King, and recommends high quality biographies of King. Discusses exercises for integrating themes from King's life into the classroom. (RW)

  7. Pretext, Context, Subtext: Textual Power in the Writing of Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogumil, Mary L.; Molino, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    Studies verbal pretexts, social subtexts, and interpretive contexts of works by Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Notes that cultural repression is propagated (and dispelled) in part through the power of language. Notes that these texts are relevant for teaching textual power in hopes of affecting social change. (RS)

  8. Water and Streambed Sediment Quality, and Ecotoxicology of a Stream along the Blue Ridge Parkway, Adjacent to a Closed Landfill, near Roanoke, Virginia: 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Donna Belval; Cherry, Donald S.; Currie, Rebecca J.

    2004-01-01

    A study was done of the effects of a closed landfill on the quality of water and streambed sediment and the benthic macroinvertebrate community of an unnamed stream and its tributary that flow through Blue Ridge Parkway lands in west-central Virginia. The primary water source for the tributary is a 4-inch polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe that protrudes from the slope at the base of the embankment bordering the landfill. An unusual expanse of precipitate was observed in the stream near the PVC pipe. Stream discharge was measured and water and streambed sediment samples were collected at a nearby reference site and at three sites downstream of the landfill in April and September 1999. Water samples were analyzed for major ions, nitrate, total and dissolved metals, total dissolved solids, total organic carbon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Streambed sediment samples were analyzed for total metals, total organic carbon, percent moisture, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, including organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. The benthic macroinvertebrate community within the stream channel also was sampled at the four chemical sampling sites and at one additional site in April and September. Each of the five sites was assessed for physical habitat quality. Water collected periodically at the PVC pipe discharge between November 1998 and November 1999 was used to conduct 48-hour acute and 7-day chronic toxicity tests using selected laboratory test organisms. Two 10-day chronic toxicity tests of streambed sediments collected near the discharge pipe also were conducted. Analyses showed that organic and inorganic constituents in water from beneath the landfill were discharged into the sampled tributary. In April, 79 percent of inorganic constituents detected in water had their highest concentrations at the site closest to the landfill; at the same site, 59 percent of inorganic

  9. Memory loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    A person with memory loss needs a lot of support. It helps to show the person familiar objects, music, or and photos or play familiar music. Write down when the person should take any medicine or do other ...

  10. Memory clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Jolley, D; Benbow, S M; Grizzell, M

    2006-01-01

    Memory clinics were first described in the 1980s. They have become accepted worldwide as useful vehicles for improving practice in the identification, investigation, and treatment of memory disorders, including dementia. They are provided in various settings, the setting determining clientele and practice. All aim to facilitate referral from GPs, other specialists, or by self referral, in the early stages of impairment, and to avoid the stigma associated with psychiatric services. They bring ...

  11. J-R Curve Determination for Disk-shaped Compact Specimens Based on the Normalization Method and Direct Current Potential Drop Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Material ductile fracture toughness can be described by J-integral versus crack extension relationship (J-R curve). As a conventional J-R curve measurement method, unloading compliance (UC) becomes impractical in elevated temperature testing due to relaxation of the material and a friction induced back-up shape of the J-R curve. In addition, the UC method may underpredict the crack extension for standard disk-shaped compact (DC(T)) specimens. In order to address these issues, the normalization method and direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique were applied for determining J-R curves at 24 C and 500 C for 0.18T DC(T) specimens made from type 316L stainless steel. For comparison purchase, the UC method was also applied in 24 C tests. The normalization method was able to yield valid J-R curves in all tests. The J-R curves from the DCPD technique need adjustment to account for the potential drop induced by plastic deformation, crack blunting, etc. and after applying a newly-developed DCPD adjustment procedure, the post-adjusted DCPD J-R curves essentially matched J-R curves from the normalization method. In contrast, the UC method underpredicted the crack extension in all tests resulting in substantial deviation in the derived J-R curves manifested by high Jq values than the normalization or DCPD method. Only for tests where the UC method underpredicted the crack extension by a very small value, J-R curves determined by the UC method were similar to those determined by the normalization or DCPD method.

  12. General Charles F. Bolden, Jr. and Professor Claude Nicollier reunite during visit to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2011-01-01

    Thursday 23 June, CERN saw an unlikely and much savoured meeting between two old colleagues and friends: General Charles F. Bolden, Jr. and Professor Claude Nicollier.   Bolden and Nicollier were separately invited to CERN for different reasons - Charles Bolden had been invited by Professor Samuel Ting to visit the newly built and now fully operational Payload Operation and Control Centre of the AMS collaboration and Claude Nicollier had been invited by the Theory Department to give a colloquium. They were delightfully surprised when they met at the entrance of the main building. Bolden and Nicollier served together in the Space Shuttle Program and were trained by NASA during the 1980’s where they became close friends. On 24 April, 1990, Bolden piloted the Space Shuttle Discovery into orbit with the Hubble telescope in the payload bay. Though Nicollier did not accompany Bolden during the Hubble launch, he did return to the telescope 3 years later on board the Space Shuttle Ende...

  13. Plutino 15810 (1994 JR1), an accidental quasi-satellite of Pluto

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2012-01-01

    In the solar system, quasi-satellites move in a 1:1 mean motion resonance going around their host body like a retrograde satellite but their mutual separation is well beyond the Hill radius and the trajectory is not closed as they orbit the Sun not the host body. So far, minor bodies temporarily trapped in the quasi-satellite dynamical state have been identified around Venus, Earth, the dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the large asteroid (4) Vesta, Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune. Using computer simulations, Tiscareno and Malhotra have predicted the existence of a small but significant population of minor bodies moving in a 1:1 mean motion resonance with Pluto. Here we show using N-body calculations that the Plutino 15810 (1994 JR1) is currently an accidental quasi-satellite of Pluto and it will remain as such for nearly 350,000 yr. By accidental we mean that the quasi-satellite phase is triggered (or terminated) not by a direct gravitational influence in the form of a discrete close encounter but as a result of a resonan...

  14. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A. [comps.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

  15. Memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Larry R; Genzel, Lisa; Wixted, John T; Morris, Richard G

    2015-08-03

    Conscious memory for a new experience is initially dependent on information stored in both the hippocampus and neocortex. Systems consolidation is the process by which the hippocampus guides the reorganization of the information stored in the neocortex such that it eventually becomes independent of the hippocampus. Early evidence for systems consolidation was provided by studies of retrograde amnesia, which found that damage to the hippocampus-impaired memories formed in the recent past, but typically spared memories formed in the more remote past. Systems consolidation has been found to occur for both episodic and semantic memories and for both spatial and nonspatial memories, although empirical inconsistencies and theoretical disagreements remain about these issues. Recent work has begun to characterize the neural mechanisms that underlie the dialogue between the hippocampus and neocortex (e.g., "neural replay," which occurs during sharp wave ripple activity). New work has also identified variables, such as the amount of preexisting knowledge, that affect the rate of consolidation. The increasing use of molecular genetic tools (e.g., optogenetics) can be expected to further improve understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying consolidation. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Is external memory memory? Biological memory and extended mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelian, Kourken

    2012-09-01

    Clark and Chalmers (1998) claim that an external resource satisfying the following criteria counts as a memory: (1) the agent has constant access to the resource; (2) the information in the resource is directly available; (3) retrieved information is automatically endorsed; (4) information is stored as a consequence of past endorsement. Research on forgetting and metamemory shows that most of these criteria are not satisfied by biological memory, so they are inadequate. More psychologically realistic criteria generate a similar classification of standard putative external memories, but the criteria still do not capture the function of memory. An adequate account of memory function, compatible with its evolution and its roles in prospection and imagination, suggests that external memory performs a function not performed by biological memory systems. External memory is thus not memory. This has implications for: extended mind theorizing, ecological validity of memory research, the causal theory of memory.

  17. Memory training in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Vanderhasselt, M.A.; Vrijsen, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Memory biases, that is, general memory impairments as well as specific mood-congruent memory biases, are important vulnerability factors in depression. Recently, computerized memory trainings have been developed to target these biases, reducing rumination and lightening depressive symptoms. This

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of polyphenol oxidase from Juglans regia (jrPPO1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekiri, Florime; Bijelic, Aleksandar; Molitor, Christian; Rompel, Annette

    2014-06-01

    Tyrosinase is a type 3 copper enzyme that catalyzes the ortho-hydroxylation of monophenols to diphenols as well as their subsequent oxidation to quinones, which are precursors for the biosynthesis of melanins. The first plant tyrosinase from walnut leaves (Juglans regia) was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. During the purification, two forms of the enzyme differing only in their C-termini [jrPPO1(Asp101-Pro444) and jrPPO1(Asp101-Arg445)] were obtained. The most abundant form jrPPO1(Asp101-Arg445), as described in Zekiri et al. [Phytochemistry (2014), 101, 5-15], was crystallized, resulting in crystals that belonged to space group C121, with unit-cell parameters a=115.56, b=91.90, c=86.87 Å, α=90, β=130.186, γ=90°, and diffracted to 2.39 Å resolution. Crystals were only obtained from solutions containing at least 30% polyethylene glycol 5000 monomethyl ether in a close-to-neutral pH range.

  19. Red, Rough, Fast, and Perturbed: New Horizons Observations of KBO (15810) 1994 JR1 from the Kuiper Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, Simon B; Benecchi, Susan; Verbiscer, Anne; Zangari, Amanda M; Weaver, H A; Lauer, Tod R; Parker, Alex H; Buie, Marc W; Cheng, Andrew F; Young, Leslie A; Olkin, Cathy B; Ennico, Kimberly; Stern, S Alan

    2016-01-01

    The 3:2 resonant KBO (15810) 1994 JR1 was observed by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft on November 2, 2015 from a distance of 1.85 AU, and again on April 7, 2016 from a distance of 0.71 AU. Acquired using the LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), these were the first close observations of any KBO other than Pluto, and the first ever of a small KBO. Combining ground-based and HST observations at small phase angles and the LORRI observations at higher phase angles, we produced the first disk-integrated solar phase curve of a typical KBO from alpha=0.6-58 degrees. Observations at these geometries, attainable only from a spacecraft in the outer Solar System, constrain surface properties such as macroscopic roughness and the single particle phase function. 1994 JR1 has a rough surface with a 37+/-5 degree mean topographic slope angle and has a relatively rapid rotation period of 5.47+/-0.33 hours. 1994 JR1 is currently 2.7 AU from Pluto; our astrometric points enable high-precision orbit determination and integr...

  20. Emil Godlewski, Jr. (1875-1944) pioneer of embryology at the Jagiellonian University of Krakow (Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Leopold

    2008-01-01

    Emil Godlewski, Jr. (1875-1944) lived and worked in Krakow. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine of the Jagiellonian University with the title of Doctor of Medical Science. He worked at the Faculty of Medicine, first in the Institute of Descriptive Anatomy and later as Professor of Biology and Embryology in the Department of Biology and Embryology, which he founded and led for many years. After early research on the development and histogenesis of muscles, professor Godlewski's scientific interests focused on regeneration and mechanisms regulating the process of fertilization, as well as early embryo development, blastulation and gastrulation. He was also interested in the origin of the primary differentiating cells in regenerates. He postulated the importance of epithelial tissue in this process and was the first to point out the change in the function, organization and role of the cells under the influence of external stimuli. Investigating fertilization and early development, he focused on the cooperation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in the regulation of the early stages of development. Godlewski was also the author of the theory of migration of the inherited substances from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and, after their processing, from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. His works were never fragmentary, but always synthetical attempts at explaining important issues relating to the mechanisms of development. In 1936 Professor Godlewski was awarded the title of Member of the Pontifica Accademia delle Scienze. Apart from doing research and teaching, Emil Godlewski devoted a lot of time to social issues, especially those connected to medicine. When Poland regained independence after World War I, he actively participated in the reopening of the Jagiellonian University.

  1. Retracing Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David L.

    2005-01-01

    There are plenty of paths to poetry but few are as accessible as retracing ones own memories. When students are asked to write about something they remember, they are given them the gift of choosing from events that are important enough to recall. They remember because what happened was funny or scary or embarrassing or heartbreaking or silly.…

  2. Memory consolidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takashima, A.; Bakker, I.

    2016-01-01

    In order to make use of novel experiences and knowledge to guide our future behavior, we must keep large amounts of information accessible for retrieval. The memory system that stores this information needs to be flexible in order to rapidly incorporate incoming information, but also requires that

  3. Broadcast Memories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈淑娴

    1995-01-01

    At the root of all memory is a communication among neurons,millions of neurons, passing signals to one another like the transistors in a computer. Transistors have to be linked by wires in order to communicate—but neurons,it now seems, are different. According to a recent study dnne at Stanford, neu-

  4. Concrete Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the presence of Atlantikwall bunkers in amateur holiday snapshots and discusses the ambiguous role of the bunker site in visual cultural memory. Departing from my family’s private photo collection from twenty years of vacationing at the Danish West coast, the different mundane...

  5. IG Statement: Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., on OIG report Early Warning Report: Main EPA Headquarters Warehouse in Landover, Maryland, Requires Immediate EPA Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statement of Inspector General Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., on the Office of Inspector General (OIG) report Early Warning Report: Main EPA Headquarters Warehouse in Landover, Maryland, Requires Immediate EPA Attention.

  6. North American Regional Security: A Trilateral Framework. By Richard J. Kilroy, Jr., Abelardo Rodriquez Sumano, and Todd S. Hataley, Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Press, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Stewart-Ingersoll

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available North American Regional Security: A Trilateral Framework. By Richard J. Kilroy, Jr., Abelardo Rodriquez Sumano, and Todd S. Hataley, Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Press, 2013. ISBN 978-1-58826-854-9.

  7. Holographic Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Holme, NCR; Berg, RH

    1999-01-01

    A Two-dimensional holographic memory for archival storage is described. Assuming a coherent transfer function, an A4 page can be stored at high resolution in an area of 1 mm(2). Recently developed side-chain liquid crystalline azobenzene polyesters are found to be suitable media for holographic...... storage. They exhibit high resolution, high diffraction efficiency, have long storage life, are fully erasable and are mechanically stable....

  8. Transactional Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Grahn, Håkan

    2010-01-01

    Current and future processor generations are based on multicore architectures where the performance increase comes from an increasing number of cores on a chip. In order to utilize the performance potential of multicore architectures the programs also need to be parallel, but writing parallel programs is a non-trivial task. Transactional memory tries to ease parallel program development by providing atomic and isolated execution of code sequences, enabling software composability and protected...

  9. HST observations of the nebula around the central compact object in the Vela Jr. supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, R. P.; de Luca, A.; Pellizzoni, A.

    2009-12-01

    Context: A handful of young (a few thousand years) supernova remnants (SNRs) host point-like X-ray sources, dubbed central compact objects (CCOs), which are thought to be radio-silent isolated neutron stars formed by the supernova explosion. So far, no CCO has been firmly detected at other wavelengths. However, ground-based observation in the Hα band detected a nebula around CXO J085201.4-461753, the CCO in the Vela Jr. SNR. The nebula has also been detected in deep R-band observations performed with the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Interestingly, both its extension and its flux in the R band are consistent with those measured in Hα, suggesting that the nebula spectrum is dominated by line emission, possibly produced by a velocity-driven bow-shock in the interstellar medium (ISM) or by its photo-ionisation from the neutron star. Aims: The aim of this work is to resolve the morphology of the Hα nebula around the CCO to verify the proposed interpretations. Methods: We performed high-resolution imaging observations of the nebula with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) through the 656N filter, almost exactly centred on the rest wavelength of the Hα line. Results: Surprisingly enough, we did not detect the nebula in our WFPC2 image down to a 3 σ flux limit of ~3 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. This limit is a factor of 10 fainter than the nebula flux measured in the discovery ground-based observations which were, however, performed with redder and broader Hα filters. Conclusions: The non-detection of the nebula in the narrower and bluer WFPC2 656N filter suggests that the peak of the emission might actually be at longer wavelengths. One possibility, compatible with the bow-shock scenario only, is that the Hα line is red-shifted by ~10-60 Å due to the neutron star motion with a radial velocity 450 ⪉ Vr ⪉ 2700 km s-1. The other possibility is that the nebula is a knot of [NII] emission (λ = 6583.6 Å) unrelated to CXO J085201

  10. [Neural correlates of memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshikatsu

    2013-01-01

    Memory can be divided into several types, although all of them involve three successive processes: encoding, storage, and retrieval. In terms of the duration of retention, neurologists classify memory into immediate, recent, and remote memories, whereas psychologists classify memory into short-term and long-term memories. In terms of the content, episodic, semantic, and procedural memories are considered to be different types of memory. Furthermore, researchers on memory have proposed relatively new concepts of memory, i.e., working memory and prospective memory. This article first provides explanations for these several types of memory. Next, neuropsychological characteristics of amnesic syndrome are briefly outlined. Finally, how several different types of memory are affected (or preserved) in patients with amnesic syndrome is described.

  11. Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. y su obra: Una fusión sistemático-existencial

    OpenAIRE

    Portela Valentín, Orlando Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    607 p. La presente Tesis, analiza las ideas filosófico-jurídicas del Juez Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Y la manera en que dichas ideas influyen en las diferentes escuelas modernas del pensamiento jurídico norteamericano. En particular se analiza su visión instrumental del Derecho y la forma en que éste se relaciona con la moral, la historia y el poder político y económico, todas estas ideas que marcan el pensamiento filosófico-jurídico norteamericano en la modernidad.Para alcanzar este propó...

  12. Comparative assessment of cyclic J-R curve determination by different methods in a pressure vessel steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tamshuk; Sivaprasad, S.; Bar, H. N.; Tarafder, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N. R.

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic J-R behaviour of a reactor pressure vessel steel using different methods available in literature has been examined to identify the best suitable method for cyclic fracture problems. Crack opening point was determined by moving average method. The η factor was experimentally determined for cyclic loading conditions and found to be similar to that of ASTM value. Analyses showed that adopting a procedure analogous to the ASTM standard for monotonic fracture is reasonable for cyclic fracture problems, and makes the comparison to monotonic fracture results straightforward.

  13. Transactional Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Tim; Rajwar, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The advent of multicore processors has renewed interest in the idea of incorporating transactions into the programming model used to write parallel programs.This approach, known as transactional memory, offers an alternative, and hopefully better, way to coordinate concurrent threads. The ACI(atomicity, consistency, isolation) properties of transactions provide a foundation to ensure that concurrent reads and writes of shared data do not produce inconsistent or incorrect results. At a higher level, a computation wrapped in a transaction executes atomically - either it completes successfullyand

  14. Memory effects in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, J. O.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the wake flow of a hemisphere and cylinder show that such memory effects can be substantial and have a significant influence on momentum transport. Memory effects are described in terms of suitable memory functions.

  15. STRUKTUR DAN PROSES MEMORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Bhinnety

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes structures and processes of human memory system according to the modal model. Sensory memory is described as the first system to store information from outside world. Short‐term memory, or now called working memory, represents a system characterized by limited ability in storing as well as retrieving information. Long‐term memory on the hand stores information larger in amount and longer than short‐term memory

  16. Memory, collective memory, orality and the gospels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2011-06-07

    Jun 7, 2011 ... with collective memory theory in the works of Halbwachs, Connerton, Gillis, Fentress and. Wickham, Olick, Schwartz ..... critical importance of cultural memory for (re)constructing history. ...... Frankfurt am Main. Baddeley, A.D. ...

  17. Flex-rigid pleuroscopic biopsy with the SB knife Jr is a novel technique for diagnosis of malignant or benign fibrothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Bo; Yin, Yan; Miao, Yuan; Eberhardt, Ralf; Hou, Gang; Herth, Felix J; Kang, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Diagnosing pleural effusion is challenging, especially in patients with malignant or benign fibrothorax, which is difficult to sample using standard flexible forceps (SFF) via flex-rigid pleuroscopy. An adequate sample is crucial for the differential diagnosis of malignant fibrothorax (malignant pleural mesothelioma, metastatic lung carcinoma, etc.) from benign fibrothorax (benign asbestos pleural disease, tuberculous pleuritis, etc.). Novel biopsy techniques are required in flex-rigid pleuroscopy to improve the sample size and quality. The SB knife Jr, which is a scissor forceps that uses a mono-pole high frequency, was developed to allow convenient and accurate resection of larger lesions during endoscopic dissection (ESD). Herein, we report two patients with fibrothorax who underwent a pleural biopsy using an SB knife Jr to investigate the potential use of this tool in flex-rigid pleuroscopy when pleural lesions are difficult to biopsy via SFF. The biopsies were successful, with sufficient size and quality for definitive diagnosis. We also successfully performed adhesiolysis with the SB knife Jr in one case, and adequate biopsies were conducted. No complications were observed. Electrosurgical biopsy with the SB knife Jr during flex-rigid pleuroscopy allowed us to obtain adequate samples for the diagnosis of malignant versus benign fibrothorax, which is usually not possible with SFF. The SB knife Jr also demonstrated a potential use for pleuropulmonary adhesions.

  18. Flex-rigid pleuroscopic biopsy with the SB knife Jr is a novel technique for diagnosis of malignant or benign fibrothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Bo; Yin, Yan; Miao, Yuan; Herth, Felix J.; Kang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing pleural effusion is challenging, especially in patients with malignant or benign fibrothorax, which is difficult to sample using standard flexible forceps (SFF) via flex-rigid pleuroscopy. An adequate sample is crucial for the differential diagnosis of malignant fibrothorax (malignant pleural mesothelioma, metastatic lung carcinoma, etc.) from benign fibrothorax (benign asbestos pleural disease, tuberculous pleuritis, etc.). Novel biopsy techniques are required in flex-rigid pleuroscopy to improve the sample size and quality. The SB knife Jr, which is a scissor forceps that uses a mono-pole high frequency, was developed to allow convenient and accurate resection of larger lesions during endoscopic dissection (ESD). Herein, we report two patients with fibrothorax who underwent a pleural biopsy using an SB knife Jr to investigate the potential use of this tool in flex-rigid pleuroscopy when pleural lesions are difficult to biopsy via SFF. The biopsies were successful, with sufficient size and quality for definitive diagnosis. We also successfully performed adhesiolysis with the SB knife Jr in one case, and adequate biopsies were conducted. No complications were observed. Electrosurgical biopsy with the SB knife Jr during flex-rigid pleuroscopy allowed us to obtain adequate samples for the diagnosis of malignant versus benign fibrothorax, which is usually not possible with SFF. The SB knife Jr also demonstrated a potential use for pleuropulmonary adhesions. PMID:28066660

  19. Optical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  20. Memory and Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈园

    1996-01-01

    Of all the myths that surround memory, the most damaging is that it is agift. That is quite untrue. Memory is a skill; and like any skill its performancedepends on application, on practice, and on regular training. Everyone poten-tially has a first-class memory; and everyone can train their memory, and there-

  1. Memory, microprocessor, and ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2003-01-01

    System Timing. ROM/PROM/EPROM. SRAM. Embedded Memory. Flash Memories. Dynamic Random Access Memory. Low-Power Memory Circuits. Timing and Signal Integrity Analysis. Microprocessor Design Verification. Microprocessor Layout Method. Architecture. ASIC Design. Logic Synthesis for Field Programmable Gate Array (EPGA) Technology. Testability Concepts and DFT. ATPG and BIST. CAD Tools for BIST/DFT and Delay Faults.

  2. JR6, a new compound isolated from Justicia procumbens, induces apoptosis in human bladder cancer EJ cells through caspase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Peng; Dong, Xian-Zhe; Yang, Mei-Hua; Chen, Shi-Lin; Bi, Ming-Gang

    2012-11-21

    Numerous efforts have been conducted in searching for effective agents against cancer, in particular from herbal medicines. Justicia procumbens is a traditional herbal remedy which was produced in the south-western and southern provinces of China and Taiwan province used to treat fever, pain, and cancer. Here, we identified a new compound 6'-hydroxy justicidin A (JR6) from Justicia procumbens, which showed obvious anti-cancer effects. The cytotoxicity activity was assayed using MTT and SRB. Intracellular ROS visualization and quantification were acquired by using a laser scanning confocal microscopy. Apoptosis was measured using a propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit by flow cytometry. Activation of caspases (caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9) was evaluated respectively using GloMax luminescence detector and Caspase-Glo 3,8,9 assay kits. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed by microscopy using JC-1 dye. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was employed to detect the expression of protein associated with cell death. JR6 remarkably inhibited growth in human bladder cancer EJ cells by decreasing cell proliferation, reduced the SOD activity, increased the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and induced apoptosis. Activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and the subsequent activation of caspase-3 indicated that JR6 may be inducing intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways. Caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 inhibition rendered this extract ineffective, thus JR6-induced apoptosis is caspase-dependent. JR6 also disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and unregulated the Bax and p53 expressions in EJ cells. These observations suggest that JR6 induce apoptosis through caspase-dependent pathway in human bladder cancer EJ cells, emphasizing the importance of this traditional medicine and thus presents a potential novel alternative to bladder cancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Lacaze, Pierre-Camille

    2014-01-01

    Written for scientists, researchers, and engineers, Non-volatile Memories describes the recent research and implementations in relation to the design of a new generation of non-volatile electronic memories. The objective is to replace existing memories (DRAM, SRAM, EEPROM, Flash, etc.) with a universal memory model likely to reach better performances than the current types of memory: extremely high commutation speeds, high implantation densities and retention time of information of about ten years.

