WorldWideScience

Sample records for iv-a group metals

  1. Annotated bibliography for liquid metal surface tensions of groups III-A, IV-A, and V-A metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtha, M.J.; Burnet, G.

    1976-04-01

    An annotated bibliography has been prepared which includes summaries of 82 publications dating from 1920 and dealing with the measurement of the surface tensions of Groups III-A, IV-A, and V-A metals in the liquid state. The bibliography is organized by key element investigated, and contains a tabulation of correlations for surface tension as a function of temperature. A brief discussion dealing with variables and methods has been included

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  3. Half-sandwich pentamethylcyclopentadienyl group 9 metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Group 9 metal complexes of 2-aminopyridyl ligands. 1137. [Cp*M(μ-Cl)Cl]2 (M = Rh and Ir) were prepared according to literature methods.15–17 NMR spectra are recorded on a Bruker Avance II 400 MHz. Infrared spectra were recorded as KBr pellets on a Perkin- Elmer. 983 spectrophotometer. Mass spectra were obtained.

  4. Intrinsic thermoelectric power of group VB metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunadhor Singh Okram

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We have reinvestigated the thermopower of group VB metals in polycrystalline forms in the temperature range of 6-300K, taking into account the critical nature of the sample surface and heat treatment especially for niobium. Strikingly small magnitude, negative sign, phonon drag dip and superconductivity not reported previously were observed in surface-cleaned single crystalline Nb. However, while thermopower magnitudes are small, mixed signs were found in the polycrystalline V, Nb and Ta samples. These properties were therefore interpreted as their intrinsic properties and were briefly discussed taking into account of the existing theory by fitting also the data that give the Fermi energies of 10.94 eV, 5.08 eV and 1.86eV, respectively.

  5. Development of radioactive platinum group metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.E. [and others

    1999-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solutions was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400m{sup 2}/g.The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 1 to 10 wt. %. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of more than 93% to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its activity is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 86 refs., 44 tabs., 88 figs.

  6. Development of radioactive platinum group metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.E.

    1999-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solutions was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400m 2 /g. The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 1 to 10 wt. %. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of more than 93% to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its activity is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 86 refs., 44 tabs., 88 figs

  7. Syntheses and characterization of one-dimensional alkali metal antimony(III) thiostannates(IV), A{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Sn{sub 3}S{sub 10} (A=K, Rb, Cs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohannan, Jinu P.; Vidyasagar, Kanamaluru, E-mail: kvsagar@iitm.ac.in

    2015-01-15

    Three new isostructural quaternary antimony(III) thiostannates(IV), A{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Sn{sub 3}S{sub 10} (A=K, Rb, Cs) have been synthesized by using alkali metal thiosulfate flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. Their structures contain A{sup +} ions around the [Sb{sub 2}Sn{sub 3}S{sub 10}]{sup 2−} chains, which are built from SbS{sub 3} pyramids, SnS{sub 6} octahedra and SnS{sub 4} tetrahedra. Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements corroborate the oxidation states and coordination environments of Sb(III) and Sn(IV). All three compounds are wide band gap semiconductors. Potassium compound undergoes partial exchange with strontium, cadmium and lead ions. - Graphical abstract: Syntheses, crystal structure, spectroscopic and partial ion-exchange studies of new one-dimensional alkali metal antimony(III) thiostannates(IV), A{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Sn{sub 3}S{sub 10} (A=K, Rb, Cs) are described. - Highlights: • Syntheses of new alkali metal antimony(III) thiostannates(IV), A{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Sn{sub 3}S{sub 10} (A=K, Rb, Cs). • Wide band gap semiconductors with one-dimensional structure. • Topotactic partial exchange of K{sup +} ions of K{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Sn{sub 3}S{sub 10} with Sr{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} ions.

  8. Half-sandwich pentamethylcyclopentadienyl group 9 metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    5). 88.51(5). 87.24(18). 95.15(18). N(1)-M(1)-Cl(2). 89.77(6). 91.76(10). 93.96(5). 92.58(18). 84.46(16). CNT represents the centroid of the Cp* ring; Cave represents the average bond distance centroid of the Cp* ring carbon and metal atom.

  9. Dipicolinate complexes of main group metals with hydrazinium cation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Some new coordination complexes of hydrazinium main group metal dipicolinate hydrates of formulae ... dipicolinate dianions and non-coordinating hydrazinium cations. Conductance measurements ... group metals, and the ability of dip2– to function as a tridentate ligand, we expect to find anionic complexes of the type ...

  10. Behaviour of the platinum-group metals in copper electrorefining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskula, M.

    1989-03-01

    Among the impurities in black anodic copper separated during the electrorefining, from an economic viewpoint, precious metals play a significant role. Usually literature only mentions the behaviour of gold and silver and it is supposed that the behaviour of other precious metals is similar. The following literature survey will demonstrate that the behaviour of the platinum-group metals during electrorefining of copper is different. Some metals build soluble and stable complex ions, others unsoluble adsorption layers at the anode surface; this influences both the dissolution of the anode and the further processing of precious metals slimes.

  11. Borides of the group 1 metals of the periodic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonov, G.V.; Serebryakova, T.I.; Neronov, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    The borides of alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium) and the metals of a copper subgroup (copper, silver, gold) are described. Consideration is given to the crystalline structure and state diagrams of the metal systems within the first group of the Periodic Table with boron. Existence, formation conditions and physico-chemical properties of binary boride phases are characterized. Conclusion is made as to the absence of interaction between boron and silver. Information on the interaction between gold and boron is scanty and conflicting. Methods are described suitable for the production of the borides of the metals within the first group of the Periodic Table [ru

  12. Statistical mechanics of light elements at high pressure. IV - A model free energy for the metallic phase. [for Jovian type planet interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, H. E.; Hubbard, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    A large quantity of data on the thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium metallic liquids have been obtained in extended computer calculations in which a Monte Carlo code essentially identical to that described by Hubbard (1972) was used. A model free energy for metallic hydrogen with a relatively small mass fraction of helium is discussed, taking into account the definition of variables, a procedure for choosing the free energy, values for the fitting parameters, and the evaluation of the entropy constants. Possibilities concerning a use of the obtained data in studies of the interiors of the outer planets are briefly considered.

  13. Bacillus anthracis GrlAV96A topoisomerase IV, a quinolone resistance mutation that does not affect the water-metal ion bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Breland, Erin J; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-12-01

    The rise in quinolone resistance is threatening the clinical use of this important class of broad-spectrum antibacterials. Quinolones kill bacteria by increasing the level of DNA strand breaks generated by the type II topoisomerases gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Most commonly, resistance is caused by mutations in the serine and acidic amino acid residues that anchor a water-metal ion bridge that facilitates quinolone-enzyme interactions. Although other mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase IV have been reported in quinolone-resistant strains, little is known regarding their contributions to cellular quinolone resistance. To address this issue, we characterized the effects of the V96A mutation in the A subunit of Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV on quinolone activity. The results indicate that this mutation causes an ∼ 3-fold decrease in quinolone potency and reduces the stability of covalent topoisomerase IV-cleaved DNA complexes. However, based on metal ion usage, the V96A mutation does not disrupt the function of the water-metal ion bridge. A similar level of resistance to quinazolinediones (which do not use the bridge) was seen. V96A is the first topoisomerase IV mutation distal to the water-metal ion bridge demonstrated to decrease quinolone activity. It also represents the first A subunit mutation reported to cause resistance to quinazolinediones. This cross-resistance suggests that the V96A change has a global effect on the structure of the drug-binding pocket of topoisomerase IV. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Structural Metals in the Group I Intron: A Ribozyme with a Multiple Metal Ion Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahley,M.; Adams, P.; Wang, J.; Strobel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg2+ and K+ ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 Angstroms of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function.

  15. Reductive metalation of the uranyl oxo-groups with main Group-, d- and f-block metals

    OpenAIRE

    Zegke, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the reductive functionalisation of the uranyl(VI) dication by metalation of the uranyl oxo-groups (O=UVI=O), using reductants from Group I, Group II, Group IV, Group XII and Group XIII as well as from the lanthanide and actinide series of the periodic table. Chapter 1 introduces uranium and nuclear waste, and gives an introduction into uranium(V) chemistry. It further compares the chemistry of uranyl(V) to neptunyl(V), with a specific focus on solid sta...

  16. Group 4 Metal Complexes of Chelating Cyclopentadienyl-ketimide Ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeřa, M.; Varga, Vojtěch; Císařová, I.; Pinkas, Jiří; Kucharczyk, P.; Sedlařík, V.; Lamač, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 5 (2016), s. 785-798 ISSN 0276-7333 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-08531S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1504 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : group 4 metal complexes * cyclopentadienyl-ketimide ligands * metallocenes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.862, year: 2016

  17. Bioaccumulation of platinum group metals in dolphins, Stenella sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Platinum group metals (PGMs) concentrations were measured in the tissues= of dolphins (Stenella sp.) caught along the Ghanaian coastline. Tissues from specimens caught by fishermen from Dixcove, western Ghana, were analysed in 2006 for palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt) and rhodium (Rh) using the Neutron Activation ...

  18. Thermochemical Properties of Group IVB and VB Transition Metal Alloys with Platinum Group Metals: Acid - Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Michael John

    Solid-state galvanic cell measurements and oxide equilibration experiments are used to derive thermochemical quantities for a variety of acid-base stabilized alloys such as Nb-Pd, Nb-Rh, Ti-Pd, and Ti-Rh. The experiments have effectively resulted in the titration of palladium by niobium metal. The excess partial molar Gibbs energy of niobium at infinite dilution was determined to be -62 kcal/mole at 1000^circ C and the Gibbs energy of formation of {rm NbPd}_{3.55} is -42 kcal/mole. These results and those for the other systems are used to assess the importance of crystal field effects in the context of the generalized Lewis acid-base theory.

  19. Effect of Platinum Group Metal Doping in Magnesium Diboride Wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Alexiou, Aikaterini; Namazkar, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    The effect of some platinum group metals(PGM = Rh, Pd, and Pt) on the microstructure and critical current density of Cu/Nb-sheathed MgB2 wires has been studied using Mg1-x PGMxB2 powders with low doping levels. It was found that Pt and Pd do not enter the MgB2 lattice and have only limited influe...

  20. Peruvian perovskite Between Transition-metal to PGM/PlatinumGroupMetal Catalytic Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Strongly correlated electronic materials made of simple building blocks, such as a transition-metal ion in an octahedral oxygen cage forming a perovskite structure- Dagotto & Tokura for examples are the high-temperature superconductivity & the CMR/Colossal Magnetoresistance . Helium-4 denotes from LC Case,ScD: "Catalytic Fusion of Deuterium into Helium-4"- 1998 dealt with gaseous D2- "contacted with a supported metallic catalyst at superatmospheric pressure". The catalyst is a platinum-group metal, at about 0.5% - 1% by weight, on activated C. Accompanies Stephen J Geier, 2010 quotes "transition metal complexes", the Energy thus produced is enormous, and because the deuterium is very cheap in the form of heavy water (less than US 1/g), the fuel cost is very low (seas &Deuteronomy to be eternally preserves. Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. HANDOJO.

  1. Kohn Anomaly and Phase Stability in Group VB Transition Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Landa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the periodic table, only a few pure metals exhibit lattice or magnetic instabilities associated with Fermi surface nesting, the classical examples being α-U and Cr. Whereas α-U displays a strong Kohn anomaly in the phonon spectrum that ultimately leads to the formation of charge density waves (CDWs, Cr is known for its nesting-induced spin density waves (SDWs. Recently, it has become clear that a pronounced Kohn anomaly and the corresponding softening in the elastic constants is also the key factor that controls structural transformations and mechanical properties in compressed group VB metals—materials with relatively high superconducting critical temperatures. This article reviews the current understanding of the structural and mechanical behavior of these metals under pressure with an introduction to the concept of the Kohn anomaly and how it is related to the important concept of Peierls instability. We review both experimental and theoretical results showing different manifestations of the Kohn anomaly in the transverse acoustic phonon mode TA (ξ00 in V, Nb, and Ta. Specifically, in V the anomaly triggers a structural transition to a rhombohedral phase, whereas in Nb and Ta it leads to an anomalous reduction in yield strength.

  2. The synthesis and properties of some organometallic compounds containing group IV (Ge, Sn)-group II (Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Des Tombe, F.J.A.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der; Creemers, H.M.J.C.; Carey, N.A.D.; Noltes, J.G.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions of triphenylgermane and triphenyltin hydride with coordinatively saturated organozinc or organocadmium compounds give organometallic complexes containing Group IV (Ge, Sn)-Group II(Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds. The 2,2′-bipyridine complexes show solvent-dependent charge-transfer

  3. Synthesis of Group IVB Metals Oxicarbides by Carboreduction Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Mazzoni

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The metals of the group IV B (Ti, Zr, Hf present a series of carbides and oxicarbides with scientific and technological interest. Many of these compounds belong to the subsystem "MO - MC" of the pseudoternary "MO - MN - MC" system (where M = Ti, Zr or Hf. In this work carboreduction reactions of TiO2 and ZrO2 were performed in argon atmosphere, using temperatures from 1250° to 1650° and reaction times of 120 min. The oxicarbides obtained were in the range TiC0.16O0.84 to TiC0.73O0.27 and ZrC0.46O0.54 to ZrC0.90O0.10. respectively. The reaction products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, with the calculation of their cell constants by means of the Rietveld method. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was used in the characterization of powdered materials. Additionally, the carborreduction reaction was followed by weight loss.

  4. Pyrometallurgical Recovery of Platinum Group Metals from Spent Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Tang, Huimin; Ye, Lei; Ma, Yutian; Rao, Mingjun; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-09-01

    As an important secondary resource with abundant platinum group metals (PGMs), spent catalysts demand recycling for both economic and environmental benefits. This article reviews the main pyrometallurgical processes for PGM recovery from spent catalysts. Existing processes, including smelting, vaporization, and sintering processes, are discussed based in part on a review of the physiochemical characteristics of PGMs in spent catalysts. The smelting technology, which produces a PGM-containing alloy, is significantly influenced by the addition of various collectors, such as lead, copper, iron, matte, or printed circuit board (PCB), considering their chemical affinities for PGMs. The vaporization process can recover PGMs in vapor form at low temperatures (250-700°C), but it suffers high corrosion and potential environmental and health risks as a result of involvement of the hazardous gases, mainly Cl2 and CO. The sintering process serves as a reforming means for recycling of the spent catalysts by in situ reduction of their oxidized PGMs components. Among these processes, the smelting process seems more promising although its overall performance can be further improved by seeking a suitable target-oriented collector and flux, together with proper pretreatment and process intensification using an external field.

  5. Platinum group metal recovery and catalyst manufacturing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Yoo, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.

    1998-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metal such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solution was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400 m 2 /g. The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 10 wt.%. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of 93 % to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its actively is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 63 refs., 38 tabs., 36 figs

  6. Platinum group metal recovery and catalyst manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Yoo, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.

    1998-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metal such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solution was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400 m{sup 2}/g. The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 10 wt.%. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of 93 % to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its actively is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 63 refs., 38 tabs., 36 figs.

  7. Aromatic polyetherketones and polyethersulfones containing 6 group metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, V.M.; Salazkin, S.N.; Sergeev, V.A.; Komarova, L.I.; Petrovskij, P.V.

    1991-01-01

    Molybdenum- and tungsten-containing polyaryleneetherketones and polyaryleneethersulfones were prepared by the method of chemical modification. Metal content in the polymers constitutes from 0.7 to 12 mass %. The structure of the metal-containing polymers prepared was studied by the methods of 1 H and 13 C NMR and IR spectroscopy. Their properties were analyzed

  8. Photoacidic and Photobasic Behavior of Transition Metal Compounds with Carboxylic Acid Group(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Donnell, Ryan M. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States; Sampaio, Renato N. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States; Li, Guocan [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States; Johansson, Patrik G. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States; Ward, Cassandra L. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States; Meyer, Gerald J. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States

    2016-03-10

    Excited state proton transfer studies of six Ru polypyridyl compounds with carboxylic acid/carboxylate group(s) revealed that some were photoacids and some were photobases. The compounds [RuII(btfmb)2(LL)]2+, [RuII(dtb)2(LL)]2+, and [RuII(bpy)2(LL)]2+, where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, btfmb is 4,4'-(CF3)2-bpy, and dtb is 4,4'-((CH3)3C)2-bpy, and LL is either dcb = 4,4'-(CO2H)2-bpy or mcb = 4-(CO2H),4'-(CO2Et)-2,2'-bpy, were synthesized and characterized. The compounds exhibited intense metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) absorption bands in the visible region and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) with long τ > 100 ns excited state lifetimes. The mcb compounds had very similar ground state pKa’s of 2.31 ± 0.07, and their characterization enabled accurate determination of the two pKa values for the commonly utilized dcb ligand, pKa1 = 2.1 ± 0.1 and pKa2 = 3.0 ± 0.2. Compounds with the btfmb ligand were photoacidic, and the other compounds were photobasic. Transient absorption spectra indicated that btfmb compounds displayed a [RuIII(btfmb–)L2]2+* localized excited state and a [RuIII(dcb–)L2]2+* formulation for all the other excited states. Time dependent PL spectral shifts provided the first kinetic data for excited state proton transfer in a transition metal compound. PL titrations, thermochemical cycles, and kinetic analysis (for the mcb compounds) provided self-consistent pKa* values. The ability to make a single ionizable group photobasic or photoacidic through ligand design was unprecedented and was understood based on the orientation of the lowest-lying MLCT excited state dipole relative to the ligand that contained the carboxylic acid group(s).

  9. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Saha, Abhijit [NOAO, 950 Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J., E-mail: rosst@nmsu.edu, E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu, E-mail: bjat@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  10. Recovering platinum-group metals from auto catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of technical challenges confront the prospective processor of spent automotive catalysts, including a frequently high (1-10%) lead content; the presence of alumina in both soluble, γ, and insoluble, α, forms; the need for recovery of greater than 90% to assure an economical process; the disposition and control of process effluents, refractory residues, and lead metal salts from catalyst processing; and the highly aggressive and corrosive reagents required. Six different processes for recovery of platinum, palladium and rhodium are described and compared on the basis of their utility and how well they meet these technical challenges

  11. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  12. Synthesis and structural study of platinum group metal complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    als by a number of ways yielding mono and dinu- clear compounds. It can also coordinate through pyri- dine and pyrazolyl nitrogens or nitrogens of pyrimidine and pyrazolyl group to form mono and dinuclear com- plexes. However, in the ..... This downfield chemical shift of phosphorus nucleus indicates the formation of ...

  13. Gamma Prime Morphology and Creep Properties of Nickel Based Superalloys With Platinum Group Metal Additions (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Cobalt on the Tensile and Stress Rupture Properties of the Nickel-Base Superalloy MAR-M247,” Metallurgical Transactions A, 13 (A) (1982), 1767-1774.           10 ...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2008-4320 GAMMA PRIME MORPHOLOGY AND CREEP PROPERTIES OF NICKEL BASED SUPERALLOYS WITH PLATINUM GROUP METAL ADDITIONS...AND SUBTITLE GAMMA PRIME MORPHOLOGY AND CREEP PROPERTIES OF NICKEL BASED SUPERALLOYS WITH PLATINUM GROUP METAL ADDITIONS (PREPRINT) 5a.

  14. Homocatenation of Metal and Metalloid Main Group Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Michael S.

    Interest in poly(diorgano)silanes, catenated silicon compounds and heavier element analogues of alkanes has derived largely from their 1-dimensional delocalisation across the Si-Si σ framework, which affords similar properties observed for polyene and unsaturated "all organic" polymers. Although not so widely recognised or studied, similar "σ-delocalised" activity may also be observed for homocatenated species of other p-block elements. In this study, a foundation for an understanding of the phenomenon of σ-delocalisation is provided through consideration of the structures, methods of synthesis and electronic behaviour of the well-established poly(diorgano)silanes. Synthetic and theoretical developments relating to analogous derivatives based upon silicon's heavier group 14 congeners are then reviewed along with the more limited examples of catenated compounds among the heavier elements of groups 15 and 13. This coverage does not dwell upon detailed aspects of structure or electronic behaviour for the individual compounds and classes of compound included. Rather, the intention is to promote something of a phenomenological awareness of a series of superficially disparate chemical systems and to encourage a more widespread appreciation of the implication that, in not displaying σ-delocalisation, it is the elements of the first full period that display the more unusual or anomalous behaviour.

  15. Systematic group-specific trends for point defects in bcc transition metals: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Dudarev, S.L.; Horsfield, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the systematic trends of point defect behaviours in bcc transition metals. We found that in all non-magnetic bcc transition metals, the most stable self-interstitial atom (SIAs) defect configuration has the symmetry. The calculated formation energy differences between the dumbbell and the lowest-energy configuration of metals in group 5B (V, Nb, Ta) are consistently larger than those of the corresponding element in group 6B (Cr, Mo, W). The predicted trends of SIA defects are fundamentally different from those in ferromagnetic α-Fe and correlate very well with the pronounced group-specific variation of thermally activated migration of SIAs under irradiation depending on the position of bcc metals in the periodic table

  16. Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation spectroscopy of group II metal complexes with salicylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan P. Dain; Gary Gresham; Gary S. Groenewold; Jeffrey D. Steill; Jos Oomens; Michael J. van Stipdonk

    2011-07-01

    Ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation, and the combination of infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to characterize singly-charged, 1:1 complexes of Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ with salicylate. For each metal-salicylate complex, the CID pathways are: (a) elimination of CO2 and (b) formation of [MOH]+ where M=Ca2+, Sr2+ or Ba2+. DFT calculations predict three minima for the cation-salicylate complexes which differ in the mode of metal binding. In the first, the metal ion is coordinated by O atoms of the (neutral) phenol and carboxylate groups of salicylate. In the second, the cation is coordinated by phenoxide and (neutral) carboxylic acid groups. The third mode involves coordination by the carboxylate group alone. The infrared spectrum for the metal-salicylate complexes contains a number of absorptions between 1000 – 1650 cm-1, and the best correlation between theoretical and experimental spectra for the structure that features coordination of the metal ion by phenoxide and the carbonyl group of the carboxylic acid group, consistent with calculated energies for the respective species.

  17. Real life experimental determination of platinum group metals content in automotive catalytic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoumis, I.; Moschovi, A. M.; Giannopoulou, I.; Panias, D.

    2018-03-01

    The real life experimental protocol for the preparation of spent automobile catalyst samples for elemental analysis is thoroughly described in the following study. Collection, sorting and dismantling, homogenization and sample preparation for X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy and Atomic Adsorption Spectroscopy combined with Inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry are discussed in detail for both ceramic and metallic spent catalysts. The concentrations of Platinum Group Metals (PGMs) in spent catalytic converters are presented based on typical consignments of recycled converters (more than 45,000 pieces) from the Greek Market. The conclusions clearly denoted commercial metallic catalytic foil contains higher PGMs loading than ceramic honeycombs. On the other hand, the total PGMs loading in spent ceramic catalytic converters has been found higher than the corresponding value for the metallic ones.

  18. Features of proteolytic properties of tetraphenylporphyrin complex with lanthanide group metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobolkina, Elena A.; Skripnikova, Tatiana A.; Starikova, Anna A.; Shumilova, Galina I.; Pendin, Andrey A.

    2018-01-01

    Demetallation of metalloporphyrin molecules is one of the essential degradation reactions in photosynthesis. The effect of metalloporphyrin nature on removal of central metals from tetraphenylporphyrin complexes based on lanthanide group metals (Dy, Er, Lu, Ho) has been studied. pH values, at which the metal ions leave the metalloporphyrin complex were established using two-phase spectrophotometric titration with potentiometric pH-control. The pH values decrease with the increase of atomic numbers of lanthanide groups, as well as with increase of 4f-electrons. The reaction of an extra ligand exchange for the hydroxide ion was studied. For Dy-, Er- and Ho-tetraphenylporphyrin complexes one particle of extra ligand coordinates with one porphyrin complex. A complex with dimeric particles can be formed for the system of Lu-tetraphenylporphyrin. Constants of the ion exchange reactions were calculated.

  19. Neutral versus cationic Group 3 metal alkyl catalysts : performance in intramolecular hydroamination/cyclisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Araujo Bambirra, Sergio; Tsurugi, H; van Leusen, D; Hessen, B

    2006-01-01

    The relative catalytic activity of neutral dialkyl versus cationic monoalkyl Group 3 metal catalysts in the intramolecular hydroamination/cyclisation of the 2,2-dimethyl-4-pentenylamine reference substrate was investigated. This was found to depend strongly on the nature of the monoanionic ancillary

  20. Activation analysis for platinum in gold and metals of the platinum group through 199Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, H.

    1976-01-01

    Platinum was determined in gold and in metals of the platinum group through 199 Au by activation analysis. The matrix was separated at the end of irradiation before the daughter nuclide was formed. Gold was separated by extraction with MIBK from 1

  1. η5 and η6 - cyclic π-perimeter hydrocarbon platinum group metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the ligand coordinates to the metal through the pyridine nitrogen and one of the pyrazole or pyrazolate nitrogens giving rise to a five-membered ring complexes leaving the nitrile group uncoordinated. 2. Experimental. 2.1 General remarks. Infrared spectra were recorded on a Perkin-Elmer. Model 983 spectrophotometer with ...

  2. Unmetallated and metallated phthalocyanines bearing oxadiazole groups: Synthesis, photophysical and photochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nas, Asiye [Department of Chemistry, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Kantekin, Halit, E-mail: halit@ktu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Durmuş, Mahmut [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, PO Box 141, Gebze, 41400 Kocaeli (Turkey); Gümrükçüoğlu, Nurhan [Department of Chemistry, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2014-10-15

    Unmetallated (4) and metallated (zinc(II), cobalt(II), lead(II)) phthalocyanines (5–7) carrying four 4-(4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)phenoxy) groups on the peripheral positions were synthesized by cyclotetramerization of 4-(4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)phenoxy)phthalonitrile (3) in the presence of corresponding metal salts (zinc(II) acetate, cobalt(II) chloride, lead(II) oxide) for metallated and without any metal for unmetallated phthalocyanines. The obtained organo-soluble phthalocyanines were characterized by infrared, electronic absorption, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectral techniques and elemental analysis as well. The photophysical and photochemical properties of newly synthesized tetra-substituted unmetallated (4), zinc(II) (5) and lead(II) (7) phthalocyanines were reported in N,N-dimetilformamid (DMF). The synthesized phthalocyanine compound 6 was not evaluated for photophysical and photochemical studies due to open shell and paramagnetic behavior of cobalt(II) metal ions in the phthalocyanine cavity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of unmetallated and metallated phthalocyanines. • Photophysical and photochemical properties of tetra-substituted phthalocyanines. • Characterization of organosoluble phthalocyanines by several spectral techniques.

  3. Investigation of complexing ability of ionites with various groups to some heavy and transition metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yedil Yergozhin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The physico-chemical and complexing properties of the sorbent based on chloromethylated styrene and divinylbenzene copolymer with nicotinamide groups and copolymers based on metacryloilaminobenzene acids with 2-methyl-5-vinylpyridineisomers are studied. By potentiometric titration method the constant of polyelectrolytes functional groups ionization, the composition and strength of the resulting complexes with ions of some heavy and transition metals are determined.

  4. A 3D analysis of the metal distribution in the compact group of galaxies HCG 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Flores, Sergio; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Alfaro-Cuello, Mayte; Rodrigo Carrasco, Eleazar; de Mello, Duilia; Amram, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    We present new Gemini/GMOS integral field unit observations of the central region of the merging compact group of galaxies HCG 31. Using this data set, we derive the oxygen abundances for the merging galaxies HCG 31A and HCG 31C. We found a smooth metallicity gradient between the nuclei of these galaxies, suggesting a mixing of metals between these objects. These results are confirmed by high-resolution Fabry-Perot data, from which we infer that gas is flowing between HCG 31A and HCG 31C.

  5. Cytotoxicity of Group 5 Transition Metal Ditellurides (MTe2; M=V, Nb, Ta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Hui Ling; Latiff, Naziah Mohamad; Sofer, Zdenĕk; Pumera, Martin

    2018-01-02

    Much research effort has been put in to study layered compounds with transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) being one of the most studied compounds. Due to their extraordinary properties such as excellent electrochemical properties, tuneable band gaps, and low shear resistance due to weak van der Waals interactions between layers, TMDs have been found to have wide applications such as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reactions, supercapacitors, biosensors, field-effect transistors (FETs), photovoltaics, and lubricant additives. In very recent years, Group 5 transition metal ditellurides have received an immense amount of research attention. However to date, little has been known of the potential toxicities posed by these materials. As such, we conducted the cytotoxicity study by incubating various concentrations of the Group 5 transition metal ditellurides (MTe 2 ; M=V, Nb, Ta) with human lung carcinoma epithelial A549 cells for 24 hours and the remaining cell viabilities after treatment was measured. Our findings indicate that VTe 2 is highly toxic whereas NbTe 2 and TaTe 2 are deemed to exhibit mild toxicities. This study constitutes an exemplary first step towards the understanding of the Group 5 transition metal ditellurides' toxicity effects in preparation for their possible future commercialisation. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Kinetic Consequences of Chemisorbed Oxygen Atoms during Methane Oxidation on Group VIII Metal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Ya Huei

    2011-01-01

    Molecular insights and the kinetic relevance of reaction elementary steps for methane activation on Group VIII metal and oxide clusters are established based on kinetic, isotopic, and theoretical assessments. These fundamental understandings enable accurate prediction of complex rate dependencies and cluster size effects during methane conversion reactions in catalytic partial oxidation, reforming, and combustion processes.Kinetics of methane reactions with oxygen are described by several reg...

  7. Automated installation for atomic emission determination of gold, silver and platinum group metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayakina, S.B.; Anoshin, G.N.; Gerasimov, P.A.; Smirnov, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    An automated installation for the direct atomic emission determination of silver, gold and platinum-group metals (Ru) in geological and geochemical materials with software for automated data acquisition and handling is designed and developed. The installation consists of a DFS-458 diffraction spectrograph, a MAES-10 multichannel analyzer of emission spectra, and a dual-jet plasmatron. A library of spectral lines of almost all elements excited in the dual-jet plasmatron is complied [ru

  8. Origin of trans-bent geometries in maximally bonded transition metal and main group molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Clark R; Weinhold, Frank

    2006-06-07

    Recent crystallographic data unambiguously demonstrate that neither Ar'GeGeAr' nor Ar'CrCrAr' molecules adopt the expected linear (VSEPR-like) geometries. Does the adoption of trans-bent geometries indicate that Ar'MMAr' molecules are not "maximally bonded" (i.e., bond order of three for M = Ge and five for M = Cr)? We employ theoretical hybrid density functional (B3LYP/6-311++G) computations and natural bond orbital-based analysis to quantify molecular bond orders and to elucidate the electronic origin of such unintuitive structures. Resonance structures based on quintuple M-M bonding dominate for the transition metal compounds, especially for molybdenum and tungsten. For the main group, M-M bonding consists of three shared electron pairs, except for M = Pb. For both d- and p-block compounds, the M-M bond orders are reflected in torsional barriers, bond-antibond splittings, and heats of hydrogenation in a qualitatively intuitive way. Trans-bent structures arise primarily from hybridization tendencies that yield the strongest sigma-bonds. For transition metals, the strong tendency toward sd-hybridization in making covalent bonds naturally results in bent ligand arrangements about the metal. In the p-block, hybridization tendencies favor high p-character, with increasing avidity as one moves down the Group 14 column, and nonlinear structures result. In both the p-block and the d-block, bonding schemes have easily identifiable Lewis-like character but adopt somewhat unconventional orbital interactions. For more common metal-metal multiply bonded compounds such as [Re2Cl8]2-, the core Lewis-like fragment [Re2Cl4]2+ is modified by four hypervalent three-center/four-electron additions.

  9. Carbide-forming groups IVB-VIB metals: a new territory in the periodic table for CVD growth of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhiyu; Fu, Lei; Song, Xiuju; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2014-07-09

    Early transition metals, especially groups IVB-VIB metals, can form stable carbides, which are known to exhibit excellent "noble-metal-like" catalytic activities. We demonstrate herein the applications of groups IVB-VIB metals in graphene growth using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique. Similar to the extensively studied Cu, Ni, and noble metals, these transition-metal foils facilitate the catalytic growth of single- to few-layer graphene. The most attractive advantage over the existing catalysts is their perfect control of layer thickness and uniformity with highly flexible experimental conditions by in situ converting the dissolved carbons into stable carbides to fully suppress the upward segregation/precipitation effect. The growth performance of graphene on these transition metals can be well explained by the periodic physicochemical properties of elements. Our work has disclosed a new territory of catalysts in the periodic table for graphene growth and is expected to trigger more interest in graphene research.

  10. WITNESSING GAS MIXING IN THE METAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE HICKSON COMPACT GROUP HCG 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Flores, S.; Alfaro-Cuello, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200, La Serena (Chile); De Oliveira, C. Mendes [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas da Universidade de São Paulo, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amram, P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Carrasco, E. R. [Gemini Observatory/AURA, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); De Mello, D. F., E-mail: storres@dfuls.cl [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time direct evidence that in a merger of disk galaxies, the pre-existing central metallicities will mix as a result of gas being transported in the merger interface region along the line that joins the two coalescing nuclei. This is shown using detailed two-dimensional kinematics as well as metallicity measurements for the nearby ongoing merger in the center of the compact group HCG 31. We focus on the emission line gas, which is extensive in the system. The two coalescing cores display similar oxygen abundances. While in between the two nuclei, the metallicity changes smoothly from one nucleus to the other indicating a mix of metals in this region, which is confirmed by the high-resolution Hα kinematics (R = 45,900). This nearby system is especially important because it involves the merging of two fairly low-mass and clumpy galaxies (LMC-like galaxies), making it an important system for comparison with high-redshift galaxies.

  11. Removal of textile dyes and metallic ions using polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldera Villalobos, M; Peláez Cid, A A; Herrera González, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the removal of textile dyes and metallic ions by means of adsorption and coagulation-flocculation using two polyelectrolytes and two macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups. The adsorption of textile dyes was studied in aqueous solutions containing cationic dyes and in wastewater containing a vat dye. Also, removal of vat and naphthol dyes was studied using the process of coagulation-flocculation. The results show these materials possess elevated adsorption capacity, and they accomplished removal rates above 97% in aqueous solutions. The removal of the vat dye improved the quality of the wastewater notably, and an uncolored effluent was obtained at the end of the treatment. The treatment using adsorption decreased the values for coloration, conductivity, suspended solids, and pH. The removal of vat and naphthol dyes by means of coagulation-flocculation was studied as well, and removal rates of 90% were obtained. The polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes also proved effective in the adsorption of metallic ions in wastewater. The treatment using adsorption accomplished high removal rates of metallic ions, and it showed greater selectivity towards Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Pb(2+). A decrease in the content of solids as well as the values for COD and conductivity was observed in the wastewater as well. The analyses of FT-IR indicated that cationic dyes and metallic ions were chemisorbed by means of ionic exchange. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of platinum group metals contained in molten glass using copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruga, Kazuyoshi; Sawada, Kayo; Arita, Yuji; Enokida, Youichi; Yamamoto, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Removal of platinum group metals (PGMs) such as Pd, Ru, and RuO 2 from molten glass by using various amounts of liquid Cu was done as a basic study on a new vitrification process for a high-level radio-active waste. We prepared two types of borosilicate glasses containing PGMs and Cu, respectively. These glasses were mixed together and heated at 1,473 K for 4h in Ar atmosphere. More than 95% of Pd were removed as a spherical metal button composed of Pd-Cu alloy when Cu was added in an amount 0.5 times the weight of Pd. Nearly 95% of Ru was also removed as a spherical button with 2.5-5 times as much Cu addition as Ru in weight. Ruthenium oxide was reduced to metallic Ru by a reaction with Cu in the molten glass. The removal fraction was increased by increasing the amount of Cu and reached 63% when Cu addition was 7.5 times as much as RuO 2 in weight. By addition of Si as a reducing agent, nearly 90% of Pd and Ru were removed with Cu and Si metal composites even under O 2 :Ar=20:80 (v/v) condition. (author)

  13. Peptide-bond modification for metal coordination: peptides containing two hydroxamate groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yunpeng; Liu, Min; Kao, Jeff L-K; Marshall, Garland R

    2003-01-01

    Peptide-bond modification via N-hydroxylation has been explored as a strategy for metal coordination to induce conformational rigidity and orient side chains for specific molecular recognition. N-Hydroxyamides were prepared by reacting N-benzyloxyamino acid esters or amides with Fmoc-AA-Cl/AgCN (Fmoc: 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl; AA: amino acid) in toluene or Fmoc-AA/HATU/DIEA in DMF (HATU: O-(7-azabenzotriazol-lyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate; DIEA: N,N-diisopropylethylamine; DMF: N,N-dimethylformamide), followed by deblocking of benzyl protecting groups. Novel linear and cyclic N,N'-dihydroxypeptides were efficiently assembled using Fmoc chemistry in solution and/or on a solid support. As screened by electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS), high iron-binding selectivity and affinity were attainable. Compounds having a spacer of two alpha-amino acids between the amino acids bearing the two hydroxamates, i.e., a spacer of 8 atoms, generated 1:1 iron complex species in the gas phase. Moreover, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), uv/vis, and (1)H-NMR analyses provided direct evidence for complex formations in solution. Significantly, the representative compound cyclo(Leu-Psi[CON(OH)]-Phe-Ala-Pro)(2) (P8) may serve as a robust metal-binding scaffold in construction of a metal-binding library for versatile metal-mediated molecular recognition. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cycloadditions to Epoxides Catalyzed by GroupIII-V Transition-Metal Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio

    2015-05-25

    Complexes of groupIII-V transition metals are gaining increasing importance as Lewis acid catalysts for the cycloaddition of dipolarophiles to epoxides. This review examines the latest reports, including homogeneous and heterogeneous applications. The pivotal step for the cycloaddition reactions is the ring opening of the epoxide following activation by the Lewis acid. Two modes of cleavage (C-C versus C-O) have been identified depending primarily on the substitution pattern of the epoxide, with lesser influence observed from the Lewis acid employed. The widely studied cycloaddition of CO2 to epoxides to afford cyclic carbonates (C-O bond cleavage) has been scrutinized in terms of catalytic efficiency and reaction mechanism, showing that unsophisticated complexes of groupIII-V transition metals are excellent molecular catalysts. These metals have been incorporated, as well, in highly performing, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. Cycloadditions to epoxides with other dipolarophiles (alkynes, imines, indoles) have been conducted with scandium triflate with remarkable performances (C-C bond cleavage). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Salts of Inorganic Group IIIa Metals: Aluminum, Gallium, Indium, and Thallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael M.; Adamson, Richard H.

    1971-01-01

    The toxicity and antitumor activity of salts of the Group IIIa metals aluminum, gallium, indium, and thallium were determined. With the (lethal dose)50 as a measure, the decreasing order of toxicity was TlCl3 ≥ In(NO3)3 > Ga(NO3)3 > Al(NO3)3. All four metals exhibited antitumor activity, but when the tumor was inoculated by a route different from that of the drug, only Ga+3 and, to a lesser extent, In+3 inhibited tumor growth. Ga(NO3)3 was found to inhibit the growth of three out of four rodent solid tumors. Gallium therefore has potential therapeutic usefulness for treatment of solid tumors in man. PMID:5283954

  16. Highly active group 11 metal complexes with α-hydrazidophosphonate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Gil, Daniel; Ortego, Lourdes; Herrera, Raquel P; Marzo, Isabel; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2017-10-17

    α-Hydrazidophosphonates are interesting scaffolds that could combine the biological properties of hydrazones and phosphonyl species, and their coordination properties remain unknown. The coordination chemistry of these ligands towards group 11 metals has been studied. A series of novel gold(i), silver(i) and copper(i) complexes with α-hydrazidophosphonate ligands have been prepared and characterised. The coordination geometries obtained vary from linear to trigonal planar for gold(i) to distorted trigonal planar or tetrahedral for silver(i) and copper(i). Structural characterisation of two silver derivatives shows the ligands in an O^N^O tridentate fashion, with dissimilar bond lengths. These compounds were screened for the in vitro cytotoxic activity against two tumour human cell lines such as HeLa (cervical carcinoma) and A549 (lung carcinoma). The IC 50 values reveal an excellent cytotoxic activity of the metal complexes compared with the α-hydrazidophosphonate ligands alone and cisplatin.

  17. Comparative study of hematological responses to platinum group metals, antimony and silver nanoparticles in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Catherine E; Gagnon, Zofia E; Pavel Sizemore, Ioana E

    2014-01-01

    Research was conducted to examine the hematological effects of heavy metals (platinum (Pt ((IV))), palladium (Pd ((II))), rhodium (Rh ((III))), antimony (Sb ((III)) and Sb ((V))), and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)) on white blood cells in mammalian (rat) and avian (chick embryo) models. These metals are used in many everyday products and are accumulating in our environment. Six-week old Sprague-Dawley female rats were treated daily by gavage and six-day old, fertile, specific pathogen-free white leghorn strain chick embryos' eggs were injected on days 7 and 14 of incubation with 0.0, 1.0, 5.0 or 10.0 ppm concentrations of Pt ((IV)) and a platinum group metal (PGM) mix of Pt ((IV)), Pd ((II)) and Rh ((III)). Chick embryos were also tested with 1.0 or 5.0 ppm of antimony compounds (Sb ((III)) and Sb ((V))) and 0.0, 15.0, 30.0, 60.0, or 100.0 ppm of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). After 8 weeks of treatment, blood was obtained from the rats by jugular cut down and from chick embryos on day 20 of incubation by heart puncture. Blood smears were made and stained and a differential white cell count was performed on each. Examination of the smears revealed unconventional dose responses, stimulation of the immune response, and decreases in leukocyte production with various metals and concentrations. Chick embryos responded differently than rats to Pt and the PGM mix; suggesting that species differences and/or stage of development are important components of response to heavy metals. Route of administration of the metals might also influence the response. All of the heavy metals tested affected the immune responses of the tested animals as demonstrated by changes in the types and numbers of leukocytes. Our findings warrant further research to determine the mechanism of these effects and to understand and prevent toxicological effects in humans and other living organisms.

  18. Unusual structures and reactivity of mixed metal cluster complexes containing the palladium/platinum tri-t-butylphosphine grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard D; Captain, Burjor

    2009-03-17

    Polynuclear metal carbonyl complexes have a range of applications in chemical research: for example, they can serve as surface models to probe features of heterogeneous catalysis and can perform novel transformations of organic molecules in solutions. Mixed metal complexes can demonstrate bimetallic cooperativity and synergism and can also serve as precursors to multimetallic heterogeneous catalysts that have superior activities and selectivities. This Account describes the results of our recent comprehensive study of the chemistry of mixed metal cluster complexes containing the sterically encumbered M(PBu(t)(3)), M = Pd or Pt, group. This grouping readily adds to the metal-metal bonds of metal carbonyl cluster complexes and modifies their reactivity. We have prepared new, highly electronically unsaturated mixed metal complexes that exhibit unusually high reactivity toward hydrogen. The platinum atom of the Pt(PBu(t)(3)) grouping can bond to as many as five metal atoms, and it can interconvert, sometimes rapidly, between the different bonding modes. The large steric effects of the PBu(t)(3) ligand allowed us to prepare highly unsaturated, stable, mixed-metal complexes, and these complexes react with hydrogen, sometimes reversibly, under very mild conditions to yield polyhydride complexes. Strong evidence suggests that the Pt(PBu(t)(3)) group can also activate metal-hydrogen bonds in other complexes. In the future, we expect that researchers will prepare a greater variety of mixed metal complexes containing the Pd/Pt(PBu(t)(3)) group or other similar bulky groups, and that some of these complexes will exhibit even more unusual chemistry than what we have observed so far.

  19. Understanding hydrogen sorption in a metal-organic framework with open-metal sites and amide functional groups

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony T.

    2013-05-09

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) studies of the mechanism of hydrogen sorption in an rht-MOF known as Cu-TPBTM are presented. The MOF is a decorated/substituted isostructural analogue to the unembellished rht-MOF, PCN-61, that was studied previously [ Forrest, K. A.J. Phys. Chem. C 2012, 116, 15538-15549. ]. The simulations were performed using three different hydrogen potentials of increasing complexity. Simulated hydrogen sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, values were in excellent agreement with the reported experimental data for only a polarizable model in one of four experimentally observed crystal structure configurations. The study demonstrates the ability of modeling to distinguish the differential sorption of distinct strucures; one configuration is found to be dominant due to favorable interactions with substrates. In addition, it was discovered that the presence of polar amide groups had a significant effect on the electrostatics of the Cu2+ ions and directs the low-pressure physisorption of hydrogen in the MOF. This is in contrast to what was observed in PCN-61, where an exterior copper ion had a higher relative charge and was the favored loading site. This tunability of the electrostatics of the copper ions via chemical substitution on the MOF framework can be explained by the presence of the negatively charged oxygen atom of the amide group that causes the interior Cu2+ ion to exhibit a higher positive charge through an inductive effect. Further, control simulations, taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by theoretical modeling, include artificially modified charges for both Cu2+ ions chosen equal to or with a higher charge on the exterior Cu2+ ion. This choice resulted in distinctly different hydrogen sorption characteristics in Cu-TPBTM with no direct sorption on the open-metal sites. Thus, this study demonstrates both the tunable nature of MOF platforms and the possibility for rational design of sorption

  20. Electron momentum spectroscopy of the group I and Il metal and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.J.; Dorsett, H.E.; Sashin, V.A.; Bolorizadeh, M.A.; Mikajlo, E.A.; Soule de Bas, B.; Nixon, K.L.; Coleman, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The group I and Il metals and oxides are relatively simple condensed phase systems that are easily accessible to theoretical studies. For this reason they have been the subject of a number of studies using a range of theoretical techniques. Calculated electronic band structures have traditionally been compared with optical, X-ray and photo emissions measurements. While these techniques provide excellent data for testing theoretical predictions they generally probe certain aspects of the electronic structure, such as special point energies or densities of states, or require considerable theoretical input for their interpretation. In this paper we present our electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) measurements for the lighter group Il metals and oxides and group I oxides. EMS can measure directly the full band dispersions and intensities and provides a sensitive test of theoretical predictions. We compare our measurements with Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations carried out within the linear combination of atomic orbitals approximation. As expected HF significantly overestimates the bandwidths and bandgaps. DFT gives reasonable overall agreement, albeit with slight overestimation of bandwidths for the oxides. The intensity distribution for the oxides show a systematic difference from all the calculations which cannot easily be explained by experimental effects such as multiple scattering in the target. This work was funded by the Australian Research Council and Flinders University. EA Mikajlo and K L Nixon acknowledge receipt of SENRAC and Ferry scholarships respectively

  1. tau-borides of nickel stabilized by 4a and 5a group metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugscheider, E.; Reimann, H.; Pankert, R.

    1982-01-01

    The structure in the nickel rich corners of ternary systems with nickel, boron and the refractory metals of the 4a and 5a group of the periodic system of the elements at 800 0 C is known. tau-borides of the stoichiometry (Ni,Me) 23 B 6 are of significant role in these systems. The concentration-temperature dependence between tau-borides and the nickel solid solutions is investigated in this work. This seems to be of interest with respect to an application of such compounds in wear resistant nickel base hard alloys. (orig.) [de

  2. Witnessing Gas Mixing in the Metal Distribution of the Hickson Compact Group HCG 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Flores, S.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Amram, P.; Alfaro-Cuello, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; de Mello, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time direct evidence that in a merger of disk galaxies, the pre-existing central metallicities will mix as a result of gas being transported in the merger interface region along the line that joins the two coalescing nuclei. This is shown using detailed two-dimensional kinematics as well as metallicity measurements for the nearby ongoing merger in the center of the compact group HCG 31. We focus on the emission line gas, which is extensive in the system. The two coalescing cores display similar oxygen abundances. While in between the two nuclei, the metallicity changes smoothly from one nucleus to the other indicating a mix of metals in this region, which is confirmed by the high-resolution Hα kinematics (R = 45,900). This nearby system is especially important because it involves the merging of two fairly low-mass and clumpy galaxies (LMC-like galaxies), making it an important system for comparison with high-redshift galaxies. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina) - Observing run: GS-2012B-Q-60.

