WorldWideScience

Sample records for isotopically anomalous xenon

  1. Average radiation widths of levels in natural xenon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguere, G., E-mail: gilles.noguere@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul les Durance (France); Litaize, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul les Durance (France); Mutti, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2011-11-15

    Average radiation widths <{Gamma}{sub {gamma}>} for the stable xenon isotopes have been estimated using neutron resonance spectroscopic information deduced from high-resolution capture and transmission data measured at the electron linear accelerator GELINA of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel, Belgium. The combination of conventional Neutron Resonance Shape Analysis techniques (NRSA) with high-energy model calculations in a simple Bayesian learning method permit to calculate a consistent local systematic in the xenon's mass region (Z=54) from A=124 to A=136.

  2. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction analyses of protein structures based on xenon and selenium resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, Betty Nicole

    The 'phase problem' is central to X-ray crystallography, and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) provides an elegant and broadly accessible solution. In the first part, the use of MAD at the xenon L3 edge is explored, as an alternative to the well established selenium K-edge phasing. In the second part, the structure of the bacterial protein Vibrio cholerae LuxQ, part of a two component signaling system involved in quorum sensing, is solved and analyzed. Keywords: anomalous scattering, x-ray diffraction, phasing, protein structure.

  3. The anomalous quadrupole collectivity in Te isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Chong

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic calculations on the spectroscopy and transition properties of even-even Te isotopes by using the large-scale configuration interaction shell model approach with a realistic interaction. These nuclei are of particular interest since their yrast spectra show a vibrational-like equally-spaced pattern but the few known E2 transitions show anomalous rotational-like behavior, which cannot be reproduced by collective models. Our calculations reproduce well the equally-spaced spectra of those isotopes as well as the constant behavior of the $B(E2)$ values in $^{114}$Te. The calculated $B(E2)$ values for neutron-deficient and heavier Te isotopes show contrasting different behaviors along the yrast line. The $B(E2)$ of light isotopes can exhibit a nearly constant bevavior upto high spins. We show that this is related to the enhanced neutron-proton correlation when approaching $N=50$.

  4. Irradiated Xenon Isotopic Ratio Measurement for Failed Fuel Detection and Location in Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Chikara; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Harano, Hideki

    2009-08-01

    The accuracy of xenon isotopic ratio burn-up calculations used for failed fuel identification was evaluated by an irradiation test of xenon tag gas samples in the Joyo test reactor. The experiment was carried out using pressurized steel capsules containing unique blend ratios of stable xenon tag gases in an on-line creep rupture experiment in Joyo. The tag gas samples were irradiated to total neutron fluences of 1.6 to 4.8 × 1026 n/m2. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used to analyze the cover gas containing released tag gas diluted to isotopic ratios of 100 to 102 ppb. The isotopic ratios of xenon tag gases after irradiation were calculated using the ORIGEN2 code. The neutron cross sections of xenon nuclides were based on the JENDL-3.3 library. These cross sections were collapsed into one group using the neutron spectra of Joyo. The comparison of measured and calculated xenon isotopic ratios provided C/E values that ranged from 0.92 to 1.10. The differences between calculation and measurement were considered to be mainly due to the measurement errors and the xenon nuclide cross section uncertainties.

  5. Isotopic Composition of Xenon in Petroleum from the Shell Bullwinkle Field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Nuzzo*; M Hyman; M W Rowe; Mnraoz; R L Palma; J Westrich

    2000-03-01

    We have measured the abundance and isotopic composition of xenon in petroleum samples from the Shell Bullwinkle Field off the coast of Louisiana. We used an oxidation and purification procedure designed to insure complete extraction and clean up of xenon from the petroleum. The xenon isotopic composition was found to be similar to the atmospheric value for one petroleum sample. While the results of the second sample suggest possible enrichment of the heavier isotopes, the errors associated with these excesses preclude a definitive statement to that effect. No monoisotopic enrichment in 129Xe was detected in either sample, the presence of which might have allowed us to deduce the petroleum age. Our results represent only the second xenon measurement from petroleum, and the concentrations are within the range of values published in the earlier report.

  6. A metastable xenon isotope detector for treaty verification

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, J A M; Conde, C A N

    2003-01-01

    A system to selectively detect and quantify the xenon metastable isotopes sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 sup m Xe, sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 sup m Xe, sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 Xe, and sup 1 sup 3 sup 5 Xe has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The system combines high-resolution electron and gamma-ray spectrometry with coincidence/anti-coincidence timing for signal selectivity and background rejection. By utilizing X-ray-fluorescence gating, backgrounds from other sources are expected to be reduced to the sub-becquerel level. Coincidence and anti-coincidence triggers are formed from the several individual detectors that comprise the system and used to identify K-shell conversion electrons and fluorescence X-rays from a sup 1 sup 0 sup 9 Cd test source with good efficiencies and energy resolutions (20 keV for the low-energy electrons, approx 1.2 keV for the fluorescence X-rays, respectively).

  7. Electric dipole moment searches using the isotope 129-xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchler, Florian

    2014-11-13

    Two new complementary experiments searching for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of 129-xenon are presented. Besides demonstration of a sensitivity improvement by employing established methods and a highly sensitive SQUID detection system the progress towards a novel measurement approach is discussed. The new method introduces time-varying electric fields and a liquid hyper-polarized xenon sample with a potential improvement in sensitivity of three orders of magnitude. The search for EDMs is motivated by their symmetry-breaking nature. A non-zero EDM provides a new source of CP violation to solve the mystery of the huge excess of matter over anti-matter in our Universe.

  8. Xenon isotopic constraints on the timing of atmospheric volatile recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parai, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2015-12-01

    Constraints on the recycling of atmospheric volatiles into the deep Earth provide important insights into mantle temperature, cooling rate, structure and style of convection over Earth history. Studies of ancient atmospheric gases trapped in Archean cherts show that the Xe isotopic composition of the atmosphere at ~3.5 Ga differed from the modern atmosphere [1]. This suggests the atmosphere evolved in isotopic composition until it reached its present-day composition at some time after 3.5 Ga. The evolution of the atmospheric Xe isotopic composition presents an opportunity to constrain the timing of Xe recycling into the Earth's mantle. Xe isotopes measured in mid-ocean ridge basalts [MORBs; 2,3] and plume-related basalts [4,5] indicate that both the upper mantle and plume source Xe isotopic compositions are dominated by recycled Xe [e.g., 3]. We find that the mantle source Xe isotopic compositions cannot be explained by recycling ancient atmospheric Xe alone; rather, subduction and incorporation of material bearing the modern atmospheric Xe composition must dominate. We note that our findings are consistent with a number of physical reasons that recently-subducted volatiles should be more prevalent than ancient subducted volatiles. First, a higher Archean mantle potential temperature should inhibit early Xe recycling to the deep Earth. Second, since the mantle turnover time scale is estimated to be between a few hundreds of Myr and 1 Gyr, the mantle recycled atmospheric Xe budget should be primarily composed of Xe subducted after ~2.5 Ga, at which point the atmosphere approaches the modern Xe composition [1]. Therefore, even if ancient atmospheric Xe were recycled efficiently to the mantle early in Earth history, the recycled atmospheric Xe budget of the mantle should still be dominated by the modern atmospheric Xe composition. [1] Pujol et al., 2011, EPSL; [2] Tucker et al., 2012, EPSL; [3] Parai and Mukhopadhyay, 2015, G-cubed; [4] Mukhopadhyay, 2012, Nature; [5

  9. Low-spin states of odd-mass xenon isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harun R Yazar

    2008-05-01

    In this work, we analyse the positive parity of states of odd-mass nucleus within the framework of interacting boson-fermion model. The result of an IBFM-1 multilevel calculation with the 2d5/2, 1g7/2, 3s1/2, 2d3/2 and 1h11/2, single particle orbits is reported for the positive parity states of the odd-mass nucleus 125-129Xe. Also, an IBM- 1 calculation is presented for the low-lying states in the even-even 124-128Xe core nucleus. The energy levels and (2) transition probabilities were calculated and compared with the experimental data. It was found that the calculated positive parity low-spin state energy spectra of the odd-mass 125-129Xe isotopes agree quite well with the experimental data.

  10. Global Xenon-133 Emission Inventory Caused by Medical Isotope Production and Derived from the Worldwide Technetium-99m Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Martin B.; Grosch, Martina; Hebel, Simon

    2014-03-01

    Emissions from medical isotope production are the most important source of background for atmospheric radioxenon measurements, which are an essential part of nuclear explosion monitoring. This article presents a new approach for estimating the global annual radioxenon emission inventory caused by medical isotope production using the amount of Tc-99m applications in hospitals as the basis. Tc-99m is the most commonly used isotope in radiology and dominates the medical isotope production. This paper presents the first estimate of the global production of Tc-99m. Depending on the production and transport scenario, global xenon emissions of 11-45 PBq/year can be derived from the global isotope demand. The lower end of this estimate is in good agreement with other estimations which are making use of reported releases and realistic process simulations. This proves the validity of the complementary assessment method proposed in this paper. It may be of relevance for future emission scenarios and for estimating the contribution to the global source term from countries and operators that do not make sufficient radioxenon release information available. It depends on sound data on medical treatments with radio-pharmaceuticals and on technical information on the production process of the supplier. This might help in understanding the apparent underestimation of the global emission inventory that has been found by atmospheric transport modelling.

  11. Early inner solar system origin for anomalous sulfur isotopes in differentiated protoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Michael A; Kim, Sang-Tae; Peters, Marc; Labidi, Jabrane; Cartigny, Pierre; Walker, Richard J; Lyons, James R; Hoek, Joost; Farquhar, James

    2014-12-16

    Achondrite meteorites have anomalous enrichments in (33)S, relative to chondrites, which have been attributed to photochemistry in the solar nebula. However, the putative photochemical reactions remain elusive, and predicted accompanying (33)S depletions have not previously been found, which could indicate an erroneous assumption regarding the origins of the (33)S anomalies, or of the bulk solar system S-isotope composition. Here, we report well-resolved anomalous (33)S depletions in IIIF iron meteorites (solar system (solar system S-isotope composition was chondritic (consistent with IAB iron meteorites, Earth, Moon, and Mars). The range of mass-independent sulfur isotope compositions may reflect spatial or temporal changes influenced by photochemical processes. A tentative correlation between S isotopes and Hf-W core segregation ages suggests that the two systems may be influenced by common factors, such as nebular location and volatile content.

  12. Anomalous isotopic effect on electron-directed reactivity by a 3-{\\mu}m midinfrared pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Kunlong; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically studied the effect of nuclear mass on electron localization in dissociating H_2^+ and its isotopes subjected to a few-cycle 3-{\\mu}m laser pulse. Compared to the isotopic trend in the near-infrared regime, our results reveal an inverse isotopic effect in which the degree of electron-directed reactivity is even higher for heavier isotopes. With the semi-classical analysis, we find, for the first time, the pronounced electron localization is established by the interferences through different channels of one- and, more importantly, higher-order photon coupling. Interestingly, due to the enhanced high-order above-threshold dissociation of heavier isotopes, the interference maxima gradually become in phase with growing mass and ultimately lead to the anomalous isotopic behavior of the electron localization. This indicates that the multi-photon coupling channels will play an important role in controlling the dissociation of larger molecules with midinfrared pulses.

  13. Evaluation technology for burnup and generated amount of plutonium by measurement of xenon isotopic ratio in dissolver off-gas at reprocessing facility (Joint research)

    OpenAIRE

    岡野 正紀; 久野 剛彦; 高橋 一朗; 白水 秀知; Charlton, W. S.; Wells, C. A.; Hemberger, P. H.; 山田 敬二; 酒井 敏雄

    2006-01-01

    The amount of Pu in the spent fuel was evaluated from Xe isotopic ratio in off-gas in reprocessing facility, is related to burnup. Six batches of dissolver off-gas at spent fuel dissolution process were sampled from the main stack in Tokai Reprocessing Plant during BWR fuel reprocessing campaign. Xenon isotopic ratio was determined with GC/MS. Burnup and generated amount of Pu were evaluated with Noble Gas Environmental Monitoring Application code (NOVA), developed by Los Alamos National Labo...

  14. Production of krypton and xenon isotopes in thick stony and iron targets isotropically irradiated with 1600 MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Gilabert, E; Lavielle, B; Leya, I; Michel, R; Neumann, S

    2002-01-01

    Two spherical targets made of gabbro with a radius of 25 cm and of steel with a radius of 10 cm were irradiated isotropically with 1600 MeV protons at the SATURNE synchrotron at Laboratoire National Saturne (LNS)/CEN Saclay, in order to simulate the production of nuclides in meteorites induced by galactic cosmic-ray protons in space. These experiments supply depth-dependent production rate data for a wide range of radioactive and stable isotopes in up to 28 target elements. In this paper, we report results for /sup 78/Kr, /sup 80-86/Kr isotopes in Rb, Sr, Y and Zr and for /sup 124/Xe, /sup 126/Xe, /sup 128-132/Xe, /sup 134/Xe, /sup 136/Xe isotopes in Ba and La. Krypton and xenon concentrations have been measured at different depths in the spheres by using conventional mass spectrometry. Based on Monte-Carlo techniques, theoretical production rates are calculated by folding depth-dependent spectra of primary and secondary protons and secondary neutrons with the excitation functions of the relevant nuclear reac...

  15. Variations in the isotopic composition of xenon under the annealing and selective dissolution of material from the Tsarev meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukoliukov, Iu. A.; Min, D. V.; Lavrukhina, A. K.; Fisenko, A. V.; Semenova, L. F.; Simonovskii, V. I.; Fugzan, M. M.; Melnikova, L. N.

    1982-10-01

    The mineral phases of thy L 5-6 Tsarev meteorite are separated by selective dissolution. Both bulk samples of gas and gas fractions separated at various temperatures between 400 and 1700 C are analyzed. The isotopic heterogeneity of the xenon in the meteorite is revealed. Under the effect of heating or the action of solvents of increasing activity, the isotopic makeup changes in regular fashion. For example, the Xe-132/Xe-130 ratio is between 7.055 + or - 0.024 and 6.224 + or - 0.020; the Xe-136/Xe-130 ratio is between 2.320 + or - 0.034 and 2.000 + or - 0.012; and the Xe-129/Xe-130 ratio is between 9.112 + or - 0.100 and 6.301 + or - 0.030. These changes are such that they can be explained on the basis of a three-component isotopic makeup of the meteor. Here, mass-fractionated Xe-Z and Xe-P are present, along with, possibly, radiogenic Xe-X.

  16. Sub-Doppler two-photon-excitation Rydberg spectroscopy of atomic xenon: mass-selective studies of isotopic and hyperfine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Mitsuhiko; He, Yabai; Baldwin, Kenneth G. H.; Orr, Brian J.

    2016-03-01

    Mass-selective sub-Doppler two-photon excitation (TPE) spectroscopy is employed to resolve isotopic contributions for transitions to high-energy Rydberg levels of xenon in an atomic beam, using narrowband pulses of coherent ultraviolet light at 205-213 nm generated by nonlinear-optical conversion processes. Previous research (Kono et al 2013 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 46 35401), has determined isotope energy shifts and hyperfine structure for 33 high-energy Rydberg levels of gas-phase xenon and accessed Rydberg levels at TPE energies in the range of 94 100-97 300 cm-1 with unprecedented spectroscopic resolution. The new isotopic-mass-resolved results were obtained by adding a pulsed free-jet atomic-beam source and a mass-selective time-of-flight detector to the apparatus in order to discern individual xenon isotopes and extract previously unresolved spectroscopic information. Resulting isotope energy shifts and hyperfine-coupling parameters are examined with regard to trends in principal quantum number n and in atomic angular-momentum quantum numbers, together with empirical and theoretical precedents for such trends.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Approaches to Understanding the Anomalous Distribution of Oxygen Isotopes in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gerardo; Christensen, Elizabeth; Boyer, Charisa; Park, Manesseh; Benitez, Ezra; Nunn, Morgan; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Terri

    2016-06-01

    Decades of careful laboratory analysis of primitive meteorites have revealed an intriguing and unexplained pattern in the distribution of oxygen isotopes in the solar system. With the recent analysis of solar wind oxygen by NASA’s Genesis mission, it appears that the Sun has a distinct oxygen isotopic composition from the terrestrial planets, asteroids, and comets. These differences cannot be explained by mass-dependent diffusion and require a physical-chemical mechanism or mechanisms that separate oxygen isotopes in a non-mass dependent manner.Several hypothesis have been proposed to explain the anomalous distribution. Photochemical self-shielding of CO may explain the anomalous distribution, however, this mechanism has key weaknesses including the requirement of a very fine tuned timescale to explain the isotopic differences between the Sun and bulk of the terrestrial planets. Recently, attention has been directed at understanding specific chemical reactions that occur on interstellar dust grains due to their similarities with non-equilibrium photochemical reactions believed to be responsible for the mass-independent isotopic fractionation patterns observed in Earth’s atmosphere. A specific focus has been directed towards understanding the formation of H2O because some of its precursor (HO2, and O3) are well-known to acquire mass-independent isotopic signatures when formed in the gas-phase.In this presentation, I describe a series of laboratory astrophysical experiments whose goal is to understand the distribution of oxygen isotopes in the solar system and perhaps, by extension, the distribution in other planetary systems. Preliminary results for the isotopic composition of O3 formed at 5K will be presented as well as the first, to our knowledge, measurements of the isotopic composition of H2O (18O/16O, 17O/16O, D/H) formed at 32K. We find that H2O formed in the astrophysical conditions we simulated acquired an anomalous isotopic composition with a triple

  18. Direct mass measurements of neutron-deficient xenon isotopes using the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Dilling, J; Beck, D; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Moore, R B; Scheidenberger, C; Schwarz, S; Sikler, G

    2004-01-01

    The masses of the noble-gas Xe isotopes with 114 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 123 have been directly measured for the first time. The experiments were carried out with the ISOLTRAP triple trap spectrometer at the online mass separator ISOLDE/CERN. A mass resolving power of the Penning trap spectrometer of $m/\\Delta m$ of close to a million was chosen resulting in an accuracy of $\\delta m \\leq 13$ keV for all investigated isotopes. Conflicts with existing, indirectly obtained, mass data by several standard deviations were found and are discussed. An atomic mass evaluation has been performed and the results are compared to information from laser spectroscopy experiments and to recent calculations employing an interacting boson model.

  19. Semiclassical wave packet study of anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-10-21

    We applied the semiclassical initial value representation method to calculate energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of scattering resonances in a two-dimensional potential for O+O2 collision. Such scattering states represent the metastable O3* species and play a central role in the process of ozone formation. Autocorrelation functions for scattering states were computed and then analyzed using the Prony method, which permits one to extract accurate energies and widths of the resonances. We found that the results of the semiclassical wave packet propagation agree well with fully quantum results. The focus was on the 16O16O18O isotopomer and the anomalous isotope effect associated with formation of this molecule, either through the 16O16O+18O or the 16O+16O18O channels. An interesting correlation between the local vibration mode character of the metastable states and their lifetimes was observed and explained. New insight is obtained into the mechanism by which the long-lived resonances in the delta zero-point energy part of spectrum produce the anomalously large isotope effect.

  20. Limits on the release of Rb isotopes from a zeolite based 83mKr calibration source for the XENON project

    CERN Document Server

    Hannen, V; Arneodo, F; Baudis, L; Beck, M; Bokeloh, K; Ferella, A D; Giboni, K; Lang, R F; Lebeda, O; Ortjohann, H -W; Schumann, M; Spalek, A; Venos, D; Weinheimer, C

    2011-01-01

    The isomer 83mKr with its half-life of 1.83 h is an ideal calibration source for a liquid noble gas dark matter experiment like the XENON project. However, the risk of contamination of the detector with traces of the much longer lived mother isotop 83Rb (86.2 d half-life) has to be ruled out. In this work the release of 83Rb atoms from a 1.8 MBq 83Rb source embedded in zeolite beads has been investigated. To do so, a cryogenic trap has been connected to the source for about 10 days, after which it was removed and probed for the strongest 83Rb gamma-rays with an ultra-sensitive Germanium detector. No signal has been found. The corresponding upper limit on the released 83Rb activity means that the investigated type of source can be used in the XENON project and similar low-background experiments as 83mKr generator without a significant risk of contaminating the detector. The measurements also allow to set upper limits on the possible release of the isotopes 84Rb and 86Rb, traces of which were created alongside ...

  1. XENON1T radon assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenner, Stefan [MPIK, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: XENON-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The radioactive isotope {sup 222}Rn is one of the most dominant intrinsic background sources for experiments dealing with a low event rate like the XENON1T Dark Matter detector. Being part of the primordial decay chain of {sup 238}U the noble gas {sup 222}Rn permanently emanates from almost all materials. Therefore, it is crucial to determine the radon emanation rate of those detector components that will be in contact with the xenon target. The technique of the radon emanation measurements, making use of ultra low background proportional counters is presented as well as selected results for XENON1T.

  2. Chemically fractionated fission-xenon in meteorites and on the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukolyukov, Yuri A.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Meshik, Alexander P.; Vu Minh, Dang; Jordan, Jimmy L.

    1994-07-01

    This is a report on the nature of isotopically anomalous xenon, which has been detected in two Ca-Al-rich inclusions of the Allende carbonaceous chondrite. It is extremely enriched in 132Xe, 129Xe, and to a lesser extent in 131Xe. Similar large excesses of 132Xe as well as of 131Xe, 134Xe, and 129Xe have previously been found in material processed in a natural nuclear reactor (Oklo phenomenon). Excess of these isotopes had also been encountered in MORB-glasses, in an ancient Greenland anorthosite. Thus, this Xe-type, which had previously been termed "alien" ( JORDON et al., 1980a) does not seem to be unique. To determine the origin of "alien" Xe, we analysed Xe (a) in neutron irradiated pitchblende and in the irradiation capsule, (b) in non-irradiated extremely fine-grained pitchblende (so-called Colorado-type deposit), and (c) in sandstone taken from the epicentre of an atomic explosion. In addition, the isotopic composition of xenon released by stepwise degassing and after selective dissolving of rocks from the Oklo natural reactor was determined. The results of these dedicated experiments demonstrate that the formation of alien Xe is due to the migration of the radioactive precursors of the stable isotopes 134Xe, 132Xe, 131Xe, and 129Xe. Due to this reason we now call it CFF-Xe - Chemically Fractionated Fission Xenon. Prerequisites for its formation are the simultaneous prevalence of two conditions: (1) fission (of 238U, 235U, and/ or 244Pu) and (2) a physicochemical environment (temperature, pressure, fluidity) at which the precursors of xenon (mainly Te and I) are mobile. Taking into account the occurrence of xenon in meteorites and terrestrial rocks, not all excesses of 129Xe in mantle rocks and natural gases are necessarily connected with the decay of primordial 129I.

  3. Anomalous H/D isotope effect on {sup 35}Cl NQR frequencies in piperidinium p-chlorobenzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Ryo; Honda, Hisashi, E-mail: hhonda@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Integrated Science (Japan); Kimura, Taiki [Yokohama City University, Faculty of Science (Japan); Nakata, Eiichi; Takamizawa, Satoshi; Noro, Sumiko [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Integrated Science (Japan); Ishimaru, Shin' ichi [Tokyo Denki University, Department of Green and Sustainable Chemistry (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Anomalous isotope effects were detected in the {sup 35}Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency of piperidinium p-chlrobenzoate (C{sub 5}H{sub 10}NH. ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COOH) by deuteration of hydrogen atoms. The atoms were determined to form two kinds of N-H...O type H-bonds in the crystal structure. Large frequency shifts of the {sup 35}Cl resonance lines reaching 288 kHz at 77 K and 278 kHz at room temperature were caused upon deuteration, in spite of the fact that the Cl atoms in the molecule do not form hydrogen bonds in the crystal. Results of single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements and density-functional-theorem calculations suggest that a dihedral-angle change of 1.8{sup o} between benzene and the piperidine ring contributes to {sup 35}Cl NQR anomalous frequency shifts.

  4. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  5. The Diversity of Anomalous HEDs: Isotopic Constraints on the Connection of EET 92023, GRA 98098, and Dhofar 700 With Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, M. E.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    The possibility for multiple parent bodies, instead of a common parent body of Vesta, for eucrites has been suggested based on the variable oxygen isotopic composition observed in some eucrites.. Recently, we added an extra dimension to the discussion based on the (epsilon)54Cr composition of the same eucrites with known (delta)17O to compare with the normal eucrites. The combined (delta)17O and (epsilon)54Cr isotope systematics for Pasamonte, PCA 91007, A-881394, and Ibitira indicate their likely origin from multiple different parent bodies than the normal eucrites. Often the qualifier anomalous is used to identify HEDs with (delta)17O values that deviate significantly (>3(sigma)) from the mean HED (delta)17O. However, variations in eucrites and diogenites also include unique geochemical characteristics such as bulk composition, trace element abundances, or volatile concentrations, in addition to (delta)17O. Here, we investigate three such geochemically anomalous HEDs: Elephant Moraine (EET) 92023, Graves Nunataks (GRA) 98098, and Dhofar 700. In addition, to verify the homogeneity of (epsilon)54Cr observed for normal HEDs thus far, a set of seven eucrites and diogenites considered normal samples were also investigated.

  6. Radon screening for XENON1T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Sebastian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Radon with its isotope {sup 222}Rn is one of the dominant sources of internal background in liquid xenon detectors searching for low energetic rare events like WIMP-nucleon scattering. In my talk I briefly review the problem posed by {sup 222}Rn and motivate the screening strategy followed by XENON1T. I introduce the radon emanation technique making use of ultra low background proportional counters and present selected results obtained during the design and construction phases of XENON1T. Finally, I sketch advances in radon emanation assay techniques and give a short outlook on upcoming measurements.