  4. Evaluation of DSA effects on SA516-Gr. 70 steel for reactor coolant piping elbow material. (Dynamic and quasi-static J-R curve characteristics.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bong Sang; Hong, Jun Hwa; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jong Myung; Kim, Jin Won [Korea Atomic Energy Reserach Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-11-01

    Dynamic and quasi-static J-R curve tests for RCS piping elbow material (SA516-Gr.70) were performed by DCPD method at various temperatures (25 deg C - 316 deg C). The objective of this project was to qualify that DSA would not affect the design safety margin for LBB analysis in the normal operating temperature region. This report describes the effects of temperature and loading rate on J-R characteristics of SA516-Gr. 70 steel for reactor coolant piping elbow material. 13 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs. (author)

  5. Verbal memory and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Pauline M

    2015-11-01

    Midlife women frequently report memory problems during the menopausal transition. Recent studies validate those complaints by showing significant correlations between memory complaints and performance on validated memory tasks. Longitudinal studies demonstrate modest declines in verbal memory during the menopausal transition and a likely rebound during the postmenopausal stage. Clinical studies that examine changes in memory following hormonal withdrawal and add-back hormone therapy (HT) demonstrate that estradiol plays a critical role in memory. Although memory changes are frequently attributed to menopausal symptoms, studies show that the memory problems occur during the transition even after controlling for menopausal symptoms. It is well established that self-reported vasomotor symptoms (VMS) are unrelated to objective memory performance. However, emerging evidence suggests that objectively measured VMS significantly correlate with memory performance, brain activity during rest, and white matter hyperintensities. This evidence raises important questions about whether VMS and VMS treatments might affect memory during the menopausal transition. Unfortunately, there are no clinical trials to inform our understanding of how HT affects both memory and objectively measured VMS in women in whom HT is indicated for treatment of moderate to severe VMS. In clinical practice, it is helpful to normalize memory complaints, to note that evidence suggests that memory problems are temporary, and to counsel women with significant VMS that memory might improve with treatment.

  6. Salam Memorial

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo

    1997-01-01

    by T.W.B. KIBBLE / Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London. Recollections of Abdus Salam at Imperial College I shall give a personal account of Professor Salam's life and work from the perspective of a colleague at Imperial College, concentrating particularly but not exclusively on the period leading up to the discovery of the electro-weak theory. If necessary I could perhaps give more detail, but only once I have given more thought to what ground I shall cover. by Sheldon Lee GLASHOW / Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. Memories of Abdus Salam. My interactions with Abdus Salam, weak as they have been, extended over five decades. I regret that we never once collaborated in print or by correspondence. I visited Abdus only twice in London and twice again in Trieste, and met him at the occasional conference or summer school. Our face-to-face encounters could be counted on one's fingers and toes, but we became the best of friends. Others will discuss Abdus as an inspiring teacher, as a great scientist,...

  7. Contributions in the Preparation and Processing of Composite Material Type Silumin 3 - Reinforced Matrix with S235JR Steel Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remus Belu-Nica

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the paper are presented concrete data on developing technological batches of metal composite material (MCM type Silumin 3-reinforced matrix with steel mesh S235JR, with the indicating of the parameter and of the distinct stages of work. The samples from prepared batches were cut along and across by water jet abrasive process and were subjected to a destructive testing program and microstructural examination, obtaining results in concordance with the desired quality. The abrasive material used for cut was GMA granite with the average mesh of 80, the particle size ranging between 150-300 µm, density 2300 kg/m3 and melting point 1240°C.

  8. Creation and covenant in a via media position: The example of J.J.P. Valeton Jr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Becking

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marked the centenary of the death of the Utrecht Old Testament scholar J.J.P. Valeton Jr (1848–1912. He was a representative of the ‘via media’ approach of Dutch theology, which aimed at joining critical scholarship and piety, by avoiding the pitfalls of modernism as well as orthodoxy. Valeton accepted the critical analysis of Graf, Kuenen, and Wellhausen, but meanwhile remained a pious person. This article will discuss Valeton’s contributions to critical scholarship of Genesis 1–3 as well as his profound ideas on ‘covenant’ as an expression of ‘friendship’. Loader’s distinction between ‘knowledge open to faith’ and ‘knowledge open for scientific approach’ is very helpful in understanding the works and ideas of Valeton.

  9. The Microcosm within: An interview with William B. Miller, Jr., on the Extended Hologenome theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Tam

    2015-01-01

    There is a singular unifying reality underlying every biologic interaction on our planet. In immunology, that which does not kill you makes you different. -William B. Miller, Jr. We are experiencing a revolution in our understanding of inner space on a par with our exponentially increasing understanding of outer space. In biology, we are learning that the genetic and epigenetic complexity within organisms is far deeper than suspected. This is a key theme in William B. Miller Jr.'s book, The Microcosm Within: Evolution and Extinction in the Hologenome. We are learning also that a focus on the human genome alone is misleading when it comes to who we really are as biological entities, and in terms of how we and other creatures have evolved. Rather than being defined by the human genome alone, we are instead defined by the "hologenome," the sum of the human genome and the far larger genetic endowment of the microbiome and symbiotic communities that reside within and around us. Miller is a medical doctor previously in private practice in Pennsylvania and Phoenix, Arizona. This book is his first foray into evolutionary theory. His book could have been titled "The Origin of Variation" because this is his primary focus. He accepts that natural selection plays a role in evolution, but he demotes this mechanism to a less important role than the Modern Synthesis suggests. His main gripe, however, concerns random variation. He argues that random variation is unable to explain the origin and evolution of biological forms that we see in the world around us and in the historical record. Miller suggests that, rather than random variation as the engine of novelty, there is a creative impulse at the heart of cellular life, and even at the level of the genetic aggregate, that generates novelty on a regular basis. I probe this assertion in the interview below. He also highlights the strong role of "exogenous genetic assault" in variation and in his immunological model of evolution.

  10. Organizational memory: from expectations memory to procedural memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbers, J.J.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Organizational memory is not just the stock of knowledge about how to do things, but also of expectations of organizational members vis-à-vis each other and the organization as a whole. The central argument of this paper is that this second type of organizational memory -organizational expectations

  11. Organizational memory: from expectations memory to procedural memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbers, J.J.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Organizational memory is not just the stock of knowledge about how to do things, but also of expectations of organizational members vis-à-vis each other and the organization as a whole. The central argument of this paper is that this second type of organizational memory -organizational expectations

  12. Exploring history and memory through autobiographical memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor Goodson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the role of autobiographical memory as a site of narrative construction. Far from being a place of liberal retrospective recall it is a site of active recapitulation and reconstruction. The article provides examples of how history and memory are intermingled. It also draws in the author’s autobiographical vignettes to explore the underpinning desires for historical reconstruction in autobiographical memory work

  13. Memory Without Parties or Parties Without Memory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mario Solís Delgadillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role of political parties in Argentina, Chile and Guatemala in relation to the implementation of public policies of memory after the return to democracy in each of these countries. To do this, we discuss the concept of memory and the problems of memorial obsession. We consider the uses and abuses of memory that human rights organizations manifest on the subject, and examine the work of the parties about the level of adaptation that allows claims of human rights movement to become matters of public policy.

  14. 20 Poemas para ler no bonde. Fotografias de Horacio Coppola. Translated by Fabrício Corsaletti e Samuel Titan Jr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Cristina Nascimento Lopes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Review of GIRONDO, Oliverio. 20 Poemas para ler no bonde. Fotografias de Horacio Coppola; tradução de Fabrício Corsaletti e Samuel Titan Jr. São Paulo: Editora 34, 2014; 112 p. (Coleção Fábula.

  15. Peer-Reviewed Research and the IEP: Implications of "Ridley School District v. M.R. and J.R. ex rel. E.R." (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Losinski, Mickey; Marshall, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    This article examines a case out of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit: "Ridley School District v. M.R and J.R. ex rel. E.R." (2012). The case is the first circuit court case in which the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act requirement that special education services be based on peer-reviewed research…

  16. Peer-Reviewed Research and the IEP: Implications of "Ridley School District v. M.R. and J.R. ex rel. E.R." (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Losinski, Mickey; Marshall, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    This article examines a case out of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit: "Ridley School District v. M.R and J.R. ex rel. E.R." (2012). The case is the first circuit court case in which the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act requirement that special education services be based on peer-reviewed research…

  17. The Mutable Prophet: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Echo Chamber Campaign of "U. S. News & World Report," 1964-1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Richard

    Between 1964 and 1968, "U. S. News and World Report" engaged in symbolic discourse with its readership through its coverage of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. "U. S. News" faced a dilemma in the mingling of King's force as a symbol with the power exerted by the egalitarian principles that Gunnar Myrdal identified as components of…

  18. The Academy on the Firing Line: William F. Buckley, Jr.'s "God and Man at Yale" and the Modern Conservative Critique of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukaitis, John J.

    2013-01-01

    In 1951, William F. Buckley, Jr. was a recent alumnus of Yale University and former editor of the "Yale Daily News" when his first major work, "God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of 'Academic Freedom'," became a controversial polemic that attracted national attention. In his work, Buckley claimed Yale's faculty advanced…

  19. Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.'s "Middle Way out of Vietnam: The Limits of Technocratic Realism" as the Basis for Foreign Policy Dissent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoe, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.'s dissenting position on Vietnam by considering it as representative of the mode of foreign policy argument called "technocratic realism." Argues that such dissent can offer only an incomplete critique of U.S. foreign policy, because it does not question the policy's underlying purposes. (SR)

  20. Medications for Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments > Medications for Memory Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/ ... Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Medications for Memory Treatments for Behavior For Sleep Changes Alternative Treatments ...

  1. Tracing Cultural Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    We encounter, relate to and make use of our past and that of others in multifarious and increasingly mobile ways. Tourism is one of the main paths for encountering sites of memory. This thesis examines tourists’ creative appropriations of sites of memory – the objects and future memories inspired...... by their encounters – to address a question that thirty years of ground - breaking research into memory has not yet sufficiently answered: What can we learn about the dynamics of cultural memory by examining mundane accounts of touristic encounters with sites of memory? From Blaavand Beach in Western Denmark...... to Soweto’s Regina Mundi Church, this thesis analyses tourists’ snapshots at sites of memory and outlines their tracing activity in cultural memory. It draws on central concepts of actor - network theory and visual culture studies for a cross - disciplinary methodology to comprehend the collective...

  2. Coping with Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Coping With Memory Loss Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... a health professional. back to top What Causes Memory Loss? Anything that affects cognition—the process of ...

  3. Music, memory and emotion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music...

  4. Memory and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memory and Aging Losing keys, misplacing a wallet, or forgetting someone’s name are common experiences. But for people nearing or over age 65, such memory lapses can be frightening. They wonder if they ...

  5. Saving Malta's music memory

    OpenAIRE

    Sant, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Maltese music is being lost. Along with it Malta loses its culture, way of life, and memories. Dr Toni Sant is trying to change this trend through the Malta Music Memory Project (M3P) http://www.um.edu.mt/think/saving-maltas-music-memory-2/

  6. Music, memory and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-08-08

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

  7. Eagle Pass Jr. High Seismology Team: Strategies for Engaging Middle School "At-Risk" Students in Authentic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, M. R.; Ellins, K. K.; Frohlich, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2008, during my participation in the NSF-sponsored Texas Earth & Space Science (TXESS) Revolution professional development program, I was awarded an AS-1 seismograph through IRIS's Seismographs in Schools Program. This program serves to create an international educational seismic network that allows teachers across the country and around the world to share seismic data in real-time using online tools, classroom activities, and technical support documents for seismic instruments. Soon after receiving my AS-1, I founded and began sponsoring the Eagle Pass Jr. High Seismology Team which consists of selected 7th and 8th grade students. Eagle Pass Jr. High is a Title 1 school that serves a predominantly "at-risk" Hispanic population. We meet after school once a week to learn about earthquakes, seismic waves, analyze recorded seismic event data using computer software programming, and correspond with other students from schools around the country. This team approach has been well received by fellow TXESS Revolution teachers with AS-1 seismographs and will be implemented by David Boyd, STEM coordinator for Williams Preparatory Academy in Dallas, Texas this fall 2011. All earthquakes recorded by our seismograph station (EPTX), which has remained online and actively recording seismic data since 2008, are catalogued and then plotted on a large world map displayed on my classroom wall. A real-time seismogram image updates every five minutes and along with all earthquakes recorded since installation can be viewed on our webpage http://www.iris.edu/hq/ssn/schools/view/eptx. During the 2010-2011 school year, my seismology team and I participated in an earthquake research study led by Dr. Cliff Frohlich at the Institute for Geophysics. The study examined seismograms and felt reports for the 25 April 2010 Alice, Texas, earthquake, in order to investigate its possible connection to oil and gas production in the Stratton oil and gas field. A research paper detailing our findings

  8. Confirmation of mutant alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase gene and transcript in Dahl salt-sensitive/JR rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Opazo, N; Barany, F; Hirayama, K; Herrera, V L

    1994-09-01

    As the sole renal Na,K-ATPase isozyme, the alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase accounts for all active transport of Na+ throughout the nephron. This role in renal Na+ reabsorption and the primacy of the kidney in hypertension pathogenesis make it a logical candidate gene for salt-sensitive genetic hypertension. An adenine (A)1079-->thymine (T) transversion, resulting in the substitution of glutamine276 with leucine and associated with decreased net 86Rb+ (K+) influx, was identified in Dahl salt-sensitive/JR rat kidney alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase cDNA. However, because a Taq polymerase chain reaction amplification-based reanalysis did not detect the mutant T1079 but rather only the wild-type A1079 alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase allele in Dahl salt-sensitive rat genomic DNA, we reexamined alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase sequences using Taq polymerase error-independent amplification-based analyses of genomic DNA (by polymerase allele-specific amplification and ligase chain reaction analysis) and kidney RNA (by mRNA-specific thermostable reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis). We also performed modified 3' mismatched correction analysis of genomic DNA using an exonuclease-positive thermostable DNA polymerase. All the confirmatory test results were concordant, confirming the A1079-->T transversion in the Dahl salt-sensitive alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase allele and its transcript, as well as the wild-type A1079 sequence in the Dahl salt-resistant alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase allele and its transcript. Documentation of a consistent Taq polymerase error that selectively substituted A at T1079 (sense strand) was obtained from Taq polymerase chain reaction amplification and subsequent cycle sequencing of reconfirmed known Dahl salt-sensitive/JR rat mutant T1079 alpha 1 cDNA M13 subclones. This Taq polymerase error results in the reversion of mutant sequence back to the wild-type alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase sequence. This identifies a site- and nucleotide-specific Taq polymerase misincorporation, suggesting that a structural

  9. Desenvolvimento pós-embrionário do intestino anterior de Dermatobia hominis (Linnaeus Jr. (Diptera, Cuterebridae Post-embryonic development of Dermatobia hominis (Linnaeus Jr. (Diptera, Cuterebridae foregut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Vieira

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Foregut in D. hominis (Linnaeus Jr., 1781 as the majority of the larval Diptera somatic tissue, is made up of polytenic cells, and grows at the expenses of the polytenization of its nuclei followed by the increase in size of each cell. The oesophagus, of ectodermic origem, is interiorly covered by a chitinous squamous epithelium that rests upon a very thin basal lamina. This sheet is surrounded by thick muscle bundles. The oesophagus intussuscepts the midgut forming the cardia. The cardia, with three epithelial layers: two internal ones, of ectodermal origin and one external of endodermic origin. At the anterior portion of the cardia, between these two types of epithelium, there is a cluster of small, non polytenic cells, forming the imaginal disk of the foregut. Metamoiphosis begins at the end of the larval period with signs of nuclear degeneration of all the polytenic cells, as well as the increase in number of the imaginal disk ones. The oesophagic portion intussuscepted into the cardia, everts; its cells suffer apoptosis and are replaced by the new cells growing from the imaginal disk. The external layer cells also degenerate and are pinched off into the lumen of the very anterior portion of the midgut. The newly formed oesophagus intussuscepts "de novo" to form the two internal layers of the adult cardia. At the same time the midgut regenerative cells grow anteriorly to form the new external layer of the adult cardia.

  10. Memory: Organization and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2017-01-01

    A major goal of memory research is to understand how cognitive processes in memory are supported at the level of brain systems and network representations. Especially promising in this direction are new findings in humans and animals that converge in indicating a key role for the hippocampus in the systematic organization of memories. New findings also indicate that the prefrontal cortex may play an equally important role in the active control of memory organization during both encoding and retrieval. Observations about the dialog between the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex provide new insights into the operation of the larger brain system that serves memory. PMID:27687117

  11. Effect of molybdenum on wear resistance of Cr-Nb hard-faced S355JR steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongchitrugsa, Nut; Chianpairot, Amnuaysak; Hartung, Fritz; Lothongkum, Gobboon [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

    2014-03-01

    The effect of Mo on the abrasive wear resistance of (20-23)Cr-(7-8)Nb hard-faced S355JR steel by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) was studied. Four types of flux, consisting of fixed Cr and Nb but varying Mo contents, coated on hard-facing electrode were used. Microstructure, micro hardness, and abrasive wear resistance of the hard-faced surface were investigated by ASTM G65 D procedure. The original microstructures consist of the primary coarse and eutectic carbides. Mo affects morphology of carbides by decreasing primary carbide size. When Mo content in the hard-faced surface was up to 6.43 wt.-%, the highest abrasive wear resistance and micro hardness were obtained. The decrease of primary carbide size is attributed to the increased nucleation induced by Mo addition. Network structure was observed when the Mo content reaches 10.19 wt.-%. The main mechanisms of wear are micro-cutting and carbide pulling out. (orig.)

  12. On the Expansion Rate, Age, and Distance of the Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2 (Vela Jr.)

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, G E; DeLaney, T; Filipovic, M D; Houck, J C; Pannuti, T G; Stage, M D

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of Chandra ACIS data for two relatively bright and narrow portions of the northwestern rim of G266.2-1.2 (a.k.a. RX J0852.0-4622 or Vela Jr.) reveal evidence of a radial displacement of 2.40 +/- 0.56 arcsec between 2003 and 2008. The corresponding expansion rate (0.42 +/- 0.10 arcsec/yr or 13.6 +/- 4.2%/kyr) is about half the rate reported for an analysis of XMM-Newton data from a similar, but not identical, portion of the rim over a similar, but not identical, time interval (0.84 +/- 0.23 arcsec/yr, Katsuda et al. 2008a). If the Chandra rate is representative of the remnant as a whole, then the results of a hydrodynamic analysis suggest that G266.2-1.2 is between 2.4 and 5.1 kyr old if it is expanding into a uniform ambient medium (whether or not it was produced by a Type Ia or Type II event). If the remnant is expanding into the material shed by a steady stellar wind, then the age could be as much as 50% higher. The Chandra expansion rate and a requirement that the shock speed be greater than or...

  13. From Catheters To Ventricular Assist Devices: 60 Years of Cardiovascular Experiences With William L. Winters, JR., M.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W L

    2015-01-01

    Automatic typewriters, transistor radios, microfiche, black and white television…while considered high-tech in the 1950s, these technologies seem limited when viewed from the 21st century. The same is true for cardiovascular medicine, which back then relied on electrocardiograms and X-rays for most diagnoses. In the 60 years since, advances in medical capabilities have progressed at a staggering pace. Patient research that once required months poring over paper charts is now reduced to hours using electronic medical record databases. Diagnostic images that once took days to process can now be accessed instantly through ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. While a half-century ago no one would have imagined accessing any and all information with a 5-second Google search, so too would noninvasive heart surgery been considered unimaginable. Since the 1950s when he graduated from medical school, William L. Winters, Jr., has been a first-hand witness to breathtaking innovations in cardiovascular medicine-both globally and in Houston. Author of Houston Hearts: A History of Cardiovascular Surgery and Medicine at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center and long-time medical editor of the Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal, Dr. Winters sat down with the journal editors this past April to share his insights from the last half-century of medical practice.

  14. Memory dynamics under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaedflieg, Conny W E M; Schwabe, Lars

    2017-06-19

    Stressful events have a major impact on memory. They modulate memory formation in a time-dependent manner, closely linked to the temporal profile of action of major stress mediators, in particular catecholamines and glucocorticoids. Shortly after stressor onset, rapidly acting catecholamines and fast, non-genomic glucocorticoid actions direct cognitive resources to the processing and consolidation of the ongoing threat. In parallel, control of memory is biased towards rather rigid systems, promoting habitual forms of memory allowing efficient processing under stress, at the expense of "cognitive" systems supporting memory flexibility and specificity. In this review, we discuss the implications of this shift in the balance of multiple memory systems for the dynamics of the memory trace. Specifically, stress appears to hinder the incorporation of contextual details into the memory trace, to impede the integration of new information into existing knowledge structures, to impair the flexible generalisation across past experiences, and to hamper the modification of memories in light of new information. Delayed, genomic glucocorticoid actions might reverse the control of memory, thus restoring homeostasis and "cognitive" control of memory again.

  15. Immunological memory is associative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  16. Flexible kernel memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Dimitri; Siegelmann, Hava

    2010-06-11

    This paper introduces a new model of associative memory, capable of both binary and continuous-valued inputs. Based on kernel theory, the memory model is on one hand a generalization of Radial Basis Function networks and, on the other, is in feature space, analogous to a Hopfield network. Attractors can be added, deleted, and updated on-line simply, without harming existing memories, and the number of attractors is independent of input dimension. Input vectors do not have to adhere to a fixed or bounded dimensionality; they can increase and decrease it without relearning previous memories. A memory consolidation process enables the network to generalize concepts and form clusters of input data, which outperforms many unsupervised clustering techniques; this process is demonstrated on handwritten digits from MNIST. Another process, reminiscent of memory reconsolidation is introduced, in which existing memories are refreshed and tuned with new inputs; this process is demonstrated on series of morphed faces.

  17. Flexible kernel memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Nowicki

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new model of associative memory, capable of both binary and continuous-valued inputs. Based on kernel theory, the memory model is on one hand a generalization of Radial Basis Function networks and, on the other, is in feature space, analogous to a Hopfield network. Attractors can be added, deleted, and updated on-line simply, without harming existing memories, and the number of attractors is independent of input dimension. Input vectors do not have to adhere to a fixed or bounded dimensionality; they can increase and decrease it without relearning previous memories. A memory consolidation process enables the network to generalize concepts and form clusters of input data, which outperforms many unsupervised clustering techniques; this process is demonstrated on handwritten digits from MNIST. Another process, reminiscent of memory reconsolidation is introduced, in which existing memories are refreshed and tuned with new inputs; this process is demonstrated on series of morphed faces.

  18. NAND flash memory technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Aritome, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses basic and advanced NAND flash memory technologies, including the principle of NAND flash, memory cell technologies, multi-bits cell technologies, scaling challenges of memory cell, reliability, and 3-dimensional cell as the future technology. Chapter 1 describes the background and early history of NAND flash. The basic device structures and operations are described in Chapter 2. Next, the author discusses the memory cell technologies focused on scaling in Chapter 3, and introduces the advanced operations for multi-level cells in Chapter 4. The physical limitations for scaling are examined in Chapter 5, and Chapter 6 describes the reliability of NAND flash memory. Chapter 7 examines 3-dimensional (3D) NAND flash memory cells and discusses the pros and cons in structure, process, operations, scalability, and performance. In Chapter 8, challenges of 3D NAND flash memory are dis ussed. Finally, in Chapter 9, the author summarizes and describes the prospect of technologies and market for the fu...

  19. Generating memory with vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Flora; Galli, Grazia; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2009-08-01

    The goal of vaccination is to induce long-lasting protective immune memory. Although most vaccines induce good memory responses, the type of memory induced by different vaccines may be considerably different. In addition, memory responses to the same vaccine may be influenced by age, environmental and genetic factors. Results emerging from detailed and integrated profiling of immune-responses to natural infection or vaccination suggest that the type and duration of immune memory are largely determined by the magnitude and complexity of innate immune signals that imprint the acquired immune primary responses. Here we summarize results obtained from analyzing human immune memory responses to different types of vaccines. We will also discuss how extending clinical investigation to events occurring early after vaccination can help identify early predictive markers of protective memory and thus contribute to faster development of better and safer vaccines.