  3. Dansyl-naphthalimide dyads as molecular probes: effect of spacer group on metal ion binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Balaraman H; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2011-11-17

    Interaction of a few dansyl-naphthalimide conjugates 1a-e linked through polymethylene spacer groups with various metal ions was investigated through absorption, fluorescence, NMR, isothermal calorimetric (ITC), and laser flash photolysis techniques. The characteristic feature of these dyads is that they exhibit competing singlet-singlet energy transfer (SSET) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) processes, both of which decrease with the increase in spacer length. Depending on the spacer group, these dyads interact selectively with divalent Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions, as compared to other mono- and divalent metal ions. Jobs plot analysis showed that these dyads form 2:3 complexes with Cu(2+) ions, while 1:1 complexes were observed with Zn(2+) ions. The association constants for the Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) complexes were determined and are found to be in the order 10(3)-10(5) M(-1). Irrespective of the length of the spacer group, these dyads interestingly act as fluorescence ratiometric molecular probes for Cu(2+) ions by altering the emission intensity of both dansyl and naphthalimide chromophores. In contrast, only the fluorescence intensity of the naphthalimide chromophore of the lower homologues (n = 1-3) was altered by Zn(2+) ions. (1)H NMR and ITC measurements confirmed the involvement of both sulfonamide and dimethylamine groups in the complexation with Cu(2+) ions, while only the latter group was involved with Zn(2+) ions. Laser excitation of the dyads 1a-e showed formation of a transient absorption which can be attributed to the radical cation of the naphthalimide chromophore, whereas only the triplet excited state of the dyads 1a-e was observed in the presence of Cu(2+) ions. Uniquely, the complexation of 1a-e with Cu(2+) ions affects both PET and SSET processes, while only the PET process was partially inhibited by Zn(2+) ions in the lower homologues (n = 1-3) and the higher homologues exhibited negligible changes in their emission properties. Our results

  4. Performance of Bond Coats Modified by Platinum Group Metals for Applications in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawancy, H. M.; Alhems, Luai M.; Aboelfotoh, M. O.

    2017-07-01

    We have investigated the partial replacement of Pt with other less expensive Pt group metals on the properties of γ' + γ bond coats used in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited on a nickel-base superalloy. The microstructure, thermal stability, oxidation behavior and performance in TBC systems of bond coats synthesized with Pt + Ru, Pt + Ir and Pt + Rh are compared with those of a reference bond coat synthesized with Pt. Yttria-stabilized zirconia has been employed as top coat in all coating systems. It is shown that at high temperatures all bond coats are degraded by interdiffusion and oxidation, however, with different kinetics. The lifetime of each TBC system is found to be limited by the cohesion between the thermally grown oxide and underlying bond coat. Differences in the behavior of various bond coats are correlated with their properties. Among the three Pt group metals investigated, the properties of the Pt + Ru bond coat are shown to closely approach those of the Pt bond coat. It is concluded that Ru with much lower cost presents a potential candidate for reducing the consumption of Pt.

  5. HIGHLY REFRACTORY CRUCIBLES OF STABILIZED ZIRCONIA FOR INDUCTION MELTING OF THE PLATINUM GROUP METALS, FABRICATED BY VIBROCASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Primachenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As the result of the studies at PJSC « UKRNIIO them. A.S.Berezhnogo» the technology and commercial production of crucibles from stabilized zirconia for the smelting of platinum group metals are develop

  6. Effect of heavy metal on survival of certain groups of indigenous soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metal pollution of soil is known to adversely effect microbial activities at elevated concentration. However, response of indigenous soil bacterial population to added heavy metal and metal combinations is poorly understood. In the present study salts of heavy metals like Cu, Cd, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were added ...

  7. Trace metal occurrences in acid-insoluble residues of the Ordovician Galena Group, southeastern Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lively, R.S.; Mossler, J.H.; Morey, G.B. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States)); Hauck, S.A. (Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Natural Resources Research Inst.)

    1993-03-01

    Regional geochemical, studies on insoluble residues from Paleozoic carbonate rocks have become an integral part of the search for new Upper Mississippi Valley-type mineral deposits in the northern Midcontinent. The authors have extended these studies to southeastern Minnesota, an area well to the north of known lead-zinc deposits of commercial size and grade. In this region, a thin sequence of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician strata unconformably overlies a complex Precambrian basement. More than 500 samples of limestone and dolomite from 40 drill holes and outcrops were analyzed for 29 related trace elements. Preliminary interpretations are based on the analysis of 380 samples of the Ordovician Galena Group from 37 localities. Results indicate that anomalous concentrations of Pb, Cu, zn, As, Cd, and Ni are confined to the southern half of the Galena subgroup area and extend less than 30 miles north of the Iowa border. The anomalous areas, as well as saddles between the, have a distinct northwest trend, coincident with structural features previously recognized in the Precambrian basement. The spatial relationships of the anomalies and the lack of direct correlation imply deposition from fluids moving north out of the main lead-zinc district along structural pathways. The lack of significant anomalies in the northern part of the subcrop area implies northwest weakening of the forces driving the metal-bearing fluids, as well as a decrease over distance in the absolute metal content of the migrating fluids.

  8. Influence of platinum group metal-free catalyst synthesis on microbial fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Rojas-Carbonell, Santiago; Awais, Roxanne; Gokhale, Rohan; Kodali, Mounika; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2018-01-01

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) ORR catalysts from the Fe-N-C family were synthesized using sacrificial support method (SSM) technique. Six experimental steps were used during the synthesis: 1) mixing the precursor, the metal salt, and the silica template; 2) first pyrolysis in hydrogen rich atmosphere; 3) ball milling; 4) etching the silica template using harsh acids environment; 5) the second pyrolysis in ammonia rich atmosphere; 6) final ball milling. Three independent batches were fabricated following the same procedure. The effect of each synthetic parameters on the surface chemistry and the electrocatalytic performance in neutral media was studied. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) experiment showed an increase in half wave potential and limiting current after the pyrolysis steps. The additional improvement was observed after etching and performing the second pyrolysis. A similar trend was seen in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), in which the power output increased from 167 ± 2 μW cm-2 to 214 ± 5 μW cm-2. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to evaluate surface chemistry of catalysts obtained after each synthetic step. The changes in chemical composition were directly correlated with the improvements in performance. We report outstanding reproducibility in both composition and performance among the three different batches.

  9. Water growth on metals and oxides: binding, dissociation and role of hydroxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmeron, M.; Bluhm, H.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Ketteler, G.; Shimizu, T.K.; Mugarza, A.; Deng, Xingyi; Herranz, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Nilsson, A.

    2008-09-01

    The authors discuss the role of the presence of dangling H bonds from water or from surface hydroxyl species on the wetting behavior of surfaces. Using Scanning Tunneling and Atomic Force Microscopies, and Photoelectron Spectroscopy, they have examined a variety of surfaces, including mica, oxides, and pure metals. They find that in all cases, the availability of free, dangling H-bonds at the surface is crucial for the subsequent growth of wetting water films. In the case of mica electrostatic forces and H-bonding to surface O atoms determine the water orientation in the first layer and also in subsequent layers with a strong influence in its wetting characteristics. In the case of oxides like TiO{sub 2}, Cu{sub 2}O, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, surface hydroxyls form readily on defects upon exposure to water vapor and help nucleate the subsequent growth of molecular water films. On pure metals, such as Pt, Pd, and Ru, the structure of the first water layer and whether or not it exhibits dangling H bonds is again crucial. Dangling H-bonds are provided by molecules with their plane oriented vertically, or by OH groups formed by the partial dissociation of water. By tying the two II atoms of the water molecules into strong H-bonds with pre-adsorbed O on Ru can also quench the wettability of the surface.

  10. Assessment of Typical Heavy Metals in Human Hair of Different Age Groups and Foodstuffs in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gang; Pan, Ligang; Liu, Xinhui

    2017-08-14

    Human hair of different age groups and foodstuff samples were collected in Beijing, China. The concerned metals-Cd, Cr, Pb, As, and Hg-were analyzed, and the metal levels in relation to age, gender, and dietary intake were further assessed. Results showed the highest level of the metals was shown by Pb, with an average concentration of 1.557 ± 0.779 mg/kg, followed by Cr (0.782 ± 0.394), Hg (0.284 ± 0.094), As (0.127 ± 0.078), and Cd (0.071 ± 0.032), following a decreasing order of Pb > Cr > Hg > As > Cd, which were all below the upper limit of normal values in China. The heavy metal concentrations varied greatly among different age groups, and higher concentrations for Cd, Cr, Pb, and As appeared in female hair, whereas higher Hg concentration were found in male hair, suggesting that age and gender were not crucial factors for assessing metal concentrations in human hair. The ingestion of cereals and vegetables were the main route by which heavy metals in the environment create hazardous health effects for local inhabitants, but the estimated metal intakes through food consumption were all lower than the proposed limit of Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI), indicating that heavy metals posed no health risks for the inhabitants. Furthermore, little relationship was found between metal intakes and the corresponding metal levels in hair. Nevertheless, the results of this study can be used to analyze the internal heavy metal burden in the resident population of Beijing area and can also serve as reference for further studies.

  11. High Performance Platinum Group Metal Free Membrane Electrode Assemblies through Control of Interfacial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton Energy Systems, Wallingford, CT (United States); Capuano, Christopher [Proton Energy Systems, Wallingford, CT (United States); Atanassov, Plamen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mukerjee, Sanjeev [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Hickner, Michael [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-11-29

    The quantitative goal of this project was to produce a high-performance anion exchange membrane water electrolyzer (AEM-WE) completely free of platinum group metals (PGMs), which could operate for at least 500 hours with less than 50 microV/hour degradation, at 500 mA/cm2. To achieve this goal, work focused on the optimization of electrocatalyst conductivity, with dispersion and utilization in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) improved through refinement of deposition techniques. Critical factors were also explored with significant work undertaken by Northeastern University to further understand catalyst-membrane-ionomer interfaces and how they differ from liquid electrolyte. Water management and optimal cell operational parameters were established through the design, fabrication, and test of a new test station at Proton specific for AEM evaluation. Additionally, AEM material stability and robustness at high potentials and gas evolution conditions were advanced at Penn State.

  12. On salting in effect of the second group metal rhodanides on aqueous-amine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupatkin, I.L.; Ostrovskaya, E.M.; Vorob'eva, L.D.; Kamyshnikova, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    The ''salting in'' effect of rhodanides of Group 2 metals (magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium) on aqueous-amine solutions (water-aniline, and water-o-toluidine systems) is studied. The solubility in these systems has been determined by the isothermal method at 25 deg C. Compositions of the co-existing liquid phases have been determined by refractometry. The phase diagrams of water-aniline-rhodanide of magnesium, calcium and strontium systems have the same qualitative view. These rhodanides ''salt in'' the water-aniline system so strongly that the systems are completely homogenized. According to the decreasing homogenization effect on the water-aniline and water-o-toluidine systems the salts may be arranged into the following series Mg(NCS) 2 >Ca(NCS) 2 >Sr(NCS) 2 >Ba(NCS) 2 . The ''salting in'. effect is weaker in the water-o-toluidine system rather than in the water-aniline one

  13. Metal halide-group III halide gas complexes with emphasis on aluminum chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeye, H.A.; Gruen, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the presently known gas complexation reactions between metal halides and group III halides are treated in a self-consistent manner. By focusing on aluminum chloride as a complexing agent, certain systematic trends are revealed. The partial pressures of the gaseous complexes display shallow minima near 800 0 K whenever the complex molecules involve more than one molecule of AlCl 3 . Increasing the aluminum chloride pressure from 1 atm. to 10 3 atm. decreases somewhat the differences in the partial pressures among the various gaseous complexes which span two to three orders of magnitude. The methods developed for characterizing the complexes, and their structures as well as some applications of gas complexation are discussed

  14. Asymmetric partitioning of metals among cluster anions and cations generated via laser ablation of mixed aluminum/Group 6 transition metal targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Sarah E; Mann, Jennifer E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-02-28

    While high-power laser ablation of metal alloys indiscriminately produces gas-phase atomic ions in proportion to the abundance of the various metals in the alloy, gas-phase ions produced by moderate-power laser ablation sources coupled with molecular beams are formed by more complicated mechanisms. A mass spectrometric study that directly compares the mass distributions of cluster anions and cations generated from laser ablation of pure aluminum, an aluminum/molybdenum mixed target, and an aluminum/tungsten mixed target is detailed. Mass spectra of anionic species generated from the mixed targets showed that both tungsten and molybdenum were in higher abundance in the negatively charged species than in the target material. Mass spectra of the cationic species showed primarily Al(+) and aluminum oxide and hydroxide cluster cations. No molybdenum- or tungsten-containing cluster cations were definitively assigned. The asymmetric distribution of aluminum and Group 6 transition metals in cation and anion cluster composition is attributed to the low ionization energy of atomic aluminum and aluminum suboxide clusters. In addition, the propensity of both molybdenum and tungsten to form metal oxide cluster anions under the same conditions that favor metallic aluminum cluster anions is attributed to differences in the optical properties of the surface oxide that is present in the metal powders used to prepare the ablation targets. Mechanisms of mixed metal oxide clusters are considered.

  15. Investigations in anhydrous liquid ammonia. Reaction of group 2, 4, 5, 11 metal and actinoids compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woidy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    compounds led to the characterization of pentaammine complexes of the dioxidouranium cation which also was shown to form di-, tetra- or octanuclear networks via oxygen bridges. In the tetra- and octanuclear compounds, penta- and hexavalent uranyl cations seem to be present in one compound. The reactions of TiCl 3 and UF 4 and the reaction of Cs[UO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 ] and CuF 2 , yielded the new compounds [UF(NH 3 ) 8 ]Cl 3 . 3,5 NH 3 and Cs[UO 2 F 3 (NH 3 ) 2 ], respectively. Both compounds demonstrated on the one hand the possibility of the exchange of halides and on the other hand the ability to accept fluoride ions. Additionally, a new method for the synthesis of uranyl chloride is presented. Experiments regarding the solubility of metal halides of group 2, 4, and 5 of the periodic table yielded the ammonia complexes of [Ca(NH 3 ) 8 ]X 2 (X = Br and I), [Ti(NH 3 ) 8 ]Cl 3 . 6 NH 3 , and mer-[VF 3 (NH 3 ) 3 ]. Instead of the expected tetragonal antiprism for the eightfold coordinated Ca 2+ ion, a coordination polyhedron best described as a twofold capped trigonal prism and for the Ti 3+ ion an untypical eightfold coordination can be observed. Characterization of the novel compounds was carried out by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry.

  16. Platinum group metal particles aggregation in nuclear glass melts under the effect of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanotin, Caroline [CEA Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DTCD/SECM/LDMC, Bagnols-sur-Cèze, F-30207 (France); Puig, Jean [Laboratoire PROMES-CNRS, UPR 8521, Font-Romeu Odeillo, F-66120 (France); Neyret, Muriel, E-mail: muriel.neyret@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DTCD/SECM/LDMC, Bagnols-sur-Cèze, F-30207 (France); Marchal, Philippe [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés (LRGP-GEMICO), Université de Lorraine-CNRS, UMR 7274, Nancy F-54001 (France)

    2016-08-15

    The viscosity of simulated high level radioactive waste glasses containing platinum group metal particles is studied over a wide range of shear stress, as a function of the particles content and the temperature, thanks to a stress imposed rheometer, coupled to a high-temperature furnace. The system shows a very shear thinning behavior. At high shear rate, the system behaves as a suspension of small clusters and individual particles and is entirely controlled by the viscosity of the glass matrix as classical suspensions. At low shear rate, above a certain fraction in platinum group metal particles, the apparition of macroscopic aggregates made up of chains of RuO{sub 2} particles separated by thin layers of glass matrix strongly influences the viscosity of the nuclear glass and leads, in particular, to the apparition of yield stress and thixotropic effects. The maximum size of these clusters as well as their effective volume fraction have been estimated by a balance between Van der Waals attractive forces and hydrodynamic forces due to shear flow. We showed experimentally and theoretically that this aggregation phenomenon is favored by an increase of the temperature, owing to the viscosity decrease of the glass matrix, leading to an unusual increase of the suspension viscosity. - Highlights: • The macroscopic aggregates made up of RuO{sub 2} particles strongly influence the nuclear glass viscosity. • The maximum size of clusters as well as their effective volume fraction can be estimated. • This aggregation phenomenon is favored by an increase of the temperature. • A viscosity model as a function of the PGM content, volume fraction and shear stress is proposed.

  17. Multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory: barrier heights and main group and transition metal energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Rebecca K; Li Manni, Giovanni; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-01-13

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory, resting on the representation of the electronic density and kinetic energy by a single Slater determinant, has revolutionized chemistry, but for open-shell systems, the Kohn-Sham Slater determinant has the wrong symmetry properties as compared to an accurate wave function. We have recently proposed a theory, called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), in which the electronic kinetic energy and classical Coulomb energy are calculated from a multiconfiguration wave function with the correct symmetry properties, and the rest of the energy is calculated from a density functional, called the on-top density functional, that depends on the density and the on-top pair density calculated from this wave function. We also proposed a simple way to approximate the on-top density functional by translation of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals. The method is much less expensive than other post-SCF methods for calculating the dynamical correlation energy starting with a multiconfiguration self-consistent-field wave function as the reference wave function, and initial tests of the theory were quite encouraging. Here, we provide a broader test of the theory by applying it to bond energies of main-group molecules and transition metal complexes, barrier heights and reaction energies for diverse chemical reactions, proton affinities, and the water dimerization energy. Averaged over 56 data points, the mean unsigned error is 3.2 kcal/mol for MC-PDFT, as compared to 6.9 kcal/mol for Kohn-Sham theory with a comparable density functional. MC-PDFT is more accurate on average than complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) for main-group small-molecule bond energies, alkyl bond dissociation energies, transition-metal-ligand bond energies, proton affinities, and the water dimerization energy.

  18. Development of thermo-responsive hydrogels with immobilized metal affinity groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Seo

    A Hydrogel is defined as a polymeric material which possesses the ability to swell in water and retain a significant fraction of water within its structure, but which will not dissolve in water. Hydrogels have been studied by many researchers because they have many useful applications in bio related fields such as drug delivery, bioseparation, and etc. In this thesis, a new hydrogel system that possesses the characteristics of thermo-responsive swelling property and immobilized metal affinity was developed. This affinity material consists of a hydrogel with stimuli responsive swelling characteristics to provide modulated diffusivity and size selectivity. Covalently bound ligands within hydrogels provide highly selective and tunable affinity-based separation. Swelling and affinity properties can be independently controlled by regulating the temperature or pH of the solution to provide a sequential separations scheme. The developed affinity hydrogels incorporate multiple modes of separations or recovery and concentrate specific solutes in chromatographic systems. Thermal sensitive affinity hydrogels were synthesized from a N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer, a crosslinker (1,4-bismethylene acrylamide) and a ligand attachable co-monomer acrylamide (AAm), using free radical chemistry. The ligand of choice is the metal affinity iminodiacetic acid (IDA) which is bound to hydrogel backbone via a spacer arm. The challenge lay in incorporating affinity ligands without affecting the temperature induced swelling of the hydrogel. Thus, PNIPAAm-Am hydrogels are functionalized with a spacer arm (1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether), the chelating ligand IDA and a divalent metal ion (Cu2+). This ligand binds histidine groups at high pH and releases them upon protonation of histidine at low pH. This can be used to separate proteins based on the occurrence of surface histidine residues in them. The resulting affinity hydrogel was shown to adsorb the protein chicken egg white

  19. Explorations of new selenites of the group IIIA and IVA metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Fang; Li Peicin; Zhang Suyun; Mao Jianggao

    2012-01-01

    Systematic explorations of new phases in the Ga III /In III /Ge IV –Se IV –O systems by hydrothermal syntheses or solid-state reactions at high-temperature led to six new ternary compounds, namely, M 2 Se 2 O 7 (M=Ga 1, In 2), M(OH)(SeO 3 ) (M=Ga 3, In 4), α-Ge(SeO 3 ) 2 5 and β-Ge(SeO 3 ) 2 6. Ga 2 Se 2 O 7 1 displays a 3D open framework composed of 2D gallium oxide layers being further bridged and capped by SeO 3 groups. In 2 Se 2 O 7 2 features a 3D indium oxide framework formed by corner- and edge- sharing InO 6 octahedra with SeO 3 groups attached on the cavities and the 8-member ring tunnels of the structure. The isostructural of M(OH)(SeO 3 ) (M=Ga 3, In 4) exhibit a 2D metal selenite layer composed of 1D edge-sharing MO 6 octahedral chains that are interconnected by SeO 3 groups. α-Ge(SeO 3 ) 2 (P2 1 /n) 5 displays a 3D open framework with 1D 8-member ring tunnels along the a-axis while β-Ge(SeO 3 ) 2 (Pa-3) 6 exhibits a condensed 3D network. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: ► Up to now, selenites of the group IIIA and IVA metals are still rare. ► Hydrothermal or solid state reactions yielded six new compounds in this system. ► They are M 2 Se 2 O 7 (M=Ga, In), M(OH)(SeO 3 ) (M=Ga, In), α-Ge(SeO 3 ) 2 and β-Ge(SeO 3 ) 2 . ► They exhibit four different 3D and one 2D structural types. ► α-Ge(SeO 3 ) 2 and β-Ge(SeO 3 ) 2 represent the first examples of germanium selenites.

  20. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Materials Joining Group, Metals and Ceramics Division, 1951 through June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Gardner, K.

    1987-08-01

    This document contains a listing of the written scientific information originating in the Materials Joining Group (formerly the Welding and Brazing Group), Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1951 through June 1987. It is a registry of about 400 documents as nearly as possible in the order in which they were issued

  1. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G.; Breckenridge, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H − (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M IIa H − (M IIa = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H − and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH − and MgH − species, the other M IIa H − species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns 2 ) and H − (1s 2 ). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M IIa H − species than for RG–H − . Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M IIa H − species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M IIa atom to move away from the incoming H −

  2. Infrared spectra, methyl group structure and internal rotation in some methy - metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, D. C.; McQuillan, G. P.; Torto, I.; Morrisson, A. R.

    1986-03-01

    Recent and current work on spectra in the CH and CD stretching regions of methyl-metal compounds is reviewed. Free internal rotation with CH force constant variation is found in MMe 3 (M  Ga, Tl) and MMe(CO) 5 (M  Mn, Re) compounds, studied in the gas phase. From solution measurements, no such rotation occurs in CpMMe(CO) 3 (M  Cr,Mo,W) and Cp 2MMe 2 (M  Ti,Zr,Hf), in most of which each methyl group contains two types of CH bond. In each d-subgroup, ν isCH decreases with increasing atomic number, while δ sCH 3 increases. The reverse occurs from Ga to Tl. r oCH values are predicted. There is evidence for the breakdown of the ν isCH/∠HCH correlation, especially in MeTiCl 3 where several features point to an unusual structure of the methyl group.

  3. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P; Manship, Daniel R; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG-H(-) (RG = He-Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, MIIaH(-) (MIIa = Be-Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be-He complex. While the RG-H(-) and Be-He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH(-) and MgH(-) species, the other MIIaH(-) species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns(2)) and H(-)(1s(2)). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the MIIaH(-) species than for RG-H(-). Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the MIIaH(-) species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the MIIa atom to move away from the incoming H(-).

  4. Slow and stopped light in active gain composite materials of metal nanoparticles. Ultralarge group index-bandwidth product predicted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang-Hyon; Choe, Song-Hyok [Institute of Lasers, State Academy of Sciences, Unjong District, Pyongyang (Korea, Democratic People' s Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Chip-compatible slow light devices with large group index-bandwidth products and low losses are of great interest in the community of modern photonics. In this work, active gain materials containing metal nanoparticles are proposed as the slow and stopped light materials. Gain-assisted high field enhancement in metal nanoparticles and the resultant strong dispersion lead to such phenomena. From the Maxwell-Garnett model, it is revealed that the metal nanocomposite exhibits the infinitely large group index when the gain of the host medium and the filling factor of metal nanoparticles satisfy a critical condition. For the gain of the host above the critical value, one can observe slowing down effect with amplification of light pulses. Significantly large group index-bandwidth products, which vary from a few to several thousand or even infinity depending on the gain value of the host medium, have been numerically predicted in active silica glasses containing spheroidal metal nanoparticles, as examples. The proposed scheme inherently provides the widely varying operating spectral range by changing the aspect ratio of metal nanoparticles and chip-compatibility with low cost. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Recycling of platinum group metals from the automotive catalysts; Reciclagem de metais do grupo da platina proveniente de catalisadores automotivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benevit, Mariana; Petter, Patricia Melo Halmenschlager; Veit, Hugo Marcelo, E-mail: patymhp@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Departamento de Materiais

    2014-07-01

    Currently it is very important to use alternative sources of raw material for obtaining metals, avoiding the traditional mining. This work aims to characterize and evaluate the recoverability of platinum group metals present in automotive catalysts. Thus, the catalysts were divided into two groups: the first was catalysts used in 1.0 cars and the second was catalyst used in 2.0 cars. DRX and FRX techniques and chemical analysis performed by ICP/OES was used to characterized these materials. The results showed that there is a significant amount of platinum group elements in catalyst waste, which can be separated and reused. In the next step, hydro and pyrometallurgical routes, for metals extraction from catalyst waste, will be studied. (author)

  6. Platinum-group elements and gold in base metal sulfides, platinum-group minerals, and Re-Os isotope compositions of the Uitkomst complex, South Africa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trubač, Jakub; Ackerman, Lukáš; Gauert, Ch.; Ďurišová, Jana; Hrstka, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 2 (2018), s. 439-461 ISSN 0361-0128 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : binary alloys * copper compounds * economic geology * gold * iridium * isotopes * ore deposits * osmium * palladium * platinum * platinum metals * pyrites * Rhenium * rhenium alloys * ruthenium * solid solutions * sulfur compounds * crustal materials * mass-balance calculations * massive sulfides * mineralized zone * monosulfide solid solutions * platinum group elements * platinum group elements (PGEs) * platinum group minerals Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy; AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology (ARUB-Q) OBOR OECD: Geology; Archaeology (ARUB-Q) Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2016

  7. No Evidence of Genotoxic Damage in a Group of Patients with Titanium Dental Implants and Different Metal Restorations in the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Sánchez-Siles, Mariano; Gilbel-del Águila, Osmundo

    2015-08-01

    Titanium is the most widely used metal in implant dentistry. In spite of its biocompatibility, when it is released into the oral environment, it can have local negative biological effects. The aims of this study were to detect the concentration of metal ions in patients with dental implants, to evaluate whether or not their release might be influenced by the presence of other metals, and to assay whether these ions might provoke genotoxic damage in oral mucosa cells. One hundred five patients with a total of 180 dental implants were included. The sample was divided into seven groups (n = 15 per group). Group 1 consisted of patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants; Group 2, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth; Group 3, patients with dental amalgams; Group 4, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants and metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth; Group 5, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants and dental amalgams; and Group 6, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants, metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth, and dental amalgams. Group 7 was the control group, without any dental treatment. The concentration of metal ions was detected using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; genotoxicity was measured using the buccal micronucleus cytome assay protocol. Group 5 displayed the highest concentration of metal ions in parts per billion (Ti, Co, Ni, Zn, Pd, Sn, and Pb). Group 6 was characterized by the highest presence of Hg. No signs of genotoxic damage were found in any of the study groups. Patients with titanium dental implants combined with other metal restorations presented higher concentrations of metal ions, but no genotoxic damage was observed in oral mucosal epithelial cells. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Enhanced Dissolution of Platinum Group Metals Using Electroless Iron Deposition Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taninouchi, Yu-ki; Okabe, Toru H.

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop a new method for efficiently recovering platinum group metals (PGMs) from catalyst scraps, the authors investigated an efficient dissolution process where the material was pretreated by electroless Fe deposition. When Rh-loaded alumina powder was kept in aqua regia at 313 K (40 °C) for 30 to 60 minutes, the Rh hardly dissolved. Meanwhile, after electroless Fe plating using a bath containing sodium borohydride and potassium sodium tartrate as the reducing and complexing agents, respectively, approximately 60 pct of Rh was extracted by aqua regia at 313 K (40 °C) after 30 minutes. Furthermore, when heat treatment was performed at 1200 K (927 °C) for 60 minutes in vacuum after electroless plating, the extraction of Rh approached 100 pct for the same leaching conditions. The authors also confirmed that the Fe deposition pretreatment enhanced the dissolution of Pt and Pd. These results indicate that an effective and environmentally friendly process for the separation and extraction of PGMs from catalyst scraps can be developed utilizing this Fe deposition pretreatment.

  9. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  10. Alkali Metal Cation Affinities of Anionic Main Group-Element Hydrides Across the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2017-10-05

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of gas-phase alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) of archetypal anionic bases across the periodic system using relativistic density functional theory at ZORA-BP86/QZ4P//ZORA-BP86/TZ2P. AMCA values of all bases were computed for the lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations and compared with the corresponding proton affinities (PA). One purpose of this work is to provide an intrinsically consistent set of values of the 298 K AMCAs of all anionic (XH n-1 - ) constituted by main group-element hydrides of groups 14-17 along the periods 2-6. In particular, we wish to establish the trend in affinity for a cation as the latter varies from proton to, and along, the alkali cations. Our main purpose is to understand these trends in terms of the underlying bonding mechanism using Kohn-Sham molecular orbital theory together with a quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of group I and group II metal complexes with Boc-hydroxylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dain, R.P.; Gresham, G.; Groenewold, G.S.; Steill, J.D.; Oomens, J.; van Stipdonk, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Hydroxamates are essential growth factors for some microbes, acting primarily as siderophores that solubilize iron for transport into a cell. Here we determined the intrinsic structure of 1:1 complexes between Boc-protected hydroxylamine and group I ([M(L)](+)) and group II ([M(L-H)](+))

  12. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G., E-mail: Tim.Wright@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Breckenridge, W. H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H{sup −} (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M{sub IIa}H{sup −} (M{sub IIa} = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H{sup −} and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH{sup −} and MgH{sup −} species, the other M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns{sup 2}) and H{sup −}(1s{sup 2}). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species than for RG–H{sup −}. Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M{sub IIa} atom to move away from the incoming H{sup −}.

  13. Metals in environmental media: A study of trace and platinum group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Pt and Pd. The study further investigated the correlation between these trace metals in roadside soils and vegetation in order to infer the potential impacts of roadside trace metals contamination of vegetation. Collected surface soil and vegetation samples were analysed with atomic absorption spectrophotometer for Zn, ...

  14. Capacitance of the double electrical layer on the copper-group metals in molten alkali metal halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillova, E. V.; Stepanov, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemical impedance is measured to study the capacitance of the double electrical layer of metallic Au, Ag, and Cu as a function of potential and temperature in nine molten salts, namely, the chlorides, bromides, and iodides of sodium, potassium, and cesium. The C- E curve of a gold electrode has an additional minimum in the anodic branch. This minimum for silver is less pronounced and is only observed at low ac signal frequencies in cesium halides. The additional minimum is not detected for copper in any salt under study. This phenomenon is explained on the assumption that the adsorption of halide anions on a positively charged electrode surface has a predominantly chemical rather than an electrostatic character. The specific adsorption in this case is accompanied by charge transfer through the interface and the formation of an adsorbent-adsorbate covalent bond.

  15. Gas phase oxidation as a tool to introduce oxygen containing groups on metal-loaded carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326164081; van den Berg, R.; Xia, B.; Muhler, M.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen containing groups were introduced, onto carbon nanofibers (CNFs) that were previously loaded with palladium, using HNO3 vapor. Using traditional liquid-phase oxidations this is not possible due to severe metal leaching. For the samples oxidized using HNO3 vapor temperature programmed

  16. Half-sandwich group 4 metal siloxy and silsesquioxane complexes : Soluble model systems for silica-grafted olefin polymerization catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchateau, R; Cremer, U; Harmsen, RJ; Mohamud, SI; Abbenhuis, HCL; van Santen, RA; Meetsma, A; Thiele, SKH; van Tol, MFH; Kranenburg, M

    1999-01-01

    The cuboctameric hydroxysilsesquioxane (c-C5H9)(7)Si8O12(OH) (2), obtained after hydrolysis of (c-C5H9)(7)Si8O12Cl (1), and triphenylsilanol have been applied as model supports for silica-grafted olefin polymerization catalysts. The ligands were introduced on group 4 metals by either chloride

  17. Modifications of chemical functional groups of Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb and its effect towards biosorption of heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Mohd Zamri, E-mail: zamriab@petronas.com.my; Ismail, Siti Salwa [Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The utilization of non-living biomass as an alternative biosorbent for heavy metal removal has gain a tremendous consideration through the years. Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb or pandan leaves, which is widely used as food additives in the South East Asia region, has been selected for its viability in the said effort due to the presence of chemical functional groups on its cellular network that enables the sorption to occur. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms participated during the heavy metal removal process, the biosorbent undergone a series of modification techniques to alter the chemical functional groups present on its constituent. From the outcome of the chemically-modified biosorbent being subjected to the contact with metal cations, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups present on the biosorbent are believed to be responsible for the metal uptake to occur through complexation mechanism. Modifying amine groups causes 14% reduction of Cu(II) uptake, whereas removing protein element increases the uptake to 26% as compared to the unmodified biosorbent. Also, scanning electron micrographs further suggested that the adsorption mechanism could perform in parallel, as attributed to the evidence of porous structure throughout the biosorbent fibrous nature.

  18. Modifications of chemical functional groups of Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb and its effect towards biosorption of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mohd. Zamri; Ismail, Siti Salwa

    2015-07-01

    The utilization of non-living biomass as an alternative biosorbent for heavy metal removal has gain a tremendous consideration through the years. Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb or pandan leaves, which is widely used as food additives in the South East Asia region, has been selected for its viability in the said effort due to the presence of chemical functional groups on its cellular network that enables the sorption to occur. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms participated during the heavy metal removal process, the biosorbent undergone a series of modification techniques to alter the chemical functional groups present on its constituent. From the outcome of the chemically-modified biosorbent being subjected to the contact with metal cations, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups present on the biosorbent are believed to be responsible for the metal uptake to occur through complexation mechanism. Modifying amine groups causes 14% reduction of Cu(II) uptake, whereas removing protein element increases the uptake to 26% as compared to the unmodified biosorbent. Also, scanning electron micrographs further suggested that the adsorption mechanism could perform in parallel, as attributed to the evidence of porous structure throughout the biosorbent fibrous nature.

  19. Teaching - methodical and research center of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in the former Soviet Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, A.A; Sigov, A.S; Shinkarenko, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Teaching - Methodical and Research Center (TMRC) 'Sokolinaja Gora' is founded in order to provide methodical-information and scientific support of institutes of higher education in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in Russia and in the countries of the Former Soviet union. It is independent association of creative communities of scientist of higher educational specialists. The main directions of the Center activity are: 1. Teaching-methodological support and development of teaching in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in Russia in the countries of the Former Soviet Union. Themes of teaching includes the basic of safe using of hydrogen technologies and devices, ecological, economic and law aspects of new hydrogen power engineering, transition to which in 21 century is one of the central problems of mankind survival; 2. Organizing of joint researches by independent creative communities of scientists in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metal; 3. Independent scientific examination, which is made by Advisory Committee of High Technologies consisting of representatives of the countries of Former Soviet Union, which are standing participants of an Annual International Symposia 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals in the Former Soviet Union Countries'. Structure of the Center: 1. Center of strategic development in the field of high technologies; 2. Scientific Research Institute of Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals; 3. Teaching-Methodical Association in specialization 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and economics' and hydrogen wide spread training; 4. Media Center 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals', 5. Organizational Center; 6. Administrative Center. The Center will be established step-by-step in 2005-2010 on the basis of the following programs: Teaching-methodological program. On the basis of this program it is planned to

  20. Preparation of New Adsorbent Containing Hydroxamic Acid Groups by Electron Beam-Induced Grafting for Metal Ion Adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwanmala, Phiriyatorn; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao

    2007-08-01

    Full text: A new adsorbent containing hydroxamic acid groups was synthesized by electron beam-induced graft copolymerization of methyl acrylate (MA) onto nonwoven fabric composed of polyethylene-coated polypropylene fiber. Conversion of ester groups of the grafted copolymer into the hydroxamic groups was performed by treatment with an alkaline solution of hydroxylamine (HA). Adsorbent containing hydroxamic acid groups can adsorb 99% of UO2 2+ , 98% of V5+, 97% of Pb2+ and 96% of Al3+ at pH, 5, 4, 6, and 4, respectively, after coming into contact with 100 ppb metal solution for 24 h

  1. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  2. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of group V metal carbide and nitride catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heock-Hoi

    1998-11-01

    Group V transition metal carbides and nitrides were prepared via the temperature programmed reaction (TPR) of corresponding oxides with NHsb3 or a CHsb4/Hsb2 mixture. Except for the tantalum compounds, phase-pure carbides and nitrides were prepared. The vanadium carbides and nitrides were the most active and selective catalysts. Therefore the principal focus of the research was the preparation, characterization, and evaluation of high surface area vanadium nitride catalysts. A series of vanadium nitrides with surface areas up to 60 msp2/g was prepared. Thermal gravimetric analysis coupled with x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the solid-state reaction proceeded by the sequential reduction of Vsb2Osb5 to VOsb{0.9} and concluded with the topotactic substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in VOsb{0.9}. The transformation of Vsb2Osb5 to VN was pseudomorphic. An experimental design was executed to determine effects of the heating rates and space velocities on the VN microstructures. The heating rates had minor effects on the surface areas and pore size distributions; however, increasing the space velocity significantly increased the surface area. The materials were mostly mesoporous. Oxygen chemisorption on the vanadium nitrides scaled linearly with the surface area. The corresponding O/Vsbsurface ratio was ≈0.6. The vanadium nitrides were active for butane activation and pyridine hydrodenitrogenation. During butane activation, their selectivities towards dehydrogenation products were as high as 98%. The major product in pyridine hydrodenitrogenation was pentane. The reaction rates increased almost linearly with the surface area suggesting that these reactions were structure insensitive. The vanadium nitrides were not active for crotonaldehyde hydrogenation; however, they catalyzed an interesting ring formation reaction that produced methylbenzaldehyde and xylene from crotonaldehyde. A new method was demonstrated for the production of very

  4. Electrochemical sensors and devices for heavy metals assay in water: the French groups' contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca ePUJOL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge in the area of heavy metal trace detection is the development of electrochemical techniques and devices which are user-friendly, robust, selective, with low detection limits and allowing fast analyses. This review presents the major contribution of the French scientific academic community in the field of electrochemical sensors and electroanalytical methods within the last 20 years. From the well-known polarography to the up-to-date generation of functionalized interfaces, the different strategies dedicated to analytical performances improvement are exposed: stripping voltammetry, solid mercury-free electrode, ion selective sensor, carbon based materials, chemically modified electrodes, nano-structured surfaces. The paper particularly emphasizes their advantages and limits face to the last Water Frame Directive devoted to the Environmental Quality Standards for heavy metals. Recent trends on trace metal speciation as well as on automatic on line monitoring devices are also evoked.

  5. Electrochemical sensors and devices for heavy metals assay in water: the French groups' contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Luca; Evrard, David; Groenen-Serrano, Karine; Freyssinier, Mathilde; Ruffien-Cizsak, Audrey; Gros, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    A great challenge in the area of heavy metal trace detection is the development of electrochemical techniques and devices which are user-friendly, robust, selective, with low detection limits and allowing fast analyses. This review presents the major contribution of the French scientific academic community in the field of electrochemical sensors and electroanalytical methods within the last 20 years. From the well-known polarography to the up-to-date generation of functionalized interfaces, the different strategies dedicated to analytical performances improvement are exposed: stripping voltammetry, solid mercury-free electrode, ion selective sensor, carbon based materials, chemically modified electrodes, nano-structured surfaces. The paper particularly emphasizes their advantages and limits face to the last Water Frame Directive devoted to the Environmental Quality Standards for heavy metals. Recent trends on trace metal speciation as well as on automatic “on line” monitoring devices are also evoked. PMID:24818124

  6. Dissociation and recombination rate constants for CN on Cu and Ni group transition metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Harrell

    2000-07-01

    We report dissociation and recombination reaction rate constants for CN on the fcc(111) surfaces of Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag and Au from molecular dynamics simulations employing our normalized bond index-reactive potential functions (NBI-RPF). The Arrhenius pre-exponentials for recombination of CN on these surfaces are about three orders of magnitude greater than the dissociation pre-exponentials. On the series of metals considered herein, the reaction energetics favor dissociation on the more active metals and favor recombination on the least active metals. However, the differences in the pre-exponentials of nearly a factor of 10 3 express the tendency of the reaction entropy to favor the recombination on the surfaces investigated. We also discuss the implications of these results in terms of the thermodynamics of the surface reactions.

  7. Determination of platinum group metal catalyst residues in active pharmaceutical ingredients by means of total reflection X-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-08-01

    The control of metal catalyst residues (i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs)) in different stages of the manufacturing processes of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and, especially, in the final product is crucial. For API specimens, there are strict guidelines to limit the levels of metal residues based on their individual levels of safety concern. For PGMs the concentration limit has been established at 10 mg/kg in the API. Therefore great effort is currently being devoted to the development of new and simple procedures to control metals in pharmaceuticals. In the present work, an analytical methodology based on benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been developed for the rapid and simple determination of some PGM catalyst impurities (Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt) in different types of API samples. An evaluation of different sample treatments (dissolution and digestion of the solid pharmaceutical samples) has been carried out and the developed methodologies have been validated according to the analytical parameters to be considered and acceptance criteria for PGM determination according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP). Limits of quantification obtained for PGM metals were in the range of 2-4 mg/kg which are satisfactory according to current legislation. From the obtained results it is shown that the developed TXRF method can be implemented in the pharmaceutical industries to increase productivity of the laboratory; offering an interesting and complementary analytical tool to other atomic spectroscopic methods.

  8. Group 4 Metalloporphyrin diolato Complexes and Catalytic Application of Metalloporphyrins and Related Transition Metal Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Guodong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the first examples of group 4 metalloporphyrin 1,2-diolato complexes were synthesized through a number of strategies. In general, treatment of imido metalloporphyrin complexes, (TTP)M=NR, (M = Ti, Zr, Hf), with vicinal diols led to the formation of a series of diolato complexes. Alternatively, the chelating pinacolate complexes could be prepared by metathesis of (TTP)MCl2 (M = Ti, Hf) with disodium pinacolate. These complexes were found to undergo C-C cleavage reactions to produce organic carbonyl compounds. For titanium porphyrins, treatment of a titanium(II) alkyne adduct, (TTP)Ti(η2-PhC≡CPh), with aromatic aldehydes or aryl ketones resulted in reductive coupling of the carbonyl groups to produce the corresponding diolato complexes. Aliphatic aldehydes or ketones were not reactive towards (TTP)Ti(η2-PhC≡CPh). However, these carbonyl compounds could be incorporated into a diolato complex on reaction with a reactive precursor, (TTP)Ti[O(Ph)2C(Ph)2O] to provide unsymmetrical diolato complexes via cross coupling reactions. In addition, an enediolato complex (TTP)Ti(OCPhCPhO) was obtained from the reaction of (TTP)Ti(η2-PhC≡CPh) with benzoin. Titanium porphyrin diolato complexes were found to be intermediates in the (TTP)Ti=O-catalyzed cleavage reactions of vicinal diols, in which atmospheric oxygen was the oxidant. Furthermore, (TTP)Ti=O was capable of catalyzing the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and α-hydroxy ketones to benzaldehyde and α-diketones, respectively. Other high valent metalloporphyrin complexes also can catalyze the oxidative diol cleavage and the benzyl alcohol oxidation reactions with dioxygen. A comparison of Ti(IV) and Sn(IV) porphyrin chemistry was undertaken. While chelated diolato complexes were invariably obtained for titanium porphyrins on treatment with 1,2-diols, the reaction of vicinal diols with tin porphyrins gave a number of products, including mono

  9. Global exploration and production capacity for platinum-group metals from 1995 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Platinum-group metals (PGMs) are required in a variety of commercial, industrial, and military applications for many existing and emerging technologies, yet the United States is highly dependent on foreign sources of PGMs. Information on global exploration for PGMs since 1995 has been used in this study as a basis for identifying locations where the industry has determined that exploration has provided data sufficient to warrant development of a new mine or expansion of an existing operation or where a significant increase in capacity for PGMs is anticipated by 2015. Discussions include an overview of the industry and the selected sites, factors affecting mineral supply, and circumstances leading to the development of mineral properties with the potential to affect mineral supply. Of the 52 sites or regional operations that were considered in this analysis, 16 sites were producing before 1995, 28 sites commenced production from 1995 through 2010, and 8 sites were expected to begin production from 2011 through 2015 if development plans came to fruition. The United States imports PGMs primarily from Canada, Russia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe to meet increasing demand for these materials in a variety of specialized and high-tech applications. Feed sources of PGMs are changing in South Africa and Russia, which together accounted for about 89 percent of platinum production and 82 percent of palladium production in 2009. A greater amount of South African PGM capacity is likely to come from deeper, higher cost Upper Group Reef seam 2 deposits and deposits in the Eastern Bushveld area. Future Russian PGM capacity is likely to come from ore zones with generally lower PGM content and different platinum-to-palladium ratios than the nickel-rich ore that dominated PGM supply in the 1990s. Because PGM supply from Canada and Russia is derived as a byproduct of copper and nickel mining, the PGM supply from these countries is influenced by economic, environmental, political, and

  10. Group 4 Transition-Metal Complexes of an Aniline–Carbene–Phenol Ligand

    KAUST Repository

    Despagnet-Ayoub, Emmanuelle

    2013-05-24

    Attempts to install a tridentate aniline-NHC-phenol (NCO) ligand on titanium and zirconium led instead to complexes resulting from unexpected rearrangement pathways that illustrate common behavior in carbene-early- transition-metal chemistry. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. η5 and η6 - cyclic π-perimeter hydrocarbon platinum group metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    shift of the ligand peaks upon coordination with the metal atom as compared to the signals of the free lig- ands. The ligand peaks resonate in the region rang- ... instead of the expected singlet due to the presence of diastereotopic protons which are non-inter convertable on the NMR time scale otherwise a singlet would have.