  7. Transportable Xenon Laboratory (TXL-1) Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Robert C.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Willett, Jesse A.; Woods, Vincent T.

    2011-03-07

    The Transportable Xenon Laboratory Operations Manual is a guide to set up and shut down TXL, a fully contained laboratory made up of instruments to identify and measure concentrations of the radioactive isotopes of xenon by taking air samples and analyzing them. The TXL is housed in a standard-sized shipping container. TXL can be shipped to and function in any country in the world.

  8. Nuclear structure studies in the xenon and radon region and the discovery of a new radon isotope by Penning trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidherr, Dennis

    2010-04-28

    Nowadays high-precision mass measurements based on Penning traps allow a deep insight into the fundamental properties of nucleonic matter. To this end, the cyclotron frequency {nu}{sub c}=qB=(2{pi}m) of an ion confined in a strong, homogeneous magnetic field B is determined. At the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE / CERN the masses of short-lived radioactive nuclei with half-lives down to several ten ms can be measured with an uncertainty in the order of 10{sup -8} and below. ISOLTRAP consists of an RFQ cooler and buncher to cool and accumulate the ions coming from ISOLDE and a double Penning trap system to first clean the ion samples and finally perform the mass measurements. Within this thesis the masses of neutron rich xenon and radon isotopes, namely {sup 138-146}Xe and {sup 223-229}Rn were determined, eleven of them for the first time. {sup 229}Rn was even discovered in this experiment and its half-life could be determined to 12{sub -1.3}{sup +1.2} s. Since the mass reflects all interactions inside the nucleus it is a unique fingerprint of the nuclide of interest. One of these interactions, the proton-neutron interaction, leads for example to the onset of deformation. The aim of this thesis is to investigate a possible connection be- tween collective effects in nuclei, like the onset of deformation, and double-differences of binding energies, so called {delta}V{sub pn} values. Especially in the here presented areas these {delta}V{sub pn} values show a very unusual behavior and can not be explained with simple orbital overlapping arguments. One explanation could be the occurrence of octupolar deformation in these regions, which is usually probed with other experimental techniques. However, a quantitative description of the influence of such type of deformation on {delta}V{sub pn} is still not possible with modern theories. (orig.)

  9. Geology and isotopic composition of helium, neon, xenon and metallogenic age of the Jinding and Baiyangping ore deposits, northwest Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE; Chunji(薛春纪); CHEN; Yuchuan(陈毓川); WANG; Denghong(王登红); YANG; Jianmin(杨建民); YANG; Weiguang(杨伟光); ZENG; Rong(曾; 荣)

    2003-01-01

    Both the Jinding and Baiyangping ore deposits developed in the Lanping basin, which is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic terrestrial clastic sedimentary basin. Their occurrences can easily lead many people to compare them with the Pb-Zn deposit hosted in sedimentary rocks, such as Mississippian Valley-, Sedex- and sandstone-type Pb-Zn deposits. However, the Lanping basin developed in the settings of strong tectonic activity of the continental crust, which could cause an effective material exchange between the lower crust and the upper mantle. The orebodies are clearly tectonically controlled without syngenetic features, which probably represents a new type of the sedimentary rock-hosted Pb-Zn deposit. The isotopic compositions of noble gases in ore-forming fluids indicate that 2%-32% of helium (3He/4He = 0.19 Ra-1.97 Ra) is derived from the mantle, 50.1% of neon (20Ne/22Ne = 10.45-10.83; 21Ne/22Ne = 0.03) from the mantle, and considerable amount of xenon (129Xe/130Xe = 5.84-6.86; 134Xe/130Xe = 2.26-2.71) from the mantle, which show that mantle fluids played an important role in the ore formation. The ore-forming age of 67-60 Ma obtained by Re-Os and 40Ar-39Ar dating methods is later than the host rock, which is coeval with the Himalayan alkali magmatism of the mantle source and mantle-crust source. In this paper, the mineralization of the Jinding and Baiyangping ore deposits is considered to be related to the mantle fluids which move upward with the magma or along the deep faults, and mix with the meteoritic brine in the crust to result in large-scale deposition.

  10. Anomalous fluoride concentration in groundwater - is it natural or pollution? A stable isotope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimon, Maria Paula Casagrande; Knöller, Kay; Roisenberg, Ari

    2007-06-01

    Fluoride anomalies (up to 11 mg/l) have been detected in groundwater of the central region of Rio Grande do Sul State, Southern Brazil, in an area where fluorosis is endemic. Two hypotheses are investigated concerning the fluoride origin: lithochemical affiliation from regional rock or contamination by fertilisers application. These hypotheses are discussed based on the stable isotope data of water, nitrate, and sulphate, which indicates that the local precipitation is the main groundwater recharge source. The isotopic composition of groundwater sulphate is similar to that of fertiliser sulphate. However, a conclusive assignment of groundwater sulphate to fertiliser origin is not indicated because further possible sulphate sources fall into the same isotopic range. In contrast, the isotopic composition of dissolved nitrate suggests that there is no direct relationship to the use of NPK fertilisers. Hence, an origin of the high fluoride content in groundwater related to long-term rock-water interactions seems likely.

  11. Chromatographic separation of radioactive noble gases from xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Beltrame, P; Bernard, E P; Bernstein, A; Biesiadzinski, T P; Boulton, E M; Bramante, R; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Coffey, T; Currie, A; Cutter, J E; Davison, T J R; Dobi, A; Dobson, J E Y; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B N; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C R; Hanhardt, M; Haselschwardt, S J; Hertel, S A; Hogan, D P; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ignarra, C M; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Ji, W; Kamdin, K; Kazkaz, K; Khaitan, D; Knoche, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Lenardo, B G; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Manalaysay, A; Mannino, R L; Marzioni, M F; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J A; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H N; Neves, F; O'Sullivan, K; Oliver-Mallory, K C; Palladino, K J; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Rhyne, C; Shaw, S; Shutt, T A; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Stephenson, S; Sumner, T J; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D J; Taylor, W; Tennyson, B P; Terman, P A; Tiedt, D R; To, W H; Tripathi, M; Tvrznikova, L; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Webb, R C; White, J T; Whitis, T J; Witherell, M S; Wolfs, F L H; Yazdani, K; Young, S K; Zhang, C

    2016-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment operates at the Sanford Underground Research Facility to detect nuclear recoils from the hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on a liquid xenon target. Liquid xenon typically contains trace amounts of the noble radioactive isotopes $^{85}$Kr and $^{39}$Ar that are not removed by the {\\em in situ} gas purification system. The decays of these isotopes at concentrations typical of research-grade xenon would be a dominant background for a WIMP search exmperiment. To remove these impurities from the liquid xenon, a chromatographic separation system based on adsorption on activated charcoal was built. 400\\,kg of xenon was processed, reducing the average concentration of krypton from 130\\,ppb to 3.5\\,ppt as measured by a cold-trap assisted mass spectroscopy system. A 50 kg batch spiked to 0.001 g/g of krypton was processed twice and reduced to an upper limit of 0.2 ppt.

  12. A hydrothermal origin for isotopically anomalous cap dolostone cements from south China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas F; Bonifacie, Magali; Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Eiler, John M; Grotzinger, John P

    2011-06-01

    The release of methane into the atmosphere through destabilization of clathrates is a positive feedback mechanism capable of amplifying global warming trends that may have operated several times in the geological past. Such methane release is a hypothesized cause or amplifier for one of the most drastic global warming events in Earth history, the end of the Marinoan 'snowball Earth' ice age, ∼635 Myr ago. A key piece of evidence supporting this hypothesis is the occurrence of exceptionally depleted carbon isotope signatures (δ(13)C(PDB) down to -48‰; ref. 8) in post-glacial cap dolostones (that is, dolostone overlying glacial deposits) from south China; these signatures have been interpreted as products of methane oxidation at the time of deposition. Here we show, on the basis of carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios, trace element content and clay mineral evidence, that carbonates bearing the (13)C-depleted signatures crystallized more than 1.6 Myr after deposition of the cap dolostone. Our results indicate that highly (13)C-depleted carbonate cements grew from hydrothermal fluids and suggest that their carbon isotope signatures are a consequence of thermogenic methane oxidation at depth. This finding not only negates carbon isotope evidence for methane release during Marinoan deglaciation in south China, but also eliminates the only known occurrence of a Precambrian sedimentary carbonate with highly (13)C-depleted signatures related to methane oxidation in a seep environment. We propose that the capacity to form highly (13)C-depleted seep carbonates, through biogenic anaeorobic oxidation of methane using sulphate, was limited in the Precambrian period by low sulphate concentrations in sea water. As a consequence, although clathrate destabilization may or may not have had a role in the exit from the 'snowball' state, it would not have left extreme carbon isotope signals in cap dolostones.

  13. Petrologic and Oxygen-Isotopic Investigations of Eucritic and Anomalous Mafic Achondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Greenwood, R. C.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.; Berger, E. L.; Barrett, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    The most common asteroidal igneous meteorites are eucrite-type basalts and gabbros rocks composed of ferroan pigeonite and augite, calcic plagioclase, silica, ilmenite, troilite, Ca-phosphate, chromite and Fe-metal. These rocks are thought to have formed on a single asteroid along with howardites and diogenites (HEDs). However, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011 is mineralogically identical to eucrites, but has an O-isotopic composition distinct from them and was derived from a different asteroid. Modern analyses with higher precision have shown that some eucrites have smaller O-isotopic differences that are nevertheless well-resolved from the group mean.

  14. Anomalous oxygen and neon isotopes in the mineral inclusions of primitive meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, P.K.; Myers, W.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville (United States). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1995-12-31

    A supernova explosion, which preceeded the formation of the solar system, may have acted like a gigantic gaseous diffusion plant or a centrifuge to produce the large isotopic anomalies recently observed for oxygen and neon in the mineral inclusions of primitive meteorites. (orig.)

  15. Xenon recovery from molybdenum-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN, 37931 (United States); Paviet, P.D.; Bresee, J.C. [U.S. Department of Energy,1000 Independence Ave, S.W., Washington DC, 20585-1290 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors research and development on the recycle of used commercial nuclear fuel as an option for future nuclear fuel cycles that offers increased use of uranium and thorium resources and a possible reduction in the overall cost of nuclear waste management. The two alternatives, direct disposal of used fuel and fuel recycle, are broadly referred to as open and closed fuel cycles. One requirement of a closed fuel cycle is the safe management of radioactive off-gases, which includes {sup 14}C, radioiodine and the noble gases, including radio-xenon. The longest lived relevant radio-xenon isotope is {sup 127}Xe; with a half-life of just 36.35 days it is feasible to trap and hold the radio-xenon to allow for decay to safe environmental levels. However, the very weak chemical bonds of noble gases, in this case xenon, make them difficult to trap, which led to an extensive DOE-NE study of noble gas adsorption on various molecular sieves as an alternative to costly cryogenics processes. Preliminary results indicate that xenon adsorption at near room temperature on molecular sieves, both synthetic and natural, may have both cost and efficiency advantages over cryogenic processes. These results appear to have direct application in helping achieve the United Nations Security Council goal of reducing xenon emissions from medical isotope producers.

  16. Evidence for in-situ methane production in ice based on anomalous isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, T. A.; Priscu, J.

    2004-12-01

    Studying microbial ecology at low temperatures is important for understanding the limits of life processes as well the search for extraterrestrial life. Glacial ice sheets are special habitats where microbes have been preserved for geologically significant periods of time. Glaciers provide three distinct environments for microbial ecosystems. Subglacial lakes beneath the East Antarctic ice sheet provide one of the most intriguing environments that have yet to be explored. The upper portion of a glacier is formed from eolian derived (wind blown) materials (snow, impurities and microbes). Bulk impurity levels tend to be less than a few ppm, cell densities generally below 100 cells/ml and surface temperatures are generally below -15oC. Subglacial environments (lowest 20m), on the other hand, tend to have (by comparison with the overlying glacier ) extremely high impurity concentrations, cell densities on the order of 106 cells/ml, and temperatures close to the pressure melting point (~ 0oC). Microbial communities in the subglacial environments are comprised of eolian derived organisms that have traveled vertically through the ice sheet as well as organisms that inhabited the soil/rock environment before the glacier formed. Cell density measurements in glacier ice are fairly straightforward given proper cleaning techniques. Whether or not the cells in a glacier are able to grow (or at least maintain their metabolic functionality) while immured in the glacier has yet to be determined. This question remains unanswered largely because the metabolic rates of microbial communities in ice have not been measured in the lab. One way to infer in-situ microbial activity in ice is to analyze the elemental and isotopic composition of gaseous metabolic byproducts that are retained in the ice matrix. We present two case studies in which the measured methane (CH4) concentration and isotope values in ice result from in-situ production. Methane measurements spanning the last 25kyr from

  17. Review of xenon-133 production and related problems; Estudio bibliografico de la produccion de xenon-133 y problemas afines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina, M.; Ropero, M.

    1980-07-01

    A literature survey is given on the production methods of fission xenon-133 and related problems, such as purification, metrological and dosimetric aspects, preparation of isotopic solutions, recycling, etc. 127 references are included. (Author) 127 refs.

  18. Cosmogenic activation of xenon and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudis, Laura; Kish, Alexander; Piastra, Francesco [University of Zuerich, Department of Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schumann, Marc [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Rare event search experiments using liquid xenon as target and detection medium require ultra-low background levels to fully exploit their physics potential. Cosmic ray induced activation of the detector components and, even more importantly, of the xenon itself during production, transportation and storage at the Earth's surface, might result in the production of radioactive isotopes with long half-lives, with a possible impact on the expected background. We present the first dedicated study on the cosmogenic activation of xenon after 345 days of exposure to cosmic rays at the Jungfraujoch research station at 3470 m above sea level, complemented by a study of copper which has been activated simultaneously. We have directly observed the production of {sup 7}Be, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 126}I and {sup 127}Xe in xenon, out of which only {sup 125}Sb could potentially lead to background for a multi-ton scale dark matter search. The production rates for five out of eight studied radioactive isotopes in copper are in agreement with the only existing dedicated activation measurement, while we observe lower rates for the remaining ones. The specific saturation activities for both samples are also compared to predictions obtained with commonly used software packages, where we observe some underpredictions, especially for xenon activation. (orig.)

  19. Anomalous quantum and isotope effects in water clusters: Physical phenomenon, model artifact, or bad approximation?

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Free energy differences $\\Delta F:=F-F_{\\text{prism}}$ are computed for several isomers of water hexamer relative to the "prism" isomer using the self-consistent phonons method. %$\\Delta F:=F-F({prism})$ We consider the isotope effect defined by the quantity $\\delta F_{D_2O}:=\\Delta F_{\\rm D_2O}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and the quantum effect, $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}:=\\Delta F_{\\hbar=0}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and evaluate them using different flexible water models. While both $\\delta F_{D_2O}$ and $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}$ are found to be rather small for all of the potentials, they are especially small for two of the empirical models, q-TIP4P/F and TTM3-F, compared to q-SPC/Fw and the two {\\it abinitio}-based models, WHBB and HBB2-pol. This qualitative difference in the properties of different water models cannot be explained by one being "more accurate" than the other. We speculate as to whether the observed anomalies are caused by the special properties of water systems, or are an artifact of either the potential energ...

  20. Cosmogenic activation of xenon and copper

    CERN Document Server

    Baudis, Laura; Piastra, Francesco; Schumann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Rare event search experiments using liquid xenon as target and detection medium require ultra-low background levels to fully exploit their physics potential. Cosmic ray induced activation of the detector components and, even more importantly, of the xenon itself during production, transportation and storage at the Earth's surface, might result in the production of radioactive isotopes with long half-lives, with a possible impact on the expected background. We present the first dedicated study on the cosmogenic activation of xenon after 345 days of exposure to cosmic rays at the Jungfraujoch research station at 3470m above sea level, complemented by a study of copper which has been activated simultaneously. We have directly observed the production of 7Be, 101Rh, 125Sb, 126I and 127Xe in xenon, out of which only 125Sb could potentially lead to background for a multi-ton scale dark matter search. The production rates for five out of eight studied radioactive isotopes in copper are in agreement with the only exis...

  1. The double isotope technique for in vivo determination of the tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for xenon in human subcutaneous adipose tissue--an evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Astrup, A; Bülow, J

    1985-01-01

    technique reduces the coefficient of variation on average flow determinations, thus an improvement in accuracy of local blood flow estimation can be obtained compared to the method in which an average partition coefficient is used. For long-term studies a partition coefficient of 7.5 ml g-1 seems valid.......Local subcutaneous 133xenon (133Xe) elimination was registered in the human forefoot in 34 patients. The tissue/blood partition coefficient for Xe was estimated individually by simultaneous registration of 133Xe and [131I]antipyrine ([131I]AP) washout from the same local depot. When measured...... in this way, an average partition coefficient for Xe was found to be 4.3 +/- 1.23 ml g-1. This value is significantly lower than the partition coefficient found in a previous in vitro study in which a Xe partition coefficient of 7.5 +/- 1.57 ml g-1 was found. Thus, if the local blood flow is calculated using...

  2. Plutonium-244 fission xenon in the most primitive meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, P.K.; Myers, W.A. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The plutonium-244/xenon-136 ages of the Murchison, Murray and Orgueil meteorites have been calculated from the existing xenon isotope data and the uranium contents. The CI carbonaceous chondrite Orgueil, which is considered to be among the most primitive - in the sense of the least altered - sample of the solar system known to man, appears to have started to retain its xenon more than 5,000 million years ago, when the ratio of [sup 244]Pu to [sup 238]U in the solar system was as high as (0.5 [+-] 0.1) (atom/atom) and the CM carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and Murray started to retain their xenon about 4,940 million years ago, when the [sup 244]Pu to [sup 238]U ratio was about 0.17 (atom/atom). (orig.)

  3. A dual-isotope rubidium comagnetometer to search for anomalous long-range spin-mass (spin-gravity) couplings of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Kimball, D F Jackson; Valdez, J; Swiatlowski, J; Rios, C; Peregrina-Ramirez, R; Montcrieffe, C; Kremer, J; Dudley, J; Sanchez, C

    2013-01-01

    The experimental concept of a search for a long-range coupling between rubidium (Rb) nuclear spins and the mass of the Earth is described. The experiment is based on simultaneous measurement of the spin precession frequencies for overlapping ensembles of Rb-85 and Rb-87 atoms contained within an evacuated, antirelaxation-coated vapor cell. Rubidium atoms are spin-polarized in the presence of an applied magnetic field by synchronous optical pumping with circularly polarized laser light. Spin precession is probed by measuring optical rotation of far-off-resonant, linearly polarized laser light. Simultaneous measurement of Rb-85 and Rb-87 spin precession frequencies enables suppression of magnetic-field-related systematic effects. The nuclear structure of the Rb isotopes makes the experiment particularly sensitive to anomalous spin-dependent interactions of the proton. Experimental sensitivity and a variety of systematic effects are discussed, and initial data are presented.

  4. Scalability study of solid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, J; Jaskierny, W F; Markley, D; Pahlka, R B; Balakishiyeva, D; Saab, T; Filipenko, M

    2015-01-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employed a cryostat cooled by liquid nitrogen combined with a xenon purification and chiller system. A modified {\\it Bridgeman's technique} reproduces a large scale optically transparent solid xenon.

  5. Scalability study of solid xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Cease, H.; Jaskierny, W. F.; Markley, D.; Pahlka, R. B.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Filipenko, M.

    2015-04-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employed a cryostat cooled by liquid nitrogen combined with a xenon purification and chiller system. A modified {\\it Bridgeman's technique} reproduces a large scale optically transparent solid xenon.

  6. Xenon and iodine reveal multiple distinct exotic xenon components in Efremovka "nanodiamonds"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Holland, G.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Fisenko, A. V.; Crowther, S. A.; Turner, G.

    2016-03-01

    dependent fractionation relative to the ambient composition. Q-Xe is dominated by the products of this ;Q-process; occurring shortly before or during solar system formation. Carriers that trapped xenon by earlier Q-process events were altered, perhaps by supernova shocks, converting some Q carriers into P3 carriers. Unlike Q carriers, these carriers preserve the isotopic signature of the xenon they trapped through oxidation of samples in the laboratory. P3 carriers thus disproportionately sample xenon that was incorporated before galactic chemical evolution had produced the solar xenon signature by enriching ambient xenon with s-process material.

  7. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  8. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Harper, Warren W.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Humble, Paul H.; Madison, Jill C.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  9. Mesoscale Backtracking by Means of Atmospheric Transport Modeling of Xenon Plumes Measured by Radionuclide Gas Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, P. P.; Achim, P.; Taffary, T.

    2006-12-01

    The monitoring of atmospheric radioactive xenon concentration is performed for nuclear safety regulatory requirements. It is also planned to be used for the detection of hypothetical nuclear tests in the framework of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). In this context, the French Atomic Energy Commission designed a high sensitive and automated fieldable station, named SPALAX, to measure the activity concentrations of xenon isotopes in the atmosphere. SPALAX stations were set up in Western Europe and have been operated quite continuously for three years or more, detecting principally xenon-133 and more scarcely xenon-135, xenon-133m and xenon-131m. There are around 150 nuclear power plants in the European Union, research reactors, reprocessing plants, medical production and application facilities releasing radioactive xenon in normal or incidental operations. A numerical study was carried out aiming to explain the SPALAX measurements. The mesoscale Atmospheric Transport Modelling involves the MM5 suite (PSU- NCAR) to predict the wind fields on nested domains, and FLEXPART, a 3D Lagrangian particle dispersion code, used to simulate the backward transport of xenon plumes detected by the SPALAX. For every event of detection, at least one potential xenon source has a significant efficiency of emission. The identified likely sources are located quite close to the SPALAX stations (some tens of kilometres), or situated farther (a few hundreds of kilometres). A base line of some mBq per cubic meter in xenon-133 is generated by the nuclear power plants. Peaks of xenon-133 ranging from tens to hundreds of mBq per cubic meter originate from a radioisotope production facility. The calculated xenon source terms required to obtain the SPALAX measurements are discussed and seem consistent with realistic emissions from the xenon sources in Western Europe.

  10. A dual-isotope rubidium comagnetometer to search for anomalous long-range spin-mass (spin-gravity) couplings of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, Derek F.J.; Lacey, Ian; Valdez, Julian; Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Rios, Cesar; Peregrina-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kremer, Jackie; Dudley, Jordan; Sanchez, C. [Department of Physics, California State University - East Bay, Hayward, California, 94542-3084 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The experimental concept of a search for a long-range coupling between rubidium (Rb) nuclear spins and the mass of the Earth is described. The experiment is based on simultaneous measurement of the spin precession frequencies for overlapping ensembles of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb atoms contained within an evacuated, antirelaxation-coated vapor cell. Rubidium atoms are spin-polarized in the presence of an applied magnetic field by synchronous optical pumping with circularly polarized laser light. Spin precession is probed by measuring optical rotation of far-off-resonant, linearly polarized laser light. Simultaneous measurement of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb spin precession frequencies enables suppression of magnetic-field-related systematic effects. The nuclear structure of the Rb isotopes makes the experiment particularly sensitive to anomalous spin-dependent interactions of the proton. Experimental sensitivity and a variety of systematic effects are discussed, and initial data are presented. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Liquid xenon purification, de-radonation (and de-kryptonation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pocar, Andrea, E-mail: pocar@umass.edu [Amherst Center for Fundamental Interactions and Physics Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Liquid xenon detectors are at the forefront of rare event physics, including searches for neutrino-less double beta decay and WIMP dark matter. The xenon for these experiments needs to be purified from chemical impurities such as electronegative atoms and molecules, which absorb ionization electrons, and VUV (178 nm) scintillation light-absorbing chemical species. In addition, superb purification from radioactive impurities is required. Particularly challenging are radioactive noble isotopes ({sup 85}Kr,{sup 39,42}Ar,{sup 220,222}Rn). Radon is a particularly universal problem, due to the extended decay sequence of its daughters and its ubiquitous presence in detector materials. Purification and de-radonation of liquid xenon are addressed with particular focus on the experience gained with the EXO-200 neutrino-less double beta decay detector.

  12. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, M. Daniel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  13. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  14. GraXe, graphene and xenon for neutrinoless double beta decay searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martín-Albo, J.; Monrabal, F.; Vidal, J. Muñoz [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valencia, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Valencia (Spain); Guinea, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), CSIC, Calle Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fogler, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Katsnelson, M.I., E-mail: gomez@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: paco.guinea@icmm.csic.es, E-mail: mfogler@ucsd.edu, E-mail: katsnel@sci.kun.nl, E-mail: justo.martin-albo@ific.uv.es, E-mail: francesc.monrabal@ific.uv.es, E-mail: jmunoz@ific.uv.es [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new detector concept, GraXe (to be pronounced as grace), to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 136}XE. GraXe combines a popular detection medium in rare-event searches, liquid xenon, with a new, background-free material, graphene. In our baseline design of GraXe, a sphere made of graphene-coated titanium mesh and filled with liquid xenon (LXe) enriched in the {sup 136}XE isotope is immersed in a large volume of natural LXe instrumented with photodetectors. Liquid xenon is an excellent scintillator, reasonably transparent to its own light. Graphene is transparent over a large frequency range, and impermeable to the xenon. Event position could be deduced from the light pattern detected in the photosensors. External backgrounds would be shielded by the buffer of natural LXe, leaving the ultra-radiopure internal volume virtually free of background. Industrial graphene can be manufactured at a competitive cost to produce the sphere. Enriching xenon in the isotope {sup 136}XE is easy and relatively cheap, and there is already near one ton of enriched xenon available in the world (currently being used by the EXO, KamLAND-Zen and NEXT experiments). All the cryogenic know-how is readily available from the numerous experiments using liquid xenon. An experiment using the GraXe concept appears realistic and affordable in a short time scale, and its physics potential is enormous.