  20. "Some People Even Died": Martin Luther King, Jr, the Civil Rights Movement and the Politics of Remembrance in Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, John S.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the interpretive practices and cultural texts that shape what teachers and students remember and forget during the annual observance of the King holiday in two second-grade classrooms. Drawing on data from an ethnographic case study of the curriculum in use and theory and research on collective memory, the author analyzes the…

  1. Psychophysiology of prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory involves the self-initiated retrieval of an intention upon an appropriate retrieval cue. Cue identification can be considered as an orienting reaction and may thus trigger a psychophysiological response. Here we present two experiments in which skin conductance responses (SCRs) elicited by prospective memory cues were compared to SCRs elicited by aversive stimuli to test whether a single prospective memory cue triggers a similar SCR as an aversive stimulus. In Experiment 2 we also assessed whether cue specificity had a differential influence on prospective memory performance and on SCRs. We found that detecting a single prospective memory cue is as likely to elicit a SCR as an aversive stimulus. Missed prospective memory cues also elicited SCRs. On a behavioural level, specific intentions led to better prospective memory performance. However, on a psychophysiological level specificity had no influence. More generally, the results indicate reliable SCRs for prospective memory cues and point to psychophysiological measures as valuable approach, which offers a new way to study one-off prospective memory tasks. Moreover, the findings are consistent with a theory that posits multiple prospective memory retrieval stages.

  2. The First High-Phase Observations of a KBO: New Horizons Imaging of (15810) 1994 JR 1 from the Kuiper Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Simon; Spencer, John R.; Benecchi, Susan D.; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Zangari, Amanda Marie; Weaver, Harold A.; Lauer, Tod R.; Parker, Alex; Buie, Marc W.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Stern, S. Alan; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    (15810) 1994 JR1, a 3:2 resonant Kupier Belt Object (KBO), was observed by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft using the LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on November 2, 2015 from a distance of 1.85 AU, and again on April 7, 2016 from a distance of 0.71 AU. These were the first close observations of any KBO other than Pluto, and the first ever of a small KBO at close range. Combining ground-based and HST observations at small phase angles and the LORRI observations at higher phase angles, we produced the first disk-integrated solar phase curve of a typical in-situ KBO from 0.6 to 58 degrees phase angle. Observations at these geometries, a range only attainable using a spacecraft in the outer Solar System, constrain surface properties such as macroscopic roughness and the single particle phase function. 1994 JR1 has a rough surface with a 37 +/- 5 degrees mean topographic slope angle and has a relatively rapid rotation period of 5.47 +/- 0.33 hours, with a lightcurve amplitude of 0.8 magnitudes from the spacecraft. 1994 JR1 is currently 2.7 AU from Pluto; our astrometric points enable high-precision orbit determination and integrations which show that it comes this close to Pluto every 2.4 million years (10,000 heliocentric orbits), causing Pluto to perturb 1994 JR1. During the November spacecraft observation, the KBO was simultaneously observed using the Hubble Space Telescope in two colors, confirming its very red spectral slope. These observations have laid the groundwork for numerous potential future distant KBO observations in the proposed New Horizons-Kuiper Belt Extended Mission.

  3. Análisis del efecto entalla en la tenacidad aparente y en los micromecanismos de rotura del acero S275JR en condiciones de lower shelf

    OpenAIRE

    Cicero González, Sergio; García Pemán, Tiberio; Madrazo Acebes, Virginia; Ruiz Martínez, Estela

    2014-01-01

    La resistencia a fractura de los materiales es generalmente mayor en condiciones entalladas que en condiciones fisuradas. En otras palabras, cuando el radio de entalla crece se produce igualmente un aumento de la tenacidad aparente a fractura, que es aquella observada en condiciones entalladas. Este artículo presenta un análisis del efecto entalla en el acero S275JR cuando opera a temperaturas pertenecientes al Lower Shelf del material, es decir, aquellas temperaturas en las cuales la fractur...

  4. Human learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M K; Hasher, L

    1987-01-01

    There have been several notable recent trends in the area of learning and memory. Problems with the episodic/semantic distinction have become more apparent, and new efforts have been made (exemplar models, distributed-memory models) to represent general knowledge without assuming a separate semantic system. Less emphasis is being placed on stable, prestored prototypes and more emphasis on a flexible memory system that provides the basis for a multitude of categories or frames of reference, derived on the spot as tasks demand. There is increasing acceptance of the idea that mental models are constructed and stored in memory in addition to, rather than instead of, memorial representations that are more closely tied to perceptions. This gives rise to questions concerning the conditions that permit inferences to be drawn and mental models to be constructed, and to questions concerning the similarities and differences in the nature of the representations in memory of perceived and generated information and in their functions. There has also been a swing from interest in deliberate strategies to interest in automatic, unconscious (even mechanistic!) processes, reflecting an appreciation that certain situations (e.g. recognition, frequency judgements, savings in indirect tasks, aspects of skill acquisition, etc) seem not to depend much on the products of strategic, effortful or reflective processes. There is a lively interest in relations among memory measures and attempts to characterize memory representations and/or processes that could give rise to dissociations among measures. Whether the pattern of results reflects the operation of functional subsystems of memory and, if so, what the "modules" are is far from clear. This issue has been fueled by work with amnesics and has contributed to a revival of interaction between researchers studying learning and memory in humans and those studying learning and memory in animals. Thus, neuroscience rivals computer science as a

  5. Quantum Associative Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, D; Ventura, Dan; Martinez, Tony

    1998-01-01

    This paper combines quantum computation with classical neural network theory to produce a quantum computational learning algorithm. Quantum computation uses microscopic quantum level effects to perform computational tasks and has produced results that in some cases are exponentially faster than their classical counterparts. The unique characteristics of quantum theory may also be used to create a quantum associative memory with a capacity exponential in the number of neurons. This paper combines two quantum computational algorithms to produce such a quantum associative memory. The result is an exponential increase in the capacity of the memory when compared to traditional associative memories such as the Hopfield network. The paper covers necessary high-level quantum mechanical and quantum computational ideas and introduces a quantum associative memory. Theoretical analysis proves the utility of the memory, and it is noted that a small version should be physically realizable in the near future.

  6. Time for memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    This article is a continuous dialogue on memory triggered by Brockmeier’s (2010) article. I drift away from the conventionalization of the archive as a spatial metaphor for memory in order to consider the greater possibility of “time” for conceptualizing memory. The concept of time is central...... in terms of autobiographical memory. The second category of time is discussed, drawing on Augustine and Bergson amongst others. Bergson’s notion of duration has been considered as a promising concept for a better understanding of autobiographical memory. Psychological phenomena such as autobiographical...... memory should embrace not only spatial dimension, but also a temporal dimension, in which a constant flow of irreversible time, where multiplicity, momentarily, dynamic stability and becoming and emergence of novelty can be observed....

  7. Regulatory T cell memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  8. Shape memory polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2017-08-29

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  9. Shape memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  10. Random Access Memory Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    extreme temperatures. True nonvolatility is offered by the NVRAM or shadow RAM. In the NVRAM , a volatile NMOS static RAM memory cell is merged with the...or reapplied, and no longer require special power sources. The size of the nine-device memory cell required for the NVRAM has limited its capacity to...4K. While 8K NVRAMs are expected in 1985, the 30 . . .’o .-. . high cost of these devices will hamper further development for larger capacity memories

  11. Ginseng and Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Shergill, Amandeep

    1998-01-01

    For thousands of years, Chinese medicine has used the herb ginseng as a memory tonic with the belief that ginseng can improve learning and memory, especially in aging humans. Recent studies have sought to validate this claim. Experiments done on rats have shown that ginsenosides, the saponins of ginseng, can partially prevent scopolamine-induced memory deficits in rats. Ginsenosides are thought to increase choline uptake in the central cholinergic nervous system, which plays important roles i...

  12. Music, memory and emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. Music has a prominent role in the everyday life of many people. Whether it is for recreation, distraction or mood enhancement, a lot of people listen to music from early in t...

  13. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to m...

  14. Emotion and Autobiographical Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuray Sarp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Self and mind are constituted with the cumulative effects of significant life events. This description is regarded as a given explicitly or implicitly in vari-ous theories of personality. Such an acknowledgment inevitably brings together these theories on two basic concepts. The first one is the emotions that give meaning to experiences and the second one is the memory which is related to the storage of these experiences. The part of the memory which is responsible for the storage and retrieval of life events is the autobiographical memory. Besides the development of personality, emotions and autobiographical memory are important in the development of and maintenance of psychopathology. Therefore, these two concepts have both longitudinal and cross-sectional functions in understanding human beings. In case of psychopathology, understanding emotions and autobiographical memory developmentally, aids in understanding the internal susceptibility factors. In addition, understanding how these two structures work and influence each other in an acute event would help to understand the etiological mechanisms of mental disorders. In the literature, theories that include both of these structures and that have clinical implications, are inconclusive. Theories on memory generally focus on cognitive and semantic structures while neglecting emotions, whereas theories on emotions generally neglect memory and its organization. There are only a few theories that cover both of these two concepts. In the present article, these theories that include both emotions and autobiographical memory in the same framework (i.e. Self Memory System, Associative Network Theory, Structural and Contextual theories and Affect Regulation Theory were discussed to see the full picture. Taken together, these theories seem to have the potential to suggest data-driven models in understanding and explaining symptoms such as flashbacks, dissociation, amnesia, over general memory seen in

  15. Memories of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirstein, William

    2013-04-01

    Although the art-historical context of a work of art is important to our appreciation of it, it is our knowledge of that history that plays causal roles in producing the experience itself. This knowledge is in the form of memories, both semantic memories about the historical circumstances, but also episodic memories concerning our personal connections with an artwork. We also create representations of minds in order to understand the emotions that artworks express.

  16. Phase change memory

    CERN Document Server

    Qureshi, Moinuddin K

    2011-01-01

    As conventional memory technologies such as DRAM and Flash run into scaling challenges, architects and system designers are forced to look at alternative technologies for building future computer systems. This synthesis lecture begins by listing the requirements for a next generation memory technology and briefly surveys the landscape of novel non-volatile memories. Among these, Phase Change Memory (PCM) is emerging as a leading contender, and the authors discuss the material, device, and circuit advances underlying this exciting technology. The lecture then describes architectural solutions t

  17. Memories Persist in Silence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Patricia Arenas Grisales

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article exposes the hypothesis that memory artifacts, created to commemorate the victims of armed conflict in Colombia, are an expression of the underground memories and a way of political action in the midst of war. We analyze three cases of creations of memory artifacts in Medellín, Colombia, as forms of suffering, perceiving and resisting the power of armed groups in Medellín. The silence, inherent in these objects, should not be treated as an absence of language, but as another form of expression of memory. Silence is a tactic used to overcome losses and reset everyday life in contexts of protracted violence.

  18. The future of memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinella, M.

    In the not too distant future, the traditional memory and storage hierarchy of may be replaced by a single Storage Class Memory (SCM) device integrated on or near the logic processor. Traditional magnetic hard drives, NAND flash, DRAM, and higher level caches (L2 and up) will be replaced with a single high performance memory device. The Storage Class Memory paradigm will require high speed ( 1012), nonvolatility (retention > 10 years), and low switching energies (Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) has recently evaluated several potential candidates SCM technologies, including Resistive (or Redox) RAM, Spin Torque Transfer RAM (STT-MRAM), and phase change memory (PCM). All of these devices show potential well beyond that of current flash technologies and research efforts are underway to improve the endurance, write speeds, and scalabilities to be on-par with DRAM. This progress has interesting implications for space electronics: each of these emerging device technologies show excellent resistance to the types of radiation typically found in space applications. Commercially developed, high density storage class memory-based systems may include a memory that is physically radiation hard, and suitable for space applications without major shielding efforts. This paper reviews the Storage Class Memory concept, emerging memory devices, and possible applicability to radiation hardened electronics for space.

  19. A Study on Associative Neural Memories

    OpenAIRE

    B.D.C.N.Prasad; P. E. S. N. Krishna Prasad; Sagar Yeruva; P Sita Rama Murty

    2011-01-01

    Memory plays a major role in Artificial Neural Networks. Without memory, Neural Network can not be learned itself. One of the primary concepts of memory in neural networks is Associative neural memories. A survey has been made on associative neural memories such as Simple associative memories (SAM), Dynamic associative memories (DAM), Bidirectional Associative memories (BAM), Hopfield memories, Context Sensitive Auto-associative memories (CSAM) and so on. These memories can be applied in vari...

  20. [Memory disorders in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danion, J M; Peretti, S; Gras-Vincendon, A; Singer, L

    1992-01-01

    The current interest in memory disorders in schizophrenia results from the way perceptions of schizophrenia--whose organic origin is becoming increasingly evident--and memory--according to which there exist not one, but several memories--have developed. Memory disorders in the schizophrenic cannot be considered in isolation from knowledge accumulated in other areas of the cognitive and neuro-sciences; a more detailed understanding of these disorders requires a comparison of the different cognitive approaches, both with each other and with the neurobiological and clinical approaches, so that they can be integrated. Despite numerous methodological and conceptual difficulties, it now appears to have been established that the schizophrenic's memory deficit should be seen in the context of a wider cognitive deficit, that the memory tasks are not all disturbed and that the memory deficit cannot be identified with one specific form of memory. Thus, iconic formation, short-term memory in the traditionally accepted sense and implicit memory are hardly, if at all, affected; in contrast, the early processing of information, working memory and explicit memory are disturbed, probably to the extent that they require the implementation of strategies to organise the information to be memorized. Finally, in certain tasks, such as those evaluating latent inhibition or negative priming, schizophrenics perform better than normal subjects, suggesting that schizophrenics' cognitive deficit is localised. This profile of memory disorders is compatible with a dysfunction predominating in the frontal and temporo-hippocampal regions. Neuroleptics and anticholinergics have opposite effects on cognitive and mnesic performance, which is improved by the former and aggravated by the latter. The influence of clinical symptoms, positive or negative, institutionalisation of patients and chronic tardive dyskinesia is unclear. Among the theoretical proposals put forward to account for the observed

  1. [Repeated measurement of memory with valenced test items: verbal memory, working memory and autobiographic memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffel, A; Terfehr, K; Uhlmann, C; Schreiner, J; Löwe, B; Spitzer, C; Wingenfeld, K

    2013-07-01

    A large number of questions in clinical and/or experimental neuropsychology require the multiple repetition of memory tests at relatively short intervals. Studies on the impact of the associated exercise and interference effects on the validity of the test results are rare. Moreover, hardly any neuropsychological instruments exist to date to record the memory performance with several parallel versions in which the emotional valence of the test material is also taken into consideration. The aim of the present study was to test whether a working memory test (WST, a digit-span task with neutral or negative distraction stimuli) devised by our workgroup can be used with repeated measurements. This question was also examined in parallel versions of a wordlist learning paradigm and an autobiographical memory test (AMT). Both tests contained stimuli with neutral, positive and negative valence. Twenty-four participants completed the memory testing including the working memory test and three versions of a wordlist and the AMT at intervals of a week apiece (measuring points 1. - 3.). The results reveal consistent performances across the three measuring points in the working and autobiographical memory test. The valence of the stimulus material did not influence the memory performance. In the delayed recall of the wordlist an improvement in memory performance over time was seen. The tests on working memory presented and the parallel versions for the declarative and autobiographical memory constitute informal economic instruments within the scope of the measurement repeatability designs. While the WST and AMT are appropriate for study designs with repeated measurements at relatively short intervals, longer intervals might seem more favourable for the use of wordlist learning paradigms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Working memory and fluid intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale; Gathercole; Conway, A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and which aspect of working memory span tasks– short-term storage or controlled attention - might drive the relationship. A sample of 119 children were followed from kindergarten to 2nd grade and completed assessments of working memory, short-term memory, and fluid intelligence. The data showed that working memory, verbal short-term memory, and fluid intelligence were highly related but sepa...

  3. Human memory search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, E.J.; Raaijmakers, J.G.W.; Hills, T.T.; Robbins, T.W.; Todd, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of understanding human memory search is hard to exaggerate: we build and live our lives based on what whe remember. This chapter explores the characteristics of memory search, with special emphasis on the use of retrieval cues. We introduce the dependent measures that are obtained

  4. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  5. Bipolar spectral associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, R G

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear spectral associative memories are proposed as quantized frequency domain formulations of nonlinear, recurrent associative memories in which volatile network attractors are instantiated by attractor waves. In contrast to conventional associative memories, attractors encoded in the frequency domain by convolution may be viewed as volatile online inputs, rather than nonvolatile, off-line parameters. Spectral memories hold several advantages over conventional associative memories, including decoder/attractor separability and linear scalability, which make them especially well suited for digital communications. Bit patterns may be transmitted over a noisy channel in a spectral attractor and recovered at the receiver by recurrent, spectral decoding. Massive nonlocal connectivity is realized virtually, maintaining high symbol-to-bit ratios while scaling linearly with pattern dimension. For n-bit patterns, autoassociative memories achieve the highest noise immunity, whereas heteroassociative memories offer the added flexibility of achieving various code rates, or degrees of extrinsic redundancy. Due to linear scalability, high noise immunity and use of conventional building blocks, spectral associative memories hold much promise for achieving robust communication systems. Simulations are provided showing bit error rates for various degrees of decoding time, computational oversampling, and signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Tracing Cultural Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    to Soweto’s Regina Mundi Church, this thesis analyses tourists’ snapshots at sites of memory and outlines their tracing activity in cultural memory. It draws on central concepts of actor - network theory and visual culture studies for a cross - disciplinary methodology to comprehend the collective...

  7. [Learning and memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul

    2004-09-01

    Memory is broadly divided into declarative and nondeclarative forms of memory. The hippocampus is required for the formation of declarative memories, while a number of other brain regions including the striatum, amygdala and nucleus accumbens are involved in the formation of nondeclarative memories. The formation of all memories require morphological changes of synapses: new ones must be formed or old ones strengthened. These changes are thought to reflect the underlying cellular basis for persistent memories. Considerable advances have occurred over the last decade in our understanding of the molecular bases of how these memories are formed. A key regulator of synaptic plasticity is a signaling pathway that includes the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. As this pathway is required for normal memory and learning, it is not surprising that mutations in members of this pathway lead to disruptions in learning. Neurofibromatosis, Coffin-Lowry syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome are three examples of developmental disorders that have mutations in key components of the MAP kinase signaling pathway.

  8. Memories of Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidwell, Amy M.; Walls, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore college students' autobiographical memories of physical education (PE). Questionnaires were distributed to students enrolled in undergraduate Introduction to PE and Introduction to Communications courses. The 261 participants wrote about memories of PE. These students recalled events from Grades…

  9. A Space for Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine the possibilities of reparation in an era of privatisation and de-industrialisation. I examine the effect of a recent project Sunshine Memory Space, a space, designed to evoke memories of a de-industrialised urban Melbourne suburb Sunshine. This project offered the opportunity for the effects of industrial change to be…

  10. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  11. LSTM with Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Pulver, Andrew; Lyu, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    LSTM is arguably the most successful RNN architecture for many tasks that involve sequential information. In the past few years there have been several proposed improvements to LSTM. We propose an improvement to LSTM which allows communication between memory cells in different blocks and allows an LSTM layer to carry out internal computation within its memory.

  12. Predicting Reasoning from Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Evan; Hayes, Brett K.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to assess the relations between reasoning and memory, in 8 experiments, the authors examined how well responses on an inductive reasoning task are predicted from responses on a recognition memory task for the same picture stimuli. Across several experimental manipulations, such as varying study time, presentation frequency, and the…

  13. An Exceptional Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ian M. L.

    1977-01-01

    An account is given of the exceptional memory of the late Professor A. C. Aitken who was also a distinguished mathematician and mental calculator. Compared with Shereshevskii, another man with exceptional memory, he shows the scholar's reliance on conceptual mapping rather than the mnemonist's reliance on perceptual chaining. (Editor)

  14. Visual Memory at Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Alan; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Explored new-born babys' capacity for forming visual memories. Used an habituation procedure that accommodated individual differences by allowing each infant to control the time course of habituation trials. Found significant novelty preference, providing strong evidence that recognition memory can be reliably demonstrated from birth. (Author/JAC)

  15. Human Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  16. Animal models of source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal, Jonathon D

    2016-01-01

    Source memory is the aspect of episodic memory that encodes the origin (i.e., source) of information acquired in the past. Episodic memory (i.e., our memories for unique personal past events) typically involves source memory because those memories focus on the origin of previous events. Source memory is at work when, for example, someone tells a favorite joke to a person while avoiding retelling the joke to the friend who originally shared the joke. Importantly, source memory permits differentiation of one episodic memory from another because source memory includes features that were present when the different memories were formed. This article reviews recent efforts to develop an animal model of source memory using rats. Experiments are reviewed which suggest that source memory is dissociated from other forms of memory. The review highlights strengths and weaknesses of a number of animal models of episodic memory. Animal models of source memory may be used to probe the biological bases of memory. Moreover, these models can be combined with genetic models of Alzheimer's disease to evaluate pharmacotherapies that ultimately have the potential to improve memory.

  17. Memory: Pandora's hippocampus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, John D E

    2004-01-01

    Greater knowledge of the human brain has enabled us to begin devising therapies to rescue or modify memory for the afflicted, such as Alzheimer's patients or post-traumatic stress disorder victims. This same knowledge could also allow us to alter how normal, healthy memory operates; we may become able to enhance memory and learning through biological intervention. But the brain consists of complex, interactive networks, and unintended consequences could easily occur. Moreover, memory is woven into our individuality. Altering our memory processes therefore risks altering us fundamentally. We may not be able to resist opening this neuroscientific Pandora's Box, John Gabrieli writes, but we must proceed with all the wisdom we can muster.

  18. Schemas and memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Dorothy; Langston, Rosamund F; Kakeyama, Masaki; Bethus, Ingrid; Spooner, Patrick A; Wood, Emma R; Witter, Menno P; Morris, Richard G M

    2007-04-01

    Memory encoding occurs rapidly, but the consolidation of memory in the neocortex has long been held to be a more gradual process. We now report, however, that systems consolidation can occur extremely quickly if an associative "schema" into which new information is incorporated has previously been created. In experiments using a hippocampal-dependent paired-associate task for rats, the memory of flavor-place associations became persistent over time as a putative neocortical schema gradually developed. New traces, trained for only one trial, then became assimilated and rapidly hippocampal-independent. Schemas also played a causal role in the creation of lasting associative memory representations during one-trial learning. The concept of neocortical schemas may unite psychological accounts of knowledge structures with neurobiological theories of systems memory consolidation.

  19. Making memories matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Gold

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the neuroendocrine bases by which emotional events regulate brain mechanisms of learning and memory. In laboratory rodents, there is extensive evidence that epinephrine influences memory processing through an inverted-U relationship, at which moderate levels enhance and high levels impair memory. These effects are, in large part, mediated by increases in blood glucose levels subsequent to epinephrine release, which then provide support for the brain processes engaged by learning and memory. These brain processes include augmentation of neurotransmitter release and of energy metabolism, the latter apparently including a key role for astrocytic glycogen. In addition to up- and down-regulation of learning and memory in general, physiological concomitants of emotion and arousal can also switch the neural system that controls learning at a particular time, at once improving some attributes of learning and impairing others in a manner that results in a change in the strategy used to solve a problem.

  20. Cosmological memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  1. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tolish, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of $(1 + z)$.

  2. Innate Memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  3. Russell on Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Baldwin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Russell famously propounded scepticism about memory in The Analysis of Mind (1921. As he there acknowledged, one way to counter this sceptical position is to hold that memory involves direct acquaintance with past, and this is in fact a thesis Russell had advanced in The Problems of Philosophy (1911. Indeed he had there used the case of memory to develop a sophisticated falibilist, non-sceptical, epistemology. By 1921, however, Russell had rejected the early conception of memory as incompatible with the neutral monism he now affirmed. In its place he argued that memory involves a distinctive type of belief whose content is given by imagery. Russell's language here is off-putting but without much distortion his later position can be interpreted as an early formulation of a functionalist theory of mind based on a causal theory of mental representation. Thus interpreted it provides the basis for a different response to Russell's sceptical thesis.

  4. Serotonin transporter and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Alfredo; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ponce-Lopez, Teresa; Tellez, Ruth; Castillo, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) has been associated to diverse functions and diseases, though seldom to memory. Therefore, we made an attempt to summarize and discuss the available publications implicating the involvement of the SERT in memory, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects. Evidence indicates that Alzheimer's disease and drugs of abuse like d-methamphetamine (METH) and (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") have been associated to decrements in the SERT expression and memory deficits. Several reports have indicated that memory formation and amnesia affected the SERT expression. The SERT expression seems to be a reliable neural marker related to memory mechanisms, its alterations and potential treatment. The pharmacological, neural and molecular mechanisms associated to these changes are of great importance for investigation.

  5. Emergence of collective memories

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sungmin; Holme, Petter

    2010-01-01

    We understand the dynamics of the world around us as by associating pairs of events, where one event has some influence on the other. These pairs of events can be aggregated into a web of memories representing our understanding of an episode of history. The events and the associations between them need not be directly experienced-they can also be acquired by communication. In this paper we take a network approach to study the dynamics of memories of history. First we investigate the network structure of a data set consisting of reported events by several individuals and how associations connect them. We focus our measurement on degree distributions, degree correlations, cycles (which represent inconsistencies as they would break the time ordering) and community structure. We proceed to model effects of communication using an agent-based model. We investigate the conditions for the memory webs of different individuals to converge to collective memories, how groups where the individuals have similar memories (b...

