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Sample records for japan nuclear energy safety organization

  1. Nuclear energy in Japan

    Guillemard, B.

    1978-01-01

    After having described the nuclear partners in Japan, the author analyzes the main aspects of Japan's nuclear energy: nuclear power plants construction program; developping of light water reactors; fuel cycle politics [fr

  2. Japan reforms its nuclear safety

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident deeply questioned the bases of nuclear safety and nuclear safety regulation in Japan. It also resulted in a considerable loss of public confidence in the safety of nuclear power across the world. Although the accident was caused by natural phenomena, institutional and human factors also largely contributed to its devastating consequences, as shown by the Japanese Diet's and Government's investigation reports. 'Both regulators and licensees were held responsible and decided to fully reconsider the existing approaches to nuclear safety. Consequently, the regulatory system underwent extensive reform based on the lessons learned from the accident,' Yoshihiro Nakagome, the President of Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organisation, an ETSON member TSO, explains. (orig.)

  3. The Japan white book about nuclear energy

    1997-01-01

    We find here a partial translation of the white book on nuclear energy published by Japan. In this document are the following themes: the safety of nuclear energy, research and development (JAERI), international cooperation, financing distribution, administrative chart of principal authorities and state agencies, budget for 1996 of nuclear energy and situation of the Japanese nuclear park. (N.C.)

  4. Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control

    Yamane, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Tadakuni

    2003-01-01

    Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control is presented. The standard recommends an enhancement of nuclear criticality safety throughout a life cycle of facility in terms of a concept of 'barriers against criticality'. (author)

  5. Nuclear power supply (Japan Nuclear Safety Institute)

    Kameyama, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    After experienced nuclear disaster occurred on March 11, 2011, role of nuclear power in future energy share in Japan became uncertain because most public seemed to prefer nuclear power phase out to energy security or costs. Whether nuclear power plants were safe shutdown or operational, technologies were requisite for maintaining their equipment by refurbishment, partly replacement or pressure proof function recovery works, all of which were basically performed by welding. Nuclear power plants consisted of tanks, piping and pumps, and considered as giant welded structures welding was mostly used. Reactor pressure vessel subject to high temperature and high pressure was around 200mm thick and made of low-alloy steels (A533B), stainless steels (308, 316) and nickel base alloys (Alloy 600, 690). Kinds of welding at site were mostly shielded-metal arc welding and TIG welding, and sometimes laser welding. Radiation effects on welding of materials were limited although radiation protection was needed for welding works under radiation environment. New welding technologies had been applied after their technical validation by experiments applicable to required regulation standards. Latest developed welding technologies were seal welding to prevent SCC propagation and temper-bead welding for cladding after removal of cracks. Detailed procedures of repair welding of Alloy 600 at the reactor outlet pipe at Oi Nuclear Power Plants unit 3 due to PWSCC were described as an example of crack removal and water jet peening, and then overlay by temper-bead welding using Alloy 600 and clad welding using Alloy 690. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Organic photovoltaic energy in Japan

    2007-01-01

    Japan finances research programs on photovoltaic conversion since 1974. Research in this domain is one of the 11 priorities of NEDO, the agency of means of the ministry of economy, trade and industry of Japan. The search for an abatement of production costs and of an increase of cells efficiency is mentioned in NEDO's programs as soon as the beginning of the 1990's. A road map has been defined which foresees photovoltaic energy production costs equivalent to the ones of thermal conversion by 2030, i.e. 7 yen/kWh (4.4 cents of euro/kWh). The use of new materials in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) or organic solar cells, and of new structures (multi-junctions) is explored to reach this objective. The organic photovoltaic technology is more particularly considered for small generation units in mobile or domestic technologies. Japan is particularly in advance in the improvement of DSSC cells efficiency, in particular in the domain of the research on solid electrolytes. Europe seems more in advance in the domain of the new generation of organic solar cells. Therefore, a complementarity may be found between Japan and French teams in the domain of organic solar cells improvement through collaboration programs. (J.S.)

  7. Inquiry relating to safety due to modification of usage of nuclear fuel material (establishment of waste safety testing facility) in Tokai Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    1979-01-01

    Application was made to the director of the Science and Technology Agency (STA) for the license relating to the modification of usage of nuclear fuel material (the establishment of waste safety testing facility) from the director of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on November 30, 1978. After passing through the safety evaluation in the Nuclear Safety Bureau of STA, inquiry was conducted to the head of the Atomic Energy Safety Commission (AESC) on June 6, 1979, from the director of the STA. The head of AESC directed to conduct the safety examination to the head of the Nuclear Fuel Safety Examination Specialist Committee on June 7, 1979. The content of the modification of usage of nuclear fuel material is the establishment of waste safety testing facility to study and test the safety relating to the treatment and disposal of high level radioactive liquid wastes due to the reprocessing of spent fuel. As for the results of the safety examination, the siting of the waste safety testing facility which is located in the Tokai Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and the test plan of the glass solidification of high level radioactive liquid are presented as the outline of the study plan. The building, main equipments including six cells, the isolation room and the glove box, the storage, and the disposal facilities for gas, liquid and solid wastes are explained as the outline of the facilities. Concerning the items from the viewpoint of safety, aseismatic design, slightly vacuum operation, shielding, decay heat removal, fire protection, explosion protection, criticality management, radiation management and environmental effect were evaluated, and the safety was confirmed. (Nakai, Y.)

  8. Organization and Nuclear Safety: Safety culture

    Martin Marquinez, A.

    1998-01-01

    This book presents the experience in nuclear safety and its influence in the exploitation on nuclear power plants. The safety organization and quality management before and after Chernobylsk and three mile island accidents

  9. IAEA Issues Report on Mission to Review Japan's Nuclear Power Plant Safety Assessment Process

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts has delivered its report on a mission it conducted from 21-31 January 2012 to review Japan's process for assessing nuclear safety at the nation's nuclear power plants. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) officials delivered the IAEA Mission Report to Japanese officials yesterday and made it publicly available today. Following the 11 March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) announced the development of a revised safety assessment process for the nation's nuclear power reactors. At the request of the Government of Japan, the IAEA organized a team of five IAEA and three international nuclear safety experts and visited Japan to review NISA's approach to the Comprehensive Assessments for the Safety of Existing Power Reactor Facilities and how NISA examines the results submitted by nuclear operators. A Preliminary Summary Report was issued on 31 January. 'The mission report provides additional information regarding the team's recommendations and overall finding that NISA's instructions to power plants and its review process for the Comprehensive Safety Assessments are generally consistent with IAEA Safety Standards', said team leader James Lyons, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. National safety assessments and their peer review by the IAEA are a key component of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by the Agency's Member States following last year's nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The IAEA safety review mission held meetings in Tokyo with officials from NISA, the Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES), and the Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO), and the team visited the Ohi Nuclear Power Station to see an example of how Japan's Comprehensive Safety Assessment is being implemented by nuclear operators. In its report delivered today

  10. Japan's regulatory and safety issues regarding nuclear materials transport

    Saito, T.; Yamanaka, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the regulatory and safety issues on nuclear materials transport which the Government of Japan (GOJ) faces and needs to well handle. Background information about the status of nuclear power plants (NPP) and nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) facilities in Japan will promote a better understanding of what this paper addresses

  11. Japan - IAEA joint Nuclear Energy Management School 2016

    Yamaguchi, Mika; Hidaka, Akihide; Ikuta, Yuko; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Sawai, Tomotsugu; Murakami, Kenta; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Tomita, Akira; Toba, Akio; Hirose, Hiroya; Watanabe, Masanori; Kitabata, Takuya; Ueda, Kinichi; Kita, Tomohiko; Namaizawa, Ken; Onose, Takatoshi

    2017-03-01

    Since 2010, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has held the 'Nuclear Energy Management School' so-called 'IAEA-NEM' to develop future leaders who plan and manage nuclear energy utilization in their county. Since 2012, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) together with the Japan Nuclear Human Resource Development Network (JN-HRD Net), the University of Tokyo (UT), the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) and JAIF International Cooperation Center (JICC) have cohosted the NEM school in Japan in cooperation with IAEA. Since then, the school has been held every year, with the school in 2016 marking the fifth. In the 2016 NEM school, Japanese nuclear energy technology and experience, such as lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, were provided by not only lectures by IAEA experts, but also lectures by Japanese experts and leaders in order to offer a unique opportunity for the participants from other countries to learn about particular cases in Japan. Opportunities to visit a variety of nuclear facilities were offered for the participants in the form of technical tours in Fukui and Kobe. Through the school, we contributed to the internationalization of Japanese young nuclear professionals, development of nuclear human resource of other countries including nuclear newcomers, and enhanced cooperative relationship between IAEA and Japan. Additionally, collaborative relationship with JN-HRD Net was strengthened solidly through the integrated cooperation among ministries, universities, manufacturers and research organizations across the county by holding the school in Japan. In this report, findings obtained during the preparatory work and the school period were reported in order to make a valuable contribution towards effectively and efficiently conducting future international nuclear human resource development activities in Japan. (author)

  12. Public acceptance (PA) of nuclear energy in Japan

    Ishii, Makoto

    1994-01-01

    Japan's nuclear development is carried out in the spirit of the Atomic Energy Basic Law that it adopted in 1955. The only nation in the world devastated by nuclear weapons, Japan strongly hopes for the abolishment of nuclear weapons and promotes the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Since Japan is in poor in natural resources nuclear power has now become a major foundation of our society and economy. As far as the Japanese people's awareness of nuclear power generation is concerned, 60% recognize it as necessary although 70% are concerned about its safety. The public acceptance (PA) of nuclear energy is facing a critical juncture at thus point due to such imminent issues as the use of plutonium and the disposal of high-level wastes. The entire Japanese government is currently striving to promote PA measures targeting various population groups. This paper reports on the peaceful use of nuclear energy and Japan's stance on this issue; people's awareness; and the current state of nuclear energy PA measures. 1 fig

  13. IAEA Expert Team Completes Mission to Review Japan's Nuclear Power Plant Safety Assessment Process, 31 January 2012, Tokyo, Japan

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts today completed a review of Japan's two-stage process for assessing nuclear safety at the nation's nuclear power plants. The team began its work on 23 January and delivered a Preliminary Summary Report to Japanese officials today and plans to finish the final report by the end of February. National safety assessments and their peer review by the IAEA are a key component of the IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by the Agency's 152 Member States following last year's nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. At the request of the Government of Japan, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a 10-person team to review the Japanese Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency's (NISA) approach to the Comprehensive Assessments for the Safety of Existing Power Reactor Facilities and how NISA examines the results submitted by nuclear operators. The IAEA safety review mission consisted of five IAEA and three international nuclear safety experts. To help its review, the team held meetings in Tokyo with officials from NISA, the Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety (JNES) Organization, and the Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO), and the team visited the Ohi Nuclear Power Station to see an example of how Japan's Comprehensive Safety Assessment is being implemented by nuclear operators. 'We concluded that NISA's instructions to power plants and its review process for the Comprehensive Safety Assessments are generally consistent with IAEA Safety Standards', said team leader James Lyons, director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. In its Preliminary Summary Report delivered today, the team highlighted a number of good practices and identified some improvements that would enhance the overall effectiveness of the Comprehensive Safety Assessment process. Good practices identified by the mission team include: Based on NISA instructions and commitments of the

  14. The challenges and directions for nuclear energy policy in Japan. Japan's nuclear energy national plan

    Yanase, Tadao

    2007-01-01

    According to the 'framework for nuclear energy policy' (October, 2005 adopted by cabinet), basic goals of nuclear policy are (1) for nuclear energy to continue to meet more than around 30-40% of electricity supply, and also (2) to further promote a fuel cycle steadily aiming at commercial introduction of a fast breeder by 2050. In order to realize an aim of this framework for nuclear energy policy', the nuclear energy subcommittee of the METI advisory committee deliberated concrete actions and the subcommittee recommendations were drawn up as 'Japan's nuclear energy national plan' in August, 2006 and incorporated as main part of the revised 'basic plan on energy' adopted by the cabinet in March 2007. Backgrounds and directions of future actions for nuclear energy policy were described. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Energy problems and nuclear power in Japan

    Shirasawa, T.

    1980-01-01

    International petroleum situation maintains the balance between demand and supply for the time being, but hereafter, it seems to be more serious and uncertain. Japanese economy tided over the first oil crisis with difficulty, and moreover, responded to the second oil crisis after the Iranian revolution somehow or other. But oil price has continued to rise, and the acceleration of inflation, the serious depression of businesses and electric power crisis are feared. In Japan where the dependence on imported petroleum is as high as 75%, it is necessary to establish the long term energy policy making energy saving and the development of substitute energy as its mainstay. In August, 1979, the report concerning the interim prospect of long term energy demand and supply was made. Largest efforts will be exerted to reduce the oil import. Then the total demand of energy in 1985 will be 582 million kl calculated in terms of petroleum. The law concerning energy saving was enacted in June, 1979. As the substitute energy, imported coal, LNG and nuclear power generation should be adopted. However, in order to put these energies in practical use, many problems to be solved remain. 21 nuclear power plants of 14.9 million kW capacity are in operation, and provide with 12% of total power generation installations. 30 million kW of nuclear power generation will be attained by 1985. (Kako, I.)

  16. Report of evaluation of organization. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute

    2004-08-01

    Various activities of JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) from December in 2003 to July in 2004 are evaluated on management, practice and progressing of development of research by the committee on organization evaluation. The report includes abstract, purpose of evaluation, evaluation items, deliberation process, total results of evaluation, development of projects, the spread of results, international cooperation, management system, effort to safety, responsibility of explanation, live together with community and other suggestions. Main projects consists of practice of FBR, development of uranium enrichment, nuclear fuel reprocessing and MOX fuel processing technology, reopening of MONJU, development of high-level radioactive waste and environmental protection policy. (S.Y.)

  17. The disappointments for nuclear energy in Japan

    2004-01-01

    Several dysfunctions are reported in this paper: A reactor (Onagawa) closed after a nitrogen leakage; a small leakage of radioactive water in the nuclear power plant of Mihama assessment raised to five deaths, the operator stops its nuclear power plants for inspection, the Japan face to its ageing nuclear power plants, the truth about the cost of M.O.X., the seven reactors of Japan closed for inspection after cracks and leaks hidden to authorities, Tokai MURA accident. (N.C.)

  18. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da, E-mail: jrausch@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rfonseca@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da

    2011-01-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  20. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da, E-mail: jrausch@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rfonseca@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  1. Statement on Nuclear Safety and Future Development, 7 October 2012, Kyoto, Japan

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    When I addressed the 2011 STS Forum a year ago, Japan was still dealing with the immediate aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Now, we are well into the post-accident phase. The emphasis for the IAEA and its 155 Member States is on implementing the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was adopted just over a year ago. Progress has been made in many areas. Possible safety weak points at nuclear power plants have been identified and are being addressed. These include issues such as ensuring adequate backup electrical power in case of a blackout. The IAEA has expanded its programme of expert peer reviews. We undertook a systematic review of IAEA Safety Standards, taking into account lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. And we held a series of international expert meetings focussing on different technical issues. A lot has been done already, but a considerable amount of work still remains to be done under the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. It is essential that all of us - Member States, the IAEA and other key stakeholders - maintain our sense of urgency and our commitment to implementing the Action Plan in full. In December, the Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety, organized by the Government of Japan and the IAEA, will take place in Fukushima Prefecture. This Conference will be a good opportunity for participants from abroad to learn first-hand lessons from the accident. For Japan, it will be an excellent opportunity to understand how other countries are reacting to the accident. For the IAEA, it will be an occasion to redouble our efforts to help people in Fukushima. A year ago, I told the STS Forum that nuclear power looked set to remain an important option for many countries, despite the Fukushima Daiichi accident. This trend has become even clearer during the past year. The latest IAEA projection is for global nuclear power capacity to grow by nearly 25 percent from current levels to 456 gigawatts by 2030. That is

  2. Nuclear energy national plan. The directions for nuclear energy policy in Japan

    2006-11-01

    Nuclear energy is a key attaining an integrated solution for energy security and global warming issues. Under the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy Japan aims to (1) maintain the 30 to 40% or more share of nuclear energy on electricity generation up to 2030 and afterwards, (2) promote the nuclear fuel cycle and (3) commercialize the fast-breeder reactors. As for policies to realize the basic targets, the 'Nuclear Energy National Plan' was compiled in August 2006 as follows: (1) Investment to construct new nuclear power plants and replace existing reactors in an era of electric power liberalization, 2) Appropriate use of existing nuclear power plants with assuring safety as a key prerequisite, (3) Steady advancement of the nuclear fuel cycle and strategic reinforcement of nuclear fuel cycle industries, (4) Strategy to secure uranium supplied, (5) Early commercialization of the fast breeder reactor cycle, (6) Achieving and developing advanced, technologies, industries and personnel, (7) Assisting the Japanese nuclear industry in promoting the international development, (8) Involved in and/or creating international frameworks to uphold both nonproliferation and expansion of nuclear power generation, (9) Fostering trust between the sates and communities where plants are located by making public hearings and public relations highly detailed and (10) Steady promotion of measures for disposal of radioactive wastes. Implementation policies were presented in details in this book with relevant data and documents. (T. Tanaka)

  3. Report on the specialists' meeting on passive and active safety features of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors organized by the international atomic energy agency at Oarai Engineering Centre of power reactor and nuclear development corporation, Japan, November 5-7, 1991

    Paranjpe, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    As recommended by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR), the International Atomic Energy Agency organized a specialists' meeting on passive and active safety features of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors. Specialists from all member countries of IWGFR-China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States-participated in the meeting and made presentations as listed in Table 1. The Commission of European Communities also sent representatives to the meeting. Table 2 contains a list of participants. The meeting consisted of five sessions: (1) an overview, (2) safety characteristics of decay heal removal systems, (3) safely characteristics of reactor protection systems and reactor shutdown systems, (4) safely characteristics of reactor cores, and (5) general discussions antiformulation of recommendations

  4. Supplement report to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook of Japan

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Komuro, Yuichi; Nakajima, Ken

    1995-10-01

    Supplementing works to 'The Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook' of Japan have been continued since 1988, the year the handbook edited by the Science and Technology Agency first appeared. This report publishes the fruits obtained in the supplementing works. Substantial improvements are made in the chapters of 'Modelling the evaluation object' and 'Methodology for analytical safety assessment', and newly added are chapters of 'Criticality safety of chemical processes', 'Criticality accidents and their evaluation methods' and 'Basic principles on design and installation of criticality alarm system'. (author)

  5. Overview of Nuclear Fuel-Cycle Policy and the Role of the Nuclear Safety Commission in Japan

    Higashi, K.; Nishinosono, S.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first generation of electricity by the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor in 1963, Japan has been extensively developing nuclear technologies solely for peaceful purposes. The country now operates 55 nuclear power plants consisted of BWRs and PWRs. Although Japan is one of the largest consumers of energy in the world, the country has very limited domestic energy resources. Therefore, Japan considers the nuclear power generation very important as plutonium and uranium recovered from spent fuels can be used in new nuclear fuels as quasi-domestic energy resource. For recycle use of nuclear fuels, the establishment of nuclear fuel recycling technologies including reprocessing technologies is essential. Since 1977, Japan has been recovering plutonium and uranium by a small scale reprocessing plant built by French technology. Recently, 800 ton/year scale commercial reprocessing plant is under construction. After overcoming the current technical problem in the vitrification facility, the commercial plant is expected to be in full operation soon. Concerning the disposal of radioactive wastes, which arises from nuclear utilization, sallow land disposal has already been implemented and medium depth (50 to 100 m) disposal plan is in progress. For high-level waste, possible candidate sites for disposal are being sought. In this paper, the statuses of nuclear power plants and of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Japan are summarized. As safety is essential for these nuclear installations, safety regulations in Japan are briefly presented from the viewpoint of Nuclear Safety Commission. Furthermore, as the most significant recent safety issue in Japan, the impacts of the large near-site earthquake hit Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP last July are reported.(author)

  6. OECD/NEA International Conference on Global Nuclear Safety Enhancement Organised in co-operation with the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) of Japan On the Occasion of the 50. Anniversary of Japan Joining the OECD

    Tanaka, Shunichi; Oshima, Kenzo; Fuketa, Toyoshi; Echavarri, Luis E.; ); Ostendorff, William C.; Viktorovich Ferapontov, Alexey; Lachaume, Jean-Luc; Yoo, Guk Hee; Lyons, James E.; ); Weightman, Mike; ); Gurria, Angel; ); Ishihara, Hirotaka

    2014-04-01

    On 8 April 2014 in Tokyo, Japan, an international conference on enhancing global nuclear safety was held by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development(OECD), in co-operation with the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) of Japan. This document brings together the 12 presentations (slides) given at this conference organized in 3 sessions: 1 - Opening Session: Opening Remarks (S. Tanaka); Statement by L.E. Echavarri; Session 1 - Global Safety Enhancements: USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident (W.C. Ostendorff); Synergy of National and International Regulatory Efforts to Enhance Global Nuclear Safety (A. Viktorovich Ferapontov); Global Safety Enhancements, The French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN)'s position (J.L. Lachaume); Nuclear Safety and Security Commission builds up safety and security (G.H. Yoo); Session 2 - Learning from Experience to Improve Safety: Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident and Responses in New Regulatory Requirements (T. Fuketa); NEA Activities to Enhance the Nuclear Regulatory Framework (L.E. Echavarri); Learning from Experience to Improve Safety - its importance, its mechanisms and its challenges (J.E. Lyons); Learning from Experience to Improve Nuclear Safety - A Perspective from the UK (M. Weightman); Conclusions and Closing Remarks (A. Gurria, H. Ishihara)

  7. Investigation of nuclear energy policy in the democratic party of Japan (DPJ) administration

    Inoue, Wataru; Amano, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    This feature consisted of three articles on whereabouts of nuclear energy policy in the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) coalition administration based on editor's interview activities. Summary is as follows. The DPJ changed the stance to nuclear power substantially in May 2007, when switched from considering it as 'transitional energy' to viewing it as 'a major power source to be steadily promoted'. With putting top priority on ensuring safety, and improving transparency and providing accountability, nuclear power would win the trust of the nation. The DPJ also wanted the Japanese nuclear industry to grow and become a successful export industry. As for the new creation of a 'Nuclear Safety Regulation Commission', more wide and open discussion would be necessary for regulatory reform so that nuclear promotion organizations could be separated from regulatory organizations in order to increase confidence among people nationwide. The DPJ has come out with a target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 25% from 1990 levels by the year 2020. High priority would be given to the improvement of capacity factors at nuclear power plants and then it would be achieved using all possible measures, including energy conservation and the development of new energies. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Future of energy and nuclear energy in Japan

    Kaya, Yoichi

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the Government of Japan announced macroflame of GDP growth rate, crude oil cost, population, economic actions and demand of energy from the present to 2030. On the view point of decrease of population, economy is not affected by it and labor shortage will be supplied by advanced technologies. Accordingly, many economists expect increase of GNP and economy. However, energy demand will increase until 2020 and then decrease. Four new atomic power plants to be building will operate until 2010 and six plants will be constructed until 2030. Discharge of CO 2 will increase until 2020 and then decrease depends on energy demand. The outlook of nuclear energy contains two important assumptions, 85% of rate of operation and 60 year of operation time. The fuel cycle is very important in the world. (S.Y.)

  9. Japan`s international cooperation programs on seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    Sanada, Akira [Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    MITI is promoting many international cooperation programs on nuclear safety area. The seismic safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is a one of most important cooperation areas. Experts from MITI and related organization join the multilateral cooperation programs carried out by international organization such as IAEA, OECD/NEA etc. MITI is also promoting bilateral cooperation programs such as information exchange meetings, training programs and seminars on nuclear safety with several countries. Concerning to the cooperation programs on seismic safety of NPPs such as information exchange and training, MITI shall continue and expand these programs. (J.P.N.)

  10. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics.

  11. Nuclear energy and international organizations

    Lindemann, B.

    1975-01-01

    The historical perspectives of the international organizations' role concerning the development and spreading of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, taking into account the national interests within and towards these organizations, are portrayed. The difference in political status between the so-called nuclear and non-nuclear States, lodged in Articles I and II of the Non-Proliferation Treaty is an important factor. The effects so far of these differences in status on the interest of nuclear States to participate in organizations and on factors which might possibly lead to conflict between these two groups are presented. The author skirts the cooperation between organizations (international bureaucracies, group-formation of states). (HP/LN) [de

  12. Change of nuclear administrative system and long-term program for nuclear energy in Japan

    Yun, S. W.; Yang, M. H.; Jeong, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    Japanese new governmental adminstrative system was restructured and became in operation from January 1, 2001 including newly establishment of the Ministry of Cabinet. Accordingly, Japanese nuclear administrative system were also changed significantly, in order to reflect the changing policy environment and response to them more efficiently in the use and development of nuclear energy. Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Safety Commission administrated by Science and Technology Agency in the past, were moved to the Ministry of Cabinet, and Integrated Science and Technology Council was also newly established under the Ministry of Cabinet. And Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry(METI) is in charge of nuclear energy policy and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology(MEXT) is in charge of nuclear academic science consequently. At the same time, the revision work of 'Long-term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear of Japan' established in 1994, has been carried out from 1999 in order to set up the long term based national nuclear policy towards the 21st century, and finally the results were open to the public in November 2000. Major changes of nuclear policy of Japan the will be good references in the establishing future national nuclear policy for the use and development of nuclear energy

  13. Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Agency and strategy for nuclear non-proliferation studies

    Senzaki, Masao; Kurasaki, Takaaki; Inoue, Naoko

    2005-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established on October 1, 2005, after the merger of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. JAEA is the only governmental nuclear research and development institute in Japan. It will engage in research activities ranging from basic research to practical applications in the nuclear field and will operate research laboratories, reactors, a reprocessing plant and a fuel fabrication plant. At the same time, the Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center (NPSTC) was also established inside of JAEA to conduct the studies on the strategy for nuclear nonproliferation studies. Five roles that JAEA should play for nuclear nonproliferation were identified and four offices were established in the center to carry out those five roles effectively. To conduct the research and development for nuclear nonproliferation efficiently, the center aims to be a 'Research Hub' based on Partnership' with other organizations. (author)

  14. Japan: Sendai, first reactor to restart. Sendai restart: how does it work? Japan: restart will be 'progressive'. 2015: which role for nuclear energy in Japan?

    Le Ngoc, Boris; Jouette, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    A set of articles addresses the restart of nuclear plants in Japan. The first one presents the Sendai nuclear plant, evokes the commitment of the Japanese nuclear safety authority (the NRA) at each step of the restart process, the agreement of local populations, the loading of the nuclear fuel, a successful crisis exercise, and the benefits expected from this restart. The second article addresses the restart process with its administrative aspects, the implication of local authorities, its technical aspects, and investments made to improve nuclear safety. The third article proposes an interview of the nuclear expert of the French embassy in Tokyo. He outlines that the restart of nuclear plants will be progressive, comments how Sendai restart has been commented in the Japanese press, evokes how this restart is part of the Japanese Prime Minister's policy, evokes the role and challenges of nuclear energy in Japan for the years to come, and the role France may play. The last article discusses the role of nuclear energy in Japan in 2015: importance of the old 3E policy (Energy, Environment, Economy) which is put into question again by the Fukushima accident, creation of a new nuclear safety authority as a first step before restarting nuclear reactors

  15. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period

  16. Present situation of Japan's public acceptance of nuclear energy - JAERO's activities

    Akama, Kozo

    1993-01-01

    Electricity demand in Japan is expected to keep increasing without doubt, reflecting her constant economic growth and the rising living standard of the people. The target figure is 20.5% or a capacity of 52 million kW, and 11 nuclear power plants with a capacity of 12 million kW are under construction. Whether such a target is achievable depends on whether or not information activities will succeed in obtaining public consensus to the siting of the new nuclear power plants. According to the result of public opinion poll by the Science and Technology Agency in 1992, 73 % people recognize the necessity of nuclear energy, however, 10% feel uneasy as well. It seems that the scale of damage caused by severe accidents and the distrust against nuclear promoters are major factors to create uneasiness among the people. This presentation describes public information activities by JAERO, the Japan Atomic Energy Relations Organization (JAERO), a non-profit organization established in 1969. There is no secret strategy or specific remedy to obtain public consensus on the nuclear issues, and an immediate effect is in no way expected, either. It is all the more imperative to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants, pursue further the operational safety, and to gain the trust from the general public. We must investigate more effective means for public information activities to gain public consent, and implement them positively and continuously with beliefs. We are prepared to do so. Activities for public acceptance of nuclear energy may vary in line with the situation in each country. It is therefore very meaningful to have the experts' gatherings like this workshop to exchange, views on the public acceptance

  17. A Study on consensus development through stake holder engagement for the use of nuclear energy in Japan

    Aoyama, Yoshiko; Sawada, Tetsuo; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    In order to alleviate the distrust surrounding the use of nuclear energy and operation of nuclear facilities, as well as to foster trust and find better ways to live in harmony with society, it is essential for the state and electric power utilities not to provide one-sided information, but to formulate adequate bilateral communication and dialogue with stake holders. In this study, we conducted a case study focused on four stake holder meetings with a view to ensuring safety in the use of nuclear energy and operation of nuclear facilities in Japan; the 'Community Meeting for Securing the Transparency of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station (Chiiki-no-kai)'; the 'Monitoring and Evaluation Conference on Environmental Radiation', established by communities where nuclear facilities are installed; the 'Round-Table Conference on Nuclear Power Policy' and the 'Conference for Public Participation and Decision Making for Nuclear Energy Policy' organized by Japan Atomic Energy Commission. As a consequence, it has been observed that in each case varying opinions were summarized through stake holder meetings, but the fact that no system exists to reflect these opinions in design of the nuclear energy policy has emerged as a controversial point. This study suggests future efforts in regard to the requirements in Japan for stake holder meetings that are necessary for fostering trust and mutual understanding among stake holders including the state and local government, electric power utilities and local residents. (author)

  18. Japan's regulatory and safety issues regarding nuclear materials transport

    Saito, T. [Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Government of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Yamanaka, T. [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Government of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    This paper focuses on the regulatory and safety issues on nuclear materials transport which the Government of Japan (GOJ) faces and needs to well handle. Background information about the status of nuclear power plants (NPP) and nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) facilities in Japan will promote a better understanding of what this paper addresses.

  19. Role of nuclear power in energy policy of Japan

    Ikuta, Toyoaki

    1984-01-01

    About 62 % of the energy supply in Japan depends on petroleum, and about 65 % of oil import comes from Persian Gulf. It is very important to ensure the supply of oil for the energy policy of Japan. For the purpose, the conversation between oil producing countries and oil consuming countries is necessary, but all the conversation carried out so far failed. The oil consumption in the world continued to decline, and the situation of oil market changed. The future situation of oil market largely depends on the development of substitute energy resources for oil. In order to ensure the supply of oil, the buyer's market must continue, therefore, effort must be continued to expand substitute energy and to promote energy saving. As the energy policy hereafter, various energy resources should be most effectively used in combination. In this compound energy age, the importance of nuclear power increases. The stable supply and economical efficiency of energy must be taken in consideration with the same weight. The only method to reduce the dependence on import is nuclear power, and this feature should be evaluated high. Nuclear power generation must be expanded hereafter. (Kako, I.)

  20. Development and application of nuclear safety goals in Japan. Lessons learnt from the case of 2003 draft safety goals

    Sugawara, Shin-etsu; Inamura, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission in Japan offered a detailed draft of nuclear safety goals to the public in 2003, though its position was ambiguous in nuclear safety regulation. This report shows the circumstances behind the development and application of 2003 draft safety goals based on our interviews with the experts who had been involved in making the draft. According to our interviews, they had intention to utilize safety goals for improving risk management of regulatory authority and nuclear energy industry, such as ameliorating deterministic regulations, accumulating experience of risk assessment and management, promoting related research, and communicating risks with general public. In practice, however, safety goals had functioned as a tool for emphasizing an assertion that 'nuclear power plants had already been safe enough'. We identified the following four major impediments to utilizing safety goals; 1) lack of sharing overall recognition of the importance of establishing safety goals among nuclear community, 2) excessive emphasis of internal event risks which leads to an inferior priority to tackle with the issue of external events risks, 3) adverse effect of 'tunnel-visioned incrementalism', that is, nuclear energy industrial entities are attracted their foci too much on what they have been told to do by regulators or local governments, and, 4) negative attitude to disclose the outcomes of risk assessment for fear of societal reactions. To encourage upcoming safety goals and risk management, this report provides the following points for overcoming these problems; 1) sharing insights on the reasons why nuclear community set up safety goals, 2) introducing the concept of adaptive risk management for maintaining questioning attitude, 3) conducting a periodic review of goal attainment level and also safety goals themselves from the eyes of a detached observer, and, 4) rebuilding relationship with society beginning with arguments with local stakeholders over

  1. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    2001-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  2. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  3. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  4. Nuclear power development in Japan

    Sugawara, A.

    1994-01-01

    The energy situation in Japan is briefly outlined. Vulnerability in energy structure of the country is shown by a comparison of primary energy supply patterns of Japan and Western countries. Japan's energy policy consists in reducing dependence on oil, promoting efficient use of energy and increasing use of non-fossil fuels. Nuclear power is a core of alternative energy for petroleum because of stable supply of nuclear fuel, low detrimental emissions and less dependence on the fuel. A short historical review of nuclear power development in Japan is presented. Some future issues as development of entire nuclear fuel cycle, social acceptance, reactor safety and nuclear power economics are also discussed. 6 figs. (R.T.)

  5. Nuclear energy and its public acceptance in Japan

    Matsui, A.

    1981-01-01

    Heavily dependent on imported oil, Japan with a nuclear park of 22 working power plants meets with public opposition for its nuclear program extension. Consequently, the foreseen 53.000 MWe installed nuclear capacity will be reduced to some 30.000 MWe for the beginning of the nineties. The paper analyses the different varieties of factors clogging the development of nuclear energy such as social, psychological and economic aspects and describes the information campaigns of concerned milieus in order to deal with this situation and comments the final results of these actions. Two concrete examples of confrontation of the public with the authorities on the approval of new nuclear power plant projects are presented. (AF)

  6. A lead for transvaluation of global nuclear energy research and funded projects in Japan

    Kiriyama, Eriko; Kajikawa, Yuya; Fujita, Katsuhide; Iwata, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Chernobyl accident had limited influence on basic research in nuclear energy. • Budget allocation to R and D and number of published papers have recently decreased. • Citation network analysis revealed reactor safety and fusion as current research trend. • Nuclear energy research policy will change after Fukushima disaster. - Abstract: The decision-making process that precedes the introduction of a new energy system should strive for a balance among human security, environmental safeguards, energy security, proliferation risk, economic risks, etc. For nuclear energy, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (Fukushima disaster) has brought forth a strong need for transvaluation of the present technology. Here, we analyzed bibliographic records of publications in nuclear science and technology to illustrate an overview and trends in nuclear energy technology and related fields by using citation network analysis. We also analyzed funding data and keywords assigned for each project by co-occurrence network analysis. This research integrates citation network analysis and bibliometric keyword analysis to compare the global trends in nuclear energy research and characteristics of research conducted at universities and institutes in Japan. We show that the Chernobyl accident had only a limited influence on basic research. The results of papers are dispersed in diverse areas of nuclear energy technology research, and the results of KAKEN projects in Japan are highly influenced by national energy policy with a focus on nuclear fuel cycle for energy security, although KAKEN allows much freedom in the selection of research projects to academic community

  7. International and national organizations within nuclear energy

    Sandstroem, S.

    1975-03-01

    A survey is given of the organization, objective and action of international and national organizations working with nuclear energy. Five types of organizations are treated: international governmental organizations, international non-governmental organizations, international organizations dealing with ionizing radiation, nordic organizations, and Swedish organizations. Special attention is payed to the Swedish participation in the different organizations. (K.K)

  8. Communication dated 1 June 2011 from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency regarding an International Conference on Nuclear Safety

    2011-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 1 June 2011 from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency concerning Japan's intention to organize an international conference, during the latter half of 2012, on nuclear safety in cooperation with the IAEA. As requested by the Resident Representative of Japan, the letter is circulated herewith for information of all Member States [es

  9. Communication dated 1 June 2011 from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency regarding an International Conference on Nuclear Safety

    2011-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 1 June 2011 from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency concerning Japan's intention to organize an international conference, during the latter half of 2012, on nuclear safety in cooperation with the IAEA. As requested by the Resident Representative of Japan, the letter is circulated herewith for information of all Member States [fr

  10. Consensus standards utilized and implemented for nuclear criticality safety in Japan

    Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1996-01-01

    The fundamental framework for the criticality safety of nuclear fuel facilities regulations is, in many advanced countries, generally formulated so that technical standards or handbook data are utilized to support the licensing safety review and to implement its guidelines. In Japan also, adequacy of the safety design of nuclear fuel facilities is checked and reviewed on the basis of licensing safety review guides. These guides are, first, open-quotes The Basic Guides for Licensing Safety Review of Nuclear Fuel Facilities,close quotes and as its subsidiaries, open-quotes The Uranium Fuel Fabrication Facility Licensing Safety Review Guidesclose quotes and open-quotes The Reprocessing Facility Licensing Safety Review Guides.close quotes The open-quotes Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook close-quote of Japan and the Technical Data Collection are published and utilized to supply related data and information for the licensing safety review, such as for the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. The well-established technical standards and data abroad such as those by the American Nuclear Society and the American National Standards Institute are also utilized to complement the standards in Japan. The basic principles of criticality safety control for nuclear fuel facilities in Japan are duly stipulated in the aforementioned basic guides as follows: 1. Guide 10: Criticality control for a single unit; 2. Guide 11: Criticality control for multiple units; 3. Guide 12: Consideration for a criticality accident

  11. Religious organizations debate nuclear energy

    Dowell, T.

    1984-08-01

    This paper reviews the history of the religious debate on nuclear energy over the last thirty years. In the 1950s, religious statements recognized the peaceful uses of atomic energy as a blessing from God and called upon world leaders to promote its use. Nuclear energy programmes were launched in this decade. In the 1960s, there was still religious approval of nuclear energy, but questions about ethics arose. It was not until the 1970s, after the oil crisis, that serious questioning and criticism of nuclear energy emerged. This was particularly true in the United States, where the majority of statements originated - especially in 1979, the year of the Three Mile Island accident. Around this time, the World Council of Churches developed the concept of the just, participatory and sustainable society. The meaning and use of these terms in the nuclear energy debate is examined. This paper also compares the balanced debate of the World Council with the case against the plutonium economy prepared by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Three religious statements from the 1980s are examined. A United Church of Canada resolution, critical of nuclear energy, is compared with a favourable report from the Methodist Church in England. Both use similar values: in one case, justice, participation and sustainability; in the other case, concern for others, participation and stewardship. There are not many Catholic statements on nuclear energy. One which is cautious and favourable is examined in detail. It is concluded that the use of concepts of justice, participation and sustainability (or their equivalents) has not clarified the nuclear debate

  12. Statement at Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety, 15 December 2012, Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    When disaster struck at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011, the IAEA offered immediate assistance to the Plant operators and the Japanese authorities as they tried to regain control over the reactors. We began sharing verified information about the accident with the world and helped to channel international assistance to Japan. A high priority was to do everything we could to help ensure the safety of the people of Japan, especially those in Fukushima Prefecture who were most affected by the crisis. I went to Japan a few days after the accident to meet then Prime Minister Kan. I assured him that Japan could count on the support of the entire international community and stressed the need for full transparency. I sent a number of expert teams to assist in areas such as radiological monitoring, food safety, and analysis of the situation at the Fukushima Daiichi Plant. Four IAEA teams undertook measurements in the Fukushima region, both inside and outside the 20 km evacuation zone. An expert on marine monitoring programmes from the IAEA Environmental Laboratories helped to monitor seawater. Joint teams from the IAEA and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization advised local authorities on technical issues related to food safety and agricultural countermeasures. Some important environmental readings at key points in the unfolding crisis were taken by IAEA experts. Our presence helped to provide reassurance to the people of Japan at a very critical time. It is now one year and nine months since the accident. In that time, we have continued to work closely with Japan. Today, I will sign an important document with Governor Sato of Fukushima Prefecture on our cooperation in the coming years. The IAEA will work closely with the Prefecture in radiation monitoring and decontamination. We will also implement human health projects with Fukushima Medical University.

  13. To promote public acceptance of nuclear energy by WiN-JAPAN

    Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kobayashi, Yoko; Ogawa, Junko

    2011-01-01

    Women in Nuclear Japan (WiN-J) has been striving to promote activities that increase public acceptance of nuclear energy especially by women. According to a public opinion poll in 2009 by the Cabient Office, Government of Japan, the ratio of men who have confidence in nuclear power plant safety was 52.1%, while the ratio of females was only 32.5%. And the ratio of negative feeling about nuclear power among males was 45.8%, while the ratio of females was 61.2%. This indicates the necessity of communication to females to encourage them to accept nuclear power. WiN-J developed two methods of communication with the public and young people about the benefits of nuclear energy and the applications of radiation in many aspects of the life. The first is town hall meetings, and the other is education for university students in the style of a Science Cafe. Surprisingly, present university student never studied about nuclear energy when they were elementary or junior high school students. However, those students will have to educate their own children to use energy wisely in consideration of the limited energy resources in the coming years. WiN-J, therefore, gives them some relevant lectures on nuclear energy and radiation. Also WiN-J can be the models for female university students who have issues such as marriage, pregnancy, promotions, and transfers which can be discussed. We have to increase the numbers of female nuclear engineers to promote public trust in the safety of nuclear power plants. For this purpose, WiN-J encourages female university students to enter the nuclear industry. We recognize that to gain people's understanding of and trust in nuclear energy may take a long time. WiN-J will continue to fulfill our challenging mission for the peaceful use of nuclear energy. (author)

  14. Organic photovoltaic energy in Japan; Le photovoltaique organique au Japon

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Japan finances research programs on photovoltaic conversion since 1974. Research in this domain is one of the 11 priorities of NEDO, the agency of means of the ministry of economy, trade and industry of Japan. The search for an abatement of production costs and of an increase of cells efficiency is mentioned in NEDO's programs as soon as the beginning of the 1990's. A road map has been defined which foresees photovoltaic energy production costs equivalent to the ones of thermal conversion by 2030, i.e. 7 yen/kWh (4.4 cents of euro/kWh). The use of new materials in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) or organic solar cells, and of new structures (multi-junctions) is explored to reach this objective. The organic photovoltaic technology is more particularly considered for small generation units in mobile or domestic technologies. Japan is particularly in advance in the improvement of DSSC cells efficiency, in particular in the domain of the research on solid electrolytes. Europe seems more in advance in the domain of the new generation of organic solar cells. Therefore, a complementarity may be found between Japan and French teams in the domain of organic solar cells improvement through collaboration programs. (J.S.)

  15. Organization and safety in nuclear power plants

    Marcus, A.A.; Nichols, M.L.; Bromiley, P.; Olson, J.; Osborn, R.N.; Scott, W.; Pelto, P.; Thurber, J.

    1990-05-01

    Perspectives from industry, academe, and the NRC are brought together in this report and used to develop a logical framework that links management and organization factors and safety in nuclear power plant performance. The framework focuses on intermediate outcomes which can be predicted by organizational and management factors, and which are subsequently linked to safety. The intermediate outcomes are efficiency, compliance, quality, and innovation. The organization and management factors can be classified in terms of environment, context, organizational governance, organizational design, and emergent processes. Initial empirical analyses were conducted on a limited set of hypotheses derived from the framework. One set of hypotheses concerned the relationships between one of the intermediate outcome variables, efficiency, as measured by critical hours and outage rate, and safety, as measured by 5 NRC indicators. Results of the analysis suggest that critical hours and outage rates and safety, as measured in this study, are not related to each other. Hypotheses were tested concerning the effects on safety and efficiency of utility financial resources and the lagged recognition and correction of problems that accompanies the reporting of major violations and licensee event reports. The analytical technique employed was regression using polynomial distributed lags. Results suggest that both financial resources and organizational problem solving/learning have significant effects on the outcome variables when time is properly taken into account. Conclusions are drawn which point to this being a promising direction to proceed, though with some care, due to the current limitations of the study. 138 refs., 36 figs., 9 tabs

  16. Historical Development of the Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Nuclear Safety in Japan. Annex I of Technical Volume 2

    2015-01-01

    The governmental and public organizations responsible for policy and safety regulation in Japan have evolved significantly during the period in which the Japanese nuclear power industry has operated. The IAEA’s Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission to Japan in 2007 commended Japan’s updating of its legislative and governmental framework to strengthen arrangements for nuclear safety in light of the incidents which had occurred. A view of these past developments is helpful to understand the origins of the regulatory framework in place at the time of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP), and to assess the prospects for the further institutional reforms that Japan has implemented following this accident. Shiroyama has identified three periods in the evolution of the governmental and regulatory organizations prior to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP

  17. Nuclear regulatory guides for LWR (PWR) fuel in Japan and some related safety research

    Ichikawa, M.

    1994-01-01

    The general aspects of licensing procedure for NPPs in Japan and regulatory guides are described. The expert committee reports closely related to PWR fuel are reviewed. Some major results of reactor safety research experiments at NSPR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of JAERI) used for establishment of related guide, are discussed. It is pointed out that the reactor safety research in Japan supports the regularity activities by establishing and revising guides and preparing the necessary regulatory data as well as improving nuclear safety. 10 figs., 4 refs

  18. Nuclear regulatory guides for LWR (PWR) fuel in Japan and some related safety research

    Ichikawa, M [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    The general aspects of licensing procedure for NPPs in Japan and regulatory guides are described. The expert committee reports closely related to PWR fuel are reviewed. Some major results of reactor safety research experiments at NSPR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of JAERI) used for establishment of related guide, are discussed. It is pointed out that the reactor safety research in Japan supports the regularity activities by establishing and revising guides and preparing the necessary regulatory data as well as improving nuclear safety. 10 figs., 4 refs.

  19. Design and safety features of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan, 1976 edition

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1976-10-01

    The December 1975 edition (JAERI-M 5959) contained design particulars and safety features of 20 commercial nuclear power plants in Japan as of December 1974. Subsequently new plants have been put into operation and some plants under construction have undergone design modifications. The present edition presents similar data of the commercial nuclear power plants in Japan up to June 1976, compiled by computer processing. (auth.)

  20. Structural change of Japan's nuclear R and D organization

    Yoon, S. W.; Jeong, H. S.; Lee, T. Z.