  12. Alkali Metal Cation Affinities of Anionic Main Group-Element Hydrides Across the Periodic Table

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of gas-phase alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) of archetypal anionic bases across the periodic system using relativistic density functional theory at ZORA-BP86/QZ4P//ZORA-BP86/TZ2P. AMCA values of all bases were computed for the lithium, sodium,

  13. Development of Novel Non-Pt Group Metal Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukerjee, Sanjeev [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Atanassov, Plamen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barton, Scott [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Dale, Nilesh [Nissan Technical Center North America (NTCNA), Farmington Hills, MI (United States); Halevi, Bar [Pajarito Powder LLC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The objective of this multi-institutional effort was to comprehensively pursue the goal of eliminating noble metal (Pt group metals, PGM) from the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrode thereby providing a quantum leap in lowering the overall PGM loading in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC). The overall project scope encompassed (a) comprehensive materials discovery effort, (b) a concomitant effort to scale up these materials with very high ( ±5%) reproducibility, both intra and inter, (c) understanding mass transport in porous medium both in gas diffusion and micro-porous layers for enhanced areal activity, (d) understanding mechanistic aspects of active site structure and ORR electrocatalytic pathway. Overall project milestones and metrics were (a) first phase effort based on performance in oxygen where the project’s Go/No-Go decision point milestone of 100 mA/cm2 at 0.8 V (internal resistance-free, iR-free) at 80°C, pure H2/O2, with 1.5 bar total pressure was met. Subsequently, the principle objectives were to (a) transition the project from H2/O2 to H2/Air with slated target of exceeding 30 mA/cm2 @ 0.8 V, 2.5 bar total pressure and an end of the project target of 1 A/cm2 @ 0.4 V (same total pressure), both under 100% relative humidity. The target for catalyst material scale up was to achieve 100 g batch size at the end of the program. This scale up target had a quality control milestone of less than 5% variation of activity measured with H2/Air (2.5 bar total pressure) at 0.8 V. In addition, the project also aimed at arriving at a unified understanding of the nature of active sites in these catalysts as well as some preliminary understanding of the mechanistic pathway. Also addressed is the development of an integrated method for determination of mass transport parameters using a combination of Helox experiments and modeling of the gas

  14. Study of high-temperature plasticity of some group metal-base alloys on sign-variable deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, S.V.; Nesterenko, A.V.; Bykov, V.N.; Krinitsin, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Temperature effect on 4 group metal alloy plasticity under sign-variable deformation is investigated. The deformation sign-variable character effect on plasticity is reduced with temperature growth. In contrast to monotonous deformation under which plasticity gross with temperature increase, a clearly manifested temperature range exists under sign-variable deformation where a shift deformation degree accumulated up to fracture is of the lightest importance

  15. Influence of the pre-adsorption of group III metals on the growth of Ge nanostructures on vicinal Si surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speckmann, Moritz; Schmidt, Thomas; Flege, Jan Ingo; Heidmann, Inga; Hoecker, Jan; Wilkens, Torsten; Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The employment of metals as surfactants (surface active agents) is a promising approach to influence the growth of Ge nanostructures on Si surfaces. Especially for group III and group V elements an enhanced or suppressed Stranski-Krastanov growth behaviour is found, respectively. For all group III metal on silicon systems presented in this study we observe a drastic change of the surface morphology after adsorption of a few monolayers. For the investigations we used a variety of surface sensitive techniques, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), spot profile analysing low-energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED), low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM), and X-ray standing waves (XSW). On the one hand, the adsorption of Ga and In leads to a smoothening of the intrinsically unstable Si(112) surface and the development of 1D metal chains. But on the other hand, the stable Si(113) is decomposed into a regular array of nanofacets after adsorption of Ga. For all cases shown here the possibility of growing highly anisotropic Ge Islands is demonstrated (Ga/Si(113),Ga/Si(112),In/Si(112)).

  16. Heavy main-group iodometallates hybridized by alkali metal via 1,10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    throline, bipyridine, terpyridine; x =2, 3; n =2, 3);17–26 c. rare earth metal organic complexes, [Ln(L)x]3+ (Ln. =Y, Tb, Nd; L=DMF and/or DMSO; x =7, 8).27–30. In these systems, most of the second ... Mengfan Yin et al. (H3O)]·H2O}n (2). Their band gaps, fluorescence and thermal stabilities are also reported and discussed.

  17. New Gateways to the Platinum Group Metal-Catalyzed Direct Deuterium-Labeling Method Utilizing Hydrogen as a Catalyst Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawama, Yoshinari; Park, Kwihwan; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Sajiki, Hironao

    2018-01-01

    Deuterium-labeled compounds are widely utilized in various scientific fields. We summarize the recent advances in the direct deuteration of sugar, saturated fatty acid, and arene derivatives using heterogeneous platinum group metal on carbon catalysts by our research group. Hydrogen gas is a key catalyst-activator to facilitate the present H-D exchange reactions. In this review, the direct activation method of catalysts using in situ-generated hydrogen based on the dehydrogenation of alcohols is introduced. The obtained multiple deuterium-labeled products, including bioactive compounds, are expected to contribute to the development of many scientific investigations.

  18. Modelling chemical abundance distributions for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group: the impact of turbulent metal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Ivanna; Wetzel, Andrew; Kirby, Evan N.; Hopkins, Philip F.; Ma, Xiangcheng; Wheeler, Coral; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-02-01

    We investigate stellar metallicity distribution functions (MDFs), including Fe and α-element abundances, in dwarf galaxies from the Feedback in Realistic Environment (FIRE) project. We examine both isolated dwarf galaxies and those that are satellites of a Milky Way-mass galaxy. In particular, we study the effects of including a sub-grid turbulent model for the diffusion of metals in gas. Simulations that include diffusion have narrower MDFs and abundance ratio distributions, because diffusion drives individual gas and star particles towards the average metallicity. This effect provides significantly better agreement with observed abundance distributions in dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, including small intrinsic scatter in [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] of ≲0.1 dex. This small intrinsic scatter arises in our simulations because the interstellar medium in dwarf galaxies is well mixed at nearly all cosmic times, such that stars that form at a given time have similar abundances to ≲0.1 dex. Thus, most of the scatter in abundances at z = 0 arises from redshift evolution and not from instantaneous scatter in the ISM. We find similar MDF widths and intrinsic scatter for satellite and isolated dwarf galaxies, which suggests that environmental effects play a minor role compared with internal chemical evolution in our simulations. Overall, with the inclusion of metal diffusion, our simulations reproduce abundance distribution widths of observed low-mass galaxies, enabling detailed studies of chemical evolution in galaxy formation.

  19. Lipid solubility of the platinum group metals Pt, Pd and Rh in dependence on the presence of complexing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Sonja; Menzel, Christoph M.; Stueben, Doris; Taraschewski, Horst; Sures, Bernd

    2003-07-01

    All complexing agents had a significant influence on octanol solubility of PGM. - Investigations on the bioaccumulation of the platinum group metals (PGM) Pt, Pd and Rh in aquatic organisms are of growing interest in environmental research due to the increasing emission of these metals by motor vehicles with catalytic converters. Until now, nothing is known about the possible influence of complexing agents on the bioaccumulation capacity of these precious metals. According to the partition coefficient between 1-octanol and water (P{sub OW}) as a measure of bioaccumulation, in this study a simple shaking method was performed in order to investigate the effects of different complexing agents (L-methionine, thio urea, EDTA, humic substances, bile compounds) on the octanol solubility of the PGM. The results demonstrated a significant influence of all agents used. L-Methionine and thio urea decreased the lipid solubility. In contrast, the presence of EDTA, humic substances and especially bile caused a higher transfer of metals in the octanol phase. For most complexing agents tested, the transfer of Pd to the lipid phase was significantly higher compared with Rh and Pt, except for bile acid where the highest octanol solubility was found for Pt. Recent experimental results on PGM accumulation in zebra mussels confirm a high bioaccumulation of Pd which could be predicted from the lipid solubility.

  20. Lipid solubility of the platinum group metals Pt, Pd and Rh in dependence on the presence of complexing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Sonja; Menzel, Christoph M.; Stueben, Doris; Taraschewski, Horst; Sures, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    All complexing agents had a significant influence on octanol solubility of PGM. - Investigations on the bioaccumulation of the platinum group metals (PGM) Pt, Pd and Rh in aquatic organisms are of growing interest in environmental research due to the increasing emission of these metals by motor vehicles with catalytic converters. Until now, nothing is known about the possible influence of complexing agents on the bioaccumulation capacity of these precious metals. According to the partition coefficient between 1-octanol and water (P OW ) as a measure of bioaccumulation, in this study a simple shaking method was performed in order to investigate the effects of different complexing agents (L-methionine, thio urea, EDTA, humic substances, bile compounds) on the octanol solubility of the PGM. The results demonstrated a significant influence of all agents used. L-Methionine and thio urea decreased the lipid solubility. In contrast, the presence of EDTA, humic substances and especially bile caused a higher transfer of metals in the octanol phase. For most complexing agents tested, the transfer of Pd to the lipid phase was significantly higher compared with Rh and Pt, except for bile acid where the highest octanol solubility was found for Pt. Recent experimental results on PGM accumulation in zebra mussels confirm a high bioaccumulation of Pd which could be predicted from the lipid solubility

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Group-6 Metal Carbonyl Complexes of Aroyl Hydrazone Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem, Mohd; Sharma, Mohita; Mahajan, Simpy; Sheikh, H. N.; Kalsotra, B. L.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonyl complexes of Chromium, molybdenum and tungsten of composition, [M(CO)4L-L], (where M= Cr, Mo or W and L-L= benzoic acid[1-(Furan-2-yl)methylene]hydrazide (BFMH), benzoic acid[(thiophene-2-yl)methylene]hydrazide (BTMH), benzoic acid[1-(thiophene-2-yl)ethylidene] hydrazide (BTEH), benzoic acid (phenylmethylene)hydrazide (BPMH) and benzoic acid[1-(anisol-3-yl)methylene] hydrazide (BAMH) are reported. These have been prepared by refluxing metal carbonyls and the ligands in 1:1molar ratio...

  2. Determination of platinum group metal catalyst residues in active pharmaceutical ingredients by means of total reflection X-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marguí, Eva, E-mail: eva.margui@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Queralt, Ignasi, E-mail: iqueralt@ictja.csic.es [Laboratory of X-ray Analytical Applications, Institute of Earth Sciences “Jaume Almera”, CSIC, Solé Sabarís s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hidalgo, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.hidalgo@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    The control of metal catalyst residues (i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs)) in different stages of the manufacturing processes of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and, especially, in the final product is crucial. For API specimens, there are strict guidelines to limit the levels of metal residues based on their individual levels of safety concern. For PGMs the concentration limit has been established at 10 mg/kg in the API. Therefore great effort is currently being devoted to the development of new and simple procedures to control metals in pharmaceuticals. In the present work, an analytical methodology based on benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been developed for the rapid and simple determination of some PGM catalyst impurities (Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt) in different types of API samples. An evaluation of different sample treatments (dissolution and digestion of the solid pharmaceutical samples) has been carried out and the developed methodologies have been validated according to the analytical parameters to be considered and acceptance criteria for PGM determination according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP). Limits of quantification obtained for PGM metals were in the range of 2–4 mg/kg which are satisfactory according to current legislation. From the obtained results it is shown that the developed TXRF method can be implemented in the pharmaceutical industries to increase productivity of the laboratory; offering an interesting and complementary analytical tool to other atomic spectroscopic methods. - Highlights: • A TXRF method for PGM catalyst residue determination in API samples is presented. • Analysis can be performed using 10 μL of the internal standardized dissolved API. • The method is rapid, simple and suitable according to the USP requirements.

  3. Synthesis of crescent aromatic oligoamides with preorganized chelating groups and their extraction towards transition metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xinshi; Chen, Long; Yang, Yongan; He, Youzhou; Zou, Shuliang; Feng, Wen; Yang, Yuanyou; Liu, Ning; Liao, Jiali; Yuan, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three crescent aromatic oligoamides were designed and synthesized. ► Selective Hg 2+ removal was achieved with high efficiency in solvent extraction. ► The stoichiometry of the extracted species was approximately 1:1 (L:M). ► The extraction constant (log K ex ) was determined to be 10.2. - Abstract: Three crescent aromatic oligoamides 1–3 with their backbones rigidified by intramolecular hydrogen bonds were designed and synthesized. The liquid–liquid extraction by these compounds has been investigated using UV–vis spectrometry towards Pb 2+ picrate and some transition metal picrates including Ag + , Hg 2+ , Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ salts. The results revealed higher selectivity and efficiency towards Hg 2+ over other metal cations; pentameric ligand 1 with six oxygen donor atoms provided the highest extractability of 83.3%, while dimeric ligand 3 extracted almost exclusively Hg 2+ . The stoichiometry of the extracted complex between ligand 1 and Hg 2+ , and the extraction constant (log K ex ) were determined in solvent extraction.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Group-6 Metal Carbonyl Complexes of Aroyl Hydrazone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Saleem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonyl complexes of Chromium, molybdenum and tungsten of composition, [M(CO4L-L], (where M= Cr, Mo or W and L-L= benzoic acid[1-(Furan-2-ylmethylene]hydrazide (BFMH, benzoic acid[(thiophene-2-ylmethylene]hydrazide (BTMH, benzoic acid[1-(thiophene-2-ylethylidene] hydrazide (BTEH, benzoic acid (phenylmethylenehydrazide (BPMH and benzoic acid[1-(anisol-3-ylmethylene] hydrazide (BAMH are reported. These have been prepared by refluxing metal carbonyls and the ligands in 1:1molar ratio. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, UV-vis spectra, 1H NMR, TGA/DTA, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The IR bands suggest that in all the complexes the ligands behave as neutral bidentate chelating type coordinating metal through carbonyl oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. The CO force constants and CO-CO interaction constants for these derivatives have been calculated using Cotton-Kraihanzel secular equations, which indicate poor π-bonding ability of the coordinated ligands.

  5. The Oldest Stars of the Extremely Metal-Poor Local Group Dwarf Irregular Galaxy Leo A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Hopp, Ulrich; Drozdovsky, Igor O.; Greggio, Laura; Crone, Mary M.

    2002-08-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) single-star photometry of Leo A in B, V, and I. Our new field of view is offset from the centrally located field observed by Tolstoy et al. in order to expose the halo population of this galaxy. We report the detection of metal-poor red horizontal branch stars, which demonstrate that Leo A is not a young galaxy. In fact, Leo A is as least as old as metal-poor Galactic Globular Clusters that exhibit red horizontal branches and are considered to have a minimum age of about 9 Gyr. We discuss the distance to Leo A and perform an extensive comparison of the data with stellar isochrones. For a distance modulus of 24.5, the data are better than 50% complete down to absolute magnitudes of 2 or more. We can easily identify stars with metallicities between 0.0001 and 0.0004, and ages between about 5 and 10 Gyr, in their post-main-sequence phases, but we lack the detection of main-sequence turnoffs that would provide unambiguous proof of ancient (>10 Gyr) stellar generations. Blue horizontal branch stars are above the detection limits but difficult to distinguish from young stars with similar colors and magnitudes. Synthetic color-magnitude diagrams show it is possible to populate the blue horizontal branch in the halo of Leo A. The models also suggest ~50% of the total astrated mass in our pointing to be attributed to an ancient (>10 Gyr) stellar population. We conclude that Leo A started to form stars at least about 9 Gyr ago. Leo A exhibits an extremely low oxygen abundance, only 3% of solar, in its ionized interstellar medium. The existence of old stars in this very oxygen-deficient galaxy illustrates that a low oxygen abundance does not preclude a history of early star formation. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  6. New type of complex alkali and alkaline earth metal borates with isolated (B12O24)12) anionic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongping; Yu, Hongwei; Pan, Shilie; Jiao, Anqing; Han, Jian; Wu, Kui; Han, Shujuan; Li, Hongyi

    2014-03-28

    Compounds with isolated anionic groups often exhibit special linear and nonlinear optical properties and possess potential applications such as birefringence, second harmonic generation and stimulated Raman scattering crystals. In this paper, two new alkali and alkaline earth mixed-metal borates, Li3KB4O8 and LiNa2Sr8B12O24F6Cl, with isolated (B12O24)(12-) anionic groups have been successfully synthesized by spontaneous crystallization. Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and they both crystallize in the same space group, R3[combining macron]. More interestingly, further structure comparison shows that the discovered anhydrous borates with the (B12O24)(12-) groups also crystallize in the same space group R3[combining macron], which is related with the local symmetry of the (B12O24)(12-) groups. These structural features suggest that the crystal structures of the family of compounds depend more on their anionic groups. In addition, the property characterizations of the two new borates were investigated by TG-DSC, IR and UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance.

  7. The Neoproterozoic Lavalleja group in Uruguay: geology and base metal deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Bettucci, L.; Preciozzi, F.; Ramos, V.; Basei, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Lavalleja Group, which is exposed along the Dom Feliciano Belt is located in the southeast of Uruguay and is represented by metavolcano-sedimentary rocks. It is developed during late Proterozoic-Early Paleozoic Brasiliano orogeny. Based on geochemical signature of the rocks of the Lavalleja Group, mainly metagabbros, basic and acidic metavolcanic rocks, a back-arc basin tectonic setting is suggested by Sánchez-Bettucci et al. (2001). The metamorphic grade increases to the southeast, ranging from lower greenschist facies to lower amphibolite facies in the Fuente del Puma and Zanja del Tigre Formations (Sánchez-Bettucci et al., 2001). The non-metamorphic to anchimetamorphic Minas Formation of Sánchez-Bettucci et al. (2001) is a junior synonim of the Arroyo del Soldado Group, previously defined by Gaucher et al. (1996). The metamorphic mineral assemblages correspond to a low-pressure regional metamorphism associated with a high thermal gradient (Sánchez-Bettucci et al., 2001).A compressive deformational event, that probably corresponds to the basin closure of the Lavalleja Group during a continental collision was recognized. The petrology, geochemistry, metamorphism grade, and tectonic setting are consistent with a back-arc basin for the Lavalleja Group (Sánchez-Bettucci et al., 2001)

  8. Synthesis and electrical conductivity studies of metal chloro and nitroxide group containing styrene butadiene rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, T.; Ramesan, M. T.

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of different functional group in SBR was done by a simple reaction between sodium nitrite and mercuric chloride in the presence of phase transfer catalyst. The attachment of chlorine and NO2 functional group in the double bond of the butadiene was monitored by FTIR and UV spectroscopy. The structure and morphology of chloro nitro SBR was studied by SEM and XRD. Flame retardency studies revealed that the chemical modification imparts better flame resistance to chemically modified SBR. AC conductivity and dielectric properties of chloro- nitro SBR was higher than that of SBR and conductivity increases with the level of chemical modification.

  9. Metal oxide, Group V-VI chalcogenides and GaN/AlGaN photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md. Rezaul

    In this work, a simple, low-cost and catalyst free one-step solution processing of onedimensional Sb2S3 nanostructures on polyimide substrates was done. This structure demonstrated its potential application as a photoconductor in the UV and visible regime. Using-field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction, Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy measurements, it was shown that the Sb 2S3 films have high crystallinity, uniform morphology and nearstoichiometric composition. Further, using tauc plot, it was found that the films have a direct bandgap of 1.67 eV. MSM photodetectors, fabricated using these films showed a clear photo response in both UV as well as visible wavelength. These devices showed UV on/off ratio as high as 160 under the light intensity of 30 mW/cm2 and a small rise time and fall time of 44 ms 28 ms respectively. The effect of geometry of metal pad and bonding wire orientation of a multi-channel FET on the coupling of THz radiation was studied. The spatial variation images were taken by raster scan with the resolution of 0.07 mm steps in both x and y directions. An effective gate bias, where the effect of noise is minimum and photoresponse is maximum, was used for imaging. By applying VGS =-2.8V and VDS =380mV, the images were taken for all different combinations of activated bonding wires and metal pads. It was observed that, effect of bonding wire orientation is negligible for the large source pad as the radiation is coupled basically between drain and gate pad. Effect of drain bonding wire on coupling depends on the maximum width or diameter of metal pad and the incoming wavelength. In this work, Position of activated Drain pad and orientation of respective bonding wire defined the image tilting angle. Voltage drop across the shorting metal between drain pads, also played a role in increasing the asymmetry by selectively exciting a certain portion of FET Channels more than the other portion

  10. Platinum Group Metal-free Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen gas is a green energy carrier with great environmental benefits. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can convert low-grade organic matter to hydrogen gas with low energy consumption and have gained a growing interest in the past decade. Cathode catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) present a major challenge for the development and future applications of MECs. An ideal cathode catalyst should be catalytically active, simple to synthesize, durable in a complex environment, and cost-effective. A variety of noble-metal free catalysts have been developed and investigated for HER in MECs, including Nickel and its alloys, MoS 2 , carbon-based catalysts and biocatalysts. MECs in turn can serve as a research platform to study the durability of the HER catalysts. This personal account has reviewed, analyzed, and discussed those catalysts with an emphasis on synthesis and modification, system performance and potential for practical applications. It is expected to provide insights into the development of HER catalysts towards MEC applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Valence density of states of group IVA transition-metal dichalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J. von; Isomaeki, H.

    1980-01-01

    The valence densities of states (VDOS) of the IVA transition-metal dichalcogenides ZrS 2 , ZrSe 2 , TiSe 2 are calculated using the Gilat-Raubenheimer method and analysed in detail VDOS based on quadratic Lagrangian interpolation (QLI) of the energies evaluated in the final self-consistent symmetrised OPW (SCSOPW) potential at 131 symmetry independent k points are found to show close resemblance to XPS measurements and recent LCAO VDOS. Using an analysis based on the division of the SCSOPW QLI VDOS into partial VDOS from individual bands we find that four pairs of valence bands (1-2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7-8) give rise to four main peaks of SCSOPW QLI VDOS. A similar analysis shows that the use of the Slater-Koster interpolation caused some artificial deep valleys into the earlier SCSOPW LCAO VDOS. The methods used to calculate SCSOPW QLI VDOS and SCSOPW LCAO VDOS are also described. (author)

  12. High temperature rheological study of borosilicate glasses containing platinum group metal particles by means of a mixer-type rheometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Jean; Hanotin, Caroline [CEA Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DTCD/SECM/LDMC, Bagnols-sur-Cèze, F-30207 (France); Neyret, Muriel, E-mail: muriel.neyret@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DTCD/SECM/LDMC, Bagnols-sur-Cèze, F-30207 (France); Marchal, Philippe [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés (LRGP-GEMICO), Université de Lorraine-CNRS, UMR 7274, Nancy, F-54001 (France)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, the rheological behavior of six simulated high level waste nuclear glasses containing 0 to 5.2 wt% platinum group metals (PGM) has been studied at a temperature of 1200 °C. By means of a stress imposed rheometer, the shear stress dependence of the viscosity, which was so far assessed only at high shear rates, has been investigated on a wider range. Experimental data have been well fitted by the Cross model and a critical stress corresponding to the rupture of PGM aggregates has been evidenced. At high shear rates, the dependence with the volume fraction in PGM particles is well accounted for by Quemada's law. At low shear rates, the first Newtonian plateau is shown to be strongly dependent on the PGM content, notably above 3 wt% and to follow an exponential dependence due to the existence of more complex structures at the origin of the critical stress. - Highlights: • Rheological behavior of nuclear glass melts is well accounted by the Cross model. • A first Newtonian plateau has been evidenced at low shear. • First Newtonian plateau and critical stress values depend on PGM (Platinum Group Metals) content. • At high shear, Quemada's law well represents the PGM content impact on viscosity.

  13. Determining the selectivity of divalent metal cations for the carboxyl group of alginate hydrogel beads during competitive sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Byungryul; Lee, Healim; Lee, Soonjae; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2015-11-15

    To investigate the competitive sorption of divalent metal ions such as Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Pb(2+) on alginate hydrogel beads, batch and column tests were conducted. The concentration of carboxyl group was found to be limited in the preparation of spherical hydrogel beads. From kinetic test results, 80% of sorption was observed within 4h, and equilibrium was attained in 48 h. According to the comparison of the total uptake and release, divalent metal ions were found to stoichiometrically interact with the carboxyl group in the alginate polymer chain. From the Langmuir equation, the maximum capacities of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Ni(2+) were calculated to be 1.1, 0.48, and 0.13 mmol/g, respectively. The separation factor (α) values for αPb/Cu, αPb/Ni, and αCu/Ni were 14.0, 98.9, and 7.1, respectively. The sorption capacity of Pb(2+) was not affected by the solution pH; however, the sorption capacities of Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) decreased with increasing solution pH, caused by competition with hydrogen. According to the result from the fixed column test, Pb(2+) exhibited the highest affinity, followed by Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), which is in exact agreement with those of kinetic and isotherm tests. The sorbent could be regenerated using 4% HCl, and the regenerated sorbent exhibited 90% capacity upto 9 cycles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Recycling the Platinum Group Metals from Automobile Catalytic Converter: An Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrat, Maryam; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Sharafi, Pezhman; Samali, Bijan

    2017-12-01

    This study provides a comparison between environmental impacts of the recovery of platinum group metals (PGMs) from the end-of-life catalytic converters by hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical methods. A gate to grave life cycle assessment of a typical three-way catalytic converter manufactured for an Australian passenger car was carried out using GaBi professional environmental package. Recovery rates, as well as qualities, quantities, losses, and fugitive emissions for all materials and elements used in both methods were calculated based on the developed flowsheets. A life cycle impact assessment was then made by carrying out a mass balance calculation. Inventory data show that the hydrometallurgical route for recycling of the platinum group metals out of catalytic converter scrap has lower impacts on the environment compared with the pyrometallurgical method. In terms of emission effects, the hydrometallurgical process was found to be highly advantageous since it causes insignificant emissions to air, sea water, and fresh water. It is also found that the hydrometallurgical route performs comparatively superior in terms of acidification, eutrophication, fossil depletion, and human toxicity. The obtained results are applicable only to the Australian setting.

  15. Bimetallic platinum group metal-free catalysts for high power generating microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Mounika; Santoro, Carlo; Herrera, Sergio; Serov, Alexey; Atanassov, Plamen

    2017-10-31

    M1-M2-N-C bimetallic catalysts with M1 as Fe and Co and M2 as Fe, Co, Ni and Mn were synthesized and investigated as cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The catalysts were prepared by Sacrificial Support Method in which silica was the template and aminoantipyrine (AAPyr) was the organic precursor. The electro-catalytic properties of these catalysts were investigated by using rotating ring disk (RRDE) electrode setup in neutral electrolyte. Fe-Mn-AAPyr outperformed Fe-AAPyr that showed higher performances compared to Fe-Co-AAPyr and Fe-Ni-AAPyr in terms of half-wave potential. In parallel, Fe-Co-AAPyr, Co-Mn-AAPyr and Co-Ni-AAPyr outperformed Co-AAPyr. The presence of Co within the catalyst contributed to high peroxide production not desired for efficient ORR. The catalytic capability of the catalysts integrated in air-breathing cathode was also verified. It was found that Co-based catalysts showed an improvement in performance by the addition of second metal compared to simple Co- AAPyr. Fe-based bimetallic materials didn't show improvement compared to Fe-AAPyr with the exception of Fe-Mn-AAPyr catalyst that had the highest performance recorded in this study with maximum power density of 221.8 ± 6.6 μWcm -2 . Activated carbon (AC) was used as control and had the lowest performances in RRDE and achieved only 95.6 ± 5.8 μWcm -2 when tested in MFC.

  16. Group preconcentration of heavy metal ions by fiber-ionites on the basis of polyacrylonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, I.Yu.; Germanova, I.F.; Polivanova, N.G.; Danilova, E.Ya.

    1990-01-01

    The optimum conditions for concentrating of copper, lead, zinc, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, manganese, iron, aluminium, chromium, silver, mercury by fiber-exchangers on the basis of polyacrylonitrile containing aminogroups, groups of thioxine and pyrazole from solutions with high content of salts were found. Advantages of sorbent containg aminogroups were shown. The technique of preconcentration of ions under investigation with the analysis of concentrate by atom-absorption, atom-emission and X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy was suggested. The method was used for analysis of waste water of power plants

  17. Sequential Linker Installation: Precise Placement of Functional Groups in Multivariate Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, S; Lu, WG; Chen, YP; Zhang, Q; Liu, TF; Feng, DW; Wang, X; Qin, JS; Zhou, HC

    2015-03-11

    A unique strategy, sequential linker installation (SLI), has been developed to construct multivariate MOFs with functional groups precisely positioned. PCN-700, a Zr-MOF with eight-connected Zr6O4(OH)(8)(H2O)(4) clusters, has been judiciously designed; the Zr-6 clusters in this MOF are arranged in such a fashion that, by replacement of terminal OH-/H2O ligands, subsequent insertion of linear dicarboxylate linkers is achieved. We demonstrate that linkers with distinct lengths and functionalities can be sequentially installed into PCN-700. Single-crystal to single-crystal transformation is realized so that the positions of the subsequently installed linkers are pinpointed via single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. This methodology provides a powerful tool to construct multivariate MOFs with precisely positioned functionalities in the desired proximity, which would otherwise be difficult to achieve.

  18. Buried Volume Analysis for Propene Polymerization Catalysis Promoted by Group 4 Metals: a Tool for Molecular Mass Prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura

    2015-10-02

    A comparison of the steric properties of homogeneous single site catalysts for propene polymerization using the percentage of buried volume (%VBur) as molecular descriptor is reported. The %VBur calculated on the neutral precursors of the active species seems to be a reliable tool to explain several experimental data related to the propene insertion and to the monomer chain transfer. Interestingly, a linear correlation between the buried volume calculated for a large set of neutral precursors and the energetic difference between propagation and termination steps calculated by DFT methods is found for Group 4 metal catalysts. The “master curves” derived for Ti, Zr and Hf confirm not only that the %VBur is an appropriate molecular descriptor for the systems considered but also that it could be used as tool for a large computational screening of new ligands.

  19. Electrochemically Smart Bimetallic Materials Featuring Group 11 Metals: In-situ Conductive Network Generation and Its Impact on Cell Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Esther [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Our results for this program “Electrochemically smart bimetallic materials featuring Group 11 metals: in-situ conductive matrix generation and its impact on battery capacity, power and reversibility” have been highly successful: 1) we demonstrated material structures which generated in-situ conductive networks through electrochemical activation with increases in conductivity up to 10,000 fold, 2) we pioneered in situ analytical methodology to map the cathodes at several stages of discharge through the use of Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to elucidate the kinetic dependence of the conductive network formation, and 3) we successfully designed synthetic methodology for direct control of material properties including crystallite size and surface area which showed significant impact on electrochemical behavior.

  20. Contamination from gold and platinum-group metals mining in the Gulf of Darién, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Bedoya, L.; Palacio Baena, J.

    2013-12-01

    Gulf of Darién, triangular southernmost extension of the Caribbean Sea, bounded by Panama on the southwest and by Colombia on the southeast and east. The Gulf is made up of 17 municipalities in the department of Choco and Antioquia. The Gulf of Darién is a geostrategic region, rich in biodiversity, known for its natural resources of minerals, oil, lumber as well as its water and fertile land. The Darién also acts as the bridge between South America and Central America and has access to the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The economy in the region is based mainly on agribusinesses, tourism and mining activities, mainly the 'mining of gold and platinum-group metals'. In our study we determined the degree of trace element contamination in estuarine sediment samples originated from mining activities and municipal waste water discharges of effluents on the gulf of Darién. . Surface samples were taken from 17 locations through the entire Gulf. Grain size, Corg, Ag, Al, Ca , Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations were analyzed, and enrichment factors (EF) as well as geo-accumulation indices (Igeo) were calculated. Concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ni, Cu and Cr show levels that are consistent with those typically found in urbanized marine environments. EF and Igeo values revealed that the Gulf is extremely contaminated with Ag and moderately contaminated with Cr and Zn. The sources of Cr, Ag, Hg and Zn are associated with the development of mining activities in the Atrato River basin. The observed enrichment of Ag may be explained as a residue of the extraction of gold and platinum-group metals.

  1. Metal distributions out to 0.5 r {sub 180} in the intracluster medium of four galaxy groups observed with Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Toru; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sato, Kosuke, E-mail: j1213703@ed.tus.ac.jp, E-mail: matusita@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2014-01-20

    We studied the distributions of metal abundances and metal-mass-to-light ratios in the intracluster medium (ICM) of four galaxy groups, MKW 4, HCG 62, the NGC 1550 group, and the NGC 5044 group, out to ∼0.5 r {sub 180} observed with Suzaku. The iron abundance decreases with radius and is about 0.2-0.4 solar beyond 0.1 r {sub 180}. At a given radius in units of r {sub 180}, the iron abundance in the ICM of the four galaxy groups was consistent with or smaller than those of clusters of galaxies. The Mg/Fe and Si/Fe ratios in the ICM are nearly constant at the solar ratio out to 0.5 r {sub 180}. We also studied systematic uncertainties in the derived metal abundances, comparing the results from two versions of atomic data for astrophysicists (ATOMDB) and single- and two-temperature model fits. Since the metals have been synthesized in galaxies, we collected K-band luminosities of galaxies from the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog and calculated the integrated iron-mass-to-light-ratios (IMLR), or the ratios of the iron mass in the ICM to light from stars in galaxies. The groups with smaller gas-mass-to-light ratios have smaller IMLR values and the IMLR is inversely correlated with the entropy excess. Based on these abundance features, we discussed the past history of metal enrichment processes in groups of galaxies.

  2. EPR and pulsed ENDOR study of intermediates from reactions of aromatic azides with group 13 metal trichlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Bencivenni

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of group 13 metal trichlorides with aromatic azides were examined by CW EPR and pulsed ENDOR spectroscopies. Complex EPR spectra were obtained from reactions of aluminium, gallium and indium trichlorides with phenyl azides containing a variety of substituents. Analysis of the spectra showed that 4-methoxy-, 3-methoxy- and 2-methoxyphenyl azides all gave ‘dimer’ radical cations [ArNHC6H4NH2]+• and trimers [ArNHC6H4NHC6H4NH2]+• followed by polymers. 4-Azidobenzonitrile, with its electron-withdrawing substituent, did not react. In general the aromatic azides appeared to react most rapidly with AlCl3 but this reagent tended to generate much polymer. InCl3 was the least reactive group 13 halide. DFT computations of the radical cations provided corroborating evidence and suggested that the unpaired electrons were accommodated in extensive π-delocalised orbitals. A mechanism to account for the reductive conversion of aromatic azides to the corresponding anilines and thence to the dimers and trimers is proposed.

  3. Beyond alkyl transfer: Synthesis of main group metal (Mg, Ca, Zn) silyl and tris(oxazolinyl)borato complexes and their stoichiometric and catalytic reactions with borane Lewis acids and carbonyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampland, Nicole Lynn [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-09

    Recently, the fundamental knowledge of main group metal chemistry has grown. This progress is crucial for the further development of main group metal compounds in silicon chemistry and catalysis and for advancing their applications as green alternatives to many rare earth and transition metal compounds. This thesis focuses on reactivity beyond the welldocumented alkyl-transfer applications for main group metals, and it highlights examples of reactions with Lewis acids and the reduction of carbonyls.

  4. Infrared spectra of the CH3-MX and CH2-MHX complexes formed by reactions of laser-ablated group 3 metal atoms with methyl halides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Gook; Andrews, Lester

    2007-04-05

    Reactions of laser-ablated group 3 metal atoms with methyl halides have been carried out in excess of Ar during condensation and the matrix infrared spectra studied. The metals are as effective as other early transition metals in providing insertion products (CH3-MX) and higher oxidation state methylidene complexes (CH2-MHX) (X = F, Cl, Br) following alpha-hydrogen migration. Unlike the cases of the group 4-6 metals, the calculated methylidene complex structures show little evidence for agostic distortion, consistent with the previously studied group 3 metal methylidene hydrides, and the C-M bond lengths of the insertion and methylidene complexes are comparable to each other. However, the C-Sc bond lengths are 0.013, 0.025, and 0.029 A shorter for the CH2-ScHX complexes, respectively, and the spin densities are consistent with weak C(2p)-Sc(3d) pi bonding. The present results reconfirm that the number of valence electrons on the metal is important for agostic interaction in simple methylidene complexes.

  5. Benchmark Calculations of Energetic Properties of Groups 4 and 6 Transition Metal Oxide Nanoclusters Including Comparison to Density Functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zongtang; Both, Johan; Li, Shenggang; Yue, Shuwen; Aprà, Edoardo; Keçeli, Murat; Wagner, Albert F.; Dixon, David A.

    2016-08-09

    The heats of formation and the normalized clustering energies (NCEs) for the group 4 and group 6 transition metal oxide (TMO) trimers and tetramers have been calculated by the Feller-Peterson-Dixon (FPD) method. The heats of formation predicted by the FPD method do not differ much from those previously derived from the NCEs at the CCSD(T)/aT level except for the CrO3 nanoclusters. New and improved heats of formation for Cr3O9 and Cr4O12 were obtained using PW91 orbitals instead of Hartree-Fock (HF) orbitals. Diffuse functions are necessary to predict accurate heats of formation. The fluoride affinities (FAs) are calculated with the CCSD(T) method. The relative energies (REs) of different isomers, NCEs, electron affinities (EAs), and FAs of (MO2)n ( M = Ti, Zr, Hf, n = 1 – 4 ) and (MO3)n ( M = Cr, Mo, W, n = 1 – 3) clusters have been benchmarked with 55 exchange-correlation DFT functionals including both pure and hybrid types. The absolute errors of the DFT results are mostly less than ±10 kcal/mol for the NCEs and the EAs, and less than ±15 kcal/mol for the FAs. Hybrid functionals usually perform better than the pure functionals for the REs and NCEs. The performance of the two types of functionals in predicting EAs and FAs is comparable. The B1B95 and PBE1PBE functionals provide reliable energetic properties for most isomers. Long range corrected pure functionals usually give poor FAs. The standard deviation of the absolute error is always close to the mean errors and the probability distributions of the DFT errors are often not Gaussian (normal). The breadth of the distribution of errors and the maximum probability are dependent on the energy property and the isomer.

  6. Bridging the gap between ionic liquids and molten salts: group 1 metal salts of the bistriflamide anion in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, João P; da Piedade, Manuel E Minas; Canongia Lopes, José N; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Esperança, José M S S; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N; Seddon, Kenneth R

    2009-03-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry experiments showed that liquid Group 1 metal salts of the bistriflamide anion undergoing reduced-pressure distillation exhibit a remarkable behavior that is in transition between that of the vapor-liquid equilibrium characteristics of aprotic ionic liquids and that of the Group 1 metal halides: the unperturbed vapors resemble those of aprotic ionic liquids, in the sense that they are essentially composed of discrete ion pairs. However, the formation of large aggregates through a succession of ion-molecule reactions is closer to what might be expected for Group 1 metal halides. Similar experiments were also carried out with bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}amine to investigate the effect of H(+), which despite being the smallest Group 1 cation, is generally regarded as a nonmetal species. In this case, instead of the complex ion-molecule reaction pattern found for the vapors of Group 1 metal salts, an equilibrium similar to those observed for aprotic ionic liquids was observed.

  7. New sugar-based gelators with an amino group, the gelatin ability of which is remarkably reinforced by the hydrogen bond and the metal coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amanokura, Natsuki; Kanekiyo, Yasumasa; Shinkai, Seiji; Reinhoudt, David

    1999-01-01

    Three sugar-integrated gelators bearing a p-aminophenyl group which are expected to exert a hydrogen-bonding effect and a metal coordination effect on the gelation ability were synthesised. -D-Galactose-based 2b was only soluble or precipitated and -D-glucose-based 4b gelated only two of 15 solvents

  8. Synthesis of group 10 metal complexes with a new unsymmetrical PN3P-pincer ligand through ligand post-modification: Structure and reactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiufang

    2017-01-01

    A post-modification strategy are used to synthesize a new class of diimine-amido PN3P-pincer group-10 transition metal complexes. The coordination chemistry and the thermal stabilities of their organometallic derivatives are characterized and investigated.

  9. Quantum Chemical Simulation of the Interaction of Functional Groups in Polyurethanes with 3 d-Metal Ions During Their Extraction from Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, M. A.; Bobkova, E. Yu.; Shundalau, M. B.; Ostrovskaya, L. E.; Vasil'eva, V. S.

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of the functional groups in the polyurethane foam adsorbent Penopurm® with the cations of some 3d-metals upon their extraction from aqueous solutions has been studied by atomic emission spectroscopy, UV/Vis and vibrational IR spectroscopy, and quantum chemical simulation using density functional theory. Penopurm® absorbs 3d-metal cations from aqueous solutions in the pH range 5-7. Some spectral criteria have been found indicating a predominant interaction of Ni2+ ions with various fragments of the polyurethane foam structure.

  10. Isospecific polymerization of 1-hexene by C1-symmetric half-metallocene dimethyl complexes of group 4 metals with bidentate N-substituted iminomethylpyrrolyl ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumoto, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Keishi; Tsurugi, Hayato; Mashima, Kazushi

    2013-07-07

    Non-bridged half-metallocene dimethyl complexes of group 4 metals 2a-4a with an N-4-methoxyphenyl(iminomethyl)pyrrolyl ligand 1a were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray analysis. Upon activation with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4], these complexes became active catalysts for the polymerization of 1-hexene. A series of hafnium complexes with various N-substituents on the imine group of ligands 1b-1g were also prepared and applied as catalysts for 1-hexene polymerization. The activation parameters for the exchange process between the two methyl groups bound to the metal for Cp*MMe2(R-pyr) complexes were estimated by NMR shape analysis at various temperatures. The findings indicated that the transition state of the ligand flipping process might be associated with the isoselectivity of the polymerization reaction.

  11. Cellulose bearing Schiff base and carboxylic acid chelating groups: a low cost and green adsorbent for heavy metal ion removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, R; Ravikumar, L

    2016-10-01

    Chemically modified cellulose bearing metal binding sites like Schiff base and carboxylic acid groups was synthesized and characterized through Fourier transform infrared and solid state 13 C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The chemically modified cellulose (Cell-PA) adsorbent was examined for its metal ion uptake ability for Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution. Kinetic and isotherm studies were carried out under optimum conditions. Pseudo-second-order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm fit well with the experimental data. Thermodynamic studies were also performed along with adsorption regeneration performance studies. The adsorbent (Cell-PA) shows high potential for the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II) metal ions, and it shows antibacterial activity towards selected microorganisms.

  12. Fully relativistic study of intermetallic dimers of group-1 elements K through element 119 and prediction of their adsorption on noble metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershina, V.; Borschevsky, A.; Anton, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The 4c-DFT calculations were performed for M 2 and MAu (M = K though element 119). Trends in atomic and molecular properties are shown to be reversed in group 1 beyond Cs due to relativity. The 8s(119) AO relativistic stabilization and contraction is the reason for the weakest M–Au bond and smallest adsorption enthalpy of element 119 on noble metals in group 1. Highlights: ► Fully relativistic 4c-DFT calculations were performed for M 2 and MAu (M = K though element 119). ► Trends in atomic and molecular properties are reversed in group 1 from Cs on due to relativity. ► The 8s(119) AO stabilization and contraction result in the weakest M–Au bond in group 1. ► The weakest adsorption of element 119 on noble metals is expected among all group-1 elements. - Abstract: Spectroscopic properties of group-1 M 2 and MAu (M = K, Rb, Cs, Fr, and element 119) were calculated using the 4c-DFT method. The results show that the relativistic contraction and stabilization of the ns(M) AO result in the inversion of trends both in atomic and molecular properties in group 1 beyond Cs. Electronegativity χ of the elements proves to decrease from Cs, the most electropositive element of all elements, to element 119, with its χ value approaching that of Na. Due to the largest relativistic effects on the 8s(119) AO in group 1, bonding in (119) 2 appears to be stronger than that of K 2 , while bonding in 119Au should be the weakest out of all group-1 MAu. Using calculated dissociation energies of M 2 , sublimation enthalpies, ΔH sub , of Fr of 77 kJ/mol and element 119 of 94 kJ/mol were estimated using a linear correlation between these quantities in the chemical group. Using the M–Au binding energies, the adsorption enthalpies, −ΔH ads , of 106 kJ/mol on gold, 76 kJ/mol on platinum, and 63 kJ/mol on silver were estimated for element 119 via a correlation with known ΔH ads in the chemical group. These moderate ΔH ads values are indicative of a

  13. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  14. Extractive properties towards rare-earth metal ions of calix[4]arenes substituted at the narrow rim by phosphoryl and amide groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaftian, M.R.; Burgard, M.; Wieser, C.; Dieleman, C.B.; Matt, D.

    1998-01-01

    The extractive properties of the cone and partial-cone isomers of 5,11,17,23-tetra-tert-butyl-25,27-bis(diethylcarbamoylmethoxy)-26,28-bis (diphenylphosphinoylmethoxy)calix[4]arene (cone-1 and partial-cone-1) in 1,2-dichloroethane towards rare-earth metal ions in nitrate media at 25 C were investigated. The analysis of the extraction equilibrium obtained from a mixture of four rare-earths (La, Eu, Er and Y) revealed that the extracted species have a 1:1 metal/ligand ratio for both ligands. The intra-group separation efficiencies of the ligands have been evaluated in a competitive extraction process of 11 rare-earth metal ions (La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb and Y). Significantly higher extractive properties were found for cone-1 with respect to partial-cone-1, suggesting the crucial role of the phosphoryl groups in the complexation of the rare-earth ions

  15. Synthesis of main group, rare-earth, and d{sup 0} metal complexes containing beta-hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Ka King [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A series of organometallic compounds containing the tris(dimethylsilyl)methyl ligand are described. The potassium carbanions KC(SiHMe2)3 and KC(SiHMe2})3TMEDA are synthesized by deprotonation of the hydrocarbon HC(SiHMe2)3 with potassium benzyl. KC(SiHMe2)3TMEDA crystallizes as a dimer with two types of three-center-two-electron KH- Si interactions. Homoleptic Ln(III) tris(silylalkyl) complexes containing β-SiH groups M{C(SiHMe2)3}3 (Ln = Y, Lu, La) are synthesized from salt elimination of the corresponding lanthanide halide and 3 equiv. of KC(SiHMe2)3. The related reactions with Sc yield bis(silylalkyl) ate-complexes containing either LiCl or KCl. The divalent calcium and ytterbium compounds M{C(SiHMe2)3}2L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF2 or TMEDA) are prepared from MI2 and 2 equiv of KC(SiHMe2)3. The compounds M{C(SiHMe2)3}2L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF2 or TMEDA) and La{C(SiHMe2)3}3 react with 1 equiv of B(C6F5)3 to give 1,3- disilacyclobutane {Me2Si-C(SiHMe2)2}2 and MC(SiHMe2)3HB(C6F5)3L, and La{C(SiHMe2)3}2HB(C6F5)3, respectively. The corresponding reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe2)3}3 (Ln = Y, Lu) give the β-SiH abstraction product [{(Me2HSi)3C}2LnC(SiHMe2)2SiMe2][HB(C6F5)3] (Ln = Y, Lu), but the silene remains associated with the Y or Lu center. The abstraction reactions of M{C(SiHMe2)3}2L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF2or TMEDA) and Ln{C(SiHMe2)3}3 (Ln = Y, Lu, La) and 2 equiv of B(C6

  16. Synthesis and characterization of near-IR absorbing metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanines modified with aromatic azo groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes Özçeşmeci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanine complexes bearing peripheral (E-4-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yldiazenyl units have been synthesized. Novel phthalonitrile derivative required for the preparation of phthalocyanine complexes was prepared by coupling 4-aminophthalonitrile and 2-naphthol. The structures of these new compounds were characterized by using elemental analyses, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In the UV-Vis spectra a broad absorption band appears for phthalocyanine complexes at around 450–500 nm resulting from azo-group introduced onto the phthalocyanine ring. The photophysical properties of metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanines were studied in tetrahydrofuran.

  17. Selective sulfur dioxide adsorbents prepared from designed dispersions of groups IA and IIA metal oxides on alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, S.N.R.; White, M.G. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Waddell, E. [Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-15

    Supported M(I)/alumina and M(II)/alumina adsorbents were prepared using M{sup n+}(acac){sub n} as the precursor. These materials may be decomposed by careful heating to create dispersions of M{sup n+}O{sub n/2}/alumina which are SO{sub 2} adsorbents. These adsorbents have been characterized by elemental analyses, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform analysis spectroscopy, SO{sub 2} adsorption capacity, and powder X-ray diffraction. The MgO/alumina prepared from Mg(acac){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O shows high dispersion of Mg species which are stable against sintering even when calcined to 500{degrees}C. The incremental SO{sub 2} sorption capacity of this material shows nearly 1 mol SO{sub 2}/mol Mg{sup 2+} in the sample. The sample prepared from Li(acac) shows more SO{sub 2} adsorption than the MgO/alumina for loadings <150 {mu}mol/g alumina. However, the LiO/alumina samples show low incremental adsorption of SO{sub 2} per mol of Li ion (0.12 mol/mol) at metal loadings greater than 150 {mu}mol/g alumina. These results are discussed in the framework of ensemble theory in the light of the solution chemistry of the metal acetylacetonates. 30 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Levels of Platinum Group Metals in Selected Species (Sarotherodon melanotheron, Chonophorus lateristriga, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii and Crassostrea tulipa in Some Estuaries and Lagoons Along the Coast of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Essumang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of some biota as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution has been demonstrated as particularly adequate due to their capacity of bioconcentration. This study evaluated the levels of platinum group metals (PGMs in some selected species along the coastal belt of Ghana, using the neutron activation analysis (NAA method. The result was processed to evaluate pollution indices in order to map the distribution of the metals in those species in the lagoons and estuaries along the costal belt of Ghana. The analysis showed significant levels of all PGMs in blackchin tilapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron Cichlidae, brown goby (Chonophorus lateristriga Gobiidae, shrimp (Macrobrachium vollenhovenii Palaemonidae, and mangrove oysters (Crassostrea tulipa Ostreidae in the lagoons and river Pra estuary. However, the oysters showed an elevated mean concentration of 0.13 μ/g (dry weight Pd. From the pollution indices, most of the sampling sites registered mean contamination factor (CF values between 1.20 and 3.00 for Pt, Pd, and Rh. The pollution load index (PLI conducted also gave an average pollution index between 0.79 and 2.37, indicating progressive contamination levels. The results revealed that anthropogenic sources, industrial and hospital effluent, etc., together with vehicular emissions, could be the contributing factors to the deposition of PGMs along the Ghanaian coast.