  6. Conflict and memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady; Brescó, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue on conflict and memory aims to underscore the importance of memory (whether individual and collective) in relation to intergroup conflicts. We argue that the way in which societies reconstruct and bring the past into the present—especially, the historical past......—is crucial when it comes to the study of intergroup conflict dynamics. In this regard, we also highlight the growing importance of memory studies within the area of social sciences as well as the multiple ways of approaching memory. Drawing from this wide theoretical framework, we introduce the articles...... of this issue, eight articles that tackle the role of memory in different conflicts, whether currently under way, in progress of being resolved, in postwar settings, or in contexts conflicts expected to happen do not arise....

  7. Emerging non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Seungbum; Wouters, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the fundamentals of emerging non-volatile memories and provides an overview of future trends in the field. Readers will find coverage of seven important memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), Phase-Change Memories (PCM), Oxide-based Resistive RAM (RRAM), Probe Storage, and Polymer Memories. Chapters are structured to reflect diffusions and clashes between different topics. Emerging Non-Volatile Memories is an ideal book for graduate students, faculty, and professionals working in the area of non-volatile memory. This book also: Covers key memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), and Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), among others. Provides an overview of non-volatile memory fundamentals. Broadens readers' understanding of future trends in non-volatile memories.

  8. Acceleration-induced nonlocality: kinetic memory versus dynamic memory

    OpenAIRE

    Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B.

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of the memory of accelerated motion in Minkowski spacetime are discussed within the framework of the nonlocal theory of accelerated observers. Two types of memory are distinguished: kinetic and dynamic. We show that only kinetic memory is acceptable, since dynamic memory leads to divergences for nonuniform accelerated motion.

  9. Aging Memories: Differential Decay of Episodic Memory Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamini, Lucia M.; Gorree, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Some memories about events can persist for decades, even a lifetime. However, recent memories incorporate rich sensory information, including knowledge on the spatial and temporal ordering of event features, while old memories typically lack this "filmic" quality. We suggest that this apparent change in the nature of memories may reflect a…

  10. Associative working memory and subsequent episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldorp, B. van; Konings, E.P.; Tilborg, I.A. Van; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate deficits in associative working memory in patients with medial-temporal lobe amnesia. However, it is unclear whether these deficits reflect working memory processing or are due to hippocampally mediated long-term memory impairment. We investigated associative working memory

  11. Associative working memory and subsequent episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldorp, B. van; Konings, E.P.C.; Tilborg, I.A.D.A. van; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate deficits in associative working memory in patients with medial-temporal lobe amnesia. However, it is unclear whether these deficits reflect working memory processing or are due to hippocampally mediated long-term memory impairment. We investigated associative working memory

  12. Recurrent correlation associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiueh, T D; Goodman, R M

    1991-01-01

    A model for a class of high-capacity associative memories is presented. Since they are based on two-layer recurrent neural networks and their operations depend on the correlation measure, these associative memories are called recurrent correlation associative memories (RCAMs). The RCAMs are shown to be asymptotically stable in both synchronous and asynchronous (sequential) update modes as long as their weighting functions are continuous and monotone nondecreasing. In particular, a high-capacity RCAM named the exponential correlation associative memory (ECAM) is proposed. The asymptotic storage capacity of the ECAM scales exponentially with the length of memory patterns, and it meets the ultimate upper bound for the capacity of associative memories. The asymptotic storage capacity of the ECAM with limited dynamic range in its exponentiation nodes is found to be proportional to that dynamic range. Design and fabrication of a 3-mm CMOS ECAM chip is reported. The prototype chip can store 32 24-bit memory patterns, and its speed is higher than one associative recall operation every 3 mus. An application of the ECAM chip to vector quantization is also described.

  13. European Union of Memories?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Anne

    After a very brief introduction to history and memory in Europe after 1989, as seen by Aleida Assmann, I will give a short introduction to the EP and to their adoption of resolutions and declarations. Then I will define some concepts central to my study before I proceed to the analysis. Finally I...... these changes have come about. Moreover, I show that there seems to be a political memory split between Left and Right and I suggest that the time might not be ripe for a shared European memory....

  14. Extended associative memories

    OpenAIRE

    J.H Sossa Azuela; R. Barrón Fernández

    2007-01-01

    The #945; #946; associative memories recently developed in Ref 10 have proven to be powerful tools for memorizing and recalling patterns when they appear distorted by noise. However they are only useful in the binary case. In this paper we show that it is possible to extend these memories now to the gray-level case. To get the desired extension, we take the original operators #945; and #946;, foundation of the #945; #946; memories, and propose a more general family of operators. We find t...

  15. Maximum Likelihood Associative Memories

    OpenAIRE

    Gripon, Vincent; Rabbat, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Associative memories are structures that store data in such a way that it can later be retrieved given only a part of its content -- a sort-of error/erasure-resilience property. They are used in applications ranging from caches and memory management in CPUs to database engines. In this work we study associative memories built on the maximum likelihood principle. We derive minimum residual error rates when the data stored comes from a uniform binary source. Second, we determine the minimum amo...

  16. History, Memory and Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    In this paper I discuss history and memory from a theoretical and philosophical point of view and the non-fiction and fiction aspects of historical representation. I use Edgar Reitz’ monumental work Heimat 1-3 (and his recent film Die Andere Heimat) as examples of very different transformative...... historical narratives. In terms of narrative construction and aesthetic form the Heimat-project challenges the dominant forms of historical fiction. By combining personal memory, everyday life and collective memory and a more indirect way of representing factual history Reitz wants to transform our look...

  17. New gravitational memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasterski, Sabrina; Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-12-14

    The conventional gravitational memory effect is a relative displacement in the position of two detectors induced by radiative energy flux. We find a new type of gravitational ‘spin memory’ in which beams on clockwise and counterclockwise orbits acquire a relative delay induced by radiative angular momentum flux. It has recently been shown that the displacement memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of Weinberg’s soft graviton theorem. Here we see that the spin memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of the recently-discovered subleading soft graviton theorem.

  18. Memory-based logic synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Sasao, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    This book describes the synthesis of logic functions using memories. It is useful to design field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) that contain both small-scale memories, called look-up tables (LUTs), and medium-scale memories, called embedded memories. This is a valuable reference for both FPGA system designers and CAD tool developers, concerned with logic synthesis for FPGAs.

  19. Context memory in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a gradual loss of memory. Specifically, context aspects of memory are impaired in AD. Our review sheds light on the neurocognitive mechanisms of this memory component that forms the core of episodic memory function.

  20. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  1. Context memory in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a gradual loss of memory. Specifically, context aspects of memory are impaired in AD. Our review sheds light on the neurocognitive mechanisms of this memory component that forms the core of episodic memory function.

  2. Evolution of working memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter Carruthers

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is fundamental to many aspects of human life, including learning, speech and text comprehension, prospection and future planning, and explicit "system 2" forms of reasoning, as well as overlapping...

  3. Conglomerate memory and cosmopolitanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under what conditions do countries and cultures considered radically different find a basis for allegiance and kinship? What part does memory play in this process? This article responds to these questions in two ways: 1 Through Emmanuel Levinas and Hannah Arendt, I propose that when an other appears in empathetic discourses that both honor difference and cite shared human experiences, seemingly irreconcilable people can develop a sense of mutual responsibility and 2 Conglomerate memory, memories that fuse together others through common pains, contributes to such an appearance. To illustrate this point, I turn to Congolese voices as they are articulated in online American discourses; although currently, authors of online texts typically rely on traditional narrative forms that position Central Africa as incommensurate to Western civilizations, the Internet's worldwide accessibility and intertextual capacities render it a place primed for developing international collectives by connecting memories while maintaining difference.

  4. The Rational Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1903-01-01

    FEW could read this useful little book of 115 pages without benefit. The author does not claim originality, but has selected the principles and facts of recognised importance from other works on memory...

  5. Modelling Immunological Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Garret, Simon; Walker, Joanne; Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Accurate immunological models offer the possibility of performing highthroughput experiments in silico that can predict, or at least suggest, in vivo phenomena. In this chapter, we compare various models of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors, by simulating several theories of immunological memory with known results. We then use the same system to evaluate the predicted effects of a theory of immunological memory. The resulting model has not been explored before in artificial immune systems research, and we compare the simulated in silico output with in vivo measurements. Although the theory appears valid, we suggest that there are a common set of reasons why immunological memory models are a useful support tool; not conclusive in themselves.

  6. Islamic Myths and Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and globalization and to the study of the place of the mass media in the contemporary Islamic resurgence. It explores the annulment of spatial and temporal distance by globalization and by the communications revolution underlying it, and how this has affected the cherished myths and memories of the Muslim community......Islamic myths and collective memory are very much alive in today’s localized struggles for identity, and are deployed in the ongoing construction of worldwide cultural networks. This book brings the theoretical perspectives of myth-making and collective memory to the study of Islam....... It shows how contemporary Islamic thinkers and movements respond to the challenges of globalization by preserving, reviving, reshaping, or transforming myths and memories....

  7. Serriform Strip Crosstie Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    edge effect of the margin serrations upon magnetization, a form of shape anisotropy, inherently defines memory cell boundaries in the domain walls, thereby giving the crossties and Bloch lines preferred locations and allowing the use of a simplified propagation

  8. Memory mass storage

    CERN Document Server

    Campardo, Giovanni; Iaculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Covering all the fundamental storage technologies such as semiconductor, magnetic, optical and uncommon, this volume details their core characteristics. In addition, it includes an overview of the 'biological memory' of the human brain and its organization.

  9. Just a Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    While Beijing accelerates its modernization drive,it needs to retain its city culture before the ancient parts of the capital are only seen in photographs and live on only in the memories of residents

  10. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  11. Multiresonator quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, S. A.; Gubaidullin, F. F.; Kirillov, R. S.; Latypov, R. R.; Perminov, N. S.; Petrovnin, K. V.; Sherstyukov, O. N.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present universal broadband multiresonator quantum memory based on the spatial-frequency combs of the microresonators coupled with a common waveguide. We find a Bragg-type impedance matching condition for the coupling of the microresonators with a waveguide field that provides an efficient broadband quantum storage. The analytical solution obtained for the microresonator fields enables sustainable parametric control of all the memory characteristics. We also construct an experimental prototype of the studied quantum memory in the microwave spectral range that demonstrates basic properties of the microwave microresonators, their coupling with a common waveguide, and independent control of the microresonator frequencies. Experimentally observed narrow lines of the microresonators confirm the possibility of multiresonator quantum memory implementation.

  12. Memory Circuit Fault Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Douglas J.; McClure, Tucker

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft are known to experience significant memory part-related failures and problems, both pre- and postlaunch. These memory parts include both static and dynamic memories (SRAM and DRAM). These failures manifest themselves in a variety of ways, such as pattern-sensitive failures, timingsensitive failures, etc. Because of the mission critical nature memory devices play in spacecraft architecture and operation, understanding their failure modes is vital to successful mission operation. To support this need, a generic simulation tool that can model different data patterns in conjunction with variable write and read conditions was developed. This tool is a mathematical and graphical way to embed pattern, electrical, and physical information to perform what-if analysis as part of a root cause failure analysis effort.

  13. Memory training with senior citizens

    OpenAIRE

    CHOVANCOVÁ, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    This is a theoretical work. It deals with the topics of senior citizens and the aging process in an abbreviated conception, periodization of old age, and active life of seniors. It describes forms of social work with seniors in medical facilities, home environments and communities, and in old people's homes. Further, it describes memory: its definition, types of memory, memory loss, reasons why people forget, work with memory and advice on memory improvement from the medical point of view. Th...

  14. Memory, Conviviality and Coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duru, Deniz Neriman

    2016-01-01

    The article explores the narratives and memories of past diversity and current practices of conviviality to investigate how class, lifestyle and tastes affect the daily interactions between people belonging to different ethno-religious backgrounds. This chapter critiques ‘coexistence’ as a concep......’ emphasize the fragmentation of people into ethnic and religious groups as a consequence of the homogenization process in the post-Ottoman Turkish context, bitter sweet memories of conviviality create a sense of belonging to Burgaz....

  15. Computational principles of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Rishidev; Fiete, Ila

    2016-03-01

    The ability to store and later use information is essential for a variety of adaptive behaviors, including integration, learning, generalization, prediction and inference. In this Review, we survey theoretical principles that can allow the brain to construct persistent states for memory. We identify requirements that a memory system must satisfy and analyze existing models and hypothesized biological substrates in light of these requirements. We also highlight open questions, theoretical puzzles and problems shared with computer science and information theory.

  16. Photonic crystal optical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, A. Wirth; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2011-06-01

    After several decades pushing the technology and the development of the world, the electronics is giving space for technologies that use light. We propose and analyze an optical memory embedded in a nonlinear photonic crystal (PhC), whose system of writing and reading data is controlled by an external command signal. This optical memory is based on optical directional couplers connected to a shared optical ring. Such a device can work over the C-Band of ITU (International Telecommunication Union).

  17. Epigenetic memory in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Mayumi; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-09-17

    Epigenetics refers to heritable changes in patterns of gene expression that occur without alterations in DNA sequence. The epigenetic mechanisms involve covalent modifications of DNA and histones, which affect transcriptional activity of chromatin. Since chromatin states can be propagated through mitotic and meiotic divisions, epigenetic mechanisms are thought to provide heritable 'cellular memory'. Here, we review selected examples of epigenetic memory in plants and briefly discuss underlying mechanisms.

  18. Tunable and Memory Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0402 TUNABLE AND MEMORY METAMATERIALS Dimitri Basov UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO Final Report 12/02/2015 DISTRIBUTION A...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-08-2010 to 14-08-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TUNABLE AND MEMORY METAMATERIALS 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550...common limitations of infrared metamaterials in order to achieve low electromagnetic losses and broad tunability of the electromagnetic response. One

  19. Regulatory T cell memory

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenblum, Md; Way, SS; Abbas, AK

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved. Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime–challenge models of infection. However, recent work ...

  20. Music and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Haefliger, Anna Berenika

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Music and its different forms of use seem to benefit people in a number of ways. Research has suggested that extensive musical practice and musical listening enhances mental functioning in healthy adults and patients with neurodegenerative disease. Yet, the findings presented have not yet examined the effects both musical training and stimuli enhancement have on episodic memory recognition. 20 musicians and 20 non-musicians took part in an episodic memory task which evaluated m...

  1. Cognitive Memory Network

    CERN Document Server

    James, Alex Pappachen; 10.1049/el.2010.0279

    2012-01-01

    A resistive memory network that has no crossover wiring is proposed to overcome the hardware limitations to size and functional complexity that is associated with conventional analogue neural networks. The proposed memory network is based on simple network cells that are arranged in a hierarchical modular architecture. Cognitive functionality of this network is demonstrated by an example of character recognition. The network is trained by an evolutionary process to completely recognise characters deformed by random noise, rotation, scaling and shifting

  2. Kirchnerist construction of memory

    OpenAIRE

    Bermúdez, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    The effects on the construction of collective memory caused by the arrival of the kirchnerism to the political field have been extensively studied. That construction suffered transformations with the change of president, which have been less studied. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to present an analysis about the discursive construction of memory during Cristina Fernández de Kirchner first government. This research is part of the discourse studies, and more precisely it is part of ...

  3. Collective Memories in Wikipedia

    OpenAIRE

    Ferron, Michela

    2012-01-01

    Collective memories are precious resources for the society, because they contribute to strengthening the emotional bonding between community members, maintaining groups cohesion, and directing future behavior. Understanding the formation of the collective memories of emotional upheavals is important to a better comprehension of people's reactions and of the consequences on their psychological health. Previous studies investigated the effects of single traumatizing events, but few of them app...

  4. Memory, collective memory, orality and the gospels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis C. Duling

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article first explores individual memory as understood from the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans to modern-day neurology and psychology. The perspective is correlated with collective memory theory in the works of Halbwachs, Connerton, Gillis, Fentress and Wickham, Olick, Schwartz, Jan and Alida Assmann and Kirk and Thatcher. The relevance of ‘orality’ is highlighted in Kelber’s works, as well as in oral poetry performance by illiterate Yugoslavian bards, as discussed in studies by Parry, Lord and Havelock. Kelber’s challenge of Bultmann’s theory of oral tradition in the gospels is also covered. The article concludes with observations and reflections, opting for a position of moderate−to−strong constructionism.

  5. Learning and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. J. Ryke

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available Under various circumstances and in different species the outward expression of learning varies considerably, and this has led to the classification of different categories of learning. Just as there is no generally agreed on definition of learning, there is no one system of classification. Types of learning commonly recognized are: Habituation, sensitization, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, trial and error, taste aversion, latent learning, cultural learning, imprinting, insight learning, learning-set learning and instinct. The term memory must include at least two separate processes. It must involve, on the one hand, that of learning something and on the other, at some later date, recalling that thing. What lies between the learning and (he remembering must be some permanent record — a memory trace — within the brain. Memory exists in at least two forms: memory for very recent events (short-term which is relatively labile and easily disruptable; and long-term memory, which is much more stable. Not everything that gets into short-term memory becomes fixed in the long-term store; a filtering mechanism selects things that might be important and discards the rest.

  6. Shape memory materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Compared with piezoelectric ceramics and magnetostrictive materials, the shape memory materials possess larger recoverable strain and recovery stress but slower response to external field. It is expected that the magneto-shape memory materials may develop considerable strain as well as rapid and precise shape control. Pseudoelasticity and shape memory effect (SME) resulted from martensitic transformation and its reverse transformation in shape memory materials were generally described. The requirements of appearing the shape memory effect in materials and the criteria for thermoelastic martensitic transformation were given. Some aspects concerning characteristics of martensitic transformation, and factors affecting SME in Ni-Ti, Cu-Zn-Al and Fe-Mn-Si based alloys as well as ZrO2 containing ceramics were briefly reviewed. Thermodynamic calculation of Ms temperature as function of grain size and parent ordering in Cu-Zn-Al was presented. The works on prediction of Ms in Fe-Mn-Si based alloys and in ZrO2-CeO2 were mentioned. Magnetic shape memory materials were briefly introduced.

  7. Immune memory in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for innate immune memory (or 'priming') in invertebrates has been accumulating over the last years. We here provide an in-depth review of the current state of evidence for immune memory in invertebrates, and in particular take a phylogenetic viewpoint. Invertebrates are a very heterogeneous group of animals and accordingly, evidence for the phenomenon of immune memory as well as the hypothesized molecular underpinnings differ largely for the diverse invertebrate taxa. The majority of research currently focuses on Arthropods, while evidence from many other groups of invertebrates is fragmentary or even lacking. We here concentrate on immune memory that is induced by pathogenic challenges, but also extent our view to a non-pathogenic context, i.e. allograft rejection, which can also show forms of memory and can inform us about general principles of specific self-nonself recognition. We discuss definitions of immune memory and a number of relevant aspects such as the type of antigens used, the route of exposure, and the kinetics of reactions following priming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Memory and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease that begins in the early age and that is associated with frequent and disturbing memory deficits. Repeated seizures will lead to the formation of an epileptogenic network that may interfere with physiological neuronal networks and thus with normal brain function: by direct activation or indirectly by deactivation during a seizure, see for example the dreamy state or the ''déja vécu'' phenomenon during temporal seizures; by ictal or post-ictal inhibition, see for example ictal or post-ictal amnesia; by a repetitive and chronic modulation leading to a reorganization of the physiological neuronal networks. The study of these interactions between epileptic and physiological neural networks must lead to better explore the patient's memory and predict memory worsening before temporal lobe surgery and to better understand the reorganization of memory networks in chronic epilepsy. The goal is double: (1) improve the prediction of post-operative memory worsening and guide rehabilitation in epileptic clinical practice; (2) improve the pathophysiological knowledge about memory processes. © Société de Biologie, 2010.

  9. Auto-reflexão ou repetição: Bento Prado Jr. e a crítica ao recurso frankfurtiano à psicanálise Self-reflection or repetition: Bento Prado Jr. and the critique of psychoanalysis in Frankfurt School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Safatle

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Procura-se analisar o projeto de uma filosofia da psicanálise desenvolvido por Bento Prado Jr. Trata-se de, por um lado, compreender o regime proposto de articulação entre filosofia e psicanálise e, por outro, a partir da posição do regime de articulação, avaliar a orientação da crítica de Bento Prado Jr. ao recurso frankfurtiano à psicanálise (Habermas e Marcuse principalmente e do elogio da leitura deleuzeana do conceito freudiano de pulsão de morte.This article aims to discuss the project of a philosophy of psychoanalysis developed by Bento Prado Jr. First, we need to understand the Bento Prado's way to articulate philosophy and psychoanalysis. After, the Bento Prado's critique of the use of psychoanalysis in Frankfurt School (Habermas and Marcuse and his eloge of deleuzean use of death drive will be evaluated.

  10. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces.

  11. Verification of Embedded Memory Systems using Efficient Memory Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ganai, Malay K; Ashar, Pranav

    2011-01-01

    We describe verification techniques for embedded memory systems using efficient memory modeling (EMM), without explicitly modeling each memory bit. We extend our previously proposed approach of EMM in Bounded Model Checking (BMC) for a single read/write port single memory system, to more commonly occurring systems with multiple memories, having multiple read and write ports. More importantly, we augment such EMM to providing correctness proofs, in addition to finding real bugs as before. The novelties of our verification approach are in a) combining EMM with proof-based abstraction that preserves the correctness of a property up to a certain analysis depth of SAT-based BMC, and b) modeling arbitrary initial memory state precisely and thereby, providing inductive proofs using SAT-based BMC for embedded memory systems. Similar to the previous approach, we construct a verification model by eliminating memory arrays, but retaining the memory interface signals with their control logic and adding constraints on tho...

  12. Memory engram storage and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, Susumu; Pignatelli, Michele; Roy, Dheeraj S; Ryan, Tomás J

    2015-12-01

    A great deal of experimental investment is directed towards questions regarding the mechanisms of memory storage. Such studies have traditionally been restricted to investigation of the anatomical structures, physiological processes, and molecular pathways necessary for the capacity of memory storage, and have avoided the question of how individual memories are stored in the brain. Memory engram technology allows the labeling and subsequent manipulation of components of specific memory engrams in particular brain regions, and it has been established that cell ensembles labeled by this method are both sufficient and necessary for memory recall. Recent research has employed this technology to probe fundamental questions of memory consolidation, differentiating between mechanisms of memory retrieval from the true neurobiology of memory storage.

  13. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepeu, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2010-09-06

    A consensus exists that cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are efficacious for mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Unfortunately, the number of non-responders is large and the therapeutic effect is usually short-lasting. In experimental animals, ChEIs exert three main actions: inhibit cholinesterase (ChE), increase extracellular levels of brain acetylcholine (ACh), improve cognitive processes, particularly when disrupted in models of AD. In this overview we shall deal with the cognitive processes that are improved by ChEI treatment because they depend on the integrity of brain cholinergic pathways and their activation. The role of cholinergic system in cognition can be investigated using different approaches. Microdialysis experiments demonstrate the involvement of the cholinergic system in attention, working, spatial and explicit memory, information encoding, sensory-motor gating, skill learning. No involvement in long-term memory has yet been demonstrated. Conversely, memory consolidation is facilitated by low cholinergic activity. Experiments on healthy human subjects, notwithstanding caveats concerning age, dose, and different memory tests, confirm the findings of animal experiments and demonstrate that stimulation of the cholinergic system facilitates attention, stimulus detection, perceptual processing and information encoding. It is not clear whether information retrieval may be improved but memory consolidation is reduced by cholinergic activation. ChEI effects in AD patients have been extensively investigated using rating scales that assess cognitive and behavioural responses. Few attempts have been made to identify which scale items respond better to ChEIs and therefore, presumably, depend on the activity of the cholinergic system. Improvement in attention and executive functions, communication, expressive language and mood stability have been reported. Memory consolidation and retrieval may be impaired by high ACh levels. Therefore, considering

  14. A expansão e a eficiência da escola rural em São Paulo: atuação e posicionamentos de Almeida Jr. a partir de estatísticas oficiais - The expansion and the efficiency of the rural school in São Paulo: the performance and the thinking of Almeida Jr. based o

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Maria Viviani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é analisar os discursos produzidos por Almeida Jr. sobre o ensino rural, entre as décadas de 1930 e 1940, e as formas sob as quais ele utilizou dados estatísticos para sustentar as suas opiniões e a sua atuação como administrador do ensino paulista. O estudo dessas questões pretende colaborar na ampliação do entendimento acerca das propostas para o ensino rural, tema bastante debatido nesse período. Por meio da análise de publicações oficiais paulistas e de artigos da Revista Brasileira de Estudos Pedagógicos, verificou-se que Almeida Jr., médico e educador ligado ao grupo dos chamados renovadores do ensino, defendia propostas voltadas para a qualidade do ensino e para a organização de uma escola básica comum, ainda que adaptada ao meio rural.Palavras-chave: educação rural, estatísticas educacionais, intelectuais da educação. THE EXPANSION AND THE EFFICIENCY OF THE RURAL SCHOOL IN SÃO PAULO: THE PERFORMANCE AND THE THINKING OF ALMEIDA JR. BASED ON OFFICIAL STATISTICSAbstractThe objective of this paper is to analyze de speeches made by Almeida Jr. about the rural education, between the decades of 1930 and 1940, and the way under which he used the statistics data to sustain his opinions and his performance as the manager of education in São Paulo. By analyzing the São Paulo’s official publications and the articles published in the Revista Brasileira de Estudos Pedagógicos, it has been found that Almeida Jr., a doctor and an educator connected to the group composed by some men who were called the renewers of education, sustained proposals which were bent to the good quality of education and to the organization of a unique elementary school, though to fit the country environment.Key-words: rural education, educational statistics, intellectuals in education. LA EXPANSIÓN Y LA EFICIENCIA DE LA ESCUELA RURAL EN SAN PABLO: ACTUACIÓN Y OPINIONES DE ALMEIDA JR. A PARTIR DE ESTAD

  15. Embodied Memory: Unconscious Smiling Modulates Emotional Evaluation of Episodic Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu eArminjon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since Damasio introduced the somatic markers hypothesis in 1991, it has spread through the psychological community, where it is now commonly acknowledged that somatic states are a factor in producing the qualitative dimension of our experiences. Present actions are emotionally guided by those somatic states that were previously activated in similar experiences. In this model, somatic markers serve as a kind of embodied memory.Here we test whether the manipulation of somatic markers can modulate the emotional evaluation of negative memories. Because facial feedback has been shown to be a powerful means of modifying emotional judgements, we used it to manipulate somatic markers. Participants first read a sad story in order to induce a negative emotional memory and then were asked to rate their emotions and memory about the text. Twenty-four hours later, the same participants were asked to assume a predetermined facial feedback (smiling while reactivating their memory of the sad story. The participants were once again asked to fill in emotional and memory questionnaires about the text. Our results showed that participants who had smiled during memory reactivation later rated the text less negatively than control participants. However, the contraction of the zygomaticus muscles during memory reactivation did not have any impact on episodic memory scores. This suggests that manipulating somatic states modified emotional memory without affecting episodic memory. Thus, modulating memories through bodily states might pave the way to studying memory as an embodied function and help shape new kinds of psychotherapeutic interventions.