    2002-01-01

    Recently Japanese government is performing a reform work in order to solve the problem involved the existing Special Public Institutions. As results to, JAERI and JNC will be merged into a new independent administrative institution which will be expected to Japan's nuclear policy effectively. Henceforth, government of Japan will establish the legislation and organizational structure until 2005. From the finding of this case study, we should make an effort in order to carry out Korea's nuclear R and D effectively for the strengthening of national competitive

  1. Advertising campaigns on the necessity of nuclear energy through mass-media in Japan

    Niwano, Sadaji

    1998-01-01

    In Japan, the way of PA activities concerning nuclear power has relatively been one-sided and the content of the information which provided to the public has focused mainly on the safety and necessity of nuclear power generations unilaterally so far. But, with the incident of sodium leakage at the Monju plant occurred at December, 1995 and subsequent fire explosion at the Tokai reprocessing plant at March 1997, distrust of the public increased rapidly against the promotion of nuclear power development in Japan. According to the opinion poll carried out in February 1996, it was shown that 70.3% of the public felt that nuclear power is not safe, up from 57.8% of previous survey in November 1995. therefore, it has become important to gain public confidence in order to achieve nuclear power development programs, and clarification of the national policy for nuclear energy development are required strongly. As a result, a series of discussions were actively made at the round- tabled conferences held by Atomic Energy Committee, Japan s national body for promotion of nuclear energy utilization and development, and Advisory Committee for Energy held by MITI, to find out the way of how Japan's nuclear power development should be promoted. In conclusions of discussions, the important theme concerning the ideal method for proceeding PA activities were emphasized. To summarize these briefly, (1) reestablish the trust in the national nuclear policy among the public by transparency and openness, reflecting public opinions. (2) promote understanding and reach an agreement with the regional community where nuclear power plant are installed or are scheduled to be installed in the future. (3) explain and convey information so that the public will think together with us. As for the (3), we are making every effort to rouse public awareness to the importance of tackling severe energy situations in Japan and lead individual people to think seriously about the issues. For that purpose, we

  2. Reorganization of the Ministries and Agencies and future nuclear energy policy in Japan

    Kitagishi, Tatsuro; Suzuki, Tatsujiro; Enomoto, Toshiaki; Kawase, Kazuharu; Izuriha, Isao; Shimohirao, Isao; Sakurai, Jun

    2001-01-01

    Japanese governmental Ministries and Agencies were reorganized to a system of one Cabinet Office and twelve Ministries and Agencies on January 6, 2001, by reformation after an interval of about a half of century. Together with this reformation, for an organization executing nuclear energy administration, the Cabinet Office, the Ministry of Education Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) started. Especially, at the METI, the 'Nuclear Energy Safety and Security Agency' was newly established to unitarity manage safety regulation of the nuclear energy facilities, to enforce system to upgrading of their safety Here were introduced on every content of the organization in the nuclear energy administration, to follow its future subjects under some items on new system and its development, new organization play in liberalization market, expectation to nuclear energy administration at the new system, question on national nuclear safety countermeasure from a standpoint of landing site, stable supply system of electric power, and expectation to suitable safety regulation to secure safety of old nuclear facilities. (G.K.)

  3. A framework of risk-informed seismic safety evaluation of nuclear power plants in Japan

    Kondo, S.; Sakagami, M.; Hirano, M.; Shiba, M.

    2001-01-01

    A framework of risk-informed seismic design and safety evaluation of nuclear power plants is under consideration in Japan so as to utilize the progress in the seismic probabilistic safety assessment methodology. Issues resolved to introduce this framework are discussed after the concept, evaluation process and characteristics of the framework are described. (author)

  4. Nuclear and energies nr 57. Japan, another glance. The environmental and radiological impact. The international impact. The illusion of renewable energies in Japan

    Lenail, B.

    2011-07-01

    The contributions of this publication first address the Japanese local context (organization, mentality, cultural background, thinking and action modes), and secondly the environmental and radiological impact of the Fukushima accident, notably in comparison with Chernobyl (contamination is much more localized, sometimes higher; a larger concerned population but quicker and more efficient protection measures; more severe consequences due to population displacement). The third article discusses the international impact of the accident: known or foreseen consequences on nuclear programs, discussion on safety strengthening and on governance, evolution of public opinion, possible consequences on climate negotiations. The last article proposes an overview of the current situation of Japan which must mobilize all the available energy resources to face the difficulties in electricity supply

  5. Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Source Terms. Nuclear Energy.

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    There has been increased public interest in the potential effects of nuclear powerplant accidents since the Soviet reactor accident at Chernobyl. People have begun to look for more information about the amount of radioactivity that might be released into the environment as a result of such an accident. When this issue is discussed by people…

  6. A comparative analysis between France and Japan on local governments' involvement in nuclear safety governance

    Sugawara, Shin-etsu; Shiroyama, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows a comparative analysis between France and Japan on the way of the local governments' involvement in nuclear safety governance through some interviews. In France, a law came into force that requires related local governments to establish 'Commision Locale d'Information' (CLI), which means the local governments officially involve in nuclear regulatory activity. Meanwhile, in Japan, related local governments substantially involve in the operation of nuclear facilities through the 'safety agreements' in spite of the lack of legal authority. As a result of comparative analysis, we can point out some institutional input from French cases as follows: to clarify the local governments' roles in the nuclear regulation system, to establish the official channels of communication among nuclear utilities, national regulatory authorities and local governments, and to stipulate explicitly the transparency as a purpose of safety regulation. (author)

  7. International nuclear energy organizations; Internationale Organisationen auf dem Gebiet der Kernenergie

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    The publication on International nuclear energy organizations describes the scope of work of the following organizations: IAEA, EURATOM, OECD-NEA, ENSREG, WANO, INSCEAR and ICRO. The issues covered by the organizations include nuclear electricity generation, radiation protection, nuclear safeguards, nuclear liability, public information, reactor safety, radioactive waste management, non-proliferation, marketing, safety technology, utility requirements, effects of nuclear radiation.

  8. Safety Culture Implementation in Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN)

    Nurwidi Astuti, Y.H.; Dewanto, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Indonesia Nuclear Energy Act no. 10 of 1997 clearly stated that Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) is the Nuclear Regulatory Body. This is the legal basis of BAPETEN to perform regulatory functions on the use of nuclear energy in Indonesia, including regulation, authorisation, inspection and enforcement. The Independent regulatory functions are stipulated in Article 4 and Article 14 of the Nuclear Energy Act no. 10 (1997) which require the government to establish regulatory body that is reporting directly to the president and has responsibility to control of the use of nuclear energy. BAPETEN has been start fully its functioning on January 4, 1999. In it roles as a regulatory body, the main aspect that continues and always to be developed is the safety culture. One of the objectives of regulatory functions is “to increase legal awareness of nuclear energy of the user to develop safety culture” (Article 15, point d), while in the elucidation of article 15 it is stipulated that “safety culture is that of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individual that emphasise the importance of safety”.

  9. Information exchange of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with nuclear societies worldwide

    Hori, Masao; Tomita, Yasushi

    2000-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) exchanges information with nuclear societies worldwide by intersocietal communication through international councils of nuclear societies and through bilateral agreements between foreign societies and by such media as international meetings, publications, and Internet applications

  10. On the safety performance of the advanced nuclear energy systems

    Li Shounan

    1999-01-01

    Some features on the safety performances of the Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems are discussed. The advantages and some peculiar problems on the safety of Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems with subcritical nuclear reactor driven by external neutron sources are also pointed out in comparison with conventional nuclear reactors

  11. Confirmation of the safety of 'Mutsu', the first nuclear ship in Japan

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission deliberated on the ''confirmation of the safety in the first nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' in Japan reported to it by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety, and acknowledged the policy toward the safety of the ship by the Science and Technology Agency. The CERS, requested by the NSC, had studied as to whether the judgement and policy by the STA toward the safety of the reactor installation in the n.s. Mutsu were appropriate. Safety confirmation concerns the following matters: reliability of the heat exchanger, piping, valves, etc., which are not duplicated with those in the emergency core cooling system, common use items for safety protection system and instrumentation and control system, fire protection, abnormal transients during operation, operation of the emergency core cooling system, analysis simulating the TMI nuclear power accident in the United States, etc. (J.P.N.)

  12. Progress of nuclear safety research, 1990

    1990-07-01

    Since the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was founded as a nonprofit, general research and development organization for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, it has actively pursued the research and development of nuclear energy. Nuclear energy is the primary source of energy in Japan where energy resources are scarce. The safety research is recognized at JAERI as one of the important issues to be clarified, and the safety research on nuclear power generation, nuclear fuel cycle, waste management and environmental safety has been conducted systematically since 1973. As of the end of 1989, 38 reactors were in operation in Japan, and the nuclear electric power generated in 1988 reached 29 % of the total electric power generated. 50 years have passed since nuclear fission was discovered in 1939. The objective of the safety research at JAERI is to earn public support and trust for the use of nuclear energy. The overview of the safety research at JAERI, fuel behavior, reliability of reactor structures and components, reactor thermal-hydraulics during LOCA, safety assessment of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, radioactive waste management and environmental radioactivity are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Nuclear energy in postwar Japan and anti-nuclear movements in the 1950s.

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2009-01-01

    The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 revealed the most destructive power to-date of man-made weapons. Their impact was so great that Japanese scientists thought that a bigger disaster could be prevented only if war was abolished. Thus they welcomed the international control of atomic energy. It was, however, only after the occupation that the Japanese general public began to learn about the horror of these atomic disasters due to the censorship imposed by the occupational forces. The hydrogen bomb test by the US in the Bikini atoll on March 1, 1954 renewed fears of nuclear weapons. The crew of a Japanese fishing vessel, the "Daigo Fukuryu Maru" (Lucky Dragon No. 5) suffered from exposure to radiation from the test. Even after the incident the US did not stop nuclear tests which continued to radioactively contaminate fish and rains in Japan. As a result, the petition movement for the ban of nuclear trials suddenly spread all over the country. By the summer of 1955 the number of the signatures grew to more than one third of Japan's population at the time. Under the strong influence of anti-nuclear Japanese public opinion the Science Council of Japan announced the so-called three principles of atomic energy: "openness," "democracy," and "independence" to ensure atomic energy was used for peaceful uses only. These principles were included in the Atomic Energy Basic Law established in December 1955. With this law, military uses of nuclear energy were strictly forbidden.

  14. Confirmation of safety (important matters to be confirmed by the administration office having jurisdiction) of the first nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu' in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    1988-01-01

    After the deliberation on this safety confirmation, which was reported on September 22, 1987, by the Science and Technology Agency, the Nuclear Safety Commission started the investigation and deliberation from the 32nd regular meeting on September 24, 1987. As the result of examining on making the radiation measurement facilities for the time of accidents on board the first nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu' into the fixed type, it was recognized to be appropriate. The contents of the investigation were the reqirements of the guideline, and the design of the radiation measurement facilities for the time of accidents such as high level containment vessel area monitors, high level reactor auxiliary machinery room area monitors, high level exhaust stack gas monitors, high level main steam pipe monitors and the radiation monitoring panel. It was confirmed that the proper countermeasures based on the features of the nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu' have been taken for the radiation measurement facilities for the time of accidents on the basis of the basic concept referring to the guideline. (Kako, I.)

  15. Japanese government makes the first step of the nuclear energy policy. The 'Nuclear Power Nation Plan' that shows the future of the nuclear energy policy of Japan

    Yanase, Tadao

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Subcommittee of the METI Advisory Committee deliberated concrete actions for achieving the basic goals of the framework for nuclear energy policy, namely 1) continuing to meet at least 30 to 40% of electricity supply even after 2030 by nuclear power generation, 2) future promoting the nuclear fuel cycle, and 3) aiming at commercializing practical FBR cycle. In August 2006, the subcommittee recommendations were drawn up as a 'Nuclear Energy National Plan'. This report includes 1) building new nuclear power plants in liberalized electricity market, 2) appropriate use of existing nuclear power plants with assuring safety as a key prerequisite, 3) promoting nuclear fuel cycle and strategically reinforcing of nuclear industries, 4) early commercialization of FBR cycle, 5) assuming ample technical and human resources to support the next generation, 6) supporting for international development of Japan's nuclear industry, 7) positive involvement in creating an international framework to uphold both non-proliferation and the expansion of nuclear power generation, 8) building trust between government and local communities through detailed communication and 9) reinforcement of measures for radioactive waste disposal. (S.Y.)

  16. Japan's international cooperation programs on seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    Sanada, Akira

    1997-01-01

    MITI is promoting many international cooperation programs on nuclear safety area. The seismic safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is a one of most important cooperation areas. Experts from MITI and related organization join the multilateral cooperation programs carried out by international organization such as IAEA, OECD/NEA etc. MITI is also promoting bilateral cooperation programs such as information exchange meetings, training programs and seminars on nuclear safety with several countries. Concerning to the cooperation programs on seismic safety of NPPs such as information exchange and training, MITI shall continue and expand these programs. (J.P.N.)

  17. Toward improvements of the education concerning radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear energy in high schools in Japan

    Matsuura, Tatsuo

    1996-01-01

    Despite the high scientific and technical level of research and practical applications of radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear energy in Japan, the level of education concerning these matters at primary school and junior and high schools seems to be considerably behind the world, according to a recent comparative survey among six European countries and Japan. It has also been found that the description of these matters in current textbooks of science and social studies in senior high schools in Japan is generally not satisfactory, both in scope and in correctness. There are many reasons for this observation. One is the fact that many Japanese people including writers of textbooks have an excessive fear for radiation and radioactivity, and consequently are critical of the use of nuclear energy. Another is that Japanese teachers also have similar feeling and tend to avoid teaching about such controversial subject. This comes from the educational policy of Monbusho, Ministry of Education, Science and Culture; the nuclear-related matters are not being given an appropriate educational position, despite their importance in the national energy policy determined by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. In addition, there are several unfortunate educational circumstances. These include, limitations of hours of teaching allotted to the subject of science, the system of choosing curricula among several menus in the subject, the shortage of experimental instruments available in classroom, the severe safety regulation in handling even a very small amount of radioactivity, extraordinary fear for radiation and radioactivity by students, teachers, and their supervisors, the rare appearance of these topics in the problems at the entrance examination of universities. This paper discusses various ways to correct the situation and reports on our recent activities for improving means of education such as textbooks and the official guidelines. (J.P.N.)

  18. Ensuring ecology safety, furthering the development of nuclear energy

    Shang Zhaorong; Chen Xiaoqiu; Tang Senming

    2008-01-01

    Ecology safety is as important as political safety, national defense safety, economy safety, food safety, etc. The nuclear power development is an important step for the national energy structure optimization, ecology caring, and implementing sustainable development. The aquatic ecology is important on disposal of low-level liquid waste and cooling water from NPPs and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and people pay more attention to ecology impact and human threat from the nuclear energy. The author describes relevant ecology problems correlated with nuclear energy such as impact of thermal discharge, ecology sensitive zone, ecology restoration, etc. in order to emphasis that development of nuclear energy should guarantee ecology safety for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. (authors)

  19. Present status of nuclear energy development and utilization in Japan 1994

    1994-03-01

    Today, world energy demands continue to increase, and over the middle and long-term, access to petroleum supplies may become difficult. At the same time, such serious environmental problems as global warming and acid rain, which are caused by the burning of fossil fuels, have drawn great public attention, and the international community has urged that solutions to them should be found. Because nuclear power offers an economically efficient, stable supply of energy whose production has little adverse effect on the environment, the world has recognized the necessity of continuing to develop and use it. The changing international political situation, however, has complicated nuclear energy matters. In Japan, particularly the collapse of the former Soviet Union and North Korea's announcement of its intention to withdraw from the Nuclear Weapons Non-Proliferation Treaty have been cause for concern. Under these circumstances, it has become increasingly important for Japan to secure stable sources of energy, since Japan is dependent on imports for its energy supply. To that end, Japan has steadily promoted the development and utilization of nuclear energy. In fiscal 1992, nuclear power accounted for 28.2 % of the total power generated by Japanese electric utilities. Japan has also worked steadily to develop a nuclear fuel cycle, which is important to the long-term stability of the energy supply. This publication describes the present status of nuclear energy development and utilization in Japan. (J.P.N.)

  20. Nuclear power development in Japan

    Sugawara, A.

    1994-01-01

    Energy situation in Japan and Japan's strategy for stable supply of energy are discussed. Benefits of nuclear power in comparison with other energy sources is considered. History of nuclear power development in Japan, modern status and future trends are described. 6 figs

  1. Safety investigation of 'Mutsu', the first nuclear ship in Japan (the correspondence to the guideline of safety design examination, etc.)

    1981-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency had made previously application for the permission of the alteration of the reactor installation in the nuclear ship Mutsu (the first of this kind in Japan), based on the overall safety investigation of the ship made by JNDA. Taking the opportunity of the governmental safety examination concerning the permission, the correspondence of the safety aspects of the n.s. Mutsu to the existing guidelines for the safety of nuclear reactor facilities was examined. These results to further enhance the safety of the n.s. Mutsu are described concerning the following matters: the safety design examination guideline for power-generating LWR facilities (58 items); the safety evaluation guideline for power-generating LWR facilities (the analysis of abnormal transients during operation and accidents); the safety countermeasures to be adopted in the reactor plant of the n.s. Mutsu from the situation of the TMI nuclear accident in U.S. (7 in design and 10 in operation management); the analysis simulating the TMI accident. (J.P.N.)

  2. Nuclear energy and safety of supply

    Gutierrez, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    According to all kinds of studies, the demand for energy grows more rapidly than population. And it also happens that the consumption of electric energy grows more rapidly than consumption of other primary energies. In view of the spectacular growth of some developing countries, the question is: what type of energy source will we use to cover the growing demand for electric power? If energy should be cheep, reliable and clean, nuclear power should be one of the source used to cover the growing demand. In this respect, it is important to analyze the nuclear fuel cycle to ascertain the reliability of the nuclear power supply. From this perspective,there are three important stages of the front-end of the fuel cycle: uranium concentrate fabrication, enrichment and manufacturing. In recent years, mining production has barely covered half of the demand for uranium, while the rest has been covered by the so-called secondary sources: inventories, strategic reserves, dilution of highly enriched uranium from military weapons, or reprocessing. The known reserves today are enough to cover 65 years of operation of the current fleet. These reserves are much larger if we include those not currently available, or if natural uranium is used directly or reprocessing is included. In the enrichment stage, there is a needed to start operation before the end of the decade of the new plants that are planned. The entry into the market of highly enriched military uranium distroit this market. There is 30% excess capacity in manufacturing which is concentrated in one supplier that accounts for 50% of this excess. Nevertheless, it must be remembered that the fuel assembly is not a commodity, which means that the excess capacity cannot be used directly by the market. To conclude, it can be safety said that, although uranium is not exempt from the tensions to which other raw materials are subject and, as all the fossil fuels, it too could be depleted, the advance of technologies and the

  3. Information Exchange of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with Nuclear Societies Worldwide

    Masao Hori; Yasushi Tomita

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes committees of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) related to information exchange, AESJ publications, AESJ Internet applications, and means for future information exchange between nuclear societies

  4. Business of Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, Nuclear Technology Test Center

    Hayakawa, Masahiko

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Test Center established the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office to execute newly the works concerning nuclear safety analysis in addition to the works related to the proving tests of nuclear machinery and equipments. The regulations for the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office concerning its organization, business and others were specially decided, and it started the business formally in August, 1980. It is a most important subject to secure the safety of nuclear facilities in nuclear fuel cycle as the premise of developing atomic energy. In Japan, the strict regulation of safety is executed by the government at each stage of the installation, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear facilities, based on the responsibility for the security of installers themselves. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Office was established as the special organ to help the safety examination related to the installation of nuclear power stations and others by the government. It improves and puts in order the safety analysis codes required for the cross checking in the safety examination, and carries out safety analysis calculation. It is operated by the cooperation of the Science and Technology Agency and the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy. The purpose of establishment, the operation and the business of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, the plan of improving and putting in order of analysis codes, and the state of the similar organs in foreign countries are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Nuclear safety

    1991-02-01

    This book reviews the accomplishments, operations, and problems faced by the defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. Specifically, it discusses the recommendations that the Safety Board made to improve safety and health conditions at the Department of Energy's defense nuclear facilities, problems the Safety Board has encountered in hiring technical staff, and management problems that could affect the Safety Board's independence and credibility

  6. Safety of emerging nuclear energy systems

    Novikov, V.M.; Slesarev, I.S.

    1989-01-01

    The first stage of world nuclear power development based on light water fission reactors has demonstrated not only rather high rate but at the same time too optimistic attitude to safety problems. Large accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl essentially affects the concept of NP development. As a result the safety and social acceptance of NP became of absolute priority among other problems. That's why emerging nuclear power systems should be first of all estimated from this point of view. In the paper some quantitative criteria of safety derived from estimations of social risk and economic-ecological damage from hypothetical accidents are formulated. On the base of these criteria we define two stages of possible way to meet safety demands: first--development of high safety fission reactors and second--that of asymptotic high safety ENEs. The limits of tolorated expenses for safety are regarded. The basis physical factors determining hazards of NES accidents are considered. This permits to classify the ways of safety demands fulfillment due to physical principals used

  7. Principal viewpoint on nuclear energy development in Japan

    Sadao Kijima

    1996-01-01

    A great deal of electricity demand in Japan is covered by Light Water Reactors. Besides the description of potential role of uranium as an energy resource, plutonium is regarded as an important one. Principal viewpoint for utilization of plutonium is presented taking into account non-proliferation aspects. Fast Breeder Reactors being suitable for utilization of plutonium are considered as a very important option that should not be abandoned in spite of difficulties in their development

  8. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  9. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu, E-mail: yamashita.kiyonobu@jaea.go.jp [Visiting Professor, at the Faculty of Petroleum and Renewable Energy Engineering, University Teknologi Malaysia Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); General Advisor Nuclear HRD Centre, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, TOKAI-mura, NAKA-gun, IBARAKI-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  10. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident

  11. Outline of safety regulations and administrations for commercial nuclear power plants in Japan

    Kinichi Yamamoto

    1987-01-01

    Outline of safety regulations and administrations for the commercial nuclear power plants in Japan is briefly described. The strict measures for safety assurance are always taken based on the principle of defense-indepth. In the actual procedures of regulatory control, the examinations and inspections shall be performed at each individual step in the stage of applications, and also in the stage of constructions. Thus, those regulatory examinations and inspections shall be performed in detail and carefully, and at the most suitable time; resulting in an effective regulatory control by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. (author)

  12. Management and organization in nuclear power plant safety

    Osborn, R.N.

    1983-08-01

    In the immediate aftermath of the Three Mile Island accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored investigations of the relation between human issues and safety tended to focus on individual and, at most, group level phenomena. This initial bottom up view of organizational safety has continued to be investigated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as evidence by the four previous papers. Recently, however, work has begun which adopts a top down management/organization approach to nuclear power plant safety. This paper reports on the research, to date, on this focus

  13. Public opinion poll on safety and regulations of nuclear energy

    Park, M. I.; Park, B. I.; Lee, S. M. [Gallup Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    The purpose of this poll is not only to research understanding on safety and regulations of nuclear energy and to compare the result by time series followed 2003 to 2002 years, also to establish the public relations strategies and to offer information for developing long-term policies. The contents of the study are on the general perception, safety, management of nuclear power station, regulations and surroundings about nuclear energy.

  14. Nuclear safety and energy supply security: conflict or goal?

    Kutas, S.

    2006-01-01

    Energy generation and safety problems at the nuclear power plant have been analysed. Nuclear power plants are operated on the commercial basis in many countries today. Safety and security in energy generation and distribution is a complex problem. Energy supply reliability, security energy price and other issues should be co-ordinated and solved at the same time. Decentralisation and deregulation means new challenges for regulatory bodies and assurance of security. International co-operation in this field is very important. Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA) consolidates efforts of regulatory bodies of European countries in order to harmonize approaches of nuclear safety. Nuclear Safety, and security of energy supply is the task and goal at the same time. (author)

  15. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident; based on the Final Report of Atomic Energy Society of Japan

    Sekimura, Naoto

    2014-09-01

    The Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) published the Final Report of the AESJ Investigation Committee on Fukushima Daiichi NPS Accident in March 2014. The AESJ is responsible to identify the underlying root causes of the accident through technical surveys and analyses, and to offer solutions for nuclear safety. At the Fukushima Daiichi, Units 1 to 3, which were under operation, were automatically shut down at 14:46 on March 11, 2011 by the Tohoku District-off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake. About 50 minutes later, the tsunami flooded and destroyed the emergency diesel generators, the seawater cooling pumps, the electric wiring system and the DC power for Units 1, 2 and 4, resulting in loss of all power except for an air-cooled emergency diesel generator at Unit 6. Unit 3 lost all AC power, and later lost DC before dawn of March 13. Cooling the reactors and monitoring the results were heavily dependent on electricity for high-pressure water injection, depressurizing the reactor, low pressure water injection, and following continuous cooling. In Unit 3, for example, recent re-evaluation in August 2014 by TEPCO shows that no cooling water was injected into the reactor core region after 8 PM on March 12, leading to the fuel melting from 5:30 AM on March 13. Even though seawater was injected from fire engines afterwards, the rupture of pressure vessel was caused and the majority of melted fuel dropped into the containment vessel of Unit 3. The estimation of amount of radioactive materials such as Xe-133, I-131, Cs-137 and Cs-134, emitted to the environment from Units 1 to 3 is discussed in the presentation. Direct causes of the accident identified in the AESJ Report were, 1) inadequate tsunami measures, 2) inadequate severe accident management measures and 3) inadequate emergency response, post-accident management/mitigation, and recovery measures. These were caused by the following underlying factors, i.e., a) lack of awareness on the roles and responsibilities by

  16. Nuclear power in Japan

    Kishida, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations

  17. Nuclear power in Japan

    Kishida, J [Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1990-07-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations.

  18. Japan's nuclear juggernaut

    Richner, S.

    1984-01-01

    A summary of nuclear energy in Japan is presented. Nuclear energy provides 17% of Japan's electricity but could provide much more. 25 more reactors (to add to the existing 27) are planned by 1995. The cooperation between Japanese government and industry and the economic assistance in building new plants means that these are not likely to be cancelled. Public acceptance of new plants has often been obtained by large cash employment inducements. Now, however, there is growing disillusionment when short-term well paid employment building the reactors is followed by unemployment when the reactor is in operation. Also there is a growing opposition to the storage of the nuclear waste. To maintain the growth of its nuclear industry Japan needs to export to provide a steady flow of big orders. (U.K.)

  19. Current status and future prospects of nuclear energy utilization in Japan

    Kondo, S.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear power is recognized as a safe, reliable and competitive energy source in Japan as Japan's 55 nuclear power plants supply about a third of the country's electricity and contribute to the rise in her degree of self-sufficiency in primary energy supply from 4% to 17%. It is also a practical and effective mean to observe the promise of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce CO2 emissions into atmosphere. The development of nuclear science and engineering, on the other hand, contributes not only to the advancement of science and technology in various fields but also to the improvement of health and living standards of the people as well as to the industrial prosperity through the application of radiation to medical diagnosis, cancer treatment, insect pest control, production of semi-conductors, radial tiers, etc. Major goal of current nuclear energy policy in Japan is to enrich the basic measures that compose the basis for the utilization of nuclear energy technologies in civil society and encourage academia and industries to innovate themselves to grapple the challenge, while sustaining the share of nuclear power in electricity generation after the year 2030 at the level equal to or greater than the current level of 30-40% based on the strategy to recycle uranium and plutonium from nuclear spent fuels, in addition to the expansion of the use of radiation technologies. Major policy areas are the improvement of institutional and financial arrangements to promote safe and effective utilization of nuclear energy technology including radiation technologies, the promotion of effective and efficient research and development activities, and the promotion of bilateral and multilateral cooperative activities necessary and or useful for facilitating these activities, in addition to nurturing the international political and institutional environment suitable for the sound promotion of nuclear energy utilization in the world. To pursue these goals, Japanese government and industries

  20. The Department of Energy nuclear criticality safety program

    Felty, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper broadly covers key events and activities from which the Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) evolved. The NCSP maintains fundamental infrastructure that supports operational criticality safety programs. This infrastructure includes continued development and maintenance of key calculational tools, differential and integral data measurements, benchmark compilation, development of training resources, hands-on training, and web-based systems to enhance information preservation and dissemination. The NCSP was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety, and evolved from a predecessor program, the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, that was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, The Need for Critical Experiment Capability. This paper also discusses the role Dr. Sol Pearlstein played in helping the Department of Energy lay the foundation for a robust and enduring criticality safety infrastructure.

  1. Nuclear situation in Japan

    2006-01-01

    This analysis takes stock on the nuclear situation in Japan. It discusses the ambitious equipment program in collaboration with the France, the destabilization of the japanese nuclear industry following the accidents and the energy policy evolutions. It presents the projects of the japanese nuclear industry: the Monju reactor restart, the Pluthermal project, the reprocessing power plant of Rokkasho Mura, the new reactors, the russian weapons dismantling, the ITER site selection and the buy out of Westinghouse by Toshiba. (A.L.B.)

  2. Japan's Energy Policy in a Post-3/11 World Juggling Safety, Sustainability and Economics

    Hiranuma, Hikaru

    2014-09-01

    The March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station turned Japan's energy policy on its head, shedding a harsh new light on Japan's energy policy and power supply system, and throwing into relief six major problem areas that had largely escaped scrutiny before the disaster. (1) Fragmentation of the power grid under the regional monopolies of Japan's 10 'general electric utilities' and the resulting failure to develop the kind of wide-area transmission system needed to transfer electricity from regions with a surplus to those suffering shortages. (2) The low electric supply capacity of entities other than the 10 regional utilities, making procurement of electric power from other sources difficult. (3) The lack of effective mechanisms for curtailing demand at times when a reliable electric supply is jeopardized. (4) The inability of customers to choose a power source or supplier. (5) The failure to manage the energy risks associated with a shutdown of Japan's nuclear power plants. (6) The urgent need to confront the risk of severe accidents and other hazards associated with nuclear power facilities. The pre-quake Strategic Energy Plan announced by the Democratic Party (DPJ) in 2010 put an emphasis on nuclear power as the mainstay of Japan's energy supply and offered little guidance for addressing these issues. The plan was subsequently rejected, and a new policy was announced by the DPJ to eliminate nuclear power from Japan's energy mix before 2040. The coalition agreement between the Liberal Democratic Party and the New Komeito Party, which defeated the DPJ in the December 2012 general election, backtracked from the 'zero nuclear power' policy, which constituted an important shift from the nuclear-dependent policies of the pre-Fukushima era. In April 2013, the LDP government of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe approved a document titled Policy on Electricity System Reform emphasizing the need to make use of a wider range of energy sources, and in April

  3. Japan [National and regional programmes on the production of hydrogen using nuclear energy

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    Japan has shown tremendous economic growth in the post-war period and is now one of the world's leading industrial countries. Japan has virtually no domestic oil or natural gas reserves and is the second-largest net importer of crude oil and largest net importer of liquefied natural gas in the world. Including nuclear power, Japan is only 16% energy self-sufficient (neglecting uranium imports). Japan's total primary energy demand in 2007 was 514 Mtoe. Oil is the most consumed energy resource in Japan (45% as of 2007), although its share of total energy consumption has strongly declined from 57% in 1990. Coal, with 22% (versus 17% in 1990), continues to account for a significant share of total energy consumption, although 99% of the coal must be imported. Natural gas (16%) and nuclear power (13%) are increasingly important sources. Total electricity production in Japan amounted to 1123 TW.h in 2007, with the largest share of 35% (up from 20% in 1990) from natural gas. The share of nuclear power is 32%, followed by coal (28%), oil (19%), hydro (9%) and other renewables (3%).

  4. Safety and risk questions following the nuclear incidents and accidents in Japan. Summary final report

    Mildenberger, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    After the nuclear accidents in Japan, GRS has carried out in-depth investigations of the events. On the one hand, the accident sequences in the affected units have been analysed from various viewpoints. On the other hand, the transferability of the findings to German plants has been examined to possibly make recommendations for safety improvements. The accident sequences at Fukushima Daiichi have been traced with as much detail as possible based on all available information. Additional insights have been drawn from thermohydraulic analyses with the GRS code system ATHLET-CD/COCOSYS focusing on the events in units 2 and 3, e.g. with regard to core damage and the state of the containments in the first days of the accident sequence. In-depth investigations have also been carried out on topics such as natural external hazards, electrical power supply or organizational measures. In addition, methodological studies on further topics related with the accidents have been performed. Through a detailed analysis of the relevant data from the events in Japan, the basis for an in-depth examination of the transferability to German plants was created. It was found that an implementation of most of the insights gained from the investigations had already been initiated as part of the GRS information notice 2012/02. Further findings have been communicated to the federal government and introduced into other relevant bodies, e.g. the Nuclear Safety Standards Committee (KTA) or the Reactor Safety Commission (RSK).

  5. Organization of nuclear safety and radiation protection in Switzerland

    Pretre, S.

    1995-01-01

    In Switzerland an important distinction is made between radiation protection (in charge of the use of ionizing radiations for medical uses or non nuclear industry), and nuclear safety (in charge of nuclear industry, including prevention or limitation of any risk of nuclear accident). In the eighties, it has been decided to make two laws for these two topics. The law for radioprotection, voted in 1991 is enforced since 1994 by OFSP (Office Federal de la Sante Publique). It performs any radiation monitoring outside nuclear industry plants. The law for nuclear safety, that should be enforced by OFEN (Office Federal de l'ENergie), is still not voted. The only existing legislation is the 1959 atomic law. (D.L.). 1 fig., 1 map

  6. The japan a nuclear power?

    Cumin, D.; Joubert, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    This work analyzes the Japan nuclear policy, in the frame of its foreign and safety policy in Pacific Asia, since the end of the cold war, especially the relations with the Usa and China. The Japan is a civil power because it has submitted the military institution to juridical restrictions and because it does not rely on the armed force to promote its national interests. The anti nuclear speech is joined with the acknowledgement of the dissuasion necessity, of the control of industrial processes and energy channels susceptible of military applications. Cultivating the ambiguity, the Japanese government can send a dissuasive message, perfectly legible, kind of communication of latent intimidation constituted by the virtual nuclear power of a state that takes part to the non proliferation treaty. (N.C.)

  7. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization qualification program. Revision 4

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document defines the Qualification Program to address the NCSO technical and managerial qualification as required by the Y-12 Training Implementation Matrix (TIM). It is implemented through a combination of LMES plant-wide training courses and professional nuclear criticality safety training provided within the organization. This Qualification Program is applicable to technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who perform the NCS tasks or serve NCS-related positions as defined in sections 5 and 6 of this program

  8. Nuclear power: Preparing for the future, 30 November 2006, Tokyo, Japan. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) lecture

    ElBaradei, M.

    2006-01-01

    The public's perception of risk has a strong influence on a country's energy choices. As with civil aviation, bioengineering, or any other advanced technology, nuclear power does not come with absolute safety guarantees. What is important is that the risks and benefits are clearly understood. All members of the nuclear community - scientists, operators and safety regulators - should make every effort to provide accurate and easily understood information to improve public understanding of the risks and benefits of nuclear energy. Common misconceptions can be of great influence in shaping public acceptance of nuclear power. How a given nation balances the risk of a nuclear accident against other factors - such as air pollution, dammed rivers, mining accidents, or dependency on foreign fuel supplies - is already a matter of complexity and legitimate debate. It is essential that the nuclear community be seen as transparent and open in its activities, to increase understanding and confidence in the safe operations of nuclear facilities

  9. On recycling of nuclear fuel in Japan

    1992-01-01

    In Japan, atomic energy has become to accomplish the important role in energy supply. Recently the interest in the protection of global environment heightened, and the anxiety on oil supply has been felt due to the circumstances in Mideast. Therefore, the importance of atomic energy as an energy source for hereafter increased, and the future plan of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan must be promoted on such viewpoint. At present in Japan, the construction of nuclear fuel cycle facilities is in progress in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture. The prototype FBR 'Monju' started the general functional test in May, this year. The transport of the plutonium reprocessed in U.K. and France to Japan will be carried out in near future. This report presents the concrete measures of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan from the long term viewpoint up to 2010. The necessity and meaning of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan, the effort related to nuclear nonproliferation, the plan of nuclear fuel recycling for hereafter in Japan, the organization of MOX fuel fabrication in Japan and abroad, the method of utilizing recovered uranium and the reprocessing of spent MOX fuel are described. (K.I.)

  10. Summary of Great East Japan Earthquake response at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station and further safety improvement measures

    Sato, Toru

    2013-01-01

    A large earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011 and tsunami was generated following it. The East Japan suffered serious damage by the earthquake and tsunami. This is called the Great East Japan Earthquake. Onagawa Nuclear Power Station (NPS) is located closest to the epicenter of Great East Japan Earthquake. We experienced intense shake by the earthquake and some flooding from the tsunami, however, we have succeeded safely cold shutdown of the reactors. In this paper, we introduce summary of Great East Japan Earthquake response a Onagawa NPS and safety improvement measures which are based on both experience of Onagawa NPS and lesson from Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident. (author)

  11. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization training implementation. Revision 4

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-05-19

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSO personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This Training Implementation document is applicable to all technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who are in a qualification program.

  12. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization training implementation. Revision 4

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSO personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This Training Implementation document is applicable to all technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who are in a qualification program

  13. A Japan's challenge - towards creating a most robust nuclear energy future

    Suzuki, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    'Full text:' The Fukushima Daiichi accident raises a fundamental question: Can science and technology prevent the inevitability of serious accidents, especially those with low probabilities and high consequences? This question reminds us of a longstanding issue with the trans-sciences, originally addressed by a great physicist, Alvin Weinberg, well before the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. A most robust nuclear energy future would not come to pass without answering it. With the human-behavior-linked nature of the Fukushima Daiichi accident in mind, an innovative way to assure the safety is to be developed not merely from the standpoint of technical measures but rather from a view of point of inter-related institutional structure between the technology and the social system. In other words, social and institutional arrangements to strengthen self-efforts for continuous improvement of safety are to be made specifically dedicated to pursuing procedural rationality between the inner and outer environments, in which a communicative action with transparency and a self-regulating system are especially useful. This is the challenge facing the global nuclear future as well as Japan to be tackled in the wake of the accident. (author)

  14. Progress of nuclear safety research, (1)

    Amano, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hiroei; Nozawa, Masao

    1981-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was established in 1956 in conformity with the national policy to extensively conduct the research associated with nuclear energy. Since then, the research on nuclear energy safety has been conducted. In 1978, the Division of Reactor Safety was organized to conduct the large research programs with large scale test facilities. Thereafter, the Divisions of Reactor Safety Evaluation, Environmental Safety Research and Reactor Fuel Examination were organized successively in the Reactor Safety Research Center. The subjects of research have ranged from the safety of nuclear reactors to that in the recycling of nuclear fuel. In this pamphlet, the activities in JAERI associated with the safety research are reported, which have been carried out in the past two years. Also, the international cooperation research program in which JAERI participated is included. This pamphlet consists of two parts, and in this Part 1, the reactor safety research is described. The safety of nuclear fuel, the integrity and safety of pressure boundary components, the engineered safety in LOCA, fuel behavior in accident and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Wind Energy Japan

    Komatsubara, Kazuyo [Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    An overview is given of wind energy in Japan: Background; Wind Energy in Japan; Japanese Wind Energy Industry; Government Supports; Useful Links; Major Japanese Companies; Profiles of Major Japanese Companies; Major Wind Energy Projects in Japan.

  16. CO{sub 2} emission reduction strategy and roles of nuclear energy in Japan

    Sato, Osamu; Shimoda, Makoto; Takematsu, Kenji; Tadokoro, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    An analysis was made on the potential and cost of reducing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from Japan`s long-term energy systems by using the MARKAL model, developed in the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (ETSAP) of International Energy Agency (IEA). Assuming future growths of GDP, the demand for energy services was estimated for the analytical time horizon 1990-2050. Assumptions were made also on prices and availability of fossil fuels, and on availability of nuclear and renewable energy. CO{sub 2} emissions and system costs were compared between energy demand and supply scenarios defined with different assumptions on nuclear energy, a CO{sub 2} disposal option, and natural gas imports. Main results were as follows. Without nuclear energy, the CO{sub 2} emissions will hardly be reduced because of the increases of coal utilization. CO{sub 2} disposal will be effective in reducing the emissions, however at much higher costs than the case with nuclear energy. The expansion of natural gas imports alone will not reduce the emissions at enough low levels. (author)

  17. Nuclear Safety

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  18. Analysis on Japan's long-term energy outlook considering massive deployment of variable renewable energy under nuclear energy scenario

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Fujii, Yasumasa

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates Japan's long-term energy outlook to 2050 considering massive deployment of solar photovoltaic (PV) system and wind power generation under nuclear energy scenario. The extensive introduction of PV system and wind power system are expected to play an important role in enhancing electricity supply security after Fukushima Nuclear Power Accident which has increased the uncertainty of future additional construction of nuclear power plant in Japan. On these backgrounds, we develop integrated energy assessment model comprised of both econometric energy demand and supply model and optimal power generation mix model. The latter model is able to explicitly analyze the impact of output fluctuation in variable renewable in detailed time resolution at 10 minutes on consecutive 365 days, incorporating the role of stationary battery technology. Simulation results reveal that intermittent fluctuation derived from high penetration level of those renewables is controlled by quick load following operation by natural gas combined cycle power plant, pumped-storage hydro power, stationary battery technology and the output suppression of PV and wind power. The results show as well that massive penetration of the renewables does not necessarily require the comparable scale of stationary battery capacity. Additionally, on the scenario which assumes the decommissioning of nuclear power plants which lifetime are over 40 years, required PV capacity in 2050 amounts to more than double of PV installment potential in both building and abandoned farmland area. (author)

  19. The case for nuclear energy. Chapter 2. Nuclear safety and energy security

    Trosman, G.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. nuclear safety assistance activities have had a direct and substantial impact on improving safe operations of 67 Soviet-designed commercial nuclear power plants in Armenia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. The U.S. Department of Energy worked with these host countries both to improve safe nuclear operations and in some cases assist in plant shutdown. Independent international safety reviews have identified significant progress in the Eastern European countries to improve the safety of their nuclear power plants since the early 1990s. In addition, all of the probabilistic risk assessments conducted at these plants show a major reduction in the frequency of core damage accidents since U.S. assistance to improve safety at these reactors began. Improved operational safety follows from the combined efforts to improve operator performance. These efforts include providing simulators for operators to practice handling emergency scenarios, developing emergency operating instructions that guide operators calmly through emergencies, providing safety parameter display systems that give operators immediate graphical information on the status of plant systems and training the operators on the safety basis for the plants they operate

  20. Military aspect of nuclear policy of Japan

    Fujita, Yuko

    2011-01-01

    Military aspect of nuclear policy of Japan was outlined. In 1952 Prime Minister Yoshida asked to prepare production of weapons for rearmament and to establish Science and Technology Agency such as to overcome lack of science research budget and inefficiency of research and cooperation. Kaya and Fushimi proposed establishment of Atomic Energy Commission as recommendation of Science Council of Japan. In 1954 Nakasone proposed budget for nuclear energy with yen 235 million to construct reactor. In 1955 Japanese delegation participated in international conference on peaceful use of nuclear energy at Geneva and nonpartisan members proposed Atomic Energy Basic Law, which limited the use of nuclear technology to peaceful purposes, ensured three principles - democratic methods, independent management, and transparency - as the basis of nuclear research and promoted international co-operation. In 1956 Atomic Energy Commission and Science and Technology Agency were established with other organizations under this law. According to internal report in the age of Prime Minister Sato, nuclear policy in Japan would be (1) no holding nuclear weapon for the time being, (2) maintaining economic and technical potential of nuclear weapon production and (3) considering no restraint for this policy whether Japan participated in NPT or not. Fuel cycle program of Monju reactor and reprocessing for power production seemed to be deployed corresponding to (3) above. Irradiated blanket of Monju reactor could be reprocessed to produce highly purified plutonium suited for nuclear bombs. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Status of nuclear safety research - 2000

    Sobajima, Makoto; Sasajima, Hideo; Umemoto, Michitaka; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Tadao; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Masahito

    2000-11-01

    The nuclear safety research at JAERI is performed in accordance with the long term plan on nuclear research, development and use and the safety research yearly plan determined by the government and under close relationship to the related departments in and around the Nuclear Safety Research Center. The criticality accident having occurred in Tokai-mura in 1999 has been the highest level nuclear accident in Japan and ensuring safety in whole nuclear cycle is severely questioned. The causes of such an accident have to be clarified not only technical points but also organizational points, and it is extremely important to make efforts in preventing recurrence, to fulfill emergency plan and to improve the safety of whole nuclear fuel cycle for restoring the reliability by the people to nuclear energy system. The fields of conducting safety research are engineering safety research on reactor facilities and nuclear fuel cycle facilities including research on radioactive waste processing and disposal and research and development on future technology for safety improvement. Also, multinational cooperation and bilateral cooperation are promoted in international research organizations in the center to internationally share the recognition of world-common issues of nuclear safety and to attain efficient promotion of research and effective utilization of research resources. (author)

  2. Activities of Japan Nuclear Technology Institute Japanese TSO of Industry

    Nagata, T.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy is a superior form of energy in that it delivers stable power supplies and counters global warming, and it is important to promote nuclear power generation as the core power sources for a nation. However, the Japanese environment surrounding nuclear energy is changing drastically, following the liberalization of market and recent series of troubles or falsifications shaking public confidence in nuclear energy. In the above mentioned situation, nuclear industries and organizations must fulfill their individual roles, and amass its strength to work toward enhancing industry initiatives for safety activities, securing safe / stable plant operations, restoring public confidence and initiate revitalization of nuclear energy operations. The Japan Nuclear Technology Institute (JANTI) has been established as a new entity for supporting and leading the industry's further progress in March 2005. Members of JANTI are not only utilities but also component manufacturers and constructors. JANTI enhance the technological foundation of nuclear energy based on scientific and rational data, coordinates its use among a wide range of relevant organizations, and helps members enhance their voluntary safety activities. At the same time, it is independent of utilities, and exercises a function of checking industry at the objective, third-party standpoint. As for the activities of JANTI itself, information disclosure and the establishment of a council comprising external members will enhance administration transparency. (author)

  3. Safety organization

    Lutz, M.