  19. Valence-Band Electronic Structures of High-Pressure-Phase PdF2-type Platinum-Group Metal Dioxides MO2 (M = Ru, Rh, Ir, and Pt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Daichi; Mizui, Tatsuya; Kato, Masahiko; Shirako, Yuichi; Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi; Akaogi, Masaki; Kojitani, Hiroshi; Ikenaga, Eiji; Muro, Takayuki

    2018-04-01

    The valence-band electronic structures of high-pressure-phase PdF2-type (HP-PdF2-type) platinum-group metal dioxides MO2 (M = Ru, Rh, Ir, and Pt) were studied by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. The obtained photoelectron spectra for HP-PdF2-type RuO2, RhO2, and IrO2 agree well with the calculated valence-band densities of states (DOSs) for these compounds, indicating their metallic properties, whereas the DOS of HP-PdF2-type PtO2 (calculated in the presence and absence of spin-orbit interactions) predicts that this material may be metallic or semimetallic, which is inconsistent with the electric conductivity reported to date and the charging effect observed in current photoelectron measurements. Compared with the calculated results, the valence-band spectrum of PtO2 appears to have shifted toward the high-binding-energy side and reveals a gradual intensity decrease toward the Fermi energy EF, implying a semiconductor-like electronic structure. Spin-dependent calculations predict a ferromagnetic ground state with a magnetization of 0.475 μB per formula unit for HP-PdF2-type RhO2.

  20. Progress in liquid metal fast reactor technology. Proceedings of the 28th meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The key objectives and activities of Member State liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) programmes are: Demonstration of effective designs; demonstration of system safety; demonstration of economic competitiveness with other power generation systems. The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) at its 1995 meeting observed that while some countries (as a result of static or falling power demand) are reducing the research and development programmes or delaying the commercial deployment of fast reactors, other countries are planning to introduce these reactors and are embarking on their own development programmes. In these circumstances the international exchange of information and experience is of increasing importance. These proceedings contain updated information from long standing members of the IWGFR and new information on the status of LMFR research and development from new members of the Group: Brazil, China, Republic of Kazakhstan and the Republic of Korea. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Dynamical Mean-Field Theory Plus Numerical Renormalization-Group Study of Spin-Orbital Separation in a Three-Band Hund Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, K M; Yin, Z P; von Delft, J; Kotliar, G; Weichselbaum, A

    2015-09-25

    We show that the numerical renormalization group is a viable multi-band impurity solver for dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), offering unprecedented real-frequency spectral resolution at arbitrarily low energies and temperatures. We use it to obtain a numerically exact DMFT solution to the Hund metal problem for a three-band model on a Bethe lattice at 1/3 filling. The ground state is a Fermi liquid. The one-particle spectral function undergoes a coherence-incoherence crossover with increasing temperature, with spectral weight being transferred from low to high energies. Further, it exhibits a strong particle-hole asymmetry. In the incoherent regime, the self-energy displays approximate power-law behavior for positive frequencies only. The spin and orbital spectral functions show "spin-orbital separation": spin screening occurs at much lower energies than orbital screening. The renormalization group flows clearly reveal the relevant physics at all energy scales.

  2. Preparation of magnetic metal organic frameworks adsorbent modified with mercapto groups for the extraction and analysis of lead in food samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Huanhuan; Tang, Jie; Ye, Guiqin; Ge, Huali; Hu, Xiaoya

    2015-08-15

    A novel magnetic metal organic frameworks adsorbent modified with mercapto groups was synthesized and developed for extraction and spectrophotometric determination of trace lead. The adsorbent was characterized by Fourier transforms infrared spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results indicated the adsorbents exhibited high adsorption capacities for lead due to the chelation mechanism between metal cations and mercapto groups. Meanwhile, the lead sorption onto the adsorbents could be easily separated from aqueous solution using a magnetic separation method. Under the optimal conditions, a linear calibration curve in the range from 1 to 20 μg L(-1) was achieved with an enrichment factor of 100. The limits of detection and quantitation for lead were found to be 0.29 and 0.97 μg L(-1), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of lead in food samples and certified reference material with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparative study of the reactivity of Zr(IV), Hf(IV) and Th(IV) metallocene complexes: Thorium is not a Group IV metal after all

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantunen, Kimberly C.; Scott, Brian L.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2007-01-01

    Thorium(IV) is often considered to show similar chemistry to Group IV transition metals. However, studies in our laboratory have shown that this generalization is incorrect. This report presents direct comparisons where the Th(IV) metallocene complexes (C 5 Me 5 ) 2 ThR 2 (R = CH 3 , Ph, CH 2 Ph) undergo unique chemical reactivity with pyridine, 2-picoline, pyridine N-oxide, 2-picoline N-oxide, and benzonitrile, while the Group IV metal analogues (C 5 R 5 ) 2 M(CH 3 ) 2 (R = H, CH 3 ; M = Zr, Hf) do not. We also report revised high-yield syntheses for the zirconium and hafnium starting materials, (C 5 H 5 ) 2 MR 2 (M = Zr, Hf; R = CH 3 , Ph, CH 2 Ph), using Grignard reagents for alkylation in addition to the X-ray crystal structures of (C 5 H 5 ) 2 Hf(Ph) 2 and (C 5 H 5 ) 2 Hf(CH 2 Ph) 2

  4. A comparative study of the reactivity of Zr(IV), Hf(IV) and Th(IV) metallocene complexes: Thorium is not a Group IV metal after all

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantunen, Kimberly C.; Scott, Brian L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kiplinger, Jaqueline L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: kiplinger@lanl.gov

    2007-10-11

    Thorium(IV) is often considered to show similar chemistry to Group IV transition metals. However, studies in our laboratory have shown that this generalization is incorrect. This report presents direct comparisons where the Th(IV) metallocene complexes (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}ThR{sub 2} (R = CH{sub 3}, Ph, CH{sub 2}Ph) undergo unique chemical reactivity with pyridine, 2-picoline, pyridine N-oxide, 2-picoline N-oxide, and benzonitrile, while the Group IV metal analogues (C{sub 5}R{sub 5}){sub 2}M(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} (R = H, CH{sub 3}; M = Zr, Hf) do not. We also report revised high-yield syntheses for the zirconium and hafnium starting materials, (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}MR{sub 2} (M = Zr, Hf; R = CH{sub 3}, Ph, CH{sub 2}Ph), using Grignard reagents for alkylation in addition to the X-ray crystal structures of (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}Hf(Ph){sub 2} and (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}Hf(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 2}.

  5. Comparative analysis of two members of the metal ion-containing group III-alcohol dehydrogenases from Dickeya zeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuche, Skander; Klippel, Barbara; von der Heyde, Amélie; Antranikian, Garabed

    2013-05-01

    A pair of NAD(+)- and NADP(+)-dependent group III-alcohol dehydrogenases was characterized from the enterobacterium, Dickeya zeae, to expand our understanding of the distribution and biochemical properties of this interesting group of enzymes. Two putative group III-alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) were identified in the genome of Dickeya zeae. Amino acid alignments and phylogenetic analysis revealed that Adh3.1 and Adh3.2 are only distantly related (~25 % identity at the protein level). Both proteins were purified to homogeneity after heterologous expression in E. coli. A specific activity of 1.8 U/mg was measured for the NAD(+)-dependent enzyme Adh3.1 with ethanol used as substrate, while NADPH-dependent Adh3.2 preferred butanal (29.1 U/mg) as substrate. Maximum activity for Adh3.1 was at 50 °C and pH 10 and for Adh3.2 at 70 °C and pH 6. Cell viability assays were used to confirm activity towards butanal and glyoxals. Biochemical characterization and phylogenetic analyses led to the hypothesis that Adh3.1 and Adh3.2 are probably the result of an ancient gene duplication event followed by functional diversification.

  6. Low temperature hydrogenolysis of waxes to diesel range gasoline and light alkanes: Comparison of catalytic properties of group 4, 5 and 6 metal hydrides supported on silica-alumina

    KAUST Repository

    Norsic, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    A series of metal hydrides (M = Zr, Hf, Ta, W) supported on silica-alumina were studied for the first time in hydrogenolysis of light alkanes in a continuous flow reactor. It was found that there is a difference in the reaction mechanism between d 0 metal hydrides of group 4 and d 0 ↔ d 2 metal hydrides of group 5 and group 6. Furthermore, the potential application of these catalysts has been demonstrated by the transformation of Fischer-Tropsch wax in a reactive distillation set-up into typical gasoline and diesel molecules in high selectivity (up to 86 wt%). Current results show that the group 4 metal hydrides have a promising yield toward liquid fuels.

  7. Metal-organic coordination architectures of tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups: Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo-Wen; Zheng, Xiang-Yu; Ding, Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Two new coordination complexes with tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups, [Co(L)2]n (1) and [Co3(L)4(N3)2·2MeOH]n (2) (L=tetrazole-1-acetate) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single crystal structure analysis shows that the cobalt-complex 1 has the 3D 3,6-connected (42.6)2(44.62.88.10)-ant topology. By introducing azide in this system, complex 2 forms the 2D network containing the [Co3] units. And the magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied.

  8. Development of deuterium labeling method based on the heterogeneous platinum group metal-catalyzed C-H activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajiki, Hironao

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium (D) labeled compounds are utilized in various scientific fields such as mechanistic elucidation of reactions, preparation of new functional materials, tracers for microanalysis, deuterium labeled heavy drugs and so on. Although the H-D exchange reaction is a straightforward method to produce deuterated organic compounds, many precedent methods require expensive deuterium gas and/or harsh reaction conditions. A part of our leading research agendas is intended to the development of novel and functional heterogeneous platinum-group catalysts and the reclamation of unknown functionalities of existing heterogeneous platinum-group catalysts. During the course of the study, benzylic positions of substrates were site-selectively deuterated under mild and palladium-on-carbon (Pd/C)-catalyzed hydrogenation conditions in heavy water (D2O). Heat conditions promoted the H-D exchange reactivity and facilitated the H-D exchange reaction at not only the benzylic sites but also inactive C-H bonds and heterocyclic nuclei. It is noteworthy that platinum-on-carbon (Pt/C) indicated a quite high affinity toward aromatic nuclei, and the H-D exchange reaction was strongly enhanced by the use of Pt/C as a catalyst under milder conditions. The mixed use of Pd/C and Pt/C was found to be more efficient in the H-D exchange reaction compared to the independent use of Pd/C or Pt/C. Furthermore, simple alkanes could also be efficiently deuterated under rhodium-on-carbon (Rh/C)-catalyzed conditions. The use of ruthenium-on-carbon (Ru/C) enabled the regiospecific and efficient deuterium incorporation at α-positions of alcohols and results were applied as a regio- and stereoselective multi-deuteration method of sugar derivatives.

  9. Group 11 Metal Compounds with Tripodal Bis(imidazole Thioether Ligands. Applications as Catalysts in the Oxidation of Alkenes and as Antimicrobial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Varela-Ramírez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available New group 11 metal complexes have been prepared using the previously described tripodal bis(imidazole thioether ligand (N-methyl-4,5-diphenyl-2-imidazolyl2C(OMeC(CH32S(tert-Bu ({BITOMe,StBu}, 2. The pincer ligand offers a N2S donor atom set that can be used to coordinate the group 11 metals in different oxidation states [AuI, AuIII, AgI, CuI and CuII]. Thus the new compounds [Au{BITOMe,StBu}Cl][AuCl4]2 (3, [Au{BITOMe,StBu}Cl] (4, [Ag{BITOMe,StBu}X] (X = OSO2CF3- 5, PF6- 6 and [Cu{BITOMe,StBu}Cl2] (7 have been synthesized from reaction of 2 with the appropriate metal precursors, and characterized in solution. While attempting characterization in the solid state of 3, single crystals of the neutral dinuclear mixed AuIII-AuI species [Au2{BITOMe,S}Cl3] (8 were obtained and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The structure shows a AuIII center coordinated to the pincer ligand through one N and the S atom. The soft AuI center coordinates to the ligand through the same S atom that has lost the tert-butyl group, thus becoming a thiolate ligand. The short distance between the AuI-AuIII atoms (3.383 Å may indicate a weak metal-metal interaction. Complexes 2-7 and the previously described CuI compound [Cu{BITOMe,StBu}]PF6 (9 have been evaluated in the oxidation of biphenyl ethylene with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (TBHP as the oxidant. Results have shown that the AuI and AgI complexes 4 and 6 (at 10 mol % loading are the more active catalysts in this oxidative cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of compounds 2-5, 7 and 9 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeast has also been evaluated. The new gold and silver compounds display moderate to high antibacterial activity, while the copper derivatives are mostly inactive. The gold and silver complexes were also potent against fungi. Their cytotoxic properties have been analyzed in vitro utilizing HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells. The compounds displayed a

  10. Homogeneous catalytic dehydrocoupling/dehydrogenation of amine-borane adducts by early transition metal, group 4 metallocene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Matthew E; Staubitz, Anne; Clark, Timothy J; Russell, Christopher A; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; Manners, Ian

    2010-03-24

    The efficient catalytic dehydrocoupling of a range of amine-borane adducts, R'RNH x BH(3) (R' = R = Me 1a; R' = R = (i)Pr 1b; R' = Me, R = CH(2)Ph 1c) by a series of group 4 metallocene type precatalysts has been demonstrated. A reduction in catalytic activity was detected upon descending the group and also on substitution of the cyclopentadienyl (Cp) ligands with sterically bulky or electron-donating substituents. Precatalysts Cp(2)TiCl(2)/2(n)BuLi and Cp(2)Ti(PMe(3))(2), which are believed to act as precursors to [Cp(2)Ti], were found to promote the transformation of 1a to [Me(2)N-BH(2)](2) (3a) in a homogeneous catalytic process. Mechanistic studies identified the linear dimer Me(2)NH-BH(2)-NMe(2)-BH(3) (2a) as a reaction intermediate, which subsequently undergoes further catalytic dehydrogenation to form cyclic dimer 3a. Synthesis of the (2)H-isotopologues of 1a allowed the extraction of phenomenological kinetic isotope effects for 1a --> 2a and 2a --> 3a from initial rate data, which permitted the proposal of a catalytic cycle with plausible intermediates. Support for the presence of an active Ti(II) catalyst was provided by the lack of reactivity of Ti(III) complexes TiCl(3) and Cp(2)TiCl or Ti(0) in the form of THF soluble colloids or bulk Ti powder toward 1a or 1b. Modeling of the rates of consumption of 1a and formation of 3a during catalysis by Cp(2)Ti(PMe(3))(2) supported this conclusion and allowed the proposal of a two cycle, four step reaction mechanism. The proposed first cycle generates 2a in a two step process. In the second cycle, interaction of 2a with the same catalyst then results in a catalytic dehydrogenative ring closing reaction to form 3a, also in a two step process.

  11. Enhanced Retention of Chelating Reagents in Octadecylsilyl Silica Phase by Interaction with Residual Silanol Groups in Solid Phase Extraction of Divalent Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmuro, Satoshi; Fujii, Kan; Yasui, Takashi; Takada, Kazutake; Yuchi, Akio; Kokusen, Hisao

    2016-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) of divalent metal ions with a lipophilic and potentially divalent hexadentate chelating reagent (H2L), with which octadecylsilyl silica (ODS), was impregnated with was studied to gain more insight into and develop the potential of this methodology. This is the first time to demonstrate that this reagent as well as other common nitrogen-containing reagents were retained both by adsorption due to hydrogen bonding between nitrogen atoms of the reagent and residual silanol groups in the ODS phase and by simple distribution into the hydrophobic space. An appreciably large amount of this reagent could be retained by the adsorption mechanism even with a relatively thin loading solution. The divalent metal ions of Mn(2+), Co(2+) and Zn(2+) were extracted as 1:1 neutral complexes ([ML]), while Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) as ion-pairs of 1:1 cationic complex ([MHL](+)) with anion in SPE with H2L. The extractability and selectivity were substantially the same as that in liquid-liquid extraction.

  12. Hydroxypyridinonate complex stability of group (IV) metals and tetravalent f-block elements: the key to the next generation of chelating agents for radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Choi, Taylor A; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2015-04-06

    The solution thermodynamics of the water-soluble complexes formed between 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and Zr(IV) or Pu(IV) were investigated to establish the metal coordination properties of this octadentate chelating agent. Stability constants log β110 = 43.1 ± 0.6 and 43.5 ± 0.7 were determined for [Zr(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))] and [Pu(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))], respectively, by spectrophotometric competition titrations against Ce(IV). Such high thermodynamic stabilities not only confirm the unparalleled Pu(IV) affinity of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) as a decorporation agent but also corroborate the great potential of hydroxypyridinonate ligands as new (89)Zr-chelating platforms for immuno-PET applications. These experimental values are in excellent agreement with previous estimates and are discussed with respect to ionic radius and electronic configuration, in comparison with those of Ce(IV) and Th(IV). Furthermore, a liquid chromatography assay combined with mass spectrometric detection was developed to probe the separation of the neutral [M(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))] complex species (M = Zr, Ce, Th, and Pu), providing additional insight into the coordination differences between group IV and tetravalent f-block metals and on the role of d and f orbitals in bonding interactions.

  13. Karel IV. a dvojí Te Deum aneb Jak to bylo tehdy a jak dnes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maňour, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2016) ISSN 2533-6940 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : Czech medieval music * Charles IV * society Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://blog.ceskafilharmonie.cz/karel-iv-a-dvoji-te-deum-aneb-jak-to-bylo-tehdy-a-jak-dnes/

  14. Development of LMR basic design technology - Development of 3-D multi-group nodal kinetics code for liquid metal reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    A development project of 3-dimensional kinetics code for ALMR has three level of works. In the first level, a multi-group, nodal kinetics code for the HEX-Z geometry has been developed. A code showed very good results for the static analysis as well as for the kinetics problems. At the second level, a core thermal-hydraulic analysis code was developed for the temperature feedback calculation in ALMR transients analysis. This code is coupled with kinetics code. A sodium property table was programmed and tested to the KAERI data and thermal feedback model was developed and coupled in code. Benchmarking of T/H calculation has been performed and showed fairly good results. At the third level of research work, reactivity feedback model for structure thermal expansion is developed and added to the code. At present, basic model was studied. However, code development in now on going. Benchmarking of this model developed can not be done because of lack of data. 31 refs., 17 tabs., 38 figs. (author)

  15. Development of LMR basic design technology - Development of 3-D. multi-group nodal kinetics code for liquid metal reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    A development project of 3-dimensional kinetics code for ALMR has four level of works. In the first level, a multi-group, nodal kinetics code for the HEX-Z geometry has been developed. At this point code showed very good results for the static analysis. However, kinetics routine has not been benchmarked because exact benchmark problem was not found. For the artificial benchmark problem, code showed satisfying results. At the second level, a core thermal-hydraulic analysis code was developed for the temperature feedback calculation ALMR transients analysis. A sodium property table was programmed and tested to the KAERI data. Benchmarking of T/H calculation has been performed and showed fairly good results. At the third level of research work, combining of two code should be done. A reactivity feedback model for structure thermal expansion is also developed at this stage. The third and fourth level is planned to be done next year. At this point, work progress is kept right on time. 24 refs., 12 tabs., 15 figs. (author)

  16. Screening the best catalyst with group 9, 10 and 11 metals monolayer loading on NbC(001) from first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Dongxiao; Zhang, Xilin; Zhang, Yanxing; Yang, Zongxian

    2018-02-01

    The supported catalysts have received great attentions due to their high catalytic activity, low cost and good stability. Here we report the stability, wetting ability, corrosion resistance and catalytic activity of the supported catalysts with group 9, 10 and 11 metals (M = Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au) monolayers (ML) deposited on NbC(001), denoted as MML/NbC(001). The PdML/NbC(001) and PtML/NbC(001) are testified as the most stable and active ones with the former even better on the whole. The catalytic activities toward oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) are clarified by the dissociation and the change in Gibbs free energies for the elementary reaction steps of O2 on PdML/NbC(001).

  17. The Kubo-Greenwood spin-dependent electrical conductivity of 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides and group-IV materials: A Green's function study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Bui Dinh; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2018-04-01

    The spin-dependent electrical conductivity of counterparts of graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and group-IV nanosheets, have investigated by a magnetic exchange field (MEF)-induction to gain the electronic transport properties of charge carriers. We have implemented a k.p Hamiltonian model through the Kubo-Greenwood formalism in order to address the dynamical behavior of correlated Dirac fermions. Tuning the MEF enables one to control the effective mass of carriers in group-IV and TMDs, differently. We have found the Dirac-like points in a new quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state at strong MEFs for both structures. For both cases, a broad peak in electrical conductivity originated from the scattering rate and entropy is observed. Spin degeneracy at some critical MEFs is another remarkable point. We have found that in the limit of zero or uniform MEFs with respect to the spin-orbit interaction, the large resulting electrical conductivity depends on the spin sub-bands in group-IV and MLDs. Featuring spin-dependent electronic transport properties, one can provide a new scenario for future possible applications.

  18. Formation of a metal-to-nitrogen bond of normal length by a neutral sufonamide group within a tridentate ligand. A new approach to radiopharmaceutical bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Theshini; Abhayawardhana, Pramuditha; Marzilli, Patricia A; Fronczek, Frank R; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2013-03-04

    We demonstrate that a tertiary sulfonamide group, N(SO2R)R'2, can rehybridize to form a M-N bond of normal length even when the group is in a linear tridentate ligand, such as in the new tridentate N(SO2R)dpa ligands derived from di-(2-picolyl)amine (N(H)dpa). N(SO2R)dpa ligands were used to prepare fac-[Re(CO)3(N(SO2R)dpa)](PF6 or BF4) complexes. Structural characterization of the new complexes established that the tertiary sulfonamide nitrogen atom binds to Re with concomitant sp(2)-to-sp(3) rehybridization, facilitating facial coordination. The new fac-[Re(CO)3(N(SO2R)dpa)]X structures provide the only examples for any metal with the sulfonamide as part of a noncyclic linear tridentate ligand and with a normal metal-to-nitrogen(tertiary sulfonamide) bond length. Rare previous examples of such normal M-N bonds have been found only in more constrained situations, such as with tripodal tetradentate ligands. Our long-term objectives for the new tridentate N(SO2R)dpa ligands are to develop the fundamental chemistry relevant to the eventual use of the fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) core (M = (99m)Tc, (186/188)Re) in imaging and therapy. The sulfonamide group uniquely contributes to two of our goals: expanding ways to conjugate the fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) core to biological molecules and also developing new symmetrical tridentate ligands that can coordinate facially to this core. Tests of our conjugation method, conducted by linking the fac-[Re(I)(CO)3](+) core to a new tetraarylporphyrin (T(N(SO2C6H4)dpa)P) as well as to a dansyl (5-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonyl) group, demonstrate that large molecular fragments can be tethered via a coordinated tertiary sulfonamide linkage to this core.

  19. Diamidophosphines with six-membered chelates and their coordination chemistry with group 4 metals: development of a trimethylene-methane-tethered [PN2]-type "molecular claw".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batke, S; Kothe, T; Haas, M; Wadepohl, H; Ballmann, J

    2016-02-28

    The coordination chemistry of the phosphine-tethered diamidophosphine ligands PhP(CH2CH2CH2NHPh)2 (pr[NPN]H2) and PhP(1,2-CH2-C6H4-NHSiMe3)2 (bn[NPN]H2) featuring six-membered N–C3–P chelates was explored with group 4 metals, which allowed for the consecutive development of a new trimethylene-methane-tethered [PN2] scaffold. In the case of the propylene-linked system pr[NPN]H2, access to the sparingly soluble dibenzyl derivative pr[NPN]ZrBn2 (3-Zr) was gained, while thermally sensitive zirconium and hafnium diiodo complexes bn[NPN]MI2 (5-M, M = Zr, Hf) were isolated in the case of the benzylene-linked derivative bn[NPN]H2. Despite the related phosphine-tethered backbone architectures of both of these ligands, their group 4 complexes were found to exhibit either C1-symmetric (bn[NPN]MX2) or averaged CS-symmetric (pr[NPN]MX2) structures in solution. To restrain the overall flexibility of these systems and thereby control the properties of the resulting complexes without disrupting the six-membered chelates, the new trimethylene-methane-tethered N,N′-di-(tert-butyl)-substituted [PN2]H2 protioligand was designed. This tripodal ligand system was prepared on a gram scale and its CS-symmetric dichloro complexes [PN2]MCl2 (6-M, M = Ti, Zr, Hf) were isolated subsequently. The benzene-soluble dibenzyl derivative [PN2]ZrBn2 (7-Zr) was synthesised as well and characterised by X-ray diffraction. These results are discussed not only in conjunction with the known [NPN]-coordinated group 4 complexes incorporating five-membered chelates, but also in the context of “molecular claws” that are related to the new [PN2] tripod.

  20. Metal interactions with boron clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the structural and bonding features of metallaboranes and metallacarboranes; transition-metal derivatives of nido-boranes and some related species; interactions of metal groups with the octahydrotriborate (1-) anion, B 3 H 8 ; metallaboron cage compounds of the main group metals; closo-carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron omega-bonds; electrochemistry of metallaboron cage compounds; and boron clusters with transition metal-hydrogen bonds

  1. Assessing the potential of group 13 and 14 metal/metalloid phthalocyanines as hole transport layers in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plint, Trevor; Lessard, Benoît H. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E5 (Canada); Bender, Timothy P. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E5 (Canada); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    In this study, we have assessed the potential application of group 13 and 14 metal and metalloid phthalocyanines ((X){sub n}-MPcs) and their axially substituted derivatives as hole-transporting layers in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). OLEDs studied herein have the generic structure of glass/ITO/(N,N′-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N′-diphenyl-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine (NPB) or (X){sub n}-MPc)(50 nm)/Alq{sub 3} (60 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (80 nm), where X is an axial substituent group. OLEDs using chloro aluminum phthalocyanine (Cl-AlPc) showed good peak luminance values of 2620 ± 113 cd/m{sup 2} at 11 V. To our knowledge, Cl-AlPc has not previously been shown to work as a hole transport material (HTL) in OLEDs. Conversely, the di-chlorides of silicon, germanium, and tin phthalocyanine (Cl{sub 2}-SiPc, Cl{sub 2}-GePc, and Cl{sub 2}-SnPc, respectively) showed poor performance compared to Cl-AlPc, having peak luminances of only 38 ± 4 cd/m{sup 2} (12 V), 23 ± 1 cd/m{sup 2} (8.5 V), and 59 ± 5 cd/m{sup 2} (13.5 V), respectively. However, by performing a simple axial substitution of the chloride groups of Cl{sub 2}-SiPc with pentafluorophenoxy groups, the resulting bis(pentafluorophenoxy) silicon phthalocyanine (F{sub 10}-SiPc) containing OLED had a peak luminance of 5141 ± 941 cd/m{sup 2} (10 V), a two order of magnitude increase over its chlorinated precursor. This material showed OLED characteristics approaching those of a baseline OLED based on the well-studied triarylamine NPB. Attempts to attach the pentafluorophenoxy axial group to both SnPc and GePc were hindered by synthetic difficulties and low thermal stability, respectively. In light of the performance improvements observed by simple axial substitution of SiPc in OLEDs, the use of axially substituted MPcs in organic electronic devices remains of continuing interest to us and potentially the field in general.

  2. Metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    From the viewpoint of general crystal chemistry principles and on the base of modern data the structural chemistry of metal carbides is presented. The classification deviding metal carbides into 4 groups depending on chemical and physical properties is presented. The features of the crystal structure of carbides of alkali alkaline earth, transition, 4 f- and 5f-elements and their effect on physical and chemical properties are considered

  3. Power generation in microbial fuel cells using platinum group metal-free cathode catalyst: Effect of the catalyst loading on performance and costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Kodali, Mounika; Herrera, Sergio; Serov, Alexey; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Atanassov, Plamen

    2018-02-01

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst with different loadings was investigated in air breathing electrodes microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Firstly, the electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the catalyst was investigated by rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) setup with different catalyst loadings. The results showed that higher loading led to an increased in the half wave potential and the limiting current and to a further decrease in the peroxide production. The electrons transferred also slightly increased with the catalyst loading up to the value of ≈3.75. This variation probably indicates that the catalyst investigated follow a 2x2e- transfer mechanism. The catalyst was integrated within activated carbon pellet-like air-breathing cathode in eight different loadings varying between 0.1 mgcm-2 and 10 mgcm-2. Performance were enhanced gradually with the increase in catalyst content. Power densities varied between 90 ± 9 μWcm-2 and 262 ± 4 μWcm-2 with catalyst loading of 0.1 mgcm-2 and 10 mgcm-2 respectively. Cost assessments related to the catalyst performance are presented. An increase in catalyst utilization led to an increase in power generated with a substantial increase in the whole costs. Also a decrease in performance due to cathode/catalyst deterioration over time led to a further increase in the costs.

  4. Catalysis design for ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters: 1. Group 1 metal and thallium(I) trispyrazolylborate complexes with hemilabile ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Malcolm H; Gallucci, Judith C; Yaman, Gülsah

    2007-10-15

    The synthesis of 3-(2-methoxy-1,1-dimethylethyl)pyrazole, pz*H is described together with its reactions with the borohydrides MBH(4), where M = Li, Na, and K, under melt conditions. At 180 degrees C, this procedure leads to a mixture of products for M = Li, and at higher temperatures, a derivative LiTp'pz*H, 1, is isolated, wherein a B-H bond and a methyl group have been eliminated and a B-O bond has been formed. For M = Na, the reaction proceeds to give the tris-pyrazolylborate derivative NaTp*, 2, but at higher temperatures the tetra-pyrazolylborate complex NaB(pz*)(4), 3, is obtained. The reactions involving KBH4 and pz*H yield the dinuclear complex K(2)(Tp*)(2)pz*H, 4. The reaction between NaTp* and TlOAc in CH(2)Cl(2) at room temperature leads to the formation of TlTp*, 5, along with NaOAc. Thallium 5 reacts with methyllithium in diethylether to give LiTp*, 6, and thallium metal, and, similarly, 5 and KH react in tetrahydrofuran to give KTp*, 7 and Tl(0). 1-7 have been characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, and by single-crystal X-ray studies, the latter of which reveal the versatile modes of binding for this new ligand bearing hemilabile ether appendages.

  5. Power generation in microbial fuel cells using platinum group metal-free cathode catalyst: Effect of the catalyst loading on performance and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Kodali, Mounika; Herrera, Sergio; Serov, Alexey; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Atanassov, Plamen

    2018-02-28

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst with different loadings was investigated in air breathing electrodes microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Firstly, the electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the catalyst was investigated by rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) setup with different catalyst loadings. The results showed that higher loading led to an increased in the half wave potential and the limiting current and to a further decrease in the peroxide production. The electrons transferred also slightly increased with the catalyst loading up to the value of ≈3.75. This variation probably indicates that the catalyst investigated follow a 2x2e - transfer mechanism. The catalyst was integrated within activated carbon pellet-like air-breathing cathode in eight different loadings varying between 0.1 mgcm -2 and 10 mgcm -2 . Performance were enhanced gradually with the increase in catalyst content. Power densities varied between 90 ± 9 μWcm -2 and 262 ± 4 μWcm -2 with catalyst loading of 0.1 mgcm -2 and 10 mgcm -2 respectively. Cost assessments related to the catalyst performance are presented. An increase in catalyst utilization led to an increase in power generated with a substantial increase in the whole costs. Also a decrease in performance due to cathode/catalyst deterioration over time led to a further increase in the costs.

  6. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  7. Prevalence of contact allergy in the general population: Sensitization to metals with a focus on nickel sulfate, the EDEN Fragrance Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttelaar, M.-L.; Ofenloch, R.; Bruze, M.; Cazzaniga, S.; Elsner, P.; Gonçalo, M.; Naldi, L.; Svensson, Å.; Diepgen, T.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitization to metals is assessed mostly in clinical populations. Studies in the general population are scarce. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of metal sensitization in the general population and to determine risk factors for nickel sensitization. In five European countries (the

  8. Versatile cooperative ligand effects in group 9 transition metal catalysis: Applications in transfer hydrogenation & hydrogen autotransfer reactions, ketene & ketene imine synthesis and hydroformylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative ligand effects of transition metal complexes have a profound impact on the reaction outcome of catalytic reactions, and development of (new) cooperative metal-ligand systems is a hot topic in current catalysis research. Conventional ligands with hydride-accepting/delivering activities

  9. Hydrophosphorylation of 1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-one and 1-methyl-3-phenyl-2-propen-1-one in the coordination sphere of carbonyl complexes of group 6B metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramshin, A.I.; Karpenko, E.A.; Cherkasov, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Methods of synthesis of η 2 - and η 4 - complexes of chalcone and benzalacetone with hexacarbonyl mononuclear complexes of group 6B metals (M Cr, Mo, W) were developed and conditions of selective η 2 - or η 4 - coordination of π-heterodiene ligand were ascertained. By the method of IR and NMR spectroscopy it was shown that hydrophosphorylation of the complexes prepared occurs in the metal coordination sphere by the Abramov reaction scheme resulting in the relevant η 2 -coordinated α-hydroxyphosphonates. According to data of quantum-chemical calculations heterodienes lose planarity as a result of π-coordination with metal, which explains regioselectivity of phosphorylation by more electrophilic carbonyl group of coordinated enone [ru

  10. Ages and sources of components of Zn-Pb, Cu, precious metal, and platinum group element deposits in the goodsprings district, Clark County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikre, Peter G.; Browne, Quentin J.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    The Goodsprings district, Clark County, Nevada, includes zinc-dominant carbonate replacement deposits of probable late Paleozoic age, and lead-dominant carbonate replacement deposits, copper ± precious metal-platinum group element (PGE) deposits, and gold ± silver deposits that are spatially associated with Late Triassic porphyritic intrusions. The district encompasses ~500 km2 although the distribution of all deposits has been laterally condensed by late Mesozoic crustal contraction. Zinc, Pb, and Cu production from about 90 deposits was ~160,000 metric tons (t) (Zn > Pb >> Cu), 2.1 million ounces (Moz) Ag, 0.09 Moz Au, and small amounts of PGEs—Co, V, Hg, Sb, Ni, Mo, Mn, Ir, and U—were also recovered.Zinc-dominant carbonate replacement deposits (Zn > Pb; Ag ± Cu) resemble Mississippi Valley Type (MVT) Zn-Pb deposits in that they occur in karst and fault breccias in Mississippian limestone where the southern margin of the regional late Paleozoic foreland basin adjoins Proterozoic crystalline rocks of the craton. They consist of calcite, dolomite, sphalerite, and galena with variably positive S isotope compositions (δ34S values range from 2.5–13‰), and highly radiogenic Pb isotope compositions (206Pb/204Pb >19), typical of MVT deposits above crystalline Precambrian basement. These deposits may have formed when southward flow of saline fluids, derived from basinal and older sedimentary rocks, encountered thinner strata and pinch-outs against the craton, forcing fluid mixing and mineral precipitation in karst and fault breccias. Lead-dominant carbonate replacement deposits (Pb > Zn, Ag ± Cu ± Au) occur among other deposit types, often near porphyritic intrusions. They generally contain higher concentrations of precious metals than zinc-dominant deposits and relatively abundant iron oxides after pyrite. They share characteristics with copper ± precious metal-PGE and gold ± silver deposits including fine-grained quartz replacement of carbonate minerals

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactivity of Group 12 Metal Thiocarboxylates, M(SOCR)(2)Lut(2) [M = Cd, Zn; R = CH(3), C(CH(3))(3); Lut = 3,5-Dimethylpyridine (Lutidine)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, May D.; Hampden-Smith, Mark J.; Duesler, Eileen N.

    1997-05-07

    A series of group 12 metal thiocarboxylate species, M(SOCR)(2)Lut(2) [M = Cd, Zn; R = CH(3), C(CH(3))(3); Lut = 3,5-dimethylpyridine (lutidine)], were synthesized to investigate their potential to act as precursors for the formation of metal sulfide materials. These species were expected to undergo thiocarboxylic anhydride elimination to give stoichiometric metal sulfides and remove the organic supporting ligands cleanly. These species were characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (where appropriate) (113)Cd NMR spectroscopies, TGA, elemental analysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The spectroscopic and analytical data were consistent with the formulas identified above, and in the solid state the compounds are monomeric with approximate tetrahedral metal coordination environments and monodentate S-bond thiocarboxylate ligands. Crystal data for Cd(SOCCH(3))(2)Lut(2): crystallized in the triclinic space group P&onemacr;, with a = 8.267(1) Å, b = 9.467(1) Å, c = 14.087(1) Å, alpha = 94.04(1) degrees, beta = 91.49(1) degrees, gamma = 104.03(1) degrees, and Z = 2. Thermal decomposition of these compounds in the solid state or in solution resulted in formation of the corresponding metal sulfide at low temperatures, as seen by powder X-ray diffraction. Evidence for thiocarboxylic anhydride elimination was documented by NMR in solution phase reactions. The effects on thiocarboxylic anhydride elimination, resulting from varying M, R, or solvent media, were examined by heating NMR tube solutions of M(SOCR)(2)Lut(2) in pyridine or toluene. Heating toluene or pyridine solutions of Cd(SOCCH(3))(2)Lut(2) resulted in formation of nanocrystalline, sphalerite CdS, as determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. These preliminary reactivity studies have revealed the great potential of this highly tailorable chemical system as precursors to group 12 metal sulfido species.

  12. Matrix Infrared Spectra of Insertion and Metallacyclopropane Complexes [CH3CH2-MH and (CH2)2-MH2] Prepared in Reactions of Laser-Ablated Group 3 Metal Atoms with Ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Gook; Andrews, Lester

    2017-11-16

    CH 3 CH 2 -MH and (CH 2 ) 2 -MH 2 were identified in the matrix IR spectra from reactions of laser-ablated group 3 metal atoms with ethane, and they were characterized via theoretical investigations. The observed products are the most stable in the proposed reaction path. Because of the small number of valence electrons, the group 3 metal high oxidation-state complexes are less stable. The C-C insertion product [(CH 3 ) 2 M], which was predicted to be more stable than the observed ones, was not observed probably because of the high energy barrier and a likely slower rate for insertion into one C-C bond than one of six C-H bonds. The C-C bond of the metallacyclopropanes is the shortest among the early transition-metal analogues, and its stretching frequencies are the highest, revealing the weakest interaction between the metal dihydride and ethylidene groups. The undetected ethylidene is not agostic, parallel to the previously examined methylidene.

  13. Induction of heat shock proteins (hsp70) in the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) following exposure to platinum group metals (platinum, palladium and rhodium): Comparison with lead and cadmium exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Christoph [Zoologisches Institut I-Oekologie, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Geb. 07.01, Kornblumenstrasse 13, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zimmermann, Sonja [Zoologisches Institut I-Oekologie, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Geb. 07.01, Kornblumenstrasse 13, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sures, Bernd [Zoologisches Institut I-Oekologie, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Geb. 07.01, Kornblumenstrasse 13, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: dc11@rz.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2005-10-05

    An increasing number of papers concentrate on the availability and uptake of platinum group elements (PGE) by different organisms. These metals are discharged into the environment from different anthropogenic sources, such as automobile catalytic converters, hospitals and other medical institutions. As the effects of these precious metals on organisms remain unclear, the induction of heat shock proteins (hsp70) in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) following exposure to soluble salts of platinum, palladium and rhodium was compared with the hsp70 induction in mussels following exposure to cadmium and lead. Mussels were sampled weekly during a period of 10 weeks and analyzed for their metal concentration and their hsp70 level. Highest metal uptake was found for Cd, followed by Pt, Pb and Pd. Rh demonstrated the lowest uptake rate. A clear time-dependent increase of hsp70 levels occurred in all exposed mussels. Concentrations of hsp70 started to rise between days 18 and 25, except for the Pt-exposed group, where the initial increase was between days 25 and 32. All groups reached maximal hsp70 concentrations at day 39. Subsequently, hsp70 levels decreased to initial levels for the remaining exposure period. Threshold metal levels for the hsp70 induction varied among the metals and increased in the order: Rh < Pd {<=} Pb < Pt < Cd. Highest hsp70 values were found for mussels exposed to Pd, with a 25-fold higher level than in the controls, followed by Pt- and Rh-exposed mussels, which showed a 19-fold increase. The hsp70 levels of the mussels exposed to Cd and Pb were much lower, showing 6- and 12-fold higher values than the control, respectively. The clear induction of hsp70 due to exposure to Pt, Pd and Rh gives evidence for strong cellular effects of these metals, especially, when compared with lead and cadmium. Among the metals tested, Pd seems to have the highest potential as inducer for hsp70 production due to its low threshold level in combination with the

  14. Induction of heat shock proteins (hsp70) in the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) following exposure to platinum group metals (platinum, palladium and rhodium): Comparison with lead and cadmium exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, Christoph; Zimmermann, Sonja; Sures, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of papers concentrate on the availability and uptake of platinum group elements (PGE) by different organisms. These metals are discharged into the environment from different anthropogenic sources, such as automobile catalytic converters, hospitals and other medical institutions. As the effects of these precious metals on organisms remain unclear, the induction of heat shock proteins (hsp70) in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) following exposure to soluble salts of platinum, palladium and rhodium was compared with the hsp70 induction in mussels following exposure to cadmium and lead. Mussels were sampled weekly during a period of 10 weeks and analyzed for their metal concentration and their hsp70 level. Highest metal uptake was found for Cd, followed by Pt, Pb and Pd. Rh demonstrated the lowest uptake rate. A clear time-dependent increase of hsp70 levels occurred in all exposed mussels. Concentrations of hsp70 started to rise between days 18 and 25, except for the Pt-exposed group, where the initial increase was between days 25 and 32. All groups reached maximal hsp70 concentrations at day 39. Subsequently, hsp70 levels decreased to initial levels for the remaining exposure period. Threshold metal levels for the hsp70 induction varied among the metals and increased in the order: Rh < Pd ≤ Pb < Pt < Cd. Highest hsp70 values were found for mussels exposed to Pd, with a 25-fold higher level than in the controls, followed by Pt- and Rh-exposed mussels, which showed a 19-fold increase. The hsp70 levels of the mussels exposed to Cd and Pb were much lower, showing 6- and 12-fold higher values than the control, respectively. The clear induction of hsp70 due to exposure to Pt, Pd and Rh gives evidence for strong cellular effects of these metals, especially, when compared with lead and cadmium. Among the metals tested, Pd seems to have the highest potential as inducer for hsp70 production due to its low threshold level in combination with the

  15. Surface structure determination of group 11 metals adsorbed on a rhenium(10 anti 10) surface by low-energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messahel, Lyria

    2012-11-12

    This thesis deals with the computational surface determination of various long-range ordered phases formed by thin films of copper, silver, and gold adsorbed on the rhenium- (10 anti 10) surface. It is based upon LEED-I,V curves for these phases that were recorded in the course of detailed experimental investigations of the respective films carried out in our group (using techniques such as LEED, MEED, and TPD). In order to solve the intricate puzzle of surface structural analysis, the electron elastic scattering behaviour of the investigated coinage metal phases was calculated using the Erlangen TensErLEED program package. Thereby first a set of theoretical LEED-I,V curves is derived for a guessed reference structure. Subsequently its structural input parameters are varied in a trial-and-error procedure until optimal agreement between experiment and theory is attained. The (1 x 1) phases formed by the deposited metals were tackled first to establish an absolute coverage calibration and to elucidate the respective growth modes on the Re(10 anti 10) surface. In all three cases the (1 x 1) structure is developed best at a coverage {Theta}{sub Cu,Ag,Au}=2 ML=1 BL. Extension of the investigation to experimental I,V curves for higher Cu coverages revealed that this element continues to grow bilayerwise, thereby retaining the Re hcp morphology. Ag, in contrast to Cu and Au, happens not to grow as homogeneously, and the TPD data suggest that Ag films exhibit the so-called simultaneous-multilayer (SM) growth mode. The following analysis of the sub-bilayer coverage range shows that the three systems exhibit considerable differences. While Cu, having a negative lattice misfit compared to Re, shows no long-range ordered superstructures, Ag and Au with a similar positive misfit form a couple of such phases. Ag features both a (1 x 4) phase, stable at ambient temperatures, that upon heating transforms into a c(2 x 2) phase that only exists at elevated temperatures. The

  16. Surface structure determination of group 11 metals adsorbed on a rhenium(10 anti 10) surface by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messahel, Lyria

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the computational surface determination of various long-range ordered phases formed by thin films of copper, silver, and gold adsorbed on the rhenium- (10 anti 10) surface. It is based upon LEED-I,V curves for these phases that were recorded in the course of detailed experimental investigations of the respective films carried out in our group (using techniques such as LEED, MEED, and TPD). In order to solve the intricate puzzle of surface structural analysis, the electron elastic scattering behaviour of the investigated coinage metal phases was calculated using the Erlangen TensErLEED program package. Thereby first a set of theoretical LEED-I,V curves is derived for a guessed reference structure. Subsequently its structural input parameters are varied in a trial-and-error procedure until optimal agreement between experiment and theory is attained. The (1 x 1) phases formed by the deposited metals were tackled first to establish an absolute coverage calibration and to elucidate the respective growth modes on the Re(10 anti 10) surface. In all three cases the (1 x 1) structure is developed best at a coverage Θ Cu,Ag,Au =2 ML=1 BL. Extension of the investigation to experimental I,V curves for higher Cu coverages revealed that this element continues to grow bilayerwise, thereby retaining the Re hcp morphology. Ag, in contrast to Cu and Au, happens not to grow as homogeneously, and the TPD data suggest that Ag films exhibit the so-called simultaneous-multilayer (SM) growth mode. The following analysis of the sub-bilayer coverage range shows that the three systems exhibit considerable differences. While Cu, having a negative lattice misfit compared to Re, shows no long-range ordered superstructures, Ag and Au with a similar positive misfit form a couple of such phases. Ag features both a (1 x 4) phase, stable at ambient temperatures, that upon heating transforms into a c(2 x 2) phase that only exists at elevated temperatures. The structure

  17. Determination of the pKa value of the hydroxyl group in the alpha-hydroxycarboxylates citrate, malate and lactate by 13C NMR: implications for metal coordination in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andre M N; Kong, XiaoLe; Hider, Robert C

    2009-10-01

    Citric acid is an important metal chelator of biological relevance. Citric acid helps solubilizing metals, increasing their bioavailability for plants and microbes and it is also thought to be a constituent of both the extracellular and cytoplasmic low molecular iron pools occurring in plants and vertebrates. Metal coordination by citric acid involves coordination both by the carboxylate and hydroxyl groups, of particular interest is its alpha-hydroxycarboxylate function. This structural feature is highly conserved in siderophores produced by evolutionarily distant species and seems to confer specificity toward Fe(III) binding. In order to understand the mechanism of metal coordination by alpha-hydroxycarboxylates and correctly evaluate the respective complex stability constants, it is essential to improve the knowledge about the ionisation of the alcohol group in these compounds. We have evaluated the hydroxyl pKa value of citric, malic and lactic acids with the objective of understanding the influence of alpha-carbon substitution. Studies at high pH values, utilizing (13)C NMR, permitted estimation of the pKa values for the three acids. The pKa (alcohol) values (14.4 for citric acid, 14.5 for malic acid, and 15.1 for lactic acid) are considerably higher than the previously reported value for citric acid (11.6) but still lower than the value of 15.5 for methanol. A comparative analysis of the three compounds indicates that different substitutions on the alpha-carbon introduce changes to the inductive effect experienced by the hydroxyl group thereby modulating its ionisation behaviour. Comparison with the siderophore rhizoferrin, which pKa (alcohol) values were confirmed to be 10 and 11.3, suggests that intra-molecular hydrogen bonding may also aid in the hydroxyl ionisation by stabilizing the resulting anion. Studies of metal coordination by alpha-hydroxycarboxylates should take these factors into account.