  16. Embodied memory: unconscious smiling modulates emotional evaluation of episodic memories

    KAUST Repository

    Arminjon, Mathieu

    2015-05-26

    Since Damasio introduced the somatic markers hypothesis in Damasio (1994), it has spread through the psychological community, where it is now commonly acknowledged that somatic states are a factor in producing the qualitative dimension of our experiences. Present actions are emotionally guided by those somatic states that were previously activated in similar experiences. In this model, somatic markers serve as a kind of embodied memory. Here, we test whether the manipulation of somatic markers can modulate the emotional evaluation of negative memories. Because facial feedback has been shown to be a powerful means of modifying emotional judgements, we used it to manipulate somatic markers. Participants first read a sad story in order to induce a negative emotional memory and then were asked to rate their emotions and memory about the text. Twenty-four hours later, the same participants were asked to assume a predetermined facial feedback (smiling) while reactivating their memory of the sad story. The participants were once again asked to fill in emotional and memory questionnaires about the text. Our results showed that participants who had smiled during memory reactivation later rated the text less negatively than control participants. However, the contraction of the zygomaticus muscles during memory reactivation did not have any impact on episodic memory scores. This suggests that manipulating somatic states modified emotional memory without affecting episodic memory. Thus, modulating memories through bodily states might pave the way to studying memory as an embodied function and help shape new kinds of psychotherapeutic interventions.

  17. MEMORY IMPROVING FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning is a lifelong process of transforming information and experience into knowledge, skills, behaviorand attitudes. Memory is the ability of the brain to store, retain and subsequently to recall information received fromthe world. Cognition can be defined as organization of information. It includes acquiring information (perception,selecting (attention, representing (understanding and retaining (memory information and using it to guidebehavior (reasoning and coordination of motor outputs.There are so many conditions associated with memory and cognitive impairment which include Aging,Alzheimer’s disease, Stroke, Stress, Head injuries, Seizures, Benzodiazepines, Brain tumors, Depression, Temporallobe defects and Schizophrenia etc.Choline rich foods can enhance memory and learning and may be useful in improving cognitive abilities. Theseinclude sea foods, liver, egg yolk, soysbeans, broccoli, ash gourd. Coloured fruits and vegetables are good source ofantioxidants which improve concentration. It is advised to decrease the consumption of foods rich in transfats likehydrogenated oils, fried foods, beef, pork, mutton and ice creams and pastries. Such foods increase the deposition offats in the neurons and impair cognition. Tea, cocoa and turmeric are reported to have good nootropic activity i.e.improving memory and learning. Apart from the foods, one should keep the brain active to maintain its cognitivefunction well.

  18. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueland, Stian M.; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-05-23

    Copper-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit excellent shape memory properties in single crystalline form. However, when they are polycrystalline, their shape memory properties are severely compromised by brittle fracture arising from transformation strain incompatibility at grain boundaries and triple junctions. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys (oSMAs) are microstructurally designed SMA structures in which the total surface area exceeds the total grain boundary area, and triple junctions can even be completely absent. Here it is shown how an oligocrystalline structure provides a means of achieving single crystal-like SMA properties without being limited by constraints of single crystal processing. Additionally, the formation of oSMAs typically involves the reduction of the size scale of specimens, and sample size effects begin to emerge. Recent findings on a size effect on the martensitic transformation in oSMAs are compared and a new regime of heat transfer associated with the transformation heat evolution in these alloys is discussed. New results on unassisted two-way shape memory and the effect of loading rate in oSMAs are also reported. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. A balanced memory network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Roudi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how working memory--the ability to store information at intermediate timescales, like tens of seconds--is implemented in realistic neuronal networks. The most likely candidate mechanism is the attractor network, and a great deal of effort has gone toward investigating it theoretically. Yet, despite almost a quarter century of intense work, attractor networks are not fully understood. In particular, there are still two unanswered questions. First, how is it that attractor networks exhibit irregular firing, as is observed experimentally during working memory tasks? And second, how many memories can be stored under biologically realistic conditions? Here we answer both questions by studying an attractor neural network in which inhibition and excitation balance each other. Using mean-field analysis, we derive a three-variable description of attractor networks. From this description it follows that irregular firing can exist only if the number of neurons involved in a memory is large. The same mean-field analysis also shows that the number of memories that can be stored in a network scales with the number of excitatory connections, a result that has been suggested for simple models but never shown for realistic ones. Both of these predictions are verified using simulations with large networks of spiking neurons.

  20. Nanoporous silicon oxide memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gunuk; Yang, Yang; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Abramova, Vera; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Thomas, Edwin L; Tour, James M

    2014-08-13

    Oxide-based two-terminal resistive random access memory (RRAM) is considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation nonvolatile memory. We introduce here a new RRAM memory structure employing a nanoporous (NP) silicon oxide (SiOx) material which enables unipolar switching through its internal vertical nanogap. Through the control of the stochastic filament formation at low voltage, the NP SiOx memory exhibited an extremely low electroforming voltage (∼ 1.6 V) and outstanding performance metrics. These include multibit storage ability (up to 9-bits), a high ON-OFF ratio (up to 10(7) A), a long high-temperature lifetime (≥ 10(4) s at 100 °C), excellent cycling endurance (≥ 10(5)), sub-50 ns switching speeds, and low power consumption (∼ 6 × 10(-5) W/bit). Also provided is the room temperature processability for versatile fabrication without any compliance current being needed during electroforming or switching operations. Taken together, these metrics in NP SiOx RRAM provide a route toward easily accessed nonvolatile memory applications.

  1. Memory Loss: 7 Tips to Improve Your Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re not alone. Everyone forgets things occasionally. Still, memory loss is nothing to take lightly. Although there are no guarantees when it comes to preventing memory loss or dementia, certain activities might help. Consider ...

  2. Negative affect impairs associative memory but not item memory.

    OpenAIRE

    Bisby, J. A.; Burgess, N.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of associations between items and their context has been proposed to rely on mechanisms distinct from those supporting memory for a single item. Although emotional experiences can profoundly affect memory, our understanding of how it interacts with different aspects of memory remains unclear. We performed three experiments to examine the effects of emotion on memory for items and their associations. By presenting neutral and negative items with background contexts, Experiment 1 ...

  3. Special Operations Commemoration: Monuments, Memory & Memorialization Practices of Elite Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Although controversial at the time the precedent set for repatriation remains U.S. policy today.27 For example, Private Thomas Enright , Private Merle...organization. The first ceremony was held in 1987 and was presided over by the Deputy Director Robert M. Gates. The Memorial Ceremony has evolved over...memorial ceremonies timelessly capture the essence of any memorialization or commemorative practice. At the inaugural Memorial Ceremony in 1987 Robert

  4. Matter and memory

    CERN Document Server

    Bergson, Henri

    1991-01-01

    Since the end of the last century," Walter Benjamin wrote, "philosophy has made a series of attempts to lay hold of the 'true' experience as opposed to the kind that manifests itself in the standardized, denatured life of the civilized masses. It is customary to classify these efforts under the heading of a philosophy of life. Towering above this literature is Henri Bergson's early monumental work, Matter and Memory."Along with Husserl's Ideas and Heidegger's Being and Time, Bergson's work represents one of the great twentieth-century investigations into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Arguably Bergson's most significant book, Matter and Memory is essential to an understanding of his philosophy and its legacy.This new edition includes an annotated bibliography prepared by Bruno Paradis.Henri Bergson (1859-1941) was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1927. His works include Time and Free Will, An Introduction to Metaphysics, Creative Evolution, and The Creative Mind.

  5. Emotion and autobiographical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2010-03-01

    Autobiographical memory encompasses our recollections of specific, personal events. In this article, we review the interactions between emotion and autobiographical memory, focusing on two broad ways in which these interactions occur. First, the emotional content of an experience can influence the way in which the event is remembered. Second, emotions and emotional goals experienced at the time of autobiographical retrieval can influence the information recalled. We discuss the behavioral manifestations of each of these types of interactions and describe the neural mechanisms that may support those interactions. We discuss how findings from the clinical literature (e.g., regarding depression) and the social psychology literature (e.g., on emotion regulation) might inform future investigations of the interplay between the emotions experienced at the time of retrieval and the memories recalled, and we present ideas for future research in this domain.

  6. Mediated Cultural Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    (A revised, full paper will be published in the journal Mediekultur, spring 2014) This paper explores two examples of narratives representing memories of acts of mass violence: Gzim Rewind (Sweden, 2011, director Knutte Wester) about 1990’s Kosovo, and The Act of Killing (Denmark, 2012, director...... perspectives of semiosis (meaning-making) in relation to the films as redefining genres and what sorts of meanings different audiences create about the films. Acts of mass violence, including murder on civilians, genocide, and wars, can be seen as seeds for memories of the involved persons and following...... generations. Acts of mass violence also construct a sort of looking glass of culturally dominant memories that are mediated through stories: retold as oral stories through generations, as myths or sagas, or remediated in contemporary documentary or fiction films. In these processes of retelling acts...

  7. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  8. External-Memory Multimaps

    CERN Document Server

    Angelino, Elaine; Mitzenmacher, Michael; Thaler, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many data structures support dictionaries, also known as maps or associative arrays, which store and manage a set of key-value pairs. A \\emph{multimap} is generalization that allows multiple values to be associated with the same key. For example, the inverted file data structure that is used prevalently in the infrastructure supporting search engines is a type of multimap, where words are used as keys and document pointers are used as values. We study the multimap abstract data type and how it can be implemented efficiently online in external memory frameworks, with constant expected I/O performance. The key technique used to achieve our results is a combination of cuckoo hashing using buckets that hold multiple items with a multiqueue implementation to cope with varying numbers of values per key. Our external-memory results are for the standard two-level memory model.

  9. When Memories are Mediated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    that are mediated through stories: told and retold as oral stories through generations, as myths or sagas, or remediated as contemporary documentary film accounts or more fictional film accounts. In these processes of retelling acts of violence, transformations of meanings across time, cultural, social......Acts of mass violence, including murder on civilians, genocide, oppression and wars, can mobilize memories of the involved persons and following generations in a certain historical situation. Acts of mass violence can also create a sort of looking glass of culturally dominant memories...... makes meaning about past events. In the discussion, we consider how mediated memories affect audiences, and the potential of achieving development of present political and cultural understandings of past acts of violence....

  10. When Memories are Mediated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    and political contexts and media platforms take place and become contexts for audience reception. This paper explores two examples of narratives that construct memories of acts of mass violence: “Gzim Rewind” (Sweden, 2011, director Knutte Wester) about 1990’s Kosovo, and “The Act of Killing” (Denmark, 2012......Acts of mass violence, including murder on civilians, genocide, oppression and wars, can mobilize memories of the involved persons and following generations in a certain historical situation. Acts of mass violence can also create a sort of looking glass of culturally dominant memories...... that are mediated through stories: told and retold as oral stories through generations, as myths or sagas, or remediated as contemporary documentary film accounts or more fictional film accounts. In these processes of retelling acts of violence, transformations of meanings across time, cultural, social...

  11. Networks with Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Rosvall, Martin; Lancichinetti, Andrea; West, Jevin D; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    It is a paradigm to capture the spread of information and disease with random flow on networks. However, this conventional approach ignores an important feature of the dynamics: where flow moves to depends on where it comes from. That is, memory matters. We analyze multi-step pathways from different systems and show that ignoring memory has profound consequences for community detection and ranking as well as for epidemic spreading. Specifically, memoryless dynamics on networks understate the effect of communities and exaggerate the effect of highly connected nodes. Including memory reveals actual travel patterns in air traffic, ranking that favors specialized journals in scientific communication, and diseases that spread more slowly and persist longer in hospitals.

  12. Shape-memory polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Behl

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Shape-memory polymers are an emerging class of active polymers that have dual-shape capability. They can change their shape in a predefined way from shape A to shape B when exposed to an appropriate stimulus. While shape B is given by the initial processing step, shape A is determined by applying a process called programming. We review fundamental aspects of the molecular design of suitable polymer architectures, tailored programming and recovery processes, and the quantification of the shape-memory effect. Shape-memory research was initially founded on the thermally induced dual-shape effect. This concept has been extended to other stimuli by either indirect thermal actuation or direct actuation by addressing stimuli-sensitive groups on the molecular level. Finally, polymers are introduced that can be multifunctional. Besides their dual-shape capability, these active materials are biofunctional or biodegradable. Potential applications for such materials as active medical devices are highlighted.

  13. Psychobiology of Active and Inactive Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Donald J.

    1979-01-01

    Argues that the distinction between short-term memory and long-term memory is no longer adequate for either human or animal memory data. Recommends additional research on the physiological brain processes underlying memory interference and retrieval. (MP)

  14. Memory before Modernity : Practices of Memory in Early Modern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, H.M.E.P.; Pollmann, J.S.; Müller, J.M.; Steen, van der J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Many students of memory assume that the practice of memory changed dramatically around 1800; this volume shows that there was much continuity as well as change. Premodern ways of negotiating memories of pain and loss, for instance, were indeed quite different to those in the modern West. Yet by exam

  15. Negative Affect Impairs Associative Memory but Not Item Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisby, James A.; Burgess, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The formation of associations between items and their context has been proposed to rely on mechanisms distinct from those supporting memory for a single item. Although emotional experiences can profoundly affect memory, our understanding of how it interacts with different aspects of memory remains unclear. We performed three experiments to examine…

  16. Aging memories: differential decay of episodic memory components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talamini, L.M.; Gorree, E.

    2012-01-01

    Some memories about events can persist for decades, even a lifetime. However, recent memories incorporate rich sensory information, including knowledge on the spatial and temporal ordering of event features, while old memories typically lack this "filmic" quality. We suggest that this apparent

  17. Shape memory polymer foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  18. Natural Killer Cell Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-10-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity and can acquire immunological memory in a manner similar to that of T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence of NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 009 Rehabilitation of memory disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, B

    2010-01-01

      Abstract: In the past memory rehabilitation focused on teaching lists of words, giving people memory exercises or teaching mnemonics that brain injured people were expected to take on board and use spontaneously...

  20. Clinical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autobiographical memory plays a key role in psychological well-being, and the field has been investigated from multiple perspectives for more than thirty years. One large body of research has examined the basic mechanisms and characteristics of autobiographical memory during general cognition......, and another body has studied what happens to it during psychological disorders, and how psychological therapies targeting memory disturbances can improve psychological well-being. This edited collection reviews and integrates current theories on autobiographical memory when viewed in a clinical perspective....... It presents an overview of basic applied and clinical approaches to autobiographical memory, covering memory specificity, traumatic memories, involuntary and intrusive memories, and the role of self-identity. The book discusses a wide range of psychological disorders, including depression, posttraumatic...

  1. Neuroepigenetic regulation of pathogenic memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie E. Sillivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our unique collection of memories determines our individuality and shapes our future interactions with the world. Remarkable advances into the neurobiological basis of memory have identified key epigenetic mechanisms that support the stability of memory. Various forms of epigenetic regulation at the levels of DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNAs can modulate transcriptional and translational events required for memory processes. By changing the cellular profile in the brain’s emotional, reward, and memory circuits, these epigenetic modifications have also been linked to perseverant, pathogenic memories. In this review, we will delve into the relevance of epigenetic dysregulation to pathogenic memory mechanisms by focusing on 2 neuropsychiatric disorders perpetuated by aberrant memory associations: substance use disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. As our understanding improves, neuroepigenetic mechanisms may someday be harnessed to develop novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of these chronic, relapsing disorders.

  2. Emotional organization of autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulkind, Matthew D; Woldorf, Gillian M

    2005-09-01

    The emotional organization of autobiographical memory was examined by determining whether emotional cues would influence autobiographical retrieval in younger and older adults. Unfamiliar musical cues that represented orthogonal combinations of positive and negative valence and high and low arousal were used. Whereas cue valence influenced the valence of the retrieved memories, cue arousal did not affect arousal ratings. However, high-arousal cues were associated with reduced response latencies. A significant bias to report positive memories was observed, especially for the older adults, but neither the distribution of memories across the life span nor response latencies varied across memories differing in valence or arousal. These data indicate that emotional information can serve as effective cues for autobiographical memories and that autobiographical memories are organized in terms of emotional valence but not emotional arousal. Thus, current theories of autobiographical memory must be expanded to include emotional valence as a primary dimension of organization.

  3. Memory Can Fade After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161930.html Memory Can Fade After Menopause But women still outperform ... their own age, but new research suggests that memory may fade as estrogen levels drop during menopause. ...

  4. Time-Predictable Virtual Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puffitsch, Wolfgang; Schoeberl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Virtual memory is an important feature of modern computer architectures. For hard real-time systems, memory protection is a particularly interesting feature of virtual memory. However, current memory management units are not designed for time-predictability and therefore cannot be used...... in such systems. This paper investigates the requirements on virtual memory from the perspective of hard real-time systems and presents the design of a time-predictable memory management unit. Our evaluation shows that the proposed design can be implemented efficiently. The design allows address translation...... and address range checking in constant time of two clock cycles on a cache miss. This constant time is in strong contrast to the possible cost of a miss in a translation look-aside buffer in traditional virtual memory organizations. Compared to a platform without a memory management unit, these two additional...

  5. Memory and Forgetfulness: NIH Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Memory & Forgetfulness NIH Research Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... agency for research on Alzheimer's disease and related memory research. An analysis funded by the NIA finds ...

  6. About sleep's role in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Björn; Born, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Over more than a century of research has established the fact that sleep benefits the retention of memory. In this review we aim to comprehensively cover the field of "sleep and memory" research by providing a historical perspective on concepts and a discussion of more recent key findings. Whereas initial theories posed a passive role for sleep enhancing memories by protecting them from interfering stimuli, current theories highlight an active role for sleep in which memories undergo a process of system consolidation during sleep. Whereas older research concentrated on the role of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, recent work has revealed the importance of slow-wave sleep (SWS) for memory consolidation and also enlightened some of the underlying electrophysiological, neurochemical, and genetic mechanisms, as well as developmental aspects in these processes. Specifically, newer findings characterize sleep as a brain state optimizing memory consolidation, in opposition to the waking brain being optimized for encoding of memories. Consolidation originates from reactivation of recently encoded neuronal memory representations, which occur during SWS and transform respective representations for integration into long-term memory. Ensuing REM sleep may stabilize transformed memories. While elaborated with respect to hippocampus-dependent memories, the concept of an active redistribution of memory representations from networks serving as temporary store into long-term stores might hold also for non-hippocampus-dependent memory, and even for nonneuronal, i.e., immunological memories, giving rise to the idea that the offline consolidation of memory during sleep represents a principle of long-term memory formation established in quite different physiological systems.

  7. Self, Nation, and Generational Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böss/Bøss, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A study of the former Irish president Eamon de Valera's self-narrative in his official autobiography as an illustration Alistair Thomson's theory of memory as 'composure' and as reflecting generational memory........A study of the former Irish president Eamon de Valera's self-narrative in his official autobiography as an illustration Alistair Thomson's theory of memory as 'composure' and as reflecting generational memory.....

  8. Shape memory polymer medical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Duncan; Benett, William J.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Small, IV, Ward; Schumann, Daniel L.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Ortega, Jason M.; Marion, III, John E.; Loge, Jeffrey M.

    2010-06-29

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  9. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo eMeneses

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The i...

  10. Novel Nanocrystal Floating Gate Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Huimei

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigating the feasibility of engineering nanocrystals and tunnel oxide layer with a novel structure. Several novel devices are demonstrated to improve the performance of the novel nanocrystal memories.A novel TiSi2 nanocrystal memory was demonstrated. TiSi2 nanocrystals were synthesized on SiO2 by annealing Ti covered Si nanocrystals. Compared to the reference Si nanocrystal memory, both experiment and simulation results show that TiSi2 nanocrystal memory exhibits ...

  11. PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik (Itzhak) [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Carnes, Kevin D. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Cocke, C. Lew [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Fehrenbach, Charles W. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Kumarappan, Vinod [PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University; Rudenko, Artem [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Trallero, Carlos [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University

    2014-05-09

    This instrumentation grant funded the development and installation of a state-of-the-art laser system to be used for the DOE funded research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. Specifically, we purchased a laser based on the KMLABs Red-Dragon design, which has a high repetition rate of 10-20 kHz crucial for multi-parameter coincidence measurements conducted in our lab. This laser system is carrier-envelope phase (CEP) locked and provides pulses as short as 21 fs directly from the amplifier (see details below). In addition, we have developed a pulse compression setup that provides sub 5 fs pulses and a CEP tagging capability that allows for long measurements of CEP dependent processes.

  12. Caracterización molecular de InJR06, un integron de clase 1 situado en un plásmido conjugativo de Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Conza,José Di; Ayala, Juan Alfonso; Porto, Ayelén; Mollerach, Marta; Gutkind,Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Se investigó la presencia de integrones de clase 1, 2 y 3 en cuatro aislamientos pediátricos de Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Un integrón de clase 1 se detectó en una cepa de S. Typhimurium, la única que además presentaba resistencia a varios antibióticos aminoglucósidos. Este integrón, llamado InJR06, y los determinantes de resistencia a aminoglucósidos se localizaron en pS06, un plásmido conjugativo de tamaño grande (≥ 55 kb). El análisis de la región variable...

  13. Making lemonade from lemons: a case study on loss of space at the Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobia, Rajia C; Feldman, Jonquil D

    2010-01-01

    The setting for this case study is the Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, a health sciences campus with medical, dental, nursing, health professions, and graduate schools. During 2008-2009, major renovations to the library building were completed including office space for a faculty development department, multipurpose classrooms, a 24/7 study area, study rooms, library staff office space, and an information commons. The impetus for changes to the library building was the decreasing need to house collections in an increasingly electronic environment, the need for office space for other departments, and growth of the student body. About 40% of the library building was remodeled or repurposed, with a loss of approximately 25% of the library's original space. Campus administration proposed changes to the library building, and librarians worked with administration, architects, and construction managers to seek renovation solutions that meshed with the library's educational mission.

  14. Heritage and Memory Studies (HMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarse, van der R.; Saloul, I.A.M.

    Heritage and Memory StudiesSeries in development with the Amsterdam School for Heritage and Memory StudiesThis ground-breaking series examines the dynamics of heritage and memory from a transnational, interdisciplinary and integrated approaches. Monographs or edited volumes critically interrogate th

  15. NUMA obliviousness through memory mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gawade, M.; Kersten, M.; Pandis, I.; Kersten, M.

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of multi-socket multi-core CPUs a lot of effort is being put into how to best exploit their abundant CPU power. In a shared memory setting the multi-socket CPUs are equipped with their own memory module, and access memory modules across sockets in a non-uniform access pattern (NUMA).

  16. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  17. Body memories in dance improvisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    In the analysis of body-memory and improvisation presented in this paper I contend that dancers’ specialised body-memory are not to be understood as more or less automatized. Rather, in each repetition, body-memories – or habits – are to be understood as unfolding in response to the actual contex...