  15. Disentangling xenon components in Nakhla: martian atmosphere, spallation and martian interior^1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Whitby, J. A.; Turner, G.

    2001-01-01

    A powdered sample of Nakhla was separated into 3 subsamples. One was left otherwise untreated, one was washed in water and one etched with HNO 3 removing 6% of the original mass. We report results of isotopic analysis of xenon released by laser step heating on aliquots of each of these subsamples; some aliquots were neutron irradiated before isotopic analysis (to allow determination of I, Ba and U as daughter xenon isotopes) and some were not. There is evidence that water soluble phases contain both martian atmospheric xenon and a component with low 129Xe/ 132Xe, either martian interior xenon or terrestrial atmosphere. Higher temperature data from unirradiated aliquots of the water and acid treated samples reveal two-component mixing. One is a trapped xenon component with 129Xe/ 132Xe = 2.350 ± 0.026, isotopically identical to the martian atmosphere as measured in shock glass from shergottites. It is associated with leachable iodine, suggesting it is trapped close to grain boundaries. It may be a result of shock incorporation of adsorbed atmospheric gas. The second component is best explained as an intimate mixture of martian interior xenon and spallation xenon. The martian interior component is present at a concentration of ˜10 -12 cm 3 STP g -1 132Xe, around 40 times lower than that observed in Chassigny. Its association with spallation xenon (produced from Ba and light rare earth elements) suggests it is in the feldspathic mesostasis. We propose that it was trapped during crystallisation and reflects the mantle source of the parental magma.

  16. In situ measurement of atmospheric krypton and xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, P. G.; Malespin, C. A.; Franz, H. B.; Pepin, R. O.; Trainer, M. G.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Freissinet, C.; Jones, J. H.; Manning, H.; Owen, T.; Pavlov, A. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Wong, M. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    Mars Science Laboratory's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation has measured all of the stable isotopes of the heavy noble gases krypton and xenon in the martian atmosphere, in situ, from the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater, Mars. Previous knowledge of martian atmospheric krypton and xenon isotope ratios has been based upon a combination of the Viking mission's krypton and xenon detections and measurements of noble gas isotope ratios in martian meteorites. However, the meteorite measurements reveal an impure mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and spallation contributions. The xenon and krypton isotopic measurements reported here include the complete set of stable isotopes, unmeasured by Viking. The new results generally agree with Mars meteorite measurements but also provide a unique opportunity to identify various non-atmospheric heavy noble gas components in the meteorites. Kr isotopic measurements define a solar-like atmospheric composition, but deviating from the solar wind pattern at 80Kr and 82Kr in a manner consistent with contributions originating from neutron capture in Br. The Xe measurements suggest an intriguing possibility that isotopes lighter than 132Xe have been enriched to varying degrees by spallation and neutron capture products degassed to the atmosphere from the regolith, and a model is constructed to explore this possibility. Such a spallation component, however, is not apparent in atmospheric Xe trapped in the glassy phases of martian meteorites.

  17. Direct WIMP searches with XENON100 and XENON1T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Ferella Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON direct Dark Matter search program. It consists of an ultra-low background double phase (liquid-gas xenon filled time projection chamber with a total mass of 161 kg (62 in the target region and 99 in the active shield, installed at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS. Here the results from the 224.6 live days of data taken between March 2011 and April 2012 are reported. The experiment set one of the most stringent limits on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section to date (2 × 10−45 cm2 for a 55 Gev/c2 WIMP mass at 90 % confidence level and the most stringent on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction (3.5 × 10−40 for a 45 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. With the same dataset, XENON100 excludes also solar axion coupling to electrons at gAe > 7.7 × 10−12 for a mass of mAxion 1 × 10−12 at a mass range of mAxion = 5−10 keV/c2 (both 90 % C.L.. Moreover an absolute spectral comparison between simulated and measured nuclear recoil distributions of light and charge signals from a 241AmBe source demonstrates a high level of detector and systematics understanding. Finally, the third generation of the XENON experiments, XENON1T, is the first tonne scale direct WIMP search experiment currently under construction. The commissioning phase of XENON1T is expected to start in early 2015 followed, a few months after, by the first science run. The experiment will reach sensitivities on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section down to 2 ×10−47 cm2 after two years of data taking.

  18. Anomalously High Isotope Ratio 3He/4He and Tritium in Deuterium-Loaded Metal: Evidence for Nuclear Reaction in Metal Hydrides at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Song-Sheng; HE Ming; WU Shao-Yong; QI Bu-Jia

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous 3He/4He ratios in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are observed to be about 1-4x10-1, much greater than the values (<10~4) in natural objects. Control experiments with the deuterium-unloaded titanium sample and original industrial deuterium gas are also carried out, but no anomalous 3He/4He values are observed. In addition, anomalous tritium in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are also observed. To explain the excess 3He and tritium in the deuterium-loaded titanium samples, it is required that the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction occurs in the samples at low temperature.%Anomalous 3He/4He ratios in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are observed to be about 1-4×10-1,much greater than the values (≤10-4) in natural objects.Control experiments with the deuterium-unloaded titanium sample and original industrial deuterium gas are also carried out,but no anomalous 3He/4He values are observed.In addition,anomalous tritium in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are also observed.To explain the excess 3He and tritium in the deuterium-loaded titanium samples,it is required that the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction occurs in the samples at low temperature.

  19. On the spin-dependent sensitivity of XENON100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-11-15

    The latest XENON100 data severely constrains dark matter elastic scattering off nuclei, leading to impressive upper limits on the spin-independent cross-section. The main goal of this paper is to stress that the same data set has also an excellent spin-dependent sensitivity, which is of utmost importance in probing dark matter models. We show in particular that the constraints set by XENON100 on the spin-dependent neutron cross-section are by far the best at present, whereas the corresponding spin-dependent proton limits lag behind other direct detection results. The effect of nuclear uncertainties on the structure functions of xenon isotopes is analysed in detail and found to lessen the robustness of the constraints, especially for spin-dependent proton couplings. Notwith-standing, the spin-dependent neutron prospects for XENON1T and DARWIN are very encouraging. We apply our constraints to well-motivated dark matter models and demonstrate that in both mass-degenerate scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric standard model the spin-dependent neutron limits can actually override the spin-independent limits. This opens the possibility of probing additional unexplored regions of the dark matter parameter space with the next generation of ton-scale direct detection experiments.

  20. Development of a functionalized Xenon biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Megan M.; Ruiz, E. Janette; Rubin, Seth M.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Winssinger, Nicolas; Schultz, Peter G.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-03-25

    NMR-based biosensors that utilize laser-polarized xenon offer potential advantages beyond current sensing technologies. These advantages include the capacity to simultaneously detect multiple analytes, the applicability to in vivo spectroscopy and imaging, and the possibility of remote amplified detection. Here we present a detailed NMR characterization of the binding of a biotin-derivatized caged-xenon sensor to avidin. Binding of functionalized xenon to avidin leads to a change in the chemical shift of the encapsulated xenon in addition to a broadening of the resonance, both of which serve as NMR markers of ligand-target interaction. A control experiment in which the biotin-binding site of avidin was blocked with native biotin showed no such spectral changes, confirming that only specific binding, rather than nonspecific contact, between avidin and functionalized xenon leads to the effects on the xenon NMR spectrum. The exchange rate of xenon (between solution and cage) and the xenon spin-lattice relaxation rate were not changed significantly upon binding. We describe two methods for enhancing the signal from functionalized xenon by exploiting the laser-polarized xenon magnetization reservoir. We also show that the xenon chemical shifts are distinct for xenon encapsulated in different diastereomeric cage molecules. This demonstrates the potential for tuning the encapsulated xenon chemical shift, which is a key requirement for being able to multiplex the biosensor.

  1. Development of a functionalized Xenon biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Megan M.; Ruiz, E. Janette; Rubin, Seth M.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Winssinger, Nicolas; Schultz, Peter G.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-03-25

    NMR-based biosensors that utilize laser-polarized xenon offer potential advantages beyond current sensing technologies. These advantages include the capacity to simultaneously detect multiple analytes, the applicability to in vivo spectroscopy and imaging, and the possibility of remote amplified detection. Here we present a detailed NMR characterization of the binding of a biotin-derivatized caged-xenon sensor to avidin. Binding of functionalized xenon to avidin leads to a change in the chemical shift of the encapsulated xenon in addition to a broadening of the resonance, both of which serve as NMR markers of ligand-target interaction. A control experiment in which the biotin-binding site of avidin was blocked with native biotin showed no such spectral changes, confirming that only specific binding, rather than nonspecific contact, between avidin and functionalized xenon leads to the effects on the xenon NMR spectrum. The exchange rate of xenon (between solution and cage) and the xenon spin-lattice relaxation rate were not changed significantly upon binding. We describe two methods for enhancing the signal from functionalized xenon by exploiting the laser-polarized xenon magnetization reservoir. We also show that the xenon chemical shifts are distinct for xenon encapsulated in different diastereomeric cage molecules. This demonstrates the potential for tuning the encapsulated xenon chemical shift, which is a key requirement for being able to multiplex the biosensor.

  2. GraXe, graphene and xenon for neutrinoless double beta decay searches

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Fogler, M M; Katsnelson, M I; Martin-Albo, J; Monrabal, F; Muñoz-Vidal, J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new detector concept, GraXe (to be pronounced as grace), to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Xe-136. GraXe combines a popular detection medium in rare-event searches, liquid xenon, with a new, background-free material, graphene. Our baseline design of GraXe is a balloon made of graphene (possibly held together with a very thin structure made of radiopure fiber) and filled with xenon enriched in the Xe-136 isotope. The balloon is immersed in a large tank containing 20 tons of natural liquid xenon and instrumented with large photomultipliers. Liquid xenon is an excellent scintillator, reasonably transparent to its own light. Graphene is transparent over a large frequency range, an impermeable to the xenon. External backgrounds would be shielded by the buffer liquid xenon, and the inner volume has virtually zero background. Industrial graphene can be manufactured at a competitive cost to produce the inner balloon, and there is already near one ton of enriched Xenon available in the world...

  3. Terrestrial and Martian weathering signatures of xenon components in shergottite mineral separates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ocker, K. D.; Crowther, S. A.; Burgess, R.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2010-08-01

    Xenon-isotopic ratios, step-heating release patterns, and gas concentrations of mineral separates from Martian shergottites Roberts Massif (RBT) 04262, Dar al Gani (DaG) 489, Shergotty, and Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B are reported. Concentrations of Martian atmospheric xenon are similar in mineral separates from all meteorites, but more weathered samples contain more terrestrial atmospheric xenon. The distributions of xenon from the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres among minerals in any one sample are similar, suggesting similarities in the processes by which they were acquired. However, in opaque and maskelynite fractions, Martian atmospheric xenon is released at higher temperatures than terrestrial atmospheric xenon. It is suggested that both Martian and terrestrial atmospheric xenon were initially introduced by weathering (low temperature alteration processes). However, the Martian component was redistributed by shock, accounting for its current residence in more retentive sites. The presence or absence of detectable 129Xe from the Martian atmosphere in mafic minerals may correspond to the extent of crustal contamination of the rock's parent melt. Variable contents of excess 129Xe contrast with previously reported consistent concentrations of excess 40Ar, suggesting distinct sources contributed these gases to the parent magma.

  4. Generation of Radixenon Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Pitts, W. K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Reeder, Paul L.; Thomas, Charles W.

    2003-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed an automated system for separating Xe from air and can detect the following radioxenon isotopes, 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. This report details the techniques used to generate the various radioxenon isotopes that are used for the calibration of the detector as well as other isotopes that have the potential to interfere with the fission produced radioxenon isotopes. Fission production is covered first using highly enriched uranium followed by a description and results from an experiment to produce radioxenon isotopes from neutron activation of ambient xenon.

  5. Xenon-based anesthesia: theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Jan-Hinrich Baumert

    2009-01-01

    Jan-Hinrich BaumertDept of Anaesthesiology, UMC St Radboud, Nijmegen, NetherlandsAbstract: Xenon has been in use as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Although it exhibits some of the properties of an ideal anesthetic, the technical complexity of xenon equipment and the high cost of the gas have prevented widespread use of xenon anesthesia. The main beneficial features of xenon anesthesia are fast induction and emergence because of low solubility in blood and tissues, along with remarkably...

  6. RESULTS FROM THE XENON100 EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rino Persiani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The XENON program consists in operating and developing double-phase time projection chambers using liquid xenon as the target material. It aims to directly detect dark matter in the form of WIMPs via their elastic scattering off xenon nuclei. The current phase is XENON100, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS, with a 62 kg liquid xenon target. We present the 100.9 live days of data, acquired between January and June 2010, with no evidence of dark matter, as well as the new results of the last scientific run, with about 225 live days. The next phase, XENON1T, will increase the sensitivity by two orders of magnitude.

  7. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  8. Novel xenon calibration scheme for two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Drew; Scime, Earl; Short, Zachary

    2016-11-01

    Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) measurements of neutral hydrogen and its isotopes are typically calibrated by performing TALIF measurements on krypton with the same diagnostic system and using the known ratio of the absorption cross sections [K. Niemi et al., J. Phys. D 34, 2330 (2001)]. Here we present the measurements of a new calibration method based on a ground state xenon scheme for which the fluorescent emission wavelength is nearly identical to that of hydrogen, thereby eliminating chromatic effects in the collection optics and simplifying detector calibration. We determine that the ratio of the TALIF cross sections of xenon and hydrogen is 0.024 ± 0.001.

  9. Anomalous 13C Isotope Abundances in C3S and C4H Observed toward the Cold Interstellar Cloud, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Nami; Takano, Shuro; Sakai, Takeshi; Shiba, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the abundances of the 13C isotopic species of C3S and C4H in the cold molecular cloud, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (Cyanopolyyne Peak), by radioastronomical observations of their rotational emission lines. The CCCS/13CCCS and CCCS/C13CCS ratios are determined to be >206 and 48 ± 15, respectively. The CC13CS line is identified with the aid of laboratory microwave spectroscopy, and the range of the CCCS/CC13CS ratio is found to be from 30 to 206. The abundances of at least two 13C isotopic species of C3S are thus found to be different. Similarly, it is found that the abundances of the four 13C isotopic species of C4H are not equivalent. The CCCCH/13CCCCH, CCCCH/C13CCCH, CCCCH/CC13CCH, and CCCCH/CCC13CH ratios are evaluated to be 141 ± 44, 97 ± 27, 82 ± 15, and 118 ± 23, respectively. Here the errors denote 3 times the standard deviation. These results will constrain the formation pathways of C3S and C4H, if the nonequivalence is caused during the formation processes of these molecules. The exchange reactions after the formation of these two molecules may also contribute to the nonequivalence. In addition, we have confirmed that the 12C/13C ratio of some species are significantly higher than the interstellar elemental 12C/13C ratio of 60-70. The observations of the 13C isotopic species provide us with rich information on chemical processes in cold interstellar clouds.

  10. Anharmonic phonons and the anomalous isotope effect in La sub 2 minus x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 (US)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, V.H.; Cohen, M.L. (Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California (USA))

    1991-09-01

    A model for the variation of an interionic potential near the orthorhombic to low-temperature-tetragonal structural phase transition in La-Sr-Cu-O can explain variations both above and below 0.5 in the superconducting isotope-effect parameter {alpha}. In particular, we posit a quadrupolar potential in which the four outer wells deepen as the phase transition is approached. This model can reproduce the experimentally observed variations in both {ital T}{sub {ital c}} and {alpha}.

  11. Wimp Detection Using Liquid Xenon (dark Matter)

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, H

    1998-01-01

    The missing mass "Dark Matter" problem of the Universe is one of the most important questions facing the moden physics and astronomy. This thesis work developed the Liquid Xenon technology to detect the SUSY ark matter. The background rejection principle was tested and many technical problem are studied, including the purification of the liquid xenon to yield both long electron lifetime and long xenon scintillation light attenuation length, and xenon recoil scintillation efficiency measurement. The detector design and construction are studied. Finally a two phase xenon detector was realized for the future dark matter experiment. The key working principle is the use of proportional scintillation and electro-luminescence to detector the ionization components, which is different between background and recoil signals. The two phase test results shown that a detector energy threshold as low as 10keV can be achieved.

  12. Xenon Gamma Detector Project Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L.

    2008-04-01

    This project provided funding of $48,500 for part of one year to support the development of compressed xenon spectrometers at BNL. This report describes upgrades that were made to the existing detector system electronics during that period, as well as subsequent testing with check sources and Special Nuclear Materials. Previous testing of the equipment extended only up to the energy of 1.3 MeV, and did not include a spectrum of Pu-239. The new electronics allowed one-button activation of the high voltage ramp that was previously controlled by manual adjustments. Mechanical relays of the charging circuit were replaced by a tera-ohm resistor chain and an optical switch. The preamplifier and shaping amplifier were replaced by more modern custom designs. We found that the xenon purity had not been degraded since the chamber was filled 10 years earlier. The resulting spectra showed significantly better resolution than sodium iodide spectra, and could be analyzed quite effectively by methods using peak area templates.

  13. Study of the short-lived fission products. Separation of iodine and xenon fission radionuclides; Estudio de los productos de fision de periodo corto. Separacion de los radionuclidos de fision del yodo y del xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina, M.; Villar, M. A.

    1965-07-01

    The separation by distillation in a sulfuric acid or phosphoric acid-hydrogen peroxide medium of the iodine isotopes (8 day iodine-131, 2,3 hour iodine-132 21 hour iodine-133, 53 minute iodine-134 and 6,7 hour iodine-135) present in a uranium sample after different irradiation and cooling times is here described. It is also reported the use of active charcoal columns for the retention of xenon isotopes (5,27 days xenon-133 and 9,2 hours xenon-135) either released during the dissolution of the uranium irradiated samples or generated along the fission isobaric chains in the solutions of distillated iodine. In both cases the radiochemical purity of the separated products is established by gamma spectrometry. (Author) 15 refs.

  14. Structures of xenon oxides at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Nicholas; Pickard, Chris; Needs, Richard; Dewaele, Agnes; Loubeyre, Paul; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    For many years, it was believed that noble gases such as xenon were entirely inert. It was only in 1962 that Bartlett first synthesized a compound of xenon. Since then, a number of other xenon compounds, including oxides, have been synthesized. Xenon oxides are unstable under ambient conditions but have been predicted to stabilize under high pressure. Here we present the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of xenon oxides at pressures of 80-100 GPa. We have synthesized new xenon oxides at these pressures and they have been characterized with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Calculations were performed with a density-functional theory framework. We have used the ab-initio random structure searching (AIRSS) method together with a data-mining technique to determine the stable compounds in the xenon-oxygen system in this pressure range. We have calculated structural and optical properties of these phases, and a good match between theoretical and experimental results has been obtained. Funding for computational research provided by the engineering and physical sciences research council (EPSRC; UK). Computing resources provided by Cambridge HPC and HECToR. X-ray diffraction experiments performed at ESRF.

  15. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  16. SAUNA—a system for automatic sampling, processing, and analysis of radioactive xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbom, A.; Larson, T.; Axelsson, A.; Elmgren, K.; Johansson, C.

    2003-08-01

    A system for automatic sampling, processing, and analysis of atmospheric radioxenon has been developed. From an air sample of about 7 m3 collected during 12 h, 0.5 cm3 of xenon is extracted, and the atmospheric activities from the four xenon isotopes 133Xe, 135Xe, 131mXe, and 133mXe are determined with a beta-gamma coincidence technique. The collection is performed using activated charcoal and molecular sieves at ambient temperature. The sample preparation and quantification are performed using preparative gas chromatography. The system was tested under routine conditions for a 5-month period, with average minimum detectable concentrations below 1 mBq/ m3 for all four isotopes.

  17. PREPARATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER AND THEIR XENON ADSORPTION PROPERTIES (Ⅱ)-XENON ADSORPTION PROPERTIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of xenon from air has an interest in the monitoring of nuclear explosion oraccident, or in the treatment of nuclear waste gas. In this paper, the pore structure of several series ofactivated carbon fibers has been characterized. The adsorption properties of xenon on theseactivated carbon fibers under different temperatures have been studied in details. The results showthat the xenon adsorption amount on activated carbon fibers do not increase with specific surfacearea of adsorbents, but are closely related to their pore size distribution. Pores whose radius equal toor narrow than 0.4nm would be more advantageous to the adsorption of xenon.

  18. Surface Coatings as Xenon Diffusion Barriers for Improved Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates surface coatings as xenon diffusion barriers on plastic scintillators. The motivation for the work is improved radioxenon detection systems, used within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). One type of radioxenon detection systems used in this context is the Swedish SAUNA system. This system uses a cylindrical plastic scintillator cell to measure the beta decay from radioxenon isotopes. The detector cell also acts as a container...

  19. Comparison of Medium Power Hall Effect Thruster Ion Acceleration for Krypton and Xenon Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    industrial demand for items such as high efficiency lighting and windows, as well as plasma based micro-fabrication, has produced wide price swings in the...past decade. Xenon prices have varied by as much as factor of ten in the past five years alone. For missions that benefit from higher specific impulse...Concentration ppb 87 1000 Stable Isotopes 9 6 Odd Isotopes 2 1 Critical Pressure MPa 5.84 5.50 Critical Temperature K 290 209 Boiling Point (1 atm) K 161 120

  20. Direct Dark Matter search with XENON100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orrigo S.E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON program for the direct detection of the dark matter in the universe. The XENON100 detector is a two-phase Time Projection Chamber filled with 161 kg of ultra pure liquid xenon. The results from 224.6 live days of dark matter search with XENON100 are presented. No evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs is found, excluding spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections above 2 × 10−45 cm2 for a 55 GeV/c2 WIMP at 90% confidence level (C.L.. The most stringent limit is established on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction for WIMP masses above 6 GeV/c2, with a minimum cross section of 3.5 × 10−40 cm2 (90% C.L. for a 45 GeV/c2 WIMP. The same dataset is used to search for axions and axion-like-particles. The best limits to date are set on the axion-electron coupling constant for solar axions, gAe < 7.7 × 10−12 (90% C.L., and for axion-like-particles, gAe < 1 × 10−12 (90% C.L. for masses between 5 and 10 keV/c2.

  1. Chondritic Xenon in the Earth's mantle: new constrains on a mantle plume below central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracausi, Antonio; Avice, Guillaume; Bernard, Peter; Furi, Evelin; Marty, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Due to their inertness, their low abundances, and the presence of several different radiochronometers in their isotope systematics, the noble gases are excellent tracers of mantle dynamics, heterogeneity and differentiation with respect to the atmosphere. Xenon deserves particular attention because its isotope systematic can be related to specific processes during terrestrial accretion (e.g., Marty, 1989; Mukhopadhyay, 2012). The origin of heavy noble gases in the Earth's mantle is still debated, and might not be solar (Holland et al., 2009). Mantle-derived CO2-rich gases are particularly powerful resources for investigating mantle-derived noble gases as large quantities of these elements are available and permit high precision isotope analysis. Here, we report high precision xenon isotopic measurements in gases from a CO2 well in the Eifel volcanic region (Germany), where volcanic activity occurred between 700 ka and 11 ka years ago. Our Xe isotope data (normalized to 130Xe) show deviations at all masses compared to the Xe isotope composition of the modern atmosphere. The improved analytical precision of the present study, and the nature of the sample, constrains the primordial Xe end-member as being "chondritic", and not solar, in the Eifel mantle source. This is consistent with an asteroidal origin for the volatile elements in Earth's mantle and it implies that volatiles in the atmosphere and in the mantle originated from distinct cosmochemical sources. Despite a significant fraction of recycled atmospheric xenon in the mantle, primordial Xe signatures still survive in the mantle. This is also a demonstration of a primordial component in a plume reservoir. Our data also show that the reservoir below the Eifel region contains heavy-radiogenic/fissiogenic xenon isotopes, whose ratios are typical of plume-derived reservoirs. The fissiogenic Pu-Xe contribution is 2.26±0.28 %, the UXe contribution is negligible, the remainder being atmospheric plus primordial. Our

  2. XMASS experiment, dark matter search with liquid xenon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamino, Akihiro, E-mail: minamino@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.j [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    The XMASS Collaboration is developing liquid xenon detector for the purpose of direct detection of dark matter in the universe. A prototype detector was developed at Kamioka Observatory to test the basic performance of single phase liquid xenon detector. With the detector, the physical properties of liquid xenon were measured, and the performance of vertex and energy reconstruction and the self-shielding power of liquid xenon for background {gamma}-rays were confirmed.

  3. XENON ANESTHESIA IN CHILDREN: BIS-MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bagaev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted 60 low-flow xenon anesthesias in children of 1-18 years of age. We measured the sedation level using bispectral (BIS index and clinically on the stage of induction, xenon anesthesia maintenance and during recovery. The trial showed that, according to the clinical and BIS-monitoring data, sevoflurane inhalational induction in children of 1-5 years of age and propofol intravenous induction in children of 6-18 years of age provides children with the required sedation level. BIS index objectively reflects intensity of the sedative component of an anesthesia both in the junior and the senior age groups on the stages of xenon anesthesia maintenance and during recovery.