    1984-06-01

    After a rapid definition of a nuclear basis installation, the national organization of nuclear safety in France is presented, as also the main organizations concerned and their functions. This report shows how the licensing procedure leading to the construction and exploitation of such installations is applied in the case of nuclear laboratories of research and development: examinations of nuclear safety problems are carried out at different levels: - centralized to define the frame out of which the installation has not to operate, - decentralized to follow in a more detailed manner its evolution [fr

  4. Nuclear safety. Seguranca nuclear

    Aveline, A [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1981-01-01

    What is nuclear safety Is there any technical way to reduce risks Is it possible to put them at reasonable levels Are there competitiveness and economic reliability to employ the nuclear energy by means of safety technics Looking for answers to these questions the author describes the sources of potential risks to nuclear reactors and tries to apply the answers to the Brazilian Nuclear Programme. (author).

  5. Progress of nuclear safety research, (2)

    Amano, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hiroei; Nozawa, Masao

    1981-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was established in 1956 in conformity with the national policy to extensively conduct the research associated with nuclear energy. Since then, the research on nuclear energy safety has been conducted. In 1978, the Division of Reactor Safety was organized to conduct the large research programs with large scale test facilities. Thereafter, the Divisions of Reactor Safety Evaluation, Environmental Safety Research and Reactor Fuel Examination were organized successevely in the Reactor Safety Research Center. The subjects of research have ranged from the safety of nuclear reactors to that in the recycling of nuclear fuel. In this pamphlet, the activities in JAERI associated with the safety research are reported, which have been carried out in the past two years. Also the international cooperation research program in which JAERI participated is included. This pamphlet consists of two parts and in this Part 2, the environmental safety research is described. The evaluation and analysis of environmental radioactivity, the study on radioactive waste management and the studies on various subjects related to environmental safety are reported. (Kako, I.)

  6. Atomic energy in Lithuania: Nuclear safety in 1997

    Kutas, S.; Krenevichius, R.; Chiuchelis, R.; Demchenko, M.

    1998-01-01

    Annual report of VATESI - Lithuanian Nuclear Safety Authority's activity in 1997 is presented. According to the prescribed responsibilities by the Law on Nuclear Energy and by the statute, VATESI's main fields of activities in 1997 were evaluation of the safety of Ignalina NPP, supervision of Ignalina NPP's operational safety, control of the implementation of safety improvement program SIP-2 in Ignalina NPP, preparation for the licensing of the unit No.1 of Ignalina NPP, accountancy and control of nuclear materials, regulation of radioactive waste management. Detailed description of all these activities is provided in the report. Important role of international assistance and cooperation is emphasized also. Year 1997 was safe for the operation of Ignalina NPP: there were no safety significant events according to the INES scale, only three events received qualification as level 1 events. In 1997 there was completed SAR of Ignalina NPP, its review report RSR and those were presented to the authorities. Taking into account all recommendations of SAR and RSR a new safety improvement program SIP-2 was made and started implemented

  7. CO2 emission reduction strategy and roles of nuclear energy in Japan

    Sato, Osamu; Shimoda, Makoto; Takematsu, Kenji; Tadokoro, Yoshihiro

    1999-03-01

    An analysis was made on the potential and cost of reducing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from Japan's long-term energy systems by using the MARKAL model, developed in the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (ETSAP) of International Energy Agency (IEA). Assuming future growths of GDP, the demand for energy services was estimated for the analytical time horizon 1990-2050. Assumptions were made also on prices and availability of fossil fuels, and on availability of nuclear and renewable energy. CO 2 emissions and system costs were compared between energy demand and supply scenarios defined with different assumptions on nuclear energy, a CO 2 disposal option, and natural gas imports. Main results were as follows. Without nuclear energy, the CO 2 emissions will hardly be reduced because of the increases of coal utilization. CO 2 disposal will be effective in reducing the emissions, however at much higher costs than the case with nuclear energy. The expansion of natural gas imports alone will not reduce the emissions at enough low levels. (author)

  8. Report of international symposium on the 22nd Japan annual nuclear energy meeting, PNC general meeting and business report about nuclear energy

    NONE

    1989-04-15

    This conference report consists of three parts, which report the 22nd annual nuclear energy meeting in Japan, including the list of Korean delegates, program and the contents of five session, the conference report for PNC general meeting and the report on international symposium for fruition of nuclear power business. It introduces the main conception and the contents of the symposium.

  9. Nuclear energy, today and tomorrow. Present status of development and utilization in Japan 1995

    1995-01-01

    The world population has exceeded 5 billion, today, and it is estimated to reach 10 billion in the middle of the twenty first century. Because of such rapid increase of population, the world energy consumption is estimated to increase tremendously. Furthermore, there are problems of limited energy resources from oil and coal down, how to respond to environment problems such as global warming, acid rain caused by fossil fuel burning, followed by carbon dioxide discharge. Under such circumstances of global scale problems, the nuclear power generation that is excellent in stable nature of supply, economic advantage, less effect to the environment, supplies about 20 % of the total power generation in the world. In our country, some 30 % of the total power generation relies on the nuclear power, as an indispensable power source. Radiation utilization, together with the nuclear power generation, is an important pillar of development and utilization of nuclear energy, and has penetrated deeply in the life of the people, in the fields of industry, agriculture, medicine and environmental protection, and it is contributing to realize affluent life to a great extent. Thus, expectations to the nuclear energy seem to grow larger and larger in future. The publication introduces present status and future potential of the development and utilization of the nuclear energy in Japan, including the basic idea and concrete plans shown in the Long-Term Program. (J.P.N.)

  10. Design and safety data of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo; Nakazima, Tetuo

    1979-02-01

    Following the previous JAERI-M 6732(1976) and JAERI-M 7261(1977), the 1978 edition as of the December is presented, which contains the data of design parameters, performance, components and equipments in nuclear power plants of Japan. Data are given in tables by computer processing. (author)

  11. Nuclear power safety

    1988-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, the organization concerned with worldwide nuclear safety has produced two international conventions to provide (1) prompt notification of nuclear accidents and (2) procedures to facilitate mutual assistance during an emergency. IAEA has also expanded operational safety review team missions, enhanced information exchange on operational safety events at nuclear power plants, and planned a review of its nuclear safety standards to ensure that they include the lessons learned from the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident. However, there appears to be a nearly unanimous belief among IAEA members that may attempt to impose international safety standards verified by an international inspection program would infringe on national sovereignty. Although several Western European countries have proposed establishing binding safety standards and inspections, no specific plant have been made; IAEA's member states are unlikely to adopt such standards and an inspection program

  12. AESJ: communicating about nuclear issues in Japan

    Anon.

    2016-01-01

    The AESJ (Atomic Energy Society of Japan) was founded in 1959 to promote the information of the Japanese public about nuclear energy and to develop exchanges between professionals of the sector. AESJ gathers about 7000 professionals and is organized around 8 regional groups and 10 technical sessions. AESJ has been publishing 2 journals: Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology since 1964 and ATOMOΣ since 1959. AESJ also awards several prizes for promoting communication and technical achievements in nuclear activities. AESJ takes part into numerous international events like for instance supporting conferences or organizing student exchanges between research centers or universities. (A.C.)

  13. Engineering experiences through nuclear power development in Japan

    Uchida, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    This keynote paper deals with: energy issues and nuclear power development in Japan, problems of radiation protection, licensing and safety regulations, research on LOCA and ECCS, stress corrosion cracks related to pressure vessels, nuclear fuel failures, steam generators, incidents, waste management and fuel cycle facilities. In conclusion it is stated that: on order to cope with global matters vitally affecting the electricity generation, taking into consideration Japanese specific energy issues, the nuclear power development has been an indispensable policy of Japan. In order to proceed with further development of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to obtain proper understanding by the public, showing assurance of the safety and reliable operation of nuclear power plants through daily plant operation. The nuclear safety issues should be considered from a global point of view. It is necessary to establish common safety standards which could harmonize the safety level of nuclear power plants in the world. The safety goal concerning severe accidents should be established as an internationally agreeable one. Japan has accumulated highly technological experience in maintenance of nuclear power plants. It is believed that the cumulative experiences in Japan can contribute to the further improvement of safety of nuclear power plants throughout the world, and for this aim a mutual information exchange should be encouraged

  14. The nuclear safety regulation in Japan and the response to changes of circumstances surrounding the nuclear electricity generation

    Hombu, K.; Hirota, M.; Taniguchi, T.; Tanaka, N.; Akimoto, S.

    2001-01-01

    The influences of external factors on nuclear safety are discussed in this paper, based on the views on the circumstances of nuclear electricity generation. The following external factors, which might have some potential impacts on nuclear safety, are selected for discussion: (1) The deregulation in the electricity generation industry; (2) The modification of approval/certification system in the regulation of electricity generation; (3) The influences on social atmosphere due to the occurrence of a series of troubles; (4) The government reform and the structural adjustment of industry and (5) Others. Our further discussion seems to focus on the following 2 issues: (a) Whether nuclear power and the other electrical sources should compete with each other for short term economical cost, or whether factors of cost stability and competitiveness as well as longer term energy supply security and global environmental issues ranging over several decades should be considered; (b) How to realize the appropriate regulation from the perspective of public acceptance and confidence (when a series of troubles occur) without imposing unnecessary burdens on industry and without jeopardizing safety. These issues may be common among many countries and can be widely discussed. (author)

  15. Dynamic design load of type 2 water-flow capsule in Nuclear Safety Research Reactor in Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and its reuse test

    1981-01-01

    A report by the Nuclear Safety Bureau of the Science and Technology Agency to the Nuclear Safety Commission was presented on the validity of the dynamic design load of type 2 water-flow capsule and the method of its reuse test. The safety in both aspects of the capsule was confirmed. The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), in which the water-flow capsule is set, is a swimming pool type reactor, fueled with enriched uranium, having heat output of 300 kW in normal operation and maximum instantaneous heat output of 23,000 MW in pulse operation. The type 2 water-flow capsule, with the initial conditions simulating a power generating LWR plant and being appropriately set, is used to acquire the data on fuel behavior and destructive power in pulse irradiation. (J.P.N.)

  16. Dynamic design load of type 2 water-flow capsule in Nuclear Safety Research Reactor in Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and its reuse test

    1981-01-01

    A report by the Nuclear Safety Bureau of the Science and Technology Agency to the Nuclear Safety Commission was presented on the validity of the dynamic design load of type 2 water-flow capsule and the method of its reuse test. The safety in both aspects of the capsule was confirmed. The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), in which the water-flow capsule is set, is a swimming pool type reactor, fueled with enriched uranium, having heat output of 300 kW in normal operation and maximum instantaneous heat output of 23,000 MW in pulse operation. The type 2 water-flow capsule, with the initial conditions simulating a power generating LWR plant and being appropriately set, is used to acquire the data on fuel behavior and destructive power in pulse irradiation.

  17. Safety Culture and the Future of Nuclear Energy

    Yim, M.-S.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of the TMI, Chernobyl, and Fukushima accidents in the past gives people a false pretence that nuclear accidents are destined to happen. In fact, these accidents could have been prevented with the presence of strong safety culture. Based on the review of the history of nuclear power and nuclear safety, this talk examines how safety culture evolved over the years and how it can guide the future of global nuclear power development without repeating the past course of accidents. (author)

  18. Nuclear safety in France

    Tanguy, P.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the main safety aspects of the French nuclear energy programme and of the general safety organization is followed by a discussion on the current thinking in CEA on some important safety issues. As far as methodology is concerned, the use of probabilistic analysis in the licensing procedure is being extensively developed. Reactor safety research is aimed at a better knowledge of the safety margins involved in the present designs of both PWRs and LMFBRs. A greater emphasis should be put during the next years in the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle installations, including waste disposals. Finally, it is suggested that further international cooperation in the field of nuclear safety should be developed in order to insure for all countries the very high safety level which has been achieved up till now. (author)

  19. Analysis of Japan's energy and environment strategy after the Fukushima nuclear plant accident

    Homma, Takashi; Akimoto, Keigo

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines economic analyses of the “Options for Energy and the Environment” proposed by the Japanese government. The main focuses of the analyses are the power generation mix in 2030, and particularly electricity supply shares of nuclear power. The options proposed by the government assume drastic energy efficiency improvements, increase in renewable energy, and deep CO 2 emission reductions. Considerable energy savings are assumed by the government even in the baseline scenario, and these are inconsistent with historical growth trends for GDP and power demand. We modify the energy savings baseline scenario for consistency with the historical trends and historical electricity savings after the nuclear power accident. In order to provide a wider array of options, particularly those with fewer negative impacts on GDP, this paper proposes alternative options under a revised baseline. In the alternative options, we assume lower shares of renewable energy in electricity supply and lower carbon price. The economic impacts for the alternative options are much smaller than those assumed by the government. The economic analyses provided in this paper will help future policy making for energy and environment in Japan. - Highlights: • This paper provides economic analyses on future energy scenarios proposed by the Japanese government. • Energy savings of the government's scenarios are inconsistent with historical trends. • We modify baseline scenario of energy savings and propose alternative options. • Economic impacts for alternative options are smaller than those by the government

  20. The current state and issues regarding communication from the nuclear energy industry to the mass media in Japan

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The mass media has the potential to effect the utilization of nuclear power in Japan. In most cases journalists contact PR staff of the nuclear energy industry (hereinafter called 'the industry') to collect information about various events of nuclear energy. The industry is always ready to distribute related information and hold a press conference timely when necessary. In terms of the organizational structure for the PR activities each electric power company organizes the PR section in-house. The PR staff provides journalists with information on a daily basis. For the purpose of grasping the mass media's awareness, the author conducted interviews with 22 journalists who had experience in reporting news on nuclear energy subjects. The result showed that the journalists recognized the necessity of nuclear energy. The interviewees suggested that a proper press launch should be needed at just the right time especially in emergency situations and a press release should be more easily understandable. This interview showed that journalists considered the media reports as reflection of citizens' opinion. Most of the journalists realize that the influence of the media coverage should not be negligible and they acknowledge commutation between the two sides is gradually improved compared to before. (author)

  1. Code on the safety of nuclear power plants: Governmental organization

    1988-01-01

    This Code recommends requirements for a regulatory body responsible for regulating the siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants for safety. It forms part of the Agency's programme for establishing Codes and Safety Guides relating to land based stationary thermal neutron power plants

  2. Educating nuclear engineers of the 21st century. Introduction of the recent activities by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan

    Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, educating the next generation nuclear engineers have been an interest to groups, who were concerned of the recent decline in nuclear population in universities and industries. In June 2005, committee on education (CE) was established in AESJ (Atomic Energy Society of Japan), hoping to coordinate the groups related to nuclear education in Japan. The birth of CE was timely; because the importance of nuclear education was emphasized in 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy (Oct., 2005)' decided by the Atomic Energy Commission. In this paper, recent activities of CE, especially the proposals CE made related Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, will be reported. The importance of the partnership with industries, government and academe will be emphasized. (author)

  3. Japan: The institute for the economy of energy recommends a quick re-start of nuclear reactors

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese Institute for the Economy of the Energy (IEEJ) considers that the sooner the nuclear reactors will re-start, the better the Japanese economy and environment will be. The 48 Japanese reactors were stopped after the Fukushima accident and their restart is linked to the implementation of new measures for reinforcing safety. Until now only 2 reactors Sendai 1 and Sendai 2 have been allowed to re-start. The procedure for the safety assessment of the reactors is slower than expected. A study shows that only 7 reactors may be allowed to re-start before march 2015 and a total of 19 units may be operating in march 2016. In this scenario 2% of the electricity will come from nuclear energy in 2014 and 15% in 2015, natural gas imports will still be necessary for the production of electricity and their global cost is estimated to reach 56 billions euros while Japan's rate of energy independence will drop by 4.6%. (A.C.)

  4. Safety technical investigation activities for shipment of damaged spent fuels from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization(JNES) carries out the investigation for damaged fuel transportation from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station(1F) under safety condition to support Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA). In 2012 fiscal year, JNES carried out the investigation of spent fuel condition in unit 4 of 1F and actual result of leak fuel transport in domestic /other countries. From this result, Package containing damaged fuel from unit 4 in 1F were considered. (author)

  5. Technical organization of safety authorities for the event of an accident at a nuclear installation

    Scherrer, J.; Evrard, J.M.; Ney, J.

    1986-01-01

    Within the general context of nuclear safety, the Central Nuclear Installation Safety Service of the French Ministry for Industry and its technical backup, the Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety of the CEA (Atomic Energy Commission), have established a special organization designed to provide real-time forecasts of the evolution of a nuclear accident situation with sufficient forewarning for the local representative of the Government (the Commissaire de la Republique in the Departement affected) to implement, as required, effective countermeasures to protect the population - for example, confinement indoors or evacuation. Descriptions are given of the principles of this organization and the particular precautions taken to confront the problems of mobilizing experts and of dealing with the saturation of normal telecommunications channels to be expected in the event of a nuclear accident. The organization set up for the installations belonging to Electricite de France is given as a detailed example. Particular stress is placed on the organizational arrangements of the Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety designed to provide the emergency teams with the evaluation and forecasting tools they require to carry out their tasks. The procedures are on the whole well developed for atmospheric radioactivity transport, for which operational models already exist. Computer-backed methods with improved performance are at present being developed. A method of forecasting the behaviour of the releases resulting from nuclear accidents is set out for pressurized water reactors, based on evaluating the physical state of the installation, confinement integrity, availability of safety and backup systems, support systems and feed sources and on forecasting how this state will develop on the basis of measured and inferred physical values transmitted from the affected power station through a national network. The experience acquired during accident

  6. Responsibilities and capabilities of a nuclear energy programme implementing organization

    2009-01-01

    An appropriate infrastructure is essential for the efficient, safe, reliable and peaceful use of nuclear power. The IAEA was encouraged by its Member States to provide assistance to those considering the introduction of nuclear power. These countries face the challenge of building a national nuclear infrastructure to support a first nuclear power plant. The IAEA is responding to their needs through increased technical assistance, missions and workshops, and with new and updated technical publications in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, an IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publication (NG-G-3.1), provides detailed guidance on a holistic approach to national nuclear infrastructure development, over three phases. Nineteen issues are identified in this guide, ranging from development of a government's national position on nuclear power to planning for procurement related to the first NPP. An important element of the holistic approach is an entity that can help prepare the decision makers in a country to make a knowledgeable commitment to nuclear power, and then to coordinate infrastructure development efforts among various implementing organizations so that they arrive at the point of readiness to issue a bid tender at the same time. In the Milestones guide, this entity is called a nuclear energy programme implementing organization (NEPIO). As a growing number of Member States started to consider the nuclear power option, they asked for guidance from the IAEA on how to launch a nuclear power programme. In particular, Member States requested additional information on how to establish a NEPIO, especially in the earliest phases of a programme. This report has been prepared to provide information on the responsibilities and capabilities of a NEPIO, as well as to give an indication on how it relates to other key national organizations in the implementation of a nuclear power programme, such as the owner

  7. Long-Term Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) on Nuclear Production of Hydrogen - A Case Study of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    2007-01-01

    In Japan, so-called a formal nuclear policy; The Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy is built up by Japan Atomic Energy Commission at every 5-year, in which not only a conventional light water reactor (LWR) but also a fast breeder reactor (FBR), HTGR and a fusion reactor (FR) is referred as a prominent candidate of long-term (<100 years) nuclear energy source. The policy makers might have multi-purpose scenarios for a future of innovated nuclear energy systems through results of various discussions at their level. According to long-term nuclear knowledge management, the author made ex ante evaluation of HTGR known as the intellectual assets of JAERI 1, from the viewpoint of hypothetical benefits under conditions of substantial uncertainty. Nuclear knowledge management (NKM) is an integrated, systematic approach to identifying, managing and sharing an organization's nuclear knowledge, and enabling persons to create new nuclear knowledge collectively and thereby helping achieve the objectives. NKM identifies, optimizes, and actively manages intellectual assets either in the form of explicit knowledge held in intangible products or tacit knowledge possessed by individuals or communities in the nuclear fields. In the present study the authors wish not only to show the validity of long-term NKM as a key factor of HTGR but also to assess their hypothetical benefits through the year 2050 under conditions of substantial uncertainty. It should be stressed that those factors are important intellectual assets of JAERI developed to date. Additionally, in the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy constructed up by the Japan Atomic Energy Commission, a LWR, a fast breeder reactor (FBR), a HTGR, and a fusion reactor (FR) are all defined as eligible and prominent candidates for long-term nuclear energy sources. In this sense, we estimate here a direct market creation of (1) hydrogen energy production and (2) electricity generation, by commercialized HTGR through the year 2050 with

  8. Progress in high energy physics and nuclear safety : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Safe Nuclear Energy

    Polański, Aleksander; Begun, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    The book contains recent results on the progress in high-energy physics, accelerator, detection and nuclear technologies, as well as nuclear safety in high-energy experimentation and in nuclear industry, covered by leading experts in the field. The forthcoming experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and cosmic-ray experiments are highlighted. Most of the current high-energy experiments and their physical motivation are analyzed. Various nuclear energy safety aspects, including progress in the production of new radiation-resistant materials, new and safe nuclear reactor designs, such as the slowly-burning reactor, as well as the use of coal-nuclear symbiotic methods of energy production can be found in the book.

  9. Public acceptance of nuclear power in Japan

    Iguchi, T.

    1995-01-01

    Japan has a fragile energy supply structure, with 84% of its energy depending on import; for example, 99.6% of the oil comes from overseas, which makes Japan's economic base rather vulnerable. In order to ensure constant energy supply, it is indispensable to diversify the energy sources and to create indigenous energy. In view of this, nuclear energy is considered to be the main alternative to crude oil because it has several advantages over other energy sources, such as stable supply of uranium and the fact that it is compatible with efforts to find solutions to global environmental problems. However, since the general public is not familiar with nuclear technology, it is difficult to get the understanding and co-operation of people. In view of this, public relations activities providing information on the need and safety of nuclear power generation have been performed. As a result, in recent years, about 70% of the people came to recognize the need for nuclear power generation. Although people's recognition of this need has increased substantially, it is still difficult for them to accept the construction of nuclear facilities, because of their anxiety regarding the safety of such plants and the lack of information by the government and electric utilities. This makes the acquisition of new sites for nuclear power plants difficult, so that the time required for developing such plants becomes longer. In order to eliminate people's anxieties, both the government and electric utilities should provide accurate information, at the proper time and using a method that makes it easy for the people to understand the problems involved. It is also important for the government and the electric utilities to listen carefully to the opinions and questions of people and to increase friendly communications with them. The government, electric utilities and constructors of nuclear facilities have to co-operate in order to improve the measures taken to gain public acceptance of

  10. Annual report of the Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency, 1979

    1980-01-01

    The pending repair work of the shielding of the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' was started at long last, and the development of nuclear ships in Japan is to be accelerated again. The Agency intends to exert more efforts to execute the repair of shielding and the works of the general inspection on safety for ''Mutsu'' rapidly and surely and to attain the expected objective. The energy situation in the world is still in confusion, and all countries, advanced and developing alike, are carrying out the researches to develop and utilize substitute energy. Especially large expectation is entertained in atomic energy which can fill the energy gap for the time being, and the policy to promote positively the improvement of safety and the development of the application to new fields is being taken. In such situation, the Atomic Energy Commission clarified the policy to positively promote the research and development on nuclear ships including the design of new nuclear reactors considering their necessity to relax the restriction of energy supply. As for the ''Mutsu'', the AEC insists that the repair should be completed and the operation test must be executed urgently. Concerning the organization for the research and development, the Agency is to undertake the solution of the pending problems related to the ''Mutsu'', and also is required to have the functions of the research and development aiming at the improvement of the economy and reliability of nuclear ships. In this report, the works of the Agency carried out in 1979 are described. (Kako, I.)

  11. Decision no. 2011-DC-0224 of the French nuclear safety authority from May 5, 2011, ordering the French atomic energy and alternative energies commission (CEA) to proceed to a complementary safety evaluation of some of its basic nuclear facilities in the eyes of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Japan), the French Prime Minister entrusted the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) with the mission to carry out a safety analysis re-evaluation of the French nuclear facilities, and in particular the nuclear power plants. A decision has been addressed by the ASN to each nuclear operator with the specifications of this safety re-evaluation analysis and the list of facilities in concern. This document is the decision addressed to the French atomic energy commission (CEA). (J.S.)

  12. Radiological consequence of Chernobyl nuclear power accident in Japan

    Uchiyama, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yuji; Kankura, Takako; Iwasaki, Tamiko; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi.

    1988-03-01

    Two years have elapsed since the accident in Chernobyl nuclear power station shocked those concerned with nuclear power generation. The effect that this accident exerted on human environment has still continued directly and indirectly, and the reports on the effect have been made in various countries and by international organizations. In Japan, about the exposure dose of Japanese people due to this accident, the Nuclear Safety Commission and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute issued the reports. In this report, the available data concerning the envrionmental radioactivity level in Japan due to the Chernobyl accident are collected, and the evaluation of exposure dose which seems most appropriate from the present day scientific viewpoint was attempted by the detailed analysis in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The enormous number of the data observed in various parts of Japan were different in sampling, locality, time and measuring method, so difficulty arose frequently. The maximum concentration of I-131 in floating dust was 2.5 Bq/m 3 observed in Fukui, and the same kinds of radioactive nuclides as those in Europe were detected. (Kako, I.)

  13. International Symposium on Nuclear Safety

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and the Embassy of Japan in the Slovak Republic, under the auspices of the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign and European Affairs Mr Lajcak organized International Symposium on Nuclear Safety on 14 and 15 March 2013. The symposium took place almost exactly two years after the occurrence of accidents at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima Daichi. The main mission of the symposium was an attempt to contribute to the improvement of nuclear safety by sharing information and lessons presented by Japanese experts with experts from the region, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission. The aim of the symposium, unlike many other events organized in connection with the events in Fukushima Daichi NPP, was a summary of the results of stress tests and measures update adopted by the international community, especially within Europe. Panel discussion was included to the program of the symposium for this aim was, mainly focused on the current state of implementation of the National Action Plan of the Slovak Republic, the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine and Switzerland and the IAEA Action Plan.

  14. Evaluating safety-critical organizations - emphasis on the nuclear industry

    Reiman, Teemu; Oedewald, Pia (VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2009-04-15

    An organizational evaluation plays a key role in the monitoring, as well as controlling and steering, of the organizational safety culture. If left unattended, organizations have a tendency to gradually drift into a condition where they have trouble identifying their vulnerabilities and mechanisms or practices that create or maintain these vulnerabilities. The aim of an organizational evaluation should be to promote increased understanding of the sociotechnical system and its changing vulnerabilities. Evaluation contributes to organizational development and management. Evaluations are used in various situations, but when the aim is to learn about possible new vulnerabilities, identify organizational reasons for problems, or prepare for future challenges, the organization is most open to genuine surprises and new findings. It is recommended that organizational evaluations should be conducted when - there are changes in the organizational structures - new tools are implemented - when the people report increased workplace stress or a decreased working climate - when incidents and near-misses increase - when work starts to become routine - when weak signals (such as employees voicing safety concerns or other worries, the organization 'feels' different, organizational climate has changed) are perceived. In organizations that already have a high safety level, safety managers work for their successors. This means that they seldom see the results of their successful efforts to improve safety. This is due to the fact that it takes time for the improvement to become noticeable in terms of increased measurable safety levels. The most challenging issue in an organizational evaluation is the definition of criteria for safety. We have adopted a system safety perspective and we state that an organization has a high potential for safety when - safety is genuinely valued and the members of the organization are motivated to put effort on achieving high levels of safety

  15. Evaluating safety-critical organizations - emphasis on the nuclear industry

    Reiman, Teemu; Oedewald, Pia

    2009-04-01

    An organizational evaluation plays a key role in the monitoring, as well as controlling and steering, of the organizational safety culture. If left unattended, organizations have a tendency to gradually drift into a condition where they have trouble identifying their vulnerabilities and mechanisms or practices that create or maintain these vulnerabilities. The aim of an organizational evaluation should be to promote increased understanding of the sociotechnical system and its changing vulnerabilities. Evaluation contributes to organizational development and management. Evaluations are used in various situations, but when the aim is to learn about possible new vulnerabilities, identify organizational reasons for problems, or prepare for future challenges, the organization is most open to genuine surprises and new findings. It is recommended that organizational evaluations should be conducted when - there are changes in the organizational structures - new tools are implemented - when the people report increased workplace stress or a decreased working climate - when incidents and near-misses increase - when work starts to become routine - when weak signals (such as employees voicing safety concerns or other worries, the organization 'feels' different, organizational climate has changed) are perceived. In organizations that already have a high safety level, safety managers work for their successors. This means that they seldom see the results of their successful efforts to improve safety. This is due to the fact that it takes time for the improvement to become noticeable in terms of increased measurable safety levels. The most challenging issue in an organizational evaluation is the definition of criteria for safety. We have adopted a system safety perspective and we state that an organization has a high potential for safety when - safety is genuinely valued and the members of the organization are motivated to put effort on achieving high levels of safety - it is

  16. 75 FR 9196 - Letter From Secretary of Energy Accepting Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board...

    2010-03-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Letter From Secretary of Energy Accepting Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2009-2 AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...: The Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges receipt of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board...

  17. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body for nuclear facilities. Safety guide

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this safety guide is to provide recommendations for national authorities on the appropriate management system, organization and staffing for the regulatory body responsible for the regulation of nuclear facilities in order to achieve compliance with the applicable safety requirements. This safety guide covers the organization and staffing in relation to nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants. Nuclear power plants. Other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies. Spent fuel reprocessing plants. And radioactive waste management facilities such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This safety guide also covers issues related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation

  18. The role of international atomic energy agency in maintaining nuclear safety competence

    Aro, I.; Mazour, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides information how International Atomic Energy Agency can assist Member States in maintaining and developing nuclear safety competence. The topics covered include the development of safety standards, organisation of nuclear safety related conferences, provision of safety reviews, organisation of training courses and topical workshops and publication of training related documents. Usefulness of these activities for competence development is discussed. (author)

  19. Nuclear safety

    Tarride, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  20. Items to be reflected to the nuclear power safety measures in Japan (concerning the examination, design and operation management) (excluding the items to be reflected to the standards)

    1980-10-01

    In connection with the Three Mile Island nuclear power accident in March, 1979, in the United States, in order to introduce the lessons from it in the nuclear power safety regulations in Japan, 52 items to be reflected to the nuclear power safety measures were chosen by the Nuclear Safety Commission. Of these, 16 items were examined by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety. It was decided that these results would be introduced in the nuclear safety regulations, by the Nuclear Safety Commission. The following 16 items are described. For the examination, four items concerning the automatic operation of safety systems and others; for the design, five items concerning a small rupture accident, the monitoring of the state of primary coolant, control room layout and others; for the operation management, seven items concerning the inspection at the time of repair, the prevention of faulty handlings by operators and others.

  1. Items to be reflected to the nuclear power safety measures in Japan (concerning the examination, design and operation management) (excluding the items to be reflected to the standards)

    1980-01-01

    In connection with the Three Mile Island nuclear power accident in March, 1979, in the United States, in order to introduce the lessons from it in the nuclear power safety regulations in Japan, 52 items to be reflected to the nuclear power safety measures were chosen by the Nuclear Safety Commission. Of these, 16 items were examined by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety. It was decided that these results would be introduced in the nuclear safety regulations, by the Nuclear Safety Commission. The following 16 items are described. For the examination, four items concerning the automatic operation of safety systems and others; for the design, five items concerning a small rupture accident, the monitoring of the state of primary coolant, control room layout and others; for the operation management, seven items concerning the inspection at the time of repair, the prevention of faulty handlings by operators and others. (J.P.N.)

  2. Requirement and prospect of nuclear data activities for nuclear safety

    Kimura, Itsuro

    2000-01-01

    Owing to continuous efforts by the members of JNDC (Japanese Nuclear Data Committee) and Nuclear Data Center in JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), several superb evaluated nuclear data files, such as JENDL, FP (fission product) yields and decay heat, have been compiled in Japan and opened to the world. However, they are seldom adopted in safety design and safety evaluation of light water reactors and are hardly found in related safety regulatory guidelines and standards except the decay heat. In this report, shown are a few examples of presently used nuclear data in the safety design and the safety evaluation of PWRs (pressurized water reactors) and so forth. And then, several procedures are recommended in order to enhance more utilization of Japanese evaluated nuclear data files for nuclear safety. (author)

  3. Nuclear and energies nr 57. Japan, another glance. The environmental and radiological impact. The international impact. The illusion of renewable energies in Japan; Nucleaire et energies no. 57. Le Japon, un autre regard. L'impact environnemental et radiologique. L'impact international. L'illusion des energies renouvelables au Japon

    Lenail, B.

    2011-07-15

    The contributions of this publication first address the Japanese local context (organization, mentality, cultural background, thinking and action modes), and secondly the environmental and radiological impact of the Fukushima accident, notably in comparison with Chernobyl (contamination is much more localized, sometimes higher; a larger concerned population but quicker and more efficient protection measures; more severe consequences due to population displacement). The third article discusses the international impact of the accident: known or foreseen consequences on nuclear programs, discussion on safety strengthening and on governance, evolution of public opinion, possible consequences on climate negotiations. The last article proposes an overview of the current situation of Japan which must mobilize all the available energy resources to face the difficulties in electricity supply

  4. White paper on atomic energy, for 1974 and 1975. [Japan

    1975-09-01

    Nearly 20 years have passed since the initiation of peaceful uses of atomic energy in Japan. Close to the end of this period, there occurred the so-called oil crisis, which emphasized the need for nuclear power development. Meanwhile, voices of the people in Japan are varied concerning nuclear power, as in siting of the power plants and the n.s. (nuclear ship) Mutsu. The paper describes the following: safety, environmental protection, nuclear power generation, nuclear fuel cycle, fission reactor and fusion reactor development, nuclear-powered ships, and radiation utilization.

  5. Situation of nuclear industry in Japan

    2004-03-01

    This document presents the situation of nuclear industry in Japan: cooperation with France in the domain of the fuel cycle (in particular the back-end) and of for the industrial R and D about fast reactors and nuclear safety; present day situation characterized by a series of incidents in the domain of nuclear safety and by an administrative reorganization of the research and safety organizations; power of local representatives, results of April 2003 elections, liberalization of the electric power sector, impact of the TEPCO affair (falsification of safety reports) on the nuclear credibility, re-start up of the Monju reactor delayed by judicial procedures, stopping of the program of MOX fuel loading in Tepco's reactors, discovery of weld defects in the newly built Rokkasho-mura reprocessing plant, an ambitious program of reactors construction, the opportunity of Russian weapons dismantling for the re-launching of sodium-cooled fast reactors; the competition between France and Japan for the setting up of ITER reactor and its impact of the French/Japanese partnership. (J.S.)

  6. Key natural analogue input required to build a safety case for direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Japan

    McKinley, I.G.; Hardie, S.M.L.; Klein, E. [MCM Consulting, Baden-Dättwil (Switzerland); Kawamura, H. [Obayashi Corporation, Nuclear Facilities Division, Tokyo (Japan); Beattie, T.M. [MCM Consulting, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Natural analogues have been previously used to support the safety case for direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel, but the focus of such work was very dependent on the key barriers of specific national disposal concepts. Investigations of the feasibility of such disposal in Japan are at an early stage but, nevertheless, it is clear that building a robust safety case will be very challenging and would benefit from focused support from natural analogue studies—both in terms of developing/testing required models and, as importantly, presenting safety arguments to a wide range of stakeholders. This paper identifies key analogues that support both longevity and spread of failure times of massive steel overpacks, the effectiveness of buffering of radiolytic oxidants and the chemical and physical mechanisms retarding release of radionuclides from the engineered barriers. It is concluded that, for countries like Japan where performance needs to be assessed as realistically as possible, natural analogues can complement the existing laboratory and theoretical knowledge base and contribute towards development of a robust safety case. (authors)

  7. Long-term outlook of energy demand and supply in Japan. Estimation of energy demand and supply for 'Nuclear Energy Vision 2100' of JAEA

    Tatematsu, Kenji; Kawasaki, Hirotsugu; Nemoto, Masahiro; Murakami, Masakazu

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we showed an energy demand and supply scenario toward the year 2100 in Japan, which underlies JAEA's 'Nuclear Energy Vision 2100' published in October 2008. This energy demand and supply scenario aimed at the coexistence of the reduction of the carbon dioxide emission and the energy security through reduction of the fossil fuel usage, positive electrification and the nuclear energy usage. We reduced the ratio of the fossil fuel in the primary energy supply to about 1/3 and extend the share of renewable and nuclear energy to 70% from current 15%. As a result, the carbon dioxide emission was reduced to current 10%, and it developed that the half was the contribution of the nuclear energy. (author)

  8. Protocol between the Nuclear Protection and Safety Bureau representing the Nuclear Authorities of Portugal and the Nuclear Energy Commission of Spain on Co-operation in Nuclear Safety

    1980-01-01

    This Protocol was signed further to the Agreement between Portugal and Spain on 14 January 1971 on co-operation in the peaceful use of nuclear energy. It provides for exchange of information on the general aspects of nuclear safety and radiation protection; study of the basic characteristics of siting, construction, operation and decommissioning of nuclear installations, and experience acquired in these areas; the problematics of planning against nuclear incidents and their environmental impact; legislation, regulations and technical standards concerning nuclear installations. The Protocol entered into force for a period of five years on the day of its signature. (NEA) [fr

  9. Nuclear Materials Diversion Safety and the Long-term Future of Nuclear Energy

    Knapp, V.

    2002-01-01

    Primarily due to irresponsible cold war politics of nuclear weapon countries nuclear proliferation situation is little short of getting out of control. In addition to five nominal nuclear weapon countries there are at present at least three more nuclear weapon countries and several countries with nuclear weapon potential. Non-proliferation treaty (NPT), signed in 1970, has been recognized by most non-nuclear weapon countries as unjust and ineffective. After the initial, deliberate, nuclear weapon developments of five nominal nuclear weapon countries, subsequent paths to nuclear weapons have been preceded by nominal peaceful use of nuclear energy. Uranium enrichment installations as well as reprocessing installations in non-nuclear weapon countries are the weakest spots of fuel cycle for diversion of nuclear materials either by governments or by illicit groups. An energy scenario, which would, by the end of century, replace the large part of fossil fuels use through extension of present nuclear practices, would mean very large increase in a number of such installations, with corresponding increase of the probability of diversion of nuclear materials. Such future is not acceptable from the point of view of proliferation safety. Recent events make it clear, that it cannot be accepted from the requirements of nuclear terrorism safety either. Nuclear community should put it clearly to their respective governments that the time has come to put general interest before the supposed national interest, by placing all enrichment and reprocessing installations under full international control. Such internationalization has a chance to be accepted by non-nuclear weapon countries, only in case should it apply to nuclear weapon countries as well, without exception. Recent terrorist acts, however horrible they were, are child,s play compared with possible acts of nuclear terrorism. Nuclear energy can be made proliferation safe and diversion of nuclear materials safe, and provide

  10. Recovery of Japanese nuclear energy with the agreement for cooperation between the USA and Japan concerning peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    Narabayashi, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    About 4.5 years has passed after Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. Only one nuclear power plant restarted in Japan, and also the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho hasn't begun a commercial operation yet. The Agreement for Cooperation Concerning the Civil Use of Atomic Energy between the U.S. and Japan the present revision agreement on July 17th, 1988 comes into force and the validated-period is 30 and reaches a due-date in July, 2018. Except for a few countries such as German and Switzerland, the nuclear power plant construction has expansionary trend. Especially, the determination is remarkable among the growing countries such as Asia and the middle-east. There are many countries which started nuclear power plant construction for the first time such as Vietnam, UAE, and Turkey. In these various countries, the merits of the nuclear power plant is admitted as the rapid increase and the countermeasure of the energy-need against the global warming like an advanced and is being proceeded with, being powerful in the form of the state project. With it, the countries such as France, the Russia the U.S., Korea, and China which have a nuclear power plant technology are vigorous and have completion for export plants. With the Japanese nuclear power plant export policy which the government proceeds with, there are not few psychological drags and ethical sense of discomforts among the people but the export of the nuclear power plant as the basic key industry in our country, and the high level waste reprocessing, this need the Japan-U.S. nuclear energy agreement. The agreement can be ended by giving notice with the document from before by 6 months in the expiration date but unless this preliminary notice is accomplished, the potency of the agreement continues. (author)

  11. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 and the nuclear near disaster at Three Mile Island in 1979, public concern about the safety of nuclear power has increased. Some of the opponents of nuclear power see it as a unique and ominous danger. Some critics see opposition to it as a moral crusade associated with the struggle for nuclear disarmament. Some describe nuclear power or almost any tampering with radioactivity as evil. Others see it as simply a potentially dangerous technology that is insufficiently understood but argue that it is being developed without adequate protection for public safety. Recently some supporters of nuclear power have argued that it is the answer to the ' greenhouse effect' as it does not produce the gases responsible for global warming. On the other side opponents have argued that the full social and economic costs are never properly considered when assessments are made of the viability or desirability of nuclear power. Meanwhile, many of the workers who have given their skills and working lives to develop nuclear power, or support its development, continue to see it as a great hope for the future, safer and environmentally cleaner than most other energy sources. Many of them find it puzzling and frustrating that others are so hostile, and are angry that the evidence about nuclear energy, as they see it, is woefully misrepresented. At times, this clash of perspectives has completely obscured the possibility of rational debate. At the extremes, some people have argued that there is no alternative to reliance on nuclear power while others have alleged that nuclear power only exists as a cover for nuclear bomb-making, that all radiation is deadly and evil and that people who support nuclear power are concealing this. Against this background, unions find themselves in a unique position and they have a special responsibility. Within the membership of the ICFTU, some affiliates have a policy against the use of nuclear power, some

  12. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    1989-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 and the nuclear near disaster at Three Mile Island in 1979, public concern about the safety of nuclear power has increased. Some of the opponents of nuclear power see it as a unique and ominous danger. Some critics see opposition to it as a moral crusade associated with the struggle for nuclear disarmament. Some describe nuclear power or almost any tampering with radioactivity as evil. Others see it as simply a potentially dangerous technology that is insufficiently understood but argue that it is being developed without adequate protection for public safety. Recently some supporters of nuclear power have argued that it is the answer to the ' greenhouse effect' as it does not produce the gases responsible for global warming. On the other side opponents have argued that the full social and economic costs are never properly considered when assessments are made of the viability or desirability of nuclear power. Meanwhile, many of the workers who have given their skills and working lives to develop nuclear power, or support its development, continue to see it as a great hope for the future, safer and environmentally cleaner than most other energy sources. Many of them find it puzzling and frustrating that others are so hostile, and are angry that the evidence about nuclear energy, as they see it, is woefully misrepresented. At times, this clash of perspectives has completely obscured the possibility of rational debate. At the extremes, some people have argued that there is no alternative to reliance on nuclear power while others have alleged that nuclear power only exists as a cover for nuclear bomb-making, that all radiation is deadly and evil and that people who support nuclear power are concealing this. Against this background, unions find themselves in a unique position and they have a special responsibility. Within the membership of the ICFTU, some affiliates have a policy against the use of nuclear power, some

  13. Nuclear power safety

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports that since the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986, over 70 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's 112 member states have adopted two conventions to enhance international cooperation by providing timely notification of an accident and emergency assistance. The Agency and other international organizations also developed programs to improve nuclear power plant safety and minimize dangers from radioactive contamination. Despite meaningful improvements, some of the measures have limitations, and serious nuclear safety problems remain in the design and operation of the older, Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. The Agency's ability to select reactors under its operational safety review program is limited. Also, information on the extent and seriousness of safety-related incidents at reactors in foreign countries is not publicly available. No agreements exist among nuclear power countries to make compliance with an nuclear safety standards or principles mandatory. Currently, adherence to international safety standards or principles is voluntary and nonbinding. Some states support the concept of mandatory compliance, but others, including the United States, believe that mandatory compliance infringes on national sovereignty and that the responsibility for nuclear reactor safety remains with each nation

  14. Nuclear law - Nuclear safety

    Pontier, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emmanuel; Leger, Marc; Deguergue, Maryse; Vallar, Christian; Pissaloux, Jean-Luc; Bernie-Boissard, Catherine; Thireau, Veronique; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Spencer, Mary; Zhang, Li; Park, Kyun Sung; Artus, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the contributions presented during a one-day seminar. The authors propose a framework for a legal approach to nuclear safety, a discussion of the 2009/71/EURATOM directive which establishes a European framework for nuclear safety in nuclear installations, a comment on nuclear safety and environmental governance, a discussion of the relationship between citizenship and nuclear, some thoughts about the Nuclear Safety Authority, an overview of the situation regarding the safety in nuclear waste burying, a comment on the Nome law with respect to electricity price and nuclear safety, a comment on the legal consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear safety in the Japanese law, a presentation of the USA nuclear regulation, an overview of nuclear safety in China, and a discussion of nuclear safety in the medical sector

  15. Nuclear safety with operational approach: towards development organization that learn

    Campos Remiro, R.; Morales de la Cruz, O.

    2014-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of the latest relevant events that occurred in plants Spanish nuclear, coupled with requirements and requirements imposed in the Nuclear sector, show the anticipation as a necessary tool for ensure a better and more flexible operation of the plant. Such notice must integrated into the operational focus of the units which constitute the Central; process which, in turn, must become one of the pillars of all organization focused in learning. (Author)

  16. Urgent Safety Measures in Japan after Great East Japan Earthquake

    Taniura, Wataru; Otani, Hiroyasu

    2012-01-01

    Due to tsunami triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake, the operating and refueling reactor facilities at Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni Nuclear Power Plants caused a nuclear hazard. Given the fact, Japanese electric power companies voluntarily began to compile various urgent measures against tsunami. And then the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) ordered the licensees to put into practice the voluntarily compiled urgent safety measures, in order to ensure the effectiveness of the means for recovering cooling functions along with avoiding the release of radioactive substances to the possible minimum, even if a huge tsunami following a severe earthquake hits nuclear power plants. The following describes the state and the effect of the urgent safety measures implemented for 44 reactors (under operation) and 1 reactor (under construction) in Japan and also describes the measures to be implemented by the licensees of reactor operation in the future.

  17. Nuclear energy and nuclear safety in Slovenia in view of the accession to the EU

    Grlicarev, I.

    2001-01-01

    The recent status in the preparation of the position of Slovenia in negotiations in to the EU in the field of nuclear energy, nuclear safety and radiation protection shows that Slovenia has still some tasks to be done, but there are no pending issues which might hinder the accession process. The effective communication has been established between EC and Slovenia. There are no issues which would need further clarification or even a transition period.(author)

  18. Input of Lithuanian science into nuclear safety improvement, coordination of technical support organizations

    Maksimovas, G.

    1999-01-01

    VATESI in its activities is very much supported by Lithuanian scientific and technical organizations which are doing expertise of safety analyses of Ignalina NPP. Description of these organizations is presented. Broad international cooperation and assistance programs is underway helping Lithuanians scientific organizations to build own capacity in making nuclear safety research

  19. Slovenian Experience as the EU Candidate Country in the Field of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety

    Grlicarev, I.