  18. Supported metal alloy catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Joseph; Smith, David C.

    2000-01-01

    A process of preparing a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride including reacting a Group IV, V, or VI metal amide complex with ammonia to obtain an intermediate product; and, heating the intermediate product to temperatures and for times sufficient to form a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride is provided together with the product of the process and a process of reforming an n-alkane by use of the product.

  19. Bite-angle bending as a key for understanding group-10 metal reactivity of d(10)-[M(NHC)(2)] complexes with sterically modest NHC ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hering, Florian; Nitsch, Joern; Paul, Ursula; Steffen, Andreas; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Radius, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis, characterization and investigations on the reactivity of the novel metal basic, yet isolable 14 VE NHC-complexes [M0(iPr2Im)2] (M = Pd 3, Pt 4; iPr2Im = 1,3-di-isopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene; VE = valence electron; NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) is reported and compared to the chemistry of

  20. Invited: Tailoring Platinum Group Metals Towards Optimal Activity for Oxygen Electroreduction to H2o and H2O2: From Extended Surfaces to Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, Ifan

    2014-01-01

    fuel cell technology could be scaled up.(1) The most widely used strategy towards decreasing the Pt loading is to alloy Pt with other late transition metals, in particular Ni or Co. (2-5) However, when tested in a fuel cell, these alloys are often susceptible towards degradation via dealloying.(6, 7......The slow kinetics of the 4-electron reduction of oxygen to H2O imposes a bottleneck against the widespread uptake of low temperature fuel cells in automotive vehicles. High loadings of platinum are required to drive the reaction; the limited supply of this precious metal limits the extent to which......, so that they can be implemented in fuel cells. In most fuel cell applications, the production of H2O2 during oxygen reduction is an unwanted side reaction, to be avoided at all cost. However, H2O2 is a very useful chemical in its own right, whose annual global production exceeds 3 M tons. At present...

  1. Invited: Tailoring Platinum Group Metals Towards Optimal Activity for Oxygen Electroreduction to H2o and H2O2: From Extended Surfaces to Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, Ifan

    2014-01-01

    The slow kinetics of the 4-electron reduction of oxygen to H2O imposes a bottleneck against the widespread uptake of low temperature fuel cells in automotive vehicles. High loadings of platinum are required to drive the reaction; the limited supply of this precious metal limits the extent to which......, so that they can be implemented in fuel cells. In most fuel cell applications, the production of H2O2 during oxygen reduction is an unwanted side reaction, to be avoided at all cost. However, H2O2 is a very useful chemical in its own right, whose annual global production exceeds 3 M tons. At present...... fuel cell technology could be scaled up.(1) The most widely used strategy towards decreasing the Pt loading is to alloy Pt with other late transition metals, in particular Ni or Co. (2-5) However, when tested in a fuel cell, these alloys are often susceptible towards degradation via dealloying.(6, 7...

  2. The use of new modified poly(acrylamide chelating resin with pendent benzothiazole groups containing donor atoms in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semmedu Selvaraj Kalaivani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption studies of poly(6-(ethoxybenzothiazole acrylamide (PEBTA, for Cu(II and Zn(II metal ions removal from an aqueous solution have been investigated, as a function of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. The chemical and structural characteristics of the adsorbent were determined by the FT-IR, 1H-NMR, TGA, SEM, and EDAX analysis. The maximum adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for Cu(II and Zn(II ions, as calculated from the Langmuir isotherm model, were 273.5 and 216.4 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetic studies show that the adsorption of Cu(II and Zn(II ions onto PEBTA follows the pseudo second order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were also evaluated, and it has been found that the adsorption process is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Desorption studies were carried out using 0.3 N HCl, and it revealed that the adsorbed Cu(II and Zn(II ions can be easily removed. The adsorption–desorption process is reversible, and this indicates that PEBTA is an effective adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from an aqueous medium.

  3. Immune response to Mycobacterium bovis-AN5 infection in genetically selected mice (selection IV-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Cavaleiro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mice genetically selected for high (H and low (L antibody production (Selection IV-A were used as murine experimental model. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the macrophagic activity and to characterize the immune response in Mycobacterium bovis-AN5 infected mice (3X10(7 bacteria. The response profile previously observed in such strains was not similar to that obtained during M. bovis infection; however, it corroborated works carried out using Selection I, which is very similar to Selection IV-A regarding infection by M. tuberculosis and Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG. Considering bacterial recovery, L IV-A mice showed higher control of the infectious process in the lungs than in the spleen, whereas H IV-A mice presented more resistance in the spleen. With respect to macrophagic activity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 was probably not involved in the infection control since there was an inhibition in the production of this metabolite. Nitric oxide (NO and TNF-alpha production seemed to be important in the control of bacterial replication and varied according to the strain, period and organ. Evaluation of the antibody production indicated that the multi-specific effect commonly observed in these strains was not the same in the response to M. bovis. Antibody concentrations were higher in L IV-A than in H IV-A mice at the beginning of the infection, being similar afterwards. Such data were compared with delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, which was more intense in H IV-A than in L IV-A mice, indicating that antibody production is independent of the capability to trigger DTH reactions and that cellular and humoral responses to M. bovis antigens show a polygenic control and an independent quantitative genetic regulation. Differences were observed among organs and metabolites, suggesting that different mechanisms play an important role in this infection in natural heterogeneous populations, indicating that NO, TNF-alpha and Th1 cytokines are

  4. Interdiffusion behavior of tungsten or rhenium and group 5 and 6 elements and alloys of the periodic table, part 1. [at dissimilar metal joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcella, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Arc cast W, CVD W, CVD Re, and powder metallurgy Re materials were hot isostatically pressure welded to ten different refractory metals and alloys (Cb, Cb-1Zr, Ta, Ta-10W, T-111, ASTAR-811C, W-25Re, Mo-50Re, W-30Re-20Mo, ect.) and thermally aged at 10 to the minus 8th power torr at 1200, 1500, 1630, 1800, and 2000 C for 100 to 2000 hours. Electron beam microprobe analysis was used to characterize the interdiffusion zone width of each couple system as a function of age time and temperature. Extrapolations of interdiffusion zone thickness to 10,000 hours were made. Classic interdiffusion analysis was performed for several of the systems by Boltzmann-Matano analysis. A method of inhibiting Kirkendall voids from forming during thermal ageing of dissimilar metal junctions was devised and experimentally demonstrated. An electron beam weld study of Cb-1Zr to Re and W-25Re demonstrated the limited acceptability of these welds.

  5. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  6. Theoretical study of the structures and electron affinities of the dimers and trimers of the group IB metals (Cu, Ag, and Au)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1989-01-01

    The molecular structure of both the neutral and negatively charged diatomic and triatomic systems containing the Cu, Ag, and Au metals are determined from ab initio calculations. For the neutral triatomic systems, the lowest energy structure is found to be triangular. The relative stability of the 2A1 and 2B2 structures can be predicted simply by knowing the constituent diatomic bond distances and atomic electron affinities (EAs). The lowest energy structure is linear for all of the negative ions. For anionic clusters containing Au, the Au atom(s) preferentially occupy the terminal position(s). The EAs of the heteronuclear systems can be predicted relatively accurately from a weighted average of the corresponding homonuclear systems. Although the theoretical EAs are systematically too small, accurate predictions for the EAs of the triatomics are obtained by uniformly scaling the ab initio results using the accurate experimental EA values available for the atoms and homonuclear diatomics.

  7. Deposition of Metal-Organic Frameworks by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy: The Influence of Substrate Functional Group Density on Film Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxuan; Shekhah, Osama; Stammer, Xia; Arslan, Hasan K.; Liu, Bo; Schüpbach, Björn; Terfort, Andreas; Wöll, Christof

    2012-01-01

    The liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 has been studied for three different COOH-terminated templating organic surfaces prepared by the adsorption of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold substrates. Three different SAMs were used, mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA), 4’-carboxyterphenyl-4-methanethiol (TPMTA) and 9-carboxy-10-(mercaptomethyl)triptycene (CMMT). The XRD data demonstrate that highly oriented HKUST-1 SURMOFs with an orientation along the (100) direction was obtained on MHDA-SAMs. In the case of the TPMTA-SAM, the quality of the deposited SURMOF films was found to be substantially inferior. Surprisingly, for the CMMT-SAMs, a different growth direction was obtained; XRD data reveal the deposition of highly oriented HKUST-1 SURMOFs grown along the (111) direction.

  8. Deposition of metal-organic frameworks by liquid-phase epitaxy: The influence of substrate functional group density on film orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, J.

    2012-09-05

    The liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 has been studied for three different COOH-terminated templating organic surfaces prepared by the adsorption of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold substrates. Three different SAMs were used, mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA), 4\\'-carboxyterphenyl-4-methanethiol (TPMTA) and 9-carboxy-10-(mercaptomethyl)triptycene (CMMT). The XRD data demonstrate that highly oriented HKUST-1 SURMOFs with an orientation along the (100) direction was obtained on MHDA-SAMs. In the case of the TPMTA-SAM, the quality of the deposited SURMOF films was found to be substantially inferior. Surprisingly, for the CMMT-SAMs, a different growth direction was obtained; XRD data reveal the deposition of highly oriented HKUST-1 SURMOFs grown along the (111) direction.

  9. Deposition of Metal-Organic Frameworks by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy: The Influence of Substrate Functional Group Density on Film Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Wöll

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The liquid phase epitaxy (LPE of the metal-organic framework (MOF HKUST-1 has been studied for three different COOH-terminated templating organic surfaces prepared by the adsorption of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on gold substrates. Three different SAMs were used, mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA, 4’-carboxyterphenyl-4-methanethiol (TPMTA and 9-carboxy-10-(mercaptomethyltriptycene (CMMT. The XRD data demonstrate that highly oriented HKUST-1 SURMOFs with an orientation along the (100 direction was obtained on MHDA-SAMs. In the case of the TPMTA-SAM, the quality of the deposited SURMOF films was found to be substantially inferior. Surprisingly, for the CMMT-SAMs, a different growth direction was obtained; XRD data reveal the deposition of highly oriented HKUST-1 SURMOFs grown along the (111 direction.

  10. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  11. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  12. Metal phosphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehlls, A.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of phosphides of the most of elements: alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth, transition metals, actinides, indium, beryllium, cadmium forming the variety of formulae and types of structures, is considered. The ways of P atom combination in phosphides vary from single atoms (ions P 3- in compounds of electropositive elements) through one-, two-dimensional complexes P n up to three-dimensional (charged) grids. In all phosphides, containing the systems of bound atoms of phosphorus, certain or all from these atoms form less than three bonds P-P. The formation of one bond P-P by every atom leads to group P 2 found as P 2 4- ion in diphosphides of transition metals with the structure of the pyrite or marcasite type (RuP 2 ). LaP, SmP, ThP, UP, ZrP form structural type NaCl

  13. Codeposition of either molybdenum or tungsten with the metals of iron group 8. The citric acid influence on codeposition of nickel and tungsten from sulphamic electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernotas, A.; Kadziauskiene, V.; Jasulaitiene, V.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of citric acid on codeposition of Ni and W from sulphamic electrolytes was investigated by measuring the hydrogen content in electro deposits and determining the current efficiency and the alloy composition by chemical analysis and X-ray spectroscopy. The reduction of W(VI) to W(0) in the electrolyte with and without citric acid was found to proceed through the formation of tungsten compounds of intermediate oxidation state. It is supposed that an increased amount of tungsten in the alloys with the increase of citric acid concentration in the electrolyte (to 0.042 mol/l) is caused by a large amount of W(IV) at the cathodic surface. The further increase of the concentration of citric acid in the electrolyte causes a decrease of tungsten amount in the alloy, because the blocking of the metallic surface of Ni and W by W compounds of intermediate oxidation state makes the reduction of W(VI) to W(0) more difficult. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  15. A group of new selenite-chlorides of strontium and d-metals (Co,Ni): Synthesis, thermal behavior and crystal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdonosov, Peter S.; Olenev, Andrey V.; Kuznetsov, Alexei N.; Dolgikh, Valery A.

    2009-01-01

    The new selenite-chlorides with composition Sr 3 (SeO 3 ) 2 Cl 2 (I) and Sr 2 M(SeO 3 ) 2 Cl 2 (M=Co, Ni (II and III)) were obtained. They crystallize in monoclinic system I: space group C2/m, a=13.203(2) A, b=5.5355(8) A, c=6.6170(10) A, β=95.89(1) o , Z=2; II Space group P2 1 /n, a=5.3400(10) A, b =6.4279(6) A, c=12.322(1) A, β=92.44(1) o , Z=2; III: space group P2 1 /n, a=5.3254(11) A, b=6.4363(13) A, c=12.197(2), β=92.53(3) o , Z=2. All three compounds are constructed in the same manner. Sr polyhedra form infinite layers, which are interconnected into a 3D framework by means of Sr polyhedra in the case of I or Co and Ni polyhedra in the case of II and III. Se atoms are situated inside the channels of the 3D framework. The topological analysis of ELF for I confirmed that the lone electron pairs of SeO 3 groups are located inside these channels. - Graphical abstract: Three new selenite-chlorides Sr 3 (SeO 3 ) 2 Cl 2 and Sr 2 M(SeO 3 ) 2 Cl 2 (M= Co,Ni)

  16. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo......M hip implant. A Danish surveillance programme has been initiated addressing these problems....

  17. New rht-Type Metal-Organic Frameworks Decorated with Acylamide Groups for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture and Chemical Fixation from Raw Power Plant Flue Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangyang; Zhou, Zhen; Chen, Cong; Bai, Junfeng; He, Cheng; Duan, Chunying

    2016-11-23

    The combination of carbon dioxide capture and chemical fixation in a one-pot process is attractive for both chemists and governments. The cycloaddition of carbon dioxide with epoxides to produce cyclic carbonates is an atomic economical reaction without any side products. By incorporating acylamide to enhance the binding affinity toward CO 2 , new rht-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with (3, 28) and (3, 24) connected units were constructed. Zn-NTTA with two types of dinuclear paddlewheel building blocks-{Zn 2 (OOC - ) 4 } and {Zn 2 (OOC - ) 3 }. The high uptake of CO 2 (115.6 cm 3 ·g -1 ) and selectivity over N 2 (30:1) at 273 K indicated that these MOFs are excellent candidates for postcombustion CO 2 isolation and capture. The MOFs feature high catalytic activity, rapid dynamics of transformation and excellent stability with turnover number (TON) values up to 110 000 per paddlewheel unit after 5 × 6 rounds of recyclability, demonstrating that they are promising heterogeneous catalysts for CO 2 cyclo-addition to value-added cyclic carbonates. The cycloaddition of epoxides with wet gases demonstrated that the catalyst activity was not affected by moisture, and the indices of the PXRD patterns of the bulk samples filtered from the catalytic reaction revealed that the crystallinities were maintained. The combination of the selective capture and catalytic transformation in one-pot enables the use of a negative-cost feedstock-raw power plant flue gas without any separation and purification-revealing the broad prospects of such MOFs for practical CO 2 fixation in industry.

  18. Liquid Metal Transformers

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series...

  19. Synthesis and Exploratory Catalysis of 3d Metals: Group-Transfer Reactions, and the Activation and Functionalization of Small Molecules Including Greenhouse Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindiola, Daniel J.

    2014-05-07

    Our work over the past three years has resulted in the development of electron rich and low-coordinate vanadium fragments, molecular nitrides of vanadium and parent imide systems of titanium, and the synthesis of phosphorus containing molecules of the 3d transition metal series. Likewise, with financial support from BES Division in DOE (DE-FG02-07ER15893), we now completed the full characterization of the first single molecular magnet (SMM) of Fe(III). We demonstrated that this monomeric form of Fe(III) has an unusual slow relaxation of the magnetization under zero applied field. To make matters more interesting, this system also undergoes a rare example of an intermediate to high-spin transition (an S = 3/2 to S = 5/2 transition). In 2010 we reported the synthesis of the first neutral and low-coordinate vanadium complexes having the terminal nitride functionality. We have now completed a full study to understand formation of the nitride ligand from the metastable azide precursor, and have also explored the reactivity of the nitride ligand in the context of incomplete and complete N-atom transfer. During the 2010-2013 period we also discovered a facile approach to assemble low-coordinate and low-valent vanadium(II) complexes and exploit their multielectron chemistry ranging from 1-3 electrons. Consequently, we can now access 3d ligand frameworks such as cyclo-P3 (and its corresponding radical anion), nitride radical anions and cations, low-coordinate vanadium oxo’s, and the first example of a vanadium thionitrosyl complex. A cis-divacant iron(IV) imido having some ligand centered radical has been also discovered, and we are in the process of elucidating its electronic structure (in particular the sign of zero field splitting and the origin of its magnitude), bonding and reactivity. We have also revisited some paramagnetic and classic metallocene compounds with S >1/2 ground states in order to understand their reactivity patterns and electronic structure. Lastly

  20. Synthesis, thermolysis and pyrolysis of group IV metal pinacolates: The impact of a vicinal diol as a supporting ligand for molecular precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Cecilia A.

    gave (THF)LiZr2(OCMe 2CMe2O)3(OCMe2CMe2OH) 3 or (HOCMe2CMe2OH)2Na2Zr 2(OCMe2CMe2O)4(OCMe2CMe 2OH)2 respectively. Similar reactions with larger +1 or +2 metals led to the formation of insoluble precipitates.

  1. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of the anionic group 6B transition-metal hydrides. Convenient, in-situ-deuterium transfer reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaus, P.L.; Kao, S.C.; Darensbourg, M.Y.; Arndt, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    The facile exchange of hydrogen for detuerium in the anionic group 6B carbonyl hydrides HM(CO) 4 L - (M = Cr, W; L = CO P(OMe) 3 ) has been studied in THF 4 (tetrahydrofuran) with CH 3 OD, D 2 O, and CH 3 CO 2 D. This has provided a synthesis of the deuterides, DM(CO) 4 L - , as well as a convenient in situ source of deuteride reducing reagents for organic halides. A number of such reductions are described, using 2 H NMR to demonstrate both selectivity and stereospecificity for certain systems. The carbonyl region of the infrared spectra of the hydrides is not affected by deuteration of the hydrides, suggesting that the M-H or M-D vibrational modes are not coupled significantly to CO vibrations in these hydrides. The mechanism of the H/D exchange and of a related H 2 elimination reaction is discussed

  2. Multi-elemental characterization of tunnel and road dusts in Houston, Texas using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry: Evidence for the release of platinum group and anthropogenic metals from motor vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spada, Nicholas; Bozlaker, Ayse; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical method for PGEs, main group, transition and rare earth metals developed. ► Comprehensive characterization of road and tunnel dust samples was accomplished. ► PGEs in dusts arise from autocatalyst attrition. ► Mobile sources also contributed to Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, W and Pb. ► All other elements, including rare earths arose from crustal sources. - Abstract: Platinum group elements (PGEs) including Rh, Pd, and Pt are important tracers for vehicular emissions, though their measurement is often challenging and difficult to replicate in environmental campaigns. These challenges arise from sample preparation steps required for PGE quantitation, which often cause severe isobaric interferences and spectral overlaps from polyatomic species of other anthropogenically emitted metals. Consequently, most previous road dust studies have either only quantified PGEs or included a small number of anthropogenic elements. Therefore a novel analytical method was developed to simultaneously measure PGEs, lanthanoids, transition and main group elements to comprehensively characterize the elemental composition of urban road and tunnel dusts. Dust samples collected from the vicinity of high-traffic roadways and a busy underwater tunnel restricted to single-axle (predominantly gasoline-driven) vehicles in Houston, TX were analyzed for 45 metals with the newly developed method using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (DRC-q-ICP–MS). Average Rh, Pd and Pt concentrations were 152 ± 52, 770 ± 208 and 529 ± 130 ng g −1 respectively in tunnel dusts while they varied between 6 and 8 ng g −1 , 10 and 88 ng g −1 and 35 and 131 ng g −1 in surface road dusts. Elemental ratios and enrichment factors demonstrated that PGEs in dusts originated from autocatalyst attrition/abrasion. Strong evidence is also presented for mobile source emissions of Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, W and Pb. However

  3. In-situ Evaluation of Soil Organic Molecules: Functional Group Chemistry Aggregate Structures, Metal and Surface Complexation Using Soft X-Ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, Satish C.

    2008-01-01

    Organic molecules are common in all Earth surface environments, and their composition and chemistry play an important role in a variety of biogeochemical reactions, such as mineral weathering, nutrient cycling and the solubility and transport of contaminants. However, most of what we know about the chemistry of these molecules comes from spectroscopy and microscopy studies of organic molecules extracted from different natural systems using either inorganic or organic solvents. Although all these methods gave us clues about the composition of these molecules, their composition and structure change with the extraction and the type of ex-situ analysis, their true behavior is less well understood. The goal of this project is to develop synchrotron instrumentation for studying natural organics, and to apply these recently developed synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques for understanding the: (1) functional group composition of naturally occurring organic molecules; (2) macromolecular structures of organic molecules; and (3) the nature of interactions of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in different environmental conditions.

  4. Rare oxidation states of group V metal compounds generated by radiolysis in non aqueous solvents: experimental and theoretical study. Attempts for synthesis of heterometallic complexes containing niobium and uranium or thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Motais, B.

    1986-02-01

    Mononuclear and binuclear complexes of group V trivalent metals (V, Nb, Ta), coordinated with γ-picolin molecules and chlorine atoms, have been oxidized or reduced, respectively by the radical-ions CH 2 Cl 2 + or CH 3 CN - radiolytically generated in free-oxygen dichloromethane or acetonitrile. The mechanism of these reactions have been established from kinetic, spectroscopic data and in some cases, from EPR measurements and theoretical SWXα calculations. Some preliminary results about the reaction occurring between Cp 2 Nb-(CO)H and Cp 2 'M(CH 3 ) 2 (M=U or Th) (Cp = eta 5 - C 5 H 5 ; Cp = eta 5 - (C 5 (CH 3 ) 5 ) are also reported [fr

  5. Platinum-group element, Gold, Silver and Base Metal distribution in compositionally zoned sulfide droplets from the Medvezky Creek Mine, Noril'sk, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, S.-J.; Cox, R.A.; Zientek, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Au, Cd, Co, Re, Zn and Platinum-group elements (PGE) have been determined in sulfide minerals from zoned sulfide droplets of the Noril'sk 1 Medvezky Creek Mine. The aims of the study were; to establish whether these elements are located in the major sulfide minerals (pentlandite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite and cubanite), to establish whether the elements show a preference for a particular sulfide mineral and to investigate the model, which suggests that the zonation in the droplets is caused by the crystal fractionation of monosulfide solid solution (mss). Nickel, Cu, Ag, Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Rh and Pd, were found to be largely located in the major sulfide minerals. In contrast, less than 25% of the Au, Cd, Pt and Zn in the rock was found to be present in these sulfides. Osmium, Ir, Ru, Rh and Re were found to be concentrated in pyrrhotite and pentlandite. Palladium and Co was found to be concentrated in pentlandite. Silver, Cd and Zn concentrations are highest in chalcopyrite and cubanite. Gold and platinum showed no preference for any of the major sulfide minerals. The enrichment of Os, Ir, Ru, Rh and Re in pyrrhotite and pentlandite (exsolution products of mss) and the low levels of these elements in the cubanite and chalcopyrite (exsolution products of intermediate solid solution, iss) support the mss crystal fractionation model, because Os, Ir, Ru, Rh and Re are compatible with mss. The enrichment of Ag, Cd and Zn in chalcopyrite and cubanite also supports the mss fractionation model these minerals are derived from the fractionated liquid and these elements are incompatible with mss and thus should be enriched in the fractionated liquid. Gold and Pt do not partition into either iss or mss and become sufficiently enriched in the final fractionated liquid to crystallize among the iss and mss grains as tellurides, bismithides and alloys. During pentlandite exsolution Pd appears to have diffused from the Cu-rich portion of the droplet into

  6. Dichloridobis(pyridine-2-thiolato-κ2N,Stin(IV: a new polymorph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyda R. Ismaylova

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnCl2(C5H4NS2], is the product of reaction of 2,2′-dipyridyl disulfide with tin tetrachloride. The SnIV atom adopts a distorted octahedral geometry, with the two bidentate pyridine-2-thiolate ligands forming two planar four-membered chelate rings. The two Sn—Cl, two Sn—N and two Sn—S bonds are in cis, cis and trans configurations, respectively. The crystal grown from acetonitrile represents a new monoclinic polymorph in space group C2/c with the molecule having twofold rotational symmetry, the SnIV atom lying on the twofold axis. The molecular structure of the monoclinic polymorph is very close to that of the triclinic polymorph studied previously in space group P-1, the molecule occupying a general position [Masaki & Matsunami (1976. Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn, 49, 3274–3279; Masaki et al. (1978. Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn, 51, 3298–3301]. Apparently, the formation of the two polymorphs is determined by the different systems of intermolecular interactions. In the crystal of the monoclinic polymorph, molecules are bound into ribbons along the c axis by C—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, whereas in the crystal of the triclinic polymorph, molecules form chains along the a axis by attractive S...S interactions. The crystal studied was a pseudo-merohedral twin; the refined BASF value is 0.221 (1.

  7. New metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, U.

    1983-12-01

    The aim of this report is to estimate the exposure to various metals and metal compounds and discuss the available information of the possible toxic effects of these metals and compounds. In the first section, some metals are defined as those with either a large or a fast increasing exposure to living organisms. The available information on toxicity is discussed in the second section. In the third section interesting metals are defined as compounds having a large exposure and an apparent insufficient knowledge of their possible toxic effects. Comments on each of these metals are also to be found in the third section. (G.B.)

  8. Metal lagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1974-01-01

    The metal lagging described is characterized by the fact that it is formed of closed sacks composed of an elastic metal mass, compressed in an outer envelope made of a fine mesh metal fabric. The metal mass is composed of stainless steel wool stuffed into the envelope. This lagging is particularly intended for the thermal protection of the end slab of LMFBR type reactors [fr

  9. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  10. Theoretical assessment of the electro-optical features of the group III nitrides (B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} and Ga{sub 12}N{sub 12}) and group IV carbides (C{sub 24}, Si{sub 12}C{sub 12} and Ge{sub 12}C{sub 12}) nanoclusters encapsulated with alkali metals (Li, Na and K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahmasebi, Elham [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Lorestan University, Khorram Abad, Lorestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakerzadeh, Ehsan, E-mail: e.shakerzadeh@scu.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biglari, Zeinab [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Lorestan University, Khorram Abad, Lorestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Encapsulation of Li, Na and K narrow the HOMO–LUMO gaps of the clusters. • The group III nitrides nanoclusters strongly interacted with the alkali metals. • First hyperpolarizabilities remarkably enhance for B{sub 12}N{sub 12} encapsulated with Na/K. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to study the influence of alkali metals (Li, Na and K) encapsulation within the group III nitrides (B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} and Ga{sub 12}N{sub 12}) and the group IV carbides (C{sub 24}, Si{sub 12}C{sub 12}and Ge{sub 12}C{sub 12}) nanoclusters. The encapsulation of Li, Na and K atoms is found to narrow the HOMO–LUMO gaps of the considered clusters. The electronic properties of these clusters, especially the group III nitrides nanoclusters, are strongly sensitive to interaction with the alkali metals. Moreover it is observed that the encapsulation of alkali metals enhances the first hyperpolarizabilities of B{sub 12}N{sub 12} nanocluster. Surprisingly, due to the alkali metals encapsulation within B{sub 12}N{sub 12} nanocluster, the first hyperpolarizability values are remarkably increased to 8505.49 and 122,503.76 a.u. for Na@B{sub 12}N{sub 12} and K@B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, respectively. Also the TD-DFT calculations at both CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and PBE0/6-311+G(d) levels of theory are also performed to investigate the origin of first hyperpolarizabilities.

  11. A Surprisingly Simple Electrostatic Model Explains Bent Versus Linear Structures in M(+)-RG2 Species (M = Group 1 Metal, Li-Fr; RG = Rare Gas, He-Rn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejeva, Anna; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2015-11-05

    It is found that a simple electrostatic model involving competition between the attractive dispersive interaction and induced-dipole repulsion between the two RG atoms performs extremely well in rationalizing the M(+)-RG2 geometries, where M = group 1 metal and RG = rare gas. The Li(+)-RG2 and Na(+)-RG2 complexes have previously been found to exhibit quasilinear or linear minimum-energy geometries, with the Na(+)-RG2 complexes having an additional bent local minimum [A. Andrejeva, A. M. Gardner, J. B. Graneek, R. J. Plowright, W. H. Breckenridge, T. G. Wright, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 13578]. In the present work, the geometries for M = K-Fr are found to be bent. A simple electrostatic model explains these conclusions and is able to account almost quantitatively for the binding energy of the second RG atom, as well as the form of the angular potential, for all 36 titular species. Additionally, results of population analyses are presented together with orbital contour plots; combined with the success of the electrostatic model, the expectation that these complexes are all physically bound is confirmed.

  12. Scalar relativistic calculations of hyperfine coupling constants using ab initio density matrix renormalization group method in combination with third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess transformation: case studies on 4d transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Lan, Tran; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi

    2015-01-13

    We have developed a new computational scheme for high-accuracy prediction of the isotropic hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) of heavy molecules, accounting for the high-level electron correlation effects, as well as the scalar-relativistic effects. For electron correlation, we employed the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method in conjunction with a complete active space model. The orbital-optimization procedure was employed to obtain the optimized orbitals required for accurately determining the isotropic HFCC. For the scalar-relativistic effects, we initially derived and implemented the Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) hyperfine coupling operators up to the third order (DKH3) by using the direct transformation scheme. A set of 4d transition-metal radicals consisting of Ag atom, PdH, and RhH2 were chosen as test cases. Good agreement between the isotropic HFCC values obtained from DMRG/DKH3 and experiment was archived. Because there are no available gas-phase values for PdH and RhH2 radicals in the literature, the results from the present high-level theory may serve as benchmark data.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and magnetism of metal-organic compounds: role of the positions of the coordinating groups of a meso-flexible ligand in placing anisotropy to exhibit spin-canting behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Paulami; Tripuramallu, Bharat Kumar; Bommakanti, Suresh; Das, Samar K

    2015-02-14

    In continuation of our recent investigation on flexible ligands, three new metal-organic coordination framework containing compounds, formulated as {Co(2)(L2)2(px3ampy)(2)}(n)·npx3ampy (1), {Co(L2)(px3ampy)(0.5)}(n) (2) and {Co(2)(L3) (px3ampy)(2)(H(2)O)}(n)·3nH(2)O (3) have been synthesized using three structurally different meso-flexible polycarboxylate ligands, H(2)L1(4,4'-methylenebis-(oxy)dibenzoic acid), H(2)L2 (3,3'-methylenebis-(oxy)dibenzoic acid) and H(4)L3 (5,5'-methylene-bis(oxy)diisophthalic acid) bearing the flexible spacer in the middle of the skeleton, along with a long flexible pyridyl ligand px3ampy (1,4-bis(3-pyridylaminomethyl)benzene). Compounds 1-3 have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric (TG) studies including elemental analysis. The crystal structure determinations reveal that compound 1 has a 1D ladder-like structure and compounds 2and 3 are characterized by 3D frameworks. Compound 2 possesses a tiling of a snz net and compound 3 has a 3D interpenetrated motif with a (4,4) connecting 2-nodal net. The variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements demonstrate the dominating antiferromagnetic nature of all three title compounds; interestingly, however, compounds 2 and 3 exhibit ferromagnetic interactions due to the uncompensated magnetic moment of the system at low temperatures. Compound 2 illustrates the occurrence of spin canted antiferromagnetic ordering at T(c) ≈ 25 K with a coercive field (H(c)) of 900 Oe at 10 K due to the inclusion of magnetic anisotropy caused by the twisting of the concerned ligand skeleton. Compound shows comparatively weak ferromagnetic ordering with T(c) ≈ 9.5 K, for which weak magnetic anisotropy is present because of two different coordination environments (octahedral and tetrahedral) between two cobalt centers. A structure-function relationship has been described based on the position of the coordinating groups with respect to

  14. Alkali metal-refractory metal biphase electrode for AMTEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Bankston, Clyde P. (Inventor); Cole, Terry (Inventor); Khanna, Satish K. (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Wheeler, Bob L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An electrode having increased output with slower degradation is formed of a film applied to a beta-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). The film comprises a refractory first metal M.sup.1 such as a platinum group metal, suitably platinum or rhodium, capable of forming a liquid or a strong surface adsorption phase with sodium at the operating temperature of an alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) and a second refractory metal insoluble in sodium or the NaM.sup.1 liquid phase such as a Group IVB, VB or VIB metal, suitably tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum or niobium. The liquid phase or surface film provides fast transport through the electrode while the insoluble refractory metal provides a structural matrix for the electrode during operation. A trilayer structure that is stable and not subject to deadhesion comprises a first, thin layer of tungsten, an intermediate co-deposited layer of tungsten-platinum and a thin surface layer of platinum.

  15. Metallic nanomesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Sun, Tianyi; Guo, Chuanfei

    2018-02-20

    A transparent flexible nanomesh having at least one conductive element and sheet resistance less than 300.OMEGA./.quadrature. when stretched to a strain of 200% in at least one direction. The nanomesh is formed by depositing a sacrificial film, depositing, etching, and oxidizing a first metal layer on the film, etching the sacrificial film, depositing a second metal layer, and removing the first metal layer to form a nanomesh on the substrate.

  16. Entre Amazonas y Grifos. Viaje por las imágenes de frontera en el siglo IV a.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Conde, Margarita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amazon imagery started population Greek vases at the end of the VII century B.C. Being of a polysemic nature, they personify the absolute otherness for the ideal Greek citizen, due to their representation of all the antithetical values: they are women, barbarian, undomesticated. Through the following centuries they are endowed with new meanings, especially in the IV century B.C., a time of profound geopolitical changes. The graphical representation of the struggle for the control of gold between Arimaspi, fierce one-eyed warriors, and Gryps, fearsome hybrid beings that extract it from the earth and guard it, starts towards the end of the vi century B.C., but it will also become a favourite theme of the Greek painters in the iv century B.C., mainly intended for the peripheral areas. We analyze the distribution area of vases decorated with both themes at both ends of the Mediterranean, and its meaning. Amazonomachy and Grypomachy, frontier imagery, seem to act as essential elements in the building of the Greek identity.La imagen de las Amazonas comienza a poblar los vasos griegos desde fines del siglo VII a.C. De naturaleza polisémica, encarnan la alteridad absoluta para el ideal ciudadano griego, pues representan todos los valores antitéticos: son mujeres, bárbaras, no domesticadas. A lo largo de los siglos se dotan de nuevos significados, especialmente en el siglo IV a.C., época de profundas mutaciones geopolíticas. La representación de la lucha por el control del oro entre Arimaspos, feroces guerreros de un solo ojo y Grifos, temibles seres híbridos que lo arrancan de la tierra y custodian, nace a fines del siglo VI a.C. pero será también en el siglo IV a.C. cuando se convierta en un tema predilecto de los pintores griegos, destinado a las áreas periféricas. Analizamos el área de distribución de los vasos decorados con ambos temas en los dos extremos del Mediterráneo y su significado. Amazonomaquias y Grifomaquias, im

  17. The Close Relationships between the Crystal Structures of MO and MSO 4 (M = Group 10, 11, or 12 Metal), and the Predicted Structures of AuO and PtSO 4

    KAUST Repository

    Derzsi, Mariana

    2013-08-21

    The structural relations of (and between) late transition metal monoxides, MO, and monosulfates, MSO4, are analyzed. We show that all of these late transition metal oxides, as well as 4d and 5d metal sulfates, crystallize in distorted rock salt lattices and argue that the distortions are driven by collective first- and/or second order Jahn-Teller effects. The collective Jahn-Teller deformations lead either to tetragonal contraction or (seldom) elongation of the rock salt lattice. On the basis of the rock salt representation of the oxides and sulfates, we show that PdO, CuO, and AgO are metrically related and that the 4d and 5d metal sulfates are close to isostructural with their oxides. These observations guide us towards as yet unknown AuO and PtSO4, for which we predict crystal structures from electronic structure calculations. The structural relations of (and between) late transition metal monoxides, MO, and monosulfates, MSO4, are analyzed. We show that all of these late transition metal oxides, as well as 4d and 5d metal sulfates, crystallize in distorted rock salt lattices and argue that the distortions are driven by collective first- and/or second order Jahn-Teller effects, as quantified by the c′/a′ ratio. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. VLSI metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G; Gildenblat, Gennady Sh

    1987-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 15: VLSI Metallization discusses the various issues and problems related to VLSI metallization. It details the available solutions and presents emerging trends.This volume is comprised of 10 chapters. The two introductory chapters, Chapter 1 and 2 serve as general references for the electrical and metallurgical properties of thin conducting films. Subsequent chapters review the various aspects of VLSI metallization. The order of presentation has been chosen to follow the common processing sequence. In Chapter 3, some relevant metal deposition tec

  19. Heavy Metal Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/heavymetalbloodtest.html Heavy Metal Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Heavy Metal Blood Test? A heavy metal blood test is a group ...

  20. Triple Point Topological Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziming Zhu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Topologically protected fermionic quasiparticles appear in metals, where band degeneracies occur at the Fermi level, dictated by the band structure topology. While in some metals these quasiparticles are direct analogues of elementary fermionic particles of the relativistic quantum field theory, other metals can have symmetries that give rise to quasiparticles, fundamentally different from those known in high-energy physics. Here, we report on a new type of topological quasiparticles—triple point fermions—realized in metals with symmorphic crystal structure, which host crossings of three bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level protected by point group symmetries. We find two topologically different types of triple point fermions, both distinct from any other topological quasiparticles reported to date. We provide examples of existing materials that host triple point fermions of both types and discuss a variety of physical phenomena associated with these quasiparticles, such as the occurrence of topological surface Fermi arcs, transport anomalies, and topological Lifshitz transitions.

  1. Heavy metal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of spawning, resistance to diseases and social acceptability (Pillay, 1993). This study aimed at determining the carbohydrate reserves and heavy metal accumulation of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis miloticus after treatment with heavy metals such as lead, copper and zinc. 2. Materials and Methods. Test organism: Nile tilapia ...

  2. Metal halide reduction with molten sodium/potassium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.

    1986-01-01

    A method of obtaining a desired metal, selected from the group consisting of titanium, aluminium, iron, manganese, hafnium, zirconium, tantalum, vanadium, uranium and tungsten, which comprises reacting a halide of the desired metal with an alkali metal reducing agent at temperature at which the reducing agent is molten, in order to produce the desired metal and halide of the metal reducing agent

  3. Plasma metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of surface contamination of the films due to plasma treatment was observed but was easily removed by argon ion cleaning. Hydrogen plasma reduction of glass supported silver(l) nitrate and palladium(ll) acetate films reveals that this metallization technique is applicable to a wide variety of metal salts and supports, and has also shown the ability of plasma reduction to retain the complex 'fern-like' structures seen for spin coated silver(l) nitrate layers. Some metal salts are susceptible to decomposition by X-rays. The reduction of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride films by soft X-rays to produce nanoscopic gold particles has been studied. The spontaneous reduction of these X-ray irradiated support gold(lll) chloride films on exposure to the atmosphere to produce gold rich metallic films has also been reported. (author)

  4. Differential sensitivity of pigmented and non-pigmented marine bacteria to metals and antibiotics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    The response of pigmented and non-pigmented marine bacteria to metals and antibiotics was investigated. The two groups responded differently to heavy metals and antibiotics. Pigmented bacteria were more resistant to metals. Among the metals, Zn...

  5. Economic aspects of metals recover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Daria; Kwaśniewska, Dobrawa

    2018-03-01

    One of the modern economy models is circular economy in which wastes should be considered as resource and used in an efficient and sustainable way. This also concerns to metals included in scraps. However, the need for metal recovery from waste is not only the result of the latest economic trends but also the result of large and constantly changing demand for metals. Shrinking natural sources of metals, concentrations of ores in small number of countries in the world and resulting from this dependence on import, geopolitical situation, new technologies demands are only a few most important determinants that have been changing the structure of the metal market over years. In this chapter, authors focused on the presentation of economic aspects of metal recovery from various sources. The chapter presents the characteristic of metal market elements (supply, demand and price) and changes that took place over decades, underlining the structure of precious and highly desirable metal market elements. Balance between the demand and supply ensures price stability and rationalizes inflation. However, growing demand on many means that secure supply chains, such as recycling and material recovery, are essential to ensure continuity in the supply chain and guarantee unrestricted technological progress and innovation. The data included in this chapter presents also the concentration of different metals and group of metals in wastes pointing that recycling of waste can become one of the possibilities of acquiring missing and critical metals. Metal-laden wastes include a few groups: waste electrical and electronic equipments, catalysts of different application, introduced on chemical, petrochemical or automotive market, galvanic wastes and wastewaters. The profitability assessment of recycling processes is very complicated. Nevertheless cited data shows that profitability of recovery depends on the metal analyzed and the type of waste. It must be underline that an optimized

  6. Treatment patterns of advanced malignant melanoma (stage III-IV) - A review of current standards in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Mark; Malvehy, Josep; Lebbe, Céleste; Heron, Louise; Amelio, Justyna; Szabo, Zsolt; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    With the recent emergence of immunotherapies and novel targeted treatments for advanced and metastatic melanoma such as selective B-Raf inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors, the treatment landscape in Europe has changed considerably. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of current treatment pathways in Europe for the treatment of advanced melanoma, unresectable stage III-IV. A literature search of four databases was conducted to identify publications reporting on the treatment patterns of advanced and metastatic melanoma (stage III-IV) in European populations. Seven full-text publications and two conference abstracts reported on observational studies of melanoma treatment practices in France, Italy and the United Kingdom. Treatment patterns were identified for two time periods: 2005-2009 and 2011-2012. Common treatments reported for both periods included chemotherapy with dacarbazine, fotemustine or temozolomide. The main differences between the two periods were the introduction and prescription of immunotherapy ipilimumab and targeted therapy vemurafenib between 2011 and 2012. Across the three countries studied, the types of treatments prescribed between 2005 and 2009 were relatively similar, however, with noticeable differences in the frequency and priority of administration. Treatment practices for advanced melanoma vary markedly across different European countries and continue to evolve with the introduction of new therapies. The results of this review highlight a considerable evidence gap with regards to recent treatment patterns for advanced melanoma in Europe, especially post-2011 after the introduction of novel therapeutic agents, and more recently with the introduction of programmed cell death 1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA Delivery and Genomic Integration into Mammalian Target Cells through Type IV A and B Secretion Systems of Human Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores L. Guzmán-Herrador

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We explore the potential of bacterial secretion systems as tools for genomic modification of human cells. We previously showed that foreign DNA can be introduced into human cells through the Type IV A secretion system of the human pathogen Bartonella henselae. Moreover, the DNA is delivered covalently attached to the conjugative relaxase TrwC, which promotes its integration into the recipient genome. In this work, we report that this tool can be adapted to other target cells by using different relaxases and secretion systems. The promiscuous relaxase MobA from plasmid RSF1010 can be used to deliver DNA into human cells with higher efficiency than TrwC. MobA also promotes DNA integration, albeit at lower rates than TrwC. Notably, we report that DNA transfer to human cells can also take place through the Type IV secretion system of two intracellular human pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii, which code for a distantly related Dot/Icm Type IV B secretion system. This suggests that DNA transfer could be an intrinsic ability of this family of secretion systems, expanding the range of target human cells. Further analysis of the DNA transfer process showed that recruitment of MobA by Dot/Icm was dependent on the IcmSW chaperone, which may explain the higher DNA transfer rates obtained. Finally, we observed that the presence of MobA negatively affected the intracellular replication of C. burnetii, suggesting an interference with Dot/Icm translocation of virulence factors.

  8. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Social Security Act for aid or assistance in the form of medical or any other type of remedial care for... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare...

  9. A Description of Room Arrangement, Design, and Appearance in Title IV-A Day Care Centers in Philadelphia, 1974-1975. Report No. 7733.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Theodore J.

    This report describes the room arrangement, design, and appearance of 152 Title IV-A Day Care centers in Philadelphia. A series of 27 items on a section of the Daily Care, In-Room Observation Guide was used to provide an overall description of rooms in day care and to identify differences in features for different types of programs. Data were…

  10. 77 FR 42353 - Ascent Venture Partners IV-A, L.P., License No. 01/01-0404; Notice Seeking Exemption Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Ascent Venture Partners IV-A, L.P., License No. 01/01-0404; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is... Act and Section 107.730, Financings which Constitute Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business...

  11. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  12. Metals 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  13. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  14. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  15. Isopermutation group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muktibodh, A. S. [Department of Mathematics, Mohota College of Science, NAGPUR-440009 India E-mail: amukti2000@yahoo.com (India)

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  16. Blood metal ion concentrations in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuru, Tadahiko; Morita, Yuji; Murata, Yasuaki; Shimamoto, Shuji; Munakata, Yutaro; Kato, Yoshiharu

    2017-05-01

    The hip placement with a metal-on-metal (MOM) bearing has been used for both surface replacement and total hip arthroplasty (THA). Use of MOM bearing for hip replacement reduces the wear compared to conventional bearings. We prospectively assessed 30 patients who underwent unilateral MOM THA. A control group of 30 patients who underwent metal-on-polyethylene THA using the implants as the other group, except for bearing, were accessed. Blood samples were collected preoperatively and at 3- , 6- , 9- , 12- , 15- , 18- , and 24-month intervals. Changes in mean blood metal ion concentration were compared between the MOM and metal-on-polyethylene groups. A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between blood cobalt and chromium concentrations in all of the patients. The mean blood ion concentrations of the MOM were significantly higher than those of the metal-on-polyethylene. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between maximum blood cobalt concentration and cup version angle. The maximum blood chromium concentrations in the patients who had larger cup version angles were more likely to decrease. We considered that cup version angle is one of the factors that have the greatest effect on blood metal ion concentration, and the target cup version angle that did not induce an increase in blood metal ion concentrations was approximately 20°.

  17. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer in reactor components cooled by liquid metal coolants in single/two phase. 11. meeting of the International Association for Hydraulic Research (IAHR) Working Group. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This Working Material includes the papers presented at the International Meeting 'Hydrodynamics and heat transfer in reactor components cooled by liquid metal coolants in single/two-phase', which was held 5-9 July 2004 at the State Scientific Center of Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after A.I. Leypunsky, in Obninsk near Moscow. The objectives of the meeting were to discuss new results obtained in the field of liquid metal coolant and to recommend the lines of further general physics and applied investigations, with the purpose of validating existing and codes under development for liquid metal cooled advanced and new generation nuclear reactors. Most of the contributions present results of experimental and numerical investigations into velocity, temperature and heat transfer in fuel subassemblies of fast reactors cooled by sodium or lead. In the frame of the meeting a benchmark problem devoted to heat transfer in the model subassembly of the fast reactor BREST-OD-300 was proposed. Experts from 5 countries (Japan, Netherlands, Spain, Republic of Korea, and Russia) took part in this benchmark exercise. The results of the benchmark calculations are summarized in the Working Material. The results of hydrodynamic studies of pressure head chambers and collector systems of liquid metal cooled reactors are presented in a number of papers. Also attention was given to the generalization of experimental data on hydraulic losses in the pipelines in case of mutual influence of local pressure drops, and to the modeling of natural convection in the fuel subassemblies and circuits with liquid metal cooling. Special emphasis at the meeting was placed on thermal hydraulics issues related to the development and design of target systems, such as heat removal in the target unit of the cascade subcritical reactor cooled by liquid salt; the target complex MK-1 for accelerator driven systems cooled by eutectic lead-bismuth alloy; and the test

  18. The extragalactic origin of the Arcturus group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro, JF; Helmi, A; Freeman, KC

    2004-01-01

    We reanalyze the group of stars associated kinematically with Arcturus and confirm that they constitute a peculiar grouping of metal-poor stars with similar apocentric radius, common angular momentum, and distinct metal abundance patterns. These properties are consistent with those expected for a

  19. Metal-metal interactions among dietary toxic and essential trace metals in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsenhans, B.; Schmolke, G.; Kolb, K.; Stokes, J.; Forth, W.