  4. A first roadmap for kryptology. [isotopic composition from supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of the complex variations of the isotopic composition of xenon in the solar system have been christened 'xenology'. In the title of the present investigation, the word 'kryptology' is employed to indicate the primary objective of the reported studies. This objective is related to the prediction of the isotopic composition of krypton which comes from a number of specific locations of a supernova in association with the isotopic compositions of xenon from these locations. Krypton is a logical candidate for testing the stellar theory on geochemical grounds, taking into account also the point of view of nucleosynthesis, because the isotopes of xenon and krypton are formed by the same thermonuclear processes in stars. The data and arguments presented in the investigation show that the treatment by Heymann and Dziczkaniec (1979), although not wrong, is too simplistic, because it has ignored the possibility of holdup and arrest in Xe network.

  5. Results from a Calibration of XENON100 Using a Source of Dissolved Radon-220

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Agostini, F; Alfonsi, M; Amaro, F D; Anthony, M; Arneodo, F; Barrow, P; Baudis, L; Bauermeister, B; Benabderrahmane, M L; Berger, T; Breur, P A; Brown, A; Brown, E; Bruenner, S; Bruno, G; Budnik, R; Butikofer, L; Calven, J; Cardoso, J M R; Cervantes, M; Cichon, D; Coderre, D; Colijn, A P; Conrad, J; Cussonneau, J P; Decowski, M P; dePerio, P; DiGangi, P; DiGiovanni, A; Diglio, S; Duchovni, E; Eurin, G; Fei, J; Ferella, A D; Fieguth, A; Franco, D; Fulgione, W; Rosso, A Gallo; Galloway, M; Gao, F; Garbini, M; Geis, C; Goetzke, L W; Grandi, L; Greene, Z; Grignon, C; Hasterok, C; Hogenbirk, E; Itay, R; Kaminsky, B; Kessler, G; Kish, A; Landsman, H; Lang, R F; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; LeCalloch, M; Lin, Q; Lindemann, S; Lindner, M; Lopes, J A M; Manfredini, A; Maris, I; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Masbou, J; Massoli, F V; Masson, D; Mayani, D; Meng, Y; Messina, M; Micheneau, K; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Murra, M; Naganoma, J; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orrigo, S E A; Pakarha, P; Pelssers, B; Persiani, R; Piastra, F; Pienaar, J; Piro, M -C; lante, G P; Priel, N; Rauch, L; Reichard, S; Reuter, C; Rizzo, A; Rosendahl, S; Rupp, N; Saldanha, R; dosSantos, J M F; Sartorelli, G; Scheibelhut, M; Schindler, S; Schreiner, J; Schumann, M; Lavina, L Scotto; Selvi, M; Shagin, P; Shockley, E; Silva, M; Simgen, H; Sivers, M v; Stein, A; Thers, D; Tiseni, A; Trinchero, G; Tunnell, C; Upole, N; Wang, H; Wei, Y; Weinheimer, C; Wulf, J; Ye, J; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    A Rn-220 source is deployed on the XENON100 dark matter detector in order to address the challenges in calibration of tonne-scale liquid noble element detectors. We show that the Pb-212 beta emission can be used for low-energy electronic recoil calibration in searches for dark matter. The isotope spreads throughout the entire active region of the detector, and its activity naturally decays below background level within a week after the source is closed. We find no increase in the activity of the troublesome Rn-222 background after calibration. Alpha emitters are also distributed throughout the detector and facilitate calibration of its response to Rn-222. Using the delayed coincidence of Rn-220/Po-216, we map for the first time the convective motion of particles in the XENON100 detector. Additionally, we make a competitive measurement of the half-life of Po-212, t = 293.9+-(1.0)+-(0.6) ns.

  6. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  7. An Ultra-Low Background PMT for Liquid Xenon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Carr, D; Chapman, J J; Chan, Y-D; Clark, K; Coffey, T; deViveiros, L; Dragowsky, M; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Gibson, K R; Hall, C; Hanhardt, M; Holbrook, B; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Larsen, N; Lee, C; Lesko, K; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lyashenko, A; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D; Mei, D; Mock, J; Morii, M; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Nikkel, J A; Pangilinan, M; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Skulski, W; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Spaans, J; Stiegler, T; Sweany, M; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D; Thomson, J; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J T; Wlasenko, M; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented from radioactivity screening of two models of photomultiplier tubes designed for use in current and future liquid xenon experiments. The Hamamatsu 5.6 cm diameter R8778 PMT, used in the LUX dark matter experiment, has yielded a positive detection of four common radioactive isotopes: 238U, 232Th, 40K, and 60Co. Screening of LUX materials has rendered backgrounds from other detector materials subdominant to the R8778 contribution. A prototype Hamamatsu 7.6 cm diameter R11410 MOD PMT has also been screened, with benchmark isotope counts measured at <0.4 238 U / <0.3 232 Th / <8.3 40 K / 2.0+-0.2 60 Co mBq/PMT. This represents a large reduction, equal to a change of \\times 1/24 238U / \\times 1/9 232Th / \\times 1/8 40K per PMT, between R8778 and R11410 MOD, concurrent with a doubling of the photocathode surface area (4.5 cm to 6.4 cm diameter). 60Co measurements are comparable between the PMTs, but can be significantly reduced in future R11410 MOD units through further material selec...

  8. Distillation of Liquid Xenon to Remove Krypton

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Iida, T; Ikeda, M; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Minamino, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, Y; Namba, T; Ogawa, H; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Ueshima, K; Yamashita, M; Kaneyuki, K; Ebizuka, Y; Kikuchi, J; Ota, A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, T; Hagiwara, H; Kamei, T; Miyamoto, K; Nagase, T; Nakamura, S; Ozaki, Y; Sato, T; Fukuda, Y; Sato, T; Nishijima, K; Sakurai, M; Maruyama, T; Motoki, D; Itow, Y; Ohsumi, H; Tasaka, S; Kim, S B; Kim, Y D; Lee, J I; Moon, S H; Urakawa, Y; Uchino, M; Kamioka, Y

    2008-01-01

    A high performance distillation system to remove krypton from xenon was constructed, and a purity level of Kr/Xe = $\\sim 3 \\times 10^{-12}$ was achieved. This development is crucial in facilitating high sensitivity low background experiments such as the search for dark matter in the universe.

  9. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  10. High-power atomic xenon laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteman, W.J.; Peters, P.J.M.; Botma, H.; Botma, H.; Tskhai, S.N.; Udalov, Yu.B.; Mei, Q.C.; Mei, Qi-Chu; Ochkin, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    The high pressure atomic xenon laser is becoming the most promising light source in the wavelength region of a few microns. The merits are high efficiency (so far up to 8 percent), high output energies (15 J/liter at 9 bar), high continuous output power (more than 200 W/liter), no gas dissociation a

  11. Relative scintillation efficiency of liquid xenon in the XENON10 direct dark matter search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur, Angel

    There is almost universal agreement that most of the mass in the Universe consists of dark matter. Many lines of reasoning suggest that the dark matter consists of a weakly interactive massive particle (WIMP) with mass ranging from 10 GeV/c 2 to a few TeV/c 2 . Today, numerous experiments aim for direct or indirect dark matter detection. XENON10 is a direct detection experiment using a xenon dual phase time projection chamber. Particles interacting with xenon will create a scintillation signal ( S 1) and ionization. The charge produced is extracted into the gas phase and converted into a proportional scintillation light ( S 2), with an external electric field. The dominant background, b particles and g rays, will undergo an electron recoil (ER) interaction, while WIMPs and neutrons will undergo a nuclear recoil (NR) interaction. Event-by-event discrimination of background signals is based on log 10 ( S 2/ S 1) NR review the requirements for a dark matter search. In particular I discuss the XENON10 detector, deployment, operation, calibrations, analysis and WIMP-nucleon cross- section limits. Finally, I present our latest results for the relative scintillation efficiency ([Special characters omitted.] ) for nuclear recoils in liquid xenon, which was the biggest source of uncertainty in the XENON10 limit. This quantity is essential to determine the nuclear energy scale and to determine the WIMP-nucleon cross sections.

  12. The iodine-plutonium-xenon age of the Moon-Earth system revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Avice, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    From iodine-plutonium-xenon isotope systematics, we re-evaluate time constraints on the early evolution of the Earth-atmosphere system and, by inference, on the Moon-forming event. Two extinct radioactivites (129I, T1/2 = 15.6 Ma, and 244Pu, T1/2 = 80 Ma) have produced radiogenic 129Xe and fissiogenic 131-136Xe, respectively, within the Earth, which related isotope fingerprints are seen in the compositions of mantle and atmospheric Xe. Recent studies of Archean rocks suggest that xenon atoms have been lost from the Earth's atmosphere and isotopically fractionated during long periods of geological time, until at least the end of the Archean eon. Here we build a model that takes into account these results. Correction for Xe loss permits to compute new closure ages for the Earth's atmosphere that are in agreement with those computed for mantle Xe. The minimum Xe formation interval for the Earth- atmosphere is 40 (-10+20) Ma after start of solar system formation, which may also date the Moon-forming impact.

  13. The iodine-plutonium-xenon age of the Moon-Earth system revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avice, G; Marty, B

    2014-09-13

    Iodine-plutonium-xenon isotope systematics have been used to re-evaluate time constraints on the early evolution of the Earth-atmosphere system and, by inference, on the Moon-forming event. Two extinct radionuclides ((129)I, T1/2=15.6 Ma and (244)Pu, T1/2=80 Ma) have produced radiogenic (129)Xe and fissiogenic (131-136)Xe, respectively, within the Earth, the related isotope fingerprints of which are seen in the compositions of mantle and atmospheric Xe. Recent studies of Archaean rocks suggest that xenon atoms have been lost from the Earth's atmosphere and isotopically fractionated during long periods of geological time, until at least the end of the Archaean eon. Here, we build a model that takes into account these results. Correction for Xe loss permits the computation of new closure ages for the Earth's atmosphere that are in agreement with those computed for mantle Xe. The corrected Xe formation interval for the Earth-atmosphere system is [Formula: see text] Ma after the beginning of Solar System formation. This time interval may represent a lower limit for the age of the Moon-forming impact.

  14. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bedikian, S; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Camp, C; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Carr, D; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A; Chiller, C; Clark, K; Classen, T; Coffey, T; Curioni, A; Dahl, E; Dazeley, S; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dragowsky, E; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M; Hall, C; Hanhardt, M; Holbrook, B; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Knoche, R; Kyre, S; Kwong, J; Lander, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Leonard, D S; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lyashenko, A; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; Marquez, Z; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morii, M; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Nikkel, J A; Pangilinan, M; Parker, P D; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Rodionov, A; Roberts, P; Shei, A; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Skulski, W; Solovov, V N; Sofka, C J; Sorensen, P; Spaans, J; Stiegler, T; Stolp, D; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D; Thomson, J; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, D; White, J T; Whitis, T J; Wlasenko, M; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2012-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) collaboration has designed and constructed a dual-phase xenon detector, in order to conduct a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles(WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. The goal of the LUX detector is to clearly detect (or exclude) WIMPS with a spin independent cross section per nucleon of $2\\times 10^{-46}$ cm$^{2}$, equivalent to $\\sim$1 event/100 kg/month in the inner 100-kg fiducial volume (FV) of the 370-kg detector. The overall background goals are set to have $<$1 background events characterized as possible WIMPs in the FV in 300 days of running. This paper describes the design and construction of the LUX detector.

  15. Studies of selenium and xenon in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bricker, T.

    1994-07-27

    Since its development, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been a widely used analytical technique. ICP-MS offers low detection limits, easy determination of isotope ratios, and simple mass spectra from analyte elements. ICP-MS has been successfully employed for many applications including geological, environmental, biological, metallurgical, food, medical, and industrial. One specific application important to many areas of study involves elemental speciation by using ICP-MS as an element specific detector interfaced to liquid chromatography. Elemental speciation information is important and cannot be obtained by atomic spectrometric methods alone which measure only the total concentration of the element present. Part 1 of this study describes the speciation of selenium in human serum by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and detection by ICP-MS. Although ICP-MS has been widely sued, room for improvement still exists. Difficulties in ICP-MS include noise in the background, matrix effects, clogging of the sampling orifice with deposited solids, and spectral interference caused by polyatomic ions. Previous work has shown that the addition of xenon into the central channel of the ICP decreases polyatomic ion levels. In Part 2 of this work, a fundamental study involving the measurement of the excitation temperature is carried out to further understand xenon`s role in the reduction of polyatomic ions. 155 refs.

  16. Optically enhanced production of metastable xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, G T; Pittman, T B

    2016-01-01

    Metastable states of noble gas atoms are typically produced by electrical discharge techniques or "all-optical" excitation methods. Here we combine electrical discharges with optical pumping to demonstrate "optically enhanced" production of metastable xenon (Xe*). We experimentally measure large increases in Xe* density with relatively small optical control field powers. This technique may have applications in systems where large metastable state densities are desirable.

  17. The Development of the improved equipment for the measurement radionuclides of xenon in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, S. A.; Dubasov, Y. V.

    2009-04-01

    The Radium Khlopin Institute have developed the mobile (vehicle based) equipment attended for the providing of the monitoring of radioactive xenon isotopes in atmospheric air on territories, neighboring with NPP. This equipment comprises the improved sampling installation with sample-processing unit and specialized spectrometer of β-γ-coincidences. The principal specificity of sampling installation is the using of the gas-cooling machine attended for the reaching of the cryogenic temperatures, which works without helium, using for cooling the processed air itself. The capacity of sampling reaches 20 cubic meters per hour with the xenon extraction factor of 75%. The duration of the sampling cycle forms 3 - 7 hours depending of the xenon volume requirements. The sample-processing unit is designed on preparative gas chromatograph scheme. Duration of sample-processing procedure does not exceed one and half hour. The volume of the prepared sample is around half liter, it contains 3 - 7 cubic centimeters of the xenon, depending of sampling cycle time. For measurements of xenon radioisotopes containing in obtained sample, was developed a β-γ-coincidences spectrometer on the base of the "ORTEC" HP Ge detector equipped with scintillation β-detector designed as Marinelli chamber of 700 cm3 volume. This spectrometer allows to reduce the ambient background more than in 20 times, with γ-channel efficiency reduction not more than in 1.5 times. The minimum detectable activity of 133Хе (MDA), evaluated by Currie formula for probability 95 % is 0.05 Bq at the exposition of 20 hours. Spectrometer is also intended for determination of the stable krypton and xenon concentrations in β-chamber by X-ray-fluorescent method. Therefore, in a shield of the spectrometer collimating pinhole is made and 241Am source is installed. To improve the sensitivity of the analysis beryllium window is made in β-chamber wall, adjoining to the HPGe detector. X-ray-fluorescent analysis allows to

  18. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S. [Institute of Nanobiotechnologies, Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg 198904 (Russian Federation); Rakcheeva, L. P., E-mail: lida@nanobio.spbstu.ru; Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A. [Institute of Nanobiotechnologies, Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Lyubchik, S. [REQUIMTE, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica 2829-516 (Portugal); Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A. [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg 198904 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  19. ANOMALOUS MAGNETIC FILMS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three types of anomalous nickel-iron magnetic films characterized by hysteresigraph and torque-magnetometer measurements; bitter-pattern observations; reprint from ’ Journal of Applied Physics .’

  20. Scintillation light, ionization yield and scintillation decay times in high pressure xenon and xenon methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pushkin, K. N.; Akimov, D. Y.; Burenkov, A. A.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Kuznetsov, I. S.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Tezuka, C.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2007-01-01

    Scintillation light, ionization yield and scintillation decay times have been measured in xenon and in its mixture with a 0.05% concentration of methane as a function of the reduced electric field (E/N)-the ratio of the electric field strength to the number density of gas-at a pressure of 21 atm. Th

  1. Xenon poisoning calculation code for miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In line with the actual requirements and based upon the specific char acteristics of MNSR, a revised point-reactor model was adopted to model MNSR's xenon poisoning. The corresponding calculation code, MNSRXPCC (Xenon Poison ing Calculation Code for MNSR), was developed and tested by the Shanghai MNSR data.

  2. First axion results from the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of searches for axions and axionlike particles with the XENON100 experiment. The axion-electron coupling constant, gAe, has been probed by exploiting the axioelectric effect in liquid xenon. A profile likelihood analysis of 224.6 live days × 34-kg exposure has shown no e

  3. Analysis of the XENON100 dark matter search data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 experiment, situated in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, aims at the direct detection of dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), based on their interactions with xenon nuclei in an ultra low background dual-phase time projection chamber. This pap

  4. The XENON1T Dark Matter Search Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide race towards direct dark matter detection in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) has been dramatically accelerated by the remarkable progress and evolution of liquid xenon time projection chambers (LXeTPCs). With a realistic discovery potential, XENON100 has already reached a sensitivity of $7\\times10^{-45}\\,\

  5. Solubilities of krypton and xenon in dichlorodifluoromethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaffer, J.H.; Shockley, W.E.; Greene, C.W.

    1984-07-01

    The solubility behavior of krypton and xenon in dichlorodifluoromethane was investigated for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in support of the fluorocarbon absorption process. The solubility data derived from solute radioisotopes had uncertainties of approx. 0.1%. Values for Henry's law constants were initially determined under equilibrium conditions at infinite solute dilution. Based on these results, the study was extended to finite solute concentrations. Nonidealities in the two binary systems were expressed as gas phase fugacity coefficients for each solute at 10/sup 0/ intervals over the range -30 to +50/sup 0/C. 22 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. A xenon gas purity monitor for EXO

    CERN Document Server

    Dobi, A; Herrin, S; Odian, A; Prescott, C Y; Rowson, P C; Ackerman, N; Aharmin, B; Auger, M; Barbeau, P S; Barry, K; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Cook, S; Counts, I; Daniels, T; DeVoe, R; Dolinski, M J; Donato, K; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Green, M; Hagemann, C; Hall, K; Hallman, D; Hargrove, C; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K; Lacey, J; Leonard, D S; LePort, F; Mackay, D; MacLellan, R; Mong, B; Diez, M Montero; Muller, A R; Neilson, R; Niner, E; O'Sullivan, K; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Pushkin, K; Rollin, E; Sinclair, D; Slutsky, S; Stekhanov, V; Twelker, K; Voskanian, N; Vuilleumier, J -L; Wichoski, U; Wodin, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design, operation, and calibration of two versions of a xenon gas purity monitor (GPM) developed for the EXO double beta decay program. The devices are sensitive to concentrations of oxygen well below 1 ppb at an ambient gas pressure of one atmosphere or more. The theory of operation of the GPM is discussed along with the interactions of oxygen and other impurities with the GPM's tungsten filament. Lab tests and experiences in commissioning the EXO-200 double beta decay experiment are described. These devices can also be used on other noble gases.

  7. Liquid Xenon Detectors for Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Miceli, A; Benard, F; Bryman, D A; Kurchaninov, L; Martin, J P; Muennich, A; Retiere, F; Ruth, T J; Sossi, V; Stoessl, A J

    2011-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging technique based on detection of annihilation photons following beta decay producing positrons. In this paper, we present the concept of a new PET system for preclinical applications consisting of a ring of twelve time projection chambers filled with liquid xenon viewed by avalanche photodiodes. Simultaneous measurement of ionization charge and scintillation light leads to a significant improvement to spatial resolution, image quality, and sensitivity. Simulated performance shows that an energy resolution of <10% (FWHM) and a sensitivity of 15% are achievable. First tests with a prototype TPC indicate position resolution <1 mm (FWHM).

  8. A pulse generator for xenon lamps

    CERN Document Server

    Janata, E

    2002-01-01

    A pulse generator is described, which enhances the analyzing light emitted from a xenon lamp as used in kinetic photospectrometry experiments. The lamp current is increased to 600 A for a duration of 3 ms; the current is constant within +-0.2% during a time interval of 2 ms. Because of instabilities of the lamp arc during pulsing, the use of the enhanced light source is limited to measuring times up to 500 mu s. The enhancement in light intensity depends on the wavelength and amounts to more than 400-fold in the UV-region.

  9. A pulse generator for xenon lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, E.

    2002-10-01

    A pulse generator is described, which enhances the analyzing light emitted from a xenon lamp as used in kinetic photospectrometry experiments. The lamp current is increased to 600 A for a duration of 3 ms; the current is constant within ±0.2% during a time interval of 2 ms. Because of instabilities of the lamp arc during pulsing, the use of the enhanced light source is limited to measuring times up to 500 μs. The enhancement in light intensity depends on the wavelength and amounts to more than 400-fold in the UV-region.

  10. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, J

    2015-01-01

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7\\,cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163\\,K), the drift speed is 0.193 $\\pm$ 0.003 cm/$\\mu$s while the drift speed in the solid phase (157\\,K) is 0.397 $\\pm$ 0.006 cm/$\\mu$s at 900 V/cm over 8.0\\,cm of uniform electric fields. Therefore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.

  11. Perovskites with the Framework-Forming Xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britvin, Sergey N; Kashtanov, Sergei A; Krzhizhanovskaya, Maria G; Gurinov, Andrey A; Glumov, Oleg V; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Kretser, Yury L; Zaitsev, Anatoly N; Chukanov, Nikita V; Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2015-11-23

    The Group 18 elements (noble gases) were the last ones in the periodic system to have not been encountered in perovskite structures. We herein report the synthesis of a new group of double perovskites KM(XeNaO6) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) containing framework-forming xenon. The structures of the new compounds, like other double perovskites, are built up of the alternating sequence of corner-sharing (XeO6) and (NaO6) octahedra arranged in a three-dimensional rocksalt order. The fact that xenon can be incorporated into the perovskite structure provides new insights into the problem of Xe depletion in the atmosphere. Since octahedrally coordinated Xe(VIII) and Si(IV) exhibit close values of ionic radii (0.48 and 0.40 Å, respectively), one could assume that Xe(VIII) can be incorporated into hyperbaric frameworks such as MgSiO3 perovskite. The ability of Xe to form stable inorganic frameworks can further extend the rich and still enigmatic chemistry of this noble gas.

  12. Anomalous law of cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  13. Anomalous law of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  14. Anomalous chiral superfluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lublinsky, Michael, E-mail: lublinsky@phys.uconn.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Zahed, Ismail [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2010-02-08

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavor anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is briefly noted.

  15. Reliability and error analysis on xenon/CT CBF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. [Diversified Diagnostic Products, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2000-02-01

    This article provides a quantitative error analysis of a simulation model of xenon/CT CBF in order to investigate the behavior and effect of different types of errors such as CT noise, motion artifacts, lower percentage of xenon supply, lower tissue enhancements, etc. A mathematical model is built to simulate these errors. By adjusting the initial parameters of the simulation model, we can scale the Gaussian noise, control the percentage of xenon supply, and change the tissue enhancement with different kVp settings. The motion artifact will be treated separately by geometrically shifting the sequential CT images. The input function is chosen from an end-tidal xenon curve of a practical study. Four kinds of cerebral blood flow, 10, 20, 50, and 80 cc/100 g/min, are examined under different error environments and the corresponding CT images are generated following the currently popular timing protocol. The simulated studies will be fed to a regular xenon/CT CBF system for calculation and evaluation. A quantitative comparison is given to reveal the behavior and effect of individual error resources. Mixed error testing is also provided to inspect the combination effect of errors. The experiment shows that CT noise is still a major error resource. The motion artifact affects the CBF results more geometrically than quantitatively. Lower xenon supply has a lesser effect on the results, but will reduce the signal/noise ratio. The lower xenon enhancement will lower the flow values in all areas of brain. (author)

  16. Anomalous pion decay revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Battistel, O A; Nemes, M C; Hiller, B

    1999-01-01

    An implicit four dimensional regularization is applied to calculate the axial-vector-vector anomalous amplitude. The present technique always complies with results of Dimensional Regularization and can be easily applied to processes involving odd numbers of $\\gamma_5$ matrices. This is illustrated explicitely in the example of this letter.

  17. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, J., E-mail: jrenner@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gehman, V.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H.S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Shuman, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Álvarez, V. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Borges, F.I.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Cárcel, S. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Castel, J.; Cebrián, S. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Calle Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cervera, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Conde, C.A.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); and others

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  18. A Xenon Condenser with a Remote Liquid Storage Vessel

    CERN Document Server

    Slutsky, S; Breuer, H; Dobi, A; Hall, C; Langford, T; Leonard, D; Kaufman, L J; Strickland, V; Voskanian, N

    2009-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of a system for xenon liquefaction in which the condenser is separated from the liquid storage vessel. The condenser is cooled by a pulse tube cryocooler, while the vessel is cooled only by the liquid xenon itself. This arrangement facilitates liquid particle detector research by allowing easy access to the upper and lower flanges of the vessel. We find that an external xenon gas pump is useful for increasing the rate at which cooling power is delivered to the vessel, and we present measurements of the power and efficiency of the apparatus.

  19. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Renner, J; Goldschmidt, A; Matis, H S; Miller, T; Nakajima, Y; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Shuman, D; Álvarez, V; Borges, F I G; Cárcel, S; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gil, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monserrate, M; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot-Guinot, M; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Seguí, L; Serra, L; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; White, J; Yahlali, N

    2014-01-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope $\\alpha$-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  20. Liquid xenon scintillators for imaging of positron emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, L

    The current understanding of xenon scintillation physics is summarized and keyed to the use of xenon as a gamma-ray detector in medical radioisotope imaging systems. Liquid xenon has a short scintillation pulse (approximately 10(8) sec) and high gamma-ray absorption and scintillation efficiencies. The fast pulse may facilitate imaging in vivo distributions of hot positron sources and allow recovery of additional spatial information by time-of-flight techniques. We begin by describing our own study of the feasibility of making a practical positron scanning system, and consider the problems of scintillation decay time, linearity, efficiency, purity, and electricfield amplifcation. The prospects for a practical instrument are considered.