    2002-01-01

    Slovenia was the first EU acceding country which has managed to successfully reach consensus with the European Commission (EC) on the chapters Energy, which comprises nuclear energy, and Environment, which comprises nuclear safety and radiation protection. This practically meant that the EU adopted the position that these two chapters did not, at that stage, require further negotiation. The EC will continue to monitor the progress in adoption and implementation of the EU legislation throughout the negotiations. The activities in relation to the accession of Slovenia to the EU in the area of nuclear energy and nuclear safety are reflected in the transposition of the legislation and establishing the institutions capable of implementing the EU legislation. The importance of regular reporting to the EC on the status is vital for monitoring the progress. The EC issues progress reports for all candidate countries on annual basis and the action plan has been devised by the EC to put some extra pressure on the candidate countries. The position of the EU in the area of nuclear legislation is reflected in the so called Non-binding EU acquis. The actual position of the EU towards each Candidate Country and to these countries as a whole is contained in the document Report on Nuclear Safety in the Context of the Enlargement. The Act on Nuclear and Radiation Safety had been drafted and is planned to be passed by the Parliament in the first half of 2002. The EC is willing to provide support in implementation of projects to strengthen nuclear safety in Slovenia (assistance to the regulatory authority, review of seismic studies, support with the periodic safety review, review and application of PSA studies). The recent status in the preparation of the position of Slovenia in negotiations in to the EU in the field of nuclear energy, nuclear safety and radiation protection shows that Slovenia has still some tasks to be done, but there are no pending issues which might hinder the

  20. Martin Marietta Energy Systems Nuclear Criticality Safety Improvement Program

    Speas, I.G.

    1987-01-01

    This report addresses questions raised by criticality safety violation at several DOE plants. Two charts are included that define the severity and reporting requirements for the six levels of accidents. A summary is given of all reported criticality incident at the DOE plants involved. The report concludes with Martin Marietta's Nuclear Criticality Safety Policy Statement

  1. Review of current status of LWR safety research in Japan

    Yamada, Tasaburo; Mishima, Yoshitsugu; Ando, Yoshio; Miyazono, Shohachiro; Takashima, Yoichi.

    1977-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Commission has exerted efforts on the research of the safety of nuclear plants in Japan, and ''Nuclear plant safety research committees'' was established in August 1974, which is composed of the government and the people. The philosophy of safety research, research and development plan, the forwarding procedure of the plan, international cooperation, for example LOFT program, and the effective feed back of the experimental results concerning nuclear safety are reviewed in this paper at first. As for the safety of nuclear reactors the basic philosophy that radio active fission products are contained in fuel or reactors with multiple barriers, (defence in depth) and almost no fission product is released outside reactor plants even at the time of hypothetical accident, is kept, and the research and development history and the future plan are described in this paper with the related technical problems. The structural safety is also explained, for example, on the philosophy ''leak before break'', pipe rupture, pipe restraint and stress analysis. The release of radioactive gas and liquid is decreased as the philosophy ''ALAP''. And probability safety evaluation method, LOCA, reactivity, accident and aseismatic design in nuclear plants in Japan are described. (Nakai, Y.)

  2. Nuclear calculation for employing medium enrichment in reactors of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Miyasaka, Yasuhiko

    1979-01-01

    The fuel used for the research reactors of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is presently highly enriched uranium of 93%. However, the U.S. government (the supplier of fuel) is claiming to utilize low or medium enriched uranium from the viewpoint of resistivity to nuclear proliferation, and the availability of highly enriched uranium is becoming hard owing to the required procedure. This report is described on the results of nuclear calculation which is the basis of fuel design in the countermeasures to the reduction of enrichment. The basic conception in the reduction of enrichment is three-fold: to lower the latent potential of nuclear proliferation as far as possible, to hold the present reactor performance as far as possible, and to limit the reduction in the range which is not accompanied by the modification of reactor core construction and cooling system. This time, the increase of the density and thickness of fuel plates and the effect of enrichment change to 45% on reactivity and neutron flux were investigated. The fuel of UAl sub(x) - Al system was assumed, which was produced by powder metallurgical method. The results of investigations on JRR-2 and JMTR reactors revealed that 45% enriched fuel does not affect the performances much. However, deterioration of the performances is not neglegible if further reduction is needed. In future, the influence of the burn-up effect of fuel on the life of reactor cores must be investigated. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    Okazaki, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    A goal of the 21. century is for society to pursue 'sustainable economic development and prosperous life by recycling resources', thus rejecting 'development based on the waste of resources'. For Japan, which has limited energy resources, it is important to secure safe, inexpensive, environmentally friendly energy resources having long-term availability. To contribute to long-term energy security and solve global environmental issues, and to create advanced competitive science and technology, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established by integrating the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) in October 2005. JAEA is endeavoring to establish nuclear fuel cycles, to contribute to social improvement through hydrogen production initiated by atomic energy, and to pursue research and development of thermonuclear fusion and quantum beam technology. This paper reviews the main R and D activities of JAEA. The structure of the paper is the following: 1. Introduction; 2. Japan Atomic Energy Agency; 3. Efforts to Commercialize the Fast Reactor Cycle; 4. Monju Progress; 5. Geological Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste R and D; 6. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor System R and D; 7. Fusion Research and Development; 8. LWR Spent Fuel Reprocessing Technology; 9. Quantum Beam Technologies; 10. Nuclear Safety Research and Regulatory Applications; 11. Basic Science and Engineering Research; 12. Contribution to the Enhanced International Nonproliferation Regimes; 13. Conclusions. To summarize, JAEA will promote the above R and D activities, addressing the following commitments: - On problems that atomic energy faces, we shall extend technical assistance in response to the government and the industrial sectors. - We shall produce technical options to attain political goals to secure medium to long-term stable energy supplies and to solve global environmental issues. - With the high potentials of atomic

  4. Nuclear power development in Japan

    Mishiro, M.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the advantages of nuclear energy for Japan. In 1997 the composition of the total primary energy supply (TPES) was oil 52.7%, coal 16.5%, nuclear 16.1% and natural gas 10.7%. Nuclear power has a significant role to play in contributing to 3 national interests: i) energy security, ii) economic growth and iii) environmental protection. Energy security is assured because a stable supply of uranium fuel can be reasonably expected in spite of dependence on import from abroad. Economic growth implies the reduction of energy costs. As nuclear power is capital intensive, the power generation cost is less affected by the fuel cost, therefore nuclear power can realize low cost by favoring high capacity utilization factor. Fossil fuels have substantial impacts on environment such as global warming and acid rain by releasing massive quantities of CO 2 , so nuclear power is a major option for meeting the Kyoto limitations. In Japan, in 2010 nuclear power is expected to reach 17% of TPES and 45% of electricity generated. (A.C.)

  5. The disappointments for nuclear energy in Japan; Les deconvenues pour l'energie nucleaire au Japon

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Several dysfunctions are reported in this paper: A reactor (Onagawa) closed after a nitrogen leakage; a small leakage of radioactive water in the nuclear power plant of Mihama assessment raised to five deaths, the operator stops its nuclear power plants for inspection, the Japan face to its ageing nuclear power plants, the truth about the cost of M.O.X., the seven reactors of Japan closed for inspection after cracks and leaks hidden to authorities, Tokai MURA accident. (N.C.)

  6. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities. Japan

    2017-01-01

    The NEA has updated, in coordination with the Permanent Delegation of Japan to the OECD, the report on the Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities in Japan. This country report provides comprehensive information on the regulatory and institutional framework governing nuclear activities in Japan. It provides a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. Content: I - General Regulatory Regime: Introduction; Mining regime; Radioactive substances and equipment; Nuclear installations (Reactor Regulation, Emergency response); Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; Radiological protection; Radioactive waste management; Nuclear safeguards and nuclear security; Transport; Nuclear third party liability. II - Institutional Framework: Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office, Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA), Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), The Agency for Natural Resources and Energy (ANRE), Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)); Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Reactor Safety Examination Committee, Nuclear Fuel Safety Examination Committee, Radiation Council, Other advisory bodies); Public and semi-public agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning Facilitation Corporation (NDF), Nuclear Waste Management Organisation (NUMO))

  7. Renovated Korean nuclear safety and security system: A review and suggestions to successful settlement

    Chung, W. S.; Yun, S. W.; Lee, D. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Dukjin-dong 150, Yusung-gu, Daejon, R.O., 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Go, D. Y. [Kyung Hee Univ., Kyung Hee daero 26, Dongdaemoon-gu, Seoul, R.O., 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    Questions of whether past nuclear regulatory body of Korea is not a proper system to monitor and check the country's nuclear energy policy and utilization have been raised. Moreover, a feeling of insecurity regarding nuclear safety after the nuclear accident in Japan has spread across the public. This has stimulated a renovation of the nuclear safety regime in Korea. The Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) was launched on October 26, 2011 as a regulatory body directly under the President in charge of strengthening independence and nuclear safety. This was a meaningful event as the NSSC it is a much more independent regulatory system for Korea. However, the NSSC itself does not guarantee an enhanced public acceptance of the nuclear policy and stable use nuclear energy. This study introduces the new NSSC system and its details in terms of organization structure, appropriateness of specialty, budget stability, and management system. (authors)

  8. Annual report of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute for fiscal 2000

    2001-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) promotes some researches such as neutron science research, light quantum/synchrotron radiation science research, radiation application research, science research, advanced basic research, and so on, based on nuclear energy R and D and contributing to general development on scientific technology, along the Long-term program on research, development and application of nuclear energy' established on June, 1994, as a general organization on nuclear energy R and D in Japan. And, as an R and D on advanced energy system bringing breakthrough on nuclear energy technology, JAERI also promotes research on future type energy system, R and D on nuclear fusion, and trial research on high temperature engineering. Furthermore, JAERI progresses research on safety and health physics, as occupying both fields of general nuclear energy science and nuclear energy. In addition, by carrying out not only interdisciplinary cooperation in Japan but also versatile international one, various research assisting business and effective R and D are promoted. Here were described in details in fiscal year 2000, on 6 items on the neutron science research (SR), 13 items on light quantum/radiation light SR, 13 items on radiation application SR, 6 items on matter SR, 3 items on environment SR, 19 items on advanced basic SR, and so on. (G.K.)

  9. Decision no. 2011-DC-0215 of the French nuclear safety authority from May 5, 2011, ordering ITER Organization to proceed to a complementary safety evaluation of its basic nuclear facility in the eyes of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Japan), the French Prime Minister entrusted the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) with the mission to carry out a safety analysis re-evaluation of the French nuclear facilities, and in particular the nuclear power plants. A decision has been addressed by the ASN to each nuclear operator with the specifications of this safety re-evaluation analysis and the list of facilities in concern. This document is the decision addressed to the ITER Organization, operator of the ITER tokamak facility of Cadarache (France). (J.S.)

  10. Nuclear Safety

    1978-09-01

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  11. Actual state of the nuclear industry in Japan and trends of nuclear development in the world

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear industry in Japan established a fixed foundation as a large complex system industry by elapsing about forty years since beginning of its development at top of 1930s. For Japan with little energy resources, nuclear power generation is one of essential choices because not only of keeping energy security but also of response to global warming problem such as global warming protection. Then, in order to intend to promote sound development of the nuclear industry in Japan, further upgrading of technology aimed at maintenance and improvement of safety and formation of understanding and agreement of the peoples must be established. Here was introduced a report on actual state of the nuclear industry in Japan in 1997 fiscal year prepared on February, 1999 by the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum. (G.K.)

  12. White paper on nuclear safety in 1981

    1981-01-01

    The measures to research, develop and utilize atomic energy in Japan have been strengthened since the Atomic Energy Act was instituted in 1955, always on the major premise of securing the safety. The Nuclear Safety Commission established in October, 1978, has executed various measures to protect the health and safety of the nation as the center of the atomic energy safety regulation administration in Japan. Now, the Nuclear Safety Commission has published this annual report on atomic energy safety, summarizing various activities for securing the safety of atomic energy since its establishment to the end of March, 1981. This report is the inaugural issue, and the course till the Nuclear Safety Commission has made its start is also described. The report is composed of general remarks, response to the TMI accident, the safety regulation and security of nuclear facilities, the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, the investigation of environmental radioactivity, the countermeasures for preventing disasters around nuclear power stations and others, the research on the safety of atomic energy, international cooperation, and the improvement of the basis for securing the safety. Various related materials are attached. (Kako, I.)

  13. Progress of nuclear safety research - 2005

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Amaya, Masaki; Saito, Junichi; Sato, Atsushi; Sono, Hiroki; Tamaki, Hitoshi; Tonoike, Kotaro; Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Motoki, Yasuo; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Araya, Fumimasa

    2006-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), one of the predecessors of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), had conducted nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy and Five-Years Program for Safety Research issued by the Japanese government. The fields of conducting safety research at JAERI were the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI had conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety and to supplement own research. Moreover, when accidents occurred at nuclear facilities, JAERI had taken a responsible role by providing experts in assistance to conducting accident investigations or emergency responses by the government or local government. These nuclear safety research and technical assistance to the government have been taken over as an important role by JAEA. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 2003 through September 2005 and utilized facilities. (author)

  14. White paper on nuclear safety in 2000

    2001-04-01

    This report is composed of three parts and a subjective part Part 1 includes special articles on the measures for the security of nuclear safety and the future problems described from the beginning of the security. Taking consideration that there exists potential risk in the utilization of nuclear energy in addition to the previous accidents in the area of nuclear energy, future measures to take for safety security were discussed as well as the reorganization of government facilities. In addition, the measures for nuclear safety according to the special nuclear disaster countermeasure law and the future problems were described. In Part 2, the trend of nuclear safety in 2000 and the actual effects of 'the basic principle for the countermeasures of the hour' proposed by the nuclear safety commission were outlined. Moreover, the activities of the commission in 2000 were briefly described. In Part 3, various activities for security of nuclear safety, the safety regulation system and the disaster protection system in nuclear facilities, nuclear safety researches in Japan were described in addition to international cooperation as to nuclear safety. Finally, various materials related to the nuclear safety commission, and the materials on the practical activities for nuclear safety were listed in the subjective part. (M.N.)

  15. Organization and conduct of IAEA fire safety reviews at nuclear power plants

    1998-01-01

    The importance of fire safety in the safe and productive operation of nuclear power plants is recognized worldwide. Lessons learned from experience in nuclear power plants indicate that fire poses a real threat to nuclear safety and that its significance extends far beyond the scope of a conventional fire hazard. With a growing understanding of the close correlation between the fire hazard in nuclear power plants and nuclear safety, backfitting for fire safety has become necessary for a number of operating plants. However, it has been recognized that the expertise necessary for a systematic independent assessment of fire safety of a NPP may not always be available to a number of Member States. In order to assist in enhancing fire safety, the IAEA has already started to offer various services to Member States in the area of fire safety. At the request of a Member State, the IAEA may provide a team of experts to conduct fire safety reviews of varying scope to evaluate the adequacy of fire safety at a specific nuclear power plant during various phases such as construction, operation and decommissioning. The IAEA nuclear safety publications related to fire protection and fire safety form a common basis for these reviews. This report provides guidance for the experts involved in the organization and conduct of fire safety review services to ensure consistency and comprehensiveness of the reviews

  16. Urgent Safety Measures in Japan after Great East Japan Earthquake

    Taniura, W.; Otani, H.

    2012-01-01

    Due to tsunami triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, the operating and refueling reactor facilities at Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni Nuclear Power Plants of Tokyo Electric Power Co. caused a nuclear hazard. Japanese electric power companies voluntarily began to compile various urgent measures against tsunami within the week the hazard was caused. As for the urgent safety measures of each licensee, it is clarified that effective measures have been appropriately implemented as a result of the inspection of the national government, the verification based on the guideline of the Japan Society of Maintenology and the stress test. (author)

  17. Experience with nuclear safety standards development in non-governmental international organizations

    Becker, K.

    1985-01-01

    Besides the IAEA as a 'governmental' organization dealing with basic safety recommendations addressed primarily to the national regulatory bodies in developing countries, two closely related non-governmental international standards organizations have gained extensive experience in the field of nuclear standardization. Over more than 25 years since their formation, both (a) the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO) Technical Committee 85 'Nuclear Energy', in particular in its Sub-Committee 3 'Reactor Technology and Safety' and (b) the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) Technical Committee 45 'Nuclear Instrumentation' have published numerous standards. A brief review is given of these, draft standards, and other documents planned to become international standards. Many of them deal with rather specialized topics typical for 'industrial' standards such as standardized procedures, instruments, methods, materials, test methods, terminology, and signs and symbols, but others are directly related to more basic safety issues. In some areas such as quality assurance, seismic aspects of siting and terminology, there has been in the past occasional overlap in the activities of the NUSS programme, IEC and ISO. Letters of Understanding have since 1981 contributed to clarifying the borderlines and to avoiding redundant efforts. Also, some experiences and problems are described arising, for example, from the harmonization of different national safety philosophies and traditions into universally accepted international standards, and the transfer of international standards into national standards systems. Finally, based on a recent comprehensive compilation of some 3300 nuclear standards and standards projects, an attempt is made to present a cost/benefit analysis and an outlook on future developments. (author)

  18. World's third-largest producer of nuclear power. Japan in need of energy

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Japan is the third largest oil consumer in the world behind the United States and China, and the second largest net importer of oil. Japan boasts one of the largest economies in the world. The country continues to experience a moderate economic recovery that began in 2003, following a decade of economic stagnation. Japan's real gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 2.5% in 2005 and 2.3% in 2004. The modest upturn over the last few years reflects higher business confidence in Japan, a surge in export demand led by exports to China, and robust consumer spending. Unemployment in Japan fell to 4.4% in 2005, down from an early 2003 peak of 5.5%. Japan has virtually no domestic oil or natural gas reserves, and in 2005 was the second largest net importer of crude oil in the world. Despite the country's dearth of hydrocarbon resources, Japanese companies have actively pursued upstream oil and natural gas projects overseas. Japan remains one of the major exporters of energy-sector capital equipment, and Japanese companies provide engineering, construction, and project management services for energy projects. (orig.)

  19. Atomic energy in Lithuania: Nuclear safety in 1996

    Vaishnys, P.; Krenevichius, R.; Alejev, A.; Demchenko, M.

    1997-01-01

    The first annual report of VATESI - Lithuanian Nuclear Safety Authority's activity is presented and cover description of the main results in 1996. VATESI was established in 1991 recently after regaining of independence when Ignalina NPP come into jurisdiction of Republic of Lithuania. Since the establishment in six year period of operation VATESI developed its activities considerably and now is able to perform the functions of independent regulator of nuclear safety in Lithuania. The main fields of VATESI activities in 1996 were evaluation of the safety of Ignalina NPP, supervision of Ignalina NPP's operational safety, control of the implementation of safety improvement program SIP-1 in Ignalina NPP, development of new regulatory legislation according to IAEA standards and practices, accountancy and control of nuclear materials, regulation of radioactive waste management. Detailed description of all these activities is provided in the report. In 1996 there were no safety significant events in Ignalina NPP according to the INES scale, only five events received qualification as level 1 events

  20. Comparative study on the Nuclear Energy Laws of Korea and Japan

    Sin, Byung Woo; Park, Jae Beom; Chung, Sang Tae

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear materials are commonly used for civil and military purposes. Theses materials are used in medical, industrial and research fields. Applications for depleted uranium include radiation shielding material used in radiological-camera devices, protecting people from radioactive sources used in the medical and industrial fields. Industrial gamma radiography uses sealed radioactive sources. Depleted Uranium(DU) is a by-product of enriched or reprocessed uranium. DU refers to uranium in which the isotopes of uranium-235 are less than that occurring in natural. Most stocks of depleted uranium were made of result of enrichment operations. The IAEA requested that Korea establish and manage laws governing all nuclear materials through the INFCIRC/153. Korea has tried its best to meet this international standard of regulating nuclear materials, including small quantity nuclear materials. The government has also ask KINAC to establish a system for monitoring nuclear material in the industrial fields. Regarding this issue, it is beneficial to make an in depth study of Japan's regulation system. Because Japan has a similar industrial structure and law system, surveying Japan's system for DU management can be a good guide to establish a management system for small quantity nuclear materials in Korea

  1. Nuclear Forensics Technologies in Japan

    Shinohara, N.; Kimura, Y.; Okubo, A.; Tomikawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is the analysis of intercepted illicit nuclear or radioactive material and any associated material to provide evidence for nuclear attribution by determining origin, history, transit routes and purpose involving such material. Nuclear forensics activities include sampling of the illicit material, analysis of the samples and evaluation of the attribution by comparing the analysed data with database or numerical simulation. Because the nuclear forensics methodologies provide hints of the origin of the nuclear materials used in illegal dealings or nuclear terrorism, it contributes to identify and indict offenders, hence to enhance deterrent effect against such terrorism. Worldwide network on nuclear forensics can lead to strengthening global nuclear security regime. In the ESARDA Symposium 2015, the results of research and development of fundamental nuclear forensics technologies performed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency during the term of 2011-2013 were reported, namely (1) technique to analyse isotopic composition of nuclear material, (2) technique to identify the impurities contained in the material, (3) technique to determine the age of the purified material by measuring the isotopic ratio of daughter thorium to parent uranium, (4) technique to make image data by observing particle shapes with electron microscope, and (5) prototype nuclear forensics library for comparison of the analysed data with database in order to evaluate its evidence such as origin and history. Japan’s capability on nuclear forensics and effective international cooperation are also mentioned for contribution to the international nuclear forensics community.

  2. Nuclear safety regulations

    1998-01-01

    The Departmental Rules and The Safety Guides were issued by the NNSA in 1998. The NNSA performed the activities of propagation and implementation of nuclear safety regulations at QTNPP in order to improve the nuclear safety culture of operating organization and construct and contract organizations

  3. Nuclear Energy Law and Arbo Law/Safety Law

    Eijnde, J.G. van den

    1986-01-01

    The legal aspects of radiation protection in the Netherlands are described. Radiation protection is regulated mainly in the Nuclear Energy Law. The Arbo Law also has some sections about radiation protection. The interaction between both laws is discussed. (Auth.)

  4. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The expanded role of the IAEA in the field of nuclear power safety will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to the NUSS program (the letters being an acronym for Nuclear Safety Standards) to establish internationally accepted safety codes and guides for nuclear power plants dealing with governmental regulatory organizations, siting, design, operation and quality assurance. Other activities discussed will be advisory services, exchange of information and training, emergency accident assistance, and technical assistance. (orig./RW)

  5. Japan's new basic energy plan

    Duffield, John S.; Woodall, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In June 2010, the Japanese cabinet adopted a new Basic Energy Plan (BEP). This was the third such plan that the government has approved since the passage of the Basic Act on Energy Policy in 2002, and it represents the most significant statement of Japanese energy policy in more than four years, since the publication of the New National Energy Strategy (NNES) in 2006. Perhaps more than its predecessors, moreover, the new plan establishes a number of ambitious targets as well as more detailed measures for achieving those targets. Among the targets are a doubling of Japan's 'energy independence ratio,' a doubling of the percentage of electricity generated by renewable sources and nuclear power, and a 30 percent reduction in energy-related CO 2 emissions, all by 2030. This paper explains the origins of the 2010 BEP and why it was adopted. It then describes the content of the plan and how it differs from the NNES. A third section analyzes the appropriateness of the new goals and targets contained in the BEP and their feasibility, finding that achievement of many of the targets was likely to be quite challenging even before the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis. - Highlights: → Origins of Japan's new Basic Energy Plan. → Content of Japan's new Basic Energy Plan. → Feasibility of achieving the targets in Japan's new Basic Energy Plan. → Impact of 2011 earthquake and tsunami on Japanese energy policy.

  6. Investigation of radiation safety management at nuclear medicine facilities in Japan. Contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system

    Endo, Keigo; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kinoshita, Fujimi; Nakazawa, Keiji

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-safety management condition in Japanese nuclear medicine facilities were investigated by the questionnaire method. The first questionnaire was asked in all Japanese 1,401 Nuclear Medicine facilities. Answers from 624 institutes (44.5%) were received and analyzed. The radiation-safety management in nuclear medicine institutes was considered to be very well performed everyday. Opinion for the present legal control of nuclear medicine institutes was that the regulation in Japan was too strict for the clinical use of radionuclides. The current regulation is based on the assumption that 1% of all radioactivity used in nuclear medicine institutes contaminates into the draining-water system. The second questionnaire detailing the contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system was sent to 128 institutes, and 64 answers were received. Of them, 42 institutes were considered to be enough to evaluate the contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system. There was no difference between 624 institutes answered to the first questionnaire and 42 institutes, where the radioactivity in the draining-water system measured, in the distribution of the institute size, draining-water system equipment and the radioactivity measuring method, and these 42 institutes seemed to be representative of Japanese nuclear medicine institutes. Contamination rate of radioactivity into the draining system was calculated by the value of radioactivity in the collecting tank divided by the amount of radionuclides used daily in each institute. The institutes were divided into two categories on the basis of nuclear medicine practice pattern; type A: in-vivo use only and type B: both in-vivo and in-vitro use. The contamination rate in 27 type A institutes did not exceed 0.01%, whereas in 15 type B institutes the contamination rate distributed widely from undetectable to above 1%. These results indicated that the present regulation for the draining-water system, which assumed

  7. Nuclear Energy Data 2013

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants declined in 2012 as a result of operational issues at some facilities and suspended operation at all but two reactors in Japan. Nuclear safety was further strengthened in 2012 following safety reviews prompted by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix pursued initiatives to increase nuclear generating capacity. In Turkey, plans were finalised for the construction of the first four reactors for commercial electricity production. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'Statlinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link [fr

  8. Plant specific safety inspection of German nuclear power plants taking into account the Fukushima-I (Japan) events

    2011-01-01

    The German Parliament requested (17 March 2011) a comprehensive inspection of German nuclear power plants. For this purpose independent expert commissions should perform a new risk analysis of all German NPPS and nuclear installations with respect to the lessons learned from the Fukushima (Japan) events and other extraordinary damage scenarios. The Reactor safety commission (RSK) was assigned by the German Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz to develop a catalogue of requirements for this safety inspection. The contribution summarizes the required inspection volume (status 30.03.2011) including the following events: natural events like earth quakes, floods, weather-based consequences and possible superposition. Additionally the following assumptions have to be considered: event independent postulated common failures or systematic faults, station blackout larger than 2 hours, long-term failure of the auxiliary cooling water supply; aggravating boundary conditions for the performance of emergency measures (non-availability of power supply), hydrogen generation and detonation hazard, restricted personnel availability, non-accessibility due to high radiation levels, impeded technical support from outside. (orig.)

  9. International conference on challenges faced by technical and scientific support organizations in enhancing nuclear safety. Contributed papers and presentations

    2007-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the IAEA has conducted a series of major conferences that have addressed topical issues and strategies critical to nuclear safety for consideration by the world's nuclear regulators. More recently, the IAEA organized the International Conference on Effective Nuclear Regulatory Systems - Facing Safety and Security Challenges, held in Moscow in 2006. The Moscow conference was the first of its kind, because it brought together senior regulators of nuclear safety, radiation safety and security from around the world to discuss how to improve regulatory effectiveness with the objective of improving the protection of the public and the users of nuclear and radioactive material. The International Conference on Challenges Faced by Technical and Scientific Support Organizations in Enhancing Nuclear Safety was held in Aix-en-Provence, France, from 23 to 27 April 2007. This conference, again, was the first of its kind, because it was the first to address technical and scientific support organizations (TSOs), the role they play in supporting either the national regulatory bodies or the industry in making optimum safety decisions and the challenges they face in providing this support. This conference provided a forum for the TSOs to discuss these and other issues with the organizations to which they provide this support - that is, the regulators and the operators/industry - as well as with other stakeholders such as research organizations and public authorities. This conference can also be considered to have a link to the Moscow conference. The Moscow conference concluded that effective regulation of nuclear safety is vital for the safe use of nuclear energy and associated technologies, both now and in the future, and is an essential prerequisite for establishing an effective Global Nuclear Safety Regime. The Moscow conference also highlighted the importance of continued and improved international cooperation in the area of nuclear safety. These

  10. Current Status of World Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology (II): Japan

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Ko, Won Il

    2007-06-01

    Japan needs to import around 80% of its energy requirements. In 1966, the first nuclear power plant began operation, nuclear energy has been a national strategic priority since 1973. Currently, 55 reactors provide around 30% of the country's electricity. Japanese energy policy has been conducted by the energy security and minimization of dependence of energy imports. The main factors regarding nuclear power are: - Continue to have nuclear power as a main factor of electricity production. - Recycle uranium and plutonium, and start domestic reprocessing from 2005. - Continue to develop fast breeder reactors to increase uranium utilization. - Promote the nuclear transparency to the public, emphasizing safety and non-proliferation. Also, the prospects of Asia's nuclear energy growth has been reviewed

  11. Nuclear safety in France

    Queniart, D.

    1989-12-01

    This paper outlines the organizational and technical aspects of nuclear safety in France. From the organization point of view, the roles of the operator, of the safety authority and of the Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety are developed. From the technical viewpoint, the evolution of safety since the beginning of the French nuclear programme, the roles of deterministic and probabilistic methods and the severe accident policy (prevention and mitigation, venting containment) in France are explained

  12. The Fukushima Nuclear Accident and a Long-Term Energy Vision for Japan

    Yuhara, Tetsuo

    2012-04-01

    Ifri and the Canon Institute for Global Studies are launching a series of policy papers presenting the analyses of senior Japanese researchers on how the triple disasters that hit the archipelago last March have impacted Japan's economic, environmental and energy policies as well as country's crisis management system. This paper presents the author's opinion regarding the media coverage of the Fukushima accident and the consequences of this serious accident for the Japanese energy policy

  13. Nuclear Energy General Objectives

    2011-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world'. One way it achieves this objective is to issue publications in various series. Two of these series are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III, paragraph A.6, of the IAEA Statute, the IAEA safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are primarily written in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own activities. The principal users are Member State regulatory bodies and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series consists of reports designed to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia and politicians, among others. The information is presented in guides, reports on the status of technology and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The series complements the IAEA's safety standards, and provides detailed guidance, experience, good practices and examples on the five areas covered in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. The Nuclear Energy Basic Principles is the highest level publication in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and describes the rationale and vision for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It presents eight Basic Principles on which nuclear energy systems should be based to fulfil nuclear energy's potential to help meet growing global energy needs. The Nuclear Energy Series Objectives are the second level publications. They describe what needs to be

  14. SAFETY FIRST

    2007-01-01

    Ensuring safety while peacefully utilizing nuclear energy is a top priority for China A fter a recent earthquake in Japan caused radioactive leaks at a nuclear power plant in Tokyo, the safety of nuclear energy has again aroused public attention.

  15. Global nuclear safety culture

    1997-01-01

    As stated in the Nuclear Safety Review 1996, three components characterize the global nuclear safety culture infrastructure: (i) legally binding international agreements; (ii) non-binding common safety standards; and (iii) the application of safety standards. The IAEA has continued to foster the global nuclear safety culture by supporting intergovernmental collaborative efforts; it has facilitated extensive information exchange, promoted the drafting of international legal agreements and the development of common safety standards, and provided for the application of safety standards by organizing a wide variety of expert services

  16. Nuclear health and safety

    1991-04-01

    Numerous environmental, safety, and health problems found at other Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities precipitated a review of these conditions at DOE's contractor-operated Pantex Plant, where our nation's nuclear weapons are assembled. This book focuses the review on examining key safety and health problems at Pantex and determining the need for external safety oversight of the plant

  17. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization guidance for the development of continuing technical training. Revision 1

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in nuclear criticality safety at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and throughout the DOE complex. Continuing technical training is training outside of the initial qualification program to address identified organization-wide needs. Typically, this training is used to improve organization performance in the conduct of business. This document provides guidelines for the development of the technical portions of the Continuing Training Program. It is not a step-by-step procedure, but a collection of considerations to be used during the development process

  18. Status of the support researches for the regulation of nuclear facilities decommissioning in Japan

    Masuda, Yusuke; Iguchi, Yukihiro; Kawasaki, Satoru; Kato, Masami

    2011-01-01

    In Japan, 4 nuclear power stations are under decommissioning and some nuclear fuel cycle facilities are expected to be decommissioned in the future. On the other hand, the safety regulation of decommissioning of nuclear facilities was changed by amending act in 2005. An approval system after review process of decommissioning plan was adopted and applied to the power stations above. In this situation, based on the experiences of the new regulatory system, the system should be well established and moreover, it should be improved and enhanced in the future. Nuclear Industry and Safety Agency (NISA) is in charge of regulation of commercial nuclear facilities in Japan and decommissioning of them is included. Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) is in charge of technical supports for NISA as a TSO (Technical Support Organization) also in this field. As for decommissioning, based on regulatory needs, JNES has been continuing research activities from October 2003, when JNES has been established. Considering the 'Prioritized Nuclear Safety Research Plan (August 2009)' of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan and the situation of operators facilities, 'Regulatory Support Research Plan between FY 2010-2014' was established in November 2009, which shows the present regulatory needs and a research program. This program consists of researches for 1. review process of decommissioning plan of power reactors, 2. review process of decommissioning plan of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, 3. termination of license at the end of decommissioning and 4. management of decommissioning waste. For the item 1, JNES studied safety assessment methods of dismantling, e.g. obtaining data and analysis of behavior of dust diffusion and risk assessment during decommissioning, which are useful findings for the review process. For the item 2, safety requirements for the decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities was compiled, which will be used in the future review. For the item 3

  19. White paper on nuclear safety in 2005

    2006-04-01

    The white paper consists of four parts. The first part described the outline of international discussions on safety culture and activities promoted by utilities and regulatory bodies in Japan. The second part explained the main activities of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan and nuclear regulatory authorities on nuclear safety regulation. The third part introduced various activities for ensuring overall nuclear safety in Japan, such as safety regulation systems for nuclear facilities, disaster measures at nuclear facilities, progress in nuclear research, nuclear safety regulation by risk-informed utilization, environmental radiation surveys, international cooperation on nuclear safety. The forth part contained various materials and data related to the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. (J.P.N.)

  20. CENS as a network for knowledge dissemination and for expertise on energy, nuclear safety and security

    Chakraborty, S.; Stoian, A.

    2005-01-01

    This is a time when the whole of Europe faces energy and environmental transitions. CEE countries face in addition the challenge of implementing medium- to long-term energy reforms in order to comply with EU legislation and practices. Crucial to the proper managing of these common and fundamental concerns is the cooperation between developed and transforming countries. At a lower level this implies that problems specific to CEE countries, such as fragmentation and lack of performing resources, can be overcome through collaboration and knowledge transfer within a network of concerned and competent entities. As an organization aiming to support environmental protection by enhancing the safety and security of nuclear facilities in CEE countries, CENS is focused on being an independent forum and platform organization for the dissemination of scientific and technical knowledge and of expertise in the nuclear and energy-related communities. In seeking to achieve this objective, CENS has over the past two years provided a system of networking and international membership for nuclear regulators in CEE countries and for technical support organizations from around Europe. (orig.)

  1. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Smith, Brian; Gschwend, Beatrice

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI's Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. Comprehensive assessments of energy systems are carried out in cooperation with PSI's General Energy Research Department. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided

  2. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Smith, Brian; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI's Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. Comprehensive assessments of energy systems are carried out in cooperation with PSI's General Energy Research Department. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  3. Development of nuclear powered ship in Japan

    Sato, Hiroshi

    1976-01-01

    The development of nuclear merchant ship in Japan was started in 1955 by the establishment of Nuclear Ship Study Group, and since then, the investigation, test and research on nuclear ships have been continued. As a result, a nuclear ocean observation and supply ship was designed for trial. Researches were carried out also in JAERI and Institute for Technical Research of Ships. Meanwhile, the nuclear icebreaker Lenin was completed in Soviet Union in 1959, the nuclear ship Savannah set out for maiden voyage in U.S. in 1962, and the construction of the nuclear ore carrier Otto Hahn was prepared in FRG. Japan Nuclear Ship Development Corp. was established in 1963, and started the design and construction of the first nuclear ship in Japan, Mutsu. The basic policy in the construction is the improvement of nuclear ship technology, the securing of safety, and the use of domestic technologies as far as possible. The progress of the design, construction and test of the Mutsu is described. Owing to the problem of radiation leak, the development of nuclear ships stagnated for a while, but the nuclear plant of the Mutsu demonstrated the expected performance in the functional test, land criticality test and zero output test, and it is expected that the bud of the independent development brought up so far can bear valuable fruit. The independent development of marine nuclear reactors should be continued by selecting the way most suitable to Japan. (Kako, I.)

  4. Human resources development in nuclear field in Japan

    Seki, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In this report, the recent topics in the nuclear field, some investigated data on human resources development (HRD) in nuclear field in Japan and the status of HRD and strategy are presented. We have investigated the basic data on HRD in nuclear field in some Asian countries so that the data could be used to develop HRD strategy. The basic data have been investigated for Japan in the following area. (1) Numbers of graduate and undergraduate students and faculty members for each of the nuclear related departments in the universities have been investigated; (2) The information on the academic associations and societies related to nuclear field has been collected; (3) In addition to the basic data directly related to human resources, the data related to the strategy for nuclear utilization such as the data on research reactors, the data on the level of the application of RI and radiation in medicine, agriculture, industry and environment and the future plan to construct NPPs, the number of NPPs being constructed and NPPs under operation have been collected and tabulated for each country. In Japan, many of the experienced nuclear engineers and scientists who have constructed nuclear power plants and developed the application methodology of RI and radiation, are aging and retiring. Also with the decrease in the construction of nuclear power plants and decrease in the nuclear energy research expenditures, it is becoming more difficult to maintain the present level of capability in designing and manufacturing of nuclear facilities. On the other hand, the educational infrastructures in the universities such as nuclear research reactors and the facilities where handling of radioactive materials is permitted, are deteriorating due to the difficulties to meet the more strict regulatory requirements. With the decrease in the popularity of nuclear energy and maturing of nuclear technology it is becoming more difficult to attract sufficient number of promising young individuals

  5. Current status of international cooperation on nuclear safety research

    Katsuragi, Satoru

    1984-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), as a representative organization in Japan, has been participating in many international cooperations on nuclear safety research. This report reviews the recent achievement and evolution of the international cooperative safety studies. Twelve projects that are based on the agreements between JAERI and foreign organizations are reviewed. As the fuel irradiation studies, the recent achievement of the OECD Halden Reactor Project and the agreement between Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Battelle Memorial Institute, and JAERI are explained. As for the study of reactivity accident, the cooperation of the NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) project in Japan with PBF, PNS and PHEBUS projects in the U.S., West Germany and France, respectively, are now in progress. The fuel performance in abnormal transient and the experiment and analysis of severe fuel damage are the new areas of international interest. The OECD/LOFT project and ROSA-4 projects are also explained in connection with the FP source term problem and the analysis codes such as RELAP-5 and TRAC. As the safety studies associated with the downstream of the nuclear fuel cycle, the BEFAST project of IAEA and the ISIRS project of OECD/NEA are shortly reviewed. (Aoki, K.)

  6. Proceedings of the seminar on nuclear safety research and the workshop on reactor safety research

    2001-07-01

    The seminar on the nuclear safety research was held on November 20, 2000 according to the start of new five year safety research plan (FY2001-2005: established by Nuclear Safety Commission) with 79 participants. In the seminar, Commissioner Dr. Kanagawa gave the outline of the next five year safety research plan. Following this presentation, progresses and future scopes of safety researches in the fields of reactor facility, fuel cycle facility, radioactive waste and environmental impact on radiation at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were reported. After the seminar, the workshop on reactor safety research was held on November 21-22, 2000 with 141 participants. In the workshop, four sessions titled safety of efficient and economic utilization of nuclear fuel, safety related to long-term utilization of power reactors, research on common safety-related issues and toward further improvement of nuclear safety were organized and, outcomes and future perspectives in these wide research R and D in the related area at other organizations including NUPEC, JAPEIC and Kansai Electric Power Co. was presented in each session. This report compiles outlines of the presentations and used materials in the seminar and the workshop to form the proceedings for the both meetings. (author)

  7. China's nuclear safety regulatory body: The national nuclear safety administration

    Zhang Shiguan

    1991-04-01

    The establishment of an independent nuclear safety regulatory body is necessary for ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and nuclear fuel. Therefore the National Nuclear Safety Administration was established by the state. The aim, purpose, organization structure and main tasks of the Administration are presented. At the same time the practical examples, such as nuclear safety regulation on the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, safety review and inspections for the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant during the construction, and nuclear material accounting and management system in the nuclear fuel fabrication plant in China, are given in order to demonstrate the important roles having been played on nuclear safety by the Administration after its founding

  8. Nuclear services for Japan

    Anderson, B.

    1991-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) became AEA Technology in April 1990. The commercial interests are focussed through 4 business units: AEA Reactor Services, with whom several contracts have been won from Japanese customers for high resolution Field Emission Gun Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (FEGSTEM); AEA Fuel Services, a contract is being negotiated with an existing Japanese customer; AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, with whom further development of an alternative approach to evaporation of liquid waste effluent for specific application in Japan is in progress; AEA Fusion. 1 fig

  9. Nuclear energy

    Hesketh, Ross.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is treated under the headings: nuclear energy -what is it; fusion (principles; practice); fission (principles); reactor types and systems (fast (neutron) reactors as breeders; fast reactors; thermal reactors; graphite-moderated thermal reactors; the CANDU reactor; light water reactors - the BWR and the PWR); the nuclear fuel cycle (waste storage; fuel element manufacture; enrichment processes; uranium mining); safety and risk assessment; the nuclear power industry and the economy (regulating authorities; economics; advantages and disadvantages). (U.K.)

  10. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti [KINS-KAIST Master Degree Program, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  11. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  12. Good performance in Japan is proof of continuing safety and reliability improvement practice

    Sumi, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power is a vital energy supply source for both security and economy for such countries as Japan whose sources of energy are dependent on imported materials. This is the very reason why Japan gives her national priority to the improvement of nuclear power safety and reliability. As of the end of 1986, total nuclear power capacity owned and operated by private utility companies in Japan amounted to 24521 MW with 32 units sharing -- 19% of the total generating capacity. Moreover, during 1986 these units scored a remarkably high capacity factor of 76.2% and shared almost 28% of the nationwide electric power production, thereby contributing to a considerable saving of imported sources of energy. This outstanding record has been achieved by the parties concerned who dedicated themselves to furthering nuclear plant safety and reliability improvement. In this connection, this paper summarizes those key factors contributing to the good nuclear power plant performance of the Kansai Electric Power Company

  13. A cost and safety superiority of fusion-fission hybrid reactor in China nuclear energy development

    Pereslavtszev, P.E.; Luan Guishi; Xia Chengang

    1994-08-01

    Considering economy and safety, an optimization model of nuclear energy developing scenarios of China was set up. An objective function to optimize was determined. Three prospective developing scenarios of China nuclear energy system including hybrid reactor were calculated and discussed. In the system which has no fissile material exchange with other system, a smooth developing model has a smooth distribution of inventory of Pu, thus the potential danger of whole nuclear energy system will be decreased. This scheme will improve investment effectiveness. Result shows that the optimization is necessary and the significant profit in cost and safety can be obtained. (5 tabs., 8 figs., 12 refs.)

  14. Situation of nuclear industry in Japan

    2002-08-01

    This document is a reprint of a note published by the nuclear service of the French embassy in Japan. It evokes the present day situation of nuclear facilities in Japan, the public acceptance and its attitude in front of accidents, the national energy program, the deregulation and competitiveness of nuclear power, the carrying out of the nuclear program, the future reactors, the fast neutron reactors, the dismantling activities, the fuel enrichment and reprocessing of spent fuels, the use of MOX fuel, the off-site storage, the vitrified and radiological wastes, the geological disposal of wastes, the prospects of the nuclear program, the companies involved in the Japan nuclear industry, the French-Japanese bilateral cooperation, and the ITER project in the domain of nuclear fusion. (J.S.)

  15. Licensing and decommissioning of nuclear installations in Japan

    Shimoyama, Shunji.

    1986-01-01

    The present report discusses the current status of Japan's licensing system and legislation concerning reactor decommissioning operations. Besides Japan is working to promote worldwide nuclear safety research. However, developing nuclear safety regulations that are uniformely applicable is a difficult job due to big differences in geographical, political, economical, and technological conditions. (CW) [de

  16. Nuclear safety

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  17. Nuclear safety

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  18. Proceedings of the nuclear safety seminar, 2011

    Amin S Zarkasih; Dhandang P; Rohadi A; Djarwani; Santoso; Abdul Waris; Zaki Su'ud; Sihana; Heryudo Kusumo; Yusri Heni; Yus Rusdian; Judi Pramono; Amil Mardha

    2011-06-01

    The Proceedings of the nuclear safety seminar by Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency with the theme of strengthening in nuclear safety control, nuclear security and nuclear safeguard to Introduction of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Indonesia held on Jakarta 27-28 June 2011. The seminar is an annual routine activities which organized by Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) as an exchange for information from scientists and researchers for using nuclear technology. The proceeding consist of 4 articles from keynotes’ speaker and 39 articles from BAPETEN, BATAN and outside participants. (PPIKSN)

  19. ESRS guidelines for software safety reviews. Reference document for the organization and conduct of Engineering Safety Review Services (ESRS) on software important to safety in nuclear power plants

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA provides safety review services to assist Member States in the application of safety standards and, in particular, to evaluate and facilitate improvements in nuclear power plant safety performance. Complementary to the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) and the International Regulatory Review Team (IRRT) services are the Engineering Safety Review Services (ESRS), which include reviews of siting, external events and structural safety, design safety, fire safety, ageing management and software safety. Software is of increasing importance to safety in nuclear power plants as the use of computer based equipment and systems, controlled by software, is increasing in new and older plants. Computer based devices are used in both safety related applications (such as process control and monitoring) and safety critical applications (such as reactor protection). Their dependability can only be ensured if a systematic, fully documented and reviewable engineering process is used. The ESRS on software safety are designed to assist a nuclear power plant or a regulatory body of a Member State in the review of documentation relating to the development, application and safety assessment of software embedded in computer based systems important to safety in nuclear power plants. The software safety reviews can be tailored to the specific needs of the requesting organization. Examples of such reviews are: project planning reviews, reviews of specific issues and reviews prior final acceptance. This report gives information on the possible scope of ESRS software safety reviews and guidance on the organization and conduct of the reviews. It is aimed at Member States considering these reviews and IAEA staff and external experts performing the reviews. The ESRS software safety reviews evaluate the degree to which software documents show that the development process and the final product conform to international standards, guidelines and current practices. Recommendations are

  20. International human cooperation in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Shiba, Koreyuki; Kaieda, Keisuke; Makuuchi, Keizo; Takada, Kazuo; Nomura, Masayuki

    1997-01-01

    Rearing of talented persons in the area of nuclear energy is one of the important works in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this report, the present situations and future schedules of international human cooperation in this area wsere summarized. First, the recent activities of International Nuclear Technology Center were outlined in respect of international human cooperation. A study and training course which was started in cooperation with JICA and IAEA from the middle of eighties and the international nuclear safety seminar aiming at advancing the nuclear safety level of the world are now being put into practice. In addition, a study and training for rearing talented persons was started from 1996 to improve the nuclear safety level of the neighbouring countries. The activities of the nuclear research interchange system by Science and Technology Agency established in 1985 and Bilateral Co-operation Agreement from 1984 were explained and also various difficulties in the international cooperation were pointed out. (M.N.)