    1987-12-01

    Exposure to toxic and essential metals is thought to be reflected by corresponding metal concentrations in tissues. However, toxic and essential metals may influence each other in regard to their retention in the body. Therefore, a basic diet containing four toxic metals (As 7, Cd 9, Ni 13, and Pb 20 ppm) and adequate amounts of essential metals was fed to rats for 2 weeks. Test groups received the basic diet with increasing concentrations of one of the toxic metals (up to 90 ppm As, 180 ppm Cd, 365 ppm Ni, and 394 ppm Pb). As, Cd, Ni, Pb, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn were determined by atomic emission spectroscopy in liver, kidney, intestine, brain, muscle, bone, skin, hair, and blood. A linear relationship between diet and tissue concentration is observed for As and Ni in the kidney, for Cd in the liver, and for Pb in the bone. In other tissues saturation was observed. While Cd-Fe interactions were common to most of the tissues, other interactions were detected only in specific tissues, e.g., As-Cu in the kidney, Cd-Zn in the liver, and As-Mn, Cd-Mn, or Ni-Cu in the intestine. Increases of renal Pb and intestinal Cd by dietary Ni, and a decrease in bone As by dietary Pb were the most pronounced interactions between the toxic metals. The results demonstrate that potential target organs for the evaluation of metal exposure need to be carefully analyzed for interfering metal-metal interactions.

  20. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  1. Geologic controls on the charateristics of carbonate reservoir. Case study on the Thamama Zone IV A of the Mubarras Field, Abu Dhabi, U. A. E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Yoshihiro; Sunauchi, Hisao; Oshima, Kazukiyo

    1987-01-01

    Sedimentary environment of Thamama WA facies ranges in the shallow, continental shelf from Lagoon to Pahaya; it shows a good oil characteristics without containing lime-mud in the vicinity of the barrier with high wave energy; it shows a poor oil characteristics containing lime mud where the wave energy is low. The Thamama IV A facies is in the transgression period showing three cycles of transgression and regression. A diagenetic action consists of miclitization, dissolving action, cementation, dolomitization, styloitization, and tar mat; cementation among which worst influences the oil characteristics. The Thamama IV A facies consists of six layers among which the peloidal grainstone gives the best oil characteristics; the rock structure of this facies is mostly grainstone; most of the particles are peloid of ultra fine to fine sand sizes, the remaining portion containing Echinodermata, shells, and Foraminifera. (4 figs, 1 tab)

  2. Formation of amorphous alloys by mechanical alloying for platinum group metal-M(M=Zr or Al) system; Mechanical alloying ni yoru kikinzoku (Pd,Pt) to M(Zr aruiwa Al) tono kongo funmatsu no hishoshitsuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuzuki, T.; Arakawa, T. [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-08-15

    The intermetallic compounds containing precious metals such as platinum white gold are widely used in chemistry or industry as catalysts. These alloy catalysts are mainly used in grinding the materials prepared by solidifying liquids. The authors of the paper attempt to prepare alloy powders of precious metal with Zr or Al by mechanical alloying (MA). As an object of applying them on a catalyst, alloy powders of precious metals (Pd and Pt) and M (Zr or Al) are regulated by the mechanical alloying reaction, and the results show that the Pd and Pt show different MA reaction while using Al as the M, the former generates an intermetallic compound as PdAl during the halfway point of the MA reaction, but the later generates amorphous powders. But, each of them generates amorphous alloys only while using Zr and the M. As a result of differential thermal analysis and electrical resistivity measurement investigating the crystalline process of the obtained amorphous alloys, it is clarified that the Pt-Al base alloy shows higher crystalline temperature compared with the other alloys. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  4. Group Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  5. Rhodium complexes of a chelating ligand with imidazol-2-ylidene and pyridin-2-ylidene donors: the effect of C-metalation of nicotinamide groups on uptake of hydride ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSkimming, Alex; Ball, Graham E; Bhadbhade, Mohan M; Colbran, Stephen B

    2012-02-20

    Rhodium complexes of the imidazolylidene (C-im) N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand, C-im-pyH(+), bearing a nicotinamide cation substituent (pyH(+)) have been targeted for ligand-centered uptake and delivery of hydride ion. This work reveals that rhodium(I) complexes such as [Rh(C-im-pyH(+))(COD)X][PF(6)] (1, a: X = Cl, b: X = I) undergo facile C-metalation of the nicotinamide ring to afford rhodium complexes of a novel chelate ligand, C,C'-im-py, with coordinated imidazolylidene (C(im)) and pyridylidene (C(py)) NHC-donors. Seven examples were characterized and include rhodium(III) monomers of the general formula [Rh(C,C'-im-py)L(x)I(2)](z+) (2: z = 1, L = H(2)O or solvent, x = 2; 3, 5, 7: z = 0, L = carboxylate, x = 1) and novel rhodium(II) dimers, the anti/syn-isomers of [Rh(2)(C,C'-im-py)(2)(μOAc)(2)I(2)] (4-anti/syn). The NMR data, backed by DFT calculations, is consistent with attribution of the C,C'-im-py ligand as a bis(carbene) donor. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies are reported for 2, 3, 4-anti, 4-syn and 7. Consistently, within the each complex, the Rh-C(im) bond length is shorter than the Rh-C(py) bond length, which is the opposite trend to that expected based on simple electronic considerations. It is proposed that intramolecular steric interactions imposed by different rings in the rigid C,C'-im-py chelate ligand dictate the observed Rh-C(NHC) bond lengths. Attempts to add hydride to the C-metalated nicotinamide ring in 3 were unsuccessful. The redox behavior of 3 and 4 and, for comparison, an analogous bis(imidazolylidene)rhodium(III) monomer (8), were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. In 3 and 4, the C-metalated nicotinamide ring is found to exhibit a one-electron reduction process at far lower potential (-2.34 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc in acetonitrile) than the two-electron nicotinamide cation-dihydronicotinamide couple found for the corresponding nonmetalated ring (-1.24 V

  6. metal alkoxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    substituent effects in the head-to-tail double insertion reactions observed ... an internal standard. The yield of diphenyl carbodii- mide was further verified by isolating it as diphenyl urea after hydrolysis. The organic fraction obtained in the catalytic metathesis .... insertion of PhNCO into metal alkoxide 1a to generate. Table 1.

  7. Metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Arjen Sybren

    1981-01-01

    It is shown in section 7.1. that the influence of topological disorder on the range of magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) glasses, is much less than often assumed. This is demonstrated via a study of the temperature dependence of the average iron hyperfine field

  8. Dynamical Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldus, Josef

    The well known symmetry (invariance, degeneracy) dynamical groups or algebras of quantum mechanical Hamiltonians provide quantum numbers (conservation laws, integrals of motion) for state labeling and the associated selection rules. In addition, it is often advantageous to employ much larger groups, referred to as the dynamical groups (noninvariance groups, dynamical algebras, spectrum generating algebras), which may or may not be the invariance groups of the studied system [4.1,2,3,4,5,6,7]. In all known cases, they are Lie groups (LGs), or rather corresponding Lie algebras (LAs), and one usually requires that all states of interest of a system be contained in a single irreducible representation (irrep). Likewise, one may require that the Hamiltonian be expressible in terms of the Casimir operators of the corresponding universal enveloping algebra [4.8,9]. In a weaker sense, one regards any group (or corresponding algebra) as a dynamical group if the Hamiltonian can be expressed in terms of its generators [4.10,11,12]. In nuclear physics, one sometimes distinguishes exact (baryon number preserving), almost exact (e.g., total isospin), approximate (e.g., SU(3) of the "eightfold way") and model (e.g., nuclear shell model) dynamical symmetries [4.13]. The dynamical groups of interest in atomic and molecular physics can be conveniently classified by their topological characteristic of compactness. Noncompact LGs (LAs) generally arise in simple problems involving an infinite number of bound states, while those involving a finite number of bound states (e.g., molecular vibrations or ab initio models of electronic structure) exploit compact LG's.

  9. Studies of Metal-Metal Bonded Compounds in Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, John [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2018-01-19

    The focus in this grant period has been on the preparation and study of compounds containing two metals (M) and a reactive main group fragment (E) aligned in a M–M=E linear array. These structures contain multiple bonds that interconnect the M and E groups, and are structures that had been proposed, but never observed, before our work.

  10. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  11. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.; Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schati, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1983-01-01

    The computer groups has been reorganized to take charge for the general purpose computers DEC10 and VAX and the computer network (Dataswitch, DECnet, IBM - connections to GSI and IPP, preparation for Datex-P). (orig.)

  12. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  13. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . These fields are interrelated and each of these fields contributes to the other. 2. Examples and classification. We first give some examples of Lie groups. The most frequently occurring ones are the linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), ...

  14. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S RAGHUNATHAN and T N VENKATARAMANA. ∗. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental ... linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), SOn(R),. SOn(C), Spn(R) and Spn(C). Let us call a con- nected Lie ..... split groups due respectively to C C Moore and. V Deodhar. B Sury solved the congruence subgroup ...

  15. Fingernails as biological indices of metal exposure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    metal levels (Cd, Pb, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn) in dif- ferent age groups of subjects with varying personal habits and prone to the hazards of trace metals in their occupa- tional environment. For this study, we have used finger- nails as biopsy material. Male subjects of matching ages in different groups were taken as controls ...

  16. Fingernails as biological indices of metal exposure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    sed vehicular traffic and use of fertilizers and pesticides in agriculture have resulted in increased metal contamina- tion in our environment. Not only the occupationally ex- posed workers (high-risk population group) but the community at large (low-risk population group) may suf- fer due to increased metal pollutants in the ...

  17. Sensor for metal detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-06-26

    NOVELTY - The sensor has a microfluidic flow channel that is provided with an inlet port, an outlet port, and a detection chamber. The detection chamber is provided with a group of sensing electrodes (4) having a working electrode (8), a counter electrode (9), and a reference electrode (10). A flow sensor is configured to measure flow in the channel. A temperature sensor (6) is configured to measure temperature in the channel (3). An electrical connection is configured to connect the sensor to a sensing device. USE - Sensor for detecting metal such as toxic metal in sample such as clinical sample such as stool, saliva, sputum, bronchial lavage, urine, vaginal swab, nasal swab, biopsy, tissue, tears, breath, blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, joint fluid, and amniotic fluid, water sample, food sample, air sample, and soil sample (all claimed). ADVANTAGE - The sensor for use with the portable analytical instrument is configured for detection of metalsin samples. The sensor can provide the excellent solution for on-site metal detection, including heavy metal detection. The sensors can provide significant advantages in higher throughput, lower cost, at the same time being less labor intensive and less dependent on individual skills. The disposable design of the sensor, the enhanced reliability and repeatability of measurements can be obtained. The sensors can be widely applied in various industries. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - INDEPENDENT CLAIMS are included for the following: (1) a system for detecting metal in sample; and (2) a method for using sensor for detecting metal in sample. DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING(S) - The drawing shows a schematic view of the sensor prototype. Channel (3) Sensing electrodes (4) Temperature sensor (6) Working electrode (8) Counter electrode (9) Reference electrode (10)

  18. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  19. THE ROLE OF METAL METABOLISM IN OXIDATIVE STRESS

    OpenAIRE

    KARTAL, Yasemin; BALCIOĞLU, Esra; KAYAALTI, Zeliha

    2018-01-01

    Metals aredivided into two groups including essential and nonessential, play important rolesin biological processes. Changes in metal ion homeostasis can lead to oxidativestress. This instance provides information that gene polymorphisms of enzymesand proteins involved in metal toxicokinetics causes possibly symptomaticeffects for numerous diseases including cancer due to playing an important rolein metal ion homeostasis. Therefore, there is an important relationship betweenmetal-induced geno...

  20. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  1. Group learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... with which they coexist. To achieve this, the research adopted phenomenology as a method and ethnography as strategy, using participant observation, in-depth interviews, and interviews-to-the-double. The results show that the collective management practice is a crossroad of other practices......, and they are interrelated to the group learning as the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the intelligibility of practices. From this perspective, it can be said that learning is a practice and not an exceptional phenomenon. Building, maintaining and rebuilding the intelligibility is the group learning...

  2. Separations of actinides, lanthanides and other metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ensor, Dale D.

    1995-01-01

    An organic extracting solution comprised of a bis(acylpyrazolone or a substituted bis(acylpyrazolone) and an extraction method useful for separating certain elements of the actinide series of the periodic table having a valence of four from one other, and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also useful for separating hexavalent actinides from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals.

  3. Evaluation of complexing agents and column temperature in ion chromatographic separation of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metals ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Pandey, Ashish; Name, Anil B.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Mohd Afzal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of ion chromatography method development is the resolution of all metal ions of interests. Resolution can be improved by changing the selectivity. Selectivity in chromatography can be altered by changes in mobile phase (eg eluent type, eluent strength) or through changes in stationary phase. Temperature has been used in altering the selectivity of particularly in reversed phase liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Present paper describe the retention behaviour of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions on a silica based carboxylate function group containing analyte column. Alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions were detected by ion conductivity and UV-VIS detectors respectively

  4. Electron energies in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, G.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-07-10

    The modern era of electron-electron interactions began a decade ago. Plummer's group initiated a program of using angular resolved photoemission to examine the band structure of the simple metals. Beginning with aluminum, and carrying on to sodium and potassium, they always found that the occupied energy bands were much narrower than expected. For example, the compressed energy bands for metallic potassium suggest a band effective mass of m* = 1.33m{sub e}. This should be compared to the band mass found from optical conductivity m*/m{sub e} = 1.01 {plus minus} 0.01. The discrepancy between these results is startling. It was this great difference which started my group doing calculations. Our program was two-fold. On one hand, we reanalyzed the experimental data, in order to see if Plummer's result was an experimental artifact. On the other hand, we completely redid the electron-electron self-energy calculations for simple metals, using the most modern choices of local-field corrections and vertex corrections. Our results will be reported in these lectures. They can be summarized as following: Our calculations give the same effective masses as the older calculations, so the theory is relatively unchanged; Our analysis of the experiments suggests that the recent measurements of band narrowing are an experimental artifact. 38 refs., 9 figs.

  5. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  6. Glassy metals

    CERN Document Server

    Russew, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    The topics discussed in this book focus on fundamental problems concerning the structural relaxation of amorphous metallic alloys, above all the possibility of studying it on the basis of viscous flow behavior and its relation to rheological anomalies, such as bend stress relaxation, thermal expansion, specific heat, density changes, and crystallization. Most relaxation studies deal with the relaxation changes of a single definite material property, and not with a wider spectrum of physical properties integrated into a common framework. This book shows that it is possible to describe these property changes on the basis of a more comprehensive theoretical understanding of their mechanism.

  7. Complementary metal ion specificity of the metal-citrate transporters CitM and CitH of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, BP; Warner, JB; Konings, WN; Lolkema, JS; Warner, Jessica B.

    2000-01-01

    Citrate uptake in Bacillus subtilis is stimulated by a wide range of divalent metal ions. The metal ions were separated into two groups based on the expression pattern of the uptake system. The two groups correlated with the metal ion specificity of two homologous B, subtilis secondary citrate

  8. Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Prisbrey, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

  9. Metal filled porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Adam F [Los Angeles, CA; Vajo, John J [West Hills, CA; Cumberland, Robert W [Malibu, CA; Liu, Ping [Irvine, CA; Salguero, Tina T [Encino, CA

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  10. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  11. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  12. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the v......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer...

  13. Design, synthesis and characterization of metal organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-12-03

    A molecular building block composition can include a metal ion component; and a ligand component including a core including at least one functional group associated with the metal ion component and the core.

  14. The removal of actinide metals from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.D.; Howell, I.V.

    1980-01-01

    A process is specified for removing actinide metals (e.g. uranium) from solutions. The solution is contacted with a substrate comprising the product obtained by reacting an inorganic solid containing surface hydroxyl groups (e.g. silica gel) with a compound containing a silane grouping, a nitrogen-containing group (e.g. an amine) and other specified radicals. After treatment, the actinide metal is recovered from the substrate. (U.K.)

  15. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity. IV - A compendium of metric theories of gravity and their post-Newtonian limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1972-01-01

    Metric theories of gravity are compiled and classified according to the types of gravitational fields they contain, and the modes of interaction among those fields. The gravitation theories considered are classified as (1) general relativity, (2) scalar-tensor theories, (3) conformally flat theories, and (4) stratified theories with conformally flat space slices. The post-Newtonian limit of each theory is constructed and its Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) values are obtained by comparing it with Will's version of the formalism. Results obtained here, when combined with experimental data and with recent work by Nordtvedt and Will and by Ni, show that, of all theories thus far examined by our group, the only currently viable ones are general relativity, the Bergmann-Wagoner scalar-tensor theory and its special cases (Nordtvedt; Brans-Dicke-Jordan), and a recent, new vector-tensor theory by Nordtvedt, Hellings, and Will.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Patterning on a Metal Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A CNT electron source, a method of manufacturing a CNT electron source, and a solar cell utilizing a CNT patterned sculptured substrate are disclosed. Embodiments utilize a metal substrate which enables CNTs to be grown directly from the substrate. An inhibitor may be applied to the metal substrate to inhibit growth of CNTs from the metal substrate. The inhibitor may be precisely applied to the metal substrate in any pattern, thereby enabling the positioning of the CNT groupings to be more precisely controlled. The surface roughness of the metal substrate may be varied to control the density of the CNTs within each CNT grouping. Further, an absorber layer and an acceptor layer may be applied to the CNT electron source to form a solar cell, where a voltage potential may be generated between the acceptor layer and the metal substrate in response to sunlight exposure.

  17. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  18. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stabilization of aqueous alkali metal aluminate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenson, S.J.

    1988-03-29

    A method of stabilizing an aqueous solution of alkali metal aluminate is described comprising: admixing an aqueous solution of alkali metal aluminate having a pH of at least 10 with a sufficient amount of vinyl polymer having pendant carboxylate groups to form a solution containing from 0.1 to 2.0 weight percent of an anionic vinyl polymer based on alkali metal aluminate solids. The anionic vinyl polymer has an average molecular weight of at least 500,000.

  20. The Sounds of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Two, I propose that this framework allows for at least a theoretical distinction between the way in which extreme metal – e.g. black metal, doom metal, funeral doom metal, death metal – relates to its sound as music and the way in which much other music may be conceived of as being constituted...

  1. Direct synthesis of some significant metal alkoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emilio, Gule Buyu

    1998-11-01

    Investigations were carried out with an attempt to study direct synthesis of metal alkoxides from elemental metals and appropriate alcohols. These were done by reacting representative metals of group I, II, III 7 IV (which are Na, Mg, Al and Sn respectively) directly with dry ethanol and dry isopropanol. The products were then analysed by infrared spectrophotometer to meter to identify metal alkoxides formed. Ethanol was found to have more acidic character in reactions with these metals than isopropanol, thus its reactions with the metals were faster. Reduction in the acidic character of isopropanol, a secondary alcohol, could be due to the existence off more alkyl groups in the molecule which displays +1 inductive effect. For the same alcohol the metals reactions were found to decrease with increase in electronegativity of the metals. Sodium being the least electronegative metal reacted fasted while tin the more electronegative metal reacted slowest. Mg, Al and Sn required a catalyst,, mercury (II) chloride and heat in order to initiate and drive the reactions completion. The alkoxides formed were found to be soluble to a certain extent in the tow alcohols and the order of solubility is such that Sn≥ Al ≥ Mg ≥ Na.(Author)

  2. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  3. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  4. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  5. Oxidation by metal salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhon'kov, D.I.; Cheprakov, A.V.; Rodkin, M.A.; Mil'chenko, A.Yu.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidation of toluene and para-substituted toluenes containing electron acceptor groups: p-toluic acid, p-methyltoluylate and p-nitrotoluene by ammonium cerium (4) nitrate and ammonium cerium (4) sulfate in aqueous solutions of trifluoroacetic acid in the presence of chlorides and bromides of alkali metals is studied. The rate and selectivity of oxidative halogenation in side chain and/or aromatic ring under the conditions studied depend both on the nature of substrate and halogenide-ion and on the reaction conditions and ligand surrounding of cerium (4) atom

  6. Effect of heavy metals on soil fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosak-Świderska, Bożena

    2010-05-01

    Fungi constitute a high proportion of the microbial biomass in soil.Being widespread in soil their large surface-to-volume ratio and high metabolic activity, fungi can contribute significantly to heavy metal dynamics in soil. At neutral pH heavy metals in soils tend to be immobilized to precipitation and/or absorption to cation exchange sites of clay minerals. In the acidic soils, metals are more mobile and enter food webs easier. Microbial production of acids and chelating agents can mobilize to toxic metals. Mobilization is often by uptake and intracellular accumulation of the heavy metlas, and in this way, the bioavailability of metals towards other organisms can be more reduced. Fungi were isolated from soils from Upper Silesia in Poland and belonged to widespread genera: Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Penicillium and Trichoderma. Fungi from different taxonomic groups differ greatly in their tolerance to heavy metals. This could be related to their wall structure and chemistry as well as biochemical and physiological characteristics of fungi. Localization of metals in fungal cells was studied using electron microscopy analysis. Metal biosorption in the cell wall can be complex as melanin granules. Fungal vacuoles have an important role in the regulation of the cytosolic concentration of metal ions, and may contribute to heavy metal tolerance.In polluted soils with heavy metals, fungal species composition can be changed and their physiological activity can be changed, too.

  7. The chemistry of the liquid alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A study of liquid alkali metals. It encourages comparison with molecular solvents in chapter covering the nature and reactivity of dissolved species, solvation, solubility and electrical conductivity of solutions. It demonstrates lab techniques unique to liquid alkali metals. It discusses large-scale applications from storage batteries to sodium-cooled reactors and future fusion reactors, and associated technological problems. Contents: Some Basic Physical and Chemical Properties; Manipulation of the Liquids; The Chemistry of Purification Methods; Species Formed by Dissolved Elements; Solubilities and Analytical Methods; Alkali Metal Mixtures; Solvation in Liquid Metal; Reactions Between Liquid Alkali Metals and Water; Reactions of Nitrogen with Lithium and the Group II Metals in Liquid Sodium; The Formation, Dissociation and Stability of Heteronuclear Polyatomic Anions; Reactions of the Liquid Alkali Metals and Their Alloys with Simple Alipatic Hydrocarbons; Reactions of the Liquid Alkali Metals with Some Halogen Compounds; Hydrogen, Oxygen and Carbon Meters; Surface Chemistry and Wetting; Corrosion of Transition Metals by the Liquid Alkali Metals; Modern Applications of the Liquid Alkali Metals

  8. Separation and preconcentration of platinum-group metals from spent autocatalysts solutions using a hetero-polymeric S, N-containing sorbent and determination by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskina, Vasilina V; Dalnova, Olga A; Filatova, Daria G; Baranovskaya, Vasilisa B; Karpov, Yuri A

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of Pt, Pd and Rh after separation and concentration by original in-house developed heterochain polymer S, N-containing sorbent. The methods of sample preparation of spent ceramic-based autocatalysts were considered, two of which were used: autoclave decomposition in mixture of acids HCl:HNO3 (3:1) and high-temperature melting with K2S2O7. Both methods anyway limit the direct determination of analytes by HR CS GFAAS. Using the first method it is an incomplete digestion of spent autocatalysts samples, since the precipitate is Si, and the rhodium metal dissolves with difficulty and partially passes into solution. In contrast to the first method, the second method allow to completely transfer analytes into solution, however, the background signal produced by the chemical composition of the flux, overlaps the analytical zone. It was found, that Pt, Pd and Rh contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively separated and concentrated by heterochain polymer S, N-containing sorbent, which has high sorption capacity, selectivity and resistant to dilute acids. The chosen HR CS GFAAS analysis conditions enable us to determine Pt, Pd and Rh with good metrological characteristics. The concentrations of Pt, Pd and Rh in two samples of automobile exhaust catalysts were found in range of 0.00015-0.00050; 0.170-0.189; 0.0180-0.0210wt%, respectively. The relative standard deviation obtained by HR CS GFAAS was not more than 5%. Limits of detection by HR CS GFAAS achieved were 6.2·10(-6)wt% for Pt, 1.8·10(-6)wt% for Pd, and 3.4·10(-6)wt% for Rh. Limits of determination achieved by HR CS GFAAS were 1.1·10(-5)wt% for Pt, 6.9·10(-5)wt% for Pd, and 8.3·10(-5)wt% for Rh. To control the accuracy of PGM in sorption concentrates by HR CS GFAAS method, it was appropriate to conduct an inter-method comparative experiment. The

  9. Some interesting structural features and metallated hypervalent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The metallation of hypervalent species/electron deficient molecules 1 of main group elements with transition metals through nucleophilic substitution reactions has resulted in the isolation of some novel products 2. These synthetic species have some interesting structural features. An overview of our experience in this field is ...

  10. Heavy metal biosorption by bacterial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecchio, A; Finoli, C; Di Simine, D; Andreoni, [No Value

    Microbial biomass provides available ligand groups on which metal ions bind by different mechanisms. Biosorption of these elements from aqueous solutions represents a remediation technology suitable for the treatment of metal-contaminated effluents. The purpose of the present investigation was the

  11. Metal polish poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal polishes are used to clean metals, including brass, copper, or silver. This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing metal polish. This article is for information only. DO NOT use ...

  12. Metal-phosphate binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  13. Metal RIE 2: Unaxis SHUTTLELINE ICP

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:CORAL Name: Unaxis ICP EtcherChlorine-based system utilizing Boron Trichloride and Chlorine to etch metals and III-V group materials on planar substrates...

  14. Heavy metal biosorption sites in Penicillium cyclopium | Tsekova ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biomass of Penicillium cyclopium was subjected to chemical treatment to study the role of the functional groups in the biosorption of heavy metal ions. The modifications of the functional groups were examined with infrared spectroscopy. Hydroxyl groups were identified as providing the major sites of heavy metal ...

  15. Platinum-group elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Loferski, Patricia J.; Parks, Heather L.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The platinum-group elements (PGEs)—platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium—are metals that have similar physical and chemical properties and tend to occur together in nature. PGEs are indispensable to many industrial applications but are mined in only a few places. The availability and accessibility of PGEs could be disrupted by economic, environmental, political, and social events. The United States net import reliance as a percentage of apparent consumption is about 90 percent.PGEs have many industrial applications. They are used in catalytic converters to reduce carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nitrous oxide emissions in automobile exhaust. The chemical industry requires platinum or platinum-rhodium alloys to manufacture nitric oxide, which is the raw material used to manufacture explosives, fertilizers, and nitric acid. In the petrochemical industry, platinum-supported catalysts are needed to refine crude oil and to produce aromatic compounds and high-octane gasoline. Alloys of PGEs are exceptionally hard and durable, making them the best known coating for industrial crucibles used in the manufacture of chemicals and synthetic materials. PGEs are used by the glass manufacturing industry in the production of fiberglass and flat-panel and liquid crystal displays. In the electronics industry, PGEs are used in computer hard disks, hybridized integrated circuits, and multilayer ceramic capacitors.Aside from their industrial applications, PGEs are used in such other fields as health, consumer goods, and finance. Platinum, for example, is used in medical implants, such as pacemakers, and PGEs are used in cancer-fighting drugs. Platinum alloys are an ideal choice for jewelry because of their white color, strength, and resistance to tarnish. Platinum, palladium, and rhodium in the form of coins and bars are also used as investment commodities, and various financial instruments based on the value of these PGEs are traded on major exchanges

  16. Metal spectra as indicators of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T E; Cao, J

    2010-12-07

    We have assembled extensive information on the cycles of seven industrial metals in 49 countries, territories, or groups of countries, drawn from a database of some 200,000 material flows, and have devised analytical approaches to treat the suite of metals as composing an approach to a national "materials metabolism." We demonstrate that in some of the more developed countries, per capita metal use is more than 10 times the global average. Additionally, countries that use more than the per capita world average of any metal do so for all metals, and vice versa, and countries that are above global average rates of use are very likely to be above global average rates at all stages of metal life cycles from fabrication onward. We show that all countries are strongly dependent on international trade to supply the spectrum of nonrenewable resources that modern technology requires, regardless of their level of development. We also find that the rate of use of the spectrum of metals stock is highly correlated to per capita gross domestic product, as well as to the Human Development Index and the Global Competitiveness Innovation Index. The implication is that as wealth and technology increase in developing countries, strong demand will be created not for a few key resources, but across the entire spectrum of the industrial metals. Long-term metal demand can be estimated given gross domestic product projections; the results suggest overall metal flow into use in 2050 of 5-10 times today's level should supplies permit.

  17. Transition-metal complexes [(PMe(3))(2)Cl(2)M(E)] and [(PMe(3))(2)(CO)(2)M(E)] with naked group 14 atoms (E=C-Sn) as ligands; part 1: parent compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Pattiyil; Frenking, Gernot

    2009-09-07

    The equilibrium geometries and bond dissociation energies of 16-valence-electron(VE) complexes [(PMe(3))(2)Cl(2)M(E)] and 18-VE complexes [(PMe(3))(2)(CO)(2)M(E)] with M=Fe, Ru, Os and E=C, Si, Ge, Sn were calculated by using density functional theory at the BP86/TZ2P level. The nature of the M--E bond was analyzed with the NBO charge decomposition analysis and the EDA energy-decomposition analysis. The theoretical results predict that the heavier Group 14 complexes [(PMe(3))(2)Cl(2)M(E)] and [(PMe(3))(2)(CO)(2)M(E)] with E=Si, Ge, Sn have C(2v) equilibrium geometries in which the PMe(3) ligands are in the axial positions. The complexes have strong M--E bonds which are slightly stronger in the 16-VE species 1ME than in the 18-VE complexes 2ME. The calculated bond dissociation energies show that the M--E bonds become weaker in both series in the order C>Si>Ge>Sn; the bond strength increases in the order FeE pi-acceptor bonds, which are not degenerate. The shape of the frontier orbitals reveals that the HOMO-2 sigma MO and the LUMO and LUMO+1 pi* MOs of 1ME are very similar to the frontier orbitals of CO.

  18. Possibilities Of Metals Extracton From Spent Metallic Automotive Catalytic Converters By Using Biometallurgical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willner J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main task of automotive catalytic converters is reducing the amount of harmful components of exhaust gases. Metallic catalytic converters are an alternative to standard ceramic catalytic converters. Metallic carriers are usually made from FeCrAl steel, which is covered by a layer of Precious Group Metals (PGMs acting as a catalyst. There are many methods used for recovery of platinum from ceramic carriers in the world, but the issue of platinum and other metals recovery from metallic carriers is poorly described. The article presents results of preliminary experiments of metals biooxidation (Fe, Cr and Al from spent catalytic converters with metallic carrier, using bacteria of the Acidithiobacillus genus.

  19. Heavy metal jako subkultura

    OpenAIRE

    KOUTNÁ, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with heavy metal subculture. Its aim is to introduce the most important branches and to show broadness of heavy metal. This bachelor thesis describes development and history, briefly shows Czech heavy metal history alongside with the biggest and most popular Czech heavy metal festivals. It shows the most dressing concerns of society against this style.

  20. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in the...

  1. Defect-Tolerant Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Rasmussen, Filip Anselm; Kuhar, Korina

    2016-01-01

    -principles investigation of defect tolerance in 29 monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) of interest for nanoscale optoelectronics. We find that the TMDs based on group VI and X metals form deep gap states upon creation of a chalcogen (S, Se, Te) vacancy, while the TMDs based on group IV metals form only...... shallow defect levels and are thus predicted to be defect-tolerant. Interestingly, all the defect sensitive TMDs have valence and conduction bands with a very similar orbital composition. This indicates a bonding/antibonding nature of the gap, which in turn suggests that dangling bonds will fall inside...

  2. Metals and metal derivatives in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colotti, Gianni; Ilari, Andrea; Boffi, Alberto; Morea, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    Several chemical elements are required by living organisms in addition to the four elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen usually present in common organic molecules. Many metals (e.g. sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum and selenium) are known to be required for normal biological functions in humans. Disorders of metal homeostasis and of metal bioavailability, or toxicity caused by metal excess, are responsible for a large number of human diseases. Metals are also extensively used in medicine as therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. In the past 5000 years, metals such as arsenic, gold and iron have been used to treat a variety of human diseases. Nowadays, an ever-increasing number of metal-based drugs is available. These contain a broad spectrum of metals, many of which are not among those essential for humans, able to target proteins and/or DNA. This mini-review describes metal-containing compounds targeting DNA or proteins currently in use, or designed to be used, as therapeutics against cancer, arthritis, parasitic and other diseases, with a special focus on the available information, often provided by X-ray studies, about their mechanism of action at a molecular level. In addition, an overview of metal complexes used for diagnosing diseases is presented.

  3. Effect of Metal Collar on Marginal Distortion of Base Metal Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grami Panah F

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that noble alloys require metal collar to resist distortion when subjected to"nrepeat firing cycle of porcelain. Metal collar is undesirable due to esthetic concerns. Since base metal"nalloys have superior physical properties, it seems that metal collar would not be necessary for obtaining"nbetter marginal adaptation of base metal crowns. The Purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of"nmetal collar on marginal distortion of base metal- ceramic crowns, Twenty base metal copings were"nconstructed and divided into two groups with and without collars. After surface preparation, porcelain"nwas applied onto the surface of specimens. Marginal gap was measured by scanning electron microscope"nduring three stages of crown fabrication: before degassing, after degassing and after glazing. The mean"nmeasurements in collarless group were; 21.4±13.4, 2I.4±14.9 and 21.9±11.9 u_m, respectively, and in-"ngroup with collar; 24.7±11.4, 24.0±! 1.5 and 26.6±11.7 urn, respectively. Two- way ANOVA revealed"nno significant difference in the mean values between two groups and among different stages of crown"nfabrication. The results of this study showed that base metal alloys did not distort during crown"nfabrication and metal collar had no effect on the amount of marginal opening (gap.

  4. The role of Glutathione, Cysteine and D-Penicillamine in exchanging Palladium and Vanadium metals from albumin metal complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtiar, Muhammad; Jan, Syed Umer; Ullah, Ihsan; Hussain, Abid; Ullah, Izhar; Gul, Rahman; Ali, Essa; Jabbar, Abdul; Kuthu, Zulfiqar Hussan; Wasim, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Farid

    2017-11-01

    Thiol groups are extensively present across biological systems being found in range of small molecules (e.g. Glutathione, Homo-cysteine) and proteins (e.g. albumin, haemo-globin). Albumin is considered to be a major thiol containing protein present in circulating Plasma. Albumin contains a single thiolate group located at cysteine-34(cys-34) at its active site. Albumin also binds a wide variety of metals and metals complexes at various sites around the protein. Usually heavy metals are preferentially attached with the thiol group of albumin. The binding of heavy metals at cys-34 provides a mechanism by which the residence time of potentially toxic species in the body can be increased. In this research we have assessed the oxidative modification of and metal binding capacity of cys-34 with heavy metals Palladium and Vanadium to investigate the ease with which it is possible to effect disulfide-thiol exchange at this sites/or remove a metal bound at this position. Both the metals were treated with albumin and then the albumin metals (Pd and V) complexes were treated with small thoil molecules like Glutathione, Cysteine and D-Penicillamine. Our finding showed that the albumin thiol group retained the metals with itself by forming some strong bonding with the Thiols group, it is concluded from this finding that if by chance both the metals enter the living system; strongly disturb the chemistry and physiological function of this bio-molecule.

  5. MetalPDB: a database of metal sites in biological macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreini, Claudia; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Lorenzini, Serena; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We present here MetalPDB (freely accessible at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it), a novel resource aimed at conveying the information available on the three-dimensional (3D) structures of metal-binding biological macromolecules in a consistent and effective manner. This is achieved through the systematic and automated representation of metal-binding sites in proteins and nucleic acids by way of Minimal Functional Sites (MFSs). MFSs are 3D templates that describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure embedding the site(s), and are the central objects of MetalPDB design. MFSs are grouped into equistructural (broadly defined as sites found in corresponding positions in similar structures) and equivalent sites (equistructural sites that contain the same metals), allowing users to easily analyse similarities and variations in metal-macromolecule interactions, and to link them to functional information. The web interface of MetalPDB allows access to a comprehensive overview of metal-containing biological structures, providing a basis to investigate the basic principles governing the properties of these systems. MetalPDB is updated monthly in an automated manner.

  6. Recycling of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Metals like iron and aluminium are produced from mineral ore and used for a range of products, some of which have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of municipal waste. Packaging in terms of cans, foils and containers are products with a short lifetime. Other products like...... appliances, vehicles and buildings, containing iron and aluminium metals, have long lifetimes before they end up in the waste stream. The recycling of production waste and postconsumer metals has a long history in the metal industry. Some metal smelters are today entirely based on scarp metals. This chapter...... describes briefly how iron and aluminium are produced and how scrap metal is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of metal recycling. Copper and other metals are also found in waste but in much smaller...

  7. Fragmentos e tópoi biográficos nos séculos V e IV A.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ipiranga Júnior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available O fenômeno biográfico na Antiguidade perpassa vários campos discursivos e gêneros literários. Pretendo abordar a formação de um campo biográfico anterior à consolidação do gênero do bíos antigo, a partir de algumas obras do séc. IV a.C. e de fragmentos do séc. V a.C. Em vista disso, reformulo a concepção de tópos biográfico no sentido de abranger obras com alguns traços biográficos, mas que não se enquadrariam estritamente no gênero. O propósito, por conseguinte, seria traçar uma taxonomia desses tópoi, assinalando o tipo de pertinência, função e contextualização nos diversos relatos.

  8. Catalytic oligomerization of ethylene to higher linear alpha-olefins promoted by the cationic group 4 [(eta 5-Cp-(CMe2-bridge)-Ph)MII(ethylene)2]+ (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) active catalysts: a density functional investigation of the influence of the metal on the catalytic activity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobisch, Sven; Ziegler, Tom

    2004-07-28

    A detailed theoretical analysis is presented of the catalytic abilities of heavier group 4 (M = Zr, Hf) metals for linear ethylene oligomerization with the cationic [(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)-(CMe(2)-bridge)-C(6)H(5))M(IV)(CH(3))(2)](+) complex as precatalyst, employing a gradient-corrected DFT method. The parent Ti system has been reported as a highly selective catalyst for ethylene trimerization. The mechanism involving metallacycle intermediates, originally proposed by Briggs and Jolly, has been supported by the present study to be operative for the investigated class of group 4 catalysts. Metallacycle growth through bimolecular ethylene uptake and subsequent insertion is likely to occur at uniform rates for larger cycles that are furthermore comparable for Ti, Zr, and Hf catalysts. Ethylene insertion into the two smallest five- and seven-membered cycles is found to become accelerated for Zr and Hf catalysts, which is due to geometrical factors. In contrast, electronic effects act to raise the barrier for metallacycle decomposition, affording alpha-olefins upon descending group 4. This process is furthermore predicted to be kinetically more difficult for larger metallacycles. The oligomer distribution of the Zr-mediated reaction is likely to comprise predominantly 1-hexene together with 1-octene, while 1-butene and alpha-olefins of chain lengths C(10)-C(18) should occur only in negligible portions. A similar composition of alpha-olefins having C(6)-C(18) chain lengths is indicated for the Hf catalysts, but with long-chain oligomers and polymers as the prevalent fraction. Between the group 4 catalysts of the investigated type, the Zr system appears as the most promising candidate having catalytic potential for production of 1-octene, although not selectively. The influence of temperature to modulate the oligomer product composition has been evaluated.

  9. Stabilization of electrocatalytic metal nanoparticles at metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junction points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chongmin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Park, Sehkyu; Aksay, Ilhan A; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2011-03-02

    Carbon-supported precious metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, and enhancement of catalyst dispersion and stability by controlling the interfacial structure is highly desired. Here we report a new method to deposit metal oxides and metal nanoparticles on graphene and form stable metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junctions for electrocatalysis applications. We first synthesize indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals directly on functionalized graphene sheets, forming an ITO-graphene hybrid. Platinum nanoparticles are then deposited, forming a unique triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Our experimental work and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are more stable at the Pt-ITO-graphene triple junctions. Furthermore, DFT calculations suggest that the defects and functional groups on graphene also play an important role in stabilizing the catalysts. These new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity.

  10. Predicting metal toxicity revisited: general properties vs. specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterbeek, H T; Verburg, T G

    2001-11-12

    The present paper addresses the prediction of metal toxicity by evaluation of the relationships between general metal properties and toxic effects. For this, metal toxicity data were taken from 30 literature data sets, which varied largely in exposure times, organisms, effects and effect levels. General metal properties were selected on basis of literature reviewing of basic metal property classifications: used were the electrochemical potential deltaE0; the ionization potential IP; the ratio between atomic radius and atomic weight AR/AW; and the electronegativity Xm. The results suggest that toxicity prediction may be performed on basis of these fixed metal properties without any adoption to specific organisms, without any division of metals into classes, or grouping of toxicity tests. The results further indicate that metal properties contribute to the observed effects in relative importances which depend on specific effects, effect levels, exposure times, selected organisms and ambient conditions. The discussion strongly suggests that prediction should be by interpolation rather than by extrapolation of calibrated toxicity data: the concept here is that unknown metal toxicities are predicted on basis of observed metal toxicities in calibration experiments. Considering the used metal properties, the calibration covers the largest number of metals by the simultanuous use of Ge(IV), Cs(I), Li(I), Mn(VII), Sc and Bi in toxicity studies. Based on the data from the 30 studies considered, metal toxicities could be ordered in a relative way. This ordering indicates that the natural abundance of metals or metal ions in the Earth's crust may be regarded as a general comparative measure of the metal toxicities. The problems encountered in toxicity interpretation and ordering of toxicities indicate that control of the solution acidity, the metal's solubility and the metal's oxidation state may be key problems to overcome in future metal ion toxicity studies.

  11. Atum: Scalable Group Communication Using Volatile Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Pavlovic, Matej; Seredinschi, Dragos-Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Atum, a group communication middleware for a large, dynamic, and hostile environment. At the heart of Atum lies the novel concept of volatile groups: small, dynamic groups of nodes, each executing a state machine replication protocol, organized in a flexible overlay. Using volatile groups, Atum scatters faulty nodes evenly among groups, and then masks each individual fault inside its group. To broadcast messages among volatile groups, Atum runs a gossip protocol across the...

  12. Mixed amido-cyclopentadienyl group 4 metal complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlík, Aleš; Lamač, Martin; Pinkas, Jiří; Růžička, A.; Horáček, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 73 (2015), s. 59154-59166 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/0924 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : BOND COVALENT RADII * IMIDO COMPLEXES * SIDE-ON Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.289, year: 2015

  13. Dipicolinate complexes of main group metals with hydrazinium cation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The capacity of pyridine carboxylic acids to act as ligand is an important property, relevant in several areas of ... There are, however, a few examples of other coordination modes of. *For correspondence ... powdered solid formed after 24 h was filtered out and the filtrate was reduced to 25 ml volume and left at room ...

  14. Modulated structures of some group V transition metal compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronsema, Klaas Derk

    1985-01-01

    Crystals usually are considered as being built by a three-dimensional periodic array of relatively simple basic units. With the aid of e.g. X-ray diffraction the periodicity of this array and the arrangement of the atoms within the basic unit -the unit cell- can be determined. This is indeed the

  15. Platinum Group Metal Recycling Technology Development - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Shore

    2009-08-19

    BASF Catalysts LLC, formerly Engelhard Corporation, has completed a project to recover Pt from PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies. The project, which began in 2003, has met the project objective of an environmentally-friendly, cost-effective method for recovery of platinum without release of hydrogen fluoride. This has been achieved using a combination of milling, dispersion and acid leaching. 99% recovery of Pt was achieved, and this high yield can be scaled up using one vessel for a single leach and rinse. Leaching was been successfully achieved using a 10% solids level, double the original target. At this solids content, the reagent and utility costs represent ~0.35% of the Pt value of a lot, using very conservative assumptions. The main cost of the process is capital depreciation, followed by labor.

  16. Synthesis and structural study of platinum group metal complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    )Cl]2, [CpRu(PPh3)2Cl] and [Cp∗M(-Cl)Cl]2, respectively, in the presence of NH4PF6. They were characterized by the following techniques viz. IR, NMR, mass spectrometry and UV-visible spectroscopy. The molecular structures of [2] and [7] ...

  17. SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1959-01-20

    It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

  18. Glassy metallic plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfu; Wang, Junqiang; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Bo; Bai, Haiyang; Pan, Mingxiang; Wang, Weihua

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports a class of bulk metallic glass including Ce-, LaCe-, CaLi-, Yb-, and Sr-based metallic glasses, which are regarded as glassy metallic plastics because they combine some unique properties of both plastics and metallic alloys. These glassy metallic plastics have very low glass transition temperature ( T g ˜25°C to 150°C) and low Young’s modulus (˜20 GPa to 35 GPa). Similar to glassy plastics, these metallic plastics show excellent plastic-like deformability on macro-, micro- and even nano-scale in their supercooled liquid range and can be processed, such as elongated, compressed, bent, and imprinted at low temperatures, in hot water for instance. Under ambient conditions, they display such metallic properties as high thermal and electric conductivities and excellent mechanical properties and other unique properties. The metallic plastics have potential applications and are also a model system for studying issues in glass physics.

  19. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  20. Metal-doped semiconductor nanoparticles and methods of synthesis thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor); Chen, Gang (Inventor); Poudel, Bed (Inventor); Kumar, Shankar (Inventor); Wang, Wenzhong (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to binary or higher order semiconductor nanoparticles doped with a metallic element, and thermoelectric compositions incorporating such nanoparticles. In one aspect, the present invention provides a thermoelectric composition comprising a plurality of nanoparticles each of which includes an alloy matrix formed of a Group IV element and Group VI element and a metallic dopant distributed within the matrix.

  1. Natural microbial system for heavy metals cleanup application

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compq

    2012-05-24

    May 24, 2012 ... infrared (FTIR) analysis has identified some organosulfur groups (thiol, disulfide and thiocarbonyl), in addition to amine group in the ... an important role in the reduction of heavy metals toxicity through the bioprecipitation of ... The metal tolerance profile of the isolated bacteria was carried out according to ...

  2. Disintegration and size reduction of slags and metals after melt refining of contaminated metallic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G.L.; Heestand, R.L.

    1981-04-01

    Melting under an oxidizing slag is an attractive method of decontaminating and reducing the volume of radioactively contaminated metal scrap. The contaminants are concentrated in a relatively small volume of slag, which leaves the metal essentially clean. A potential method of permanently disposing of the resulting slags (and metals if necessary) is emplacing them into deep shale by grout hydrofracture. Suspension in grout mixtures requires that the slag and metal be granular. The feasibility of size-reducing slags and disintegrating metals and subsequently incorporating both into grout mixtures was demonstrated. Various types of slags were crushed with a small jaw crusher into particles smaller than 3 mm. Several metals were also melted and water-blasted into coarse metal powder or shot ranging in size from 0.05 to 3 mm. A simple low-pressure water atomizer having a multiple nozzle with a converging-line jet stream was developed and used for this purpose. No significant slag dust and steam were generated during slag crushing and liquid-metal water-blasting tests, indicating that contamination can be well contained within the system. The crushed slags and the coarse metal powders were suspendable in group fluids, which indicates probable disposability by shale hydrofracture. The granulation of slags and metals facilitates their containment, transport, and storage

  3. Semi-metallic polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubnova, Olga; Khan, Zia Ullah; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Polymers are lightweight, flexible, solution-processable materials that are promising for low-cost printed electronics as well as for mass-produced and large-area applications. Previous studies demonstrated that they can possess insulating, semiconducting or metallic properties; here we report...... a Fermi glass to a semi-metal. The high Seebeck value, the metallic conductivity at room temperature and the absence of unpaired electron spins makes polymer semi-metals attractive for thermoelectrics and spintronics....

  4. Marks of Metal Copenhell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet.......Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet....