  1. Radon depletion in xenon boil-off gas

    OpenAIRE

    Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Lindemann, S.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Simgen, H.

    2016-01-01

    An important background in detectors using liquid xenon for rare event searches arises from the decays of radon and its daughters. We report for the first time a reduction of $^{222}$Rn in the gas phase above a liquid xenon reservoir. We show a reduction factor of $\\gtrsim 4$ for the $^{222}$Rn concentration in boil-off xenon gas compared to the radon enriched liquid phase. A semiconductor-based $\\alpha$-detector and miniaturized proportional counters are used to detect the radon. As the rado...

  2. Viscoelasticity of Xenon near the Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    Using a novel, overdamped, oscillator flown aboard the Space Shuttle, we measured the viscosity of xenon near the liquid-vapor critical point in the frequency range 2 Hz less than or equal to f less than or equal to 12 Hz. The measured viscosity divergence is characterized by the exponent z(sub eta) = 0.0690 +/- 0.0006, in agreement with the value z(sub eta) = 0.067 +/- 0.002 calculated from a two-loop perturbation expansion. Viscoelastic behavior was evident when t = (T - T(sub c))/T(sub c) less than 10(exp -5) and dominant when t less than 10(exp -6), further from T(sub c) than predicted. Viscoelastic behavior scales as Af(tau) where tau is the fluctuation decay time. The measured value of A is 2.0 +/- 0.3 times the result of a one-loop calculation. (Uncertainties stated are one standard uncertainty.)

  3. Modeling Pulse Characteristics in Xenon with NEST

    CERN Document Server

    Mock, Jeremy; Kazkaz, Kareem; Szydagis, Matthew; Tripathi, Mani; Uvarov, Sergey; Woods, Michael; Walsh, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive model for describing the characteristics of pulsed signals, generated by particle interactions in xenon detectors, is presented. An emphasis is laid on two-phase time projection chambers, but the models presented are also applicable to single phase detectors. In order to simulate the pulse shape due to primary scintillation light, effects such as the ratio of singlet and triplet dimer state populations, as well as their corresponding decay times, and the recombination time are incorporated into the model. In a two phase time projection chamber, when simulating the pulse caused by electroluminescence light, parameters such as ionization electron mean free path in gas, the drift velocity, singlet and triplet decay times, diffusion constants, and the electron trapping time, have been implemented. This modeling has been incorporated into a complete software package, which realistically simulates the expected pulse shapes for these types of detectors.

  4. Method for production of an isotopically enriched compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous, Matthew G.

    2012-12-11

    A method is presented for producing and isolating an isotopically enriched compound of a desired isotope from a parent radionuclide. The method includes forming, or placing, a precipitate containing a parent radionuclide of the desired daughter isotope in a first reaction zone and allowing sufficient time for the parent to decay into the desired gaseous daughter radioisotope. The method further contemplates collecting the desired daughter isotope as a solid in a second reaction zone through the application of temperatures below the freezing point of the desired isotope to a second reaction zone that is connected to the first reaction zone. Specifically, a method is presented for producing isotopically enriched compounds of xenon, including the radioactive isotope Xe-131m and the stable isotope Xe-131.

  5. Radon depletion in xenon boil-off gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Lindemann, S.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    An important background in detectors using liquid xenon for rare event searches arises from the decays of radon and its daughters. We report for the first time a reduction of {sup 222}Rn in the gas phase above a liquid xenon reservoir. We show a reduction factor of >or similar 4 for the {sup 222}Rn concentration in boil-off xenon gas compared to the radon enriched liquid phase. A semiconductor-based α-detector and miniaturized proportional counters are used to detect the radon. As the radon depletion in the boil-off gas is understood as a single-stage distillation process, this result establishes the suitability of cryogenic distillation to separate radon from xenon down to the 10{sup -15} mol/mol level. (orig.)

  6. Radon depletion in xenon boil-off gas

    CERN Document Server

    Bruenner, S; Lindemann, S; Undagoitia, T Marrodán; Simgen, H

    2016-01-01

    An important background in detectors using liquid xenon for rare event searches arises from the decays of radon and its daughters. We report for the first time a reduction of $^{222}$Rn in the gas phase above a liquid xenon reservoir. We show a reduction factor of $\\gtrsim 4$ for the $^{222}$Rn concentration in boil-off xenon gas compared to the radon enriched liquid phase. A semiconductor-based $\\alpha$-detector and miniaturized proportional counters are used to detect the radon. As the radon depletion in the boil-off gas is understood as a single-stage distillation process, this result establishes the suitability of cryogenic distillation to separate radon from xenon down to the $10^{-15}\\,$mol/mol level.

  7. MPGDs in Compton imaging with liquid-xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Duval; Herve, Carduner; Jean-Pierre, Cussonneau; Jacob, Lamblin; Patrick, Le Ray; Eric, Morteau; Tugdual, Oger; Jean-Sebastien, Stutzmann; Dominique, Thers

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of radiation with liquid xenon, inducing both scintillation and ionization signals, is of particular interest for Compton-sequences reconstruction. We report on the development and recent results of a liquid-xenon time-projection chamber, dedicated to a novel nuclear imaging technique named "3 gamma imaging". In a first prototype, the scintillation is detected by a vacuum photomultiplier tube and the charges are collected with a MICROMEGAS structure; both are fully immersed in liquid xenon. In view of the final large-area detector, and with the aim of minimizing dead-zones, we are investigating a gaseous photomultiplier for recording the UV scintillation photons. The prototype concept is presented as well as preliminary results in liquid xenon. We also present soft x-rays test results of a gaseous photomultiplier prototype made of a double Thick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM) at normal temperature and pressure conditions.

  8. Radon depletion in xenon boil-off gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Lindemann, S.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Simgen, H.

    2017-03-01

    An important background in detectors using liquid xenon for rare event searches arises from the decays of radon and its daughters. We report for the first time a reduction of ^{222}Rn in the gas phase above a liquid xenon reservoir. We show a reduction factor of ≳ 4 for the ^{222}Rn concentration in boil-off xenon gas compared to the radon enriched liquid phase. A semiconductor-based α -detector and miniaturized proportional counters are used to detect the radon. As the radon depletion in the boil-off gas is understood as a single-stage distillation process, this result establishes the suitability of cryogenic distillation to separate radon from xenon down to the 10^{-15} mol/mol level.

  9. Radon removal from gaseous xenon with activated charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Hieda, K.; Hiraide, K.; Hirano, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y.; Liu, J.; Martens, K.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nishiie, H.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shinozaki, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Ueshima, K.; Umemoto, D.; Yamashita, M.; Hosokawa, K.; Murata, A.; Otsuka, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kusaba, F.; Motoki, D.; Nishijima, K.; Tasaka, S.; Fujii, K.; Murayama, I.; Nakamura, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Nishitani, Y.; Takiya, H.; Uchida, H.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, J. S.; Xmass Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Many low background experiments using xenon need to remove radioactive radon to improve their sensitivities. However, no method of continually removing radon from xenon has been described in the literature. We studied a method to remove radon from xenon gas through an activated charcoal trap. From our measurements we infer a linear relationship between the mean propagation velocity vRn of radon and vXe of xenon in the trap with vRn/vXe=(0.96±0.10)×10-3 at -85 °C. As the mechanism for radon removal in this charcoal trap is its decay, knowledge of this parameter allows us to design an efficient radon removal system for the XMASS experiment. The verification of this system found that it reduces radon by a factor of 0.07, which is in line with its expected average retention time of 14.8 days for radon.

  10. Anomalous diffusion of epicentres

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Posadas, A; Luzon, F

    2007-01-01

    The classification of earthquakes in main shocks and aftershocks by a method recently proposed by M. Baiesi and M. Paczuski allows to the generation of a complex network composed of clusters that group the most correlated events. The spatial distribution of epicentres inside these structures corresponding to the catalogue of earthquakes in the eastern region of Cuba shows anomalous anti-diffusive behaviour evidencing the attractive nature of the main shock and the possible description in terms of fractional kinetics.

  11. Anomalous law of cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergo a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature ma...

  12. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  13. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  14. Measuring radon reduction in xenon boil-off gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenner, Stefan; Cichon, Dominick; Lindemann, Sebastian; Marrodan Undagoitia, Teresa; Simgen, Hardy [MPIK, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    {sup 222}Rn, which originates from the decay of primordial {sup 238}U, is one of the major background sources for ultra-low background noble gas detectors. One of them is XENON1T, which is a dark matter direct detection experiment looking for hypothetical weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). It uses liquid xenon (LXe) as a detection medium and aims to be sensitive to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-sections of σ∝2.10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} at a WIMP mass of ∝50 GeV/c{sup 2}. To achieve this goal, radon activity inside the detector must be limited to a few mBq/kg. One possible way for reducing the concentration of {sup 222}Rn inside such an LXe detector is using the so-called ''boil-off method''. It takes advantage of the fact, that the radon concentration in boil-off xenon is smaller compared to the concentration in the liquid xenon from which the boil-off xenon evaporated. This can be understood by the different vapor pressures of radon and xenon. In this talk, tests conducted at the MPIK are outlined which probe the feasibility and effectiveness of the boil-off method. The results prove, that a reduction of the radon concentration can indeed be achieved. In addition, an outlook for possible future applications of this technique is given.

  15. Scintillation luminescence for high-pressure xenon gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S.; Hasebe, N.; Igarashi, T.; Kobayashi, M.-N.; Miyachi, T.; Miyajima, M.; Okada, H.; Okudaira, O.; Tezuka, C.; Yokoyama, E.; Doke, T.; Shibamura, E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Ulin, S. E.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2004-09-01

    Scintillation and ionization yields in xenon gas for 5.49MeV alpha-particles were measured in the range of pressure from 0.35 to 3.7MPa and the electric field strength (E) over the number density of xenon atoms (N), E/N from 0 to 5×10-18Vcm2. When our data are normalized at the data point measured by Saito et al., the number of scintillation photons is 2.3×105 while the number of ionization electrons is 2.0×105 at 2.6MPa and at 3.7×10-18Vcm2. The scintillation and ionization yields of xenon doped with 0.2% hydrogen, High-Pressure Xenon gas[H2-0.2%], at 2.6MPa was also measured. Scintillation yield of the Xe-H2 mixture gas is 80% as high as that of pure xenon. It is found that the scintillation yield is luminous enough to generate a trigger pulse of the high-pressure xenon time projection chamber, which is expected as a promising MeV Compton gamma-ray camera.

  16. NEXT, high-pressure xenon gas experiments for ultimate sensitivity to Majorana neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Monrabal, F

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe an innovative type of Time Projection Chamber (TPC), which uses high-pressure xenon gas (HPXe) and electroluminescence amplification of the ionization charge as the basis of a apparatus capable of fully reconstructing the energy and topological signal of rare events. We will discuss a specific design of such HPXe TPC, the NEXT-100 detector, that will search for neutrinoless double beta decay using 100-150 kg of xenon enriched in the isotope Xe-136. NEXT-100 is currently under construction, after completion of an accelerated and very successful R&D period. It will be installed at the Laboratorio Subterr\\'aneo de Canfranc (LSC), in Spain. The commissioning run is expected for late 2013 or early 2014. We will also present physics arguments that suggest that the HPXe technology can be extrapolated to the next-to-next generation (e.g, a fiducial mass of 1 ton of target), which will fully explore the Majorana nature of the neutrino if the mass hierarchy is inverse.

  17. Removal of noble gases out of xenon by a cryogenic distillation column for the XENON1T experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieguth, Alexander; Murra, Michael; Rosendahl, Stephan; Bruno, Gianmarco; Schneider, Sergej; Weinheimer, Christian; Huhmann, Christian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The upcoming XENON1T experiment is the next step for the dark matter particle search. It will surpass current limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section set by liquid xenon detectors as LUX and XENON100 by more than an order of magnitude, which leads to an expected sensitivity of 2.0.10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} for WIMPs with a mass of 50 GeV/c{sup 2} after a 2.2 ton-year live-time. For achieving new sensitivity limits the reduction of internal background sources as {sup 85}Kr and {sup 222}Rn is of crucial importance. Taking advantage of the different boiling points of these noble gas impurities and xenon, they can be separated by a cryogenic distillation column in different steps. The improvement of the krypton removal by distillation for the XENON1T experiment and a first test setup on radon distillation at the XENON100 experiment are presented.

  18. Removal of noble gases out of xenon by a cryogenic distillation column for the XENON1T experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murra, Michael; Bruno, Gianmarco; Fieguth, Alexander; Huhmann, Christian; Rosendahl, Stephan; Schneider, Sergej; Weinheimer, Christian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische-Wilhelms Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The XENON1T experiment is the next generation experiment for the direct detection of dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPS). With its 3.3 tons of liquid xenon XENON1T will increase the sensitivity on the WIMP-nucleon cross section down to 2.0 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2}, which is more than one order of magnitude better than the current best limits by LUX and XENON100. A key requirement to reach this sensitivity is the reduction of radioactive backgrounds such as {sup 85}Kr and {sup 222}Rn. Because of different boiling points of Kr and Xe both components can be separated by a cryogenic distillation column, which has been constructed and characterized for XENON1T, where a reduction factor greater 120000 has been confirmed. Based on the same principle, the separation of Rn and Xe by cryogenic distillation is currently being tested at XENON100, using the system as radon source and detector at the same time. The cryogenic distillation column, the krypton removal measurements as well as the radon removal tests are presented.

  19. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within...... the $\\delta$-expansion, for a wide range of number of flavours. We also find that this is always smaller than the anomalous dimension of the fermion mass operator. These findings challenge the partial compositeness paradigm....

  20. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalous dimension of the fermion masses at the infrared fixed point, and the resulting values compare well with the lattice determinations.

  1. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small for a wide range of number of flavours. We also find that this is always smaller than the anomalous dimension of the fermion mass operator. These findings challenge the partial compositeness paradigm.

  2. Fast and selective MRI of xenon biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doepfert, Joerg; Kunth, Martin; Witte, Christopher; Rossella, Federica; Schroeder, Leif [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP), Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Due to its excellent chemical shift sensitivity and because its magnetization can be easily amplified by hyperpolarization, the use of xenon as a functionalized solution-state contrast agent (by trapping it in molecular cages such as cryptophane-A (CrA)) shows great promise. To further increase the signal, we detect Xe inside the cages indirectly by chemical exchange saturation transfer (Hyper-CEST). However, imaging of the hyperpolarized nuclei remains challenging, since each excitation pulse followed by readout gradients depletes the hyperpolarization. Here, we employ single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) to encode a whole image with only one excitation. We prepared a phantom consisting of two compartments containing CrA molecules (concentration: 10 {mu}M) with a chemical shift separation of 1.2 ppm and imaged it by EPI combined with CEST presaturation (acquisition time: 19 ms, saturation time: 4 s). By setting the frequency of the saturation pulse to either of the two cage frequencies, we were able to distinguish the two CrA resonances and separately image their spatial distribution. The total acquisition time for one image was drastically reduced compared to the original approach using chemical shift imaging. The proposed method demonstrates the possibility of fast and selective imaging of highly specific functionalized agents in the micro molar regime.

  3. Cerebral blood flow tomography with xenon-133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassen, N.A.

    1985-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured tomographically by inhalation of Xenon-/sup 133/. The calculation is based on taking a sequence of tomograms during the wash-in and wash-out phase of the tracer. Due to the dynamic nature of the process, a highly sensitive and fast moving single photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT) is required. Two brain-dedicated SPECT systems designed for this purpose are mentioned, and the method is described with special reference to the limitations inherent in the soft energy of the 133Xe primary photons. CBF tomography can be used for a multitude of clinical and investigative purposes. This article discusses in particular its use for the selection of patients with carotid occlusion for extracranial/intracranial bypass surgery, for detection of severe arterial spasm after aneurysm bleeding, and for detection of low flow areas during severe migraine attacks. The use of other tracers for CBF tomography using SPECT is summarized with emphasis on the /sup 99m/Tc chelates that freely pass the intact blood-brain barrier. The highly sensitive brain-dedicated SPECT systems described are a prerequisite for achieving high resolution tomograms with such tracers.

  4. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  5. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Anomalous radiative transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenzo; Tobita, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transitions involving photons derived by many-body interaction of the form, $\\partial_{\\mu} G^{\\mu}$, in the standard model are studied. This does not affect the equation of motion in the bulk, but makes wave functions modified, and causes the unusual transition characterized by the time-independent probability. In the transition probability at a time-interval T expressed generally in the form $P=T \\Gamma_0 +P^{(d)}$, now with $\\Gamma_0=0, P^{(d)} \

  7. RELAX Update: Recent Developments in the Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Johnston, W. A.; Lyon, I. C.; Turner, G.

    1993-07-01

    Refrigerator Enhanced Laser Analyser for Xenon (RELAX) [1] is an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer designed for the analysis of xenon from meteorites. It combines a selective laser resonance ionization ion source using a Nd:YAG based laser system for the generation of UV light pulses at 10Hz with a low volume (400cc) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. A cryogenic sample concentrator is used to increase sensitivity to the point where one count per second is produced from a sample of 1000 atoms, and this, combined with the continuous measurement of all isotopes and baselines implicit in the time-of-flight technique gives an effective sensitivity 2 orders of magnitude in excess of conventional, single-collector, magnetic sector instruments. In the past year the data acquisition system has been radically altered by the addition of discrimination against electronic noise and the development of a pulse counting system for small quantities of gas (light isotopes ^124Xe and ^126Xe. Precisions of close to 10% are achievable in under 10 minutes in calibration aliquots that contain approximately 600 atoms of ^124Xe. Gas can be released from samples using either an argon ion laser microprobe or a tantalum filament microfurnace while being observed through the laser port via a video monitoring system. The blank from the sample extraction chamber in which either the filament furnace or the laser microprobe sample mount can be fitted is not measurably higher than the dynamic blank of the spectrometer (10^-15ccSTP xenon total) however, at high filament temperatures (~1000 degrees C) the filament furnace produces a larger blank (up to 5 x 10^-15ccSTP) over the 5 minute duration of a typical sample extraction. No corresponding increase in blank has been noted when the laser microprobe is in use. High resolution stepped pyrolysis analyses of acid residues from the Murchison meteorite have been performed using the filament furnace in preference to the laser probe because of the greater

  8. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  9. Anomalous Microwave Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J

    1999-01-01

    Improved knowledge of diffuse Galactic emission is important to maximize the scientific return from scheduled CMB anisotropy missions. Cross-correlation of microwave maps with maps of the far-IR dust continuum show a ubiquitous microwave emission component whose spatial distribution is traced by far-IR dust emission. The spectral index of this emission, beta_{radio} = -2.2 (+0.5 -0.7) is suggestive of free-free emission but does not preclude other candidates. Comparison of H-alpha and microwave results show that both data sets have positive correlations with the far-IR dust emission. Microwave data, however, are consistently brighter than can be explained solely from free-free emission traced by H-alpha. This ``anomalous'' microwave emission can be explained as electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The anomalous component at 53 GHz is 2.5 times as bright as the free-free emission traced by H-alpha, providing an approximate normalization for models with significant spinning dust emission.

  10. Xenon-enhanced CT imaging of local pulmonary ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    We are using the unique features of electron beam CT (EBCT) in conjunction with respiratory and cardiac gating to explore the use of non-radioactive xenon gas as a pulmonary ventilation contrast agent. The goal is to construct accurate and quantitative high-resolution maps of local pulmonary ventilation in humans. We are evaluating xenon-enhanced computed tomography in the pig model with dynamic tracer washout/dilution and single breath inhalation imaging protocols. Scanning is done via an EBCT scanner which offers 50 msec scan aperture speeds. CT attenuation coefficients (image gray scale value) show a linear increase with xenon concentration (r equals 0.99). We measure a 1.55 Hounsfield Unit (HU) enhancement (kV equals 130, mA equals 623) per percentage increase in xenon gas concentration giving an approximately 155 HU enhancement with 100% xenon gas concentration as measured in a plexiglass super-syringe. Early results indicate that a single breath (from functional residual capacity to total lung capacity) of 100% xenon gas provides an average 32 +/- 1.85 (SE) HU enhancement in the lung parenchyma (maximum 50 HU) and should not encounter unwanted xenon side effects. However, changes in lung density occurring during even short breath holds (as short as 10 seconds) may limit using a single breath technique to synchronous volumetric scanning, currently possible only with EBCT. Preliminary results indicate close agreement between measured regional xenon concentration-time curves and theoretical predictions for the same sample. More than 10 breaths with inspirations to as high as 25 cmH2O airway pressure were needed to clear tracer from all lung regions and some regions had nearly linear rather than mono-exponential clearance curves. When regional parenchymal xenon concentration-time curves were analyzed, vertical gradients in ventilation and redistribution of ventilation at higher inspiratory flow rates were consistent with known pulmonary physiology. We present

  11. Signal yields, energy resolution, and recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Araújo, H M; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Beltrame, P; Bernard, E P; Bernstein, A; Biesiadzinski, T P; Boulton, E M; Bramante, R; Brás, P; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Currie, A; Cutter, J E; Davison, T J R; Dobi, A; Dobson, J E Y; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B N; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C R; Hanhardt, M; Haselschwardt, S J; Hertel, S A; Hogan, D P; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ignarra, C M; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Ji, W; Kamdin, K; Kazkaz, K; Khaitan, D; Knoche, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Lenardo, B G; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Manalaysay, A; Mannino, R L; Marzioni, M F; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J A; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H N; Neves, F; O'Sullivan, K; Oliver-Mallory, K C; Palladino, K J; Pease, E K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Rhyne, C; Shaw, S; Shutt, T A; Silva, C; Solmaz, M; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Stephenson, S; Sumner, T J; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D J; Taylor, W C; Tennyson, B P; Terman, P A; Tiedt, D R; To, W H; Tripathi, M; Tvrznikova, L; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Webb, R C; White, J T; Whitis, T J; Witherell, M S; Wolfs, F L H; Xu, J; Yazdani, K; Young, S K; Zhang, C

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks in the dark-matter-search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector. Liquid xenon charge and light yields for electronic recoil energies between 5.2 and 661.7 keV are measured, as well as the energy resolution for the LUX detector at those same energies. Additionally, there is an interpretation of existing measurements and descriptions of electron-ion recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon as limiting cases of a more general liquid xenon re- combination fluctuation model. Measurements of the standard deviation of these fluctuations at monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks exhibit a linear dependence on the number of ions for energy deposits up to 661.7 keV, consistent with previous LUX measurements between 2-16 keV with $^3$H. We highlight similarities in liquid xenon recombination for electronic and nuclear recoils with a comparison of recombination fluctuations measured...

  12. Xenon Anesthesia Improves Respiratory Gas Exchanges in Morbidly Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Abramo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Xenon-in-oxygen is a high density gas mixture and may improve PaO2/FiO2 ratio in morbidly obese patients uniforming distribution of ventilation during anesthesia. Methods. We compared xenon versus sevoflurane anesthesia in twenty adult morbidly obese patients (BMI>35 candidate for roux-en-Y laparoscopic gastric bypass and assessed PaO2/FiO2 ratio at baseline, at 15 min from induction of anaesthesia and every 60 min during surgery. Differences in intraoperative and postoperative data including heart rate, systolic and diastolic pressure, oxygen saturation, plateau pressure, eyes opening and extubation time, Aldrete score on arrival to the PACU were compared by the Mann-Whitney test and were considered as secondary aims. Moreover the occurrence of side effects and postoperative analgesic demand were assessed. Results. In xenon group PaO2-FiO2 ratio was significantly higher after 60 min and 120 min from induction of anesthesia; heart rate and overall remifentanil consumption were lower; the eyes opening time and the extubation time were shorter; morphine consumption at 72 hours was lower; postoperative nausea was more common. Conclusions. Xenon anesthesia improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio and maintained its distinctive rapid recovery times and cardiovascular stability. A reduction of opioid consumption during and after surgery and an increased incidence of PONV were also observed in xenon group.

  13. Signal yields, energy resolution, and recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bramante, R.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks in the dark-matter-search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector. Liquid xenon charge and light yields for electronic recoil energies between 5.2 and 661.7 keV are measured, as well as the energy resolution for the LUX detector at those same energies. Additionally, there is an interpretation of existing measurements and descriptions of electron-ion recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon as limiting cases of a more general liquid xenon recombination fluctuation model. Measurements of the standard deviation of these fluctuations at monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks exhibit a linear dependence on the number of ions for energy deposits up to 661.7 keV, consistent with previous LUX measurements between 2 and 16 keV with 3H. We highlight similarities in liquid xenon recombination for electronic and nuclear recoils with a comparison of recombination fluctuations measured with low-energy calibration data.