  1. The key role of nuclear energy to strengthen economic safety for France and the European Union

    Jouette, Isabelle; Le Ngoc, Boris; Chenu, Anne; Nieuviaert, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This publication first discusses how to improve the external safety (energy independence) for France. It outlines that nuclear energy is a safety factor for the economy, that France needs to reduce its dependence on fossil energies through an electrification of uses, that imports of fossil energies can be reduced by developing nuclear research. In a second part, it discusses how to improve internal supply safety for France and for the EU. It evokes the crisis situation faced by the European electricity market, outlines the need to invest in existing nuclear production capacities, the need to stabilize the electric system, and to take better advantage of non-carbon energies (possible future technological advances of the energy sector are evoked)

  2. Research on energy supply, demand and economy forecasting in Japan

    Shiba, Tsuyoshi; Kamezaki, Hiroshi; Yuyama, Tomonori; Suzuki, Atsushi

    1999-10-01

    This project aims to do research on forecasts of energy demand structure and electricity generation cost in each power plant in Japan in the 21st century, considering constructing successful FBR scenario. During the process of doing research on forecasts of energy demand structure in Japan, documents published from organizations in inside and outside of Japan were collected. These documents include prospects of economic growth rate, forecasts of amount for energy supply and demand, the maximum amount of introducing new energy resources, CO2 regulation, and evaluation of energy best mixture. Organizations in Japan such as Economic Council and Japan Energy Economic Research Institute have provided long-term forecasts until the early 21st century. Meanwhile, organizations overseas have provided forecasts of economic structure, and demand and supply for energy in OECD and East Asia including Japan. In connection with forecasts of electricity generation cost in each power plant, views on the ultimate reserves and cost of resources are reviewed in this report. According to some views on oil reserves, making assumptions based on reserves/production ratio, the maximum length of the time that oil reserves will last is 150 years. In addition, this report provides summaries of cost and potential role of various resources, including solar energy and wind energy; and views on waste, safety, energy security-related externality cost, and the price of transferring CO2 emission right. (author)

  3. International nuclear energy guide

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current technical and economical events in the nuclear field. Twelve papers have been abstracted and input to the data base. The ''international nuclear energy guide'' gives a general directory of the name, the address and the telephone number of the companies and bodies quoted in this guide; a chronology of the main events 1982. The administrative and professional organization, the nuclear courses and research centers in France are presented, as also the organization of protection and safety, and of nuclear fuel cycle. The firms concerned by the design and the construction of NSSS and the allied nuclear firms are also presented. The last part of this guide deals with the nuclear energy in the world: descriptive list of international organizations, and, the nuclear activities throughout the world (alphabetical order by countries) [fr

  4. Nuclear energy in Lithuania: Its role, efficiency and safety issues

    Miskinis, V.; Galinis, A.; Streimikiene, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of the Lithuanian economy and the power sector as well as problems related to further operation of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (Ignalina NPP) which plays a crucial role in the Lithuanian energy sector. Recent studies have validated that it is economical to keep the Ignalina NPP in operation as long as it is possible and the necessary licenses can be obtained. However, its safe operation remains a very important issue determining its lifetime. Development of an infrastructure and activities necessary for safe and reliable operation of the plant are also very important. (author)

  5. Japan's new energy policy

    2014-11-01

    Japan's energy policy is undergoing fundamental changes. The accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant questions the future contribution of nuclear power in the national energy mix. Growing imports of fossil fuels to replace the lost nuclear capacity inflated energy prices and raise economic and energy security challenges. At the same time, the US shale gas and oil revolution is reshaping the global energy scene. Japan expects to take advantage of the trend to eliminate the 'Asian premium' on natural gas prices and expand cheaper natural gas consumption. These developments have driven the Government of Japan to review its energy policy from scratch and adopt a new Strategic Energy Plan. This new policy has far reaching implications for gas and coal development in Japan but also for the international markets as Japan is the world's largest LNG importer and the second largest coal importer. This document summarizes the key findings of a new report by CEDIGAZ 'Japan's new energy policy: In search for stable and competitive energy supply'. The report analyzes the current changes taking place on the gas and coal markets in Japan, in light of the new energy policy adopted in April 2014, and in particular the decision to restart safe nuclear power plants and push forward electricity market reforms

  6. Proceedings of fifth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety

    1997-01-01

    The fifth international topical meeting on nuclear thermohydraulics, operations and safety was convened in Beijing in April 14-18, 1997. The topical meeting was sponsored by the Chinese Nuclear Society and cosponsored by American Nuclear Society, Atomic Energy Society of Japan, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Canada Nuclear Society, Korean Nuclear Society, Mexican Nuclear Society, Nuclear Society of Slovenia and Spanish Nuclear Society. There were 262 articles were published in the meeting. They are related nuclear power thermohydraulics, operations and safety

  7. Plutonium ocean shipment safety between Europe and Japan

    Pierce, J.D.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.; McClure, J.D.; Smith, J.D.; Dukart, R.J.; Koski, J.A.; Braithwate, J.W.; Sorenson, N.R.; Yamamoto, K.; Kitamura, T.; Shibata, K.; Ouchi, Y.; Ito, T.

    2004-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) have conducted an extensive emergency response planning study of the safety of the sea transport of plutonium for JNC. This study was conducted in response to international concerns about the safety of the marine transport of PuO2 powder that began with the sea transport of plutonium powder from France to Japan in 1992 using a purposebuilt ship. This emergency response planning study addressed four topics to better define the accident environment for long-range sea transport of nuclear materials. The first topic is a probabilistic safety analysis that evaluates the technical issues of transporting plutonium between Europe and Japan. An engine-room fire aboard a purposebuilt ship is evaluated as the second topic to determine the vulnerability and safety margin of radioactive material packaging for plutonium designed to meet International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards. The third topic is a corrosion study performed for generic plutonium packaging to estimate the time required to breach the containment boundary in the event of submersion in seawater. The final study topic is a worldwide survey of information on high-value cargo salvage capabilities from sunken ships. The primary purpose of this overall emergency response planning study is to describe and analyze the safety of radioactive material transportation operations for the international transportation of radioactive materials by maritime cargo vessels

  8. Plutonium ocean shipment safety between Europe and Japan

    Pierce, J D; Hohnstreiter, G F; McClure, J D; Smith, J D; Dukart, R J; Koski, J A; Braithwate, J W; Sorenson, N R [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamamoto, K; Kitamura, T; Shibata, K; Ouchi, Y; Ito, T [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai-mura (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) have conducted an extensive emergency response planning study of the safety of the sea transport of plutonium for JNC. This study was conducted in response to international concerns about the safety of the marine transport of PuO2 powder that began with the sea transport of plutonium powder from France to Japan in 1992 using a purposebuilt ship. This emergency response planning study addressed four topics to better define the accident environment for long-range sea transport of nuclear materials. The first topic is a probabilistic safety analysis that evaluates the technical issues of transporting plutonium between Europe and Japan. An engine-room fire aboard a purposebuilt ship is evaluated as the second topic to determine the vulnerability and safety margin of radioactive material packaging for plutonium designed to meet International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards. The third topic is a corrosion study performed for generic plutonium packaging to estimate the time required to breach the containment boundary in the event of submersion in seawater. The final study topic is a worldwide survey of information on high-value cargo salvage capabilities from sunken ships. The primary purpose of this overall emergency response planning study is to describe and analyze the safety of radioactive material transportation operations for the international transportation of radioactive materials by maritime cargo vessels.

  9. Organization and liability of British regulating authorities involved in nuclear safety and radiation protection

    Harbison, S.

    1995-01-01

    In Great Britain, nuclear safety juridic basis is made of two law: HSWA (1974) for hygiene and security in working environment, and NIA (1965) specific to nuclear sites. The HSWA law created an HSC (Hygiene and Security Commission) in charge of workers and public security. HSC executive organ is HSE, whose nuclear office is NSD. Nevertheless, the general philosophy remains the one of HSWA, which results in the liability of operators in nuclear matters, as well as for any other industrial matter. (D.L.). 1 fig., 1 map

  10. Nuclear energy

    Panait, A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a general report presenting the section VII entitled Nuclear Power of the National Conference on Energy (CNE '94) held in Neptun, Romania, on 13-16 June 1994. The problems addressed were those relating to electric power produced by nuclear power plant, to heat secondary generation, to quality assurance, to safety, etc. A special attention was paid to the commissioning of the first Romanian nuclear power unit, the Cernavoda-1 reactor of CANDU type. The communications were grouped in four subsections. These were: 1. Quality assurance, nuclear safety, and environmental protection; 2. Nuclear power plant, commissioning, and operation; 3. Nuclear power plant inspection, maintenance, and repairs, heavy water technology; 4. Public opinion education. There were 22 reports, altogether

  11. Safety hazard Iran? Between nuclear thread and peaceful use of nuclear energy

    Schroeter, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    The volume on Iran between nuclear thread and peaceful use of nuclear energy covers the following contributions: Iran versus USA: labor pains of a new world order; certainties, speculations and lack of knowledge; The nuclear conflict as symptom of deeper conflicts of the Middle East; Peaceful use of nuclear energy? The Iranian nuclear conflict; Satellite broadcast in Iranian backyards; An American invention becoming a doom for the Iran.

  12. On the state of the radiation safety in the atomic energy and nuclear industry of Russia

    Panfilov, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    The general aspects of the activity of organs of government in the field of human radiation protection and some other problems of nuclear industry connecting with the new economic and politic situation in Russia have been discussed. There are present information about the organs of government relating to the questions of radiation safety and the major directions of governmental policy in this fields. Some problems of the elimination of the consequences of the accidents in NPPs (Chernobyl, Chelyabinsk), the programs of the radiation safety improvement of population and the information about new normative nuclear safety documents have also been written in this report. (author)

  13. White paper on nuclear energy, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Japan has scant energy resources, and more than 80% of its energy demand depends on other countries. The energy problem should be considered not only from the domestic viewpoint of energy supply and demand but also from the global viewpoint. Japanese nuclear power generation accounts for about 30% of its total electric power. The main strategy of Japan is to secure stable energy supply through the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle, and to efficiently use the plutonium and residual uranium recovered from spent nuclear fuel. The sodium leakage from the prototype FBR 'Monju' in December, 1995 raised the anxiety about the nuclear policy. People living in Japan should be assured the peace of mind about the development and utilization of nuclear energy. Regarding coexistence of nuclear energy and people, stronger demand of clearer reflection of public opinion to nuclear policy, holding of the round table conferences on nuclear policy, various efforts toward the coexistence of nuclear energy and people and so on are discussed. The development and utilization of nuclear energy in Japan and overseas are reported on nuclear nonproliferation, safety assurance, information disclosure, present and future of nuclear power generation, international cooperation and others. (K.I.)

  14. Design and safety data of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan, 1977 edition

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1977-09-01

    Following on previous JAERI-M 5959(1975) and JAERI-M 6732(1976), which contained the data for design parameters, performance, components and equipments of Japanese nuclear power plants, the 1977 updated edition is compiled as of June 1977. The data are arranged and tabulated by computer processing. (auth.)

  15. Regulatory risks associated with nuclear safety legislation after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident in Japan. Focus on legal structure of the nuclear reactor regulation act

    Tanabe, Tomoyuki; Maruyama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear safety regulations enforced after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident under the Nuclear Reactor Regulation Act face the following regulatory problems that involve potential risk factors for nuclear businesses; 1) 'entity based regulation' unable to cope with business cessation or bankruptcy of the entity subject of regulation, 2) potential risk of the Nuclear Regulation Authority's inappropriate involvement in nuclear industry policy beyond their duty, and 3) compliance of backfits under vague regulations. In order to alleviate them, this report, through analyzing these regulatory problems from the view point of sound development of the nuclear industry, proposes the following regulatory reforms; (1) To clarify the rule for industry policy in nuclear regulations and enable the authority, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, to choose most appropriate industrial policy measure. (2) Through establishing safety goals as measures to promote continuous improvement of nuclear safety regulations, to stimulate timely adjustments of the regulations, and to introduce a legal mechanism into the nuclear regulation systems under which validity of administrative law and its application can be checked. (author)

  16. Regulatory practice for safety of nuclear energy in the German Democratic Republic

    Krueger, F.W.; Arndt, H.; Nessau, L.; Rabold, H.; Roehnsch, W.; Scheel, H.

    1988-01-01

    An outline of the regulatory practice applied in the GDR to ensure the safe use of nuclear energy is given in the form of answers to a questionnaire issued by the IAEA with the objective of giving the international community confidence in the safety of nuclear power programmes. (author)

  17. The Nuclear Energy Agency: Strengthening Nuclear Safety Technology and Regulation Through Effective International Cooperation

    Nieh, H.

    2016-01-01

    The NEA provides an effective forum for international co-operation on nuclear safety and regulatory issues in its specific task groups, working parties and expert groups, as well as through joint international safety research projects. In these activities, NEA member countries work together to share and analyse data and experiences, gain consensus and develop approaches that can be applied within each country’s governmental processes. Through effective international co-operation, NEA member countries have worked together to develop actions for improving their regulatory frameworks and nuclear installation safety. As a result of these efforts, safety improvements and further harmonisation have been realized in the areas operating reactors, new reactors, human and organisational factors and nuclear safety research. At the NEA, technical and programmatic work under the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), joint safety research projects and the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) have helped NEA member countries to ensure a high standard for nuclear safety and to further develop the technical knowledge base. (author)

  18. Nuclear Safety Regulations

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.

    2008-01-01

    Beside new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment ('Official Gazette' No. 15/08), from 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted Ordinance on performing nuclear activities ('Official Gazette' No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety ('Official Gazette' No. 74/06), based on Nuclear Safety Act ('Official Gazette' No. 173/03). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, submitting the application for the issue of a licence to perform nuclear activities, and the procedure for issuing decisions on granting a licence to perform a nuclear activity. The Ordinance also regulates the content of the forms for notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, as well as of the application for the issue of a licence to perform the nuclear activity and the method of keeping the register of nuclear activities. According to the Nuclear Safety Act, nuclear activities are the production, processing, use, storage, disposal, transport, import, export, possession or other handling of nuclear material or specified equipment. The Ordinance on special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned conditions, whereas compliance is established by a decision passed by the SONS. Special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety are organizational, technical, technological conditions and established system of quality assurance. In 2007, State Office for Nuclear Safety finalized the text of new Ordinance on conditions for nuclear safety and protection with regard to the siting, design, construction, use and decommissioning of a facility in which a nuclear activity is

  19. Confusion surrounding the concept of nuclear 'security'. 'Preventing Japan from going nuclear contributes to Japan's national security'?

    Kubota, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    A law enacted on June 20 to establish a new Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) fully separated from the nuclear promotional authorities. It added the provision, which says nuclear safety should be guaranteed not only to defend lives, people's health and the environment but also to 'contribute to Japan's national security', to Article 2 of the Atomic Energy Basic Law. NRA integrated the existing regulatory authorities for safety, security and safeguards, into one. Supporters of an amendment quietly slipped into the law were denying it could provide cover for military use of nuclear technology, but arouse international concern about recycling program of extracting plutonium from spent fuels. Nuclear policy minister said: 'The safeguards are in place to prevent nuclear proliferation. The world 'security' precisely means the prevention of nuclear proliferation.' If not used explicitly about safeguards, they left room for stretched interpretation. The author recommended the world' contribute to Japan's national security' should be deleted instead of explaining appropriately, both at home and abroad, the use of nuclear power in Japan limited to peaceful purposes. (T. Tanaka)

  20. Nuclear and radiological safety 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    1995-06-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear and Radiological Safety issued during the period 1980-1994. The following aspects are covered: Uranium mining and milling, Fuel fabrication and storage, Nuclear power plants, Research reactors, Radiation sources and accelerators, Transport of radioactive materials, Waste repositories, Radiation protection, Accident response, Radioactive waste management, Safety analysis, Quality management, Legal and governmental aspects

  1. The work of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency on safety and licensing of nuclear installations

    Strohl, P.

    1975-01-01

    The acceleration of nuclear power programmes in OECD Member countries is reflected in the emphasis given by OECD/NEA to its activities in nuclear safety and regulatory matters. Particular effort is devoted to work on radiation protection and radioactive waste management, safety of nuclear installations and nuclear law development. A Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations reviews the state of the art and identifies areas for research and co-ordination of national programmes. A Sub-Committee on Licensing collates information and data on licensing standards and practices of different countries with a view to considering problems of common interest. Comparative studies of various licensing systems and discussions between licensing authorities should help to improve regulatory control of nuclear installations for which there appears to be a need for internationally accepted standards in the long run. (author)

  2. Status report of the US Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program

    1994-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) implements the US Government's International Nuclear Safety Program to improve the level of safety at Soviet-designed nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Unkraine. The program is conducted consistent with guidance and policies established by the US Department of State (DOS) and the Agency for International Development and in close collaboration with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Some of the program elements were initiated in 1990 under a bilateral agreement with the former Soviet Union; however, most activities began after the Lisbon Nuclear Safety Initiative was announced by the DOS in 1992. Within DOE, the program is managed by the International Division of the Office of Nuclear Energy. The overall objective of the International Nuclear Safety Program is to make comprehensive improvements in the physical conditions of the power plants, plant operations, infrastructures, and safety cultures of countries operating Soviet-designed reactors. This status report summarizes the Internatioal Nuclear Safety Program's activities that have been completed as of September 1994 and discusses those activities currently in progress

  3. Present status of nuclear power safety studies in JAERI

    1989-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute carries out the safety research required for ensuring safety accompanying the development and utilization of atomic energy, dividing the roles with industrial circules, universities and other public research institutes. First, it carries out the research based on the yearly program of safety research, in which the subjects of safety research that the state should execute are decided. Next, it carries out a series of the safety verification test on atomic energy facilities entrusted by the state using the special account for power source development promotion countermeasures. Besides, it carries out the safety research on the specific subjects entrusted by outside organizations. The object and range of atomic energy safety at present are roughly divided into four fields, that is, nuclear power stations, nuclear fuel facilities, waste treatment and disposal, and environmental radioactivity. In order to advance the research effectively, in addition to the generalization department and the execution department, various committees are organized. In 1988, about 260 persons engaged in these four research fields, and the budget for fiscal year 1988 was about 17.4 billion yen. (K.I.)

  4. Nuclear safety culture and nuclear safety supervision

    Chai Jianshe

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the author reviews systematically and summarizes up the development process and stage characteristics of nuclear safety culture, analysis the connotation and characteristics of nuclear safety culture, sums up the achievements of our country's nuclear safety supervision, dissects the challenges and problems of nuclear safety supervision. This thesis focused on the relationship between nuclear safety culture and nuclear safety supervision, they are essential differences, but there is a close relationship. Nuclear safety supervision needs to introduce some concepts of nuclear safety culture, lays emphasis on humanistic care and improves its level and efficiency. Nuclear safety supervision authorities must strengthen nuclear safety culture training, conduct the development of nuclear safety culture, make sure that nuclear safety culture can play significant roles. (author)

  5. Nuclear Safety Culture

    2017-01-01

    Ethics is caring about people and Safety is caring that no physical harm comes to people.Therefore Safety is a type of Ethical Behavior. Culture: is The Way We Do Things Here.Safety Culture is mixture of organization traditions, values, attitudes and behaviors modeled by Its leaders and internalized by its members that serve to make nuclear safety the overriding priority. Safety Culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in Organisations and individuals which established that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance

  6. The function of specialized organization in work safety engineering for nuclear installations

    Salvatore, J.E.L.

    1989-01-01

    The attributions of Brazilian CNEN in the licensing procedures of any nuclear installation are discussed. It is shown that the work safety engineering and industrial safety constitute important functions for nuclear safety. (M.C.K.) [pt

  7. The future of nuclear energy. Safety and nuclear power plants. Contribution of engineering companies

    Garcia Rodriguez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Risk, its consideration and its acceptance or rejection, are parameters which to a large extent are independent and sometimes difficult to interrelate. Nuclear energy, unlike motoring or civil aviation, has not gained sufficient public acceptance, this despite the fact that the risk to population is by far the least of the three. It is therefore necessary to continue with its improvement is an attempt to create the same confidence in the nuclear industry, as society has placed in civil aviation. Improvement in future nuclear power plants must be a combination of improved safety and a reduction in capital investment. This objective can only be reached through standardization and international cooperation. Engineering has a very important part to play in the standardization process. An increase in engineering input during the design, construction, operation and maintenance phases of future nuclear power plants, and the application of increasingly sophisticated analysis and management tools are anticipated. Nevertheless, the financial impact on the cost of each plant will fall as a result of increased input spread throughout the range of standard plants. Our current Advanced Reactor Power Plant Programme enables the Spanish industry to participate actively in the creation of future standards nuclear power plants. Having a presence in selected engineering activities, which guarantees access to the state of the art in this area, is one of our priorities, since it will facilitate the presence of the rest of the industry in future projects. If the objectives described above are to be reached, the present involvement of the spanish industry in this programme must be maintained in the medium and long term. (Author)

  8. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex IV: PSI nuclear energy and safety

    Birchley, J.; Roesel, R.; Doesburg, R. van [eds.] [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-09-01

    Nuclear energy research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI`s Department F4. It is explicitly mentioned in the Institute`s official charter and commands about one fifth of the Institute`s federal resources. Presently, PSI invests approx. 200 py/a in nuclear energy research, one third of this being externally funded; the share of external funding in investment costs totals approx. 50%. This funding is provided by the Swiss utilities and the NAGRA, the Safety Authority (HSK) and the former National Fund for Energy Research (NEFF). PSI`s activities in nuclear research concentrate on three main areas: safety of operating plants, safety features of future reactor concepts and waste management. 7% of personnel are invested in addressing global aspects of energy. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  9. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex IV: PSI nuclear energy and safety

    Birchley, J.; Roesel, R.; Doesburg, R. van

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear energy research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI's Department F4. It is explicitly mentioned in the Institute's official charter and commands about one fifth of the Institute's federal resources. Presently, PSI invests approx. 200 py/a in nuclear energy research, one third of this being externally funded; the share of external funding in investment costs totals approx. 50%. This funding is provided by the Swiss utilities and the NAGRA, the Safety Authority (HSK) and the former National Fund for Energy Research (NEFF). PSI's activities in nuclear research concentrate on three main areas: safety of operating plants, safety features of future reactor concepts and waste management. 7% of personnel are invested in addressing global aspects of energy. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  10. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs.

  11. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs

  12. Short- and long-range energy strategies for Japan and the world after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Muraoka, K.; Wagner, F.; Yamagata, Y.; Donné, A.J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in 2011 has caused profound effects on energy policies in Japan and worldwide. This is particularly because it occurred at the time of the growing awareness of global warming forcing measures towards decarbonised energy production, namely the use of fossil fuels has to be drastically reduced from the present level of more than 80% by 2050. A dilemma has now emerged because nuclear power, a CO 2 -free technology with proven large-scale energy production capability, lost confidence in many societies, especially in Japan and Germany. As a consequence, there is a world-wide effort now to expand renewable energies (REs), specifically photo-voltaic (PV) and wind power. However, the authors conjecture that PV and wind power can provide only up to a 40% share of the electricity production as long as sufficient storage is not available. Beyond this level, the technological (high grid power) and economic problems (large surplus production) grow. This is the result of the analysis of the growing use of REs in the electricity systems for Germany and Japan. The key element to overcome this situation is to develop suitable energy storage technologies. This is particularly necessary when electricity will become the main energy source because also transportation, process heat and heating, will be supplied by it. Facing the difficulty in replacing all fossil fuels in all countries with different technology standards, a rapid development of carbon capture and storage (CCS) might also be necessary. Therefore, for the short-range strategy up to 2050, all meaningful options have to be developed. For the long-range strategy beyond 2050, new energy sources (such as thermonuclear fusion, solar fuels and nuclear power—if inherently safe concepts will gain credibility of societies again), and large-scale energy storage systems based on novel concepts (such as large-capacity batteries and hydrogen) is required. It is acknowledged

  13. Short- and long-range energy strategies for Japan and the world after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Muraoka, K.; Wagner, F.; Yamagata, Y.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in 2011 has caused profound effects on energy policies in Japan and worldwide. This is particularly because it occurred at the time of the growing awareness of global warming forcing measures towards decarbonised energy production, namely the use of fossil fuels has to be drastically reduced from the present level of more than 80% by 2050. A dilemma has now emerged because nuclear power, a CO2-free technology with proven large-scale energy production capability, lost confidence in many societies, especially in Japan and Germany. As a consequence, there is a world-wide effort now to expand renewable energies (REs), specifically photo-voltaic (PV) and wind power. However, the authors conjecture that PV and wind power can provide only up to a 40% share of the electricity production as long as sufficient storage is not available. Beyond this level, the technological (high grid power) and economic problems (large surplus production) grow. This is the result of the analysis of the growing use of REs in the electricity systems for Germany and Japan. The key element to overcome this situation is to develop suitable energy storage technologies. This is particularly necessary when electricity will become the main energy source because also transportation, process heat and heating, will be supplied by it. Facing the difficulty in replacing all fossil fuels in all countries with different technology standards, a rapid development of carbon capture and storage (CCS) might also be necessary. Therefore, for the short-range strategy up to 2050, all meaningful options have to be developed. For the long-range strategy beyond 2050, new energy sources (such as thermonuclear fusion, solar fuels and nuclear power—if inherently safe concepts will gain credibility of societies again), and large-scale energy storage systems based on novel concepts (such as large-capacity batteries and hydrogen) is required. It is acknowledged

  14. The role of Nuclear Energy Unit in gathering, organizing and disseminating of nuclear information

    Samsurdin Ahamad

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN) was established with an aim to promote the application of Nuclear Science and Technology in industries, agriculture and medicine in Malaysia. Therefore UTN represents Malaysia in INIS so as to share the available information for collection, merging and dissemination of information. In UTN a variety of activities are being carried out, especially by the Information Science Department whereby a library, equipped with reading materials and a computerized information system (SMBK) is set up as the information centre. A number of publications have also been made so as to keep the technical officers and other staff aware of the developments in Nuclear Science and Technology. To provide a better understanding of the latest techniques and nuclear technological procedures, courses, seminars and workshops for officers involved are carried out. Talks and exhibitions are also organized in order to promote Nuclear Science and Technology amongst the layman. (author)

  15. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Smith, Brian; Gschwend, Beatrice

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI's Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The total effort invested in nuclear energy research in 1999 amounted to about 185 py/a and 4.7 MCHF of investment and maintenance costs. Approximately half of the salary, investment and maintenance costs are externally funded, primarily by the Swiss Utilities, the national co-operative for the disposal of nuclear waste (NAGRA), the Federal Office of Energy (BFE) through the nuclear safety inspectorate (HSK) and the Federal Office for Science and Education (BBW) in connection with the EU Framework Programmes; an increasing part of external funding is coming from domestic and foreign industry (nuclear component and fuel suppliers). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. 4 % of the total resources are invested in addressing more global aspects of energy. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided

  16. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Birchley, Jon; Ringele, Ruth

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI's Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The total effort invested in nuclear energy research in 1998 amounted to about 195 py/a and 4.5 millions CHF of investment and maintenance costs. Approximately half of the salary, investment and maintenance costs are externally funded, primarily by the Swiss Utilities, the national co-operative for the disposal of nuclear waste (NAGRA), the Federal Office of Energy (BFE) through the nuclear safety inspectorate (HSK) and the Federal Office for Science and Education (BBW) in connection with the EC Framework Programmes; an increasing part of external funding is coming from domestic and foreign industry (nuclear component and fuel suppliers). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. 4 % of the total resources are invested in addressing more global aspects of energy. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. A list of scientific publications in 1998 is included. (author)

  17. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Birchley, Jon; Ringele, Ruth [eds.

    1999-09-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI`s Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The total effort invested in nuclear energy research in 1998 amounted to about 195 py/a and 4.5 millions CHF of investment and maintenance costs. Approximately half of the salary, investment and maintenance costs are externally funded, primarily by the Swiss Utilities, the national co-operative for the disposal of nuclear waste (NAGRA), the Federal Office of Energy (BFE) through the nuclear safety inspectorate (HSK) and the Federal Office for Science and Education (BBW) in connection with the EC Framework Programmes; an increasing part of external funding is coming from domestic and foreign industry (nuclear component and fuel suppliers). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. 4 % of the total resources are invested in addressing more global aspects of energy. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. A list of scientific publications in 1998 is included. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  18. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Smith, Brian; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2000-07-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI's Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The total effort invested in nuclear energy research in 1999 amounted to about 185 py/a and 4.7 MCHF of investment and maintenance costs. Approximately half of the salary, investment and maintenance costs are externally funded, primarily by the Swiss Utilities, the national co-operative for the disposal of nuclear waste (NAGRA), the Federal Office of Energy (BFE) through the nuclear safety inspectorate (HSK) and the Federal Office for Science and Education (BBW) in connection with the EU Framework Programmes; an increasing part of external funding is coming from domestic and foreign industry (nuclear component and fuel suppliers). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. 4 % of the total resources are invested in addressing more global aspects of energy. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided.

  19. History and structure of Japan-US nuclear alliance

    Yoshioka, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    'Japan-US nuclear alliance' for civil use of nuclear energy was used here as technical term for the state Japanese commercial power plants were all water-cooled reactors under the US nuclear engineering umbrella and US admitted Japanese development of all 'SNT: sensitive nuclear technology' in the area of nuclear fuel cycle. 'Japan-US alliance' was used for various areas closely related with national security while 'Japan-US nuclear weapon alliance' was for military use of nuclear energy such as nuclear weapon (transport methods included) and counter weapon system. Military and civil use of nuclear energy relied fundamentally on common technical bases and especially nuclear fuel cycle related technologies were directly connected to both uses and called 'SNT'. Japanese nuclear policy sticking to SNT might come from the axiom: nuclear engineering for national security, that meant Japan refrained from nuclear arms but maintained technical and industrial potential of nuclear arms. This could be called 'nuclear arms standby strategy' and derived from compromise of both countries to play role of stabilizer of 'Japan-US alliance'. History of Japanese nuclear power development could be well understood as formation process of 'Japan-US nuclear alliance'. If Fukushima Daiichi accident forced nuclear power to phase out, nuclear fuel cycle would be obliged to terminate. This meant failure of the axiom and dissolution of 'Japan-US nuclear alliance'. (T. Tanaka)

  20. Enhancing operational nuclear safety

    Sengoku, Katsuhisa

    2008-01-01

    Since Chernobyl, the dictum A n accident anywhere is an accident everywhere i s a globally shared perception. The paper presents challenges to the international nuclear community: globalization, sustainable and dynamic development, secure, safe and clean energy supply, nuclear r enaissance , public concern for nuclear safety, nuclear security, and technology and management. Strong national safety infrastructures and international cooperation are required to maintain a high level of nuclear safety and security worldwide. There is an increasing number of countries thinking of going nuclear: Morocco, Indonesia, Iran, Poland, Turkey, Bangladesh, Egypt, Vietnam, Chile, Nigeria, Malaysia, Thailand, Uruguay, Tunisia, Algeria. Another serious incident will jeopardize the prospect of nuclear renaissance. Safety and security are preconditions for countries newly introducing NPP as well as for those with mature nuclear programmes. The Global Nuclear Safety Regime (GNSR) is referred to as the institutional, legal and technical framework to achieve worldwide implementation of the safety of nuclear installations. At the top of the framework is the Convention on Nuclear Safety which covers the nuclear power plants. The convention has 56 contracting parties which meet triennially where national reports are presented and subject to the review of peers. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) undertakes a programme to foster the GNSR through the establishment of IAEA safety standards and related publications. The programme provides for the application of standards for the (1) safety of nuclear installations, (2) safety of radioactive sources, (3) safe transport of radioactive material and (4) management of radioactive waste. It also provides for the security of nuclear installations, nuclear material and radioactive material. The safety standards hierarchy is as follows: safety fundamental, safety requirements and safety guides. The safety fundamentals are the bases for IAEA

  1. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin

    2015-01-01

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization

  2. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization.

  3. Economic estimation of the external effect on the security of energy and public acceptance for nuclear power plants in Japan

    Fujimoto, Noboru; Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji

    2000-01-01

    Energy taxes in Japan, i. e., three laws of electric power source, crude oil customs duties and oil taxes, as well as the fuel stock of the power plants have been investigated, and the economical estimation for the nuclear power generation has been carried out from standpoints of the security of energy and public acceptance. For the security, it has been clear that the nuclear power is advanced in internalization of fuel stock by external economy and diversification of electric power source by external diseconomy, but oil and LNG thermal power generation is not sufficiently internalized. None of the power source has paid for the compensation for the risk in public acceptance. The fuel stock for the thermal power is estimated to be for about one week to a month, whereas nuclear power plants have a potential stock that lasts for 3 years. The external effect could go up to 35 billion yen if it is converted to fuel. The predominance, therefore, of the nuclear power for the security of energy is confirmed. Also, it is presumable that the external cost for the fuel stock, so called, is larger than the one for risk and CO 2 reduction. (author)

  4. The safety climate of a Department of Energy nuclear facility: A sociotechnical analysis

    Johnson, A.E.; Harbour, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Government- and public-sponsored groups are increasingly demanding greater accountability by the Department of Energy's weapons complex. Many of these demands have focused on the development of a positive safety climate, one that not only protects workers onsite, but also the surrounding populace and environment as well. These demands are, in part, a response to findings which demonstrate a close linkage between actual organizational safety performance and the organization's safety climate, i.e., the collective attitudes employees hold concerning the level of safety in their organization. This paper describes the approach taken in the systematic assessment of the safety climate at EG ampersand G Rocky Flats Plant (RFP)

  5. White paper on nuclear safety in 2009

    2009-06-01

    It deals with a general introduction of nuclear safety like general safety, safety regulation and system law and standard. It indicates of nuclear energy facility safety about general safety, safety regulation of operating nuclear power plant safety regulation under constructing nuclear power plant. It deals with radiation facility safety, monitoring of environmental radiation, radiation protection, radiation control, international cooperating on nuclear energy safety and establishment of safety regulation.

  6. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Safety overview and management function

    Booth, M.; Brodsky, R.S.; Frankhouser, W.L.

    1981-02-01

    The Under Secretary of Energy established the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee in October, 1979, in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident, to assess the adequacy of training of personnel at DOE nuclear facilities. Subsequently, in February, 1980, the charge to this Committee was modified to assess all implications of the Kemeny Commission report on TMI with regard to DOE nuclear reactors, excluding those in the Division of Naval Reactors. The modified charge was also limited, for the time being, to reactor facilities instead of all nuclear facilities. This report describes the portion of the revised assessment activities that was assigned to the Assessment Support Team

  7. Safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactors

    1981-03-01

    One of the first tasks of the NFPQT Committee was to determine which DOE reactors would be assessed. The Committee determined that in view of the limited time available to conduct the assessment, 13 DOE reactors were of such size (physical, power or fission product inventory) to warrant review. This determination was approved by the Under Secretary. A decision was also made in the cases of three weapons material production reactors, C, K and P, to concentrate on the K reactor only, since all three are of the same basic design, have the same operating features, are all at the same site, and are all operated by the same contractor. The assessment was accomplished in the following ways: reviewing the results of assessments conducted by the DOE organizations with reactor safety responsibilities, which were undertaken in compliance with the request of the various program directors; reviewing selected documents that were requested by the Committee and assembled at DOE Headquarters; interviewing DOE Headquarters and Field Office personnel; and conducting on-site reviews of four reactors located at four different sites. The four reactors for on-site reviews were: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); K Production Reactor; High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Specific findings and recommendations from the assessment are presented

  8. Reports and operational engineering: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    Rochman, A.; Washburn, B.W.

    1981-02-01

    The Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, established via an October 24, 1979 memorandum from the Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary, was instructed to review the ''Kemeny Commission'' recommendations and to identify possible implications for DOE's nuclear facilities. As a result of this review, the Committee recommended that DOE carry out assessments in seven categories. The assessments would address specific topics identified for each category as delineated in the NFPQT ''Guidelines for Assessing the Safe Operation of DOE-Owned Reactors,'' dated May 7, 1980. The Committee recognized that similar assessments had been ongoing in the DOE program and safety overview organizations since the Three Mile Island nuclear accident and it was the Committee's intent to use the results of those ongoing assessments as an input to their evaluations. This information would be supplemented by additional studies consisting of the subject-related documents used at each reactor facility studied, and an on-site review of these reactor facilities by professional personnel within the Department of Energy, its operating contractors and independent consultants. 1 tab

  9. Technical organization of safety authorities in case of accident in a nuclear installation

    Scherrer, J.; Evrard, J.M.; Ney, J.

    1985-11-01

    The Central safety Service of Nuclear Facilities of the French industry Department and the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut (IPSN) are organized to estimate in real time, the evolution of an accidental situation with a sufficient margin in time to allow the local government representative to develop, in case of necessity, efficient procedures for the protection of the population. This paper presents the principles of this organization and the precautions taken to cope as well with problems of mobilization of experts as the full occupation of current telecommunication lines. The example of the organization concerning the installations of Electricite de France is detailed. The CEA IPSN has developed means widely advanced, concerning the atmospheric transfer of radioactivity. For PWRs, a method allowing to forecast releases in case of accidental situation is presented. Finally, the knowledge acquired with the accident simulations realized during the last years is described [fr

  10. Public education in nuclear science at the Kyushu Museum of Energy in Japan

    Takashima, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The Kyushu Museum of Energy, funded by the Kyushu Electric Power Company Inc., was opened in September 1982. The planning and design were done by Dentsu, Inc., and the actual construction was shared among several construction and manufacturing companies. This is an educational museum which shows how people have developed and depended on energy and energy sources since the discovery of fire in prehistory. There are four major sections, devoted to fire itself, electricity, nuclear power by fission, and nuclear power by fusion. In addition, the museum will track visitors through the exhibits in terms of 'The History of Energy' as a beginning point for their tour, lead them through 'Present Energy Needs and Uses', and thence to 'Future Energy Developments and Needs'. The museum is of a 'hands-on' active display type design, with many large and attractive display panels, working models, pleasant mixes of sound, light, and images, and educational levels that encompass general public interest to semitechnical explanations that will satisfy the undergraduate with a technical background. (author) 4 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Public education in nuclear science at the Kyushu Museum of Energy in Japan

    Takashima, Y [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1993-06-01

    The Kyushu Museum of Energy, funded by the Kyushu Electric Power Company Inc., was opened in September 1982. The planning and design were done by Dentsu, Inc., and the actual construction was shared among several construction and manufacturing companies. This is an educational museum which shows how people have developed and depended on energy and energy sources since the discovery of fire in prehistory. There are four major sections, devoted to fire itself, electricity, nuclear power by fission, and nuclear power by fusion. In addition, the museum will track visitors through the exhibits in terms of 'The History of Energy' as a beginning point for their tour, lead them through 'Present Energy Needs and Uses', and thence to 'Future Energy Developments and Needs'. The museum is of a 'hands-on' active display type design, with many large and attractive display panels, working models, pleasant mixes of sound, light, and images, and educational levels that encompass general public interest to semitechnical explanations that will satisfy the undergraduate with a technical background. (author) 4 figs.; 1 tab.

  12. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the field of nuclear power safety is growing. In the period since the Three Mile Island accident, a significant expansion in its nuclear safety programme has taken place. To assure an acceptable safety level world-wide, new emphasis is being placed on the major effort to establish and foster the use of a comprehensive set of internationally agreed safety standards for nuclear power plants. New initiatives are in progress to intensify international co-operative safety efforts through the exchange of information on safety-related operating occurrences, and through a more open sharing of safety research results. Emergency accident assistance lends itself to international co-operation and steps are being taken to establish an emergency assistance programme so the Agency can aid in co-ordinating a timely response to provide, at short notice, help and advice in case of a nuclear power accident. There has been some strengthening of those advisory services which involve missions of international experts primarily to countries with less developed nuclear power programmes, and in conjunction with the Technical Assistance Programme there is a co-ordinated programme for developing countries, involving safety training courses and assistance aimed at promoting an effective national regulatory programme in all countries using nuclear power. This paper discusses the major features of the IAEA activities in nuclear power plant safety. An understanding of the programme and its limitations is essential to its more effective use. Additional initiatives may still be proposed, but the possibilities for international and regional co-operation to assure an adequate level of safety world-wide already exist. (author)

  13. The role of nuclear reaction theory and data in nuclear energy and safety applications

    Schmidt, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear data requirements for nuclear fission reactor design and safety computations are so large that they cannot be satisfied by experimental measurements alone. Nuclear reaction theories and models have recently been developed and refined to the extent, that, with suitable parametrisation and fitting to accurately known experimental data, they can be used for filling gaps in the available experimental nuclear data base as well as for bulk computations of nuclear reaction, e.g. activation cross sections. The concurrent rapid development of ever more powerful mainframe and personal computers has stimulated the development of comprehensive nuclear model computer codes. A representative selection of such codes will be presented in the lectures and computer exercises of this Workshop. In order to fulfill nuclear data requirements of the nineties and, at the same time, develop improved tools for nuclear physics teaching at developing country universities it will be required and a major future task of the IAEA nuclear data programme to develop computer files of ''best'' sets of nuclear parameters for standardised input to nuclear model computations of nuclear data. Nuclear scientists from developing countries can make substantial contributions to this project. (author). 25 refs

  14. Glossary of nuclear energy

    Seo, Du Hwan

    1987-01-01

    This book gives descriptions of explanations of terminologies concerning to nuclear energy such as analysis of financial safety of nuclear energy, radwaste disposal, fast breeder reactor, nuclear reactor and device, nuclear fuel and technique for concentration, using of nuclear energy radiation and measurement, plan for development of nuclear energy and international institution. This book includes 160 terms on nuclear energy and arranges in Korean alphabetical order.

  15. What is nuclear power in Japan?

    Suzuki, Toshikazu

    2011-03-01

    The aggressive use of such non-fossil energy as the atomic energy with high power density and energy production efficiency is an indispensable choice aiming at the low-carbon society. There is a trial calculation that the carbon dioxide emission of 40000 ton can be suppressed by nuclear power generation by one ton of uranium. The basis of nuclear research after the Second World War in Japan was established by the researchers learnt in Argonne National Laboratory. In 2010, NPPs under operation are 54 units and the total electric generating power is 48.85GW. The amount of nuclear power generation per person of the people is 0.38kW in Japan, and it is near 0.34kW of the United States. However, the TMI accident and the Chernobyl disaster should have greatly stagnated the nuclear industry of Japan although it is not more serious than the United States. A lot of Japanese unconsciously associate a nuclear accident with the atomic bomb. According to the investigation which Science and Technology Agency carried out to the specialist in 1999, ``What will be the field where talent should be emphatically sent in the future?'' the rank of nuclear technology was the lowest in 32 fields. The influence of the nuclear industry stagnation was remarkable in the education. The subject related to the atomic energy of a university existed 19 in 1985 that was the previous year of the Chernobyl disaster decreased to 7 in 2003. In such a situation, we have to rely on the atomic energy because Japan depends for 96% of energy resources on import. The development of the fuel reprocessing and the fast breeder reactor has been continued in spite of a heavy failure. That is the only means left behind for Japan to be released from both fossil fuel and carbon dioxide.

  16. Fiscal 1978 annual report of Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency

    1979-01-01

    In October, 1978, the nuclear ship Mutsu was moved to Sasebo Port from Ominato Port for shield repair and comprehensive safety check-up and repair; and this was a long-standing problem for the ship. In face of a new energy age, Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency is endeavoring to bring up the nuclear ship technology in Japan to the top level in the world by successfully completing the n.s. Mutsu through perfect safety and reliability. For Japan, which is a leading country of shipbuilding and merchant shipping, the development of nuclear ships is extremely important. On the activities of the agency from April, 1978, to March, 1979, the following matters are described: safety check and shielding repair of the n.s. Mutsu; Maintenance of the n.s. Mutsu at Ominato and Sasebo ports and its sailing to Sasebo port; works at Sasebo port before and after the arrival of the n.s. Mutsu; maintenance works of the Mutsu facilities at Ominato port; governmental formalities for permission and approval; training of ship crew; administrative works. (J.P.N.)

  17. On the merger between Toshiba Corporation and Japan Atomic Energy Operation Co., Ltd. (reply report)

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission made a careful examination regarding the merger between Toshiba Corporation and Japan Atomic Energy Operation Co., Ltd., (an issue submitted on August 16, 1989, for deliberation), and submitted a report to the prime minister. A study was carried out to determine whether the technical expertise possessed by Japan Atomic Energy Operation Co. would taken over properly by Toshiba Corporation, which would continue to exist after the merger. Results of the study revealed that the organization and technical experts existing at Japan Atomic Energy Operation Co. before the merger would properly incorporated into the existing system in Toshiba Corporation. Thus, it was confirmed that Toshiba Corporation after the merger would have technical capabilities required to install and operate nuclear reactors. The Atomic Nuclear Safety Commission started the above-mentioned study on the subject matter at the 32nd meeting, which was held on August 24, 1989, and reached the conclusion at the 34th meeting held on August 31, 1989. (N.K.)

  18. Standards: An international framework for nuclear safety

    Versteeg, J.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA, uniquely among international organizations concerned with the use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy, has statutory functions to establish safety standards and to provide for their application in Member States. The IAEA also contributes towards another major element of the 'global safety culture', namely the establishment of legally binding international agreements on safety related issues. (author)

  19. New Nuclear Safety Regulations

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.; Cizmek, A.