  18. Stress disrupts response memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzel, Friederike M; Wolf, Oliver T; Schwabe, Lars

    2013-08-01

    Stress effects on memory are well-known. Most studies, however, focused on the impact of stress on hippocampus-dependent 'declarative' memory processes. Less is known about whether stress influences also striatum-based memory processes, such as stimulus-response (S-R) memory. First evidence from rodent experiments shows that glucocorticoid stress hormones may enhance the consolidation of S-R memories. Whether stress affects also S-R memory retrieval remains largely elusive. Therefore, we tested in the present experiment in humans the effect of stress on the retrieval of S-R memories. Healthy men and women were trained to locate three objects in an S-R version of a virtual eight-arm radial maze. One week later, participants underwent a stressor or a control condition before their memory of the S-R task was tested. Our results showed that participants (n=43) who were exposed to the stressor before retention testing made significantly more errors in this test trial, suggesting that stress impaired S-R memory retrieval. Moreover, high cortisol concentrations were associated with reduced S-R memory. These findings indicate that stress may affect memory retrieval processes in humans beyond hippocampal 'declarative' memory.

  19. Heritage and Memory Studies (HMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarse, van der R.; Saloul, I.A.M.

    Heritage and Memory StudiesSeries in development with the Amsterdam School for Heritage and Memory StudiesThis ground-breaking series examines the dynamics of heritage and memory from a transnational, interdisciplinary and integrated approaches. Monographs or edited volumes critically interrogate

  20. Heritage and Memory Studies (HMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarse, van der R.; Saloul, I.A.M.

    Heritage and Memory Studies Series in development with the Amsterdam School for Heritage and Memory Studies This ground-breaking series examines the dynamics of heritage and memory from a transnational, interdisciplinary and integrated approaches. Monographs or edited volumes critically interrogate

  1. Memory Storage and Neural Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates memory storage and molecular nature of associative-memory formation by analyzing Pavlovian conditioning in marine snails and rabbits. Presented is the design of a computer-based memory system (neural networks) using the rules acquired in the investigation. Reports that the artificial network recognized patterns well. (YP)

  2. Transacted Memory for Smart Cards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, Pieter H.; Butler, Michael J.; de Jong, Eduard; Longley, Mark; Olivieira, J.N.; Zave, P.

    A transacted memory that is implemented using EEPROM technology offers persistence, undoability and auditing. The transacted memory system is formally specified in Z, and refined in two steps to a prototype C implementation / SPIN model. Conclusions are offered both on the transacted memory system

  3. The LVIS Jr. microstent to assist coil embolization of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms: clinical study to assess safety and efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moehlenbruch, M.; Herweh, C.; Behrens, L.; Jestaedt, L.; Bendszus, M.; Pham, M. [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Amiri, H.; Ringleb, P.A. [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    This study was aimed to assess clinical safety and efficacy of the LVIS Jr. microstent in stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms. IRB approved single-center interventional clinical study in 22 patients (10 females, 12 males, mean age 55, age range 33-74 years) for the endovascular treatment of wide-neck aneurysms. After obtaining informed consent, patients were included according to the following criteria: aneurysm fundus-to-neck ratio < 2 or neck diameter > 4 mm, and a parent vessel diameter of ≤3.5 mm. Primary end point for clinical safety was absence of death, absence of major or minor stroke, and absence of transient ischemic attack. Primary end point for treatment efficacy was complete angiographic occlusion according to the Raymond-Roy Occlusion Classification (RROC) immediately after the procedure and at follow-up after 3 and 6 months on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 20/22 (91 %) of patients, the primary end point of safety was reached; in the two remaining patients, transient ischemic attack, but no permanent deficit was observed; in 16/22 (73 %), efficient occlusion (RROC1) was reached, and in 6/22 (27 %), a residual neck remained (RROC2). Single [seven with antegrade, two in crossover configuration, and four with ''first-balloon-then-stent'' (FBTS) technique] or double-stent (eight patients with Y configuration and one patient with X configuration) deployment was technically successful in all cases. Deployment of the LVIS Jr. microstent in various single- or double-stent configurations is safe and effective to assist the treatment of intracranial wide-neck aneurysms. (orig.)

  4. "Memorial de agravios"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boletín Cultural y Bibliográfico Banco de la República

    1959-12-01

    Full Text Available El texto de este célebre documento, conocido con el nombre de Memorial de Agravios, fue redactado por Don Camilo Torres, en su calidad de Asesor del Cabildo de Santafé y se publicó por primera vez en folleto en 1832.

  5. Memorial Alexander Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AECK Associates, Arquitectos

    1958-05-01

    Full Text Available En Atlanta, el Instituto Tecnológico de Georgia acaba de ampliar sus instalaciones deportivas, construyendo el Alexander Memorial Center. Consta este nuevo Centro de dos edificios: una pista de baloncesto cubierta y un edificio anejo con vestuarios, duchas, una pista de entrenamiento, equipos técnicos y la emisora de radio Georgia Tech W. G. S. T.

  6. Memory Mechanisms in Grasping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Constanze; Franz, Volker H.

    2009-01-01

    The availability of visual information influences the execution of goal-directed movements. This is very prominent in memory conditions, where a delay is introduced between stimulus presentation and execution of the movement. The corresponding effects could be due to a decay of the visual information or to different processing mechanisms used for…

  7. Connecting Competing Memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarse, van der R.; Saloul, I.A.M.

    Research Expert Meeting: Connecting Competing Memories of War in Contemporary Europe5 March 2014NIAS hosts, 6 - 7 March, the expert meeting of the Consortium for 'The Cultural Heritage of War in Contemporary Europe'. The aim is to draft main themes and discuss financial and research structures regar

  8. YANGTZE DISCHARGE MEMORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus Fraedrich; Xiuhua Zhu

    2009-01-01

    We present a review on studies focusing on memories in hydrological time series in the Yangtze Basin based on observational and reconstructed historical data.Memory appears as scaling of power spectra,S(f)~f-β,with 0 <β≤ 1.The presence of scaling is noteworthy in daily river discharge time series:1)from weeks to a couple of years,power spectra follow flicker noise,that is β≈ 1;2)beyond years,spectral scaling appraaclTes β≈0.3.In historical time series of floods and draughts,power spectra also shows scaling with β≈ 0.38 ~0.52.Furthermore,a 70-year peak is detected in historical maritime events series,which also appears in other past climate indicators.Presence of memory in these hydrological time series implies clustering of extremes and scaling of their recurrence times,therefore,probabilistic forecast potential for extremes can be derived.On the other hand,although several physical processes,for example,soil moisture storage and high intermittency of precipitation,have been suggested to be the possible candidates contributing to the presence of long term memory,they remain open for future research.

  9. Visualizing Dynamic Memory Allocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreta, Sergio; Telea, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    We present a visualization tool for dynamic memory allocation information obtained from instrumenting the runtime allocator used by C programs. The goal of the presented visualization techniques is to convey insight in the dynamic behavior of the allocator. The purpose is to help the allocator desig

  10. Dreams Memories & Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Photography students spend a considerable amount of time working on technical issues in shooting, composing, editing, and processing prints. Another aspect of their learning should include the conception and communication of their ideas. A student's memories and dreams can serve as motivation to create images in visual art. Some artists claim that…

  11. Advanced image memory architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercillo, Richard; McNeill, Kevin M.

    1994-05-01

    A workstation for radiographic images, known as the Arizona Viewing Console (AVC), was developed at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in the Department of Radiology. This workstation has been in use as a research tool to aid us in investigating how a radiologist interacts with a workstation, to determine which image processing features are required to aid the radiologist, to develop user interfaces and to support psychophysical and clinical studies. Results from these studies have show a need to increase the current image memory's available storage in order to accommodate high resolution images. The current triple-ported image memory can be allocated to store any number of images up to a combined total of 4 million pixels. Over the past couple of years, higher resolution images have become easier to generate with the advent of laser digitizers and computed radiology systems. As part of our research, a larger 32 million pixel image memory for AVC has been designed to replace the existing image memory.

  12. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  13. Wolfgang Gentner Memorial

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Memorial was held in the Main Auditorium on 30 April 1981. The photo shows (centre, first row) Volker Soergel (DESY Director), Mrs. Gentner, Jean Teillac (President of the Council), Hélène Langevin-Joliot, Herwig Schopper (CERN Director-General).

  14. Dreams Memories & Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Photography students spend a considerable amount of time working on technical issues in shooting, composing, editing, and processing prints. Another aspect of their learning should include the conception and communication of their ideas. A student's memories and dreams can serve as motivation to create images in visual art. Some artists claim that…

  15. Echoic memory in pigeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Kretzschmar; T. Kalenscher; O. Güntürkün; C. Kaernbach

    2008-01-01

    It is unknown whether birds are able to retain the memory of purely sensory auditory information such as white noise over an extended period of time. In a Pavlovian heart rate conditioning paradigm, four pigeons were trained to associate a mild electric shock with periodic random waveforms, and no s

  16. Memory Loss and Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Underlying the generally oblivious attitude of teachers and learners towards the past is insufficient respect for the role of memory in giving meaning to experience and access to knowledge. We shape our identity by making sense of our past and its relationship to present and future selves, a process that should be intensively cultivated when we…

  17. Islamic Myths and Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and globalization and to the study of the place of the mass media in the contemporary Islamic resurgence. It explores the annulment of spatial and temporal distance by globalization and by the communications revolution underlying it, and how this has affected the cherished myths and memories of the Muslim community...

  18. The Memory Library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen-Bagneux, Ole

    2014-01-01

    of classification and retrieval processes is presented. The key element is to understand the library both as a physical structure and as a structure in the memory of the Alexandrian scholars. In this article, these structures are put together so to propose a new interpretation of the library....

  19. The Memory of God

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ulrik Houlind

    The thematic aim of the present dissertation is twofold: To contribute to the contemporary discussion within philosophy of religion, which revolves around ‘the death and (alleged) return of God’; more specifically, I want to rethink God through the concept memory, drawing on selected writings from...

  20. Memory for Routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, James A.; Rips, Lance J.

    1982-01-01

    Presents experiments which compare two theories of memory for routine events, one emphasizing temporal sequence of events, the other focusing on events' hierarchical structure or centrality. Findings suggest that sequence and centrality information may be computed as needed, rather than precompiled. (Author/BK)

  1. The role of stress during memory reactivation on intrusive memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jessica; Garber, Benjamin; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    Intrusive memories are unwanted recollections that maintain distress in psychological disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that memories that are reactivated through retrieval become temporarily vulnerable to environmental or pharmacological manipulation, including changes in levels of circulating stress hormones. This study investigated the influence of stress during memory reactivation of an emotionally arousing trauma film on subsequent intrusive memories. Three groups of participants (N=63) viewed a trauma film depicting a serious car accident at baseline. Two days later (Time 2), one group received a reactivation induction following a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT; Stress/Reactivation condition), whilst the second group reactivated the memory after a control procedure (Reactivation condition). A third group underwent the SECPT but was not asked to reactivate memory of the trauma film (Stress condition). Two days later (Time 3), all participants received a surprise cued memory recall test and intrusions questionnaire which they completed online. Results showed that those in the Stress/Reactivation group had higher intrusions scores than the other two groups, suggesting that acute stress promotes intrusive memories only when the memory trace is reactivated shortly afterwards. Increased cortisol predicted enhanced intrusive experiences in the Stress/Reactivation condition but not in the other conditions. This pattern of results suggests that acute stress during the reactivation of emotional material impacts on involuntary emotional memories. These findings suggest a possible explanation for the mechanism underlying the maintenance of intrusive memories in clinical disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring memory hierarchy design with emerging memory technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Guangyu

    2014-01-01

    This book equips readers with tools for computer architecture of high performance, low power, and high reliability memory hierarchy in computer systems based on emerging memory technologies, such as STTRAM, PCM, FBDRAM, etc.  The techniques described offer advantages of high density, near-zero static power, and immunity to soft errors, which have the potential of overcoming the “memory wall.”  The authors discuss memory design from various perspectives: emerging memory technologies are employed in the memory hierarchy with novel architecture modification;  hybrid memory structure is introduced to leverage advantages from multiple memory technologies; an analytical model named “Moguls” is introduced to explore quantitatively the optimization design of a memory hierarchy; finally, the vulnerability of the CMPs to radiation-based soft errors is improved by replacing different levels of on-chip memory with STT-RAMs.   ·         Provides a holistic study of using emerging memory technologies i...

  3. False memories and memory confidence in borderline patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Lisa; Wingenfeld, Katja; Spitzer, Carsten; Nagel, Matthias; Moritz, Steffen

    2013-12-01

    Mixed results have been obtained regarding memory in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Prior reports and anecdotal evidence suggests that patients with BPD are prone to false memories but this assumption has to been put to firm empirical test, yet. Memory accuracy and confidence was assessed in 20 BPD patients and 22 healthy controls using a visual variant of the false memory (Deese-Roediger-McDermott) paradigm which involved a negative and a positive-valenced picture. Groups did not differ regarding veridical item recognition. Importantly, patients did not display more false memories than controls. At trend level, borderline patients rated more items as new with high confidence compared to healthy controls. The results tentatively suggest that borderline patients show uncompromised visual memory functions and display no increased susceptibility for distorted memories. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. False memories in highly superior autobiographical memory individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patihis, Lawrence; Frenda, Steven J; LePort, Aurora K R; Petersen, Nicole; Nichols, Rebecca M; Stark, Craig E L; McGaugh, James L; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2013-12-24

    The recent identification of highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) raised the possibility that there may be individuals who are immune to memory distortions. We measured HSAM participants' and age- and sex-matched controls' susceptibility to false memories using several research paradigms. HSAM participants and controls were both susceptible to false recognition of nonpresented critical lure words in an associative word-list task. In a misinformation task, HSAM participants showed higher overall false memory compared with that of controls for details in a photographic slideshow. HSAM participants were equally as likely as controls to mistakenly report they had seen nonexistent footage of a plane crash. Finding false memories in a superior-memory group suggests that malleable reconstructive mechanisms may be fundamental to episodic remembering. Paradoxically, HSAM individuals may retrieve abundant and accurate autobiographical memories using fallible reconstructive processes.

  5. About Sleep's Role in Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Over more than a century of research has established the fact that sleep benefits the retention of memory. In this review we aim to comprehensively cover the field of “sleep and memory” research by providing a historical perspective on concepts and a discussion of more recent key findings. Whereas initial theories posed a passive role for sleep enhancing memories by protecting them from interfering stimuli, current theories highlight an active role for sleep in which memories undergo a process of system consolidation during sleep. Whereas older research concentrated on the role of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, recent work has revealed the importance of slow-wave sleep (SWS) for memory consolidation and also enlightened some of the underlying electrophysiological, neurochemical, and genetic mechanisms, as well as developmental aspects in these processes. Specifically, newer findings characterize sleep as a brain state optimizing memory consolidation, in opposition to the waking brain being optimized for encoding of memories. Consolidation originates from reactivation of recently encoded neuronal memory representations, which occur during SWS and transform respective representations for integration into long-term memory. Ensuing REM sleep may stabilize transformed memories. While elaborated with respect to hippocampus-dependent memories, the concept of an active redistribution of memory representations from networks serving as temporary store into long-term stores might hold also for non-hippocampus-dependent memory, and even for nonneuronal, i.e., immunological memories, giving rise to the idea that the offline consolidation of memory during sleep represents a principle of long-term memory formation established in quite different physiological systems. PMID:23589831

  6. Study of T L LiF: Mg,Ti (Model JR1152C) material for its use in the environmental monitoring; Estudio del material TL LiF: Mg, Ti (JR1152C) para su empleo en el monitoreo ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina P, D.; Diaz B, E.; Prendes A, M. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, CPHR, Apdo. postal 6195, Habana 6, CP 10600, Ciudad Habana (Cuba)

    1999-07-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility to use the T L material of LiF: Mg,Ti (Model JR1152C) as environmental dosemeter it was realized its characterization of it according to the established criterion in the standard IEC-1066. The properties studied were: homogeneity of the lot, reproducibility, response linearity, detection threshold, auto irradiation, residual signal, response pride (fading) and angular dependence. The results prove the compliment of the IEC requirements and therefore the applicability of this dosemeter in the environmental monitoring. (Author)

  7. Dissociation and memory fragmentation: Experimental effects on meta-memory but not on actual memory performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hout, M.; Kindt, M.

    2003-01-01

    The relation between state dissociation and fragmentary memory was investigated by assessing both actual memory performance and meta-memory. From a sample of 330 normal subjects, 2 subsamples were selected on basis of trait dissociation, as measured by the Dissociative Experience Scale. 20 subjects

  8. Dissociation and memory fragmentation: Experimental effects on meta-memory but not on actual memory performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hout, M.; Kindt, M.

    2003-01-01

    The relation between state dissociation and fragmentary memory was investigated by assessing both actual memory performance and meta-memory. From a sample of 330 normal subjects, 2 subsamples were selected on basis of trait dissociation, as measured by the Dissociative Experience Scale. 20 subjects

  9. Atomic memory access hardware implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jung Ho; Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J

    2015-02-17

    Atomic memory access requests are handled using a variety of systems and methods. According to one example method, a data-processing circuit having an address-request generator that issues requests to a common memory implements a method of processing the requests using a memory-access intervention circuit coupled between the generator and the common memory. The method identifies a current atomic-memory access request from a plurality of memory access requests. A data set is stored that corresponds to the current atomic-memory access request in a data storage circuit within the intervention circuit. It is determined whether the current atomic-memory access request corresponds to at least one previously-stored atomic-memory access request. In response to determining correspondence, the current request is implemented by retrieving data from the common memory. The data is modified in response to the current request and at least one other access request in the memory-access intervention circuit.

  10. Implicit Memory in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Latchford

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of neuropsychological studies have revealed that memory problems are relatively common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. It may be useful to compare MS with conditions such as Huntington's disease (HD, which have been referred to as subcortical dementia. A characteristic of these conditions may be an impairment in implicit (unconscious memory, but not in explicit (conscious memory. The present study examined the functioning of explicit and implicit memory in MS. Results showed that implicit memory was not significantly impaired in the MS subjects, and that they were impaired on recall but not recognition. A correlation was found between implicit memory performance and disability status in MS patients. Findings also suggest the possibility of long-term priming of implicit memory in the control subjects. The implications of these results are discussed.

  11. Flashbulb memories in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, G; Conway, M A; Maylor, E A

    1994-09-01

    In this study of age differences in flashbulb memory, groups of young and older adults gave detailed accounts of how they heard the news of the resignation of the British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. They were tested within 14 days after the event and again 11 months later. They also gave ratings for the encoding variables (surprise, emotion, importance, knowledge, and interest) and for frequency of rehearsal. Memories that met a strict criterion of consistency between the original and delayed responses were classified as flashbulb memories. Although 90% of young Ss had flashbulb memories, only 42% of the elderly met the criterion. The age groups also differed in the type of details remembered and in the relationship between the encoding and rehearsal variables and the occurrence of flashbulb memory. The age-related deficit in flashbulb memory is related to source amnesia and to a deficit in memory for context.

  12. Longevity pathways and memory ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias eGkikas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ageing process has been associated with numerous pathologies at the cellular, tissue, and organ level. Decline or loss of brain functions, including learning and memory, is one of the most devastating and feared aspects of ageing. Learning and memory are fundamental processes by which animals adjust to environmental changes, evaluate various sensory signals based on context and experience, and make decisions to generate adaptive behaviours. Age-related memory impairment is an important phenotype of brain ageing. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related memory impairment is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies that may eventually lead to the development of drugs to combat memory loss. Studies in invertebrate animal models have taught us much about the physiology of ageing and its effects on learning and memory. In this review we survey recent progress relevant to conserved molecular pathways implicated in both ageing and memory formation and consolidation.

  13. Memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Holger

    2013-12-01

    Loss of memory is among the first symptoms reported by patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and by their caretakers. Working memory and long-term declarative memory are affected early during the course of the disease. The individual pattern of impaired memory functions correlates with parameters of structural or functional brain integrity. AD pathology interferes with the formation of memories from the molecular level to the framework of neural networks. The investigation of AD memory loss helps to identify the involved neural structures, such as the default mode network, the influence of epigenetic and genetic factors, such as ApoE4 status, and evolutionary aspects of human cognition. Clinically, the analysis of memory assists the definition of AD subtypes, disease grading, and prognostic predictions. Despite new AD criteria that allow the earlier diagnosis of the disease by inclusion of biomarkers derived from cerebrospinal fluid or hippocampal volume analysis, neuropsychological testing remains at the core of AD diagnosis.

  14. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences.

  15. Hierarchical organization of cognitive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, M; Suzuki, W A; Gadian, D G; Vargha-Khadem, F

    1997-10-29

    This paper addresses the question of the organization of memory processes within the medial temporal lobe. Evidence obtained in patients with late-onset amnesia resulting from medial temporal pathology has given rise to two opposing interpretations of the effects of such damage on long-term cognitive memory. One view is that cognitive memory, including memory for both facts and events, is served in a unitary manner by the hippocampus and its surrounding cortices; the other is that the basic function affected in amnesia is event memory, the memory for factual material often showing substantial preservation. Recent findings in patients with amnesia resulting from relatively selective hippocampal damage sustained early in life suggest a possible reconciliation of the two views. The new findings suggest that the hippocampus may be especially important for event as opposed to fact memory, with the surrounding cortical areas contributing to both. Evidence from neuroanatomical and neurobehavioural studies in monkeys is presented in support of this proposal.

  16. Stress effects on working memory, explicit memory, and implicit memory for neutral and emotional stimuli in healthy men

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias Luethi; Beat Meier; Carmen Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Stress is a strong modulator of memory function. However, memory is not a unitary process and stress seems to exert different effects depending on the memory type under study. Here, we explored the impact of social stress on different aspects of human memory, including tests for explicit memory and working memory (for neutral materials), as well as implicit memory (perceptual priming, contextual priming and classical conditioning for emotional stimuli). A total of 35 young adult...

  17. Working memory and the memory distortion component of hindsight bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvillo, Dustin P

    2012-01-01

    One component of hindsight bias is memory distortion: Individuals' recollections of their predictions are biased towards known outcomes. The present study examined the role of working memory in the memory distortion component of hindsight bias. Participants answered almanac-like questions, completed a measure of working memory capacity, were provided with the correct answers, and attempted to recollect their original judgements in two conditions: with and without a concurrent working memory load. Participants' recalled judgements were more biased by feedback when they recalled these judgements with a concurrent memory load and working memory capacity was negatively correlated with memory distortion. These findings are consistent with reconstruction accounts of the memory distortion component of hindsight bias and, more generally, with dual process theories of cognition. These results also relate the memory distortion component of hindsight bias with other cognitive errors, such as source monitoring errors, the belief bias in syllogistic reasoning and anchoring effects. Implications for the separate components view of hindsight bias are discussed.

  18. Method and apparatus for faulty memory utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, Chen-Yong; Andrade Costa, Carlos H.; Park, Yoonho; Rosenburg, Bryan S.; Ryu, Kyung D.

    2016-04-19

    A method for faulty memory utilization in a memory system includes: obtaining information regarding memory health status of at least one memory page in the memory system; determining an error tolerance of the memory page when the information regarding memory health status indicates that a failure is predicted to occur in an area of the memory system affecting the memory page; initiating a migration of data stored in the memory page when it is determined that the data stored in the memory page is non-error-tolerant; notifying at least one application regarding a predicted operating system failure and/or a predicted application failure when it is determined that data stored in the memory page is non-error-tolerant and cannot be migrated; and notifying at least one application regarding the memory failure predicted to occur when it is determined that data stored in the memory page is error-tolerant.

  19. Plant electrical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Carrell, Holly; Adesina, Tejumade; Markin, Vladislav S; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-07-01

    Electrical signaling, short-term memory and rapid closure of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula Ellis (Venus flytrap) have been attracting the attention of researchers since the XIX century. We found that the electrical stimulus between a midrib and a lobe closes the Venus flytrap upper leaf without mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. The closing time of Venus flytrap by electrical stimulation is the same as mechanically induced closing. Transmission of a single electrical charge between a lobe and the midrib causes closure of the trap and induces an electrical signal propagating between both lobes and midrib. The Venus flytrap can accumulate small subthreshold charges, and when the threshold value is reached, the trap closes. Repeated application of smaller charges demonstrates the summation of stimuli. The cumulative character of electrical stimuli points to the existence of short-term electrical memory in the Venus flytrap.

  20. Shape Memory Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deexith Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are metals that "remember" their original shapes. SMAs are useful for such things as actuators which are materials that "change shape, stiffness, position, natural frequency, and other mechanical characteristics in response to temperature or electromagnetic fields" The potential uses for SMAs especially as actuators have broadened the spectrum of many scientific fields. The study of the history and development of SMAs can provide an insight into a material involved in cutting-edge technology. The diverse applications for these metals have made them increasingly important and visible to the world. This paper presents the working of shape memory alloys , the phenomenon of super-elasticity and applications of these alloys.

  1. TED KYCIA MEMORIAL SYMPOSIUM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTENBERG, L.; RUBINSTEIN, R.; SAMIOS, N.; LI, K.; GIACOMELLI, G.; MOCKETT, P.; CARROLL, A.; JOHNSON, R.; BRYMAN, D.; TIPPENS, B.