  14. Emergence in Elderly Patient Undergoing General Anesthesia with Xenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sanfilippo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is a consensus that the postoperative cognitive function is impaired in elderly patients after general anaesthesia, and such category patient takes more time to recover. Xenon is a noble gas with anesthetic properties mediated by antagonism of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. With a minimum alveolar concentration of 0.63, xenon is intended for maintaining hypnosis with 30% oxygen. The fast recovery after xenon anaesthesia was hypothesized to be advantageous in this scenario. Case Presentation. We report the case of 99-year-old woman who underwent sigmoid colon carcinoma resection with colorectal anastomosis. We carried out the induction phase by propofol, oxygen, fentanil, and rocuronium bromide, and then we proceeded to a rapid sequence endotracheal intubation consequently. The patient was monitored by IBP, NIBP, ECG, cardiac frequency, respiratory rate, capnometry, TOF Guard, blood gas analysis, and BIS. For maintenance we administrated oxygen, remifentanil, rocuronium bromide, and xenon gas 60–65%. Shortly after the end of surgery the patients started an autonomous respiratory activity, and a high BIS level was also recorded. Decision was made by our team to proceed into the emergence phase. The residual neuromuscular block was antagonized by sugammadex, modified Aldrete score was implicated, and we got our patient fully awake without any cognitive dysfunction or delirium. Conclusion. The rapid emergence to full orientation in very elderly patient who had been anesthetized by xenon shows concordance to the high BIS values and the clinical signs of the depth of anesthesia.

  15. The next generation dark matter hunter: XENON1T status and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzo A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The XENON Dark Matter Experiment has been ongoing at LNGS since 2005 with the goal of searching for dark matter WIMPs with liquid xenon as target and detector material. With detectors of increasing target mass and decreasing background, the XENON program has achieved competitive limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction couplings, but also on axions and axion like particles. With the start of the next generation experiment, XENON1T expected in 2015, XENON Dark Matter Experiment will continue to lead field of dark matter direct detection. XENON1T will be the first experiment to use multi-tons of liquid xenon in a time projection chamber and is designed to achieve two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than the current best limits. I will review the status of construction and the scientific goals of XENON1T.

  16. Xenon and isoflurane improved biventricular function during right ventricular ischemia and reperfusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, M.; Roehl, A.B.; Baumert, J.H.; Bleilevens, C.; Fischer, S.; Steendijk, P.; Rossaint, R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although anesthetics have some cardioprotective properties, these benefits are often counterbalanced by their negative inotropic effects. Xenon, on the other hand, does not influence myocardial contractility. Thus, xenon may be a superior treatment for the maintenance of global hemodynam

  17. Plutonium-244 in the early solar system and xenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, P.K. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville (United States). Dept. of Chem. Eng.; Myers, W.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville (United States). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1995-06-01

    Isotopic compositions of the anomalous xenon components, such as the so-called xenon-H L and the s-type xenon, can be explained in terms of a two-component model in which they are regarded as representing the isotopic composition of a mixture of the {sup 244}Pu fission xenon component and a trapped xenon component, whose isotopic composition resembles that of the atmospheric xenon, but is often markedly altered by a combined effect of (a) mass-fractionation, (b) spallation and (c) neutron-capture reactions caused primarily by the 10 keV (stellar temperature) neutrons. (orig.)

  18. Hypersatellite and satellite transitions in xenon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilakovac, K.; Vesković, M.; Horvat, V.; Kauić, S.

    1990-10-01

    Decay of double-K-shell-vacancy states in xenon atoms, created in the decay of 131Cs, was investigated. The measurements were performed with a pair of germanium detectors, a fast-slow coincidence system, and a three-parameter pulse-height analyzer. In the analysis of the two-dimensional E1-E2 spectrum, improved least-squares routines were applied. The following results were derived: the probability of creation of a double K-shell vacancy per 131Cs decay, PKK=(1.48+/-0.35)×10-5 the hypersatellite energy shifts Δh(Kα)=(653+/-20) eV, Δh(Kβ1)=(834+/-39) eV, and Δh(Kβ2)=(903+/-81) eV; the average values of the satellite energy shifts due to the presence of an L3- or L2-shell spectator vacancy Δs(KαL-1)=(80+/-15) eV, Δs(Kβ1L-1)=(169+/-34) eV, and Δs(Kβ2L-1)=(261+/-81) eV; the intensity ratios of the hypersatellite transitions, I(Kαh2)/I(Kαh1)=0.94+/-0.18, I(Kβh1)/I(Kαh1)=0.36+/-0.06, and I(Kβh2)/ I(Kαh1)=0.09+/-0.04 the intensity ratios of the satellite transitions I(Kα2L-1)/I(Kα1L-1)=0.44+/-0.10 and 0.44+/-0.09 for an L3 and L2 spectator vacancy, respectively; and the intensity ratios of some other satellite transitions.

  19. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within...

  20. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within the $...

  1. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalou...

  2. Focal cerebral ischemia measured by the intra-arterial 133xenon method. Limitations of 2-dimensional blood flow measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyhøj Olsen, T; Larsen, B; Bech Skriver, E;

    1981-01-01

    with infarcts involving cortical surface structures were included in the study. Eleven such patients were found among 43 consecutive patients with completed stroke, all investigated with CT-scan. The blood supply to the infarcted areas was evaluated using 3 different approaches: 1) The first minute washout...... of 133 xenon (rCBF), 2) the initial distribution of isotope during the first 5 sec and 3) the cumulated counts recorded during 15 min. Compton scatter and the "look through phenomenon" were responsible for the majority of counts recorded from the infarcted areas and the blood flow recorded was found...... to be grossly overestimated and much more influenced by the blood flow in the surroundings than in the ischemic area itself. However, using the 3 approaches, infarcted areas were always disclosed by our equipment. It is concluded that 2-dimensional isotope technique is not reliable for quantifying focal...

  3. Focal cerebral ischemia measured by the intra-arterial 133xenon method. Limitations of 2-dimensional blood flow measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyhøj Olsen, T; Larsen, B; Bech Skriver, E;

    1981-01-01

    of 133 xenon (rCBF), 2) the initial distribution of isotope during the first 5 sec and 3) the cumulated counts recorded during 15 min. Compton scatter and the "look through phenomenon" were responsible for the majority of counts recorded from the infarcted areas and the blood flow recorded was found...... to be grossly overestimated and much more influenced by the blood flow in the surroundings than in the ischemic area itself. However, using the 3 approaches, infarcted areas were always disclosed by our equipment. It is concluded that 2-dimensional isotope technique is not reliable for quantifying focal...... with infarcts involving cortical surface structures were included in the study. Eleven such patients were found among 43 consecutive patients with completed stroke, all investigated with CT-scan. The blood supply to the infarcted areas was evaluated using 3 different approaches: 1) The first minute washout...

  4. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  5. Direct observation of bubble-assisted electroluminescence in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Erdal, E; Chepel, V; Rappaport, M L; Vartsky, D; Breskin, A

    2015-01-01

    Bubble formation in liquid xenon underneath a Thick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM) electrode immersed in liquid xenon was observed with a CCD camera. With voltage across the THGEM, the appearance of bubbles was correlated with that of electroluminescence signals induced by ionization electrons from alpha-particle tracks. This confirms recent indirect evidence that the observed photons are due to electroluminescence within a xenon vapor layer trapped under the electrode. The bubbles seem to emerge spontaneously due to heat flow from 300K into the liquid, or in a controlled manner, by locally boiling the liquid with resistive wires. Controlled bubble formation resulted in energy resolution of {\\sigma}/E~7.5% for ~6,000 ionization electrons. The phenomenon could pave ways towards the conception of large-volume 'local dual-phase' noble-liquid TPCs.

  6. Liquid Hole Multipliers: bubble-assisted electroluminescence in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Arazi, L; Coimbra, A E C; Rappaport, M L; Vartsky, D; Chepel, V; Breskin, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we discuss the mechanism behind the large electroluminescence signals observed at relatively low electric fields in the holes of a Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) electrode immersed in liquid xenon. We present strong evidence that the scintillation light is generated in xenon bubbles trapped below the THGEM holes. The process is shown to be remarkably stable over months of operation, providing - under specific thermodynamic conditions - energy resolution similar to that of present dual-phase liquid xenon experiments. The observed mechanism may serve as the basis for the development of Liquid Hole Multipliers (LHMs), capable of producing local charge-induced electroluminescence signals in large-volume single-phase noble-liquid detectors for dark matter and neutrino physics experiments.

  7. Calibration of a Liquid Xenon Detector with Kr-83m

    CERN Document Server

    Kastens, L W; Manzur, A; McKinsey, D N

    2009-01-01

    We report the preparation of a Kr-83m source and its subsequent use in calibrating a liquid xenon detector. Kr-83m atoms were produced through the decay of Rb-83 atoms trapped in zeolite molecular sieve and were then introduced into liquid xenon. Decaying Kr-83m nuclei were detected through liquid xenon scintillation. Conversion electrons with energies of 9.4 keV and 32.1 keV from the decay of Kr-83m were both observed. This calibration source will allow the characterization of the scintillation and ionization response of noble liquid detectors at low energies, highly valuable for the search for WIMP dark matter. Kr-83m may also be useful for measuring fluid flow dynamics, both to understand purification in noble liquid-based particle detectors, as well as for studies of classical and quantum turbulence in superfluid helium.

  8. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  9. Dark matter scattering on electrons: Accurate calculations of atomic excitations and implications for the DAMA and XENON experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Dzuba, Vladimir; Flambaum, Victor; Gribakin, Gleb; Pospelov, Maxim; Stadnik, Yevgeny

    2017-01-01

    Atoms can become ionised during the scattering of a slow, heavy particle off a bound electron. Such an interaction involving leptophilic WIMP dark matter is a potential explanation for the anomalous 9 sigma annual modulation in the DAMA direct detection experiment. We show that due to non-analytic, cusp-like behavior of Coulomb functions close to the nucleus leads to an effective atomic structure enhancement. Crucially, we also show that electron relativistic effects are important. With this in mind, we perform high-accuracy relativistic calculations of atomic ionisation. We scan the parameter space: the DM mass, the mediator mass, and the effective coupling strength, to determine if there is any region that could potentially explain the DAMA signal. While we find that the modulation fraction of all events with energy deposition above 2 keV in NaI can be quite significant, reaching 50%, the relevant parts of the parameter space are excluded by the XENON10 and XENON100 experiments.

  10. Detection of anomalous events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  11. Optically Anomalous Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Optical anomalies in crystals are puzzles that collectively constituted the greatest unsolved problems in crystallography in the 19th Century. The most common anomaly is a discrepancy between a crystal’s symmetry as determined by its shape or by X-ray analysis, and that determined by monitoring the polarization state of traversing light. These discrepancies were perceived as a great impediment to the development of the sciences of crystals on the basis of Curie’s Symmetry Principle, the grand organizing idea in the physical sciences to emerge in the latter half of the 19th Century. Optically Anomalous Crystals begins with an historical introduction covering the contributions of Brewster, Biot, Mallard, Brauns, Tamman, and many other distinguished crystallographers. From this follows a tutorial in crystal optics. Further chapters discuss the two main mechanisms of optical dissymmetry: 1. the piezo-optic effect, and 2. the kinetic ordering of atoms. The text then tackles complex, inhomogeneous crystals, and...

  12. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are no

  13. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Mathew; G A Adebayo

    2011-12-01

    We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at = 3.32 Å. It was observed that the attraction of the molecules in the liquid surface which produces a resistance to penetration decreases with temperature. This may be attributed to the greater average separation of molecules at higher temperature.

  14. Xenon purity analysis for EXO-200 via mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dobi, A; Slutsky, S; Yen, Y -R; Aharmin, B; Auger, M; Barbeau, P S; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Cleveland, B; Conley, R; Cook, J; Cook, S; Counts, I; Craddock, W; Daniels, T; Davis, C G; Davis, J; deVoe, R; Dixit, M; Dolinski, M J; Donato, K; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Fierlinger, P; Franco, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Green, C; Hagemann, C; Hall, K; Hallman, D; Hargrove, C; Herrin, S; Hughes, M; Hodgson, J; Juget, F; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K; Leonard, D S; Lutter, G; Mackay, D; MacLellan, R; Marino, M; Mong, B; Díez, M Montero; Morgan, P; Müller, A R; Neilson, R; Odian, A; O'Sullivan, K; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Pushkin, K; Rivas, A; Rollin, E; Rowson, P C; Sabourov, A; Sinclair, D; Skarpaas, K; Stekhanov, V; Strickland, V; Swift, M; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Vuilleumier, J -M; Weber, M; Wichoski, U; Wodin, J; Wright, J D; Yang, L

    2011-01-01

    We describe purity measurements of the natural and enriched xenon stockpiles used by the EXO-200 double beta decay experiment based on a mass spectrometry technique. The sensitivity of the spectrometer is enhanced by several orders of magnitude by the presence of a liquid nitrogen cold trap, and many impurity species of interest can be detected at the level of one part-per-billion or better. We have used the technique to screen the EXO-200 xenon before, during, and after its use in our detector, and these measurements have proven useful. This is the first application of the cold trap mass spectrometry technique to an operating physics experiment.

  15. Scintillation yield of liquid xenon at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)], E-mail: ueshima@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Abe, K.; Iida, T.; Ikeda, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y.; Minamino, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nakajima, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamashita, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kaneyuki, K. [Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Doke, T. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8555 (Japan)] (and others)

    2008-09-01

    The intensity of scintillation light emission from liquid xenon at room temperature was measured. The scintillation light yield at 1{sup 0}C was measured to be 0.64{+-}0.02 (stat.) {+-}0.06 (sys.) of that at -100{sup 0}C. Using the reported light yield at -100{sup 0}C (46 photons/keV), the measured light yield at 1{sup 0}C corresponds to 29 photons/keV. This result shows that liquid xenon scintillator provides high light yield even at room temperature.

  16. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; DeBoef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality. PMID:28106110

  17. Calculation of Minimum-Detectable-Concentration Levels of Radioxenon Isotopes Using the PNNL ARSA System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2006-03-11

    Measurement of xenon fission product isotopes is a key element in the global network being established to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The automated Radio-xenon Analyzer/Sampler (ARSA), built by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, can detect 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe via a beta-gamma counting system. Due to the variable background and sources of these four radio-xenon isotopes, it is important to have as sensitive a detection system as possible and to quantify the Minimum-Detectable-Concentrations (MDC) that such a system will be able to detect to preclude false negative and false positive results. From data obtained from IAR in Germany MDC values for 133Xe were well below the 1 mBq/SCMA as required by the PTS for the Comprehensive Test BAn Treaty [WGB TL-11,1999].

  18. Xenon instability study of large core Monte Carlo calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanova, E.V. [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPHi' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorodkov, S.S.

    2016-09-15

    One of the goals of neutronic calculations of large cores may be self-consistent distribution of equilibrium xenon through the reactor core. In deterministic calculations such self consistency is relatively simply achieved with the help of additional outer iterations by xenon, which can increase several times solution run time. But in stochastic calculation of large cores such increase is utterly undesirable, since even without these outer iterations it demands modeling of billion of histories, which in case of complicated large core may take about a day of 100 processors work. In addition the unavoidable statistical uncertainty here plays role of transient process, which excites xenon oscillations. In this work the rise of such oscillations and the way of their overcoming with the help of hybrid stochastic/deterministic calculation is studied. It is proposed to make at first single static Monte Carlo calculation of given core and to receive multi-group mesh cell characteristics for future use in operative code. This one will evaluate xenon distribution through the core, which will be equilibrium for deterministic solution and substantially close to equilibrium Monte Carlo solution, paid with enormous computing cost.

  19. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Ion Propulsion System Information Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencil, Eirc S.; Benson, Scott W.

    2008-01-01

    This document is a guide to New Frontiers mission proposal teams. The document describes the development and status of the NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system (IPS) technology, its application to planetary missions, and the process anticipated to transition NEXT to the first flight mission.

  20. Charge States of Krypton and Xenon in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsler, Peter; Fludra, Andrzej; Giunta, Alessandra

    2017-09-01

    We calculate charge state distributions of Kr and Xe in a model for two different types of solar wind using the effective ionization and recombination rates provided from the OPEN_ADAS data base. The charge states of heavy elements in the solar wind are essential for estimating the efficiency of Coulomb drag in the inner corona. We find that xenon ions experience particularly low Coulomb drag from protons in the inner corona, comparable to the notoriously weak drag of protons on helium ions. It has been found long ago that helium in the solar wind can be strongly depleted near interplanetary current sheets, whereas coronal mass ejecta are sometimes strongly enriched in helium. We argue that if the extraordinary variability of the helium abundance in the solar wind is due to inefficient Coulomb drag, the xenon abundance must vary strongly. In fact, a secular decrease of the solar wind xenon abundance relative to the other heavier noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) has been postulated based on a comparison of noble gases in recently irradiated and ancient samples of ilmenite in the lunar regolith. We conclude that decreasing solar activity and decreasing frequency of coronal mass ejections over the solar lifetime might be responsible for a secularly decreasing abundance of xenon in the solar wind.

  1. PWR core stablity aganst xenon-induced spatial power oscillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H.J.; Han, K.I. (Korea Advanced Energy Research Inst., Seoul (Republic of Korea))

    1982-06-01

    Stability of a PWR core against xenon-induced axial power oscillation is studied using one-dimensional xenon transient analysis code, DD1D, that has been developed and verified at KAERI. Analyzed by DD1D utilizing the Kori Unit 1 design and operating data is the sensitivity of axial stability in a PWR core to the changes in core physical parameters including core power level, moderator temperature coefficient, core inlet temperature, doppler power coefficient and core average burnup. Through the sensitivity study the Kori Unit 1 core is found to be stable against axial xenon oscillation at the beginning of cycle 1. But, it becomes less stable as burnup progresses, and unstable at the end of cycle. Such a decrease in stability is mainly due to combined effect of changes in axial power distribution, moderator temperature coefficient and doppler power coefficient as core burnup progresses. It is concluded from the stability analysis of the Kori Unit 1 core that design of a large PWR with high power density and increased dimension can not avoid xenon-induced axial power instabilites to some extents, especially at the end of cycle.

  2. Radon removal from gaseous xenon with activated charcoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Hieda, K.; Hiraide, K.; Hirano, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Liu, J.; Martens, K. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nishiie, H.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shinozaki, A. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Ueshima, K.; Umemoto, D. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); and others

    2012-01-01

    Many low background experiments using xenon need to remove radioactive radon to improve their sensitivities. However, no method of continually removing radon from xenon has been described in the literature. We studied a method to remove radon from xenon gas through an activated charcoal trap. From our measurements we infer a linear relationship between the mean propagation velocity v{sub Rn} of radon and v{sub Xe} of xenon in the trap with v{sub Rn}/v{sub Xe}=(0.96{+-}0.10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} at -85 Degree-Sign C. As the mechanism for radon removal in this charcoal trap is its decay, knowledge of this parameter allows us to design an efficient radon removal system for the XMASS experiment. The verification of this system found that it reduces radon by a factor of 0.07, which is in line with its expected average retention time of 14.8 days for radon.

  3. Static Adsorption of Xenon on ACF at 257 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The static adsorption of xenon on active carbon fiber (ACF) at 257 K was measured with ASAP2010 specific surface area and pore diameter distribution instrument by changing the working gas from nitrogen to xenon. Compared with grain activated carbon (GAC), the results were as follows: (1) The adsorption performance of Viscose-based ACF (VACF-As) was the best among all absorbents tested. VACF-A3 was the superior xenon absorbent. The performance of pitch-based ACF (PACF-Cs) approached that of GAC, (2) Due to the difference of aperture distribution, the adsorption performances of ACF with different radics were different under the same experiment conditions even though the specific surface area was similar, (3) There were some differences of adsorptive capacity among ACF absorbents which had the same radic, however there was not definite relationship between their specific surface area and adsorptive capacity, (4) The adsorption of xenon on all kinds of ACF agrees with Langmuir equation, (5) The adsorptive curves can be fitted with a binomial equation.

  4. On the behavior of solutions of xenon in liquid n-alkanes: solubility of xenon in n-pentane and n-hexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifácio, Rui P M F; Martins, Luís F G; McCabe, Clare; Filipe, Eduardo J M

    2010-12-09

    The solubility of xenon in liquid n-pentane and n-hexane has been studied experimentally, theoretically, and by computer simulation. Measurements of the solubility are reported for xenon + n-pentane as a function of temperature from 254 to 305 K. The uncertainty in the experimental data is less than 0.15%. The thermodynamic functions of solvation such as the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of solvation have been calculated from Henry's law coefficients for xenon + n-pentane solutions and also for xenon + n-hexane, which were reported in previous work. The results provide a further example of the similarity between the xenon + n-alkane interaction and the n-alkane + n-alkane interactions. Using the SAFT-VR approach we were able to quantitatively predict the experimental solubility for xenon in n-pentane and semiquantitatively that of xenon in n-hexane using simple Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules to describe the unlikely interaction. Henry's constants at infinite dilution for xenon + n-pentane and xenon + n-hexane were also calculated by Monte Carlo simulation using a united atom force field to describe the n-alkane and the Widom test particle insertion method.

  5. Direct Dark Matter Search with the XENON100 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yuan

    Dark matter, a non-luminous, non-baryonic matter, is thought to constitute 23 % of the matter-energy components in the universe today. Except for its gravitational effects, the existence of dark matter has never been confirmed by any other means and its nature remains unknown. If a hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) were in thermal equilibrium in the early universe, it could have a relic abundance close to that of dark matter today, which provides a promising particle candidate of dark matter. Minimal Super-Symmetric extensions to the standard model predicts a stable particle with mass in the range 10 GeV/c2 to 1000 GeV/c2, and spin-independent cross-section with ordinary matter nucleon sigmax power of liquid xenon, as well as a 99 kg liquid xenon active veto, the electromagnetic radiation background is greatly suppressed. By utilizing the difference of (S2/S1) between electronic recoil and nuclear recoil, the expected WIMP signature, a small nuclear recoil energy deposition, could be discriminated from electronic recoil background with high efficiency. XENON100 achieved the lowest background rate (< 2.2 x 10--2 events/kg/day/keV) in the dark matter search region (< 40 keV) among all direct dark matter detectors. With 11.2 days of data, XENON100 already sets the world's best spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section limit of 2.7 x 10--44 cm2 at WIMP mass 50 GeV/c 2. With 100.9 days of data, XENON100 excludes WIMP-nucleon cross-section above 7.0 x 10--45 cm2 for a WIMP mass of 50 GeV/c2 at 90% confidence level.

  6. Practice of centrifugal stable isotope separation for experiments in neutrino physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhomirov, A.V. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Results of xenon 136, germanium 76 and chromium 50 enrichment with the use of centrifuge cascades are presented. The isotopes are meant for use in experiments in neutrino physics. Tens of kilograms of these isotopes have been produced in Russia, with an enrichment level of an order of magnitude or higher with respect to their natural content. Practical possibilities of using the centrifugal technique both for neutrino investigation and other applications are outlined. 2 tabs., 9 refs.

  7. Evaluation of pulmonary function using single-breath-hold dual-energy computed tomography with xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoyama, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kosuke; Saito, Yuriko; Mikami, Shintaro; Moriyama, Gaku; Yanagita, Hisami; Watanabe, Wataru; Otani, Katharina; Honda, Norinari; Uematsu, Kazutsugu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (xenon-enhanced CT) can provide lung ventilation maps that may be useful for assessing structural and functional abnormalities of the lung. Xenon-enhanced CT has been performed using a multiple-breath-hold technique during xenon washout. We recently developed xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique to assess ventilation. We sought to evaluate whether xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique correlates with pulmonary function testing (PFT) results. Twenty-six patients, including 11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, underwent xenon-enhanced CT and PFT. Three of the COPD patients underwent xenon-enhanced CT before and after bronchodilator treatment. Images from xenon-CT were obtained by dual-source CT during a breath-hold after a single vital-capacity inspiration of a xenon–oxygen gas mixture. Image postprocessing by 3-material decomposition generated conventional CT and xenon-enhanced images. Low-attenuation areas on xenon images matched low-attenuation areas on conventional CT in 21 cases but matched normal-attenuation areas in 5 cases. Volumes of Hounsfield unit (HU) histograms of xenon images correlated moderately and highly with vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC), respectively (r = 0.68 and 0.85). Means and modes of histograms weakly correlated with VC (r = 0.39 and 0.38), moderately with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (r = 0.59 and 0.56), weakly with the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (r = 0.46 and 0.42), and moderately with the ratio of FEV1 to its predicted value (r = 0.64 and 0.60). Mode and volume of histograms increased in 2 COPD patients after the improvement of FEV1 with bronchodilators. Inhalation of xenon gas caused no adverse effects. Xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique depicted functional abnormalities not detectable on thin-slice CT. Mode, mean, and volume of HU histograms of xenon images

  8. Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC

    CERN Multimedia

    \\textbf{Double beta decay without neutrino emission (0$\\upsilon$2$\\beta$)}, is the only process that may indicate wether neutrinos and antineutrinos are different or the same particle. It may happen for a dozen of nuclides. In this case neutrino would be the only known completely neutral fermion. However, the decay is expected to be extremely rare, much rarer that the already very rare (2$\\upsilon$2$\\beta$). In the latter two neutrinos and two electron are emitted, while only two electrons are emitted in the (0$\\upsilon$2$\\beta$) decay. Consequently, the sum of the electron energies have a well defined and known value in the latter case, while in the former has a continuous spectrum. The main experimental parameters are then the background index, BI, which is the number of counts due to background per unit energy interval (keV), unit isotope mass (kg) and unit live time (yr) in the known region of interest and the energy resolution (∆$\\textit{E}$ Full With Half Maximum). Indeed the total background for a gi...