    2008-01-01

    Beside new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment (Official Gazette No. 15/08), from 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted Ordinance on performing nuclear activities (Official Gazette No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety (Official Gazette No. 74/06), based on Nuclear Safety Act (Official Gazette No. 173/03). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of announcing the intention to perform nuclear activity, submitting an application for the issue of a license to perform nuclear activity, and the procedure for adoption a decision on issuing a nuclear activity license. The Ordinance also regulates the contents of the application form for the announcement of the intention to perform nuclear activity, as well as of the application for the issue of a nuclear activity license and the method of keeping a nuclear activity register. The Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned conditions, whereas compliance is established by a decision passed by the SONS. Special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety are organizational, technical, technological conditions and established system of quality assurance. In 2007, SONS finalized the text of new Ordinance on nuclear safety and protection conditions for location, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of facility in which nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance regulates nuclear safety and protection conditions for location, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of facility in which nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance defines facilities in which nuclear activity is

  20. Datafile: [nuclear power in] Japan

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Japan is third after the USA and France in terms of the Western World's installed nuclear capacity, but it has by far the largest forward programme. Great effort is also being put into the fuel cycle and advanced reactors. There is close co-operation between the government, utilities and manufacturers, but Japan has not sought to export reactors. The government has responded to the growing public opposition to nuclear power with a massive increase in its budget for public relations. Details of the nuclear power programme are given. (author)

  1. Real-time environmental monitoring at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute O-arai Engineering Center. Using the internet to promote safety and environmental transparency

    Motomatsu, Sheila; Nakashima Inoue, Naoko

    2000-12-01

    The report documents the results of an effort at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute O-arai Engineering Center (JNC/OEC) to provide via the Internet, in real-time, environmental monitoring data to promote safety and environmental transparency. Provided in Japanese as well as in English, the Internet site provides assurance that OEC nuclear operations are being conducted in a manner that is safe to both people in the surrounding area and the environment. This work conducted by Environmental Monitoring Team of the OEC Safety Administration Section fulfilled the assignment to release data real-time via the Internet tasked by the Information Disclosure Section of the JNC Headquarters Public Relations Division. The work conducted by the visiting exchange scientist fulfilled the experimental portion of Action Sheet 34 of the Agreement between JNC and DOE for Cooperation in Research and Development Concerning Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Measures for Safeguards and Nonproliferation. In Japan, the project for Action Sheet 34 Personnel Exchange on Remote Monitoring and Transparency' entailed both a study and an experiment on how remote monitoring technologies can be used to promote nonproliferation, environmental and safety transparency. Environmental airborne radionuclide monitoring falls under the definition of remote monitoring technology more broadly defined as 'remotely accessed unattended monitoring system technology'. (author)

  2. Present status and future outlook of nuclear power generation in Japan

    Kunikazu Aisaka

    1987-01-01

    The structure of energy consumption in Japan is heavily dependent on imported oil, therefore Japan has been making its greatest effort in developing nuclear power among other alternatives of oil. The capacity factor of the nuclear power plants in Japan marked 76% in FY 1986, exceeding 70% level for the past several years. The share of nuclear power is expected to increase steadily in the future. Future scale of the nuclear power generation is projected as 62,000 MW in year 2000 and as 137,000 MW in 2030. Nuclear power is expected to produce 58% of the nation's total power generation in 2030. Under the present circumstances, Janpan is executing a nuclear energy policy based on the following guidelines: 1. Promoting the safety advancement program; 2. Improving LWR technologies; 3. Program on use of plutonium in thermal reactors; 4. Advanced thermal reactors (ATRs); 5. Promotion of FBR development; 6. Nuclear fuel cycle. (Liu)

  3. A Guidebook for Evaluating Organizations in the Nuclear Industry - an example of safety culture evaluation

    Oedewald, Pia; Pietikaeinen, Elina; Reiman, Teemu

    2011-06-01

    Organizations in the nuclear industry need to maintain an overview on their vulnerabilities and strengths with respect to safety. Systematic periodical self assessments are necessary to achieve this overview. This guidebook provides suggestions and examples to assist power companies but also external evaluators and regulators in carrying out organizational evaluations. Organizational evaluation process is divided into five main steps. These are: 1) planning the evaluation framework and the practicalities of the evaluation process, 2) selecting data collection methods and conducting the data acquisition, 3) structuring and analysing the data, 4) interpreting the findings and 5) reporting the evaluation results with possible recommendations. The guidebook emphasises the importance of a solid background framework when dealing with multifaceted phenomena like organisational activities and system safety. The validity and credibility of the evaluation stem largely from the evaluation team's ability to crystallize what they mean by organization and safety when they conduct organisational safety evaluations - and thus, what are the criteria for the evaluation. Another important and often under-considered phase in organizational evaluation is interpretation of the findings. In this guidebook a safety culture evaluation in a Nordic nuclear power plant is presented as an example of organizational evaluation. With the help of the example, challenges of each step in the organizational evaluation process are described. Suggestions for dealing with them are presented. In the case example, the DISC (Design for Integrated Safety culture) model is used as the evaluation framework. The DISC model describes the criteria for a good safety culture and the organizational functions necessary to develop a good safety culture in the organization

  4. JTEC panel on nuclear power in Japan. Final report

    Hansen, K.F.; Behnke, W.B.; Cousin, S.B.; Evans, E.A.; Olander, D.R.

    1990-10-01

    The report examines the status and direction of nuclear power-related research and development in Japan in six areas: the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear materials, instrumentation and control technology, CAD/CAM, nuclear safety research, and nuclear plant construction. Overall findings suggest that the nuclear power industry in Japan is at an advanced state of development; in particular, Japan is now technologically self-sufficient. Long-term goals of the Japanese program include closure of the complete fuel cycle and pursuit of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor as the future base system

  5. Safety study of fire protection for nuclear fuel cycle facility

    2013-01-01

    Insufficiencies in the fire protection system of the nuclear reactor facilities were pointed out when the fire occurred due to the Niigata prefecture-Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in July, 2007. This prompted the revision of the fire protection safety examination guideline for nuclear reactors as well as commercial guidelines. The commercial guidelines have been endorsed by the regulatory body. Now commercial fire protection standards for nuclear facilities such as the design guideline and the management guideline for protecting fire in the Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are available, however, those to apply to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility (MFFF) have not been established. For the improvement of fire protection system of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the development of a standard for the fire protection, corresponding to the commercial standard for LWRs were required. Thus, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) formulated a fire protection guidelines for nuclear fuel cycle facilities as a standard relevant to the fire protection of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities considering functions specific to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In formulating the guidelines, investigation has been conduced on the commercial guidelines for nuclear reactors in Japan and the standards relevant to the fire protection of nuclear facilities in USA and other countries as well as non-nuclear industrial fire protection standards. The guideline consists of two parts; Equipments and Management, as the commercial guidances of the nuclear reactor. In addition, the acquisition of fire evaluation data for a components (an electric cabinet, cable, oil etc.) targeted for spread of fire and the evaluation model of fire source were continued for the fire hazard analysis (FHA). (author)

  6. IRSN opinion on nuclear safety within the frame of the National Debate on Energy Transition

    2013-06-01

    This note aims at outlining that nuclear safety must be taken into consideration in the debate on energy transition, and more particularly major accidents which may have a radiological impact on populations and on the environment. It outlines that the nuclear sector is generally perceived as a source of innovation, a booster for scientific, industrial and economic excellence, and that reducing the share of nuclear energy could affect these abilities. It discusses the relationship between ageing and safety for the French nuclear reactor fleet. It addresses the issue of a possible accident and the necessary provision of compensation costs. It finally outlines that, even though the probability of severe accidents for reactors of new generation is low, improvement actions are still to be studied, notably regarding the organisational and human context

  7. Data list of nuclear power plants in Japan

    Izumi, Fumio; Ito, Noboru; Higuchi, Suminori; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1987-03-01

    The PPD (Nuclear Power Plant Data Base) has been under development in JAERI since 1983 as a six-year program to provide useful information for reactor safety regulation and reactor safety research. Information source of the PPD is mainly based on SAR's (Safety Analysis Reports) of 35 nuclear power plants which are operating, under construction or under licensing review in Japan. The report BWR edition consists of several data lists stored in the PPD, concerning safety design such as performances, equipments and installations of 18 BWR plants in Japan. The informations are based on SAR Attachment Chapter 8 ''Nuclear Reactor Facility Safety Design''. (author)

  8. The regulatory system of nuclear safety in Russia

    Mizoguchi, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    This article explains what type of mechanism the nuclear system has and how nuclear safety is regulated in Russia. There are two main organizations in this system : ROSATOM and ROSTEKHADZOR. ROSATOM, which was founded in 2007, incorporates all the nuclear industries in Russia, including civil nuclear companies as well as nuclear weapons complex facilities. ROSTEKHNADZOR is the federal body that secures and supervises the safety in using atomic energy. This article also reviews three laws on regulating nuclear safety. (author)

  9. Nuclear safety research

    1999-01-01

    The NNSA checked and coordinated in 1999 the research project of the Surveillance Technology on Nuclear Installations under the National 9th-Five-Year Program to promote the organizations that undertake the research work on schedule and lay a foundation of obtaining achievements and effectiveness for the 9th-five-year plan on nuclear safety research

  10. Japan/India. Towards a nuclear cooperation?

    Pajon, Celine

    2011-10-01

    As diplomatic, economic and strategic relationships between Japan and India have been intensively developed for a decade, the author aims at discussing the very sensitive approach to a nuclear cooperation between these two countries as Japan, while taking benefit of the American nuclear umbrella, is a strong defender of nuclear disarmament and non proliferation, and India has been developing its own civilian and military nuclear programme outside of the international regime which it considers as discriminative. The author first discusses factors which incited Japan to build up a strategic partnership with India in front of the evolution of the political context, of the powerful upswing of China, and of the new American orientation with respect to Delhi. She comments the economic and political stakes of the currently negotiated Japan-India nuclear cooperation agreement which not only concerns the relationships between these both countries, but also French and American industrial groups which are present on the Indian market. She also notices that the Fukushima accident which has put Japan energy choices into question again, is a new deal which is to be taken into account

  11. Framework of nuclear safety and safety assessment

    Furuta, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Since enormous energy is released by nuclear chain reaction mainly as a form of radiation, a great potential risk accompanies utilization of nuclear energy. Safety has been continuously a critical issue therefore from the very beginning of its development. Though the framework of nuclear safety that has been established at an early developmental stage of nuclear engineering is still valid, more comprehensive approaches are required having experienced several events such as Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and JCO. This article gives a brief view of the most basic principles how nuclear safety is achieved, which were introduced and sophisticated in nuclear engineering but applicable also to other engineering domains in general. (author)

  12. New safety concept for geological disposal in Japan - -16339

    Kitayama, Kazumi

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a new safety concept for the Japanese geological disposal program, which is a development of the conventional multi-barrier system concept. The Japanese government established the 'Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan' (NUMO) as an implementation body in 2000 based on the 'Final disposal act' following the publication of the 'H-12 Report', which confirmed the scientific and engineering feasibility of HLW geological disposal in Japan. Since then, NUMO has undertaken further technical developments aimed at achieving safe and efficient implementation of final disposal. The safety concept developed in the 'H-12 Report' provides sufficient safety on the basis of site-generic considerations. However, it is considered to be over-conservative and therefore does not represent the most probable performance of the engineered or natural barriers. Recently, concrete measures have been proposed requiring the safety case to be presented in terms of a realistic assessment of the most probable performance. This approach takes into account the safety functions of both engineered and natural barriers as well as the long-term static geochemical equilibrium. In particular, the evolution of the safety performance of engineered and natural barriers can be efficiently augmented by the realistic long-term geochemical equilibrium. (author)

  13. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations

  14. FAPIG's activities for public acceptance of nuclear energy. Analytical results of questionnaire executed at organized visits to nuclear power stations

    Yoneda, Masaaki

    2010-01-01

    The First Atomic Power Industry Group (FAPIG) organized eighteenth visit of woman employees to nuclear power stations. They would have few chance of such a visit and to unfamiliar with mechanism of nuclear power generation as well as radiation and radioactivity. Participants were required to have a lecture on energy in general and basic understanding of nuclear energy and then had a visit to nuclear power stations to learn nuclear energy as correct knowledge. They also filled out the same questionnaire before the lecture and after the visit to express their ideas or comments on nuclear energy. This paper described analytical results of the questionnaire and significance of the organized visit for public acceptance of nuclear energy. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Current and anticipated uses of thermal hydraulic codes at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Akimoto, Hajime; Kukita; Ohnuki, Akira

    1997-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is conducting several research programs related to thermal-hydraulic and neutronic behavior of light water reactors (LWRs). These include LWR safety research projects, which are conducted in accordance with the Nuclear Safety Commission's research plan, and reactor engineering projects for the development of innovative reactor designs or core/fuel designs. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes are used for various purposes including experimental analysis, nuclear power plant (NPP) safety analysis, and design assessment

  16. Knowledge management as an approach to strengthen safety culture in nuclear organizations

    Karseka, T.S.; Yanev, Y.L.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 10 years knowledge management (KM) in nuclear organizations has emerged as a powerful strategy to deal with important and frequently critical issues of attrition, generation change and knowledge transfer. Applying KM practices in operating organizations, in technical support organizations and regulatory bodies has proven to be efficient and necessary for maintaining competence and skills for achieving high level of safety and operational performance. The IAEA defines KM as an integrated, systematic approach to identifying, acquiring, transforming, developing, disseminating, using, sharing, and preserving knowledge, relevant to achieving specified objectives. KM focuses on people and organizational culture to stimulate and nurture the sharing and use of knowledge; on processes or methods to find, create, capture and share knowledge; and on technology to store and assimilate knowledge and to make it readily accessible in a manner which will allow people to work together even if they are not located together. A main objective of this paper is to describe constructive actions which can sponsor knowledge sharing and solidarity in safety conscious attitude among all employees. All principles and approaches refer primarily to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operating organizations but are also applicable to other institutions involved into nuclear sector. (orig.)

  17. Knowledge management as an approach to strengthen safety culture in nuclear organizations

    Karseka, T.S.; Yanev, Y.L. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Nuclear Energy Dept.

    2013-04-15

    In the last 10 years knowledge management (KM) in nuclear organizations has emerged as a powerful strategy to deal with important and frequently critical issues of attrition, generation change and knowledge transfer. Applying KM practices in operating organizations, in technical support organizations and regulatory bodies has proven to be efficient and necessary for maintaining competence and skills for achieving high level of safety and operational performance. The IAEA defines KM as an integrated, systematic approach to identifying, acquiring, transforming, developing, disseminating, using, sharing, and preserving knowledge, relevant to achieving specified objectives. KM focuses on people and organizational culture to stimulate and nurture the sharing and use of knowledge; on processes or methods to find, create, capture and share knowledge; and on technology to store and assimilate knowledge and to make it readily accessible in a manner which will allow people to work together even if they are not located together. A main objective of this paper is to describe constructive actions which can sponsor knowledge sharing and solidarity in safety conscious attitude among all employees. All principles and approaches refer primarily to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operating organizations but are also applicable to other institutions involved into nuclear sector. (orig.)

  18. Future nuclear energy policy based on the Broad Outline of Nuclear Energy Policy

    Saito, Shinzo

    2006-01-01

    The Broad Outline of Nuclear Energy Policy for about ten years was determined by the Cabinet meeting of Japan. Nuclear power plant safety and regulation, nuclear waste management, nuclear power production and nuclear power research and development were discussed. It determined that 3 nuclear power plants, which are building, should be built, and about 10 plants will be built to product 30 to 40 % of Japan electricity generation after 2030. FBR will be operated until 2050. The nuclear fuel cycle system will be used continuously. The nuclear power plant safety and nuclear waste management are so important for the nuclear industry that these subjects were discussed in detail. In order to understand and use the quantum beam technology, the advanced institutions and equipments and network among scientists, industry and people should be planed and practically used. (S.Y.)

  19. Nuclear energy for the 21. century

    2005-03-01

    This document gathers 5 introductory papers to this conference about nuclear energy for the 21. century: the French energy policy during the last 30 years (situation of France with respect to the energy supply and demand, main trends of the French energy policy, future of the French nuclear policy); presentation of IAEA (technology transfer, nuclear safety, non-proliferation policy, structure and financial resources, council of governors, general conference, secretariat); nuclear power and sustainable development; promoting safety at nuclear facilities (promoting safety, basics of safety, safety at the design stage, risk management, regulatory control and efficiency of the regulation organization, role of IAEA); nuclear energy today (contribution to sustainable development, safety, best solution for the management of radioactive wastes, future of nuclear energy). (J.S.)

  20. Independent safety organization

    Kato, W.Y.; Weinstock, E.V.; Carew, J.F.; Cerbone, R.J.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Taylor, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has conducted a study on the need and feasibility of an independent organization to investigate significant safety events for the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, USNRC. The study consists of three parts: the need for an independent organization to investigate significant safety events, alternative organizations to conduct investigations, and legislative requirements. The determination of need was investigated by reviewing current NRC investigation practices, comparing aviation and nuclear industry practices, and interviewing a spectrum of representatives from the nuclear industry, the regulatory agency, and the public sector. The advantages and disadvantages of alternative independent organizations were studied, namely, an Office of Nuclear Safety headed by a director reporting to the Executive Director for Operations (EDO) of NRC; an Office of Nuclear Safety headed by a director reporting to the NRC Commissioners; a multi-member NTSB-type Nuclear Safety Board independent of the NRC. The costs associated with operating a Nuclear Safety Board were also included in the study. The legislative requirements, both new authority and changes to the existing NRC legislative authority, were studied. 134 references

  1. Nuclear energy

    Luxo, Armand.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons and conditions of utilizing nuclear power in developing countries are examined jointly with the present status and future uses already evaluated by some organizations. Some consequences are deduced in the human, financial scientific and technological fields, with provisional suggestions for preparing the nuclear industry development in these countries. As a conclusion trends are given to show how the industrialized countries having gained a long scientific and technological experience in nuclear energy can afford their assistance in this field, to developing countries [fr

  2. Education of nuclear engineering in Japan

    Ozawa, Yasutomo; Yamamuro, Nobuhiro

    1979-01-01

    The research Committee of Nuclear Engineering Education has two working groups. One group has carried out surveyes on the curriculums of nuclear engineering course of universities in Japan and the activities of graduates in the industrial worlds. The other group conducted an investigation on the present status of energy education in senior high schools. This is an interim report on the activity of the research committee. (author)

  3. Development of safety performance indicators in Japan

    Ohashi, H.; Tamao, S.; Tanaka, J.; Sawayama, T.

    2001-01-01

    For the purpose of safety regulations of operating nuclear power stations in Japan, the regulatory authorities utilize two types of regulations. One is the direct regulation, such as periodical inspection to inspect the function and performance of equipment important to safety, and the other is the audit type regulation such as preservation inspection to audit the compliance with the safety preservation rules. As performance indicators are expected to be an effective tool to evaluate the activities by audit type regulations, NUPEC is studying a comprehensive set of operational performance indicators to meet the effective evaluation method for the safety preservation activities in the audit type regulations under the frame of current safety regulation system. The study includes the establishment of comprehensive operational performance indicators applicable in Japan, the effective application of performance indicators to the current Japanese regulation, the clarification of the applicable scope of utilization, the possibility of applying the performance indicators. This report describes the present status of our performance indicator studies. After the completion of these studies the regulatory authorities will evaluate if and how the new set of comprehensive performance indicators could be introduced to Japanese regulatory scheme. (author)

  4. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex IV: PSI nuclear energy and safety research

    Birchley, J.; Roesel, R.; Wellner, A.

    1997-01-01

    The department 'Nuclear Energy and Safety Research' (F4) at PSI carries the responsibility of performing the essential nuclear energy research in Switzerland. This research is part of the remit of PSI and follows government directive; about one-fifth of the Institute's Federal budget is allocated to this task. Currently about 190 persons are working in this field. Approximately 45% of the salary and investment costs (5.5 million CHF in the budget period 1996/97) are externally funded. This funding is provided primarily by the Swiss Utilities, the NAGRA and the safety authority HSK. The activities in nuclear research concentrate on three main domains: safety and safety related problems of operating plants, safety features of future reactor and fuel cycle concepts and waste management; another 4% of staff are addressing broader aspects of energy. At the end of 1996, a policy evaluation with the laboratory heads took place in order to redefine the direction of F4 activities. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  5. The public image and image shaping of the nuclear and radiation safety regulatory organization

    Li Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    Good image is the basis of trust. It is imminent to build good public image as our society and the public pay close attention to the negative information of relevant government departments which directly or indirectly affects the public image of the government departments in recent years. In order to promote the public image of the government regulatory department, it is required for all staff to figure out how to conscientiously fulfill social responsibility, how to respond to and properly handle emergencies, and how to establish and improve a full-time public relations team. Based on nuclear and radiation safety regulatory task, this paper discussed the necessity of government departments to set up the public image, and how to shape the public image of the nuclear and radiation safety regulatory organization. (author)

  6. Nuclear energy generation and the safety criteria for Brazilian power plants

    Silva, Gustavo Brandão e

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the use of nuclear technology can help to diversify the national electricity matrix in a sustainable and efficient way. For this, an analysis of the current situation of the Brazilian electric sector will be made, exposing its fragilities and highlighting the advantages of the nuclear source as an alternative to integrate the necessary thermoelectric base to the reliable supply of electricity in the country. In addition, the objective of the work is to detail the process of exploiting atomic energy in Brazil from raw material mining, through the stages involving the manufacture of nuclear fuel, to the current operation and situation of Brazilian power plants. By taking the Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant as a case study, the safety criteria adopted in its design and operation will be highlighted. Particular attention will also be given to the electric supply alternatives and to the active safety systems of the plant

  7. Building a new energy network in North East Asia. A perspective from post-Fukushima Japan

    Shibutani, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) has accelerated Japan's drive for less dependence on nuclear and fossil energy and more green renewables, which inevitably require a new energy strategy. In this paper, a new strategic scenario for moving 'beyond a single economy' is proposed to incorporate Japan with the North East Asian (NEA) energy market in regards to its electricity grid and natural gas pipeline network while preserving nuclear power by strengthening safety. Suggestions are also made that Japan should open more doors for new comers in a manner of open-access towards member economies of NEA. However, there are persistent geopolitical constraints and risks in NEA. The connection of Japan's energy network to its regional neighbors would avoid the tendrils and tentacles of geopolitics that wrap around NEA, and subsequently provide opportunities to build on common energy interests. (author)

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Japan

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office; Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry - METI; Minister of Land, Infrastructure and Transport - MLIT; Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology - MEXT); 2. Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission - AEC; Nuclear Safety Commission - NSC; Radiation Council; Special Committee on Energy Policy; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA)

  9. Communication dated 16 July 2008 received from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency concerning an International Initiative on 3S-Based Nuclear Energy Infrastructure

    2008-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 16 July 2008 from the Resident Representative of Japan attaching a document entitled 'International Initiative on 3S-based Nuclear Energy Infrastructure'. The communication, and as requested therein, its attachment, are circulated herewith for information

  10. Safety and risk questions following the nuclear incidents and accidents in Japan. Summary final report; Sicherheits- und Risikofragen im Nachgang zu den nuklearen Stoer- und Unfaellen in Japan. Zusammenfassender Abschlussbericht

    Mildenberger, Oliver

    2015-03-15

    After the nuclear accidents in Japan, GRS has carried out in-depth investigations of the events. On the one hand, the accident sequences in the affected units have been analysed from various viewpoints. On the other hand, the transferability of the findings to German plants has been examined to possibly make recommendations for safety improvements. The accident sequences at Fukushima Daiichi have been traced with as much detail as possible based on all available information. Additional insights have been drawn from thermohydraulic analyses with the GRS code system ATHLET-CD/COCOSYS focusing on the events in units 2 and 3, e.g. with regard to core damage and the state of the containments in the first days of the accident sequence. In-depth investigations have also been carried out on topics such as natural external hazards, electrical power supply or organizational measures. In addition, methodological studies on further topics related with the accidents have been performed. Through a detailed analysis of the relevant data from the events in Japan, the basis for an in-depth examination of the transferability to German plants was created. It was found that an implementation of most of the insights gained from the investigations had already been initiated as part of the GRS information notice 2012/02. Further findings have been communicated to the federal government and introduced into other relevant bodies, e.g. the Nuclear Safety Standards Committee (KTA) or the Reactor Safety Commission (RSK).

  11. Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2010

    2011-07-01

    The Agency, as a leading organization for promoting international cooperation among its Member States, is in a unique position to observe global trends, issues and challenges in nuclear safety and security through a wide variety of activities related to the establishment of safety standards and security guidelines and their application. The contents of this Nuclear Safety Review reflect the emerging nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges for 2010, as well as recapitulate the Agency's activities intended to further strengthen the global nuclear safety and security framework in all areas of nuclear, radiation, waste and transport safety. The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, caused by the extraordinary disasters of the earthquake and tsunamis that struck Japan on 11 March 2011, continues to be assessed. As this report focuses on developments in 2010, the accident and its implications are not addressed here, but will be addressed in future reports of the Agency. The international nuclear community maintained a high level of safety performance in 2010. Nuclear power plant safety performance remained high, and indicated an improved trend in the number of emergency shutdowns as well in the level of energy available during these shutdowns. In addition, more States explored or expanded their interests in nuclear power programmes, and more faced the challenge of establishing the required regulatory infrastructure, regulatory supervision and safety management over nuclear installations and the use of ionizing radiation. Issues surrounding radiation protection and radioecology continued as trends in 2010. For example, increased public awareness of exposure to and environmental impacts of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) as well as nuclear legacy sites has led to increased public concern. In addition, human resources in radiation protection and radioecology have been lost as a result of retirement and of the migration of experts to

  12. Review of nuclear energy

    Mattila, L.; Anttila, M.; Pirilae, P.; Vuori, S.

    1997-05-01

    The report is an overview on the production of the nuclear energy all over the world. The amount of production at present and in future, availability of the nuclear fuel, development of nuclear technology, environmental and safety issues, radioactive waste management and commissioning of the plants and also the competitivity of nuclear energy compared with other energy forms are considered. (91 refs.)

  13. Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety

    Connolly, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  14. Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety

    Connolly, T.J. (ed.)

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  15. For future energy. Questionnaire survey 'need and safety of nuclear energy'

    Horiuchi, Norikazu

    2006-01-01

    The questionnairing has been conducted on students in the department of engineering, and environmental and information studies of Musashi Institute of Technology, and Toyoko Gakuen Women's College for six years. The results are collected by every department and university and college. Abstract of results is 1) about 70% of students thought necessity of nuclear energy, 2) in case of accidents and troubles in relation to nuclear energy, they have a distrust of nuclear power generation and nuclear energy, 3) they put their hope to use natural energies without pollution and destruct of global environment, and 4) the feeling of students was not the same in the literature course as the scientific course, but generally speaking, their results tend to be agreement with an adult member of society. The tasks of university are stated. (S.Y.)

  16. Management Systems and Safety Culture in the Nuclear Energy Sector (ISO 9001 & GS-R-3)

    Smetnik, A.; Murlis, D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the enterprises of the Rosatom State Nuclear Energy Corporation that provides products and services to foreign customers should rely on the requirements to the management systems established by the IAEA Standard GS-R-3 “The management system for facilities and activities”. This results from the fact that in order to enter foreign markets, Russian suppliers have to meet foreign requirements related to quality assurance, protection of the environment, nuclear and radiation safety, etc. For instance, the Finnish customer “Fennovoima” requires full compliance of the management systems of the Russian companies involved in the construction of the Hanhikivi-1 NPP with the GS-R-3 Standard. ISO 9001 quality management systems were widely implemented in the nuclear industry enterprises in Russia. The assessment of compliance of the quality management systems with the established requirements is carried out by the certification bodies. The same relates to the environmental management systems that are implemented at the majority of nuclear industry facilities in Russia. But due to their uniqueness and associated significant risks, the nuclear industry enterprises have to meet current safety requirements and principles established in the IAEA Safety Standards, such as safety culture and risk management.

  17. Constructing a Model for Safe Nuclear Energy. General Conference Event to Focus on Innovative Cross-cutting Approach to Nuclear Safety

    Verlini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Two innovative IAEA Extra-Budgetary Programmes, supporting safe nuclear energy in Bulgaria and Romania, passed their one-year milestone in 2010. Funded by the Norwegian government, these programmes are unique in that they cover separate but cross-cutting issues related to nuclear safety, including safety culture, safety assessments, risk management and resource management.

  18. Role of Laws and Regulations For Nuclear Energy Installation in Developing Safety Measures Against Accident

    Hussein, A.Z.; Zakaria, Kh.M.

    2011-01-01

    The energy industry has been considered as an economic development driver. The fundamental safety policy for nuclear facilities is to protect health and safety of the public and the site personnel against undue risks associated with radiation and radioactive materials resulting from normal operation and abnormal conditions. This policy is implemented, based on the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle for normal operation and the defense-in-depth principle (prevention of the occurrence of anomalies, prevention of the escalation of anomalies into accidents, and prevention of excessive release of radioactive materials into the environment), through establishment of safety guides and standards. More over the consideration of suitable site selection and safety design, verification by safety evaluation, quality assurance for manufacturing, construction and operation, periodic testing and inspection, confirmation by regulatory bodies, and reflection of experienced troubles to safety countermeasures. Are of these paramount importance concepts are applied variety of nuclear facilities, which is, nuclear reactors, uranium enrichment plants, fuel conversion/fabrication plants, reprocessing plants, radioactive waste management facilities, and so on, considering unique features of each facility.

  19. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  20. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  1. Nuclear safety and regulation

    Kim, Hho Jung

    2000-03-01

    This book contains 12 chapters, which are atom and radiation, nuclear reactor and kinds of nuclear power plant, safeguard actuation system and stability evaluation for rock foundation of nuclear power plant, nuclear safety and principle, safety analysis and classification of incident, probabilistic safety assessment and major incident, nuclear safety regulation, system of nuclear safety regulation, main function and subject of safety regulation in nuclear facilities, regulation of fuel cycle and a nuclear dump site, protection of radiation and, safety supervision and, safety supervision and measurement of environmental radioactivity.

  2. Nuclear safety legislation and supervision in China

    Zhang Shiguan

    1991-02-01

    The cause for the urgent need of nuclear safety legislation and supervision in China is firstly described, and then a brief introduction to the basic principle and guideline of nuclear safety is presented. Finally the elaboration on the establishment of nuclear safety regulatory system, the enactment of a series of regulations and safety guides, and the implementation of licencing, nuclear safety supervision and research for ensuring the safety of nuclear energy, since the founding of the National Nuclear Safety Administration, are introduced

  3. Change in plan for installation of nuclear reactor in No.1 atomic powered vessel of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (change in purpose of use and in method for nuclear reactor installation and spent fuel disposal) (report)

    1987-01-01

    This report, compiled by the Nuclear Safety Commission to be submitted to the Prime Minister, deals with studies concerning some changes in the plan for the installation of a nuclear reactor in the No.1 atomic powered vessel to be constructed under the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (changes in the purpose of its use and in the methods for the nuclear reactor installation and spent fuel disposal). The conclusions of and procedures for the examination and evaluation are presented and then detailes of the studies are described. The study on the location requirements for the incidental land facilities at Sekinehama covers various conditions concerning the location, geology, earthquakes, meteorology, hydrology and social environment. The study on the safety design of the nuclear reactor facilities deals with the reactor, fuel handling facilities and other auxiliary facilities, as well as various land facilities to be constructed at Sekinehama including the reactor facilities and other facilities for fuel handling, waste disposal and protection and management of radioactive rays. Evaluation of possible radiation emission is shown and the accident analysis is also addressed. (Nogami, K.)

  4. Maintaining nuclear competence and expertise in Japan

    Fujii, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The fundamental law of atomic energy, which strictly restricts the application of atomic energy to the peaceful use, was established in 1955 in Japan. Since then, during the past five decades, great efforts were made to develop atomic energy. So far 52 units of light water reactors, 29 BWRs and 23 PWRs, have been built and in operation, 5 units are under construction and 6 units are planed to be built. Total capacity of presently operated NPPs amounts to 45.7 Gwe and the nuclear energy shares 30 % of the total electricity generation in Japan. During the past 10 years, several accidents occur in the nuclear facilities of electric power companies, and JNC ( previously PNC ). In spite of these accidents, including the accident of Kansai Electric Power Co. this year, the important role of nuclear energy to sustain the lives of people in Japan is intact. In the nuclear energy projection, the construction of NPPs continues till 2010. Thereafter reconstructions of NPPs are foreseen in the decade 2030's for the replacement of present NPPs in operation after 60 years services. Attention has been directed to the technology preservation: how competence and expertise of nuclear engineering can be maintained till the next period of replacement construction, in particular, the period between years 2010 and 2030. The present paper reviews the status of nuclear engineering programs in universities in Japan. The nuclear education programs started in graduate schools in 1957 and expanded to undergraduate schools of major national universities. Presently nine universities are providing systematic nuclear education programs in their graduate schools, although the corresponding department have been changed their names from 'nuclear' to more broaden terms of 'quantum', 'energy' and 'system' in several universities. Under the conditions of shrinking nuclear industries, how to maintain the present education system is seriously concerned matter in the universities. The present paper

  5. Voluntary research results for five years along the master plan on nuclear safety research. FY 2001 - 2005

    Sato, Yoshinori

    2006-05-01

    Safety Research has been conducted from FY 2001 to FY 2005 according to the Master Plan on Nuclear Safety Research (FY 2001-2005) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency which took over former Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. This report shows the voluntary research results for five years conducted from FY 2001 to FY 2005 according to the Master Plan on Nuclear Safety Research (FY 2001-2005). (author)

  6. Enhancement of nuclear safety culture

    Anderson, Stanley J.

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the 40-year history of the commercial nuclear power industry, improvements have continually been made in the design of nuclear power plants and the equipment in them. In one sense, we have reached an enviable point -- in most plants, equipment failures have become relatively rare. Yet events continue to occur. Regardless of how much the plants are improved, that equipment is operated by people -- highly motivated, well-trained people -- but people nonetheless. And people occasionally make mistakes. By setting the right climate and by setting high standards, good plant management can reduce the number of mistakes made ? and also reduce their potential consequences. Another way to say this is that the proper safety culture must be established and continually improved upon in our nuclear plants. Safety culture is defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency as 'that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance.' In short, we must make safety our top priority

  7. Nuclear energy and public safety (Part I): a bibliography of popular literature

    Gabriel, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The focus of Part 1 is to aid the general research (especially undergraduate students and the general public) to locate information on the safety aspects of nuclear energy. A subject index after the bibliography breaks down the entries into 11 subtopics. An author index is also provided. This part of the bibliography consists of books, periodical articles, and government publications dating from 1959 to 1980

  8. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumeier, S.; Bosbach, D. (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m{sup 3}) of high level waste and about 300.000 m{sup 3} of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear

  9. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumeier, S.; Bosbach, D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m 3 ) of high level waste and about 300.000 m 3 of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear graphite

  10. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    Klinkenberg, M; Neumeier, S; Bosbach, D [eds.

    2011-07-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m{sup 3}) of high level waste and about 300.000 m{sup 3} of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear

  11. An international nuclear safety regime

    Rosen, M.

    1995-01-01

    For all the parties involved with safe use of nuclear energy, the opening for signature of the 'Convention on Nuclear Safety' (signed by 60 countries) and the ongoing work to prepare a 'Convention on Radioactive Waste Safety' are particularly important milestones. 'Convention on Nuclear Safety' is the first legal instrument that directly addresses the safety of nuclear power plants worldwide. The two conventions are only one facet of international cooperation to enhance safety. A review of some cooperative efforts of the past decades, and some key provisions of the new safety conventions, presented in this paper, show how international cooperation is increasing nuclear safety worldwide. The safety philosophy and practices involved with legal framework for the safe use of nuclear power will foster a collective international involvement and commitment. It will be a positive step towards increasing public confidence in nuclear power

  12. Decommissioning project feedback experience in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institut

    Yanagihara, S.; Tachibana, M.; Miyajima, K.

    2003-01-01

    Since starting the research and development program for peaceful use of nuclear energy in 1950's, various research and demonstration facilities have been constructed in research organizations, universities and commercial sectors in Japan. Some of the nuclear facilities constructed in the early stage of research and development have been retired to be decommissioned because of completion of the initial objectives in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). On the other hand, since the first commercial operation of nuclear power plant (1968), the number of nuclear power plants has increased up to 52 plants operating as of August 2003 in Japan. The shear of nuclear energy accounts approximately for 35% of electricity generation in total at present time. However, several nuclear power plants have been operated for more than 25 years and two nuclear power plants are expected to be finally shutdown by 2010 to be eventually decommissioned. The Tokai Power Station, the oldest Japanese nuclear power plant operated by the Japan Atomic Power Company, was permanently shutdown from March 1998 and it is in decommissioning stage at this time. The Fugen, which is advanced thermal reactor operated by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), was finally shutdown on March, 2003 after 25 years operation to be decommissioned. In addition, relating to planned unification between JAERI and JNC in 2005, the studies have been in progress on decommissioning and radioactive waste treatment and disposal; the cost was estimated to be 10 to 30 billion Japanese yens per year during 80 years for decommissioning of nearly 200 nuclear facilities. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities is thus getting to be one of important issues in Japan. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities might be possible using conventional and/or partially improved technology. However, reviewing project feedback experience on decommissioning and decontamination might contribute to solve various issues

  13. Catalogue of requirements for a plant-specific safety inspection of German nuclear power plants taking into account the Fukushima-I (Japan) events; Anforderungskatalog fuer anlagenbezogene Ueberpruefungen deutscher Kernkraftwerke unter Beruecksichtigung der Ereignisse in Fukushima-I (Japan)

    NONE

    2011-03-30

    The catalogue of requirements for a plant-specific safety inspection of German nuclear power plants taking into account the Fukushima-I (Japan) events worked out by the German RSK (reactor safety commission) includes the following inspection topics: natural events like earth quakes, floods, weather-based consequences and possible superposition; civilization-based events like airplane crash, gas release, reactor accident consequences for neighboring units, terroristic impacts, external attacks on computer-based control systems. Further event-independent assumptions have to be considered: station blackout, long-term emergency power supply requirement, failure of auxiliary cooling water supply, efficacy of preventive measures, aggravating boundary conditions for the performance of emergency measures.

  14. Data list of nuclear power plants in Japan

    Izumi, Fumio; Horikami, Kunihiko; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Namatame, Ken.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the database called PPD (Nuclear Power Plant Database) has started in 1983 at JAERI as a six-year program to provide useful information for reactor safety regulation and reactor safety research. In 1988 the program has been accomplished, and since then the data in the database has been updating and adding. Information source of the PPD is based on SAR's (Safety Analysis Report) of 47 nuclear power plants which are operating, under construction or under licensing review in Japan. The report, BWR edition, consists of lists of major data stored in the PPD, relating to safety design of 25 BWR plants in Japan. (author)

  15. Probabilistic analysis of safety of a production plant of hydrogen using nuclear energy

    Flores F, A.; Nelson E, P.F.; Francois L, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The present work makes use of the Probabilistic Safety analysis to evaluate and to quantify the safety in a plant producer of hydrogen coupled to a nuclear reactor of high temperature, the one which is building in Japan. It is had the description of systems and devices of the HTTR, the pipe diagrams and instrumentation of the plant, as well as the rates of generic faults for the components of the plant. The first step was to carry out a HAZOP study (Hazard and Operability Study) with the purpose of obtaining the initiator events; once obtained these, it was developed a tree of events by each initiator event and for each system it was developed a fault tree; the data used for the quantification of the failure probability of the systems were obtained starting from several generic sources of information. In each tree of events different final states were obtained and it stops each one, their occurrence frequency. The construction and evaluation of the tree of events and of failures one carries out with the SAPHIRE program. The results show the safety of the shutdown system of the HTTR and they allow to suggest modifications to the auxiliary system of refrigeration and to the heat exchanger helium/water pressurized. (Author)

  16. On symbiotic nuclear power: a test for feasibility of comprehensive national energy policy of Japan

    Tanaka, Y.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines ambivalent attitudes of the Japanese toward nuclear power and shows that despite great benefits nuclear power plants may bring to local governments and people, the Japanese have become more sensitive to risks of nuclear related facilities than to their benefits in a post Chernobyl period. In this light, the usefulness and limitations of economic incentives are analyzed. Third, the importance of particular institutional arrangements is discussed with respect to development 'symbiotic' schemes for nuclear power plants and people in neighboring communities. These 'symbiotic' schemes have dual purposes: to make a wider and more flexible use of the site space for developing local industries, and to raise the quality of life by improving the socio-economic infrastructure and social welfare. 6 refs., 1 fig

  17. Nuclear energy

    Kuhn, W.

    1986-01-01

    This loose-leaf collection is made up of five didactically prepared units covering the following subjects: basic knowledge on nuclear energy, nuclear energy in relation to energy economy, site issues, environmental compatibility of nuclear energy, and nuclear energy in the focus of political and social action. To this was added a comprehensive collection of material: specific scientific background material, a multitude of tables, diagrams, charts etc. for copying, as well as 44 transparent charts, mostly in four colours. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Nuclear power plant safety in the framework of future energy systems

    Kroeger, W.

    1995-01-01

    The work in the direction of 'sustainability' must, in the author's opinion, include the development of appropriate sustainability criteria. These must be concretised in such a way that they can be considered as technically mature and that one can derive from them further requirements for the development of energy systems. Once such criteria have been defined and accepted and dogmatism is driven back, nuclear technology would have considerable chances. On a planetary level, nuclear energy has a convincing perspective. The ongoing development work and the tendencies followed thereby, including a new safety cannot last for ever. An unprejudiced debate on nuclear risks, as can be observed at many places, on adequate internalisation of external costs, on the 'value' of technology for a country are signs of a 'normalisation'. However, this process is not (yet) robust and reliable, or even manageable. (author) 9 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Fukushima Ministerial Conference Urges Continued Work to Strengthen Nuclear Safety

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Strengthening nuclear safety is a continuous process that leaves no room for complacency, the Co-Presidents of the Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety said in a statement today. Koichiro Gemba, Japan's Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Fadillah bin Haji Yusof, Malaysia's Deputy Minister of Science, Technology and Innovation, released the Co-Presidents' Statement at the conclusion of the Conference's Ministerial Plenary, on day one of the three-day event. ''It was stressed that nuclear safety is a prerequisite for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, that strengthening nuclear safety is a continuous process and that there should be no complacency in safety matters,'' the statement said. The statement recognized progress reported by Japan in the response to the Fukushima Daiichi accident, including the achievement of the present stable status of the nuclear power station and the significant decrease in radioactive releases at the accident site. It stressed the importance of continued transparency in sharing objective information on the progress of decommissioning the plant, remediation and waste management, and encouraged Japan to lead an international effort to obtain data from the damaged reactors. ''The lessons learned from these activities, through their dissemination and related cooperation with the international community, are expected to contribute to enhancing the safety and effectiveness of future decommissioning and remediation activities worldwide,'' it said. The statement emphasized the importance of strengthening the IAEA's central role in international efforts to enhance global nuclear safety, underlining the Agency's Safety Standards and the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. It urged IAEA Member States to strengthen efforts to implement the Action Plan fully, including the use of international peer reviews and putting the recommendations of such reviews into practice. It stressed the ''utmost importance of establishing and

  20. Nuclear energy basic knowledge

    Volkmer, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Atoms, nuclear decays and radioactivity, energy, nuclear fission and the chain reaction, controlled nuclear fission, nuclear power plants, safety installations in nuclear power plants, fuel supply and disposal, radiation measurement and radiation exposition of man. (HSI)

  1. Present and future activities of nuclear desalination in Japan

    Minato, A.; Hirai, M.

    2004-01-01

    Seawater desalination plants have been installed at several nuclear power plants in Japan in order to satisfy the regulations for nuclear plant installation. This has been done where there is a limited source of water due to the geological conditions. These desalination plants are being operated to ensure supplemental water by using thermal or electrical energy from the nuclear power plant. The desalination plant is not operated continuously during the year because the major function of the plant is to ensure the supply of supplemental water for the nuclear power plant. Regarding maintenance of the desalination plant, some piping was exchanged due to corrosion by high temperature seawater, however, the desalination plants are being operated without any trouble as of today. Recently, the development of innovative and/or small reactor designs, that emphasise safety features, has been promoted in Japan to use for seawater desalination and for installation in developing countries. An advanced RO system with lower energy consumption technology is also being developed. Furthermore, some Japanese industries and universities are now very interested in nuclear desalination. (author)

  2. Cooperation of technical support organizations of state nuclear regulatory committee of Ukraine in sip safety regulation

    Bikov, V.O.; Kyilochits'ka, T.P.; Bogorins'kij, P.; Vasil'chenko, V.M.; Kondrat'jev, S.M.; Smishlyajeva, S.P.; Troter, D.

    2002-01-01

    The main task of the technical support in the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) licensing process consists in Technical Evaluation of SIP projects and documents submitted by the Licensee to State Nuclear Regulatory Committee to substantiate the safety of Shelter-related work. The goal of this task is to evaluate the submitted materials whether they meet the requirements of nuclear and radiation safety

  3. Japan nuclear ship sea trial

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Toshikatus; Mizushima, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    The sea trial of the first Japan nuclear Ship 'MUTSU' was conducted from the end of October to December in 1990. The purpose of the sea trial was to verify the nuclear propulsive performances and maneuverabilities. The present report describes the results of the sea trial. These results are classified into four items: 1. Speed test and engineering performance tests 2. Maneuvering performance tests 3. Vibration tests 4. Other tests. Acceptable performances were demonstrated, as expected in the original design. The experience of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which were newly adopted for the sea trial, is also reported. (author)

  4. Progress on development of nuclear power in Japan

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Since three Laws on the nuclear power were published 45 years has passed. Now, development on nuclear power in Japan is at an emergent state. In Japan, 51 units of commercial nuclear reactors with 44.917 GW are in operation, occupy about 37% of total electric power generation, and is positioned at an essential basic energy source supporting economical society in Japan. However, an accident occurred at Tokai Works of the JCO Co., Ltd., one of the uranium reconversion company, on September 30, 1999, was the first critical accident in Japan, and became the worst case in history on development of nuclear power in Japan, because of forming three heavy radiation disabled persons (One of them was dead) in its operators. This was a big crisis with relation to existence on development of nuclear power in Japan, by which anxiety and distrust of the Japanese against the nuclear power were amplified rapidly. On the other side, for Japan short in energy sources and of a big energy consumption, in order to intend for a long term to carry out energy security, global environmental conservation, and sustainable maintenance of essential growth, it remains to be one of important optional methods to further promote nuclear power generation and to establish nuclear fuel cycle. Here were described on progress on peaceful applications of nuclear power in Japan, progress on the field of nuclear power in Japan (from 1955 to 1999), progress on Tokai nuclear power station, introduction of nuclear power generation and effort on its domestic production. (G.K.)