    2000-05-19

    On the afternoon of May 19 2000, a Memorial Seminar was held in the BNL physics Large Seminar Room to honor the memory of Ted Kyeia, a prominent particle physicist who had been a member of the BNL staff for 40 years. Although it was understandably a somewhat sad occasion because Ted was no longer with us, nevertheless there was much for his colleagues and friends to celebrate in recalling the outstanding contributions that he had made in those four decades. The Seminar speakers were all people who had worked with Ted during that period; each discussed one aspect of his career, but also included anecdotes and personal reminiscences. This booklet contains the Seminar program, listing the speakers, and also copies of transparencies of the talks (and one paper which was a later expansion of a talk); sadly, not all of the personal remarks appeared on the transparencies.

  2. Learning, memory, and synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witthoft, Nathan; Winawer, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    People with color-grapheme synesthesia experience color when viewing written letters or numerals, usually with a particular color evoked by each grapheme. Here, we report on data from 11 color-grapheme synesthetes who had startlingly similar color-grapheme pairings traceable to childhood toys containing colored letters. These are the first and only data to show learned synesthesia of this kind in more than a single individual. Whereas some researchers have focused on genetic and perceptual aspects of synesthesia, our results indicate that a complete explanation of synesthesia must also incorporate a central role for learning and memory. We argue that these two positions can be reconciled by thinking of synesthesia as the automatic retrieval of highly specific mnemonic associations, in which perceptual contents are brought to mind in a manner akin to mental imagery or the perceptual-reinstatement effects found in memory studies.

  3. Mediated Cultural Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    (A revised, full paper will be published in the journal Mediekultur, spring 2014) This paper explores two examples of narratives representing memories of acts of mass violence: Gzim Rewind (Sweden, 2011, director Knutte Wester) about 1990’s Kosovo, and The Act of Killing (Denmark, 2012, director...... Joshua Oppenheimer) about 1960’s Indonesia. The two films, in very different ways, focus on persons who tell about their involvement in acts of mass violence. Both films are told as "a film within a film" and experiment with “documentary” as genre. The two film projects and audiences are analyzed from...... perspectives of semiosis (meaning-making) in relation to the films as redefining genres and what sorts of meanings different audiences create about the films. Acts of mass violence, including murder on civilians, genocide, and wars, can be seen as seeds for memories of the involved persons and following...

  4. Skill and Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-30

    Bower (Ed.), The Psychology of Learning and-Motivation, Vol. 16, Academic Press, in press. 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on revees side It necoessar md...Spence & J.T. Spence (Eds.), The Psychology of Learning and Motivation: Advances in Research and Theory. New York: Academic Press, Inc., 1968...Cognition, 1981, 10, 17-23. Baddeley, A.D. & Hitch, G. Working Memory. In G.. Bower (Ed.), The Psychology of Learning and Motivation. : ,1974. Biederman

  5. Fuzzy associative memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosko, Bart

    1991-01-01

    Mappings between fuzzy cubes are discussed. This level of abstraction provides a surprising and fruitful alternative to the propositional and predicate-calculas reasoning techniques used in expert systems. It allows one to reason with sets instead of propositions. Discussed here are fuzzy and neural function estimators, neural vs. fuzzy representation of structured knowledge, fuzzy vector-matrix multiplication, and fuzzy associative memory (FAM) system architecture.

  6. Coupled Neural Associative Memories

    OpenAIRE

    Karbasi, Amin; Salavati, Amir Hesam; Shokrollahi, Amin

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel architecture to design a neural associative memory that is capable of learning a large number of patterns and recalling them later in presence of noise. It is based on dividing the neurons into local clusters and parallel plains, very similar to the architecture of the visual cortex of macaque brain. The common features of our proposed architecture with those of spatially-coupled codes enable us to show that the performance of such networks in eliminating noise is drastical...

  7. Representation in Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-07

    notion of the schema finds its way into modern cognitive psychology from the writings of Bartlett (1932) and from Piaget (1952). Throughout most of its...Anderson. Cognitive algebra: Information integration applied to social attribution. December, 1972. 32. Jean H. Handler and Nancy L. Stein. Recall...knowledge in memory. January, 1976. 56. David E. Rumelhart. Toward an interactive model of reading. March, 1976. 57. Jean M. Handler, Nancy S

  8. A Memorial Gathering

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Bob Dobinson (1943-2004) Bob's friends and colleagues are warmly invited to join in a memorial gathering on Thursday 15th April 2004 at 11:00 hours in the CERN Council Chamber/ Salle de Conseil (Bldg 503 1st floor) Some colleagues will pay tribute to Bob's lifetime achievements and his contributions to past and present experiments. The gathering will conclude with refreshments in the Salle des Pas Perdus.

  9. Shape memory alloy actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  10. Hypnosis, memory and amnesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kihlstrom, J F

    1997-01-01

    Hypnotized subjects respond to suggestions from the hypnotist for imaginative experiences involving alterations in perception and memory. Individual differences in hypnotizability are only weakly related to other forms of suggestibility. Neuropsychological speculations about hypnosis focus on the right hemisphere and/or the frontal lobes. Posthypnotic amnesia refers to subjects' difficulty in remembering, after hypnosis, the events and experiences that transpired while they were hypnotized. P...

  11. [From memories about war].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, B A

    2010-04-01

    The article presents publication of memories of a military physician Spivak B.A., finished the First Kiev medical institute in 1941. The author held rank: from August 1941--chief of sanitary service of a separated battalion, April 1942-June 1945--chief of operation-bandaging unit of 246 SMSB SD. After war served in military treatment institutes on ranks of surgical profile, finished the military service in the rank of chief of surgical unit of Kovel garrison hospital in 1964.

  12. Solvent-driven temperature memory and multiple shape memory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Guo, Jingkai; Safranski, David L; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-05-28

    Thermally-activated temperature memory and multiple shape memory effects have been observed in amorphous polymers with a broad glass transition. In this work, we demonstrate that the same shape recovery behaviors can also be achieved through solvent absorption. We investigate the recovery behaviors of programmed Nafion membranes in various solvents and compare the solvent-driven and temperature-driven shape recovery response. The results show that the programming temperature and solvent type have a corresponding strong influence on the shape recovery behavior. Specifically, lower programming temperatures induce faster initial recovery rates and larger recovery, which is known as the temperature memory effect. The temperature memory effect can be used to achieve multi-staged and multiple shape recovery of specimens programmed at different temperatures. Different solvents can also induce different shape recovery, analogous to the temperature memory effect, and can also provide a mechanism for multi-staged and multiple shape memory recovery.

  13. Antiferroelectric Shape Memory Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Uchino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiferroelectrics (AFE can exhibit a “shape memory function controllable by electric field”, with huge isotropic volumetric expansion (0.26% associated with the AFE to Ferroelectric (FE phase transformation. Small inverse electric field application can realize the original AFE phase. The response speed is quick (2.5 ms. In the Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.6Sn0.41-yTiy]0.98O3 (PNZST system, the shape memory function is observed in the intermediate range between high temperature AFE and low temperature FE, or low Ti-concentration AFE and high Ti-concentration FE in the composition. In the AFE multilayer actuators (MLAs, the crack is initiated in the center of a pair of internal electrodes under cyclic electric field, rather than the edge area of the internal electrodes in normal piezoelectric MLAs. The two-sublattice polarization coupling model is proposed to explain: (1 isotropic volume expansion during the AFE-FE transformation; and (2 piezoelectric anisotropy. We introduce latching relays and mechanical clampers as possible unique applications of shape memory ceramics.

  14. Dielectric elastomer memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas G.; Xie, Sheng Q.; Calius, Emilio P.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2011-04-01

    Life shows us that the distribution of intelligence throughout flexible muscular networks is a highly successful solution to a wide range of challenges, for example: human hearts, octopi, or even starfish. Recreating this success in engineered systems requires soft actuator technologies with embedded sensing and intelligence. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator(s) (DEA) are promising due to their large stresses and strains, as well as quiet flexible multimodal operation. Recently dielectric elastomer devices were presented with built in sensor, driver, and logic capability enabled by a new concept called the Dielectric Elastomer Switch(es) (DES). DES use electrode piezoresistivity to control the charge on DEA and enable the distribution of intelligence throughout a DEA device. In this paper we advance the capabilities of DES further to form volatile memory elements. A set reset flip-flop with inverted reset line was developed based on DES and DEA. With a 3200V supply the flip-flop behaved appropriately and demonstrated the creation of dielectric elastomer memory capable of changing state in response to 1 second long set and reset pulses. This memory opens up applications such as oscillator, de-bounce, timing, and sequential logic circuits; all of which could be distributed throughout biomimetic actuator arrays. Future work will include miniaturisation to improve response speed, implementation into more complex circuits, and investigation of longer lasting and more sensitive switching materials.

  15. Sleep loss produces false memories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Diekelmann

    Full Text Available People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal",..., lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black". Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss.

  16. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Unifying Memory and Database Transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ricardo J.; Lourenço, João M.

    Software Transactional Memory is a concurrency control technique gaining increasing popularity, as it provides high-level concurrency control constructs and eases the development of highly multi-threaded applications. But this easiness comes at the expense of restricting the operations that can be executed within a memory transaction, and operations such as terminal and file I/O are either not allowed or incur in serious performance penalties. Database I/O is another example of operations that usually are not allowed within a memory transaction. This paper proposes to combine memory and database transactions in a single unified model, benefiting from the ACID properties of the database transactions and from the speed of main memory data processing. The new unified model covers, without differentiating, both memory and database operations. Thus, the users are allowed to freely intertwine memory and database accesses within the same transaction, knowing that the memory and database contents will always remain consistent and that the transaction will atomically abort or commit the operations in both memory and database. This approach allows to increase the granularity of the in-memory atomic actions and hence, simplifies the reasoning about them.

  18. The evolution of episodic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Timothy A.; Fortin, Norbert J.

    2013-01-01

    One prominent view holds that episodic memory emerged recently in humans and lacks a “(neo)Darwinian evolution” [Tulving E (2002) Annu Rev Psychol 53:1–25]. Here, we review evidence supporting the alternative perspective that episodic memory has a long evolutionary history. We show that fundamental features of episodic memory capacity are present in mammals and birds and that the major brain regions responsible for episodic memory in humans have anatomical and functional homologs in other species. We propose that episodic memory capacity depends on a fundamental neural circuit that is similar across mammalian and avian species, suggesting that protoepisodic memory systems exist across amniotes and, possibly, all vertebrates. The implication is that episodic memory in diverse species may primarily be due to a shared underlying neural ancestry, rather than the result of evolutionary convergence. We also discuss potential advantages that episodic memory may offer, as well as species-specific divergences that have developed on top of the fundamental episodic memory architecture. We conclude by identifying possible time points for the emergence of episodic memory in evolution, to help guide further research in this area. PMID:23754432

  19. Investigating Memory Development in Children and Infantile Amnesia in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi Tari, Somayeh

    2008-01-01

    Although many researchers have worked on memory development, still little is known about what develops in memory development. When one reviews the literature about memory, she encounters many types of memories such as short term vs. long term memory, working memory, explicit vs. implicit memory, trans-saccadic memory, autobiographical memory,…

  20. Dreams are made of memories, but maybe not for memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagrove, Mark; Ruby, Perrine; Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-12-01

    Llewellyn's claim that rapid eye movement (REM) dream imagery may be related to the processes involved in memory consolidation during sleep is plausible. However, whereas there is voluntary and deliberate intention behind the construction of images in the ancient art of memory (AAOM) method, there is a lack of intentionality in producing dream images. The memory for dreams is also fragile, and dependent on encoding once awake.

  1. Electrophysiological measures of episodic memory control and memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, E L; Herron, J E

    2006-10-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) index processes that occur before, during and after retrieval of information from episodic memory. In this selective review we provide a loose theoretical framework within which retrieval processes operating at these different stages can be considered. We go on to describe how ERPs have been employed in order to index processes operating at each of these stages. These data have contributed to current understanding of the processes that are engaged around the time of episodic memory retrieval, and also illustrate the potential that ERPs have for understanding in detail how memory retrieval processes changes in populations with memory impairments.

  2. Immune memory, immune oblivion: a lesson from Funes the memorious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Yair

    2007-01-01

    We commonly think of the immune system as having a memory. However, memory is always accompanied by a complementary process of oblivion. Is there immune oblivion? In this theoretical paper, I address this question and suggest that oblivion is an integral aspect of memorization. In this context, I suggest that immune memory is an orchestration of reversible and irreversible processes of biological computation through feedback loops. Drawing on the linguistic metaphor, I inquire into the implications of this idea for a better understanding of immune memory and immune deficiency among the elderly.

  3. Sleep enhances false memories depending on general memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2010-04-02

    Memory is subject to dynamic changes, sometimes giving rise to the formation of false memories due to biased processes of consolidation or retrieval. Sleep is known to benefit memory consolidation through an active reorganization of representations whereas acute sleep deprivation impairs retrieval functions. Here, we investigated whether sleep after learning and sleep deprivation at retrieval enhance the generation of false memories in a free recall test. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal", etc.), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black"). Free recall was tested after 9h following a night of sleep, a night of wakefulness (sleep deprivation) or daytime wakefulness. Compared with memory performance after a retention period of daytime wakefulness, both post-learning nocturnal sleep as well as acute sleep deprivation at retrieval significantly enhanced false recall of theme words. However, these effects were only observed in subjects with low general memory performance. These data point to two different ways in which sleep affects false memory generation through semantic generalization: one acts during consolidation on the memory trace per se, presumably by active reorganization of the trace in the post-learning sleep period. The other is related to the recovery function of sleep and affects cognitive control processes of retrieval. Both effects are unmasked when the material is relatively weakly encoded.

  4. Effects of suppressing negative memories on intrusions and autobiographical memory specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraerts, Elke; Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether avoidance of negative memories results in intrusions as well as reduced memory specificity. Healthy participants suppressed memories of either a negative or a neutral autobiographical event. Individuals who suppressed negative memories tended to demonstrate smaller increa

  5. Effects of suppressing negative memories on intrusions and autobiographical memory specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraerts, Elke; Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether avoidance of negative memories results in intrusions as well as reduced memory specificity. Healthy participants suppressed memories of either a negative or a neutral autobiographical event. Individuals who suppressed negative memories tended to demonstrate smaller increa

  6. MITOLOGIAS MIDIÁTICAS DE PELÉ, RONALDINHO GAÚCHO E NEYMAR JR. ANÁLISE SEMIÓTICO-DISCURSIVA DAS HQS DE MAURÍCIO DE SOUSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio de Carvalho Messa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta e discute os perfis de três personagens-títulos das histórias em quadrinhos da Turma da Mônica, de Maurício de Sousa – Pelezinho, Ronaldinho Gaúcho e Neymar Jr., craques do futebol brasileiro – para evidenciar as diferentes formas de representação simbólica do futebol no imaginário midiático. A partir de um trabalho metodológico de monitoramento semiótico-discursivo das edições impressas de fevereiro de 2013 a fevereiro de 2014, selecionaramse algumas passagens para destacar as distintas nuances do conhecimento sobre o futebol veiculado nas narrativas, por meio de determinadas ocorrências sígnicas. São elas: características das personalidades dos heróis (sujeitos históricos e suas bases parafrásticas e paródicas; figuratividades do futebol – presença da bola, aspectos sociais e pedagógicos do desporto, propaganda ideológica, estereótipos e índices morais e políticos subjacentes às narrativas. Com base nessa categorização e nas teorias da linguagem de Roland Barthes e Umberto Eco, identificamos que a revista do Pelezinho, proposta mais antiga do autor, concentra no personagem grande parte do repertório cultural do futebol brasileiro dos anos 70-80, condensando questões de linguagem e comportamento, assim como a disseminação dos saberes sobre o futebol e sua pedagogia, incluindo seus desdobramentos afetivos e sociais. Já as histórias de Ronaldinho Gaúcho e Neymar Jr. têm suas propostas encomendadas a partir de temas recorrentes da agenda midiática nacional dos anos 2000, com um menor comprometimento com os saberes acerca do futebol. Por meio de enredos pouco problematizáveis, as políticas editoriais dessas duas últimas tematizam amenidades do universo infantil, engrenam campanhas ideológicas, que reforçam estereótipos e padrões morais, geralmente extraídos da factualidade  jornalística e/ou da mitologia midiático-esportiva brasileira.

  7. The Agency of Memory Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    2016-01-01

    and international tourists’ photographs and notes, especially their visual encounters with the exhibition, are understood as participatory interactions in the course of memory work. The article’s aim is twofold: introducing an ANT-inspired methodology to the field of memory studies, and mapping a Sowetan memory......This article analyses the multifarious acts of cultural memory taking place in the small, almost hidden, exhibition space of the famous Regina Mundi Church in Soweto, South Africa, home to the photographic exhibition “The Story of Soweto.” Next to the photographs (1950-2010) by well-known apartheid...... of action, examining the idea that objects, such as images, that leave a trace can act as mediators of memory. Starting from visitors’ appropriations of the exhibition space, the essay sheds light on the different life cycles of memory objects, in particular images, and their diverse mediations. Domestic...

  8. Electrophysiological measures of familiarity memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklinger, Axel

    2006-10-01

    Event-related potentials are a valuable tool for the study of human memory function. This selective review provides a brief introduction in models of recognition memory and then describes how ERPs can be used to investigate familiarity memory, an acontextual form of remembering that can be distinguished from the recollection of detailed information of prior events. ERP studies on the mid-frontal old/new effect, the putative electrophysiological correlate of familiarity memory are reviewed. It will be illustrated how familiarity memory is reflected in this effect, how it can electrophysiologically be dissociated from other forms of memory and which brain systems mediate this form of remembering. Recent studies will be reviewed that illustrate that familiarity is not only restricted to single items but can also support the retrieval of associative information.

  9. Is memory for music special?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulkind, Matthew D

    2009-07-01

    Although psychologists since Hermann Ebbinghaus have studied memory, research in this area has focused on visual and verbal stimuli with little attention paid to music. This bias is surprising because of the ubiquity of music in human cultures across history as well as current cultural beliefs that memory for music is "special." This paper examines the question of whether memory for music is special by addressing two related questions: First, do cultural beliefs about the mnemonic power of music stand up to empirical test? Second, can theories designed to explain memory for non-musical stimuli be applied to musical stimuli? A review of the literature suggests that music is special in some circumstances but not others and that some theories designed to explain cognitive processing of linguistic stimuli apply reasonably well to musical stimuli. Thus, although the question of whether memory for music is special remains open, the unique structure of musical stimuli strongly suggests that memory for music is indeed special.

  10. Fault Tolerant External Memory Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Mølhave, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Algorithms dealing with massive data sets are usually designed for I/O-efficiency, often captured by the I/O model by Aggarwal and Vitter. Another aspect of dealing with massive data is how to deal with memory faults, e.g. captured by the adversary based faulty memory RAM by Finocchi and Italiano....... However, current fault tolerant algorithms do not scale beyond the internal memory. In this paper we investigate for the first time the connection between I/O-efficiency in the I/O model and fault tolerance in the faulty memory RAM, and we assume that both memory and disk are unreliable. We show a lower...... bound on the number of I/Os required for any deterministic dictionary that is resilient to memory faults. We design a static and a dynamic deterministic dictionary with optimal query performance as well as an optimal sorting algorithm and an optimal priority queue. Finally, we consider scenarios where...

  11. Dynamic neural systems enable adaptive, flexible memories.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, M.C.W.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Almost all studies on memory formation have implicitly put forward a rather static view on memory. However, memories are not stable but sensitive to changes over time. Here we argue that memory alterations arise from the inherent predictive function of memory. Within this framework, we draw an

  12. Long memory and changing persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Robinson; Sibbertsen, Philipp

    We study the empirical behaviour of semi-parametric log-periodogram estimation for long memory models when the true process exhibits a change in persistence. Simulation results confirm theoretical arguments which suggest that evidence for long memory is likely to be found. A recently proposed test...... by Sibbertsen and Kruse (2009) is shown to exhibit noticeable power to discriminate between long memory and a structural change in autoregressive parameters....

  13. Memory transition between communicating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena FELL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available What happens to a memory when it has been externalised and embodied but has not reached its addressee yet? A letter that has been written but has not been read, a monument before it is unveiled or a Neolithic tool buried in the ground – all these objects harbour human memories engrained in their physicality; messages intended for those who will read the letter, admire the monument and hold the tool. According to Ilyenkov’s theory of objective idealism, the conscious and wilful input encoded in all manmade objects as the ‘ideal’ has an objective existence, independent from the author, but this existence lasts only while memories are shared between communicating parties. If all human minds were absent from the world for a period of time, the ‘ideal’, or memories, would cease to exist. They would spring back to existence, however, once humans re-entered the world. Ilyenkov’s analysis of memories existing outside an individual human consciousness is informative and thorough but, following his line of thought, we would have to accept an ontological gap in the process of memory acquisition, storage and transmission. If there is a period, following memory acquisition and preceding its transmission, when memories plainly do not exist, then each time a new reader, spectator or user perceives them, he or she must create the author’s memories ex nihilo. Bergson’s theory of duration and intuition can help us to resolve this paradox.This paper will explore the ontological characteristics of memory passage in communication taken at different stages of the process. There will be an indication of how the findings of this investigation could be applicable to concrete cases of memory transmission. In particular, this concerns intergenerational communication, technological memory, the use of digital devices and the Internet.

  14. Perception and Memory of Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-20

    altogether. His explanation for the efftct is similar to that proposed by Raijmakers and Shiffrin (1981) in the SAM model of memory : Items from... Atkinson , R. C., & Juola, J. E (1974). Search and decision processes in recognition memory . In D. H. Krantz et al. (Eds.), Contemporary Developments in...Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory , and Cognition, 12, 426-431. Raaijmakers, J. G. W, & Shiffrin , R. M. (1981). Search of

  15. Completely positive maps with memory

    CERN Document Server

    Daffer, S; Cresser, J D; McIver, J K; Daffer, Sonja; Wodkiewicz, Krzysztof; Cresser, James D.; Iver, John K. Mc

    2003-01-01

    The prevailing description for dissipative quantum dynamics is given by the Lindblad form of a Markovian master equation, used under the assumption that memory effects are negligible. However, in certain physical situations, the master equation is essentially of a non-Markovian nature. This paper examines master equations that possess a memory kernel, leading to a replacement of white noise by colored noise. The conditions under which this leads to a completely positive, trace-preserving map are discussed for an exponential memory kernel. A physical model that possesses such an exponential memory kernel is presented. This model contains a classical, fluctuating environment based on random telegraph signal stochastic variables.

  16. Fidelity of a Quantum Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Surmacz, K; Nunn, J; Waldermann, F C; Walmsley, I; Wang, Z

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a figure of merit for a quantum memory which measures the preservation of entanglement between a qubit stored in and retrieved from the memory and an auxiliary qubit. We consider a general quantum memory system consisting of a medium of two level absorbers, with the qubit to be stored encoded in a single photon. We derive an analytic expression for our figure of merit taking into account Gaussian fluctuations in the Hamiltonian parameters, which for example model inhomogeneous broadening and storage time dephasing. Finally we specialize to the case of an atomic quantum memory where fluctuations arise predominantly from Doppler broadening and motional dephasing.

  17. Distributed-memory matrix computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Susanne Mølleskov

    1995-01-01

    in these algorithms is that many scientific applications rely heavily on the performance of the involved dense linear algebra building blocks. Even though we consider the distributed-memory as well as the shared-memory programming paradigm, the major part of the thesis is dedicated to distributed-memory architectures....... We emphasize distributed-memory massively parallel computers - such as the Connection Machines model CM-200 and model CM-5/CM-5E - available to us at UNI-C and at Thinking Machines Corporation. The CM-200 was at the time this project started one of the few existing massively parallel computers...

  18. Memory mechanisms supporting syntactic comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to characterize the memory system that supports sentence comprehension have historically drawn extensively on short-term memory as a source of mechanisms that might apply to sentences. The focus of these efforts has changed significantly in the past decade. As a result of changes in models of short-term working memory (ST-WM) and developments in models of sentence comprehension, the effort to relate entire components of an ST-WM system, such as those in the model developed by Baddeley (Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 829–839, 2003) to sentence comprehension has largely been replaced by an effort to relate more specific mechanisms found in modern models of ST-WM to memory processes that support one aspect of sentence comprehension—the assignment of syntactic structure (parsing) and its use in determining sentence meaning (interpretation) during sentence comprehension. In this article, we present the historical background to recent studies of the memory mechanisms that support parsing and interpretation and review recent research into this relation. We argue that the results of this research do not converge on a set of mechanisms derived from ST-WM that apply to parsing and interpretation. We argue that the memory mechanisms supporting parsing and interpretation have features that characterize another memory system that has been postulated to account for skilled performance—long-term working memory. We propose a model of the relation of different aspects of parsing and interpretation to ST-WM and long-term working memory. PMID:23319178

  19. Gender differences in episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlitz, A; Nilsson, L G; Bäckman, L

    1997-11-01

    The relationship between gender and memory has been largely neglected by research, despite occasional studies reporting gender differences in episodic memory performance. The present study examined potential gender differences in episodic memory, semantic memory, primary memory, and priming. Five hundred thirty women and 470 men, randomly sampled from the city of Umeå, Sweden, 35-80 years of age, participated in the study. There were no differences between men and women with regard to age or education, or on a measure of global intellectual functioning. As has been demonstrated previously, men out performed women on a visuospatial task and women outperformed men on tests of verbal fluency. In addition, the results demonstrated that women consistently performed at a higher level than did men on the episodic memory tasks, although there were no differences between men and women on the tasks assessing semantic memory, primary memory, or priming. The women's higher level of performance on the episodic memory tasks could not be fully explained by their higher verbal ability.