  9. Understanding radioxenon isotopical ratios originating from radiopharmaceutical facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Ringbom, A.; Bowyer, T. W.; Becker, A.; de Geer, L.-E.; Nikkinen, M.; Payne, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    It was recently shown that radiopharmaceutical facilities (RPF) are major contributors to the general background of 133Xe and other xenon isotopes both in the northern and southern hemisphere. To distinguish a nuclear explosion signal from releases from civil nuclear facilities, not only the activity concentrations but also the ratios of the four different CTBT relevant radioxenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) have to be well understood. First measurements taken recently in and around two of the world's largest RPF's: NTP at Pelindaba, South Africa and IRE at Fleurus, Belgium have been presented. At both sites, also stack samples were taken in close cooperation with the facility operators. The radioxenon in Belgium could be classified in four classes: the normal European background (133Xe activity between 0 - 5 mBq/m3) on one hand and then the samples where all four isotopes were detected with 133mXe/131mXe > 1. In northern South Africa the Pelindaba RPF is in practice the sole source of radioxenon. It generated a background of 133Xe at the measurement site some 230 km to the west of the RPF of 0 - 5 mBq/m3. In the cases where the air from the Pelindaba facility reached the measurement site directly and in a short time period, the 133Xe was higher, also 135Xe was present and in some samples 133mXe as well. The ratios of the activity concentrations of 135Xe/133Xe vs. 133mXe/131mXe (Multiple Isotope Ratio Plot - MIRC) have been analysed. For both facilities, the possible theoretical ratio's for different scenarios were calculated with the information available and compared with the measurements. It was found that there is an excess of 131mXe present in the European samples compared to theoretical calculations. A similar excess has also been seen in samples measured in northern America. In South Africa, neither the environmental samples nor the stack ones contained 131mXe at measurable levels. This can probably be explained by different processes and

  10. Dark matter sensitivity of multi-ton liquid xenon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schumann, Marc; Bütikofer, Lukas; Kish, Alexander; Selvi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of multi ton-scale time projection chambers using a liquid xenon target, e.g., the proposed DARWIN instrument, to spin-independent and spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering interactions. Taking into account realistic backgrounds from the detector itself as well as from neutrinos, we examine the impact of exposure, energy threshold, background rejection efficiency and energy resolution on the dark matter sensitivity. With an exposure of 200 t x y and assuming detector parameters which have been already demonstrated experimentally, spin-independent cross sections as low as $2.5 \\times 10^{-49}$ cm$^2$ can be probed for WIMP masses around 40 GeV/$c^2$. Additional improvements in terms of background rejection and exposure will further increase the sensitivity, while the ultimate WIMP science reach will be limited by neutrinos scattering coherently off the xenon nuclei.

  11. First Dark Matter Results from the XENON100 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Arneodo, F; Askin, A; Baudis, L; Behrens, A; Brown, E; Cardoso, J M R; Choi, B; Cline, D B; Fattori, S; Ferella, A D; Giboni, K -L; Hugenberg, K; Kish, A; Lam, C W; Lamblin, J; Lang, R F; Lim, K E; Lopes, J A M; Undagoitia, T Marrodán; Mei, Y; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orrigo, S E A; Pantic, E; Plante, G; Ribeiro, A C C; Santorelli, R; Santos, J M F dos; Schumann, M; Shagin, P; Teymourian, A; Thers, D; Tziaferi, E; Wang, H; Weinheimer, C

    2010-01-01

    The XENON100 experiment, in operation at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy, is designed to search for dark matter WIMPs scattering off 62 kg of liquid xenon in an ultra-low background dual-phase time projection chamber. In this letter, we present first dark matter results from the analysis of 11.17 live days of non-blind data, acquired in October and November 2009. In the selected fiducial target of 40 kg, and within the pre-defined signal region, we observe no events and hence exclude spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross-sections above 3 x 10^-44 cm^2 for 50 GeV/c^2 WIMPs at 90% confidence level. Below 20 GeV/c^2, this result challenges the interpretation of the CoGeNT or DAMA signals as being due to spin-independent, elastic, light mass WIMP interactions.

  12. Two-photon resonant, stimulated processes in krypton and xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.C.

    1988-11-01

    Both on-axis and conical emissions have been observed following two-photon pumping of the 5p states of krypton and the 6p', 7p, 8p, and 4f states of xenon. In the former case, coherent emissions from the 5p states to the 5s are observed, and in the latter case, many p..-->..s, d..-->..p, and f..-->..d cascade emissions are observed. By analogy to the well-studied alkali and alkaline earth examples, the emissions are discussed in terms of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), stimulated hyper-Raman scattering, and parametric four-wave mixing. The physical processes responsible for the conical emission and for intensity anomalies in the xenon p..-->..s emissions are not understood at present. Interference effects due to coherent cancellation between competing excitation pathways may be occurring. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  13. IR-LAS Measurements of a Pulsed Xenon Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi; Wada, Ryota; Motomura, Hideki; Aono, Masaharu

    As a first step to understand the processes taking place in a pulsed xenon discharge, the temporal behavior of the radial metastable atom distribution in a xenon lamp was measured by IR laser absorption spectroscopy. During the first 10μs after starting the discharge, high electron density and the depletion of the ground state atoms at the center of the discharge brought about an almost flat distribution of the metastable atoms within the half-radius area. Following that, the metastable atom density became higher at the center than outside because of recombination between electrons and ions. After the metastable density increase and following voltage cut off, the metastable density decreases again. Considering the diffusion equation alongside these results, it becomes clear that the decrease of the metastable density is caused by quenching to the resonace level from the metastable level or three-body collisions forming excimers.

  14. Measurements of proportional scintillation in liquid xenon using thin wires

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Goetzke, L W; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Messina, M; Naganoma, J; Plante, G; Rizzo, A; Shagin, P; Wall, R

    2014-01-01

    Proportional scintillation in liquid xenon has a promising application in the field of direct dark matter detection, potentially allowing for simpler, more sensitive detectors. However, knowledge of the basic properties of the phenomenon as well as guidelines for its practical use are currently limited. We report here on measurements of proportional scintillation light emitted in liquid xenon around thin wires. The maximum proportional scintillation gain of $287^{+97}_{-75}$ photons per drift electron was obtained using 10 $\\mu$m diameter gold plated tungsten wire. The thresholds for electron multiplication and proportional scintillation are measured as $725^{+48}_{-139}$ and $412^{+10}_{-133}$ kV/cm, respectively. The threshold for proportional scintillation is in good agreement with a previously published result, while the electron multiplication threshold represents a novel measurement. A complete set of parameters for the practical use of the electron multiplication and proportional scintillation processe...

  15. High Pressure XENON Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Field Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David K. Wehe; Zong He; Glenn K. Knoll

    2004-02-16

    This project explored a new concept for high-pressure xenon ionization chambers by replacing the Frisch grid with coplanar grid electrodes similar to those used in wide bandgap semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers. This work is the first attempt to apply the coplanar grid anode design in a gas ionization chamber in order to achieve to improved energy resolution. Three prototype detectors, two cylindrical and one parallel plate configurations, were built and tested. While the detectors did not demonstrate energy resolutions as good as other high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometers, the results demonstrated that the concept of single polarity charge sending using coplanar grid electrodes will work in a gas detector.

  16. NEXT: R and D towards a xenon high pressure TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, Thorsten [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Sanchez, Federico [IFAE, Barcelona (Spain); Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martin-Albo, Justo; Ball, Markus; Novella, Pau; Monrabal, Francesc; Cervera, Anselmo [IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Garcia Irastorza, Igor [Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    An open question within the Standard Model is the nature of the neutrino. Is it a Majorana or a Dirac particle? The only way to answer this, is the search for neutrino-less double beta decays. Various experimental approaches are investigated for this reason e.g. diodes, bolometers, liquid Xenon. The key points for all of them is the high requirements on the energy resolution to distinguish between the decay with two neutrinos and the neutrino-less decay and the external background suppression. Recently some Spanish groups started a R and D program to investigate the possibility to use a pressurized Xenon TPC with MPGD readout (MM, LEM (GEM)). In the presentation the choice of gaseous Xe is motivated and an overview about the R and D plans is given.

  17. Inelastic scattering of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Pshenichnyuk, I A

    2016-01-01

    We study inelastic interactions of particles with quantized vortices in superfluids by using a semi-classical matter wave theory that is analogous to the Landau two-fluid equations, but allows for the vortex dynamics. The research is motivated by recent experiments on xenon doped helium nanodroplets that show clustering of the impurities along the vortex cores. We numerically simulate the dynamics of trapping and interactions of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluid helium and the obtained results can be extended to scattering of other impurities by quantized vortices. Different energies and impact parameters of incident particles are considered. We show that inelastic scattering is closely linked to the generation of Kelvin waves along a quantized vortex during the interaction even if there is no capture. The capture criterion of an impurity is formulated in terms of the binding energy.

  18. Driving Rabi oscillations at the giant dipole resonance in xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Pabst, Stefan; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) produce short and very intense light pulses in the XUV and x-ray regimes. We investigate the possibility to drive Rabi oscillations in xenon with an intense FEL pulse by using the unusually large dipole strength of the giant-dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR decays within less than 30 as due to its position, which is above the $4d$ ionization threshold. We find that intensities around 10$^{18}$ W/cm$^2$ are required to induce Rabi oscillations with a period comparable to the lifetime. The pulse duration should not exceed 100 as because xenon will be fully ionized within a few lifetimes. Rabi oscillations reveal themselves also in the photoelectron spectrum in form of Autler-Townes splittings extending over several tens of electronvolt.

  19. Transition from linear to nonlinear sputtering of solid xenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen;

    1995-01-01

    Self-sputtering of solid xenon has been studied with molecular dynamics simulations as a model system for the transition from dominantly linear to strongly nonlinear effects. The simulation covered the projectile energy range from 20 to 750 eV. Within a relatively narrow range from 30 to 250 eV, ......V, nonlinear features such as high collision densities in the sputtering volume, amorphization of the crystalline structure, and an enhanced emission of low-energy atoms occur gradually....

  20. Xenon excimer emission from multicapillary discharges in direct current mode

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Rahaman, Hasibur; Nam, Sang Hoon; Giapis, Konstantinos P.; Iberler, Marcus; Jacoby, Joachim; Frank, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microdischarges in xenon have been generated in a pressure range of 400–1013 mbar with a fixed flow rate of 100 sccm. These microdischarges are obtained from three metallic capillary tubes in series for excimer emission. Total discharge voltage is thrice as large as that of a single capillary discharge tube at current levels of up to 12 mA. Total spectral irradiance of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission also increases significantly compared to that of the single capillary discharge. Further, t...

  1. Shear Thinning Near the Critical Point of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu

    2008-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of reduced shear rate: 10(exp -3) critical fluctuations. The measurements had a temperature resolution of 0.01 mK and were conducted in microgravity aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity. The viscometer measured the drag on a delicate nickel screen as it oscillated in the xenon at amplitudes 3 mu,m 430 mu, and frequencies 1 Hz critical scaling. At high frequencies, (omega tau)(exp 2) > gamma-dot tau, C(sub gamma) depends also on both x(sub 0) and omega. The data were compared with numerical calculations based on the Carreau-Yasuda relation for complex fluids: eta(gamma-dot)/eta(0)=[1+A(sub gamma)|gamma-dot tau|](exp - chi(sub eta)/3+chi(sub eta)), where chi(sub eta) =0.069 is the critical exponent for viscosity and mode-coupling theory predicts A(sub gamma) =0.121. For xenon we find A(sub gamma) =0.137 +/- 0.029, in agreement with the mode coupling value. Remarkably, the xenon data close to the critical temperature T(sub c) were independent of the cooling rate (both above and below T(sub c) and these data were symmetric about T(sub c) to within a temperature scale factor. The scale factors for the magnitude of the oscillator s response differed from those for the oscillator's phase; this suggests that the surface tension of the two-phase domains affected the drag on the screen below T(sub c).

  2. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Baudis, L; Kish, A; Manalaysay, A; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Schumann, M

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 2-30 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and 7-Be neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ~2x10^-48 cm^2 and WIMP masses around 50 GeV, for an assumed 99.5% rejectio...

  3. 37 Ar Calibration of the Large Underground Xenon Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Elizabeth; LUX Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LUX collaboration released its 332 live-day WIMP search result in June 2016. Besides WIMPs, there are several other rare particles to search for using two-phase xenon detectors, such as axion-like pseudoscalars, axions, and electrophilic dark matter. All of these proposed particles interact with xenon via electron recoils at low energy. Also, the neutrino magnetic moment can be searched for by examining the rates of neutrino-electron scattering at low energy. Therefore, understanding xenon's response in this low-energy regime is vitally important. 37Ar is an ideal source for calibrating a detector at these low energies, because it decays via electron capture (EC) and releases x-rays at two energies: 2.8 keV due to EC from the K-shell and 0.27 keV due to EC from the L-shell. Additionally, 37Ar can be used to precisely study recombination fluctuations at a specific energy in the WIMP region of interest. Recombination fluctuations limit electron recoil discrimination efficiency, so understanding how these fluctuations change with electric drift field is important to all LUX analysis. This talk will explain the motivation, creation, deployment, and results of the 37Ar source in LUX over a wide range of drift fields.

  4. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, Robert A. [Constellation Technology Corporation, 7887 Bryan Dairy Road, Suite 100, Largo, FL 33777 (United States)], E-mail: austin@contech.com

    2007-08-21

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas (Z=54), moderate densities ({approx}0.3-0.5 g/cm{sup 3}) and good energy resolution (2-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990s, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Current applications for Constellation's detectors are principally in the area of defense (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Advanced Spectroscopic Portals), but as awareness of this technology grows, it will surely find applications in a much expanded range of fields.

  5. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert A.

    2007-08-01

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas ( Z=54), moderate densities (˜0.3-0.5 g/cm 3) and good energy resolution (2-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990s, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Current applications for Constellation's detectors are principally in the area of defense (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Advanced Spectroscopic Portals), but as awareness of this technology grows, it will surely find applications in a much expanded range of fields.

  6. Intermittent exposure to xenon protects against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Jia

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics, especially gentamicin, are widely used to treat Gram-negative infections due to their efficacy and low cost. Nevertheless the use of gentamicin is limited by its major side effect, nephrotoxicity. Xenon (Xe provided substantial organoprotective effects in acute injury of the brain and the heart and protected against renal ischemic-reperfusion injury. In this study, we investigated whether xenon could protect against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were intermittently exposed to either 70% xenon or 70% nitrogen (N2 balanced with 30% oxygen before and during gentamicin administration at a dose of 100 mg/kg for 7 days to model gentamicin-induced kidney injury. We observed that intermittent exposure to Xe provided morphological and functional renoprotection, which was characterized by attenuation of renal tubular damage, apoptosis, and oxidative stress, but not a reduction in inflammation. We also found that Xe pretreatment upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α and its downstream effector vascular endothelial growth factor, but not HIF-1α. With regard to the three HIF prolyl hydroxylases, Xe pretreatment upregulated prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein-2 (PHD2, suppressed PHD1, and had no influence on PHD3 in the rat kidneys. Pretreatment with Xe also increased the expression of miR-21, a microRNA known to have anti-apoptotic effects. These results support Xe renoprotection against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  7. NMR investigations of surfaces and interfaces using spin-polarized xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaede, Holly Caroline [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-07-01

    129Xe NMR is potentially useful for the investigation of material surfaces, but has been limited to high surface area samples in which sufficient xenon can be loaded to achieve acceptable signal to noise ratios. In Chapter 2 conventional 129Xe NMR is used to study a high surface area polymer, a catalyst, and a confined liquid crystal to determine the topology of these systems. Further information about the spatial proximity of different sites of the catalyst and liquid crystal systems is determined through two dimensional exchange NMR in Chapter 3. Lower surface area systems may be investigated with spin-polarized xenon, which may be achieved through optical pumping and spin exchange. Optically polarized xenon can be up to 105times more sensitive than thermally polarized xenon. In Chapter 4 highly polarized xenon is used to examine the surface of poly(acrylonitrile) and the formation of xenon clathrate hydrates. An attractive use of polarized xenon is as a magnetization source in cross polarization experiments. Cross polarization from adsorbed polarized xenon may allow detection of surface nuclei with drastic enhancements. A non-selective low field thermal mixing technique is used to enhance the 13C signal of CO2 of xenon occluded in solid CO2 by a factor of 200. High-field cross polarization from xenon to proton on the surface of high surface area polymers has enabled signal enhancements of ~1,000. These studies, together with investigations of the efficiency of the cross polarization process from polarized xenon, are discussed in Chapter 5. Another use of polarized xenon is as an imaging contrast agent in systems that are not compatible with traditional contrast agents. The resolution attainable with this method is determined through images of structured phantoms in Chapter 6.

  8. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for sevoflurane and xenon at normothermia and hypothermia in newborn pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Dingley, J; Elstad, M; Scull-Brown, E; Steen, P A; Thoresen, M

    2013-05-01

    Neuroprotection from therapeutic hypothermia increases when combined with the anaesthetic gas xenon in animal studies. A clinical feasibility study of the combined treatment has been successfully undertaken in asphyxiated human term newborns. It is unknown whether xenon alone would be sufficient for sedation during hypothermia eliminating or reducing the need for other sedative or analgesic infusions in ventilated sick infants. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of xenon is unknown in any neonatal species. Eight newborn pigs were anaesthetised with sevoflurane alone and then sevoflurane plus xenon at two temperatures. Pigs were randomised to start at either 38.5°C or 33.5°C. MAC for sevoflurane was determined using the claw clamp technique at the preset body temperature. For xenon MAC determination, a background of 0.5 MAC sevoflurane was used, and 60% xenon added to the gas mixture. The relationship between sevoflurane and xenon MAC is assumed to be additive. Xenon concentrations were changed in 5% steps until a positive clamp reaction was noted. Pigs' temperature was changed to the second target, and two MAC determinations for sevoflurane and 0.5 MAC sevoflurane plus xenon were repeated. MAC for sevoflurane was 4.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.65-4.50] at 38.5°C and 3.05% (CI: 2.63-3.48) at 33.5°C, a significant reduction. MAC for xenon was 120% at 38.5°C and 116% at 33.5°C, not different. In newborn swine sevoflurane, MAC was temperature dependent, while xenon MAC was independent of temperature. There was large individual variability in xenon MAC, from 60% to 120%. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  9. Anomalous carbon-isotope ratios in nonvolatile organic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, I R; Nissenbaum, A

    1966-08-12

    Organic mats are associated with sulfur deposits in Upper Pleistocene sand ridges of the coastal plain of southern Israel; black, brittle, and non-volatile, they show parallel layering but no other apparent cellular structure. Two independent carbon-14 determinations yielded ages of 27,750+/-500 and 31,370+/-1400 years. Four carbon-13:carbon-12 determinations fell within the range deltaC(13) =-82.5 to -89.3 per mille relative to the PDB standard; these appear to be the lowest values yet reported for naturally occurring high-molecular-weight organic material. The origin of the carbon is probably complex; it must have passed through at least one biologic cycle before final deposition.

  10. The afterglow characteristics of xenon pulsed plasma for mercury-free fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi; Kurokawa, Hisayoshi; Aono, Masaharu; Ninomiya, Hideki

    2000-03-01

    In this study, the spectroscopic characteristics of radiations from xenon pulsed plasma are measured experimentally as a study on a mercury-free fluorescent lamp. Each radiation waveform has two peaks and they vary according to the inner diameter of lamp and the pressure of xenon as follows: (a) As the inner diameter of lamps increases, the afterglow radiation, that is the second peak, decays faster. (b) As the xenon pressure increases the first peak of radiation just after the start of discharge decreases and the afterglow increases. The characteristics of afterglow are explained by the rate equation of metastable xenon atoms Xem, and its coefficients are determined through the experimental results. This equation shows that in order to obtain intense phosphor afterglow, i.e. strong radiation of xenon excimer, high pressure of xenon and large lamp diameter are desirable. Moreover, high pressure of xenon brings fast decay of afterglow. Then the afterglow radiation has no overlap on the first peak of next discharge at a high frequency. Consequently, higher pressure of xenon and large lamp diameter are desirable for high intensity and high efficacy for xenon fluorescent lamps.

  11. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Anomalous magnetic moment of anyons

    CERN Document Server

    Gat, G; Gat, Gil; Ray, Rashmi

    1994-01-01

    The anomalous magnetic moment of anyons is calculated to leading order in a 1/N expansion. It is shown that the gyromagnetic ratio g remains 2 to the leading order in 1/N. This result strongly supports that obtained in \\cite{poly}, namely that g=2 is in fact exact.

  13. The iodine-xenon system in clasts and chondrules from ordinary chondrites: Implications for early solar system chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Whitby, J. A.; Turner, G.; Bridges, J. C.; Hutchison, R.

    2000-05-01

    We have studied the iodine-xenon system in chondrules and clasts from ordinary chondrites. Cristobalite bearing clasts from Parnallee (LL3.6) closed to xenon loss 1-4 Ma after Bjurböle. Feline (a feldspar and nepheline rich clast also from Parnallee) closed at 7.04 +/- 0.15 Ma. 2 out of 3 chondrules from Parnallee that yielded well defined initial iodine ratios gave ages identical to Bjurböle's within error. A clast from Barwell (L5) has a well-defined initial iodine ratio corresponding to closure 3.62 +/- 0.60 Ma before Bjurböle. Partial disturbance and complete obliteration of the I-Xe system by shock are revealed in clasts from Julesburg (L3.6) and Quenggouk (H4) respectively. Partial disturbance by shock is capable of generating anomalously high initial iodine ratios. In some cases these could be misinterpreted, yielding erroneous ages. A macrochondrule from Isoulane-n-Amahar contains concentrations of iodine similar to 'ordinary' chondrules but, unlike most ordinary chondrules, contains no radiogenic 129Xe. This requires resetting 50 Ma or more later than most chondrules. The earliest chondrule ages in the I-Xe, Mn-Cr and Al-Mg systems are in reasonable agreement. This, and the frequent lack of evidence for metamorphism capable of resetting the I-Xe chronometer, leads us to conclude that (at least) the earliest chondrule I-Xe ages represent formation. If so, chondrule formation took place at a time when sizeable parent bodies were present in the solar system.

  14. Iodine-xenon analysis of ordinary chondrite halide: implications for early solar system water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busfield, A.; Gilmour, J. D.; Whitby, J. A.; Turner, G.

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of iodine-xenon analyses of irradiated halide grains extracted from the H-chondrite Monahans (1998) and compare them with those from Zag ( Whitby et al., 2000) to address the timing of aqueous processing on the H-chondrite parent body. Xe isotopic analyses were carried out using the RELAX mass spectrometer with laser stepped heating. The initial 129I/ 127I ratio in the Monahans halide was determined to be (9.37 ± 0.06) × 10 -5 with an iodine concentration of ˜400 ppb. Significant scatter, especially in the Zag data, indicates that a simple interpretation as a formation age is unreliable. Instead we propose a model whereby halide minerals in both meteorites formed ˜5 Ma after the enstatite achondrite Shallowater (at an absolute age of 4559 Ma). This age is in agreement with the timing of aqueous alteration on the carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies and ordinary chondrite metamorphism and is consistent with the decay of 26Al as a heat source for heating and mobilisation of brines on the H-chondrite parent body. Post accretion surface impact events may have also contributed to the heat source.

  15. Ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer for evaluating krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Y., E-mail: iwata.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Experimental Fast Reactor Department, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Sekiya, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Ito, C. [Experimental Fast Reactor Department, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    An ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer that can be applied to evaluate krypton (Kr) contamination in xenon (Xe) dark matter detectors has been developed for measuring Kr at the parts-per-trillion (ppt) or sub-ppt level in Xe. The gas sample is introduced without any condensation into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer through a pulsed supersonic valve. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 212.6 nm, {sup 84}Kr atoms in the sample are resonantly ionized along with other Kr isotopes. {sup 84}Kr ions are then mass separated and detected by the mass spectrometer in order to measure the Kr impurity concentration. With our current setup, approximately 0.4 ppt of Kr impurities contained in pure argon (Ar) gas are detectable with a measurement time of 1000 s. Although Kr detection sensitivity in Xe is expected to be approximately half of that in Ar, our spectrometer can evaluate Kr contamination in Xe to the sub-ppt level.

  16. Fuel preparation for use in the production of medical isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policke, Timothy A.; Aase, Scott B.; Stagg, William R.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention relates generally to the field of medical isotope production by fission of uranium-235 and the fuel utilized therein (e.g., the production of suitable Low Enriched Uranium (LEU is uranium having 20 weight percent or less uranium-235) fuel for medical isotope production) and, in particular to a method for producing LEU fuel and a LEU fuel product that is suitable for use in the production of medical isotopes. In one embodiment, the LEU fuel of the present invention is designed to be utilized in an Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor (AHR) for the production of various medical isotopes including, but not limited to, molybdenum-99, cesium-137, iodine-131, strontium-89, xenon-133 and yttrium-90.

  17. First Numerical Simulations of Anomalous Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hongo, Masaru; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous hydrodynamics is a low-energy effective theory that captures effects of quantum anomalies. We develop a numerical code of anomalous hydrodynamics and apply it to dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, where anomalous transports are expected to occur. This is the first attempt to perform fully non-linear numerical simulations of anomalous hydrodynamics. We discuss implications of the simulations for possible experimental observations of anomalous transport effects. From analyses of the charge-dependent elliptic flow parameters ($v_2^\\pm$) as a function of the net charge asymmetry $A_\\pm$, we quantitatively verify that the linear dependence of $\\Delta v_2 \\equiv v_2^- - v_2^+$ on the net charge asymmetry $A_\\pm$ cannot be regarded as a sensitive signal of anomalous transports, contrary to previous studies. We, however, find that the intercept $\\Delta v_2(A_\\pm=0)$ is sensitive to anomalous transport effects.

  18. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found.