  5. Japan's nuclear catastrophe; a shocking calamity

    Shiva, Sonu; Gaur, Madhusudan

    2012-01-01

    Japan suffered a massive earthquake which was followed by more disastrous tsunami that led to nuclear crises. The Fukushima nuclear plant faced series of explosions and the water cooling system failed. The nuclear reactor is spreading radioactivity in the atmosphere. This has immensely affected the country's economy and the authorities are still struggling to stop the release of radiation from the quake hit nuclear plant. The professors of various universities are tense with regard to dangerous amount of radiation present in the air. The survivors of the calamity are afraid of cancer and other dire illnesses; who have been exposed to Japan's crippled nuclear plant on march 11, 2011. Though the scientists claim that Tokyo is safe from the radiations but the authorities do not have the sufficient data to prove about its safety. There has been much errors and delay in the proper assessment of the crises and the truth may take 5 to 10 years of time to come out, but this would be too late. This paper is an attempt to delve deep into the reasons of this calamity. It intends to suggest some measures that can be helpful in assessing the damage and improvements that can be taken up with regard to location and design of nuclear power plant so that in such situation of emergency the coping becomes easier and damage minimized. (author)

  6. Annual report of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, for fiscal 1989

    1990-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has promoted the research on nuclear safety, the research and development of high temperature engineering and nuclear fusion which are the leading projects bringing about the breakthrough in atomic energy technology, the research on radiation utilization and the research and development of nuclear-powered ships, following the 'Plan of development and long term utilization of atomic energy' decided in 1987, as the central, general research institute in atomic energy field in Japan. Also the advanced basic research for opening atomic energy frontier and various international cooperation as well as the cooperation in Japan have been promoted. The engineering safety of nuclear facilities and environmental safety, the construction of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, the design of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor and the various tests related to it, the reconstruction of JT-60 for increasing the current, the design of a nuclear fusion reactor, the high utilization of radiation using ion beam, the construction of Sekinehama Port for the nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu', the power increasing test of the reactor of the Mutsu, the reconstruction of JRR-3 and others are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Public acceptance (PA) activities of nuclear power in Japan

    Yamada, Masafumi; Iguchi, Tatsuro

    1993-10-01

    At the first part of presentation present status of nuclear power development in Japan is described. Then results of poll on nuclear energy acceptance by population are analyzed. Further, current activities and future efforts directed to broad understanding by people benefits of nuclear energy are described. 6 figs

  8. Establishment of 'Japan Atomic Energy Agency'. Its role and expectation

    Nakahara, Toru; Itakura, Shuichiro; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Hino, Ryutaro; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Sakurada, Michio; Kimura, Itsuro; Kikuyama, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    In October 2005, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established as an independent administrative institution with the integration of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). JAEA is the only institute in Japan dedicated to comprehensive research and development in the field of nuclear energy. This paper put together a special article on its role and expectation. Firstly the essentials of comprehensive nuclear research and its future perspective were discussed mainly based on 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' of the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. Eight articles were followed on specific items such as quantum beams utilization, hydrogen production with nuclear heat, neutron science and ITER project, and put stress on joint works and smooth transfer of related technology to the private sector. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Nuclear Safety Charter

    2008-01-01

    The AREVA 'Values Charter' reaffirmed the priority that must be given to the requirement for a very high level of safety, which applies in particular to the nuclear field. The purpose of this Nuclear Safety Charter is to set forth the group's commitments in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection so as to ensure that this requirement is met throughout the life cycle of the facilities. It should enable each of us, in carrying out our duties, to commit to this requirement personally, for the company, and for all stakeholders. These commitments are anchored in organizational and action principles and in complete transparency. They build on a safety culture shared by all personnel and maintained by periodic refresher training. They are implemented through Safety, Health, and Environmental management systems. The purpose of these commitments, beyond strict compliance with the laws and regulations in force in countries in which we operate as a group, is to foster a continuous improvement initiative aimed at continually enhancing our overall performance as a group. Content: 1 - Organization: responsibility of the group's executive management and subsidiaries, prime responsibility of the operator, a system of clearly defined responsibilities that draws on skilled support and on independent control of operating personnel, the general inspectorate: a shared expertise and an independent control of the operating organization, an organization that can be adapted for emergency management. 2 - Action principles: nuclear safety applies to every stage in the plant life cycle, lessons learned are analyzed and capitalized through the continuous improvement initiative, analyzing risks in advance is the basis of Areva's safety culture, employees are empowered to improve nuclear Safety, the group is committed to a voluntary radiation protection initiative And a sustained effort in reducing waste and effluent from facility Operations, employees and subcontractors are treated

  10. Nuclear energy in Finland

    Kilpi, K.; Palmen, B.

    1983-01-01

    Finland currently generates about 40% of its electricity from nuclear power. This achievement of worldwide record magnitude is based on long-lasting efforts to build and maintain the competent infrastructure and close international cooperation required by this demanding technology. This booklet published by the Finnish Atomic Energy Commission gives an overview of nuclear energy and related organizations in Finland. It describes the utility companies and nuclear power production, the manufacturing industry and its export potential, research and educational activities and the legal framework and authorities for nuclear safety and administration. International cooperation has been essential for Finland in developing its nuclear energy capacity and appreciation is espressed to many countries and international organizations which have contributed to this. At the same time Finnish organizations are willing to share the experiences and know-how they have gained in building nuclear power in a small country. This is a road which will be followed by many other countries in the decades to come. It is hoped that this booklet will also help to open new channels of cooperation in such efforts

  11. Nuclear safety

    Arnott, D.

    1981-01-01

    Dr Arnott, scientific consultant to PANDORA, emphasises our lack of knowledge of the behaviour of highly active radioactive wastes, particularly effluents, and their characteristics. He proposes that they should be stored, preferably in a solidified state, until our knowledge allows their safe disposal. Political aspects and government policies are discussed and human fallibility is stressed. The nuclear establishment and nuclear power programme are severely criticised. (U.K.)

  12. International development of Japan's Nuclear Industry. Indispensable Japan-U.S. cooperation

    Saigo, Masao

    2006-01-01

    It is significant to internationally develop the nuclear power plants technology that has been fostered by Japan's nuclear industry. It is also important to work with taking the degree of development of nuclear power plants of the recipient country into consideration. ''Forum on International Development of Nuclear Industry'' organized by the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) proposed it would be indispensable for a Japan's nuclear industry to establish a Japan-U.S. Cooperation with the support of Government in order to develop the nuclear technology internationally. In November 2005, the investigating team including utilities and nuclear industry visited U.S. and exchanged opinions on its possibility. Investigating results and their evaluation were described. (T.Tanaka)

  13. Preliminary safety examination on thorium molten-salt nuclear energy synergetics

    Furukawa, Kazuo

    1991-01-01

    The new global fission industry for the next century should keep a strong public acceptance, which means to ensure an enough rational safety feature not only in the engineering issue but also in all issues of integral fuel-cycle system. In this sense, the safety characteristics of the Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetic System (THORIMS-NES) is widely examined relating with the several aspects of environmental (including resources, radio-waste, etc.) social (including anti-nuclear proliferation and terrorism, etc), basic technological, engineering, institutional, and economical aspects. From this examination it seems that this system is verified as one of the most promising measures of North-South problem, greenhouse effect, etc in the world. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Introduction to nuclear energy

    2004-01-01

    After some descriptions about atoms, fission and fusion, explanations are given about the functioning of a nuclear power plant. The safety with the different plans of emergency and factors that lead to a better nuclear safety are exposed, then comes a part for the environmental protection; the fuel cycle is tackled. Some historical aspects of nuclear energy finish this file. (N.C.)

  15. Soft energy vs nuclear energy

    Ando, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    During the early 1960s, a plentiful, inexpensive supply of petroleum enabled Japanese industry to progress rapidly; however, almost all of this petroleum was imported. Even after the first oil crisis of 1973, the recent annual energy consumption of Japan is calculated to be about 360 million tons in terms of petroleum, and actual petroleum forms 73% of total energy. It is necessary for Japan to reduce reliance on petroleum and to diversify energy resources. The use of other fossil fuels, such as coal, LNG and LPG, and hydraulic energy, is considered as an established alternative. In this presentation, the author deals with new energy, namely soft energy and nuclear energy, and discusses their characteristics and problems. The following kinds of energy are dealt with: a) Solar energy, b) Geothermal energy, c) Ocean energy (tidal, thermal, wave), d) Wind energy, e) Biomass energy, f) Hydrogen, g) Nuclear (thermal, fast, fusion). To solve the energy problem in future, assiduous efforts should be made to develop new energy systems. Among them, the most promising alternative energy is nuclear energy, and various kinds of thermal reactor systems have been developed for practical application. As a solution to the long-term future energy problem, research on and development of fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are going on. (author)

  16. HCTISN - Plenary extraordinary meeting on the 9 March 2012 - General consequences of the earthquake and tsunami; Status of Fukushima-Dai-ichi nuclear installations; The Fukushima accident, one year after: environmental and health situation in Japan; Protective actions undertaken by Japanese authorities; Support by AREVA to Japan after the Fukushima accident; What went on in Fukushima? Implementation of the IAEA nuclear safety action plan; Review of European stress tests by the peers; Opinion of the ASN on complementary safety assessments (CSAs)

    Kataoka, Susumu; Charles, T.; Champion, Didier; Jean-Luc Godet; Arnaud GAY; Philippe Jamet

    2012-01-01

    This document contains Power Point presentations proposed during a plenary session of the High Committee transparency and information on nuclear safety (HCTISN). The contributions addressed the Fukushima accident (the earthquake and the tsunami, the technical consequences on the plant, the consequences on the environment and on health, the different actions undertaken in Japan to protect the population, the consequences on nuclear safety in other countries with notably the performance of stress tests or the organisation of complementary safety assessments on the French fleet of nuclear reactors

  17. IAEA to Cooperate with Japan on Nuclear Security at 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo

    2018-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Government of Japan signed an agreement today aimed at enhancing nuclear security measures for the summer Olympic Games and Paralympic Games in Tokyo in 2020. The agreement follows previous IAEA support to major public events, including the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro and the 2012 European soccer championship in Poland and Ukraine. IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano and Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono presided over the signing ceremony at the Agency’s headquarters in Vienna. Practical Arrangements outlining the planned cooperation were signed by IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo, head of the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, and H.E. Mitsuru Kitano, Japan’s Ambassador to the International Organizations in Vienna. “The IAEA has extensive experience in supporting Member States on nuclear security for major public events,” Amano said at the ceremony. “The Agency welcomes the cooperation to support the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, and is already cooperating with Japan by sharing the experiences of Member States which previously hosted the Olympics.” The details of the cooperation will be decided in due course, but the possible areas of cooperation include the IAEA offering Japanese authorities training courses, workshops, technical visits and exercises related to nuclear security, hosting preparatory technical meetings and lending supplementary radiation detection equipment. The IAEA and Japan may also exchange information related to nuclear security events as appropriate and through the cooperation, the IAEA will also benefit from Japan’s good practices on nuclear security.

  18. Circumstances in a nuclear power plant. Organization of risk and institutionalization of safety

    Wessblad, H.

    1999-01-01

    Risk societies are made of risk organisations. This dissertation is an ethnographic study of a risk organisation, of a nuclear power plant. Risk organizations have larger demands on their organization than traditional companies have. Risk societies, to come or already present, have new political agendas. Within a risk society the major task is to reduce and distribute the negative side effects of industrial production, not to increase and distribute well-fare in society, as it has been in an industrial society. This is a study of a risk organisation claimed to produce these negative side effects. The title of this thesis relates to specific occasions in the organisation. The branch concept, circumstances, defines 'situations beyond normal performance', which are to be reported to the nuclear authorities. These circumstances are rarely endangering man or material, but given the nature of nuclear power production, they have a potential to escalate to something larger. This dissertation focuses on how the organisation deals with these issues and reproduces safety as something taken-for-granted. The material is gathered using participant observation of different functions in the plant. The work is based on narration of situations, meetings, interviews, and small talk etc, in every-day-interaction. The dissertation describes how business-as-usual produce safety. It is a description of how values, norms, attitudes, ideas, knowledge are produced and reproduced. These issues are discussed mainly in an institutional theory perspective. What has become apparent is that functions governed by routines and instructions tend to be more flexible and reflecting than those dealing with new tasks, such as problem solving projects. Thus, these new projects tend to reproduce earlier established procedures. Through the narration of the various functions of the plant joined with theoretical discussions, different themes have been found describing how the organisation deals with

  19. Current status of nuclear safety research

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Efforts at nuclear safety research have expanded year by year in Japan, in term of money and technical achievement. The Atomic Energy Commission set last year the five year nuclear safety research program, a guideline by which various research institutes will be able to develop their own efforts in a concerted manner. From the results of the nuclear safety research which cover very wide areas ranging from reactor engineering safety, safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, prevention of radiation hazards to the adequate treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, AIJ hereafter focuses of LWR engineering safety and prevents two articles, one introducing the current results of the NSSR program developed by JAERI and the other reporting the LWR reliability demonstration testing projects being promoted by MITI. The outline of these demonstration tests was reported in this report. The tests consist of earthquake resistance reliability test of nuclear power plants, steam generator reliability tests, valve integrity tests, fuel assembly reliability tests, reliability tests of heat affected zones and reliability tests of pumps. (Kobatake, H.)

  20. The photovoltaic energy in Japan

    Georgel, O.

    2005-07-01

    Today the Japan is the leader of the photovoltaic energy. The first reason of this success is an action of the government integrating subventions for the installation of photovoltaic systems and a support of the scientific research. To explain this success, the author presents the energy situation in Japan, details the national programs, the industrial sector (market, silicon needs, recycling, manufacturers, building industry) and presents the main actors. (A.L.B.)

  1. A review of the nuclear safety activities in Italy

    Merelli, A.

    1989-01-01

    A review of research programs carried out in Italy in the field of nuclear reactor safety was done in 1986, in the frame of the activities of the Commission of the European Communities, the International Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The report contains information on these programs, as well as information on the organization of safety research in Italy and the evolution of safety research programs

  2. Draft Law on the creation, attribution, organization and functioning of a ''Regulatory Authority and Nuclear Safety'' (ARSN)

    Issoufou, Mahamadou

    2016-08-01

    This Draft Law deals with the establishment, responsibilities, organization and functioning of an Autority Control and Nuclear Safety. Through this law, the Regulatory and Nuclear Safety Autority is responsible for regulation of nuclear and radiological activities to ensure the safety, security and protection of persons and the environment against the effects of radiation throughout the national territory. [fr

  3. Germany bars nuclear energy

    Gaullier, V.

    1999-01-01

    Germany wants a future without nuclear energy, the different steps about the going out of nuclear programs are recalled. The real choice is either fossil energies with their unquestionable safety levels but with an increase of the greenhouse effect or nuclear energy with its safety concerns and waste management problems but without pollutant emission. The debate will have to be set in most European countries. (A.C.)

  4. Perception of the nuclear energy in Mexico

    Xolocostli M, J.V.; Alonso V, G.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    From their beginnings the Nuclear Energy has generated a lot of polemic, since on one hand it was seen as something completely harmful, due to the making of atomic weapons and those effects of the radiation (Hiroshima and Nagasaki). But on the other hand it has been saying that it could be the 'Panacea' of the humanity like an inexhaustible source of energy, this brought that a countless of reactors was built for the electric power production at world level, unfortunately some accidents as that of Chernobyl (Former Soviet Union 1986) as well as the contribution of the media of the fear toward the nuclear energy made that it was formed a barrier of the public opinion toward all that has to do with the nuclear energy, the construction of new power stations one came below and even in some countries the environmentalist organizations achieved their governments to close some power stations. In the last years the concern for the global heating and the climatic change has put in the world calendar the use of the nuclear energy again, by means of the new designs of advanced reactors with more safety measures, more efficient and economic. In several countries the public opinion is looking to the nuclear energy with good eyes, reason by a resurgence is glimpsed from the nuclear energy to great scale, so it is so several countries they have already begun the construction of new advanced reactors ones (Japan, China, Finland) and some included one already has them in operation. In Mexico, it is ignored to certain science which is the real posture of the public opinion with regard to this topic so controversial, reason why it was carried out this study to know the perception of the public in general with regard to this topic, as well as the convenience of enlarging the infrastructure of electric power generation in our country by means of this energy type. (Author)

  5. Amendment of the atomic energy basic law and other related laws and establishment of the nuclear safety commission

    Ochi, Kenji

    1978-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Basic Law and related several laws were amended in the recent diet session. The amendment of the laws was requested after the radiation leakage from nuclear-powered ship ''Mutsu''. The reform of administrative system of atomic energy development and utilization are consisted of two important points: one is to establish the Nuclear Safety Commission for strengthening nuclear safety administration, and the other is to give an authority to each ministry or agency to regulate nuclear power reactor from the establishment to operation according to its original mission. (author)

  6. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response

  7. Prospects for nuclear safety research

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a paper presented by Eric S. Beckjord (Director, Nuclear Regulatory Research/NRC) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 1994. The following topics are briefly reviewed: (1) Reactor vessel research, (2) Probabilistic risk assessment, (3) Direct containment heating, (4) Advanced LWR research, (5) Nuclear energy prospects in the US, and (6) Future nuclear safety research. Subtopics within the last category include economics, waste disposal, and health and safety.

  8. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. A submission to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review by Atomic Energy Canada Limited

    1987-01-01

    This submission comments on the evolution of the Canadian nuclear program, the management of safety, and the reactor design, analysis, operation and research programs that contribute to the safety of the CANDU reactor and provide assurance of safety to the regulatory agency and to the public. The CANDU reactor system has been designed and developed with close cooperation between Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), utilities, manufacturers, and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The AECB has the responsibility, on behalf of the public, for establishing acceptable standards with respect to public risk and for establishing through independent review that these standards are satisfied. The plant designer has responsibility for defining how those standards will be met. The plant operator has responsibility for operating within the framework of those standards. The Canadian approach to safety design is based on the philosophy of defence in depth. Defence in depth is achieved through a high level of equipment quality, system redundancy and fail-safe design; regulating and process systems designed to maintain all process systems within acceptable operating parameters; and, independent safety systems to shut down the reactor, provide long-term cooling, and contain potential release of radioactivity in the event of an accident. The resulting design meets regulatory requirements not only in Canada but also in other countries. Probabilistic safety and risk evaluations show that the CANDU design offers a level of safety and least as good as other commercially available reactor designs

  9. Nuclear energy and environment

    Alves, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    A general view about the use of energy for brazilian development is presented. The international situation of the nuclear field and the pacific utilization of nuclear energy in Brazil are commented. The safety concepts used for reactor and nuclear facilities licensing, the environmental monitoring program and radiation protection program used in Brazil are described. (E.G.) [pt

  10. The future of nuclear power: Looking ahead. Address at the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Sendai, 12 April 1999

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his address at the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (Sendai, 12 April 1999), the Director General of the IAEA described the role of the IAEA for nuclear power development, emphasizing the following aspects: nuclear power and the global energy mix, nuclear safety and the importance of public confidence, economic competitiveness and the role of research and development, and the importance of nuclear verification and prevention of illicit trafficking

  11. Nuclear Safety Review for 2014

    2014-07-01

    share and disseminate the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident through the analysis of relevant technical aspects. In 2013, the Agency organized two international experts’ meetings (IEMs), one on decommissioning and remediation after a nuclear accident and one on human and organizational factors in nuclear safety in light of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP. The Agency also organized the International Conference on Effective Nuclear Regulatory Systems: Transforming Experience into Regulatory Improvements, held in Ottawa, Canada, in April 2013. • The Agency published a) the IAEA Report on Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency in the Light of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant; b) the IAEA Report on Decommissioning and Remediation after a Nuclear Accident; and c) the IAEA Report on Strengthening Nuclear Regulatory Effectiveness in Light of Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

  12. Japan, new agenda for energy security

    Chrisstoffels, J.H.

    2007-07-01

    The author argues that the Japanese government will actively seek to strengthen security of supply. Japan has almost no domestic energy reserves. It is Asia's leading energy importer, but it faces increasing competition for resources from China and India. This has led to growing concern among Japanese policy makers. In the spring of 2007 a new Basic Energy Law was drafted that offers a strategic change of direction, away from a policy emphasis on free (energy) trade promotion and liberalisation of domestic energy markets. Japan will boost energy diplomacy towards energy producing countries and increase financial guarantees to Japanese oil and gas development companies. At the same time, Japan will raise efforts to lower its dependency on foreign oil and gas. To this end, it has set ambitious targets for further nuclear power development and the promotion of bio-trade. The author points at a multitude of complexities that may impede the success of these policies, Still, EU policy makers should be aware that Japan's energy policy has changed, driven by the conviction that markets alone cannot be relied upon to guarantee a secure supply of energy. [nl

  13. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Smith, B. L.

    2002-03-01

    The year 2001 was marked by the extensive audit of energy research at PSI. The audit took place on 21/22 June, and nuclear energy research was evaluated by five international experts. It was possible to present the quality and relevance of our research in a convincing way. This, together with optimal use of the available resources in our department Nuclear Energy and Safety (NES), prompted the highly welcome result that the auditors attested a high degree of scientific quality to the NES projects in general, with some of them judged to be of world-class standard. They recommended all audited projects be maintained, adequate resources to be allocated accordingly and, if necessary, an increase of public funding in nuclear energy research to be granted to achieve this. Finally, it was recommended that energy research should be explicitly mentioned in the statement of the ultimate mission of PSI. At the level of 'daily work', efforts in several directions related to the future of the Hotlab were one of the main focuses during the past year. On the one hand, the safety-related backfitting of the facility (particularly in regard to fire protection) has been continued, and was coupled with intensive planning studies, and with a thorough radiological cleaning of the labs; this invariably led to some impediment to the current research activities. Despite external burdens, which have led to some delays and additional costs, three of the four refurbishment phases have been completed, and the corresponding laboratories were brought back into operation after inspection and approval by the regulatory authority HSK. Given the size and complexity of the project, progress must be considered very satisfactory. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided

  14. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Smith, B.L. (ed.)

    2002-03-01

    The year 2001 was marked by the extensive audit of energy research at PSI. The audit took place on 21/22 June, and nuclear energy research was evaluated by five international experts. It was possible to present the quality and relevance of our research in a convincing way. This, together with optimal use of the available resources in our department Nuclear Energy and Safety (NES), prompted the highly welcome result that the auditors attested a high degree of scientific quality to the NES projects in general, with some of them judged to be of world-class standard. They recommended all audited projects be maintained, adequate resources to be allocated accordingly and, if necessary, an increase of public funding in nuclear energy research to be granted to achieve this. Finally, it was recommended that energy research should be explicitly mentioned in the statement of the ultimate mission of PSI. At the level of 'daily work', efforts in several directions related to the future of the Hotlab were one of the main focuses during the past year. On the one hand, the safety-related backfitting of the facility (particularly in regard to fire protection) has been continued, and was coupled with intensive planning studies, and with a thorough radiological cleaning of the labs; this invariably led to some impediment to the current research activities. Despite external burdens, which have led to some delays and additional costs, three of the four refurbishment phases have been completed, and the corresponding laboratories were brought back into operation after inspection and approval by the regulatory authority HSK. Given the size and complexity of the project, progress must be considered very satisfactory. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  15. FAPIG's activities for public acceptance of nuclear energy. Analytical results of questionnaire executed at organized visits to nuclear power stations

    Mizoguchi, Tadao

    1999-01-01

    FAPIG organizes a visit to nuclear power station in every November. It is an object that visitors acquire the correct knowledge of nuclear power by looking at the various facilities in the nuclear power stations. The paper showed the analytical results of questionnaire executed at organized visits to the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station. The visitors were 18 women. The questionnaire was carried out by the same problems before and after seminar and a conducted tour. Their impressions and opinions and the changes are analyzed. The speakers used easy words, video, OHP, pamphlet and experimental equipment. These means showed very good results to visitors. The seminar had very large effect on just recognition of safety and need of it. The change of answer proved from 3 to 6 of need and from 0 to 7 of safety of it. Nine members indicated good understanding of seminar content. The interested items in the seminar were measurement of radiation, effects of radiation, reason of decreasing average life, Chernobyl accident, difference between nuclear power and atomic bomb and nuclear power dose not generate carbon dioxide and recycle plutonium after nuclear fission of uranium. (S.Y.)

  16. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators

  17. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  18. Post-Fukushima Japan: The continuing nuclear controversy

    Fam, Shun Deng; Xiong, Jieru; Xiong, Gordon; Yong, Ding Li; Ng, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima disaster was a wake-up call for the nuclear industry as well as a shocking revelation of the inner workings of the Japanese power sector. The political fallout from the event was far-reaching, pushing governments into abandoning nuclear expansion, turning instead to fossil fuels and renewable energy alternatives. While the move away from nuclear energy was deemed a move critical to political survival in Europe, we find that political candidates running on anti-nuclear platforms did not win elections, while the pro-nuclear Liberal Democratic Party won government in the 2012 elections. Against this backdrop, we analyse the energy conflict in Japan using a framework of values versus interests and consider the regulatory and cultural conditions that contributed to the disaster. A number of considerations lie in the way of an organised phase-out of nuclear power in Japan. We also consider the possible policy paths Japan may take. - Highlights: • As Europeans urgently phase-out nuclear power, Japan voted out such a government despite high anti-nuclear sentiment. • Regulatory climate within the nuclear industry was dysfunctional as a result of being captured by the ‘nuclear village’. • New ‘independent’ nuclear authority is made up of previously captured agency. • With a pro-nuclear government, and lack of really independent nuclear authority, old problems may yet arise. • Japanese government has to choose between lowering emissions, low popular support for nuclear power, and affordable electricity

  19. Roadmap on R&D and Human Resource for Light Water Reactors Safety and Knowledge Management: Status in Japan

    Sekimura, N.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The roadmap for light water reactor safety technology and human resource has been constructed by the Special Committee on Nuclear Safety Research Roadmap in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). Based upon the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident, effective planning of research activities to improve safety can also contribute to enhance human resource and management of accumulated knowledge-base in the future domestic and international community. (author

  20. Nuclear safety research

    1996-01-01

    The topics 'Large-sized PWR-NPP Safety Techniques Research',and 'The Key Techniques Research on the Safety Supervision and Control for Operation of Nuclear Installations' have been adopted as an apart of 'the National 9th five Year Programs for Tacking the Key Scientific and Technical Topics' which are organized by the State Planning Commission (SPC) and State Science and Technology Commission (SSTC) respectively, and have obtained a financial support from them. To play a better role with the limited fund, the NNSA laid special stress on selecting key sub-topics on nuclear safety, and carefully choosing units which would undertake sub-topics and signing technical contracts with them

  1. Causal model of safety-checking action of the staff of nuclear power plants and the organization climate

    Fukui, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Michio; Yamaura, Kazuho

    2000-01-01

    For those who run an organization, it is critical to identify the causal relationship between the organization's characteristics and the safety-checking action of its staff, in order to effectively implement activities for promoting safety. In this research. a causal model of the safety-checking action was developed and factors affecting it were studied. A questionnaire survey, which includes safety awareness, attitude toward safety, safety culture and others, was conducted at three nuclear power plants and eight factors were extracted by means of factor analysis of the questionnaire items. The extracted eight interrelated factors were as follows: work norm, supervisory action, interest in training, recognition of importance, safety-checking action, the subject of safety, knowledge/skills, and the attitude of an organization. Among them, seven factors except the recognition of importance were defined as latent variables and a causal model of safety-checking action was constructed. By means of covariance structure analysis, it was found that the three factors: the attitude of an organization, supervisory action and the subject of safety, have a significant effect on the safety-checking action. Moreover, it was also studied that workplaces in which these three factors are highly regarded form social environment where safety-checking action is fully supported by the workplace as a whole, while workplaces in which these three factors are poorly regarded do not fully form social environment where safety-checking action is supported. Therefore, the workplaces form an organizational environment where safety-checking action tends to depend strongly upon the knowledge or skills of individuals. On top of these, it was noted that the attitude of an organization and supervisory action are important factors that serve as the first trigger affecting the formation of the organizational climate for safety. (author)

  2. Causal model of safety-checking action of the staff of nuclear power plants and the organization climate

    Fukui, Hirokazu [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan); Yoshida, Michio; Yamaura, Kazuho [Japan Institute for Group Dynamics, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    For those who run an organization, it is critical to identify the causal relationship between the organization's characteristics and the safety-checking action of its staff, in order to effectively implement activities for promoting safety. In this research. a causal model of the safety-checking action was developed and factors affecting it were studied. A questionnaire survey, which includes safety awareness, attitude toward safety, safety culture and others, was conducted at three nuclear power plants and eight factors were extracted by means of factor analysis of the questionnaire items. The extracted eight interrelated factors were as follows: work norm, supervisory action, interest in training, recognition of importance, safety-checking action, the subject of safety, knowledge/skills, and the attitude of an organization. Among them, seven factors except the recognition of importance were defined as latent variables and a causal model of safety-checking action was constructed. By means of covariance structure analysis, it was found that the three factors: the attitude of an organization, supervisory action and the subject of safety, have a significant effect on the safety-checking action. Moreover, it was also studied that workplaces in which these three factors are highly regarded form social environment where safety-checking action is fully supported by the workplace as a whole, while workplaces in which these three factors are poorly regarded do not fully form social environment where safety-checking action is supported. Therefore, the workplaces form an organizational environment where safety-checking action tends to depend strongly upon the knowledge or skills of individuals. On top of these, it was noted that the attitude of an organization and supervisory action are important factors that serve as the first trigger affecting the formation of the organizational climate for safety. (author)

  3. Energy R and D in Japan; TOPICAL

    J.J. Dooley

    1999-01-01

    In 1997, the public and private sectors in Japan invested$90.3 billion in R and D. Japan is the second largest supporter of R and D after the United States. A very large percentage (79.4%) of all R and D in Japan is supported by the private sector. The prolonged economic recession that has plagued the Japanese economy for most of the 1990s has significantly reduced the scale of the Japanese R and D effort compared to what it would have been had the economy been more robust. The Japanese government has recently attempted to bring the economy out of this recession through the use of economic stimulus packages. These stimulus packages have contained significant new funding for R and D, although it is apparent that much of the funding is going to R and D programs and R and D construction projects with very near tern payoff and not to the support of longer term R and D. In 1998, the Japanese government devoted 13.7% of all public R and D funds to the support of energy R and D. The priority accorded to energy R and D in Japan is significantly higher than in any other industrialized nation. The Japanese energy R and D program, which was funded at$2.5 billion in 1997, is overwhelmingly focused on nuclear energy R and D. Nuclear energy R and D (fission and fusion) accounts for 75% of the total national energy R and D budget. The fission energy R and D effort has decreased nearly 24% since 1996 as the government attempts to refocus this program in the face of growing public opposition to the Japanese government's efforts to expand the nuclear power program. Energy efficiency R and D (8% of the total national energy R and D budget) and renewable energy R and D receive relatively modest support from the Japanese government

  4. Progress of nuclear safety research. 2001

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Sasajima, Hideo; Nishiyama, Yutaka (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-10-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy or the Safety Research Annual Plan issued by the Japanese government. The safety research at JAERI concerns the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 1999 through March 2001. (author)

  5. Nuclear safety in Spain

    Caro, R.

    1988-01-01

    Control and monitoring of all Spanish nuclear facilities was first carried out by the Department of Nuclear Safety of the Junta de Energia Nuclear established by the Nuclear Energy Act in 1964. Later, following the example of other Western countries, it was concluded that regulations and monitoring of nuclear energy on one hand and its promotion and development on the other should not be done by the same national body. Therefore, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) was created in 1980, as the sole national body responsible for controlling the safety of nuclear installations, and radiological protection. The CSN has five members, one chairman and four comissioners, required to be independent and therefore with politically objective criteria, internationally acknowledged technical capability, and free from other duties and responsibilities. For this purpose the Chairman has been given the status of Minister and the commissioners that of Secretary of State. They serve for six years, after being accepted by Parliament by a majority of at least 3/5 of the votes, and are called upon to report to Parliament at least twice a year on nuclear safety and radiological protection in the country. A complete report on those issues is presented to Parliament, becoming a politic document as from that moment. To prepare that report (basically a summary of CSN activities) and, in general, to fulfill all its tasks, the CSN has a staff of some 300, about 50% being technical. CSN activities cover: 1. Standards; 2. Licences; 3. Research; 4. Environment; 5. Information; and 6. International Relations

  6. The nuclear controversy and nuclear safety techniques

    Ragnarson, P.

    1979-09-01

    Survey interviews with 125 Swedish nuclear safety engineers are summarized and commented upon. A short historical background is given, claiming that the major safety issues of nuclear energy have been debated continously during the 50's and 60's in a way that could well have been watched and interpreted by a political, democratic system involving political parties, government departments, etc. With a few exceptions, these 125 engineers represent 10 - 20 years experience in nuclear research and development. By definition they belong to a professional group of about 800 in Sweden (1978). The main aim of the study is to find out if (how and why) a public debate can bring about changes in an industrially established technology by influencing the attitudes and technical judgements of the individuals and/or organizations involved. Examples are given in which the nuclear specialists themselves admit or claim that direct or indirect impacts from the public debate have been important. A common experience is that the scientists and engineers have been forced to broaden their professional scope through a time-consuming but - on the whole - 'positive' process. A year after the interviews started, a serious reactor accident occured near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The group has been used for a survey of the immediate reactions in order to see if it could cause sudden changes of attitudes among the experts. A minority demonstrated clear changes towards a more cautious attitude regarding nuclear risks. (author)

  7. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  8. The outlook for nuclear power development in Japan

    Hiraiwa, Gaishi

    1987-01-01

    The world economy has entered a new stage of growth--albeit low growth--following painful adjustments in the wake of past oil crises. At the same time, energy demand is expanding at an even slower rate, due to the structural changes in industry and improved efficiency in energy use. Furthermore, progress in the development of alternative energies and technical innovations in both the supply and use of energy have sharpened competition between energy sources. We also aim to improve even further the economy of nuclear power, within the bounds of safety and reliability, to minimize electric power generation costs by optimizing the total system for nuclear power generation including the nuclear fuel cycle. In Japan's long-term strategy for the development of nuclear power, our basic plan is to switch from light-water reactors to fast-breeder reactors (FBR), as the latter use plutonium most efficiently. Every effort is being made to have FBR reactors up and running at an early date. However, given the outlook for the development of their technology and the supply and demand situation for uranium, we estimate that this won't be achieved until 2020 or 2030. With this timetable in mind, it will be important to prepare for the coming age of FBR by mastering the technologies of and establishing the foundation necessary for plutonium utilization. To this end, we plan to expand our use of plutonium to an appropriate scale, at the earliest possible date. (J.P.N.)

  9. Nuclear safety infrastructure

    Moffitt, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of nuclear power in any country requires the early establishment of a long term nuclear safety infrastructure. This is necessary to ensure that the siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and dismantling of the nuclear power plant and any other related installations, as well as the long term management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, are conducted in a safe and secure manner. The decision to undertake a nuclear power program is a major commitment requiring strict attention to nuclear safety. This commitment is a responsibility to not only the citizens of the country developing such a program, but also a responsibility to the international community. Nobody can take on this responsibility or make the critical decisions except the host country. It is important to make sure that the decision making process and the development activities are done in as open a manner as possible allowing interested stakeholders the opportunity to review and comment on the actions and plans. It cannot be overemphasized that everyone involved in a program to develop nuclear power carries a responsibility for ensuring safety. While it is clear that the key decisions and activities are the responsibility of the host country, it is also very important to recognize that help is available. The IAEA, OECD-NEA, WANO and other international organizations along with countries with established nuclear power programs are available to provide information and assistance. In particular, the IAEA and OECD-NEA have published several documents regarding the development of a nuclear power program and they have been and continue to support many meetings and seminars regarding the development of nuclear power programs

  10. A QUARTER CENTURY OF NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT IN JAPAN

    Masuda, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is entitled ''A QUARTER CENTURY OF NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT IN JAPAN''. Since the first statement on the strategy for radioactive waste management in Japan was made by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1976, a quarter century has passed, in which much experience has been accumulated both in technical and social domains. This paper looks back in this 25-year history of radioactive waste management in Japan by highlighting activities related to high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal

  11. Working material. IAEA seismic safety of nuclear power plants. International workshop on lessons learned from strong earthquake

    2008-08-01

    The International Workshop on Lessons Learned from Strong Earthquake was held at Kashiwazaki civic plaza, Kashiwazaki, Niigata-prefecture, Japan, for three days in June 2008. Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP (KK-NPP) is located in the city of Kashiwazaki and the village of Kariwa, and owned and operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Ltd. (TEPCO). After it experienced the Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake in July 2007, IAEA dispatched experts' missions twice and held technical discussions with TEPCO. Through such activities, the IAEA secretariat and experts obtained up-dated information of plant integrity, geological and seismological evaluation and developments of the consultation in the regulatory framework of Japan. Some of the information has been shared with the member states through the reports on findings and lessons learned from the missions to Japan. The international workshop was held to discuss and share the information of lessons learned from strong earthquakes in member states' nuclear installations. It provided the opportunity for participants from abroad to share the information of the recent earthquake and experience in Japan and to visit KK-NPP. And for experts in Japan, the workshop provided the opportunity to share the international approach on seismic-safety-related measures and experiences. The workshop was organised by the IAEA as a part of an extra budgetary project, in cooperation with OECD/NEA, hosted by Japanese organisations including Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC), and Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES). The number of the workshop participants was 70 experts from outside Japan, 27 countries and 2 international organisations, 154 Japanese experts and 81 audience and media personnel, totalling to 305 participants. The three-day workshop was open to the media including the site visit, and covered by NHK (the nation's public broadcasting corporation) and nation-wide and local television

  12. Safety aspects of the desalination of sea water using nuclear energy

    Carnino, A.; Gasparini, N.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear plants for desalination to be built in the future will have to meet the standards of safety required for the best nuclear power plants currently in operation or being designed. Some specific characteristics of desalination plants such as siting and coupling require particular consideration from a safety point of view, and further safety studies will be needed when the type and size of the reactor are determined. The current safety approach, based on the defence in depth strategy, has been shown to be a sound foundation for the safety and protection of public health, and gives the plant the capability of dealing with a large variety of sequences, even beyond the design basis. The Department of Nuclear Safety of the IAEA is involved in many activities, the most important of which are to establish safety standards, and to provide various safety services and technical knowledge in many Technical Co-operation assistance projects. The department is also involved in other safety areas, notably in the field of future reactors. The IAEA is carrying out a project on the safety of new generation reactors, including those used for desalination, with the objective of fostering an exchange of information on safety approaches, promoting harmonization among Member States and contributing towards the development and revision of safety standards and guidelines for nuclear power plant design. The safety, regulatory and environmental concerns in nuclear powered desalination are those related directly to nuclear power plants, with due consideration given to the coupling process. The protection of product water against radioactive contamination must be ensured. An effective infrastructure, including appropriate training, a legal framework and regulatory regime, is a prerequisite to considering use of nuclear power for desalination plants, also in those countries with limited industrial infrastructures and little experience in nuclear technology or safety. (author)

  13. Nuclear Energy and the Environment.

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    "Nuclear Energy and the Environment" is a pocket folder of removable leaflets concerned with two major topics: Nuclear energy and Nuclear Techniques. Under Nuclear Energy, leaflets concerning the topics of "Radiation--A Fact of Life,""The Impact of a Fact: 1963 Test Ban Treaty,""Energy Needs and Nuclear Power,""Power Reactor Safety,""Transport,"…

  14. Challenges Faced by Regulators and Technical, Scientific and Support Organizations (TSOs) in Enhancing Nuclear Safety and Security

    Travers, W.D.

    2011-01-01

    Renewed interest in new reactor build programmes, not only in countries with already established nuclear programmes but also in many other countries with limited or no workforce experienced in the design, licensing, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, has resulted in a need for technical, scientific and support organizations (TSOs) to support regulatory bodies in carrying out their mandated responsibilities. The primary function of a regulatory body, such as the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), is to regulate the safe use of nuclear facilities and radioactive material for peaceful civilian purposes. In so doing, the regulatory body needs to provide a clear and focused approach to: safety, security and safeguards for licensing; inspection and enforcement of reactor design; construction; commissioning; operation; decommissioning; nuclear waste management activities; and the use, possession or transfer of special nuclear materials and activities within the country. Accomplishing this goal requires a highly educated, multidisciplinary, diverse workforce with significant work experience. Recognizing that it takes several decades and a lot of resources to achieve self-sufficiency, many countries, particularly emergent nuclear countries, would have to rely on TSOs to start their programmes and to carry out their oversight responsibilities. Towards that end, FANR is working closely with international counterparts, the International Atomic Energy Agency and TSOs to exchange information, expertise, industry experience and ongoing research to ensure that high levels of safety, security and safeguards are established and maintained in reactor design and operation throughout the life of the facility, and that special nuclear material within the UAE is properly documented and controlled, is not stolen, lost or diverted to any illicit or non-peaceful activities, and does not pose unreasonable radiological risk due

  15. Nuclear energy

    2007-01-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  16. White paper on nuclear safety in 2004

    2005-05-01

    The white paper consists of four parts. The first part described the regulation of nuclear facility decommissioning and the clearance level at which the decommissioned waste materials are not necessarily treated as radioactive materials. The second part explained the main operations of the nuclear safety regulation of the Nuclear Safety Commission and the regulatory bodies in 2004 and Mihama unit 3 accident. The third part introduced various activities for the general preservation of nuclear safety in Japan, such as safety regulation systems for nuclear facilities, disaster preparedness of nuclear facilities, progress in nuclear research, environmental radiation surveys and international cooperation on nuclear safety. The forth part contained various materials and data related to the Nuclear Safety Commission. (J.P.N.)

  17. 1986 international meeting of nuclear reactor safety committees

    Moeller, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    During the week of Oct. 20-23, 1986, nuclear power-plant safety representatives from the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), France, Japan, and the US assembled to discuss subjects of mutual interest. The meeting, the first of its kind, was organized under the leadership and direction of David A. Ward, Chairman, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and held at the Wingspread Conference Center of the Johnson Foundation in Racine, Wis. Approximately 40 representatives of the several countries attended. Discussions were candid and provided the participants an opportunity to share thoughts and information on nuclear safety concerns and solutions

  18. Safety of nuclear installations

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act, a Licence may only be issued if the precautions required by the state of the art have been taken to prevent damage resulting from the construction and operation of the installation. The maximum admissible body doses in the area around the installation which must be observed in planning constructional and other technical protective measures to counter accidents in or at a nuclear power station (accident planning values, are established). According to the Radiological Protection Ordinance the Licensing Authority can consider these precautions to have been taken if, in designing the installation against accidents, the applicant has assumed the accidents which, according to the Safety Criteria and Guidelines for Nuclear Power Stations published in the Federal Register by the Federal Minister of the Interior after hearing the competent senior state authorities, must determine the design of a nuclear power station. On the basis of previous experience from safety analysis, assessment and operation of nuclear power stations, the accident guidelines published here define which accidents are determinative for the safety-related design of PWR power stations and what verification -particularly with regard to compliance with the accident planning values of the Radiological Protection Ordinance -must be provided by the applicant. (author)

  19. The Advisory Committee of International Nuclear Information System (INIS) for Japan

    Kunii, Katsuhiko; Itabashi, Keizo

    2016-10-01

    Under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) Programme commenced in 1970 and ever since INIS has been acting as a database system available worldwide through information networks each time providing bibliographic information then full text documents of literature, technical reports, etc. on peaceful use of nuclear science and technology, thoroughly supported and maintained by INIS Secretariat in Vienna, on the other hand the inputs for INIS are provided by Member States and Organizations in their own boundaries. As for the INIS activity in Japan, while, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), then succeeded as the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as of today, the both have been responsible with the INIS activity in Japan as the INIS National Centre for Japan based on the request of the “former” Science and Technology Agency of the Japanese Government, an advisory committee had have a very important role for the INIS activity in Japan by enthusiastically advising the whole related to the activity from advanced and comprehensive viewpoints of expertise. This report describes about it, the Advisory Committee of International Nuclear Information System (INIS) for Japan, successfully been held 34 times from Oct. 1970 to Mar. 2005. Included are the history and its records, change of the member and topics of the Advisory Committee, and the minutes. (author)

  20. Nuclear energy. Economical aspects

    Legee, F.

    2010-01-01

    This document present 43 slides of a power point presentation containing detailed data on economical and cost data for nuclear energy and nuclear power plants: evolution from 1971 to 2007 of world total primary energy supply, development of nuclear energy in the world, nuclear power plants in the world in 2009, service life of nuclear power plants and its extension; nuclear energy market and perspectives at 2030, the EPR concept (generation III) and its perspectives at 2030 in the world; cost assessment (power generation cost, nuclear power generation cost, costs due to nuclear safety, comparison of investment costs for gas, coal and nuclear power generation, costs for building a nuclear reactor and general cost; cost for the entire fuel cycle, the case of the closed cycle with recycling (MOX); costs for radioactive waste storage; financial costs and other costs such as environmental impacts, strategic stocks, comparative evaluation of the competitiveness of nuclear versus coal and gas

  1. Nuclear energy

    Wethe, Per Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Today we know two forms of nuclear energy: fission and fusion. Fission is the decomposition of heavy nuclei, while fusion is the melting together of light nuclei. Both processes create a large surplus of energy. Technologically, we can currently only use fission to produce energy in today's nuclear power plants, but there is intense research worldwide in order to realize a controlled fusion process. In a practical context, today's nuclear energy is a sustained source of energy since the resource base is virtually unlimited. When fusion technology is realized, the resource supply will be a marginal problem. (AG)

  2. Convention on nuclear safety

    1994-01-01

    The Convention on Nuclear Safety was adopted on 17 June 1994 by Diplomatic Conference convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its Headquarters from 14 to 17 June 1994. The Convention will enter into force on the ninetieth day after the date of deposit with the Depository (the Agency's Director General) of the twenty-second instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval, including the instruments of seventeen States, having each at leas one nuclear installation which has achieved criticality in a reactor core. The text of the Convention as adopted is reproduced in the Annex hereto for the information of all Member States

  3. Nuclear Energy Data - 2016

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting nuclear power status in NEA member countries and in the OECD area. Information provided by governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projections of nuclear generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants increased slightly in 2015, by 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively. Two new units were connected to the grid in 2015, in Russia and Korea; two reactors returned to operation in Japan under the new regulatory regime; and seven reactors were officially shut down - five in Japan, one in Germany and one in the United Kingdom. Governments committed to having nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for developing or increasing nuclear generating capacity, with the preparation of new build projects progressing in Finland, Hungary, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'Stat Links'. For each Stat Link, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link. (authors)

  4. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  5. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    1993-11-01

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24

  6. Report of cooperative research programs in the field of ion-beam breeding between Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Bilateral cooperative research)

    Ahmad, Zaiton; Oono, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes Bilateral Cooperative Research between Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (a representative of the Government of Malaysia) implemented from 2002 to 2012 under 'THE IMPLEMENTING ARRANGEMENT BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT OF MALAYSIA AND THE JAPAN ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY ON THE RESEARCH COOPERATION IN THE FIELD OF RADIATION PROCESSING'. The research activities in two Cooperative Research Programs, 'Mutation Induction of Orchid Plants by Ion Beams' and 'Generating New Ornamental Plant Varieties Using Ion Beams' performed 2002-2007 and 2007-2012, respectively, are contained. The lists of steering committee meetings, irradiation experiments, and publications/presentations of each program are also attached in the Appendixes. (author)

  7. Summary final report: Contract between the Japan atomic power company and the U.S. Department of Energy Improvement of core safety - study on GEM (III)

    Burke, T.M.; Lucoff, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of activities associated with the technical exchange between representatives of the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the development and testing of Gas Expansion Modules (GEM) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Issuance of this report completes the scope of work defined in the original contract between JAPC and DOE titled ''Study on Improvement of Core Safety - Study on GEM (III).'' Negotiations related to potential modification of the contract are in progress. Under the proposed contract modification, DOE would provide an additional report documenting FFTF pump start tests with GEMs and answer additional JAPC questions related to core safety with and without GEMs

  8. Summary final report: Contract between the Japan atomic power company and the U.S. Department of Energy Improvement of core safety - study on GEM (III)

    Burke, T.M.; Lucoff, D.M.