  20. Acute exercise improves motor memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Kasper Christen; Roig, Marc; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that a single bout of acute cardiovascular exercise improves motor skill learning through an optimization of long-term motor memory. Here we expand this previous finding, to explore potential exercise-related biomarkers and their association with measures of motor memory...... practice whereas lactate correlated with better retention 1 hour as well as 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Thus, improvements in motor skill acquisition and retention induced by acute cardiovascular exercise are associated with increased concentrations of biomarkers involved in memory and learning...... processes. More mechanistic studies are required to elucidate the specific role of each biomarker in the formation of motor memory....

  1. Phase behavior and molecular thermodynamics of coacervation in oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant systems: a cationic polymer JR 400 and anionic surfactant SDS mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongcui; Kelkar, Manish S; Wagner, Norman J

    2012-07-17

    Coacervation in mixtures of polyelectrolytes and surfactants with opposite charge is common in nature and is also technologically important to consumer health care products. To understand the complexation behavior of these systems better, we combine multiple experimental techniques to systematically study the polymer/surfactant binding interactions and the phase behavior of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant in cationic JR 400 polymer aqueous solutions. The phase-behavior study resolves a discrepancy in the literature by identifying a metastable phase between the differing redissolution phase boundaries reported in the literature for the surfactant-rich regime. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyzed within the framework of the simple Satake-Yang model identifies binding parameters for the surfactant-lean phase, whereas a calculation for polymer-bound micelles coexisting with free micelles is analyzed in the surfactant-rich redissolution regime. This analysis provides a preliminary understanding of the interactions governing the observed phase behavior. The resulting thermodynamic properties, including binding constants and the molar Gibbs free energies, enthalpies, and entropies, identify the relative importance of both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions and provide a first approximation for the corresponding microstructures in the different phases. Our study also addresses the stability and metastability of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes and surfactant mixtures.

  2. Applied Mathematics in the Humanities: Review of Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences by Sidney Siegel and N. John Castellan, Jr. (2nd ed., 1988

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H. Grawe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sydney Siegel and N. John Castellan, Jr. Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, Second Edition (New York NY: McGraw Hill, 1988. 399 pp. ISBN: 9780070573574. Almost 60 years ago, Sidney Siegel wrote a stellar book helping anyone in academe to use nonparametric statistics, but ironically, 60 years after that achievement, American higher education confesses itself to be in the worst Quantitative Teaching Crisis of all time. The key clue to solving that crisis may be in Siegel and Castellan’s title, Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, which quietly and perhaps unconsciously excludes the Humanities. Yet it is in humanistic realities that students read, write, and think. This book review considers what could be done if the Humanities were made aware of the enormous power of nonparametric statistics for advancing both their disciplines and their students’ ability to think quantitatively. A potentially revolutionary, humanistic, nonparametric finding is considered in detail along with a brief account of tens of humanistic discoveries deriving from Siegel and Castellan’s impetus.

  3. Molecular control of memory in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Hua-Yue; Ye, Bo-Ping; Wang, Da-Yong

    2008-01-01

    Model invertebrate organism Caenorhabditis elegans has become an ideal model to unravel the complex processes of memory. C. elegans has three simple forms of memory: memory for thermosensation, memory for chemosensation, and memory for mechanosensation. In the form of memory for mechanosensation, short-term memory, intermediate-term memory, and long-term memory have been extensively studied. The short-term memory and intermediate-term memory may occur in the presynaptic sensory neurons, where...

  4. Memory, Mind and Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memory, Mind and Language celebrates the 30th anniversary of the The Nordic Association of Linguists (NAL) and the main contribution is the history of those first 30 years. The book is also an overview of trends and basic problems in linguistics in the first decennium of the 21st century. It takes...... up a number of topics in the field, among them the question of synchrony vs. diachrony in the language sciences, and issues of how to investigate the relationship between language, brain and mind. The book proposes some preliminary solutions to that problem, and, most significantly, it touches...

  5. Nanoparticle shuttle memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alex Karlwalter [Kensington, CA

    2012-03-06

    A device for storing data using nanoparticle shuttle memory having a nanotube. The nanotube has a first end and a second end. A first electrode is electrically connected to the first end of the nanotube. A second electrode is electrically connected to the second end of the nanotube. The nanotube has an enclosed nanoparticle shuttle. A switched voltage source is electrically connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby a voltage may be controllably applied across the nanotube. A resistance meter is also connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby the electrical resistance across the nanotube can be determined.

  6. Models of wave memory

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchenko, Serguey

    2015-01-01

    This monograph examines in detail models of neural systems described by delay-differential equations. Each element of the medium (neuron) is an oscillator that generates, in standalone mode, short impulses also known as spikes. The book discusses models of synaptic interaction between neurons, which lead to complex oscillatory modes in the system. In addition, it presents a solution to the problem of choosing the parameters of interaction in order to obtain attractors with predetermined structure. These attractors are represented as images encoded in the form of autowaves (wave memory). The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but it will also be beneficial for graduate students.

  7. Memorial Center - Milwaukee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saarinen, Eero

    1959-12-01

    Full Text Available El Memorial Center de Milwaukee ha sido erigido en la parte más alta de la ciudad, coronando una enorme colina que domina ampliamente el conjunto urbano y un hermoso lago. Su emplazamiento, al final de un puente de grandes dimensiones, exigía que fuese tratado en armonía con éste, habiéndose adoptado por ello el sistema de colocar la edificación reposando sobre una planta totalmente diáfana que deja vista la estructura, cuyos esbeltos soportes dan sensación de monumentalidad.

  8. Memory Code©

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Londoño, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    El proyecto Memory Code© pertenece al ámbito de las cosmopolíticas del arte contemporáneo porque se ocupa de una relación singular de lo humano (mujer) con lo no-humano (caballo y técnicas)5. Específicamente enmarca el estudio del Binomio Ecuestre: caballo-jinete en el marco de una relación afectiva y de adiestramiento (doma clásica). Dicha relación estuvo compuesta por los siguientes operadores : a) Elementos de con-tacto entre jinete-caballo: espuelas, estribus, fustas b) Sistemas rítmicos ...

  9. A memory to remember

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡石柱

    2016-01-01

    "When the dawn comes,tonight will be a memory,too.And a new day will begin."安德鲁·韦伯的经典歌剧《猫》,用艾略特的诗歌改编成这首《Memory》,曾经风华绝代的Grizabella,如今落魄潦倒,她在歌中唱出记忆中往昔的美好,以及对自己坎坷际遇的理解,最终获得登上天堂重生的机会。

  10. Relations between subjective evaluations of memory and objective memory performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, IW; Berg, IJ; Deelman, BG

    2001-01-01

    Several explanations for the weak relations between subjective memory judgments and objective memory performance were investigated in two groups of normal older adults. Group 1 sampled a general population (mean age 61.6 yr., range 46-891, while Group 2 sampled subjects who were on a waiting Est for

  11. Remaking Memories: Reconsolidation Updates Positively Motivated Spatial Memory in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bethany; Bukoski, Elizabeth; Nadel, Lynn; Fellous, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence that reactivation of a memory returns it to a labile state, initiating a restabilization process termed reconsolidation, which allows for updating of the memory. In this study we investigated reactivation-dependent updating using a new positively motivated spatial task in rodents that was designed specifically to model a…

  12. On the Susceptibility of Adaptive Memory to False Memory Illusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Mark L.; Derbish, Mary H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that survival-related processing of word lists enhances retention for that material. However, the claim that survival-related memories are more accurate has only been examined when true recall and recognition of neutral material has been measured. In the current experiments, we examined the adaptive memory superiority…

  13. Memory in Architecture: Contemporary memorial projects and their predecessors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanovic, S.

    2015-01-01

    This research is focused on several case studies, all contemporary architectural projects, dedicated to commemoration of different atrocities. The process of creating a memorial is bound up with a wide range of influences and affects, like any architectural project. However, building a memorial is f

  14. Memory in autistic spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jill; Mayes, Andrew; Bigham, Sally

    2012-05-01

    Behavioral evidence concerning memory in forms of high-functioning autism (HFA) and in moderately low-functioning autism (M-LFA) is reviewed and compared. Findings on M-LFA are sparse. However, it is provisionally concluded that memory profiles in HFA and M-LFA (relative to ability-matched controls) are similar but that declarative memory impairments are more extensive in M-LFA than in HFA. Specifically, both groups have diminished memory for emotion- or person-related stimuli. Regarding memory for nonsocial stimuli, both groups probably have mental-age-appropriate nondeclarative memory, and within declarative memory, both groups have mental-age-appropriate immediate free recall of within-span or supraspan lists of unrelated items, as well as cued recall and paired associate learning. By contrast, recognition is largely unimpaired in HFA but moderately impaired in M-LFA, and free recall of meaningful or structured stimuli is moderately impaired in HFA but more severely impaired in M-LFA. Theoretical explanations of data on declarative memory in HFA identify problems in the integrative processing, or the consolidation and storage, of complex stimuli or a specific problem of recollection. Proposed neural substrates include the following: disconnectivity of primary sensory and association areas; dysfunctions of medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, or posterior parietal lobe; or combinations of these associated with neural disconnectivity. Hypothetically, perirhinal dysfunction might explain the more extensive declarative memory impairments in M-LFA. Foreseeable consequences of uneven memory abilities in HFA and M-LFA are outlined, including possible effects on language and learning in M-LFA. Finally, priorities for future research are identified, highlighting the urgent need for research on memory in lower functioning individuals.

  15. Working and strategic memory deficits in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M.; Gabrieli, J. D.; Stebbins, G. T.; Sullivan, E. V.

    1998-01-01

    Working memory and its contribution to performance on strategic memory tests in schizophrenia were studied. Patients (n = 18) and control participants (n = 15), all men, received tests of immediate memory (forward digit span), working memory (listening, computation, and backward digit span), and long-term strategic (free recall, temporal order, and self-ordered pointing) and nonstrategic (recognition) memory. Schizophrenia patients performed worse on all tests. Education, verbal intelligence, and immediate memory capacity did not account for deficits in working memory in schizophrenia patients. Reduced working memory capacity accounted for group differences in strategic memory but not in recognition memory. Working memory impairment may be central to the profile of impaired cognitive performance in schizophrenia and is consistent with hypothesized frontal lobe dysfunction associated with this disease. Additional medial-temporal dysfunction may account for the recognition memory deficit.

  16. Development scenarios for organizational memory information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Alphonsus B.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Well-managed organizational memories have been emphasized in the recent management literature as important sources for business success. Organizational memory infonnation systems (OMIS) have been conceptualized as a framework for information technologies to support these organizational memories.

  17. Development scenarios for organizational memory information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Alphonsus B.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Well-managed organizational memories have been emphasized in the recent management literature as important sources for business success. Organizational memory infonnation systems (OMIS) have been conceptualized as a framework for information technologies to support these organizational memories. OMI

  18. Multistate Resistive Switching Memory for Synaptic Memory Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti

    2016-07-12

    Reproducible low bias bipolar resistive switching memory in HfZnOx based memristors is reported. The modification of the concentration of oxygen vacancies in the ternary oxide film, which is facilitated by adding ZnO into HfO2, results in improved memory operation by the ternary oxide compared to the single binary oxides. A controlled multistate memory operation is achieved by controlling current compliance and RESET stop voltages. A high DC cyclic stability up to 400 cycles in the multistate memory performance is observed. Conventional synaptic operation in terms of potentiation, depression plasticity, and Ebbinghaus forgetting process are also studied. The memory mechanism is shown to originate from the migration of the oxygen vacancies and modulation of the interfacial layers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  19. An Experimental Analysis of Memory Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Anthony A.

    2007-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys were trained and tested in visual and auditory list-memory tasks with sequences of four travel pictures or four natural/environmental sounds followed by single test items. Acquisitions of the visual list-memory task are presented. Visual recency (last item) memory diminished with retention delay, and primacy (first item) memory strengthened. Capuchin monkeys, pigeons, and humans showed similar visual-memory changes. Rhesus learned an auditory memory task and showed octave gener...

  20. Magnonic Holographic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitun, Alexander; Kozhevnikov, Alexander; Gertz, Frederick; Filimonov, Yuri

    2015-03-01

    Collective oscillation of spins in magnetic lattice known as spin waves (magnons) possess relatively long coherence length at room temperature, which makes it possible to build sub-micrometer scale holographic devices similar to the devices developed in optics. In this work, we present a prototype 2-bit magnonic holographic memory. The memory consists of the double-cross waveguide structure made of Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 with magnets placed on the top of waveguide junctions. Information is encoded in the orientation of the magnets, while the read-out is accomplished by the spin waves generated by the micro-antennas placed on the edges of the waveguides. The interference pattern produced by multiple spin waves makes it possible to build a unique holographic image of the magnetic structure and recognize the state of the each magnet. The development of magnonic holographic devices opens a new horizon for building scalable holographic devices compatible with conventional electronic devices. This work was supported in part by the FAME Center, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA and by the National Science Foundation under the NEB2020 Grant ECCS-1124714.

  1. Morphological associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G X; Sussner, P; Diza-de-Leon, J L

    1998-01-01

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. A nonlinear activation function usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network and set the next state of the neuron. In this paper we introduce a novel class of artificial neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before possible application of a nonlinear activation function. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. The main emphasis of the research presented here is on morphological associative memories. We examine the computing and storage capabilities of morphological associative memories and discuss differences between morphological models and traditional semilinear models such as the Hopfield net.

  2. The memory loophole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    The memory loophole supposes that the measurement of an entangled pair is influenced by the measurements of earlier pairs in the same run of measurements. To assert the memory loophole is thus to deny that measurement is intrinsically random. It is argued that measurement might instead involve a process of recovery and equilibrium in the measuring apparatus akin to that described in thermodynamics by Le Chatelier's principle. The predictions of quantum mechanics would then arise from conservation of the measured property in the combined system of apparatus and measured ensemble. Measurement would be consistent with classical laws of conservation, not simply in the classical limit of large numbers, but whatever the size of the ensemble. However variances from quantum mechanical predictions would be self-correcting and centripetal, rather than Markovian and increasing as under the standard theory. Entanglement correlations would persist, not because the entangled particles act in concert (which would entail nonlocality), but because the measurements of the particles were influenced by the one fluctuating state of imbalance in the process of measurement.

  3. Optical Bidirectional Associative Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosko, Bart; Guest, Clark

    1987-06-01

    Four optical implementations of bidirectional associative memories (BAMs) are presented. BAMs are heteroassociative content addressable memories (CAMs). A BAM stores the m binary associations (A1, B1), ..., (Am, Bm) , where A is a point in the Boolean n-cube and B is a point in the Boolean p-cube. A is a neural network of n bivalent or continuous neurons ai; B is a network of p bivalent or continuous neurons bi. The fixed synaptic connections between the A and B networks are represented by some n-by-p real matrix M. Bidirectionality, forward and backward information flow, in neural nets produces two-way associative search for the nearest stored pair (Ai, Bi) to an input key. Every matrix is a bidirectionally stable hetero-associative CAM for boh bivalent and continuous networks. This generalizes the well-known unidirectional stability for autoassociative networks with square symmetric M. When the BAM neurons are activated, the network quickly evolves to a stable state of two-pattern reverberation, or pseudo-adaptive resonance. The stable reverberation corresponds to a system energy local minimum. Heteroassociative pairs (Ai, Bi) are encoded in a BAM M by summing bipolar correlation matrices, M = X1T Y1 + ... + XmT Ym , where Xi (Yi) is the bipolar version of Ai (Bi), with -1s replacing Os. the BAM storage capacity for reliable recall is roughly m reflection hologram, and a transmission hologram.

  4. Magnetic shape memory fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heczko, Oleg; Straka, Ladislav; Soderberg, Outi; Hannula, Simo-Pekka

    2005-05-01

    Single crystal specimens of having compositions close to Ni2MnGa and exhibiting magnetic shape memory effect (MSME) were tested in a rotating magnetic field at a frequency of 5.7 Hz. The applied magnetic field, about 0.7 T was strong enough to induce the MSME. Test of one specimen was discontinued because of the structural failure of the specimens after 0.5 million cycles. Second specimen was tested up to 37 millions cycles. The evolution of the martensitic morphology and crack propagation were observed by optical microscopy. To characterize the magnetic shape memory behavior the simultaneous measurements of the field-induced strain and magnetization as a function of the magnetic field and external load was used. The full MSM effect, about 6% obtained prior the test, decreased to about 3% during the first million cycles. This value stayed then approximately constant up to 37 millions cycles of rotating magnetic field. The magnetic field needed to initiate the MSME increased. The observed behavior is discussed within the framework of observed martensitic band structure in the specimens and the existence of initial cracks and other obstacles for martensitic twin boundary motion.

  5. Memory of Power Transformed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Maleska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay is focused on the phenomenon of power. Special attention is paid to the past understanding, research and explanation of what power is, and how it has been understood throughout history. Traditionally, power has referred to authority, influence, control. The research of literary works, however, has led me to the realization that the notion of power is understood in different terms in literature in comparison to how it is explained in philosophy and the social sciences. In order to contribute to the broader understanding of power from a literary point of view, this essay examines many questions concerning this phenomenon, such as: how does the past understanding of power determine how it is accepted and interpreted in the present? How are the success of the present efforts and initiatives affected by the memory of power? The essay attempts to show that the memory of the notion of power is not and cannot be fixed and given once and for all. Therefore, the literary examples provided demonstrate how the definitions of power given in the past are transformed and transfigured by present literary works, which show how we may “forget” what we know about this phenomenon, and define it from a new perspective.

  6. Memory Strategies in Writing Melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhivuori, Jukka

    1999-01-01

    Examines knowledge about the structure of memory in order to understand the process of writing melodies. Focuses on a study of 25 students who were asked to write two melodies using a computer. Presents the results and offers an example of the function of memory in writing melodies. (CMK)

  7. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  8. Making Connections with Memory Boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, April

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the use of children's literature within the social studies classroom on the topic of memory boxes. Includes discussions of four books: (1) "The Littlest Angel" (Charles Tazewell); (2) "The Hundred Penny Box" (Sharon Bell Mathis); (3) "Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge" (Mem Fox); and (4) "The Memory Box" (Mary Bahr). (CMK)

  9. The formation of flashbulb memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, M A; Anderson, S J; Larsen, S F; Donnelly, C M; McDaniel, M A; McClelland, A G; Rawles, R E; Logie, R H

    1994-05-01

    A large group of subjects took part in a multinational test-retest study to investigate the formation of flashbulb (FB) memories for learning the news of the resignation of the British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher. Over 86% of the U.K. subjects were found to have FB memories nearly 1 year after the resignation; their memory reports were characterized by spontaneous, accurate, and full recall of event details, including minutiae. In contrast, less than 29% of the non-U.K. subjects had FB memories 1 year later; memory reports in this group were characterized by forgetting, reconstructive errors, and confabulatory responses. A causal analysis of secondary variables showed that the formation of FB memories was primarily associated with the level of importance attached to the event and level of affective response to the news. These findings lend some support to the study by R. Brown and Kulik (1977), who suggest that FB memories may constitute a class of autobiographical memories distinguished by some form of preferential encoding.

  10. Entorhinal cortex and consolidated memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori

    2014-07-01

    The entorhinal cortex is thought to support rapid encoding of new associations by serving as an interface between the hippocampus and neocortical regions. Although the entorhinal-hippocampal interaction is undoubtedly essential for initial memory acquisition, the entorhinal cortex contributes to memory retrieval even after the hippocampus is no longer necessary. This suggests that during memory consolidation additional synaptic reinforcement may take place within the cortical network, which may change the connectivity of entorhinal cortex with cortical regions other than the hippocampus. Here, I outline behavioral and physiological findings which collectively suggest that memory consolidation involves the gradual strengthening of connection between the entorhinal cortex and the medial prefrontal/anterior cingulate cortex (mPFC/ACC), a region that may permanently store the learned association. This newly formed connection allows for close interaction between the entorhinal cortex and the mPFC/ACC, through which the mPFC/ACC gains access to neocortical regions that store the content of memory. Thus, the entorhinal cortex may serve as a gatekeeper of cortical memory network by selectively interacting either with the hippocampus or mPFC/ACC depending on the age of memory. This model provides a new framework for a modification of cortical memory network during systems consolidation, thereby adding a fresh dimension to future studies on its biological mechanism.

  11. Professional Memory and English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpey, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns the way that research into Professional Memory (PM) in English teaching might re-connect the school subject with constituencies--the individuals, communities and social values--it once served. By PM I mean the collective memories of a generation of English teachers which, when brought into conjunction with existing histories,…

  12. Learning and Memory in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses important recent strides in the documentation and understanding of the infant's learning and memory capacity. Focuses on the psychobiology of learning, hedonic mediation of approach-avoidance and learned behavior, infant memory, and critical conditions of infancy and behavioral misadventures. (RJC)

  13. Optimal Foraging in Semantic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Thomas T.; Jones, Michael N.; Todd, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Do humans search in memory using dynamic local-to-global search strategies similar to those that animals use to forage between patches in space? If so, do their dynamic memory search policies correspond to optimal foraging strategies seen for spatial foraging? Results from a number of fields suggest these possibilities, including the shared…

  14. Narratives and Memory in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowlinson, Michael; Casey, Andrea; Hansen, Per H.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations remember through narratives and storytelling. The articles in this Special Issue explore the interface between organization studies, memory studies, and historiography. They focus on the practices for organizational remembering. Taken together, the articles explore the similarities...... and differences between ethnographic and historical methods for studying memory in organizations, which represents a contribution to the historic turn in organization studies....

  15. In Memory of Mlassacre Victims

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    China's first National Memorial Day for Nanjing Massacre Victims was held on December 13, 2o14. Chinese President Xi Jinping and other Communist Party of China and state leaders were present at the ceremony held at the memorial hall for the massacre victims in Nanjing, diangsu Provinee.

  16. Output Interference in Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, Amy H.; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Dennis and Humphreys (2001) proposed that interference in recognition memory arises solely from the prior contexts of the test word: Interference does not arise from memory traces of other words (from events prior to the study list or on the study list, and regardless of similarity to the test item). We evaluate this model using output…

  17. Infant Memory for Musical Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Jenny R.; Loman, Michelle M.; Robertson, Rachel R. W.

    2000-01-01

    Two experiments examined memory of 7-month-olds after 2-week retention interval for passages of two Mozart movements heard daily for 2 weeks. Results suggested that the infants retained familiarized music in long-term memory and that their listening preferences were affected by the extent to which familiar passages were removed from the musical…

  18. Interference and memory capacity limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endress, Ansgar D; Szabó, Szilárd

    2017-10-01

    Working memory (WM) is thought to have a fixed and limited capacity. However, the origins of these capacity limitations are debated, and generally attributed to active, attentional processes. Here, we show that the existence of interference among items in memory mathematically guarantees fixed and limited capacity limits under very general conditions, irrespective of any processing assumptions. Assuming that interference (a) increases with the number of interfering items and (b) brings memory performance to chance levels for large numbers of interfering items, capacity limits are a simple function of the relative influence of memorization and interference. In contrast, we show that time-based memory limitations do not lead to fixed memory capacity limitations that are independent of the timing properties of an experiment. We show that interference can mimic both slot-like and continuous resource-like memory limitations, suggesting that these types of memory performance might not be as different as commonly believed. We speculate that slot-like WM limitations might arise from crowding-like phenomena in memory when participants have to retrieve items. Further, based on earlier research on parallel attention and enumeration, we suggest that crowding-like phenomena might be a common reason for the 3 major cognitive capacity limitations. As suggested by Miller (1956) and Cowan (2001), these capacity limitations might arise because of a common reason, even though they likely rely on distinct processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Characterization of Spatial Memory Reconsolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jaeger, Xavier; Courtey, Julie; Brus, Maïna; Artinian, Julien; Villain, Hélène; Bacquié, Elodie; Roullet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Reconsolidation is necessary for the restabilization of reactivated memory traces. However, experimental parameters have been suggested as boundary conditions for this process. Here we investigated the role of a spatial memory trace's age, strength, and update on the reconsolidation process in mice. We first found that protein synthesis is…

  20. Collaborative inhibition in spatial memory retrieval

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sjolund, Lori A; Erdman, Matthew; Kelly, Jonathan W

    2014-01-01

    .... Two experiments were designed to explore whether collaborative inhibition, which has heretofore been studied using traditional memory stimuli such as word lists, also characterizes spatial memory retrieval...