  5. Nanochemistry of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, Gleb B

    2001-01-01

    The results of studies on the nanochemistry of metals published in recent years are generalised. Primary attention is centred on the methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles and their chemical reactions. The means of stabilisation of nanoparticles which involve individual metals and incorporate atoms of several metals are considered as well as their physicochemical properties. Self-assembling processes of nanoparticles are described. The prospects of using metal nanoparticles in semiconductor devices, catalysis, biology and medicine are discussed. The bibliography includes 165 references.

  6. Metal release and metal allergy after total hip replacement with resurfacing versus conventional hybrid prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Klas; Jakobsen, Stig S; Lorenzen, Nina D; Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Stilling, Maiken; Baad-Hansen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasties were reintroduced because of the problems with osteolysis and aseptic loosening related to polyethylene wear of early metal-on-polyethylene (MOP) arthroplasties. The volumetric wear rate has been greatly reduced with MOM arthroplasties; however, because of nano-size wear particles, the absolute number has been greatly increased. Thus, a source of metal ion exposure with the potential to sensitize patients is present. We hypothesized that higher amounts of wear particles result in increased release of metal ions and ultimately lead to an increased incidence of metal allergy. Methods 52 hips in 52 patients (median age 60 (51–64) years, 30 women) were randomized to either a MOM hip resurfacing system (ReCap) or a standard MOP total hip arthoplasty (Mallory Head/Exeter). Spot urine samples were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, after 3 months, and after 1, 2, and 5 years and tested with inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. After 5 years, hypersensitivity to metals was evaluated by patch testing and lymphocyte transformation assay. In addition, the patients answered a questionnaire about hypersensitivity. Results A statistically significant 10- to 20-fold increase in urinary levels of cobalt and chromium was observed throughout the entire follow-up in the MOM group. The prevalence of metal allergy was similar between groups. Interpretation While we observed significantly increased levels of metal ions in the urine during the entire follow-up period, no difference in prevalence of metal allergy was observed in the MOM group. However, the effect of long-term metal exposure remains uncertain. PMID:24930546

  7. Metallophilic interactions in polymeric group 11 thiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolari, Kalle; Sahamies, Joona; Kalenius, Elina; Novikov, Alexander S.; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu.; Haukka, Matti

    2016-10-01

    Three polymeric group 11 transition metal polymers featuring metallophilic interactions were obtained directly via self-assembly of metal ions and 4-pyridinethiol ligands. In the cationic [Cu2(S-pyH)4]n2+ with [ZnCl4]n2- counterion (1) and in the neutral [Ag(S-py) (S-pyH)]n (2) 4-pyridinethiol (S-pyH) and its deprotonated form (S-py) are coordinated through the sulfur atom. Both ligands are acting as bridging ligands linking the metal centers together. In the solid state, the gold(I) polymer [Au(S-pyH)2]Cl (3) consists of the repeating cationic [Au(S-pyH)2]+ units held together by aurophilic interactions. Compound 1 is a zig-zag chain, whereas the metal chains in the structures of 2 and 3 are linear. The protonation level of the thiol ligand had an impact on the crystallization of polymers. Both nature of the metal center and reaction conditions affected the polymerization. QTAIM analysis confirmed direct metal-metal contacts only in polymers 1 and 3. In polymer 2, no theoretical evidence of argentophilic contacts was obtained even though the AgṡṡṡAg distance was found to be less than sum of the Bondi's van der Waals radius of silver.

  8. Novel Ammonium Metal Borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Jepsen, Lars Haahr; Cerny, Radovan

    halide-free ammonium metal borohydrides is presented, which have the chemical compositions (NH4)xM(BH4)n+x. The ammonium metal borohydrides are synthesized by cryomilling of NH4BH4 – M(BH4)n (M = Li, Na, K, Mg, Sr, Y, Mn, La, Gd) in different ratios. A new range of ammonium metal borohydrides is formed...

  9. Adiponectin has a pivotal role in the cardioprotective effect of CP-3(iv), a selective CD36 azapeptide ligand, after transient coronary artery occlusion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, David N; Bessi, Valérie L; Ménard, Liliane; Piquereau, Jérôme; Proulx, Caroline; Febbraio, Maria; Lubell, William D; Carpentier, André C; Burelle, Yan; Ong, Huy; Marleau, Sylvie

    2018-02-01

    CD36 is a multiligand receptor involved in lipid metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of CP-3(iv), an azapeptide belonging to a new class of selective CD36 ligands. The role of CP-3(iv) in mediating cardioprotection was investigated because CD36 signaling leads to activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, a transcriptional regulator of adiponectin. CP-3(iv) pretreatment reduced infarct size by 54% and preserved hemodynamics in C57BL/6 mice subjected to 30 min coronary ligation and reperfusion but had no effect in CD36-deficient mice. The effects of CP-3(iv) were associated with an increase in circulating adiponectin levels, epididymal fat adiponectin gene expression, and adiponectin transcriptional regulators ( Pparg, Cebpb, Sirt1) after 6 h of reperfusion. Reduced myocardial oxidative stress and apoptosis were observed along with an increase in expression of myocardial adiponectin target proteins, including cyclooxygenase-2, phospho-AMPK, and phospho-Akt. Moreover, CP-3(iv) increased myocardial performance in isolated hearts, whereas blockade of adiponectin with an anti-adiponectin antibody abrogated it. CP-3(iv) exerts cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (MI/R) injury and dysfunction, at least in part, by increasing circulating and myocardial adiponectin levels. Hence, both paracrine and endocrine effects of adiponectin may contribute to reduced reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis after MI/R, in a CD36-dependent manner.-Huynh, D. N., Bessi, V. L., Ménard, L., Piquereau, J., Proulx, C., Febbraio, M., Lubell, W. D., Carpentier, A. C., Burelle, Y., Ong, H., Marleau, S. Adiponectin has a pivotal role in the cardioprotective effect of CP-3(iv), a selective CD36 azapeptide ligand, after transient coronary artery occlusion in mice.

  10. Accumulation and effects of metal mixtures in two seaweed species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Tayler A; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2015-05-01

    Metal pollution, due to various anthropogenic sources, may pose a threat to marine ecosystems. Metals can be introduced into food chains via bioaccumulation in primary producers, and may potentially lead to toxic effects. Macroalgae are used as food by a wide variety of organisms, and are therefore extremely important in aquatic systems. This study investigated the accumulation and effects of metals in two macroalgae species. The green seaweed, Ulva lactuca and the red seaweed, Agardhiella subulata were each concurrently exposed to five metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd, and Zn) and U. lactuca was also exposed to each metal individually for 48 h. Metal accumulation in the seaweed was measured, and various photosynthetic parameters were assessed, using imaging pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry. Increased metal accumulation occurred in both seaweed species after 48 h exposure to metal mixtures and each metal individually. The distribution of metals in both seaweed species changed with increasing metal exposure concentrations, resulting in higher proportions of Cu and Zn in the metal-exposed groups, as compared to respective controls. Further, U. lactuca accumulated higher concentrations of metals when exposed to each metal individually rather than in metal mixtures, suggesting interactions among metals for uptake and/or bioaccumulation. Significant impairment of photosynthetic parameters in U. lactuca was observed after exposure to 100 and 1000 μg/L metal mixtures, as well as 100 μg/L of either Cd or Cu. These results demonstrate metal bioaccumulation and toxic effects in important primary producers, and may have implications for higher trophic levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur...

  12. Heavy metals in human primary teeth: some factors influencing the metal concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvinnereim, H M; Eide, R; Riise, T

    2000-06-08

    Human primary teeth have been used as indicators of heavy metal exposure for several decades, but the knowledge about the influence of factors such as tooth type and the presence of caries and roots on metal concentrations is limited. Samples of tooth powder from more than 1200 Norwegian primary teeth without fillings have been analyzed for lead, zinc and cadmium content, and 554 of them for mercury. The material represents all groups of tooth types (incisors, canines and molars), carious and non-carious teeth, and teeth with and without roots. Here we investigate how tooth group and the presence of caries and roots are related to metal concentrations in the teeth. We find that carious teeth have higher metal concentrations than non-carious teeth; the difference was statistically significant for lead, mercury and zinc. Teeth with roots have higher lead and zinc concentrations than teeth without roots. We find differences in metal concentrations between the tooth groups for lead, mercury and zinc. Significant, positive correlations are found between lead and the three other metals and between mercury and zinc. We conclude that metal concentrations in primary teeth are affected by the presence of caries and roots and by tooth group.

  13. Biomolecules for Removal of Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namita Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Patents reveal that heavy metals are natural constituents of the earth's crust, but some heavy metals like cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic etc. are injurious to living organisms at higher concentration. Nowadays, anthropogenic activities have altered geochemical cycles and biochemical balance of heavy metals. Biomolecules are used nowadays for removal of heavy metals compared to other synthetic biosorbents due to their environmental friendly nature and cost effectiveness. The goal of this work is to identify the role of biomolecules like polysaccharides, polypeptides, natural compounds containing aromatic acid etc. for heavy metal removal by bio sorption. It has been observed that efficiency of biomolecules can be increased by functionalization e.g. cellulose functionalization with EDTA, chitosan with sulphur groups, alginate with carboxyl/ hydroxyl group etc. It was found that the porous structure of aerogel beads improves both sorption and kinetic properties of the material. Out of polypeptides metallothionein has been widely used for removal of heavy metal up to 88% from seawater after a single centrifugation. These cost effective functionalized biomolecules are significantly used for remediation of heavy metals by immobilizing these biomolecules onto materials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Band theory of metals the elements

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, Simon L

    1970-01-01

    Band Theory of Metals: The Elements focuses on the band theory of solids. The book first discusses revision of quantum mechanics. Topics include Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, normalization, stationary states, wave and group velocities, mean values, and variational method. The text takes a look at the free-electron theory of metals, including heat capacities, density of states, Fermi energy, core and metal electrons, and eigenfunctions in three dimensions. The book also reviews the effects of crystal fields in one dimension. The eigenfunctions of the translations; symmetry operations of t

  15. Use of algae for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S K; Gaur, J P

    2005-01-01

    Many algae have immense capability to sorb metals, and there is considerable potential for using them to treat wastewaters. Metal sorption involves binding on the cell surface and to intracellular ligands. The adsorbed metal is several times greater than intracellular metal. Carboxyl group is most important for metal binding. Concentration of metal and biomass in solution, pH, temperature, cations, anions and metabolic stage of the organism affect metal sorption. Algae can effectively remove metals from multi-metal solutions. Dead cells sorb more metal than live cells. Various pretreatments enhance metal sorption capacity of algae. CaCl2 pretreatment is the most suitable and economic method for activation of algal biomass. Algal periphyton has great potential for removing metals from wastewaters. An immobilized or granulated biomass-filled column can be used for several sorption/desorption cycles with unaltered or slightly decreased metal removal. Langmuir and Freundlich models, commonly used for fitting sorption data, cannot precisely describe metal sorption since they ignore the effect of pH, biomass concentration, etc. For commercial application of algal technology for metal removal from wastewaters, emphasis should be given to: (i) selection of strains with high metal sorption capacity, (ii) adequate understanding of sorption mechanisms, (iii) development of low-cost methods for cell immobilization, (iv) development of better models for predicting metal sorption, (v) genetic manipulation of algae for increased number of surface groups or over expression of metal binding proteins, and (vi) economic feasibility.

  16. Multiple allergies to metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Eng Tu

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: Metal alloys may induce multiple metal allergies. Patients suspected of having a metal allergy should be patch tested with an extended series of metals. We recommend adding palladium and gold, at least, to the standard series.

  17. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  18. Toxicity from Metals, Old Menaces and New Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Briner

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Metals make up the bulk of the periodic table and range from the very light (e.g., beryllium to the very heavy (e.g., the actinides. Metals are important constituents of life, drive economic activity and industry, but can also be a hazard to human health. The metals can be roughly divided into three groups. The first being those metals, such as iron and zinc, that are essential to human life and have a wide therapeutic dose range. The second group of metals, such as lead, mercury, and uranium, has no known biological role and are toxic even at low doses. The third group of metals, such as selenium and manganese, has a role in maintaining human health but has a very narrow dose range that, when exceeded, produces toxic effects. [...

  19. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  20. Histologic, serologic, and tribologic findings in failed metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty: AAOS exhibit selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, Christopher E; Erickson, Jill; Clarke, Ian; Donaldson, Thomas; Layfield, Lester; Peters, Christopher L

    2013-11-06

    Despite multiple changes in second-generation metal-on-metal hip implants, greater-than-expected revision rates have led to alarm. We hypothesized that the finding of intraoperative metallosis would be associated with a high metal load on histologic analysis and that both would be associated with increased wear, greater serum metal ion levels, and predictable biologic responses in the histologic sections. We evaluated the implant positioning, serum ion levels, intraoperative findings of metallosis, wear characteristics of retrieved implants (tribology), histology, and outcomes in a series of eighteen large-diameter metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties. The arthroplasties were divided into two groups on the basis of the intraoperative finding of metallosis and into two groups on the basis of the metal load score. Intraoperative metallosis was not associated with a high metal load score (p = 0.15). The finding of intraoperative metallosis was associated with greater serum metal ion levels, greater wear rates, and greater complication rates. Aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL) scores were similar between the metallosis and non-metallosis groups (p = 0.49) as well as between the high and low-metal-load groups (p = 0.56).

  1. Metal Detecting in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobat, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, metal detector surveying conducted by non-professional volunteers (amateur archaeologists) has contributed significantly to archaeological research and heritage practice in Denmark. Metal detecting has always been legal in Denmark, and official stakeholders have from...... the beginning of metal detector archaeology pursued a liberal model, focusing on cooperation and inclusion rather than confrontation and criminalization. Like no other surveying method, the metal detector has contributed to increasing enormously the amount of data and sites from metal-rich periods. Virtually...... all of the spectacular and ground-breaking discoveries of the past decades are owed to metal detectors in the hands of amateur archaeologists. In order to serve as a contribution to the discussion on the upsides and downsides of liberal metal detector archaeology, this article addresses mainly three...

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF CATALYTIC METAL ION LIGANDS IN RIBOZYMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, John K.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Site-bound metal ions participate in the catalytic mechanisms of many ribozymes. Understanding these mechanisms therefore requires knowledge of the specific ligands on both substrate and ribozyme that coordinate these catalytic metal ions. A number of different structural and biochemical strategies have been developed and refined for identifying metal ion binding sites within ribozymes, and for assessing the catalytic contributions of the metal ions bound at those sites. We review these approaches and provide examples of their application, focusing in particular on metal ion rescue experiments and their roles in the construction of the transition state models for the Tetrahymena group I and RNase P ribozymes. PMID:19651216

  3. Metal Borohydrides synthesized from metal borides and metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    Metal Borohydrides Synthesized from Metal Borides and Metal Hydrides Alexander Fogha, Sanna Sommera, Kasper T. Møllera, T. R. Jensena aCenter for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Chemistry Department, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000...... Aarhus C, Denmark email: gallafogh@hotmail.com / sanna-sommer@hotmail.com Magnesium boride, MgB2, ball milled with MH (M = Li, Na, Ca) followed by hydrogenation under high hydrogen pressure, readily forms the corresponding metal borohydrides, M(BH4)x (M = Li, Na, Ca) and MgH2 according to reaction scheme...... and Ca(BH4)2, respectively [3,4]. An attempt to synthesize alkali and alkaline earth metal borohydrides from various borides by ball milling under high hydrogen pressure is presented here. MgB2, AlB2 and CaB6 have been milled with MHx (M = Li, Na, Mg, Ca) at p(H2) = 110 bar for 24 hours. All samples were...

  4. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  5. Probability groups as orbits of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattarai, H.N.

    2003-11-01

    The set of double cosets of a group with respect to a subgroup and the set of orbits of a group with respect to a group of automorphisms have structures which can be studied as multigroups, hypergroups or Pasch geometries. When the subgroup or the group of automorphisms are finite, the multivalued products can be provided with some weightages forming so-called Probability Groups. It is shown in this paper that some abstract probability groups can be realized as orbit spaces of groups. (author)

  6. Thin Metallic Films from Solvated Metal Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-14

    research has developed over the past two decades that deals with the generation of atoms of metals (by metal evaporation, and the interaction of these...Departamento de Quimica , Universidad de Concepcion, Cassilla 3-:, c oncepcion, Chile. -I{ - ~ *~.’JS*~M 4 .~4\\ 821 19 the gold particles were negatively...flocculation were observed, as shown in table a Generally about 0.1 g In was Suspended in 100-200 nl solvent. Several approacies to characterization of

  7. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  8. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  9. Characterization and management of radioactive sodium and other reactor components as input data for the decommissioning of liquid metal-cooled fast reactors. A compilation of data produced of data produced by members of the IAEA technical working group on fast reactors (TWG-FR) at two consultancies and one technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A number of liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMFRs) are in operation and, some have already been shut down; other reactors will reach the end of their design lifetime in a few years and become candidates for decommissioning. It is unfortunate that little consideration was devoted to decommissioning of reactors at the plant design and construction stage. It is with this focus that the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) recommended that the IAEA organize the exchange of information on LMFRs decommissioning technology. It was pointed out that the decommissioning of small sodium-cooled reactors has shown that there are two basic differences between thermal and fast reactors decommissioning: on the one side, the treatment and disposal of radioactive sodium coolant, and on the other side, the management of reactor components, for which the structural materials are activated in depth by fast neutrons. To this end, a Technical Committee Meeting on Sodium Removal and Disposal from LMFRs in Normal Operation and in the framework of Decommissioning (Aix-en-Provence, France, November 1997) and two Consultancies on Decommissioning of the Kazakh BN-350 LMFR (Vienna, Austria, October 1996; Obninsk, Russian Federation, February 1998) were convened by the IAEA. These Meetings brought together a group of experts from France, Russia, Kazakhstan, the UK, and the USA to exchange information on, and to review current technical knowledge and experience in the management of radioactive coolant and reactor components following closing of LMFRs, as well as their design features and operating experience relevant for decommissioning procedures. The report provides general and detailed information on activation characteristics of the primary coolant; treatment and disposal of the spent sodium; removal of the residual sodium deposits and decontamination; the activation characteristics of the reactor components and the management of the latter. The recurring theme is finding

  10. Enfoque teórico de la danza en Grecia en el período clásico, siglos V y IV a.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikitas Nikitaras

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La danza, durante el período clásico de los siglos V y IV a.C., pasando por la música y la gimnasia es una asignatura de la educación para adolescentes y un elemento de la educación del hombre. Platón señala la necesidad de evitar la depravación moral, la suavidad y el espíritu anárquico, elementos que pueden ser producidos por la danza. Aristóteles concibe que la música tiene una cierta capacidad favorable para la armonía y el ritmo e induce que tienen que ser buscados los ritmos y la música apropiadas. Platón y Aristóteles creen que la danza es considerada como un elemento constitutivo de la naturaleza humana. La danza es una parte integral de la vida diaria de los ciudadanos, Platón indica que en el instinto humano la distracción de ritmos y cantos constituyen elementos básicos que iban incluidos en los banquetes, donde tomaban lugar los sacrificios y las súplicas. Inicialmente en la tragedia griega, la danza en las competencias impresiona a los hombres, no obstante, más tarde aparecieron también las mujeres pero raramente hombres y mujeres juntos. En la región de Tracia, en adoración a Dionisio, existe la presencia de mujeres como Favni, Thiades o Vakhes, también con en las danzas de las deidades locales Vendida y Kotitto. En Vravrona cerca de Atenas, en el siglo V a.C., las mujeres y los hombres de la alta sociedad bailaban juntos. Testimonios de Demóstenes y Jenofonte y descubrimientos de excavaciones, confirman el comienzo del “profesionalismo” en el baile. En este período nosotros tenemos excepcionales instructores de baile como Telestis, instructores de “Orhishis” como Kleopas de Tebas y Zinón.

  11. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Metal uptake and acute toxicity in zebrafish: Common mechanisms across multiple metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsop, Derek, E-mail: alsopde@mcmaster.ca [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    All metals tested reduced calcium uptake in zebrafish larvae. However, it was whole body sodium loss that was functionally related to toxicity. The zebrafish larvae acute toxicity assay save time, space and resources. - Abstract: Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) were used to examine the mechanisms of action and acute toxicities of metals. Larvae had similar physiological responses and sensitivities to waterborne metals as adults. While cadmium and zinc have previously been shown to reduce Ca{sup 2+} uptake, copper and nickel also decreased Ca{sup 2+} uptake, suggesting that the epithelial transport of all these metals is through Ca{sup 2+} pathways. However, exposure to cadmium, copper or nickel for up to 48 h had little or no effect on total whole body Ca{sup 2+} levels, indicating that the reduction of Ca{sup 2+} uptake is not the acute toxic mechanism of these metals. Instead, mortalities were effectively related to whole body Na{sup +}, which decreased up to 39% after 48 h exposures to different metals around their respective 96 h LC50s. Decreases in whole body K{sup +} were also observed, although they were not as pronounced or frequent as Na{sup +} losses. None of the metals tested inhibited Na{sup +} uptake in zebrafish (Na{sup +} uptake was in fact increased with exposure) and the observed losses of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} were proportional to the ionic gradients between the plasma and water, indicating diffusive ion loss with metal exposure. This study has shown that there is a common pathway for metal uptake and a common mechanism of acute toxicity across groups of metals in zebrafish. The disruption of ion uptake accompanying metal exposure does not appear to be responsible for the acute toxicity of metals, as has been previously suggested, but rather the toxicity is instead due to total ion loss (predominantly Na{sup +}).

  13. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Ja, Li (Chicago, IL); Yang, Xinmin (Evanston, IL)

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetra fluoro, aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  14. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, T.J.; Ja, L.; Yang, X.

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetrafluoro-aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  15. 11th meeting of the working group on fracture processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains the full text of the 29 papers read at the 11th meeting of the DVM working group on fracture processes. The first part discusses non-metallic materials (plastics, glasses, ceramics), the second part contains mostly theoretical investigations, and the third part discusses the fracture behaviour of metallic materials. (RW) [de

  16. Transformations of functional groups attached to cyclopentadienyl or related ligands in group 4 metal complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinkas, Jiří; Lamač, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 296, JUL 2015 (2015), s. 45-90 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-08531S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Zirconium * Functionalized cyclopentadienyl ligands * Titanium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.994, year: 2015

  17. Liquid metal thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottowski-Duemenil, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    This textbook is a report of the 26 years activity of the Liquid Metal Boiling Working Group (LMBWG). It summarizes the state of the art of liquid metal thermo-hydraulics achieved through the collaboration of scientists concerned with the development of the Fast Breeder Reactor. The first chapter entitled ''Liquid Metal Boiling Behaviour'', presents the background and boiling mechanisms. This section gives the reader a brief but thorough survey on the superheat phenomena in liquid metals. The second chapter of the text, ''A Review of Single and Two-Phase Flow Pressure Drop Studies and Application to Flow Stability Analysis of Boiling Liquid Metal Systems'' summarizes the difficulty of pressure drop simulation of boiling sodium in core bundles. The third chapter ''Liquid Metal Dry-Out Data for Flow in Tubes and Bundles'' describes the conditions of critical heat flux which limits the coolability of the reactor core. The fourth chapter dealing with the LMFBR specific topic of ''Natural Convection Cooling of Liquid Metal Systems''. This chapter gives a review of both plant experiments and out-of-pile experiments and shows the advances in the development of computing power over the past decade of mathematical modelling ''Subassembly Blockages Suties'' are discussed in chapter five. Chapter six is entitled ''A Review of the Methods and Codes Available for the Calculation on Thermal-Hydraulics in Rod-Cluster and other Geometries, Steady state and Transient Boiling Flow Regimes, and the Validation achieves''. Codes available for the calculation of thermal-hydraulics in rod-clusters and other geometries are reviewed. Chapter seven, ''Comparative Studies of Thermohydraulic Computer Code Simulations of Sodium Boiling under Loss of Flow Conditions'', represents one of the key activities of the LMBWG. Several benchmark exercises were performed with the aim of transient sodium boiling simulation in single channels and bundle blockages under steady state conditions and loss of

  18. Soil heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherameti, Irena [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik und Pflanzenphysiologie; Varma, Ajit (eds.) [Amity Univ., Uttar Pradesh (India). Amity Inst. of Microbial Technology; Amity Science, Technology and Innovation Foundation, Noida, UP (India)

    2010-07-01

    Human activities have dramatically changed the composition and organisation of soils. Industrial and urban wastes, agricultural application and also mining activities resulted in an increased concentration of heavy metals in soils. How plants and soil microorganisms cope with this situation and the sophisticated techniques developed for survival in contaminated soils is discussed in this volume. The topics presented include: the general role of heavy metals in biological soil systems; the relation of inorganic and organic pollutions; heavy metal, salt tolerance and combined effects with salinity; effects on abuscular mycorrhizal and on saprophytic soil fungi; heavy metal resistance by streptomycetes; trace element determination of environmental samples; the use of microbiological communities as indicators; phytostabilization of lead polluted sites by native plants; effects of soil earthworms on removal of heavy metals and the remediation of heavy metal contaminated tropical land. (orig.)

  19. Light metal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qinbai

    2016-04-19

    An electrochemical process for the production of light metals, particularly aluminum. Such a process involves contacting a light metal source material with an inorganic acid to form a solution containing the light metal ions in high concentration. The solution is fed to an electrochemical reactor assembly having an anode side containing an anode and a cathode side containing a cathode, with anode side and the cathode side separated by a bipolar membrane, with the solution being fed to the anode side. Light metal ions are electrochemically transferred through the bipolar membrane to the cathode side. The process further involves reducing the light metal ions to light metal powder. An associated processing system is also provided.

  20. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  2. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  3. Ion implantation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vook, F.L.

    1977-02-01

    The application of ion beams to metals is rapidly emerging as a promising area of research and technology. This report briefly describes some of the recent advances in the modification and study of the basic properties of metals by ion implantation techniques. Most of the research discussed illustrates some of the new and exciting applications of ion beams to metals which are under active investigation at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque

  4. Tritium in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, T.

    1990-01-01

    In this Chapter a review is given of some of the important features of metal tritides as opposed to hydrides and deuterides. After an introduction to the topics of tritium and tritium in metals information will be presented on a variety of metal-tritium systems. Of main interest here are the differences from the classic hydrogen behavior; the so called isotope effect. A second important topic is that of aging effects produced by the accumulation of 3 He in the samples. (orig.)

  5. Application of liquid metals for the extraction of solid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid metals dissolve several solid metals in considerable amounts at moderate temperatures. The dissolution processes may be based upon simple physical solubility, formation of intermetallic phases. Even chemical reactions are often observed in which non-metallic elements might be involved. Thus, the capacity to dissolve metals and chemical properties of the liquid metals play a role in these processes. Besides the solubility also chemical properties and thermochemical data are of importance. The dissolution of metals in liquid metals can be applied to separate the solutes from other metals or non-metallic phases. Relatively noble metals can be chemically reduced by the liquid phases. Such solution processes can be applied in the extractive metallurgy, for instance to extract metals from metallic waste. The recycling of metals is of high economical and ecological importance. Examples of possible processes are discussed. (author)

  6. Highly aligned vertical GaN nanowires using submonolayer metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T [Albuquerque, NM; Li, Qiming [Albuquerque, NM; Creighton, J Randall [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-06-29

    A method for forming vertically oriented, crystallographically aligned nanowires (nanocolumns) using monolayer or submonolayer quantities of metal atoms to form uniformly sized metal islands that serve as catalysts for MOCVD growth of Group III nitride nanowires.

  7. Physics of amorphous metals

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalenko, Nikolai P; Krey, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of bulk metallic glasses has led to a large increase in the industrial importance of amorphous metals, and this is expected to continue. This book is the first to describe the theoretical physics of amorphous metals, including the important theoretical development of the last 20 years.The renowned authors stress the universal aspects in their description of the phonon or magnon low-energy excitations in the amorphous metals, e.g. concerning the remarkable consequences of the properties of these excitations for the thermodynamics at low and intermediate temperatures. Tunneling

  8. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound......Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  9. Purification of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    We developed the system for purifying uranium metal and its metallic compounds and for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. The degree of the purity of uranium metal was examined by the conventional electrical resistivity measurement and by the chemical analysis using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The results show that some metallic impurities evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of a rod with a molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained high purified uranium metal of 99.99% up with regarding to metallic impurities. The maximum residual resistivity ratio, the r.r.r., so far obtained was about 17-20. Using the purified uranium, we are attempting to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  10. Metal weight table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This book is comprised of two parts about metallic material weight table. the first part deals with steel on weight table of section steel and bar steel, hexagonal steel, equal angle steel, unequal angle steel, channel steel, T steel, H steel, CT steel, light gauge steel, light rail, stainless steel weight calculation, carbon steel pipe for general rescue a circular nail, zinc galvanizing and wire lope. The second part is about nonferrous metal on weight calculation for nonferrous metal nonferrous metal plates, steel pipe, brass copper bar and aluminum.

  11. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Christen, Philipp

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC(50) in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  12. The Effectiveness of Blood Metal Ions in Identifying Patients with Unilateral Birmingham Hip Resurfacing and Corail-Pinnacle Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants at Risk of Adverse Reactions to Metal Debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharu, Gulraj S; Berryman, Fiona; Brash, Lesley; Pynsent, Paul B; Treacy, Ronan B C; Dunlop, David J

    2016-04-20

    We investigated whether blood metal ions could effectively identify patients with metal-on-metal hip implants with two common designs (Birmingham Hip Resurfacing [BHR] and Corail-Pinnacle) who were at risk of adverse reactions to metal debris. This single-center, prospective study involved 598 patients with unilateral hip implants (309 patients with the BHR implant and 289 patients with the Corail-Pinnacle implant) undergoing whole blood metal ion sampling at a mean time of 6.9 years. Patients were classified into two groups, one that had adverse reactions to metal debris (those who had to undergo revision for adverse reactions to metal debris or those with adverse reactions to metal debris on imaging; n = 46) and one that did not (n = 552). Three metal ion parameters (cobalt, chromium, and cobalt-chromium ratio) were compared between groups. Optimal metal ion thresholds for identifying patients with adverse reactions to metal debris were determined using receiver operating characteristic analysis. All ion parameters were significantly higher (p adverse reactions to metal debris compared with those who did not. Cobalt maximized the area under the curve for patients with the BHR implant (90.5%) and those with the Corail-Pinnacle implant (79.6%). For patients with the BHR implant, the area under the curve for cobalt was significantly greater than that for the cobalt-chromium ratio (p = 0.0005), but it was not significantly greater than that for chromium (p = 0.8483). For the patients with the Corail-Pinnacle implant, the area under the curve for cobalt was significantly greater than that for chromium (p = 0.0004), but it was similar to that for the cobalt-chromium ratio (p = 0.8139). Optimal blood metal ion thresholds for identifying adverse reactions to metal debris varied between the two different implants. When using cobalt, the optimal threshold for identifying adverse reactions to metal debris was 2.15 μg/L for the BHR group and 3.57 μg/L for the Corail

  13. Chemical modification of epitaxial graphene: spontaneous grafting of aryl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, Elena; Itkis, Mikhail E; Ramesh, Palanisamy; Berger, Claire; Sprinkle, Michael; de Heer, Walt A; Haddon, Robert C

    2009-02-04

    The addition of nitrophenyl groups to the surface of few-layer epitaxial graphene (EG) by the formation of covalent carbon-carbon bonds changed the electronic structure and transport properties of the EG from near-metallic to semiconducting.

  14. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  15. Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueck, Steven R. J.; Myers, David R.; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

  16. Neutron activation analysis for noble metals in matte leach residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the neutron activation analysis technique as a method for rapid and precise determinations of platinum group metals in matte leach residues depends on obtaining a method for effecting complete and homogeneous sample dilution. A simple method for solid dilution of metal samples is outlined in this study, which provided a basis for the accurate determination of all the noble metals by the Neutron Activation Analysis technique

  17. Trace Metal Requirements and Interactions in Symbiodinium kawagutii

    OpenAIRE

    Irene B. Rodriguez; Tung-Yuan Ho; Tung-Yuan Ho

    2018-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms need trace metals for various biological processes and different groups of microalgae have distinctive obligate necessities due to their respective biochemical requirements and ecological niches. We have previously shown that the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium kawagutii requires high concentrations of bioavailable Fe to achieve optimum growth. Here, we further explored the trace metal requirements of S. kawagutii with intensive focus on the effect of individual metal and...

  18. Heavy metal pollution and genetic adaptations in ectomycorrhizal fungi

    OpenAIRE

    COLPAERT, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal toxicity is a strong trigger for evolutionary adaptation in terrestrial biota that colonise metalliferous soils. Here, I will focus on the occurrence of metal tolerance in ectomycorrhizal fungi, the predominant group of root symbionts of pioneer trees that try to colonise severely polluted sites. A considerable amount of literature exists on metal-tolerant plants, which is in sharp contrast to what we know about the tolerance in the fungal symbiotic partners that associate with th...

  19. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  20. Metal uptake and acute toxicity in zebrafish: common mechanisms across multiple metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M

    2011-10-01

    Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) were used to examine the mechanisms of action and acute toxicities of metals. Larvae had similar physiological responses and sensitivities to waterborne metals as adults. While cadmium and zinc have previously been shown to reduce Ca(2+) uptake, copper and nickel also decreased Ca(2+) uptake, suggesting that the epithelial transport of all these metals is through Ca(2+) pathways. However, exposure to cadmium, copper or nickel for up to 48 h had little or no effect on total whole body Ca(2+) levels, indicating that the reduction of Ca(2+) uptake is not the acute toxic mechanism of these metals. Instead, mortalities were effectively related to whole body Na(+), which decreased up to 39% after 48 h exposures to different metals around their respective 96 h LC50s. Decreases in whole body K(+) were also observed, although they were not as pronounced or frequent as Na(+) losses. None of the metals tested inhibited Na(+) uptake in zebrafish (Na(+) uptake was in fact increased with exposure) and the observed losses of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were proportional to the ionic gradients between the plasma and water, indicating diffusive ion loss with metal exposure. This study has shown that there is a common pathway for metal uptake and a common mechanism of acute toxicity across groups of metals in zebrafish. The disruption of ion uptake accompanying metal exposure does not appear to be responsible for the acute toxicity of metals, as has been previously suggested, but rather the toxicity is instead due to total ion loss (predominantly Na(+)). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner; Tumen, Fikret

    2009-01-01

    Sorption of Cd 2+ , Cr 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Pb 2+ and Zn 2+ onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni 2+ > Cd 2+ > Cu 2+ > Pb 2+ > Zn 2+ > Cr 3+ . The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb 2+ > Cu 2+ > Ni 2+ > Cd 2+ > Zn 2+ > Cr 3+ . The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol -1 for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The ΔG o and ΔH o values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low ΔH o values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  2. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner; Tumen, Fikret

    2009-05-30

    Sorption of Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni(2+)>Cd(2+)>Cu(2+)>Pb(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(3+). The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Ni(2+)>Cd(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(3+). The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol(-1) for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The DeltaG degrees and DeltaH degrees values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low DeltaH degrees values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  3. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner [Department of Chemical Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey); Tumen, Fikret, E-mail: ftumen@firat.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2009-05-30

    Sorption of Cd{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Pb{sup 2+} > Zn{sup 2+} > Cr{sup 3+}. The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Zn{sup 2+} > Cr{sup 3+}. The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol{sup -1} for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The {Delta}G{sup o} and {Delta}H{sup o} values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low {Delta}H{sup o} values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  4. Large head metal-on-metal cementless total hip arthroplasty versus 28mm metal-on-polyethylene cementless total hip arthroplasty: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Raaij Jos JAM

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis of the hip is successfully treated by total hip arthroplasty with metal-on-polyethylene articulation. Polyethylene wear debris can however lead to osteolysis, aseptic loosening and failure of the implant. Large head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty may overcome polyethylene wear induced prosthetic failure, but can increase systemic cobalt and chromium ion concentrations. The objective of this study is to compare two cementless total hip arthroplasties: a conventional 28 mm metal-on-polyethylene articulation and a large head metal-on-metal articulation. We hypothesize that the latter arthroplasties show less bone density loss and higher serum metal ion concentrations. We expect equal functional scores, greater range of motion, fewer dislocations, fewer periprosthetic radiolucencies and increased prosthetic survival with the metal-on-metal articulation. Methods A randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Patients to be included suffer from non-inflammatory degenerative joint disease of the hip, are aged between 18 and 80 and are admitted for primary cementless unilateral total hip arthroplasty. Patients in the metal-on-metal group will receive a cementless titanium alloy acetabular component with a cobalt-chromium liner and a cobalt-chromium femoral head varying from 38 to 60 mm. Patients in the metal-on-polyethylene group will receive a cementless titanium alloy acetabular component with a polyethylene liner and a 28 mm cobalt-chromium femoral head. We will assess acetabular bone mineral density by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, serum ion concentrations of cobalt, chromium and titanium, self reported functional status (Oxford hip score, physician reported functional status and range of motion (Harris hip score, number of dislocations and prosthetic survival. Measurements will take place preoperatively, perioperatively, and postoperatively (6 weeks, 1 year, 5 years and 10 years. Discussion

  5. Metal separation from multi metallic solutions by sorption on and desorption from grape stalks

    OpenAIRE

    Busschaert, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    During the last years, problems related to soil and freshwater contaminations have often stood in the center of interest. Accumulated pollutants in the soil can end up in the water by dissolving in it. Heavy metals are part of the group of chemical elements that have strongly increased in the environment by human activities such as the mine and metallurgy industries. One of the highest concentrations of heavy metals in wastewaters can be found in Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). This are the outflow...

  6. Polymer-supported metals and metal oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Sudipta; Guibal, E.; Quignard, F.; SenGupta, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles exhibit unique properties in regard to sorption behaviors, magnetic activity, chemical reduction, ligand sequestration among others. To this end, attempts are being continuously made to take advantage of them in multitude of applications including separation, catalysis, environmental remediation, sensing, biomedical applications and others. However, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles lack chemical stability and mechanical strength. They exhibit extremely high pressure drop or head loss in fixed-bed column operation and are not suitable for any flow-through systems. Also, nanoparticles tend to aggregate; this phenomenon reduces their high surface area to volume ratio and subsequently reduces effectiveness. By appropriately dispersing metal and metal oxide nanoparticles into synthetic and naturally occurring polymers, many of the shortcomings can be overcome without compromising the parent properties of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, the appropriate choice of the polymer host with specific functional groups may even lead to the enhancement of the properties of nanoparticles. The synthesis of hybrid materials involves two broad pathways: dispersing the nanoparticles (i) within pre-formed or commercially available polymers; and (ii) during the polymerization process. This review presents a broad coverage of nanoparticles and polymeric/biopolymeric host materials and the resulting properties of the hybrid composites. In addition, the review discusses the role of the Donnan membrane effect exerted by the host functionalized polymer in harnessing the desirable properties of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for intended applications.

  7. Hardness of metallic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China; Henan Key Laboratory of Advanced Non-ferrous Metals, Luoyang 471003, China; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, ...

  8. Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    between amounts of metals in the aquatic insects and the surrounding water medium,. Materials and methods indicating that most of the accumulated. Test animals metals were from the water medium. Tympanotonus fuscatus var. radula L. The significance of bioaccumulation. (Periwinkle) (Mollusca; Gastropoda, studies lies ...

  9. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  10. Liquid metals pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Frere, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Pumps used to pump liquid metals depend on the liquid metal and on the type of application concerned. One deals more particularly with electromagnetic pumps, the main pumps used with mechanical pumps. To pump sodium in the nuclear field, these two types of pumps are used; the pumps of different circuits of Super Phenix are presented and described [fr

  11. Marks of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Udstilling på Mediemuseet med fokus på den visuelle side af heavy metal: Logoer, pladecovers og lignende.......Udstilling på Mediemuseet med fokus på den visuelle side af heavy metal: Logoer, pladecovers og lignende....

  12. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. agarose gel electrophoresis results, energy dispersive X-ray spectra, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering data, nanoparticle tracking analysis and an atomic force microscopy image of Ni-CPMV. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00525h

  13. Leachability of protein and metals incorporated into aquatic invertebrates: are species and metals-exposure history important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J.S.; Suedkamp, M.J.; Morris, J.M.; Farag, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    To partially simulate conditions in fish intestinal tracts, we leached six groups of metals-contaminated invertebrates at pH 2 and pH 7, and analyzed the concentrations of four metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) and total protein in the leachates. Four of the groups of invertebrates were benthic macroinvertebrates collected from metals-contaminated rivers (the Clark Fork River in Montana and the Coeur d’Alene River in Idaho, USA); the other two groups of invertebrates (one of which was exposed to metals in the laboratory) were laboratory-reared brine shrimp (Artemia sp.). Additionally, we fractionated the pH 2 leachates using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Protein content was 1.3 to 1.4× higher in Artemia than in the benthic macroinvertebrates, and leachability of metals and protein differed considerably among several of the groups of invertebrates. In SEC fractions of the pH 2 leachates from both groups of Artemia, Cu and protein co-eluted; however, Cu and protein did not co-elute in SEC fractions of the leachates from any of the benthic macroinvertebrate groups. Although none of the other three metals co-eluted with protein in any of the pH 2 leachates, one or more of the metals co-eluted with lower-molecular-weight molecules in the leachates from all of the groups of invertebrates. These results suggest fundamental differences in metal-binding properties and protein leachability among some invertebrates. Thus, different invertebrates and different histories of metals exposure might lead to different availability of metals and protein to predators.

  14. Production of magnesium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  15. Metal borohydrides and derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paskevicius, Mark; Haarh Jepsen, Lars; Schouwink, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    review new synthetic strategies along with structural, physical and chemical properties for metal borohydrides, revealing a number of new trends correlating composition, structure, bonding and thermal properties. These new trends provide general knowledge and may contribute to the design and discovery......A wide variety of metal borohydrides, MBH4, have been discovered and characterized during the past decade, revealing an extremely rich chemistry including fascinating structural flexibility and a wide range of compositions and physical properties. Metal borohydrides receive increasing interest...... major classes of metal borohydride derivatives have also been discovered: anion-substituted compounds where the complex borohydride anion, BH4 -, is replaced by another anion, i.e. a halide or amide ion; and metal borohydrides modified with neutral molecules, such as NH3, NH3BH3, N2H4, etc. Here, we...

  16. Metals and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Miah, Mahfuzur Rahman; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals play important roles in the human body, maintaining cell structure and regulating gene expression, neurotransmission, and antioxidant response, to name a few. However, excessive metal accumulation in the nervous system may be toxic, inducing oxidative stress, disrupting mitochondrial function, and impairing the activity of numerous enzymes. Damage caused by metal accumulation may result in permanent injuries, including severe neurological disorders. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong correlation between aberrant metal exposure and a number of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Guillain–Barré disease, Gulf War syndrome, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and Wilson’s disease. Here, we briefly survey the literature relating to the role of metals in neurodegeneration. PMID:27006759

  17. Chelation in Metal Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaran J.S. Flora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy is the preferred medical treatment for reducing the toxic effects of metals. Chelating agents are capable of binding to toxic metal ions to form complex structures which are easily excreted from the body removing them from intracellular or extracellular spaces. 2,3-Dimercaprol has long been the mainstay of chelation therapy for lead or arsenic poisoning, however its serious side effects have led researchers to develop less toxic analogues. Hydrophilic chelators like meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid effectively promote renal metal excretion, but their ability to access intracellular metals is weak. Newer strategies to address these drawbacks like combination therapy (use of structurally different chelating agents or co-administration of antioxidants have been reported recently. In this review we provide an update of the existing chelating agents and the various strategies available for the treatment of heavy metals and metalloid intoxications.

  18. Experience with Group Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weiqin

    2006-01-01

    Supervision can take a few different forms. For example, it can be one-to-one supervision and it can also be group supervision. Group supervision is an important process within the scientific community. Many research groups use this form to supervise doctoral- and master students in groups. Some efforts have been made to study this process. For example, Samara (2002) studied the group supervision process in group writing. However, group supervision has not been studied thorough...

  19. Novel extractants with high selectivity for valuable metals in seawater. Calixarene derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakoi, Takahiko; Goto, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    Seawater contains various valuable metals such as uranium and lithium. Therefore, attempts are being made to develop highly selective extractants which recognize target metal ions in reclaimed seawater. In this review, we have focused our study on the application of novel cyclic compound calixarene based extractants. A novel host compound calixarene, which is a cyclic compound connecting some phenol rings, is capable of forming several different extractant ring sizes and introducing various kinds of functional groups towards targeting of metal ions in seawater. Therefore, calixarene derivatives are capable of extracting valuable metals such as uranium, alkaline metals, heavy metals, rare earth metals and noble metals selectively by varying structural ring size and functional groups. The novel host compound calixarene has given promising results which line it up as a potential extractant for the separation of valuable metal ions in seawater. (author)

  20. Design and economic justification of group blanks application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Todić

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the manufacturing process planning, blanks are either selected or designed, respectively forms of input material for the manufacture of products. Reviewed in this paper are three types of group blanks: group castings, group forgings manufactured by closed die forging and free forging, and group blanks manufactured by pressing melted metal in casts. The paper also presents requisites for design and evaluation of economic justification of group blanks application.

  1. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  2. Investigation of biologically-designed metal-specific chelators for potential metal recovery and waste remediation applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria, algae and plants produce metal-specific chelators to capture required nutrient or toxic trace metals. Biological systems are thought to be very efficient, honed by evolutionary forces over time. Understanding the approaches used by living organisms to select for specific metals in the environment may lead to design of cheaper and more effective approaches for metal recovery and contaminant-metal remediation. In this study, the binding of a common siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), to three aqueous metal cations, Fe(II), Fe(III), and UO{sub 2}(VI) was investigated using classical molecular dynamics. DFO-B has three acetohydroxamate groups and a terminal amine group that all deprotonate with increasing pH. For all three metals, complexes with DFO-B (-2) are the most stable and favored under alkaline conditions. Under more acidic conditions, the metal-DFO complexes involve chelation with both acetohydroxamate and acetylamine groups. The approach taken here allows for detailed investigation of metal binding to biologically-designed organic ligands.

  3. Review of challenges in the escalation of metal- biosorbing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-23

    Apr 23, 2014 ... The passive adsorption of metal species by various functional groups on microbial cell wall includes non-metabolic mecha- nisms such as ion exchange, ...... kle filters and sociated with t they depen ter body thro lower power uiring pumps. 1998; Voles veral paramet ed-bed contin stem arrange avy metals.

  4. A bioseparation process for removing heavy metals from waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of cell structure, cell wall, micropores and macropores is evaluated in terms of the potential of these biosorbents for metal sequestration. Binding mechanisms are discussed, including the key functional groups involved and the ion-exchange process. Quantification of metal-biomass interactions is fundamental to the ...

  5. Coordination of cassava starch to metal ions and thermolysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava starch formed Werner-type complexes with ions of metals from the transition groups. This was proven by conductivity and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. The coordination of starch to central metal ions influenced the thermal decomposition of starch. As a rule complexes started to decompose at ...

  6. COORDINATION OF CASSAVA STARCH TO METAL IONS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    ABSTRACT. Cassava starch formed Werner-type complexes with ions of metals from the transition groups. This was proven by conductivity and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. The coordination of starch to central metal ions influenced the thermal decomposition of starch. As a rule complexes started to ...

  7. Toxic effect of heavy metals on aquatic environment | Baby ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The indiscriminate discharge of industrial effluents, raw sewage wastes and other waste pollute most of the environments and affect survival and physiological activities of target organisms. Metals in particular have a tendency to accumulate and undergo food chain magnification. Heavy metals affect all groups of organisms ...

  8. Select toxic metals status of pregnant women with history of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxic metals are part of the most important groups of environmental pollutants that can bind to vital cellular components and interfere with their functions via inhalation, foods, water etc. The serum levels of toxic metals (lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic) in pregnant women with history of pregnancy complications, ...

  9. Framework for Metals Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Framework for Metals Risk Assessment is a science-based document that addresses the special attributes and behaviors of metals and metal compounds to be considered when assessing their human health and ecological risks.

  10. Free Boolean Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ga Sipacheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Known and new results on free Boolean topological groups are collected. An account of the properties that these groups share with free or free Abelian topological groups and properties specific to free Boolean groups is given. Special emphasis is placed on the application of set-theoretic methods to the study of Boolean topological groups.