    1997-03-18

    This report provides a summary of activities associated with the technical exchange between representatives of the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the development and testing of Gas Expansion Modules (GEM) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Issuance of this report completes the scope of work defined in the original contract between JAPC and DOE titled ''Study on Improvement of Core Safety - Study on GEM (III).'' Negotiations related to potential modification of the contract are in progress. Under the proposed contract modification, DOE would provide an additional report documenting FFTF pump start tests with GEMs and answer additional JAPC questions related to core safety with and without GEMs.

  9. Nuclear Energy Data - 2017

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting nuclear power status in NEA member countries and in the OECD area. Information provided by governments includes statistics on total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, fuel cycle capacities and requirements, and projections to 2035, where available. Country reports summarise energy policies, updates of the status in nuclear energy programs and fuel cycle developments. In 2016, nuclear power continued to supply significant amounts of low-carbon baseload electricity, despite strong competition from low-cost fossil fuels and subsidised renewable energy sources. Three new units were connected to the grid in 2016, in Korea, Russia and the United States. In Japan, an additional three reactors returned to operation in 2016, bringing the total to five under the new regulatory regime. Three reactors were officially shut down in 2016 - one in Japan, one in Russia and one in the United States. Governments committed to having nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for developing or increasing nuclear generating capacity, with the preparation of new build projects making progress in Finland, Hungary, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports

  10. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex IV: PSI nuclear energy and safety research progress report 1994

    Williams, T; Kallfelz, J M; Mathews, D [eds.; Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear energy research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI. It is explicitly mentioned in the Institute`s official charter and commands about one fifth of the Institute`s federal resources. Presently, PSI invests approx. 200 py/a in nuclear energy research, one third of this being externally funded; the share of external funding in investment costs totals approx. 50%. This funding is provided by the Swiss utilities and the NAGRA, the Safety Authority (HSK) and the former National Fund for Energy Research (NEFF). PSI`s activities in nuclear research concentrate on three main areas: safety of operating plants, safety features of future reactor concepts and waste management. 7% of personnel are invested in addressing global aspects of energy. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  11. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex IV: PSI nuclear energy and safety research progress report 1994

    Williams, T.; Kallfelz, J.M.; Mathews, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear energy research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI. It is explicitly mentioned in the Institute's official charter and commands about one fifth of the Institute's federal resources. Presently, PSI invests approx. 200 py/a in nuclear energy research, one third of this being externally funded; the share of external funding in investment costs totals approx. 50%. This funding is provided by the Swiss utilities and the NAGRA, the Safety Authority (HSK) and the former National Fund for Energy Research (NEFF). PSI's activities in nuclear research concentrate on three main areas: safety of operating plants, safety features of future reactor concepts and waste management. 7% of personnel are invested in addressing global aspects of energy. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  12. Towards an International Approach to Nuclear Safety

    Tomihiro Taniguchi

    2006-01-01

    This document presents in a series of transparencies the different activities of the IAEA: Introduction of International Atomic Energy Agency, Changing world, Changing Technology, Changing Global Security, Developing Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems, Global Nuclear Safety Regime, IAEA Safety Standards: Hierarchy - Global Reference for Striving for Excellence, IAEA Safety Reviews and Services: Integrated Safety Approach, Global Knowledge Network - Asian Nuclear Safety Network, Safety Issues and Challenges, Synergy between Safety and Security, Recent Developments: Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM), Incident and Emergency Preparedness and Response, Holistic Approach for Safety and Security, Sustainable Development. (J.S.)

  13. Developing Nuclear Safety Culture within a Supplier Organization: An Insight from AREVA

    L’Epinois, B. de

    2016-01-01

    AREVA is present throughout the entire nuclear cycle, from uranium mining to used fuel recycling, including nuclear reactor design, equipment delivery and operating services. AREVA is recognised by utilities around the world for its expertise, its skills in cutting-edge technologies, and its dedication to the highest level of safety. This presentation will focus on the ways the safety culture applies to the supplier missions, along with the traditional focus on quality, costs and schedule. It will develop how the safety culture traits developed for nuclear operators by, for example, WANO or the IAEA, can be adequately be imported and embedded into the supply industry. This will be illustrated with some examples in this field. (author)

  14. Nuclear energy in Spain

    Villota, C. de

    2007-01-01

    Carlos Villota. Director of Nuclear Energy of UNESA gave an overview of the Spanish nuclear industry, the utility companies and the relevant institutions. Companies of the nuclear industry include firms that produce heavy components or equipment (ENSA), manufacturers of nuclear fuel (ENUSA), engineering companies, the National Company for Radioactive Waste Management (ENRESA), and nuclear power plants (nine units at seven sites). Nuclear energy is a significant component of the energy mix in Spain: 11% of all energy produced in Spain is of nuclear origin, whilst the share of nuclear energy in the total electricity generation is approximately 23%. The five main players of the energy sector that provide for the vast majority of electricity production, distribution, and supply have formed the Spanish Electricity Industry Association (UNESA). The latter carries out co-ordination, representation, management and promotion tasks for its members, as well as the protection of their business and professional interests. In the nuclear field, UNESA through its Nuclear Energy Committee co-ordinates aspects related to nuclear safety and radiological protection, regulation, NPP operation and R and D. Regarding the institutional framework of the nuclear industry, ENSA, ENUSA and ENRESA are controlled by the national government through the Ministry of Economy and Finance and the Ministry of Science and Technology. All companies of the nuclear industry are licensed by the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITYC), while the regulatory body is the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN). It is noteworthy that CSN is independent of the government, as it reports directly to Parliament. (author)

  15. Public acceptance of nuclear power development in Japan

    Ohori, H.

    1977-01-01

    Although the Japanese set out to achieve the peaceful uses of atomic energy in 1956, the question of public acceptance took on serious proportions only as the development of nuclear power moved toward commercial application. A string of reactor troubles over the past few years complicated the question apparently to the point where it could scarcely be worse. It is not possible to deal with opposition movements in Japan without taking into account the background of the special national sentiment born of the people's experience of the atomic bombings, but it is also true that the people's deep-going fears of atomic energy have been increased by sensational newspaper reports, as well as internetional attacks by the opponents of nuclear development. Added to this, the ''Mutsu'' incident and other troubles have given the people distrust of the whole nuclear administration and those responsible for nuclear regulation. but, at the same time, the oil crisis of 1973 brought about an awakening of the people to the need for the development of nuclear power to solve Japan's energy problems, for Japan is seriously lacking in natural resources. An influential newspaper took samplings of public opinion in 1975 which revealed that, while 48 percent of the people expressed fears of atomic energy, 70 percent, including those who had some misgivings but still took the need for granted, said that Japan has no choice but to depend on nuclear power. The Government and industry have made long-range projections on nuclear power generation, forecasting that it will expand to 25 percent of all power generating plants by 1985, and to 35 percent by 1990. The gravest problem to be solved if this projected scale of nuclear development is to be achieved is the shortage of adequate plant sites. This can not be solved unless every effort is made to dispel the general feeling of mistrust mentioned, and to make sure that the development of nuclear power is socially accepted. It is hoped that the

  16. Japan's energy conservation policy

    Yoda, Kenichi

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews developments in Japanese energy conservation since the 1970s. The industrial sector has achieved the greatest success, due to industrial restructuring as well as improvements in energy efficiency. In the residential/commercial sector, the efficiency of appliances has been much improved. Although improvements have been made in the fuel efficiency of passenger cars, energy consumption in the transportation sector has risen slightly owing to increased transport of passengers and freight. The overall responsibility for energy conservation policy rests with the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. MITI is also responsible for implementing specific conservation policies in regard to the industrial and commercial sectors. In the residential sector, MITI works with the Ministry of Construction and in the transportation sector with the Ministry of Transport. To realize the goals of energy conservation policy through general research, dissemination of public information and other activities, MITI works with the Energy Conservation Center (ECC). (author). 2 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    Aoki, S.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    From the outset of nuclear power development in Japan, major emphasis has been placed on the safety of the nuclear power plants. There are now twelve nuclear power plants in operation with a total output of 6600 MWe. Their operating records were generally satisfactory, but in the 1974 to 1975 period, they experienced somewhat declined availability due to the repair work under the specific circumstances. After investigation of causes of troubles and the countermeasures thereof were made to ensure safety, they are now keeping good performance. In Japan, nuclear power plants are strictly subject to sufficient and careful inspection in compliance with the safety regulation, and are placed under stringent radiation control of employees. Under the various circumstances, however, the period of annual inspection tends to be prolonged more than originally planned, and this consequently is considered to be one of the causes of reduced availability. In order to develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on the assurance of safety and to endeavor to devise measures to improve availability of the plants, based on the careful analysis of causes which reduce plant availability. This paper discusses the results of studies made for the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and Operating Experience of LWR Nuclear Power Plants in Japan; a) Operating experience with light water reactors b) Improvements in design of light water reactors during the past ten years c) Analysis of the factors which affect plant availability; 2) Assurance of Safety and Measures to Increase Availability a) Measures for safety and environmental protection b) Measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees c) Appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work d) Measures to increase plant availability e) Measures to improve reliability of equipments and components; and 3) Future Technical Problems

  18. Japan's post-Fukushima reconstruction: A case study for implementation of sustainable energy technologies

    Nesheiwat, Julia; Cross, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Following World War II, Japan miraculously developed into an economic powerhouse and a model of energy efficiency among developed countries. This lasted more than 65 years until the Northeastern Japan earthquake and tsunami induced nuclear crisis of March 2011 brought Japan to an existential crossroads. Instead of implementing its plans to increase nuclear power generation capacity from thirty percent to fifty percent, Japan shut-down all fifty-four nuclear reactors for safety checks and stress-checks (two have since been restarted), resulting in reduced power generation during the summer of 2012. The reconstruction of Northeastern Japan approaches at a time when the world is grappling with a transition to sustainable energy technologies—one that will require substantial investment but one that would result in fundamental changes in infrastructure and energy efficiency. Certain reconstruction methods can be inappropriate in the social, cultural and climatic context of disaster affected areas. Thus, how can practitioners employ sustainable reconstructions which better respond to local housing needs and availability of natural energy resources without a framework in place? This paper aims at sensitizing policy-makers and stakeholders involved in post disaster reconstruction by recognizing advantages of deploying sustainable energy technologies, to reduce dependence of vulnerable communities on external markets. - Highlights: • We examine the energy challenges faced by Japan in the aftermath of Fukushima. • We identify policy measures for the use of energy technologies applicable to disaster prone nations. • We evaluate the potential for renewable energy to support reduced reliance on nuclear energy in Japan. • We model scenarios for eco-towns and smart-cities in post-disaster reconstruction. • We assess the role of culture in formulating energy policy in post-disaster reconstruction

  19. Nuclear safety in France

    Servant, J.

    1979-12-01

    The main areas of nuclear safety are considered in this paper, recalling the laws and resolutions in force and also the appropriate authority in each case. The following topics are reviewed: radiological protection, protection of workers, measures to be taken in case of an accident, radioactive effluents, impact on the environment of non-nuclear pollution, nuclear plant safety, protection against malicious acts, control and safeguard of nuclear materials, radioisotopes, transport of radioactive substances, naval propulsion, waste management, nuclear plant decommissioning and export of nuclear equipment and materials. Finally, the author describes the role of the general Secretariat of the Interdepartmental Committee on Nuclear Safety

  20. Regulatory Framework for the Safe and Secure Transport of Nuclear Material in Japan

    Konnai, A.; Shibasaki, N.; Ikoma, Y.; Kato, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Iwasa, T.

    2016-01-01

    Regulations for nuclear material transport in Japan are based on international regulations. Safety and security regulations, however, have sometime different aspects which have caused a conflict of operations. This paper aims to introduce framework of safety and security regulations for nuclear material transport in Japan, and shows some issues in cooperation of these regulations. (author)

  1. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    Machida, Y.; Shimakura, D.

    2004-01-01

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  2. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    Machida, Y.; Shimakura, D. [NSnet, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power.

  3. Review of Policy Documents for Nuclear Safety and Regulation

    Kim, Woong Sik; Choi, Kwang Sik; Choi, Young Sung; Kim, Hho Jung; Kim, Ho Ki

    2006-01-01

    The goal of regulation is to protect public health and safety as well as environment from radiological hazards that may occur as a result of the use of atomic energy. In September 1994, the Korean government issued the Nuclear Safety Policy Statement (NSPS) to establish policy goals of maintaining and achieving high-level of nuclear safety and also help the public understand the national policy and a strong will of the government toward nuclear safety. It declares the importance of establishing safety culture in nuclear community and also specifies five nuclear regulatory principles (Independence, Openness, Clarity, Efficiency and Reliability) and provides the eleven regulatory policy directions. In 2001, the Nuclear Safety Charter was declared to make the highest goal of safety in driving nuclear business clearer; to encourage atomic energy- related institutions and workers to keep in mind the mission and responsibility for assuring safety; to guarantee public confidence in related organizations. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) also issues Yearly Regulatory Policy Directions at the beginning of every year. Recently, the third Atomic Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) has been established. It becomes necessary for the relevant organizations to prepare the detailed plans on such areas as nuclear development, safety management, regulation, etc. This paper introduces a multi-level structure of nuclear safety and regulation policy documents in Korea and presents some improvements necessary for better application of the policies

  4. Review of Policy Documents for Nuclear Safety and Regulation

    Kim, Woong Sik; Choi, Kwang Sik; Choi, Young Sung; Kim, Hho Jung; Kim, Ho Ki [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The goal of regulation is to protect public health and safety as well as environment from radiological hazards that may occur as a result of the use of atomic energy. In September 1994, the Korean government issued the Nuclear Safety Policy Statement (NSPS) to establish policy goals of maintaining and achieving high-level of nuclear safety and also help the public understand the national policy and a strong will of the government toward nuclear safety. It declares the importance of establishing safety culture in nuclear community and also specifies five nuclear regulatory principles (Independence, Openness, Clarity, Efficiency and Reliability) and provides the eleven regulatory policy directions. In 2001, the Nuclear Safety Charter was declared to make the highest goal of safety in driving nuclear business clearer; to encourage atomic energy- related institutions and workers to keep in mind the mission and responsibility for assuring safety; to guarantee public confidence in related organizations. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) also issues Yearly Regulatory Policy Directions at the beginning of every year. Recently, the third Atomic Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) has been established. It becomes necessary for the relevant organizations to prepare the detailed plans on such areas as nuclear development, safety management, regulation, etc. This paper introduces a multi-level structure of nuclear safety and regulation policy documents in Korea and presents some improvements necessary for better application of the policies.

  5. Nuclear energy technology

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  6. 76 FR 56242 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety...

    2011-09-12

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 52-018-COL, 52-019-COL, 52-025-COL, 52-026-COL; ASLBP No. 11-913-01-COL-BD01] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Establishment... following captioned cases: Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, (William States Lee III Nuclear Station, Units 1 and...

  7. Safety design and evaluation policy for future FBRs in Japan

    Aizawa, Kiyoto

    1991-01-01

    The safety policy for fast breeder reactors (FBRs) has gradually matured in accordance with the development of FBRs. The safety assessment of the Japanese prototype FBR, Monju during the licensing process accelerated the maturity and the integration of knowledge and databases. Results are expected to be reflected in the establishment of the safety design and evaluation policy for FBRs. Although the methodologies and safety policies developed for LWRs are applicable in principle to future FBRs, it is neither rational nor realistic to treat safety only with these policies. It is recommended that one should develop the methodologies and safety policies starting from understanding of the inherent safety characteristics of FBR's through safety research, plant operating experience and design work. In the last few years, some technical committees were organized in Japan and have discussed key safety issues which are specific to FBRs in order to provide preparatory reports and to establish safety standards and guidelines for future commercial FBRs. (author)

  8. Criticality safety research on nuclear fuel cycle facility

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2004-07-01

    This paper present d s current status and future program of the criticality safety research on nuclear fuel cycle made by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Experimental research on solution fuel treated in reprocessing plant has been performed using two critical facilities, STACY and TRACY. Fundamental data of static and transient characteristics are accumulated for validation of criticality safety codes. Subcritical measurements are also made for developing a monitoring system for criticality safety. Criticality safety codes system for solution and power system, and evaluation method related to burnup credit are developed. (author)

  9. 48 CFR 923.7001 - Nuclear safety.

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nuclear safety. 923.7001... ENVIRONMENT, CONSERVATION, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Environmental, Energy and Water Efficiency, Renewable Energy Technologies, and Occupational Safety Programs 923.7001 Nuclear safety. The DOE...

  10. Activities of the nuclear emergency assistance and training center. Strengthening co-operation with parties in normal circumstances

    Watanabe, Fumitaka; Matsui, Tomoaki; Nomura, Tamotsu

    2005-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) established the Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) in March 2002. The center aims to provide various support nuclear safety regulatory bodies, local governments and nuclear facility licenses as specialists about nuclear and radiological issues according to the role shown in the Basic Disaster Management Plan. Upon a nuclear and/or radiological disaster occurring in Japan, NEAT will send specialists to the disaster scene, and offer the use of special equipments. NEAT maintains frequent contact with related organizations in normal circumstance. NEAT also participates in nuclear emergency exercises instructed by the parties concerned, which has contributed to the brewing of mutual trust with related organizations. In October 2005, JNC and JAERI merged into a new organization named the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). NEAT, as a section of the organization, continuously deals with nuclear emergencies. (author)

  11. International Aspects of Nuclear Safety

    Lash, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Even though not all the world's nations have developed a nuclear power industry, nuclear safety is unquestionably an international issue. Perhaps the most compelling proof is the 1986 accident at Chornobyl nuclear power plant in what is now Ukraine. The U.S. Department of Energy conducts a comprehensive, cooperative effort to reduce risks at Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. In the host countries : Armenia, Ukraine, Russia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Slovakia, and Kazakhstan joint projects are correcting major safety deficiencies and establishing nuclear safety infrastructures that will be self-sustaining.The U.S. effort has six primary goals: 1. Operational Safety - Implement the basic elements of operational safety consistent with internationally accepted practices. 2. Training - Improve operator training to internationally accepted standards. 3. Safety Maintenance - Help establish technically effective maintenance programs that can ensure the reliability of safety-related equipment. 4. Safety Systems - Implement safety system improvements consistent with remaining plant lifetimes. 5. Safety Evaluations - Transfer the capability to conduct in-depth plant safety evaluations using internationally accepted methods. 6. Legal and Regulatory Capabilities - Facilitate host-country implementation of necessary laws and regulatory policies consistent with their international treaty obligations governing the safe use of nuclear power

  12. Current and anticipated uses of thermal hydraulic codes at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Akimoto, Hajime; Kukita; Ohnuki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is conducting several research programs related to thermal-hydraulic and neutronic behavior of light water reactors (LWRs). These include LWR safety research projects, which are conducted in accordance with the Nuclear Safety Commission`s research plan, and reactor engineering projects for the development of innovative reactor designs or core/fuel designs. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes are used for various purposes including experimental analysis, nuclear power plant (NPP) safety analysis, and design assessment.

  13. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis.

  14. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis

  15. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Ro, Seong Ki; Shin, Hee Seong; Park, Seong Won; Shin, Young Joon.

    1997-06-01

    Nuclear criticality safety guide was described for handling, transportation and storage of nuclear fissile materials in this report. The major part of the report was excerpted frp, TID-7016(revision 2) and nuclear criticality safety written by Knief. (author). 16 tabs., 44 figs., 5 refs

  16. The Effect of the Japan 2011 Disaster on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Stocks Worldwide: An Event Study

    Robert Ferstl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This event study investigates the impact of the Japanese nuclear disaster in Fukushima-Daiichi on the daily stock prices of French, German, Japanese, and U.S. nuclear utility and alternative energy firms. Hypotheses regarding the (cumulative abnormal returns based on a three-factor model are analyzed through joint tests by multivariate regression models and bootstrapping. Our results show significant abnormal returns for Japanese nuclear utility firms during the one-week event window and the subsequent four-week post-event window. Furthermore, while French and German nuclear utility and alternative energy stocks exhibit significant abnormal returns during the event window, we cannot confirm abnormal returns for U.S. stocks.

  17. Nuclear and radiological safety. 1986-1998. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    1999-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with nuclear and radiological safety issued from 1986 to 1998. Publications are sorted according to the following subjects: Uranium mining and milling; Fuel fabrication and storage; Nuclear power plants; Research reactors; Radiation sources and accelerators; Transport of radioactive material; Waste repositories; Radiation protection; Accident response; Radioactive waste management; Safety analysis; Quality management; Legal and governmental aspects

  18. Nuclear and radiological safety. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    2001-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with nuclear and radiological safety issued from 1990 to 2001. Publications are sorted according to the following subjects: Uranium mining and milling. Fuel fabrication and storage. Nuclear power plants. Research reactors. Radiation sources and accelerators. Transport of radioactive material. Waste repositories. Radiation protection. Accident response. Radioactive waste management. Safety analysis. Quality management. Legal and governmental aspects

  19. Nuclear and radiological safety. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with nuclear and radiological safety issued from 1990 to 2001. Publications are sorted according to the following subjects: Uranium mining and milling. Fuel fabrication and storage. Nuclear power plants. Research reactors. Radiation sources and accelerators. Transport of radioactive material. Waste repositories. Radiation protection. Accident response. Radioactive waste management. Safety analysis. Quality management. Legal and governmental aspects.

  20. The law for the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    1985-01-01

    The Act for Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been promulgated anew. Contents are the following : general rules, officials, advisors and personnel, duties, financial affairs and accounts, supervision, miscellaneous rules, penal provisions, and additional rules. (In the additional rules, the merger into JAERI of Japan Nuclear Ship Research and Development Agency is treated.) Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute conducts research etc. for the development of atomic energy comprehensively and efficiently, thereby contributing to the promotion of atomic energy research, development and utilization, according to the Atomic Energy Fundamental Act. Duties are atomic energy basic and application research, reactor relation, training of the personnel, RIs relation, etc. (Mori, K.)

  1. Joint submission of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    1987-08-01

    The manufacturing company members of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries are proud to have played their part in the development of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in Ontario, and the achievement of the very real benefits discussed in this paper, which greatly outweigh the hypothetical risks

  2. Reports by the Parliamentary Office for scientific and technological assessments. Tuesday, May 31, 2011. Hearing opened to the press on the organization of nuclear safety

    2011-05-01

    Members of the French Parliament, and representatives of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), of the European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG), of the IAEA, of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), of the French institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) first address the international dimension of nuclear safety control. They describe, comment and discuss the situation of the Fukushima nuclear plant, the impact of this accident on France (cooperation with Japan, atmospheric measurement in France), the different national approaches to nuclear safety, the specifications for the audit of the French nuclear power plants and the security assessments foreseen for the European nuclear stock, the issue of international standard elaboration, the activity of the WANO in the field of international cooperation. In a second part, members of Parliament and representatives of the ASN, the IRSN, EDF, and AREVA and of the French committee of certification of companies for the training and monitoring of personnel working under ionizing radiation (CEFRI) describe, comment and discuss the nuclear safety modalities in France

  3. Present status of nuclear power safety studies in JAERI, 1994

    1994-10-01

    Securing safety in the development and utilization of nuclear power is the prerequisite, and in order to maintain the safety of nuclear power facilities at level corresponding to the expansion and diversification of nuclear power development and utilization, it is necessary to promote the safety research. The reliable evaluation of environmental effect and the safe disposal of radioactive waste are the indispensable conditions. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has carried out the research on the engineering safety of nuclear reactors and nuclear fuel cycle facilities and the research on the environmental safety related to environmental radiation and the treatment and disposal of radioactive waste. In this book, the researches on the safety of reactor fuel, the reliability of reactor machinery and equipment and structures, the thermo-hydraulic behavior of reactors at the time of accidents, the behavior of reactors at the time of severe accidents, the analytical research on the safety of reactors, the researches on the safety of nuclear fuel cycle, the treatment and disposal of radioactive waste, the assessment and analysis of environmental radiation and radioactivity, and the individual researches related to nuclear power safety are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Nuclear energy and the nuclear energy industry

    Bromova, E.; Vargoncik, D.; Sovadina, M.

    2013-01-01

    A popular interactive multimedia publication on nuclear energy in Slovak. 'Nuclear energy and energy' is a modern electronic publication that through engaging interpretation, combined with a number of interactive elements, explains the basic principles and facts of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Operation of nuclear power plants, an important part of the energy resources of developed countries, is frequently discussed topic in different social groups. Especially important is truthful knowledgeability of the general public about the benefits of technical solutions, but also on the risks and safety measures throughout the nuclear industry. According to an online survey 'Nuclear energy and energy' is the most comprehensive electronic multimedia publication worldwide, dedicated to the popularization of nuclear energy. With easy to understand texts, interactive and rich collection of accessories stock it belongs to modern educational and informational titles of the present time. The basic explanatory text of the publication is accompanied by history and the present time of all Slovak nuclear installations, including stock photos. For readers are presented the various attractions legible for the interpretation, which help them in a visual way to make a more complete picture of the concerned issue. Each chapter ends with a test pad where the readers can test their knowledge. Whole explanatory text (72 multimedia pages, 81,000 words) is accompanied by a lot of stock of graphic materials. The publication also includes 336 photos in 60 thematic photo galleries, 45 stock charts and drawings, diagrams and interactive 31 videos and 3D models.

  5. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors

  6. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system. US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report (Joint research)

    Yui, Mikazu; Ishikawa, Hirohisa; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Hioki, Kazumasa; Naito, Morimasa; Makino, Hitoshi; Oda, Chie; Tachi, Yukio; Mitsui, Seiichiro; Shibata, Masahiro; Watanabe, Atsuo; Yoshino, Kyoji; Seo, Toshihiro; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Nutt, Mark; Peters, Mark; Bresee, James; Lesica, Sue; Schwab, Patrick; Gomberg, Steve; Jones, Jay; Halsey, Bill; Marra, John; Vienna, John; Gombert, Drik; McMahon, Kevin; James, Scott; Caporuscio, Florie

    2010-05-01

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors

  7. Safety culture in nuclear power enterprise

    Zou Zhengyu; Su Luming

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) introduced the concept of safety culture when analyzing the Chernobyl accident. Safety culture has now been widely accepted and practiced by nuclear enterprise in the world. As an important safeguard for nuclear safety, safety culture has become the core of nuclear power enterprise and entitled as the soul of nuclear enterprise. This paper analyzes the three levels of safety culture and describes its three developing phases. (authors)

  8. Policy for introduction of risk-informed regulation for nuclear facilities in Japan

    Akihide Hidaka; Shoichiro Sakaguchi; Toshihiro Bannai; Kunihiro Matsui

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear safety regulations in Japan place a basis on the deterministic approach with the defence-in-depth philosophy and engineering judgments. However, as the development of PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) technologies in recent years, the Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC) began to consider that the utilization of risk information in addition to the traditional deterministic approach could be very effective for the safety regulations to improve rationality, consistency, transparency and efficiency by appropriate allocation of limited resources for the regulatory activities. In order to show the basic strategy, the NSC published the policy for introduction of Risk-Informed Regulation (RIR) in November 2003. The safety goals that play an important role in RIR were tentatively established in December 2003 while the performance goals are under development as of May, 2005. It is expected that RIR be gradually introduced from the applicable area. The NSC is now examining what the RIR system in Japan should be by making each role and incentive of the competent organizations clear. In the future, when the experiences on application of the safety goals are accumulated, RIR will be consistently applied from design to operational area. This paper describes the recent activities of the NSC for introduction of RIR in Japan and development of the safety goals including the performance goals. (authors)

  9. Nuclear energy

    1996-01-01

    Several issues concerning nuclear energy in France during 1996 are presented: permission of a demand for installing underground laboratories in three sites (Marcoule, Bure and Chapelle-Baton); a report assessing the capacity of Superphenix plant to operate as a research tool; the project of merging between Framatome and Gec-Alsthom companies; the revision of a general report on nuclear energy in France; the issue of military plutonium management

  10. Nuclear Energy

    1982-11-01

    A brief indication is given of the United Kingdom nuclear power programme including descriptions of the fission process, the Magnox, AGR and PWR type reactors, the recycling process, waste management and decommissioning, safety precautions, the prototype fast reactor at Dounreay, and the JET fusion experiment. (U.K.)

  11. Handbook of advanced nuclear hydrogen safety. 1st edition

    Hino, Ryutaro; Takegami, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Toru

    2017-03-01

    In the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear accident, safety measures against hydrogen in severe accident has been recognized as a serious technical problem in Japan. Therefore, efforts have begun to form a common knowledge base between nuclear engineers and experts on combustion and explosion, and to secure and improve future nuclear energy safety. As one of such activities, we have prepared the 'Handbook of Advanced Nuclear Hydrogen Safety'. A handbook committee consisting of Japanese experts in the fields of nuclear and combustion-explosion in universities, nuclear companies, electric companies and research institutes was established in 2012. The objective and consents of the handbook were determined, and the outline of the contents was decided. The concepts of the handbook are as follows: to show advanced nuclear hydrogen safety technologies that nuclear engineers should understand, to show hydrogen safety points to make combustion-explosion experts cooperate with nuclear engineers, to expand information on water radiolysis considering the situation from just after the Fukushima accidents and to the waste management necessary for decommissioning after the accident etc. Many experts have participated to manuscript preparation, which was the first step of forming a hydrogen community across the boundaries of fields. The hydrogen community is expected to grow along with its improvement to the knowledge base on nuclear hydrogen safety. (author)

  12. The Science of Nuclear Safety and Security. IAEA Backs the Work of Technical and Scientific Support Organizations in Safety and Security

    Verlini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Expertise in physical protection and accounting of nuclear and other radioactive material in use, storage and transport, and the associated facilities, as well as experience in the maintenance of systems, equipment and associated software used for effective border monitoring and for radiological threat assessment, are the fundaments of safety and security. This knowledge is developed through technical and scientific support organizations (TSOs), neutral and official organizations that provide the basis for decisions and activities regarding nuclear and radiation safety. The quality of the technical and scientific expertise provided by TSOs to the nuclear industry and their contribution to effective regulatory systems are of fundamental importance. For many years, the IAEA has been supporting the work of TSOs, by helping the TSOs promote their technical competence, transparency and observance of ethical principles.

  13. Assessment of safety culture from the INB organization: A case study for nuclear fuel cycle industry

    Goncalves, J.S.; Barreto, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    The present article describes strategies, methodologies and first results on the Safety Culture Self-assessment Project under way at INB since August 2001. As a Brazilian Government company in charge of the nuclear fuel cycle activities,. the main purposes of the Project is to evaluate the present status of its safety culture and to propose actions to ensure continuous safety improvement at management level of its industrial processes. The proposed safety culture assessment describes INB's various production sites taking into account the different aspects of their activities, such as regional, social and technical issues. The survey was performed in March/2002 very good attendance (about 80%) the employees. The first global survey results are presented in item 4. (author)

  14. Positioning of Nuclear in the Japanese Energy Mix

    Masuda, Tatsuo; Komiyama, Ryiochi

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear fission was discovered in the late 1930's. The first application went towards military use, and gradually expanded to civil use such as power generation. Power generation gained importance in two stages: firstly, to shift away from oil in power generation after the oil shocks in the 1970's, and second, to arrest climate change due to CO 2 -free nature of nuclear power more recently. This typically applies to Japan, which has become the world third largest in nuclear power generation. However, nuclear power is violent by nature, and major accidents of nuclear power plants shook the public confidence in nuclear safety. Japan has been put into such situation in a most radical way due to the Fukushima nuclear disaster of March 2011. This disaster may have its root causes in the history of nuclear development in Japan. Nuclear scientists failed to take the initiative in peaceful use of nuclear and lost the opportunity of making basic researches prior to the commercial introduction of nuclear power generation. Otherwise, safety issues could have been handled with greater care and 'nuclear safety myth' could not have prevailed. Today, the discussion is ongoing on how to position nuclear in the Japanese energy mix. Purely from economic viewpoint, due to the energy reality of Japan, it might be extremely difficult to sustain its economy without nuclear at least in short and medium term. However, the public opinions are divided with the vast majority in favor of zero-nuclear or decreased nuclear dependency. In this context, employing an energy-economic model, an attempt was made to analyze Japan's power generation mix in 2030 under possible nuclear scenarios and assessed the role of nuclear energy in its energy mix. A technical implication taken form this analysis is that, if intermittent renewables such as solar and wind may largely diffuse in power grid replacing nuclear power, output fluctuation from high penetration level of these energy sources will be

  15. Nuclear energy

    Hladky, S.

    1985-01-01

    This booklet appeared in a series on technical history. It tries to communicate some of the scientific, technical and social stresses, which have been connected with the application of nuclear energy since its discovery. The individual sections are concerned with the following subjects: the search for the 'smallest particles'; the atomic nucleus; nuclear fission; the 'Manhattan Project'; the time after this - from the euphoria of the 1950's via disillusionment and change of opinion to the state of nuclear energy at the start of the 1980's. The booklet contains many details and is generously illustrated. (HSCH) [de

  16. Vision of nuclear energy

    1987-01-01

    A study about the perspectives of nuclear energy, in Japan, for the next 40 years is shown. The present tendencies are analyzed as well as the importance that the subject adquires for the economy and the industry. At the same time, the parameters of the governmental, private and foreign participation are established in the frame of the technological development. The aim fixed for the year 2030 can be divided into; 1: from 1986 to 2010-development of the technology of nuclear fuel cycle already stablished and in process of maturity. The LWR technology will reach a very advanced stage. The fast breeder reactors (FBRs) will become commercially available, and the nuclear fuel cycle will reach its maturity in Japan; 2: from 2011 to 2030-commercial use of the FBRS and further advance in the nuclear fuel cycle. (M.E.L.) [es

  17. Nuclear energy

    Rippon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Do we need nuclear energy. Is it safe. What are the risks. Will it lead to proliferation. The questions are endless, the answers often confused. In the vigorous debates that surround the siting and operation of nuclear power plants, it is all too easy to lose sight of the central issues amid the mass of arguments and counter-arguments put forward. And there remains the doubt, who do we believe. This book presents the facts, simply, straightforwardly, and comprehensibly. It describes the different types of nuclear reactor, how they work, how energy is produced and transformed into usable power, how nuclear waste is handled, what safeguards are built in to prevent accident, contamination and misuse. More important, it does this in the context of the real world, examining the benefits as well as the dangers of a nuclear power programme, quantifying the risks, and providing an authoritative account of the nuclear industry worldwide. Technically complex and politically controversial, the contribution of nuclear energy to our future energy requirements is a crucial topic of our time. (author)

  18. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    2001-01-01

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction

  19. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    None

    2001-03-01

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  20. Nuclear safety - Topical issues

    1995-01-01

    The following topical issues related to nuclear safety are discussed: steam generators; maintenance strategies; control rod drive nozzle cracks; core shrouds cracks; sump strainer blockage; fire protection; computer software important for safety; safety during shutdown; operational safety experience; external hazards and other site related issues. 5 figs, 5 tabs

  1. Program for educating nuclear engineers in Japan. Partnership with industry, government and academe begins

    Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, educating the next generation of nuclear engineers has been of interest to groups who are concerned with the recent decline in the number of nuclear engineers in universities and industries. Discussions and proposals have been summarized in independent reports by industry (JAIF; Japan Atomic Industrial Forum), government (Science Council of Japan) and the academe (AESJ; Atomic Energy Society of Japan). In June 2005 a Committee on Education (CE) was established within AESJ with the intention of coordinating the groups interested in nuclear education in Japan. The birth of CE was timely, because the importance of nuclear education was emphasized in 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy (Oct., 2005)' which was adopted by the Atomic Energy Commission. The Nuclear Energy Subcommittee of the METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) Advisory Committee deliberated concrete actions for achieving the basic goals of the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy and their recommendations were drawn up as a 'Nuclear Energy National Plan'. This was the MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) and METI action plan to create nuclear energy training programs for universities, etc. A task group, consisting of members from industry, government and academe was organized within JAIF to give advice to these training programs. The author of this paper (and chairman of CE) participated in and made proposals to the task group as a representative of the academe. In this paper, the proposal made by CE and the outline of the final program will be reported. Furthermore, the importance of the partnership between industry, government and academe will be emphasized. (author)

  2. Mathematical models in nuclear safety and radiation protection of nuclear energy

    1993-01-01

    This collection of papers contains the full texts of 33 reports presented at the Seminar, all of which are indexed and abstracted separately for the INIS database. The topics of the reports cover the mathematical models and computer codes for risk analysis, reactor reliability simulating, safety-related benchmarks, thermohydraulic studies, reactor kinetics, hypothetical accidents and their radiological consequences, etc. The investigations refer mainly to WWER-440 and WWER-1000 type reactors of the Kozloduy NPP

  3. Nuclear Energy Literature Review

    Simic, Z.; Wastin, F.

    2016-01-01

    In the light of five years after a major accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant it is interesting to make nuclear energy related literature review. There is a number of accidents related reports from all major international institutions (like the IAEA and OECD NEA) and research organizations have drawn conclusions and lessons to learn from this terrible accident. These reports are the result of expert and scientific analyses carried out during these five years and they present ideal sources for both understanding what has happened and what can be learned in order to avoid and mitigate effects of such events in the future. From a wider perspective it is also interesting to analyze the impact on research and development (R and D) activities. This literature review is performed with hope to gain some useful insights from the analysis of the volume and topics in all research activities related to the Fukushima accident and nuclear energy (NE) altogether. This kind of review should at least provide an overview of trends and provide base for better planning of future activities. This paper analyzes the published NE related research of over more than 50 years with focus on three major nuclear accidents (TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima). It has been performed using Scopus tools and database, and mainly focuses on statistics related to the subjects, countries, keywords and type of publishing. It also analyses how responsive is nuclear energy related R and D regarding the volume and subjects, and how is that research spread among most active countries. Nuclear power accidents influence increase and change of research. Both accidents, Chernobyl and Fukushima had maximum share in all nuclear power related papers at similar yearly level (9 percent in 1991 and 12 percent in 2015 respectively). TMI peaked at the 2.5 percent share in 1982. Engineering is the most frequent subjects for TMI and cumulative NE related publishing. Medicine and environmental science subjects

  4. Nuclear energy

    Seidel, J.

    1990-01-01

    This set of questions is based on an inquiry from the years 1987 to 1989. About 250 people af all age groups - primarily, however, young people between 16 and 25 years of age - were asked to state the questions they considered particularly important on the subject of nuclear energy. The survey was carried out without handicaps according to the brain-storming principle. Although the results cannot claim to be representative, they certainly reflect the areas of interest of many citizens and also their expectations, hopes and fears in connection with nuclear energy. The greater part of the questions were aimed at three topic areas: The security of nuclear power-stations, the effects of radioactivity on people and the problem of waste disposal. The book centres around these sets of questions. The introduction gives a general survey of the significance of nuclear energy as a whole. After this follow questions to do with the function of nuclear power stations, for the problems of security and waste disposal - which are dealt with in the following chapters - are easier to explain and to understand if a few physical and technical basics are understood. In the final section of the book there are questions on the so-called rejection debate and on the possibility of replacing nuclear energy with other energy forms. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Radiological protection and nuclear safety postgraduate course

    Segado, R.C.; Menossi, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The first Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Postgraduate Course was held in 1977, when the former Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Branch of the National Atomic Energy Commission decided implement that course for the qualification of its professionals. After then, in 1980, by agreement between the CNEA, the National University of Buenos Aires and the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare got its present academic qualification as a Post-Graduate Course. Since then, it was sponsored by the IAEA. This Organization annually grants fellowships to fifteen students from different countries. Up to now, twenty consecutive courses have been delivered and more than five hundredth graduated, more than half of them coming from abroad. The aim of the course is the qualification and training in Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety of those professionals involved in the design, construction, operation and decommissioning of Nuclear and Radioactive Installation and their related regulatory issues. (author) [es

  6. Radioactivity and nuclear energy

    Hoffmann, J.; Kuczera, B.

    2001-05-01

    The terms radioactivity and nuclear energy, which have become words causing irritation in the political sphere, actually represent nothing but a large potential for innovative exploitation of natural resources. The contributions to this publication of the Karlsruhe Research Center examine more closely three major aspects of radioactivity and nuclear energy. The first paper highlights steps in the history of the discovery of radioactivity in the natural environment and presents the state of the art in health physics and research into the effects of exposure of the population to natural or artificial radionuclides. Following contributions focus on: Radiochemical methods applied in the medical sciences (diagnostic methods and devices, therapy). Nuclear energy and electricity generation, and the related safety policies, are an important subject. In this context, the approaches and pathways taken in the field of nuclear science and technology are reported and discussed from the angle of nuclear safety science, and current trends are shown in the elaboration of advanced safety standards relating to nuclear power plant operation and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. Finally, beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in the context of a sustainable energy policy are emphasized. In particular, the credentials of nuclear energy in the process of building an energy economy based on a balanced energy mix which combines economic and ecologic advantages are shown. (orig./CB) [de

  7. Nuclear power in Japan and the USA

    Titterton, E.

    1979-06-01

    The development of the nuclear power industry in Japan and the USA is discussed. The author lists the number of nuclear power plants operating, under construction and planned and considers the contribution made by nuclear power stations to the total electricity generated. The advantages of nuclear power to both countries are outlined and forecasts are made of the role to be played by nuclear power in future years

  8. Nuclear Safety through International Cooperation

    Flory, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident was the worst at a nuclear facility since the Chernobyl accident in 1986. It caused deep public anxiety and damaged confidence in nuclear power. Following this accident, strengthening nuclear safety standards and emergency response has become an imperative at the global level. The IAEA is leading in developing a global approach, and the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety is providing a comprehensive framework and acting as a significant driving force to identify lessons learned and to implement safety improvements. Strengthening nuclear safety is addressed through a number of measures proposed in the Action Plan including 12 main actions focusing on safety assessments in the light of the accident. Significant progress has been made in assessing safety vulnerabilities of nuclear power plants, strengthening the IAEA's peer review services, improvements in emergency preparedness and response capabilities, strengthening and maintaining capacity building, as well as widening the scope and enhancing communication and information sharing with Member States, international organizations and the public. Progress has also been made in reviewing the IAEA's safety standards, which continue to be widely applied by regulators, operators and the nuclear industry in general, with increased attention and focus on accident prevention, in particular severe accidents, and emergency preparedness and response.

  9. Nuclear energy

    Reuss, Paul

    2012-01-01

    With simple and accessible explanations, this book presents the physical principles, the history and industrial developments of nuclear energy. More than 25 years after the Chernobyl accidents and few months only after the Fukushima one, it discusses the pros and cons of this energy source with its assets and its risks. (J.S.)

  10. Nuclear energy: technology, safety, ecology, economy, management. The I All-Russian scientific-practical conference of young nuclear scientists of Siberia. Collection of scientific papers

    2010-01-01

    Collection of research papers I All-Russian scientific-practical conference of young nuclear scientists in Siberia, held 19-25 September 2010 in Tomsk, is presented. The edition contains material on a wide range of research scientists-economists, professors, graduate students and young scientists, and school children of Tomsk, Seversk, and several other Russian cities on the technology, security, ecology, economics, management in the nuclear power industry. Discussion of the presented research was conducted on sections: 1. Technological support for the nuclear fuel cycle, 2. Nuclear non-proliferation and environmental safety of the nuclear fuel cycle, 3. Energy: Present and Future 4. It all starts with an idea [ru

  11. Japan's contribution to nuclear medical research

    Rahman, M.; Sakamoto, Junichi; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the degree of Japan's contribution to the nuclear medical research in the last decade. Articles published in 1991-2000 in highly reputed nuclear medical journals were accessed through the MEDLINE database. The number of articles having affiliation with a Japanese institution was counted along with publication year. In addition, shares of top-ranking countries were determined along with their trends over time. Of the total number of articles (7,788), Japan's share of articles in selected nuclear medical journals was 11.4% (889 articles) and ranked 2nd in the world after the USA (2,645 articles). The recent increase in the share was statistically significant for Japan (p=0.02, test for trend). Japan's share in nuclear medical research output is much higher than that in other biomedical fields. (author)

  12. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (French Edition)

    2017-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication.

  13. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Russian Edition)

    2016-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication.

  14. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Arabic Edition)

    2017-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication.

  15. Nuclear criticality safety and time reactivity enhancement aspects of energy amplifier system devices

    Siciliano, F [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondelle, Matera (Italy). Direzione INFO

    1995-12-01

    As far as the Rubbia`s and colleagues proposal of innovating Energy Amplifier system (E.A.s.) device driven by a particle beam accelerator is concerned, four basic topics are comprised in the present paper: (1) A short outline of the nuclear aspects of Th-U and U-Pu fuel cycles regarding their general breeding and efficiency features. (2) The needed nuclear criticality control requirements have been studied in terms of safety regulating parameters on the basis of the ThO2 mixed oxides selected as fuel kind for the E.A.s. device technology development. Particular attention is devoted to time evolution of neutron multiplication factor since delayed development of the 233U buildup and so system reactivity are expected in the Th-U