  11. Method for producing metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-02-10

    Method for producing metallic nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating non-oxidizing plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone to metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and to the plasma afterglow where it cools and condenses to form solid metallic nanoparticles.

  12. Method for producing metallic microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-06-29

    Method for producing metallic particles. The method converts metallic nanoparticles into larger, spherical metallic particles. An aerosol of solid metallic nanoparticles and a non-oxidizing plasma having a portion sufficiently hot to melt the nanoparticles are generated. The aerosol is directed into the plasma where the metallic nanoparticles melt, collide, join, and spheroidize. The molten spherical metallic particles are directed away from the plasma and enter the afterglow where they cool and solidify.

  13. Nanoporous metal-carbon composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Satcher, Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Colvin, Jeffrey; Felter, Thomas; Kim, Sangil; Merrill, Matthew; Orme, Christine

    2017-12-19

    Described here is a metal-carbon composite, comprising (a) a porous three-dimensional scaffold comprising one or more of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, and (b) metal nanoparticles disposed on said porous scaffold, wherein the metal-carbon composite has a density of 1 g/cm.sup.3 or less, and wherein the metal nanoparticles account for 1 wt. % or more of the metal-carbon composite. Also described are methods for making the metal-carbon composite.

  14. Stars at Low Metallicity in Dwarf Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Cole, Andrew; Hunt, LK; Madden, S; Schneider, R

    2008-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies offer an opportunity to understand the properties of low metallicity star formation both today and at the earliest times at the, epoch of the formation of the first stars. Here we concentrate on two galaxies in the Local Group: the dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A, which has been the

  15. Phosphopeptide enrichment by immobilized metal affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E.; Larsen, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively...

  16. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  17. Platinum metals in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zereini, Fathi [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Analytical Chemistry; Wiseman, Clare L.S. (ed.) [Toronto Univ. (Canada). School of the Environment

    2015-03-01

    This book contains the five chapters with the following topics: 1. SOURCES OF PGE EMISSIONS ELEMENTS: Sources of Platinum Group Elements (PGE) in the Environment; Impact of Platinum Group Element Emissions from Mining and Production Activities. 2. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PGE IN BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MATRICES: Appraisal of Biosorption for Recovery, Separation and Determination of Platinum, Palladium and Rhodium in Environmental Samples; On the Underestimated Factors Influencing the Accuracy of Determination of Pt and Pd by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Road Dust Samples; Application of Solid Sorbents for Enrichment and Separation of Platinum Metal Ions; Voltammetric Analysis of Platinum in Environmental Matrices; Speciation Analysis of Chloroplatinates; Analysis of Platinum Group Elements in Environmental Samples: A Review. 3. OCCURRENCE, CHEMICAL BEHAVIOR AND FATE OF PGE IN THE ENVIRONMENT: Brazilian PGE Research Data Survey on Urban and Roadside Soils; Platinum, Palladium and Rhodium in a Bavarian Roadside Soil; Increase of Platinum Group Element Concentrations in Soils and Airborne Dust During the Period of Vehicular Exhaust Catalysts Introduction; Platinum-Group Elements in Urban Fluvial Bed Sediments-Hawaii; Long-Term Monitoring of Palladium and Platinum Contents in Road Dust of the City of Munich, Germany; Characterization of PGEs and Other Elements in Road Dusts and Airborne Particles in Houston, Texas; Accumulation and Distribution of Pt and Pd in Roadside Dust, Soil and Vegetation in Bulgaria; Increase of the Environmental Pt Concentration in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City Associated to the Use of Automobile Catalytic Converters; Solubility of Emitted Platinum Group Elements (Pt, Pd and Rh) in Airborne Particulate Matter (PM10) in the Presence of Organic Complexing Agents; The Influence of Anionic Species (Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) on the Transformation and Solubility of Platinum in

  18. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  19. Profinite graphs and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  20. Actinide metal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage

  1. Metal recovery via geobiotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Schippers, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Specialized acidophilic bacteria and archaea are able to extract valuable metals such as copper, gold, cobalt, nickel, zinc, and uranium from sulfide ores. This process is known as bioleaching and its application in the mining industry as biomining. Laboratory studies also demonstrated bioleaching of oxide ores such as laterites and of mining residues such as mine tailings as well as metal recycling from waste (secondary mining). Metals being leached have to be recovered from acidic polymetallic solutions (mine and process waters) which is possible via biosorption or biomineralisation.

  2. Electronic structure of disordered transition metals within scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakyibchuk, P.M.; Volkov, O.V.; Vakarchuk, S.O.

    2005-01-01

    Here we present a new approach to the calculation of density of states of disordered transition metals based on the T-matrix framework presented by Lloyd within generalized Ziman's theory of transport properties and energy structure of disordered metals. This approach makes it possible to avoid such difficulties of familiar calculations as renormalized perturbation theory. We have achieved double hill energy resonance for transition metals at Fe and Co groups caused by hybridization potential. So the results are in good correlation with model presentation of energy structure of these metals conduction band for explaining magnetic and transport properties

  3. Progress of Application Researches of Porous Fiber Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal fiber porous materials with intrinsic properties of metal and functional properties of porous materials have received a great deal of attention in the fundamental research and industry applications. With developments of the preparation technologies and industrial requirements, porous fiber metals with excellent properties are developed and applied in many industry areas, e.g., sound absorption, heat transfer, energy absorption and lightweight structures. The applied research progress of the metal fiber porous materials in such application areas based on the recent work in our group was reviewed in this paper.

  4. Progress of Application Researches of Porous Fiber Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhengping; Zhu, Jilei; Tang, Huiping; Ao, Qingbo; Zhi, Hao; Wang, Jianyong; Li, Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Metal fiber porous materials with intrinsic properties of metal and functional properties of porous materials have received a great deal of attention in the fundamental research and industry applications. With developments of the preparation technologies and industrial requirements, porous fiber metals with excellent properties are developed and applied in many industry areas, e.g., sound absorption, heat transfer, energy absorption and lightweight structures. The applied research progress of the metal fiber porous materials in such application areas based on the recent work in our group was reviewed in this paper. PMID:28879952

  5. Designer ligands: The search for metal ion selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry T. Kaye

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews research conducted at Rhodes University towards the development of metal-selective ligands. The research has focused on the rational design, synthesis and evaluation of novel ligands for use in the formation of copper complexes as biomimetic models of the metalloenzyme, tyrosinase, and for the selective extraction of silver, nickel and platinum group metal ions in the presence of contaminating metal ions. Attention has also been given to the development of efficient, metal-selective molecular imprinted polymers.

  6. Progress in vacuum metal extraction, refining and consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, C.V.; Mukherjee, T.K.; Sharma, B.P.

    1973-01-01

    The unique achievements in the process metallurgy of rare metals in the past quarter century should largely be attributed to advances in vacuum technology. New standards for high purity, increasing demand for pure metals and alloys for established applications, and steady improvement in sophistication and capacity of vacuum furnaces have provided the stimulus for developing and expanding vacuum metal extraction processes, and also exploring totally new processes. The paper discusses the thermochemistry of vacuum metallurgy, carbothermic and metallothermic reduction reactions, consolidation and refining by vacuum arc melting, electron beam melting and high temperature high vacuum sintering, and ultrapurification, with special reference to the reactive and refractory metals of Group IV to VI. (author)

  7. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H.U. [ed.

    1991-12-15

    The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) Specialists Meeting on Properties of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment was held during June 18 to June 20, 1991, at the Nuclear Research Centre (Kernforschungszentrum) in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Specialists Meeting was divided into five technical sessions which addressed topics as follows: Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environments under Off-Normal Conditions;Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium; and Conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  8. Alkali metal ion templated transition metal formate framework materials: synthesis, crystal structures, ion migration, and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeland, Espen; Lock, Nina; Filsø, Mette; Stingaciu, Marian; Shen, Yanbin; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2014-10-06

    Four transition metal formate coordination polymers with anionic frameworks, namely, Na[Mn(HCOO)3], K[Mn(HCOO)3], Na2[Cu3(HCOO)8], and K2[Cu5(HCOO)12], were synthesized using a mild solution chemistry approach. Multitemperature single-crystal (100-300 K) and powder X-ray diffraction studies of the compounds reveal structures of large diversity ranging from cubic chiral Na-Mn formate to triclinic Na-Cu formate. The structural variety is caused by the nature of the transition metals, the alkali metal ion templation, and the versatility of the formate group, which offers metal-metal coordination through three different O-C-O bridging modes (syn-syn, syn-anti, anti-anti) in addition to metal-metal bridging via a single oxygen atom. The two manganese(II) compounds contain mononuclear, octahedrally coordinated moieties, but the three-dimensional connectivity between the manganese octahedra is very different in the two structures. The two copper frameworks, in contrast, consist of binuclear and mononuclear moieties (Na-Cu formate) and trinuclear and mononuclear moieties (K-Cu formate), respectively. Procrystal electron density analysis of the compounds indicates one-dimensional K(+)-ion conductivity in K-Mn and K-Cu, and the nature of the proposed potassium ion migration is compared with results from similar analysis on known Na(+) and K(+) ion conductors. K-Mn and Na-Mn were tested as cathode materials, but this resulted in poor reversibility due to low conductivity or structural collapse. The magnetic properties of the compounds were studied by vibrating sample magnetometric measurements, and their thermal stabilities were determined by thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. Despite structural differences, the metal formates that contain the same transition metal have similar magnetic properties and thermal decomposition pathways, that is, the nature of the transition metal controls the compound properties.

  9. The role of metal ion-ligand interactions during divalent metal ion adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Daniel S; Crawford, Russell J; Harding, Ian H

    2015-09-15

    A suite of seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II)) was adsorbed from solution onto two Fe2O3 samples, quartz SiO2 and three different amphoteric polystyrene latices (containing amine and carboxyl functional groups). For the metal oxides, a high correlation was observed between the pH at which 50% of the metal was removed from solution (pH50) and the first hydrolysis constant for the metal ion (pK1). For the polystyrene latices, a much higher correlation was observed between the pH50 and pKc (equilibrium constant describing metal-carboxyl affinity) as opposed to pK1. These observations provide evidence of a strong relationship that exists between a metal's affinity for a particular ligand in solution and for that metal ion's affinity for the same ligand present as part of an adsorbing surface. The isoelectric point of the amphoteric latex surface can be increased by decreasing the carboxyl content of the latex surface. For all 7 metal ions, this resulted in a substantial decrease, for any given pH, in adsorption. We suggest that this may be partly due to the decreased carboxyl content, but is dominantly attributable to the presence of less favorable electrostatic conditions. This, in turn, demonstrates that electrostatics play a controlling role in metal ion adsorption onto amphoteric latex surfaces and, in addition to the nature of the metal ion, also controls the pH at which adsorption takes place. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The NASA-UC-UH Eta-Earth program. IV. A low-mass planet orbiting an M dwarf 3.6 PC from Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Muirhead, Philip S.; Becker, Juliette C. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Henry, Gregory W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard, Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Von Braun, Kaspar [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wright, Jason T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Johnson, John Asher [Center for Planetary Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We report the discovery of a low-mass planet orbiting Gl 15 A based on radial velocities from the Eta-Earth Survey using HIRES at Keck Observatory. Gl 15 Ab is a planet with minimum mass Msin i = 5.35 ± 0.75 M {sub ⊕}, orbital period P = 11.4433 ± 0.0016 days, and an orbit that is consistent with circular. We characterize the host star using a variety of techniques. Photometric observations at Fairborn Observatory show no evidence for rotational modulation of spots at the orbital period to a limit of ∼0.1 mmag, thus supporting the existence of the planet. We detect a second RV signal with a period of 44 days that we attribute to rotational modulation of stellar surface features, as confirmed by optical photometry and the Ca II H and K activity indicator. Using infrared spectroscopy from Palomar-TripleSpec, we measure an M2 V spectral type and a sub-solar metallicity ([M/H] = –0.22, [Fe/H] = –0.32). We measure a stellar radius of 0.3863 ± 0.0021 R {sub ☉} based on interferometry from CHARA.

  11. Mechanisms of lichen resistance to metallic pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarret, C.; Manceau, A.; Eybert-Berard, L. [Univ. of Grenoble and CNRS (France). Environmental Geochemistry Group; Cuny, D.; Haluwyn, C. van [Lab. de Botanique et de Cryptogamie, Lille (France); Deruelle, S. [Institut d`Ecologie, Paris (France); Hazemann, J.L.; Menthonnex, J.J. [Univ. of Grenoble and CNRS (France). Environmental Geochemistry Group]|[CNRS, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Cristallographie; Soldo, Y. [CNRS, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Cristallographie

    1998-11-01

    Some lichens have a unique ability to grow in heavily contaminated areas due to the development of adaptative mechanisms allowing a high tolerance to metals. Here the authors report on the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in the metal hyperaccumulator Diploschistes muscorum and of Pb in the metal tolerant lichen Xanthoria parietina. The speciation of Zn and Pb has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy using the advanced third-generation synchrotron radiation source of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF in Grenoble). This study reveals that in both lichens cells are protected from toxicity by complexation of heavy metals, but the strategies differ: in D. muscorum, Pb and Zn are accumulated through an enhanced synthesis of oxalate, which precipitates toxic elements as insoluble salts, whereas in X. parietina, Pb is complexed to carboxylic groups of the fungal cell walls. The authors conclude that hyperaccumulation of metals results from a reactive mechanism of organic acid production, whereas metallo-tolerance is achieved by a passive complexation to existing functional groups.

  12. Group purchasing: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetrich, J G

    1987-07-01

    The various types and operational methods of purchasing groups are described, and evaluation of groups is discussed. Since group purchasing is increasing in popularity as a method of controlling drug costs, community and hospital pharmacy managers may need to evaluate various groups to determine the appropriateness of their services. Groups are categorized as independent, system based, or alliance or association based. Instead of "purchasing," some groups develop contracts for hospitals, which then purchase directly from the vendor. Aside from this basic difference between groups that purchase and groups that contract, comparisons among groups are difficult because of the wide variation in sizes and services. Competition developing from diversification among groups has led to "super groups," formed from local and regional groups. In evaluating groups, advantages and disadvantages germane to accomplishing the member's objectives must be considered. To ensure a group's success, members must be committed and support the group's philosophies; hospital pharmacists must help to establish a strong formulary system. To select vendors, groups should develop formal qualification and selection criteria and should not base a decision solely on price. The method of solicitation (bidding or negotiating), as well as the role of the prime vendor, should be studied. Legal implications of group purchasing, especially in the areas of administrative fees and drug diversion, must also be considered. The most advantageous group for each organization will include members with common missions and will be able to implement strategies for future success.

  13. Ordered groups and infinite permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    The subjects of ordered groups and of infinite permutation groups have long en­ joyed a symbiotic relationship. Although the two subjects come from very different sources, they have in certain ways come together, and each has derived considerable benefit from the other. My own personal contact with this interaction began in 1961. I had done Ph. D. work on sequence convergence in totally ordered groups under the direction of Paul Conrad. In the process, I had encountered "pseudo-convergent" sequences in an ordered group G, which are like Cauchy sequences, except that the differences be­ tween terms of large index approach not 0 but a convex subgroup G of G. If G is normal, then such sequences are conveniently described as Cauchy sequences in the quotient ordered group GIG. If G is not normal, of course GIG has no group structure, though it is still a totally ordered set. The best that can be said is that the elements of G permute GIG in an order-preserving fashion. In independent investigations around that t...

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of Metals: A Scientific Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Philip; Eckelman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    We have assembled extensive information on the cradle-to-gate environmental burdens of 63 metals in their major use forms, and illustrated the interconnectedness of metal production systems. Related cumulative energy use, global warming potential, human health implications and ecosystem damage are estimated by metal life cycle stage (i.e., mining, purification, and refining). For some elements, these are the first life cycle estimates of environmental impacts reported in the literature. We show that, if compared on a per kilogram basis, the platinum group metals and gold display the highest environmental burdens, while many of the major industrial metals (e.g., iron, manganese, titanium) are found at the lower end of the environmental impacts scale. If compared on the basis of their global annual production in 2008, iron and aluminum display the largest impacts, and thallium and tellurium the lowest. With the exception of a few metals, environmental impacts of the majority of elements are dominated by the purification and refining stages in which metals are transformed from a concentrate into their metallic form. Out of the 63 metals investigated, 42 metals are obtained as co-products in multi output processes. We test the sensitivity of varying allocation rationales, in which the environmental burden are allocated to the various metal and mineral products, on the overall results. Monte-Carlo simulation is applied to further investigate the stability of our results. This analysis is the most comprehensive life cycle comparison of metals to date and allows for the first time a complete bottom-up estimate of life cycle impacts of the metals and mining sector globally. We estimate global direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions in 2008 at 3.4 Gt CO2-eq per year and primary energy use at 49 EJ per year (9.5% of global use), and report the shares for all metals to both impact categories. PMID:24999810

  15. Life cycle assessment of metals: a scientific synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Nuss

    Full Text Available We have assembled extensive information on the cradle-to-gate environmental burdens of 63 metals in their major use forms, and illustrated the interconnectedness of metal production systems. Related cumulative energy use, global warming potential, human health implications and ecosystem damage are estimated by metal life cycle stage (i.e., mining, purification, and refining. For some elements, these are the first life cycle estimates of environmental impacts reported in the literature. We show that, if compared on a per kilogram basis, the platinum group metals and gold display the highest environmental burdens, while many of the major industrial metals (e.g., iron, manganese, titanium are found at the lower end of the environmental impacts scale. If compared on the basis of their global annual production in 2008, iron and aluminum display the largest impacts, and thallium and tellurium the lowest. With the exception of a few metals, environmental impacts of the majority of elements are dominated by the purification and refining stages in which metals are transformed from a concentrate into their metallic form. Out of the 63 metals investigated, 42 metals are obtained as co-products in multi output processes. We test the sensitivity of varying allocation rationales, in which the environmental burden are allocated to the various metal and mineral products, on the overall results. Monte-Carlo simulation is applied to further investigate the stability of our results. This analysis is the most comprehensive life cycle comparison of metals to date and allows for the first time a complete bottom-up estimate of life cycle impacts of the metals and mining sector globally. We estimate global direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions in 2008 at 3.4 Gt CO2-eq per year and primary energy use at 49 EJ per year (9.5% of global use, and report the shares for all metals to both impact categories.

  16. Neutral bimetallic transition metal phenoxyiminato catalysts and related polymerization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Tobin J [Evanston, IL; Rodriguez, Brandon A [Evanston, IL; Delferro, Massimiliano [Chicago, IL

    2012-08-07

    A catalyst composition comprising a neutral bimetallic diphenoxydiiminate complex of group 10 metals or Ni, Pd or Pt is disclosed. The compositions can be used for the preparation of homo- and co-polymers of olefinic monomer compounds.

  17. Annals of SAM meeting '96. National meeting on precious metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Works are presented at the SAM meeting '96 of the Argentine Materials Association. The papers can be grouped under the following main topics: physical metallurgy; ceramics; polymers; precious metals; extractive metallurgy; corrosion; powder metallurgy. refs., ills

  18. Alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shū; Yamashita, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-18

    The group 2 alkaline earth metals calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) are among the most common elements on Earth, abundant in both the sea and the Earth's crust. Although they are familiar in our daily lives, their application to organic synthesis has, so far, been limited. Some particularly useful properties of these elements include (i) low electronegativity, (ii) a stable oxidation state of +2, meaning that they can potentially form two covalent bonds with anions, and (iii) the ability to occupy a variety of coordination sites due to their large ionic radius. Furthermore, the alkaline earth metals, found between the group 1 and group 3 elements, show mild but significant Lewis acidity, which can be harnessed to control coordinative molecules via a Lewis acid-base interaction. Taken together, these characteristics make the metals Ca, Sr, and Ba very promising components of highly functionalized acid-base catalysts. In this Account, we describe the development of chiral alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. Recently prepared chiral alkaline earth metal complexes have shown high diastereo- and enantioselectivities in fundamental and important chemical transformations. We chose chiral bisoxazoline (Box) derivatives bearing a methylene tether as a ligand for chiral modification. These molecules are very useful because they can covalently coordinate to alkaline earth metals in a bidentate fashion through deprotonation of the tether portion. It was found that chiral calcium-Box complexes could successfully promote catalytic asymmetric 1,4-addition and [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Both the calcium-Box complexes and chiral strontium-bis-sulfonamide and chiral barium-BINOLate complexes could catalyze asymmetric 1,4-addition reactions with high enantioselectivities. Furthermore, we designed a calcium-neutral coordinative ligand complex as a new type of chiral alkaline

  19. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  20. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  1. Ferrous Metal Processing Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes ferrous metal processing plants in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  2. Nonferrous Metal Processing Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes nonferrous metal processing plants in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  3. Quasicrystalline metallic adlayers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ugc

    Quasicrystalline metallic adlayers. S. R. Barman. UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore. 23rd Mid-year Meeting of the Indian Academy of Sciences,. July 13-14, 2012,. Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.

  4. Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 4. Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution - Development of Chronological Records and Geochemical Monitoring. Rohit Shrivastav. General Article Volume 6 Issue 4 April 2001 pp 62-68 ...

  5. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of hydrogen in metals processing and treatment identified, and mechanisms for hydrogen entry into a ferritic surface are discussed. The differences between hydrogen attack of ferritic steels and copper alloys are contrasted, and an unusual case study...

  6. Micro metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Micro Metal Forming, i. e. forming of parts and features with dimensions below 1 mm, is a young area of research in the wide field of metal forming technologies, expanding the limits for applying metal forming towards micro technology. The essential challenges arise from the reduced geometrical size and the increased lot size. In order to enable potential users to apply micro metal forming in production, information about the following topics are given: tribological behavior: friction between tool and work piece as well as tool wear mechanical behavior: strength and formability of the work piece material, durability of the work pieces size effects: basic description of effects occurring due to the fact, that the quantitative relation between different features changes with decreasing size process windows and limits for forming processes tool making methods numerical modeling of processes and process chains quality assurance and metrology All topics are discussed with respect to the questions relevant to micro...

  7. Hardness of metallic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    -known Hall–Petch relationship predicts that the strength or hardness of conventional metal alloys increases with decreasing grain sizes. However, the rela- tionship fails when the grain size is down to nanometers as many experimental results ...

  8. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Ramírez-Sandoval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO32. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis.

  9. New Approach for Fractioning Metal Compounds Studies in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkina, Tatiana; Motuzova, Galina; Mandzhieva, Saglara; Bauer, Tatiana; Burachevskaya, Marina; Sushkova, Svetlana; Nevidomskaya, Dina; Kalinitchenko, Valeriy

    2016-04-01

    A combined approach for fractioning metal compounds in soils on the basis of sequential (Tessier, 1979) and parallel extractions (1 N NH4Ac, pH 8; 1% EDTA in NH4Ac; and 1N HCl) is proposed. Metal compounds in sequential and parallel extracts are grouped according to the strength of their bonds with soil components. A given group includes metal compounds with similar strengths of bonds and, hence, with similar migration capacities. The groups of firmly and loosely bound metal compounds can be distinguished. This approach has been used to assess the group composition of Zn, Cu, and Pb compounds in an ordinary chernozem and its changes upon the soil contamination with metals. Contamination of an ordinary chernozem from Rostov oblast with heavy metals caused a disturbance of the natural ratios between the metal compounds. In the natural soil, firmly bound metals predominate (88-95%of the total content), which is mainly caused by the fixation of metals in lattices of silicate minerals (56-83%of the total content). The mobility of the metals in the natural soil is low (5-12%) and is mainly related to metal compounds loosely bound with the soil carbonates. Upon the soil contamination with metals (application rates of 100-300 mg/kg), the content of all the metal compounds increases, but the ratio between them shifts towards a higher portion of the potentially mobile metal compounds (up to 30-40% of the bulk contents of the metals). Organic substances and non-silicate Fe, Al, and Mn minerals become the main carriers of the firmly and loosely bound metals. The strengths of their bonds with Cu, Pb, and Zn differ. Lead in the studied chernozems is mainly fixed in a loosely bound form with organic matter, whereas copper and zinc are fixed both by the organic matter and by the non-silicate Fe, Al, and Mn compounds. Firm fixation of the applied Cu and Pb is mainly ensured by the soil organic matter and non-silicate minerals, whereas firm fixation of Zn is mainly due to non

  10. Mining Critical Metals and Elements from Seawater: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Mamadou S; Kotte, Madhusudhana Rao; Cho, Manki

    2015-08-18

    The availability and sustainable supply of technology metals and valuable elements is critical to the global economy. There is a growing realization that the development and deployment of the clean energy technologies and sustainable products and manufacturing industries of the 21st century will require large amounts of critical metals and valuable elements including rare-earth elements (REEs), platinum group metals (PGMs), lithium, copper, cobalt, silver, and gold. Advances in industrial ecology, water purification, and resource recovery have established that seawater is an important and largely untapped source of technology metals and valuable elements. This feature article discusses the opportunities and challenges of mining critical metals and elements from seawater. We highlight recent advances and provide an outlook of the future of metal mining and resource recovery from seawater.

  11. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  12. Citizens' action group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andritzky, W.

    1978-01-01

    For the first empirical study of citizens' action groups 331 such groups were consulted. Important information was collected on the following aspects of these groups: their self-image, areas and forms of activities, objectives and their extent, how long the group has existed, successes and failures and their forms of organisation. (orig.) [de

  13. When Groups Go Wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopler, Janice H.; Galinsky, Maeda J.

    1981-01-01

    Studied social workers' perceptions of group dimensions that had negative effects on members. Found that group leaders viewed group composition as a major source of harmful interaction while members and observers saw group norms as a more frequent cause of negative effects. (Author/JAC)

  14. PRODUCTION OF HAFNIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, G.W.; Boubel, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    This patent deals with a process of producing pure Hf metal from oxygen- contaminated gaseous Hf chloride. The oxygen compounds in the chioride gas are halogenated by contacting the gas at elevated temperature with Cl/sub 2/ in the presence of C. The Hf chloride, still in gaseous form, is contacted with molten Mg whereby Hf metal is formed and condensed on the Mg. (AEC)

  15. The Confluence of Heavy Metal Biooxidation and Heavy Metal Resistance: Implications for Bioleaching by Extreme Thermoacidophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett Wheaton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Extreme thermoacidophiles (Topt > 65 °C, pHopt < 3.5 inhabit unique environments fraught with challenges, including extremely high temperatures, low pH, as well as high levels of soluble metal species. In fact, certain members of this group thrive by metabolizing heavy metals, creating a dynamic equilibrium between biooxidation to meet bioenergetic needs and mechanisms for tolerating and resisting the toxic effects of solubilized metals. Extremely thermoacidophilic archaea dominate bioleaching operations at elevated temperatures and have been considered for processing certain mineral types (e.g., chalcopyrite, some of which are recalcitrant to their mesophilic counterparts. A key issue to consider, in addition to temperature and pH, is the extent to which solid phase heavy metals are solubilized and the concomitant impact of these mobilized metals on the microorganism’s growth physiology. Here, extreme thermoacidophiles are examined from the perspectives of biodiversity, heavy metal biooxidation, metal resistance mechanisms, microbe-solid interactions, and application of these archaea in biomining operations.

  16. VERY LOW MASS STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO SOLAR-LIKE STARS FROM MARVELS. IV. A CANDIDATE BROWN DWARF OR LOW-MASS STELLAR COMPANION TO HIP 67526

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Peng; Ge Jian; De Lee, Nathan; Fleming, Scott W.; Lee, Brian L.; Ma Bo; Wang, Ji; Cargile, Phillip; Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan G.; Crepp, Justin R.; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Ferreira, Letícia D.; Esposito, Massimiliano; Femenia, Bruno; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Ghezzi, Luan; Wisniewski, John P.; Agol, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a candidate brown dwarf (BD) or a very low mass stellar companion (MARVELS-5b) to the star HIP 67526 from the Multi-object Apache point observatory Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The radial velocity curve for this object contains 31 epochs spread over 2.5 yr. Our Keplerian fit, using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach, reveals that the companion has an orbital period of 90.2695 +0.0188 -0.0187 days, an eccentricity of 0.4375 ± 0.0040, and a semi-amplitude of 2948.14 +16.65 -16.55 m s –1 . Using additional high-resolution spectroscopy, we find the host star has an effective temperature T eff = 6004 ± 34 K, a surface gravity log g (cgs) =4.55 ± 0.17, and a metallicity [Fe/H] =+0.04 ± 0.06. The stellar mass and radius determined through the empirical relationship of Torres et al. yields 1.10 ± 0.09 M ☉ and 0.92 ± 0.19 R ☉ . The minimum mass of MARVELS-5b is 65.0 ± 2.9M Jup , indicating that it is likely to be either a BD or a very low mass star, thus occupying a relatively sparsely populated region of the mass function of companions to solar-type stars. The distance to this system is 101 ± 10 pc from the astrometric measurements of Hipparcos. No stellar tertiary is detected in the high-contrast images taken by either FastCam lucky imaging or Keck adaptive optics imaging, ruling out any star with mass greater than 0.2 M ☉ at a separation larger than 40 AU

  17. Strategic Management fundamentals of metal enterprises in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Zargana Irina Anatolevna

    2013-01-01

    The basics and characteristics of strategic management at the metal enterprises are considered. The stages of development and implementation of enterprise management strategy are structured. The balanced scorecard and process management as tools of achieving the goals are considered. The block diagram of metal enterprises management strategy is presented, in which the groups of process indicators are allocated and the balanced scorecard for the process groups are developed.

  18. Strategic Management fundamentals of metal enterprises in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zargana Irina Anatolevna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The basics and characteristics of strategic management at the metal enterprises are considered. The stages of development and implementation of enterprise management strategy are structured. The balanced scorecard and process management as tools of achieving the goals are considered. The block diagram of metal enterprises management strategy is presented, in which the groups of process indicators are allocated and the balanced scorecard for the process groups are developed.

  19. Group Psychotherapy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rainer; Strauss, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the development of group psychotherapies in Germany originating from a psychodynamic tradition. The German health system provides access to inpatient and outpatient psychotherapy for all of its citizens. Whereas groups are common in inpatient settings, the provision of outpatient group treatment still could be improved, as it is the case for the general training of group psychotherapists. Group research in Germany largely reflects clinical practice, with more studies coming from the inpatient field. It is stated that the general image of group treatment seems to be largely positive, which could provide a basis for political initiatives to improve the dissemination of group therapy in this country.

  20. Handbook of group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, Athanase; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Groups and group actions are probably the most central objects in mathematics. Comprising volumes 31 and 32 of the ALM series (with further volumes forthcoming), the Handbook of Group Actions presents survey articles on the topic of group actions and how they appear in several mathematical contexts. The general subject matter is organized under the following sections: geometry, mapping class groups, knot groups, topology, representation theory, deformation theory, and discrete groups. The various articles deal with both classical material and modern developments. They are written by specialists in their respective subject areas, and addressed to graduate students who want to learn the theory, as well as to specialists as a reference.

  1. Metal-Semiconductor Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, D. I.

    Metal-semiconductor contacts display a range of electrical characteristics from strongly rectifying to ohmic, each having its own applications. The rectifying properties of metal points on metallic sulphides were used extensively as detectors in early radio experiments, while during the second world war the rectifying point contact diode became important as a frequency detector and low level microwave radar detector [1]. Since 1945 the development of metal semiconductor contacts has been stimulated by the intense activity in the field of semiconductor physics and has remained vital in the ohmic connection of semiconductor devices with the outside world. The developments in surface science and the increased use of Schottky barriers in microelectronics has lead to much research with the aim of obtaining a full understanding of the physics of barrier formation and of current transport across the metal-semiconductor interface. Large gain spin electronic devices are possible with appropriate designs by incorporating ferromagnetic layers with semiconductors such as silicon [2]. This inevitably leads to metal-semiconductor contacts, and the impact of such junctions on the device must be considered. In this section we aim to look simply at the physical models that can be used to understand the electrical properties that can arise from these contacts, and then briefly discuss how deviations of these models can occur in practical junctions.

  2. Metals in fungal virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwien, Franziska; Skrahina, Volha; Kasper, Lydia; Hube, Bernhard; Brunke, Sascha

    2018-01-01

    Metals are essential for life, and they play a central role in the struggle between infecting microbes and their hosts. In fact, an important aspect of microbial pathogenesis is the 'nutritional immunity', in which metals are actively restricted (or, in an extended definition of the term, locally enriched) by the host to hinder microbial growth and virulence. Consequently, fungi have evolved often complex regulatory networks, uptake and detoxification systems for essential metals such as iron, zinc, copper, nickel and manganese. These systems often differ fundamentally from their bacterial counterparts, but even within the fungal pathogens we can find common and unique solutions to maintain metal homeostasis. Thus, we here compare the common and species-specific mechanisms used for different metals among different fungal species-focusing on important human pathogens such as Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus or Cryptococcus neoformans, but also looking at model fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae or A. nidulans as well-studied examples for the underlying principles. These direct comparisons of our current knowledge reveal that we have a good understanding how model fungal pathogens take up iron or zinc, but that much is still to learn about other metals and specific adaptations of individual species-not the least to exploit this knowledge for new antifungal strategies. © FEMS 2017.

  3. Trace Metal Requirements and Interactions in Symbiodinium kawagutii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Irene B.; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms need trace metals for various biological processes and different groups of microalgae have distinctive obligate necessities due to their respective biochemical requirements and ecological niches. We have previously shown that the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium kawagutii requires high concentrations of bioavailable Fe to achieve optimum growth. Here, we further explored the trace metal requirements of S. kawagutii with intensive focus on the effect of individual metal and its interaction with other divalent metals. We found that low Zn availability significantly decreases growth rates and results in elevated intracellular Mn, Co, Ni, and Fe quotas in the dinoflagellate. The results highlight the complex interaction among trace metals in S. kawagutii and suggest either metal replacement strategy to counter low Zn availability or enhanced uptake of other metals by non-specific divalent metal transporters. In this work, we also examined the Fe requirement of S. kawagutii using continuous cultures. We validated that 500 pM of Fe′ was sufficient to support maximum cell density during steady state growth period either at 26 or 28°C. This study shows that growth of S. kawagutii was limited by metal availability in the following order, Fe > Zn > Mn > Cu > Ni > Co. The fundamental information obtained for the free-living Symbiodinium shall provide insights into how trace metal availability, either from ambient seawater or hosts, affects growth and proliferation of symbiotic dinoflagellates and the interaction between symbiont and their hosts. PMID:29467748

  4. Trace Metal Requirements and Interactions inSymbiodinium kawagutii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Irene B; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms need trace metals for various biological processes and different groups of microalgae have distinctive obligate necessities due to their respective biochemical requirements and ecological niches. We have previously shown that the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium kawagutii requires high concentrations of bioavailable Fe to achieve optimum growth. Here, we further explored the trace metal requirements of S. kawagutii with intensive focus on the effect of individual metal and its interaction with other divalent metals. We found that low Zn availability significantly decreases growth rates and results in elevated intracellular Mn, Co, Ni, and Fe quotas in the dinoflagellate. The results highlight the complex interaction among trace metals in S. kawagutii and suggest either metal replacement strategy to counter low Zn availability or enhanced uptake of other metals by non-specific divalent metal transporters. In this work, we also examined the Fe requirement of S. kawagutii using continuous cultures. We validated that 500 pM of Fe' was sufficient to support maximum cell density during steady state growth period either at 26 or 28°C. This study shows that growth of S. kawagutii was limited by metal availability in the following order, Fe > Zn > Mn > Cu > Ni > Co. The fundamental information obtained for the free-living Symbiodinium shall provide insights into how trace metal availability, either from ambient seawater or hosts, affects growth and proliferation of symbiotic dinoflagellates and the interaction between symbiont and their hosts.

  5. Trace Metal Requirements and Interactions in Symbiodinium kawagutii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene B. Rodriguez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic organisms need trace metals for various biological processes and different groups of microalgae have distinctive obligate necessities due to their respective biochemical requirements and ecological niches. We have previously shown that the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium kawagutii requires high concentrations of bioavailable Fe to achieve optimum growth. Here, we further explored the trace metal requirements of S. kawagutii with intensive focus on the effect of individual metal and its interaction with other divalent metals. We found that low Zn availability significantly decreases growth rates and results in elevated intracellular Mn, Co, Ni, and Fe quotas in the dinoflagellate. The results highlight the complex interaction among trace metals in S. kawagutii and suggest either metal replacement strategy to counter low Zn availability or enhanced uptake of other metals by non-specific divalent metal transporters. In this work, we also examined the Fe requirement of S. kawagutii using continuous cultures. We validated that 500 pM of Fe′ was sufficient to support maximum cell density during steady state growth period either at 26 or 28°C. This study shows that growth of S. kawagutii was limited by metal availability in the following order, Fe > Zn > Mn > Cu > Ni > Co. The fundamental information obtained for the free-living Symbiodinium shall provide insights into how trace metal availability, either from ambient seawater or hosts, affects growth and proliferation of symbiotic dinoflagellates and the interaction between symbiont and their hosts.

  6. Dissolution of Metal Supported Spent Auto Catalysts in Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fornalczyk A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal supported auto catalysts, have been used in sports and racing cars initially, but nowadays their application systematically increases. In Metal Substrate (supported Converters (MSC, catalytic functions are performed by the Platinum Group Metals (PGM: Pt, Pd, Rh, similarly to the catalysts on ceramic carriers. The contents of these metals make that spent catalytic converters are valuable source of precious metals. All over the world there are many methods for the metals recovery from the ceramic carriers, however, the issue of platinum recovery from metal supported catalysts has not been studied sufficiently yet. The paper presents preliminary results of dissolution of spent automotive catalyst on a metal carrier by means of acids: H2SO4, HCl, HNO3, H3PO4. The main assumption of the research was the dissolution of base metals (Fe, Cr, Al from metallic carrier of catalyst, avoiding dissolution of PGMs. Dissolution was the most effective when concentrated hydrochloric acid, and 2M sulfuric acid (VI was used. It was observed that the dust, remaining after leaching, contained platinum in the level of 0.8% and 0.7%, respectively.

  7. Heavy Metal Biosorption sites in Penicillium cyclopium *a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    103A , 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria. ABSTRACT: The biomass of Penicillium cyclopium was subjected to chemical treatment to study the role of the functional groups in the biosorption of heavy metal ions. The modifications of the functional groups were examined with infrared spectroscopy. Hydroxyl groups were identified as ...

  8. Metals in aerosols of the Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes L, J.

    1998-01-01

    The general purpose and scope of this work was to have a data base that includes enough information about the heavy metals which are disseminated in the atmospheric air in Mexico City, like it is what refers to its elements, its concentration and its particle size. For this were collected samples through collectors types: of the filters unit and the cascade impactor. Through the PIXE analysis for filters and films it was identified the presence of 20 elements in the majority of samples studied of the four seasons during the years 1993-1994. The metals were classified in two groups: those of natural origin and those of anthropogenic origin. (Author)

  9. Innovation in business groups

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon Belenzon; Tomer Berkovitz

    2007-01-01

    Using novel data on European firms, this paper investigates the relationship between business groups and innovation. Controlling for various firm characteristics, we find that group affiliates are more innovative than standalones. We examine several hypotheses to explain this finding, focusing on group internal capital markets and knowledge spillovers. We find that group affiliation is particularly important for innovation in industries that rely more on external funding and in groups with mo...

  10. Heavy Metal - Exploring a magnetised metallic asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Andrews, David; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Masters, Adam; Thomas, Nicolas; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Herique, Alain; Retherford, Kurt; Tortora, Paolo; Trigo-Rodriguez, Joseph; Ivchenko, Nickolay; Simon, Sven

    2017-04-01

    We propose a spacecraft mission (Heavy Metal) to orbit and explore (16) Psyche - the largest M-class metallic asteroid in the main belt. Recent estimates of the shape, 279×232×189 km and mass, 2.7×10(19) kg make it one of the largest and densest of asteroids, and together with the high surface radar reflectivity and the spectral data measured from Earth it is consistent with a bulk composition rich in iron-nickel. The M5 mission Heavy Metal will investigate if (16) Psyche is the exposed metallic core of a planetesimal, formed early enough to melt and differentiate. High-resolution mapping of the surface in optical, IR, UV and radar wavebands, along with the determination of the shape and gravity field will be used to address the formation and subsequent evolution of (16) Psyche, determining the origin of metallic asteroids. It is conceivable that a cataclysmic collision with a second body led to the ejection of all or part of the differentiated core of the parent body. Measurements at (16) Psyche therefore provide a possibility to directly examine an iron-rich planetary core, similar to that expected at the center of all the major planets including Earth. A short-lived dynamo producing a magnetic field early in the life of (16) Psyche could have led to a remnant field (of tens of micro Tesla) being preserved in the body today. (16) Psyche is embedded in the variable flow of the solar wind. Whereas planetary magnetospheres and induced magnetospheres are the result of intense dynamo fields and dense conductive ionospheres presenting obstacles to the solar wind, (16) Psyche may show an entirely new 'class' of interaction as a consequence of its lack of a significant atmosphere, the extremely high bulk electrical conductivity of the asteroid, and the possible presence of intense magnetic fields retained in iron-rich material. The small characteristic scale of (16) Psyche ( 200 km) firmly places any solar wind interaction in the "sub-MHD" scale, in which kinetic

  11. Increased frequency of delayed type hypersensitivity to metals in patients with connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stejskal, Vera; Reynolds, Tim; Bjørklund, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissue disease (CTD) is a group of inflammatory disorders of unknown aetiology. Patients with CTD often report hypersensitivity to nickel. We examined the frequency of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) (Type IV allergy) to metals in patients with CTD. Thirty-eight patients; 9 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 16 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 13 with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and a control group of 43 healthy age- and sex-matched subjects were included in the study. A detailed metal exposure history was collected by questionnaire. Metal hypersensitivity was evaluated using the optimised lymphocyte transformation test LTT-MELISA(®) (Memory Lymphocyte Immuno Stimulation Assay). In all subjects, the main source of metal exposure was dental metal restorations. The majority of patients (87%) had a positive lymphocyte reaction to at least one metal and 63% reacted to two or more metals tested. Within the control group, 43% of healthy subjects reacted to one metal and only 18% reacted to two or more metals. The increased metal reactivity in the patient group compared with the control group was statistically significant (Pnickel, mercury, gold and palladium. Patients with SLE, RA and SS have an increased frequency of metal DTH. Metals such as nickel, mercury and gold are present in dental restorative materials, and many adults are therefore continually exposed to metal ions through corrosion of dental alloys. Metal-related DTH will cause inflammation. Since inflammation is a key process in CTDs, it is possible that metal-specific T cell reactivity is an etiological factor in their development. The role of metal-specific lymphocytes in autoimmunity remains an exciting challenge for future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical pitfalls in patients with Ehlers–Danlos type IV: A case of spontaneous sigmoid perforation in a 17-year-old male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lyn Ng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS is a group of well described connective tissue disorders in which collagen production is impaired. The surgical management of affected individuals remains challenging, with no general consensus. We report a case of spontaneous sigmoid perforation in a 17-year-old Eurasian male, in whom we subsequently established the diagnosis of EDS type IV (EDS-IV. We review the literature to discuss the clinical features and diagnosis, and the recommended therapeutic management.

  13. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Richard

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  14. Comparison of Complications Following Revision of Metal-on-Metal Versus Metal-on-Polyethylene Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Shoji; Fukunishi, Shigeo; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Sing, David C; Hansen, Erik N; Vail, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of patients who required revision and the rate of early complications after revision for metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MOM THA) and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty (MOP THA). Matched cohorts were selected by retrospective review from a single-center database of revision THAs for failed MOM and MOP THAs from 2010 to 2014. A total of 140 hips in 140 patients comprised the study population; 39 revisions were performed for failed MOM THAs (MOM group), and 101 revisions were performed for failed MOP THAs (MOP group). Data included patient demographics, reason for revision, type of revision procedure, any complication within 90 days after surgery, admission type, and discharge disposition. Primary diagnosis, time from primary THA to revision, operative time, blood loss, and length of stay were reviewed. The analysis showed the time from the index primary procedure to first revision was earlier (P=.01) in the MOM group despite no significant intergroup differences in age, gender, primary diagnosis, or body mass index. Surgical morbidity, as indicated by operative time, blood loss, and length of stay, was lower in the MOM group. The stem was retained more often in the MOM group. There was no significant difference between the groups in overall complication rate. These findings indicate that when performed at an earlier time period before extensive soft tissue reaction to metal ions, revision following MOM THA is not associated with an increased complication rate compared with revision following MOP THA. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e164-e169.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  16. Emission factors for heavy metals from diesel and petrol used in European vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulles, M.P.J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Appelman, W.A.J.; Verheul, M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Heavy metals constitute an important group of persistent toxic pollutants occurring in ambient air and other media. One of the suspected sources of these metals in the atmosphere is combustion of transport fuels in road vehicles. However estimates of the emissions of these metals from road

  17. Synthesis of Mesoporous Metal Oxides by Structure Replication: Thermal Analysis of Metal Nitrates in Porous Carbon Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Weinberger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of metal nitrates were filled into the pores of an ordered mesoporous CMK-3 carbon matrix by solution-based impregnation. Thermal conversion of the metal nitrates into the respective metal oxides, and subsequent removal of the carbon matrix by thermal combustion, provides a versatile means to prepare mesoporous metal oxides (so-called nanocasting. This study aims to monitor the thermally induced processes by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, coupled with mass ion detection (MS. The highly dispersed metal nitrates in the pores of the carbon matrix tend to react to the respective metal oxides at lower temperature than reported in the literature for pure, i.e., carbon-free, metal nitrates. The subsequent thermal combustion of the CMK-3 carbon matrix also occurs at lower temperature, which is explained by a catalytic effect of the metal oxides present in the pores. This catalytic effect is particularly strong for oxides of redox active metals, such as transition group VII and VIII metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Ce.

  18. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  19. Independent student study groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Graham D; Hyde, Sarah J; Davy, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Teachers and students regulate learning to varying degrees in educational programmes in higher education. We present evidence that students in a student-centred medical programme self- and co-regulate their learning in independently formed study groups. We describe the perceived benefits of study groups and the effect of study group membership on student achievement. Years 1-2 of a 4-year, graduate-entry problem-based medical programme. We surveyed 233 year 2 students about features of their study groups and their study group membership in years 1-2. We compared study group membership with students' scores on a written summative assessment held at the end of their second year. For students who joined 1 study group, the length of time their group stayed together was positively related to achievement in the written summative assessment. There were no differences in summative assessment results between students who had been in a study group and students who had not been in a study group. Effective study groups are supportive, socially cohesive groups who generate mutual trust and loyalty, and self- and co-regulate their learning by giving and receiving explanations and summaries and motivating individual study. Teachers can support the formation of study groups by using small-group teaching/learning activities, providing clear learning outcomes and assessment criteria, minimising competition for grades and allocating room space.

  20. Charge transfer in gold--alkali-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.

    1994-01-01

    Based on conventional electronegativity arguments, gold--alkali-metal compounds are expected to be among the most ''ionic'' of metallic compounds. The concepts of ionicity and charge transfer are difficult to quantify. However, the changes in bonding in the 50/50 Au--alkali-metal systems between the elemental metals and the compounds are so severe that observations can readily be made concerning their character. The results, as obtained from self-consistent electronic-structure calculations, lead to the apparently odd observation that the electron density at the alkali-metal sites in the compound increases significantly and this involves high l componennts in the charge density. This increase, however, can be attributed to Au-like orbitals spatially overlapping the alkali-metal sites. In a chemical sense, it is reasonable to consider the alkali-metal transferring charge to these Au orbitals. While normally the difference in heats of formation between muffin-tin and full-potential calculations for transition-metal--transition-metal and transition-metal--main-group (e.g., Al) compounds having high site symmetry are small, for the gold--alkali-metal systems, the changes in bonding in the compounds cause differences of ∼0.5 eV/atom between the two classes of potential. Any serious estimate of the electronic structure in these systems must account for these aspherical bonding charges. The origin of the semiconducting behavior of the heavy-alkali-metal Au compounds is shown to arise from a combination of the Au-Au separations and the ionic character of the compounds; the light-alkali-metal Au compounds, with their smaller Au-Au separations, do not have a semiconducting gap. Core-level shifts and isomer shifts are also briefly discussed