  19. Preparation and Purification of 125I With Neutron Irradiated Xenon in a Vacuum Circular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAOZeng-xing; LIYu-cheng; YUNing-wen; WUJie; XIANGXue-qin; ZHAOXiu-yan

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation and purification of 125I with neutron irradiated xenon in a vacuum circular system, which is specially designed with an irradiate chamber set inside of the reactor and three decay chambers set outside of the reactor. The xenon is filled in this system and recurrently circulates between the irradiate chamber and the decay chambers during the reactor is operating.

  20. Design and comparison of exchange spectroscopy approaches to cryptophane-xenon host-guest kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchak, Sergey; Kilian, Wolfgang; Schröder, Leif; Mitschang, Lorenz

    2016-04-01

    Exchange spectroscopy is used in combination with a variation of xenon concentration to disentangle the kinetics of the reversible binding of xenon to cryptophane-A. The signal intensity of either free or crytophane-bound xenon decays in a manner characteristic of the underlying exchange reactions when the spins in the other pool are perturbed. Three experimental approaches, including the well-known Hyper-CEST method, are shown to effectively entail a simple linear dependence of the signal depletion rate, or of a related quantity, on free xenon concentration. This occurs when using spin pool saturation or inversion followed by free exchange. The identification and quantification of contributions to the binding kinetics is then straightforward: in the depletion rate plot, the intercept at the vanishing free xenon concentration represents the kinetic rate coefficient for xenon detachment from the host by dissociative processes while the slope is indicative of the kinetic rate coefficient for degenerate exchange reactions. Comparing quantified kinetic rates for hyperpolarized xenon in aqueous solution reveals the high accuracy of each approach but also shows differences in the precision of the numerical results and in the requirements for prior knowledge. Because of their broad range of applicability the proposed exchange spectroscopy experiments can be readily used to unravel the kinetics of complex formation of xenon with host molecules in the various situations appearing in practice.

  1. Scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoil in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Arneodo, F; Badertscher, A; Benetti, P; Bernardini, E; Bettini, A; Borio di Tigliole, A A; Brunetti, R; Bueno, A G; Calligarich, E; Campanelli, M; Carpanese, C; Cavalli, D; Cavanna, F; Cennini, P; Centro, Sandro; Cesana, A; Cline, D; De Mitri, I; Dolfini, R; Ferrari, A; Gigli-Berzolari, A; Matthey, C; Mauri, F; Mazza, D; Mazzone, L; Meng, G; Montanari, C; Nurzia, G; Otwinowski, S; Palamara, O; Pascoli, D; Pepato, Adriano; Petrera, S; Periale, L; Piano Mortari, G; Piazzoli, A; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Rancati, T; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Rebuzzi, D; Revol, Jean Pierre Charles; Rico, J; Rossella, M; Rossi, C; Rubbia, André; Rubbia, Carlo; Sala, P; Scannicchio, D A; Sergiampietri, F; Suzuki, S; Terrani, M; Tian, W; Ventura, Sandro; Vignoli, C; Wang, H; Woo, J; Xu, Z

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of a test done with a Liquid Xenon (LXe) detector for 'Dark Matter' search, exposed to a neutron beam to produce nuclear recoil events simulating those which would be generated by WIMP's elastic scattering. The aim of the experiment was to measure directly the scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoil. The nuclear recoil considered in the test was in the tens of keV range. The ratio of measured visible energy over the true recoil energy was evaluated to be about 20%, in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  2. Xenon Fractionation, Hydrogen Escape, and the Oxidation of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Catling, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Xenon in Earth's atmosphere is severely mass fractionated and depleted compared to any plausible solar system source material, yet Kr is unfractionated. These observations seem to imply that Xe has escaped from Earth. Vigorous hydrodynamic hydrogen escape can produce mass fractionation in heavy gases. The required hydrogen flux is very high but within the range permitted by solar EUV heating when Earth was 100 Myrs old or younger. However this model cannot explain why Xe escapes but Kr does not. Recently, what appears to be ancient atmospheric xenon has been recovered from several very ancient (3-3.5 Ga) terrestrial hydrothermal barites and cherts (Pujol 2011, 2013). What is eye-catching about this ancient Xe is that it is less fractionated that Xe in modern air. In other words, it appears that a process was active on Earth some 3 to 3.5 billion years ago that caused xenon to fractionate. By this time the Sun was no longer the EUV source that it used to be. If xenon was being fractionated by escape — currently the only viable hypothesis — it had to be in Earth's Archean atmosphere and under rather modest levels of EUV forcing. It should be possible for Xe, but not Kr, to escape from Earth as an ion. In a hydrodynamically escaping hydrogen wind the hydrogen is partially ionized. The key concepts are that ions are much more strongly coupled to the escaping flow than are neutrals (so that a relatively modest flow of H and H+ to space could carry Xe+ along with it, the flux can be small enough to be consistent with diffusion-limited flux), and that Xe alone among the noble gases is more easily ionized than hydrogen. This sort of escape is possible along the polar field lines, although a weak or absent magnetic field would likely work as well. The extended history of hydrogen escape implicit in Xe escape in the Archean is consistent with other suggestions that hydrogen escape in the Archean was considerable. Hydrogen escape plausibly played the key role in creating

  3. Development of Liquid Xenon Imaging Gamma-Ray Spectrophotometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    ground potential. The cathode plane is made from 63/rm diameter silver-plated beryllium copper wire set at 0.55mm pitch on a 15cm span. These wires are...100000 ( ! IUD i 10 10000 .. SCUID GAS Pressure Density (torr) 10 ,..........I (gm/cc) 10 1 1 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 Temperature (K...The freon is kept in a 30cm diameter by 10cm deep SS cryostat large enough to accomodate a 15cm diameter by 5cm deep liquid xenon cell and copper

  4. Detector r&d proposal liquid xenon(krypton) calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Séguinot, Jacques; Ypsilantis, Thomas; Bosteels, Michel; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Gougas, Andreas; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann; Zichichi, Antonino; Ferreira-Marques, R; Lopes, M I; Policarpo, Armando; Kostrikov, M E; Ostankov, A P; Zaitsev, A; Giomataris, Ioanis; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    A proposal is made for R&D support to investigate the ultimate resolution achievable in a totally active liquid Xenon (Krypton) electromagnetic calorimeter which should lead to the construction of a 100 (400) litre prototype. Detection of either ionization or scintillation gives excellent energy resolution (sigmaE/E le 1%/sqrtE) while ionization alone gives precise determination of the direction (order 1mr) and vertex origin (order 1mm) of a high energy photon or electron (E ge 25 GeV). Large surface area photocathodes have been developed which efficiently detect the fast scintillation signal.

  5. Xenon excimer emission from multicapillary discharges in direct current mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Rahaman, Hasibur; Nam, Sang Hoon; Giapis, Konstantinos P.; Iberler, Marcus; Jacoby, Joachim; Frank, Klaus

    2011-08-01

    Microdischarges in xenon have been generated in a pressure range of 400-1013 mbar with a fixed flow rate of 100 sccm. These microdischarges are obtained from three metallic capillary tubes in series for excimer emission. Total discharge voltage is thrice as large as that of a single capillary discharge tube at current levels of up to 12 mA. Total spectral irradiance of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission also increases significantly compared to that of the single capillary discharge. Further, the irradiance of the VUV emission is strongly dependent on pressure as well as the discharge current.

  6. Xenon excimer emission from multicapillary discharges in direct current mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Rahaman, Hasibur; Nam, Sang Hoon [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Giapis, Konstantinos P. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Iberler, Marcus; Jacoby, Joachim [Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-St. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frank, Klaus [Physics Department I, F.A., University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Microdischarges in xenon have been generated in a pressure range of 400-1013 mbar with a fixed flow rate of 100 sccm. These microdischarges are obtained from three metallic capillary tubes in series for excimer emission. Total discharge voltage is thrice as large as that of a single capillary discharge tube at current levels of up to 12 mA. Total spectral irradiance of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission also increases significantly compared to that of the single capillary discharge. Further, the irradiance of the VUV emission is strongly dependent on pressure as well as the discharge current.

  7. Frequency-Dependent Viscosity of Xenon Near the Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    We used a novel, overdamped oscillator aboard the Space Shuttle to measure the viscosity eta of xenon near its critical density rho(sub c), and temperature T(sub c). In microgravity, useful data were obtained within 0.1 mK of T(sub c), corresponding to a reduced temperature t = (T -T(sub c))/T(sub c) = 3 x 10(exp -7). The data extend two decades closer to T(sub c) than the best ground measurements, and they directly reveal the expected power-law behavior eta proportional to t(sup -(nu)z(sub eta)). Here nu is the correlation length exponent, and our result for the small viscosity exponent is z(sub eta) = 0.0690 +/- 0.0006. (All uncertainties are one standard uncertainty.) Our value for z(sub eta) depends only weakly on the form of the viscosity crossover function, and it agrees with the value 0.067 +/- 0.002 obtained from a recent two-loop perturbation expansion. The measurements spanned the frequency range 2 Hz less than or equal to f less than or equal to 12 Hz and revealed viscoelasticity when t less than or equal to 10(exp -1), further from T(sub c) than predicted. The viscoelasticity scales as Af(tau), where tau is the fluctuation-decay time. The fitted value of the viscoelastic time-scale parameter A is 2.0 +/- 0.3 times the result of a one-loop perturbation calculation. Near T(sub c), the xenon's calculated time constant for thermal diffusion exceeded days. Nevertheless, the viscosity results were independent of the xenon's temperature history, indicating that the density was kept near rho(sub c), by judicious choices of the temperature vs. time program. Deliberately bad choices led to large density inhomogeneities. At t greater than 10(exp -5), the xenon approached equilibrium much faster than expected, suggesting that convection driven by microgravity and by electric fields slowly stirred the sample.

  8. Xenon tissue/blood partition coefficient for pig urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Bülow, J; Nielsen, S L

    1990-01-01

    In four landrace pigs the tissue/blood partition coefficient (lambda) for xenon (Xe) for the urinary bladder was calculated after chemical analysis for lipid, water and protein content and determination of the haematocrit. The coefficients varied from bladder to bladder owing to small differences...... in both the haematocrit and tissue composition. In Xe washout studies of the blood flow of the urinary bladder, we recommend calculating the lambda for Xe from the actual haematocrit and from the median value of tissue composition found in the present study....

  9. Anomalous Thermalization in Ergodic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luitz, David J.; Bar Lev, Yevgeny

    2016-10-01

    It is commonly believed that quantum isolated systems satisfying the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) are diffusive. We show that this assumption is too restrictive since there are systems that are asymptotically in a thermal state yet exhibit anomalous, subdiffusive thermalization. We show that such systems satisfy a modified version of the ETH ansatz and derive a general connection between the scaling of the variance of the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators, written in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian, and the dynamical exponent. We find that for subdiffusively thermalizing systems the variance scales more slowly with system size than expected for diffusive systems. We corroborate our findings by numerically studying the distribution of the coefficients of the eigenfunctions and the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators of the random field Heisenberg chain, which has anomalous transport in its thermal phase. Surprisingly, this system also has non-Gaussian distributions of the eigenfunctions, thus, directly violating Berry's conjecture.

  10. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  11. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Prototype Model 1R (PM1R) Ion Thruster and Propellant Management System Wear Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Soulas, George C.; Sovey, James S.

    2010-01-01

    The results of the NEXT wear test are presented. This test was conducted with a 36-cm ion engine (designated PM1R) and an engineering model propellant management system. The thruster operated with beam extraction for a total of 1680 hr and processed 30.5 kg of xenon during the wear test, which included performance testing and some operation with an engineering model power processing unit. A total of 1312 hr was accumulated at full power, 277 hr at low power, and the remainder was at intermediate throttle levels. Overall ion engine performance, which includes thrust, thruster input power, specific impulse, and thrust efficiency, was steady with no indications of performance degradation. The propellant management system performed without incident during the wear test. The ion engine and propellant management system were also inspected following the test with no indication of anomalous hardware degradation from operation.

  12. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  13. Scalability, scintillation readout and charge drift in a kilogram scale solid xenon particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, J; Jaskierny, W F; Markley, D; Pahlka, R B; Balakishiyeva, D; Saab, T; Filipenko, M

    2014-01-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  14. Application of scintillating properties of liquid xenon and silicon photomultiplier technology to medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Benlloch-Rodriguez, J. M.; Ferrario, Paola

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new positron emission time-of-flight apparatus using liquid xenon. The detector is based in a liquid xenon scintillating cell. The cell shape and dimensions can be optimized depending on the intended application. In its simplest form, the liquid xenon scintillating cell is a box in which two faces are covered by silicon photomultipliers and the others by a reflecting material such as Teflon. It is a compact, homogenous and highly efficient detector which shares many of the desirable properties of monolithic crystals, with the added advantage of high yield and fast scintillation offered by liquid xenon. Our initial studies suggest that good energy and spatial resolution comparable with that achieved by lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals can be obtained with a detector based in liquid xenon scintillating cells. In addition, the system can potentially achieve an excellent coincidence resolving time of better than 100 ps.

  15. The Electron Recoil Response of the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Evan; Xenon1T Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    XENON1T employs a two-phase xenon TPC to search for dark matter by detecting scintillation light produced by nuclear recoils in a 2 ton active volume of liquid xenon. However, nuclear recoils are not the only recoils that can occur since radiogenic electronic recoils are possible. Our only way of differentiating nuclear and electronic recoils is by comparing the relative fraction of scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals. For the first Science Run of XENON1T, we must understand the response of our detector to S1 and S2 signals at the low keV energies where dark matter will present itself. Therefore, I will be discussing the current understanding of our signal and detection mechanisms at these energies. This work includes work using sources such as the Rn220 technique developed by XENON collaborators for understanding our rejection of electronic recoils.

  16. Shock-tube measurements of the excitational cross-section in xenon-hydrogen mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, Hiromichi (Hiroshima Denki Inst. of Tech. (Japan)); Kawamura, Masahiko; Gohda, Noriaki

    1984-02-01

    The Ionization relaxation and radiative-cooling processes behind shock wave in xenon with or without a small amount of hydrogen have been investigated using a quadrature interferometer technique at shock Mach numbers Msub(s)--13 and the initial pressure P/sub 1/=2.0 Torr. By adding a small amount of hydrogen (--0.5% of the initial pressure) to xenon, the ionization relaxation time was drastically reduced to about one-third of its pure xenon value. From the comparison between theoretical values based on the two-step ionization model and experimental data, the slope constants of excitational cross-section against relative kinetic energy between xenon atom-atom collisions and xenon-hydrogen atom-atom collisions were determined to be 1.8x10/sup -19/ cm/sup 2//eV and 9.0x10/sup -19/ cm/sup 2//eV, respectively.

  17. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  18. Physics reach of the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Agostini, F; Alfonsi, M; Amaro, F D; Anthony, M; Arazi, L; Arneodo, F; Balan, C; Barrow, P; Baudis, L; Bauermeister, B; Berger, T; Breur, P; Breskin, A; Brown, A; Brown, E; Bruenner, S; Bruno, G; Budnik, R; Bütikofer, L; Cardoso, J M R; Cervantes, M; Cichon, D; Coderre, D; Colijn, A P; Conrad, J; Contreras, H; Cussonneau, J P; Decowski, M P; de Perio, P; Di Gangi, P; Di Giovanni, A; Duchovni, E; Fattori, S; Ferella, A D; Fieguth, A; Franco, D; Fulgione, W; Galloway, M; Garbini, M; Geis, C; Goetzke, L W; Greene, Z; Grignon, C; Gross, E; Hampel, W; Hasterok, C; Itay, R; Kaether, F; Kaminsky, B; Kessler, G; Kish, A; Landsman, H; Lang, R F; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Calloch, M Le; Levy, C; Lindemann, S; Lindner, M; Lopes, J A M; Lyashenko, A; Macmullin, S; Manfredini, A; Undagoitia, T Marrodán; Masbou, J; Massoli, F V; Mayani, D; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Meng, Y; Messina, M; Micheneau, K; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Murra, M; Naganoma, J; Oberlack, U; Orrigo, S E A; Pakarha, P; Pelssers, B; Persiani, R; Piastra, F; Pienaar, J; Plante, G; Priel, N; Rauch, L; Reichard, S; Reuter, C; Rizzo, A; Rosendahl, S; Rupp, N; Santos, J M F dos; Sartorelli, G; Scheibelhut, M; Schindler, S; Schreiner, J; Schumann, M; Lavina, L Scotto; Selvi, M; Shagin, P; Simgen, H; Stein, A; Thers, D; Tiseni, A; Trinchero, G; Tunnell, C; von Sivers, M; Wall, R; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wei, Y; Weinheimer, C; Wulf, J; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The XENON1T experiment is currently in the commissioning phase at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. In this article we study the experiment's expected sensitivity to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section, based on Monte Carlo predictions of the electronic and nuclear recoil backgrounds. The total electronic recoil background in $1$ tonne fiducial volume and ($1$, $12$) keV electronic recoil equivalent energy region, before applying any selection to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils, is $(1.80 \\pm 0.15) \\cdot 10^{-4}$ ($\\rm{kg} \\cdot day \\cdot keV)^{-1}$, mainly due to the decay of $^{222}\\rm{Rn}$ daughters inside the xenon target. The nuclear recoil background in the corresponding nuclear recoil equivalent energy region ($4$, $50$) keV, is composed of $(0.6 \\pm 0.1)$ ($\\rm{t} \\cdot y)^{-1}$ from radiogenic neutrons, $(1.8 \\pm 0.3) \\cdot 10^{-2}$ ($\\rm{t} \\cdot y)^{-1}$ from coherent scattering of neutrinos, and less than $0.01$ ($\\rm{t} \\cdot y)^{-1}$ from...

  19. MAC of xenon and halothane in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, S L; Nemoto, E M; Yao, L; Yonas, H

    1994-10-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) maps produced by 33% xenon-enhanced computed tomographic scanning (Xe/CT LCBF) are useful in the clinical diagnosis and management of patients with cerebrovascular disorders. However, observations in humans that 25-35% xenon (Xe) inhalation increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) have raised concerns that Xe/CT LCBF measurements may be inaccurate and that Xe inhalation may be hazardous in patients with decreased intracranial compliance. In contrast, 33% Xe does not increase CBF in rhesus monkeys. To determine whether this interspecies difference in the effect of Xe on CBF correlates with an interspecies difference in the anesthetic potency of Xe, we measured the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of Xe preventing movement to a tail-clamp stimulus in rhesus monkeys. Using a standard protocol for the determination of MAC in animals, we first measured the MAC of halothane (n = 5), and then used a combination of halothane and Xe to measure the MAC of Xe (n = 7). The halothane MAC was 0.99 +/- 0.12% (M +/- SD), and the Xe MAC was 98 +/- 15%. These results suggest that the MAC of Xe in rhesus monkeys is higher than the reported human Xe MAC value of 71%. Thus the absence of an effect of 33% Xe on CBF in the rhesus monkey may be related to its lower anesthetic potency.

  20. Steady state fractionation of heavy noble gas isotopes in a deep unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Alan M.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Andraski, Brian; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore steady state fractionation processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ), we measured argon, krypton, and xenon isotope ratios throughout a ∼110 m deep UZ at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in Nevada, USA. Prior work has suggested that gravitational settling should create a nearly linear increase in heavy-to-light isotope ratios toward the bottom of stagnant air columns in porous media. Our high-precision measurements revealed a binary mixture between (1) expected steady state isotopic compositions and (2) unfractionated atmospheric air. We hypothesize that the presence of an unsealed pipe connecting the surface to the water table allowed for direct inflow of surface air in response to extensive UZ gas sampling prior to our first (2015) measurements. Observed isotopic resettling in deep UZ samples collected a year later, after sealing the pipe, supports this interpretation. Data and modeling each suggest that the strong influence of gravitational settling and weaker influences of thermal diffusion and fluxes of CO2 and water vapor accurately describe steady state isotopic fractionation of argon, krypton, and xenon within the UZ. The data confirm that heavy noble gas isotopes are sensitive indicators of UZ depth. Based on this finding, we outline a potential inverse approach to quantify past water table depths from noble gas isotope measurements in paleogroundwater, after accounting for fractionation during dissolution of UZ air and bubbles.

  1. Steady state fractionation of heavy noble gas isotopes in a deep unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Alan M.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-04-01

    To explore steady state fractionation processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ), we measured argon, krypton, and xenon isotope ratios throughout a ˜110 m deep UZ at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in Nevada, USA. Prior work has suggested that gravitational settling should create a nearly linear increase in heavy-to-light isotope ratios toward the bottom of stagnant air columns in porous media. Our high-precision measurements revealed a binary mixture between (1) expected steady state isotopic compositions and (2) unfractionated atmospheric air. We hypothesize that the presence of an unsealed pipe connecting the surface to the water table allowed for direct inflow of surface air in response to extensive UZ gas sampling prior to our first (2015) measurements. Observed isotopic resettling in deep UZ samples collected a year later, after sealing the pipe, supports this interpretation. Data and modeling each suggest that the strong influence of gravitational settling and weaker influences of thermal diffusion and fluxes of CO2 and water vapor accurately describe steady state isotopic fractionation of argon, krypton, and xenon within the UZ. The data confirm that heavy noble gas isotopes are sensitive indicators of UZ depth. Based on this finding, we outline a potential inverse approach to quantify past water table depths from noble gas isotope measurements in paleogroundwater, after accounting for fractionation during dissolution of UZ air and bubbles.

  2. Interstellar Isotopes: Prospects with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Cold molecular clouds are natural environments for the enrichment of interstellar molecules in the heavy isotopes of H, C, N and O. Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets, that may trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. Models of the fractionation chemistry of H, C, N and O in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred, make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and the capabilities of ALMA for testing these models (e.g. in observing doubly-substituted isotopologues) will be outlined.

  3. Anomalous Transport Foundations and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klages, Rainer; Sokolov, Igor M

    2008-01-01

    This multi-author reference work provides a unique introduction to the currently emerging, highly interdisciplinary field of those transport processes that cannot be described by using standard methods of statistical mechanics. It comprehensively summarizes topics ranging from mathematical foundations of anomalous dynamics to the most recent experiments in this field. In so doing, this monograph extracts and emphasizes common principles and methods from many different disciplines while providing up-to-date coverage of this new field of research, considering such diverse applications as plasma

  4. Barium Tagging in Solid Xenon for the nEXO Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Christopher; Craycraft, Adam; Walton, Timothy; Fairbank, William; nEXO Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The proposed nEXO experiment utilizes a tonne-scale liquid xenon time projection chamber to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in xenon-136. Positive observation of this decay would determine the nature of the neutrino to be a MAJORANA particle, as well as measure the absolute neutrino mass scale. A critical concern for any rare decay search is reducing or eliminating backgrounds that cannot be distinguished from signal. A powerful background discrimination technique is positive identification of the daughter atom of the decay, in this case barium. This technique, called ``barium tagging'' may be available for a second phase of nEXO operation, allowing for neutrino mass sensitivity beyond the inverted mass hierarchy. Development is underway on a scheme to capture the barium daughter in solid xenon with a cryogenic probe and detect the barium by laser-induced fluorescence inside the solid xenon sample. This presentation reports results on imaging of single barium atoms frozen in a solid xenon matrix, as well as the progress on the freezing and removal of a solid xenon sample from liquid xenon. Graduated.

  5. Removing krypton from xenon by cryogenic distillation to the ppq level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [Physik-Institut, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. v. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Huhmann, C.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lin, Q. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Meng, Y.; Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Lavina, L.S. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Cristescu, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-05-15

    The XENON1T experiment aims for the direct detection of dark matter in a detector filled with 3.3 tons of liquid xenon. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the background induced by radioactive decays inside the detector has to be sufficiently low. One major contributor is the β-emitter {sup 85}Kr which is present in the xenon. For XENON1T a concentration of natural krypton in xenon {sup nat}Kr/Xe < 200 ppq (parts per quadrillion, 1 ppq = 10{sup -15} mol/mol) is required. In this work, the design, construction and test of a novel cryogenic distillation column using the common McCabe-Thiele approach is described. The system demonstrated a krypton reduction factor of 6.4 . 10{sup 5} with thermodynamic stability at process speeds above 3 kg/h. The resulting concentration of {sup nat}Kr/Xe < 26 ppq is the lowest ever achieved, almost one order of magnitude below the requirements for XENON1T and even sufficient for future dark matter experiments using liquid xenon, such as XENONnT and DARWIN. (orig.)

  6. The breakthrough curve combination for xenon sampling dynamics in a carbon molecular sieve column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu-jiang, Liu; Zhan-ying, Chen; Yin-zhong, Chang; Shi-lian, Wang; Qi, Li; Yuan-qing, Fan; Huai-mao, Jia; Xin-jun, Zhang; Yun-gang, Zhao

    2015-01-21

    In the research of xenon sampling and xenon measurements, the xenon breakthrough curve plays a significant role in the xenon concentrating dynamics. In order to improve the theoretical comprehension of the xenon concentrating procedure from the atmosphere, the method of the breakthrough curve combination for sampling techniques should be developed and investigated under pulse injection conditions. In this paper, we describe a xenon breakthrough curve in a carbon molecular sieve column, the combination curve method for five conditions is shown and debated in detail; the fitting curves and the prediction equations are derived in theory and verified by the designed experiments. As a consequence, the curves of the derived equations are in good agreement with the fitting curves by tested. The retention times of the xenon in the column are 61.2, 42.2 and 23.5 at the flow rate of 1200, 1600 and 2000 mL min(-1), respectively, but the breakthrough times are 51.4, 38.6 and 35.1 min.

  7. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Xenon Acquisition Strategies for High-Power Electric Propulsion NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Unfried, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) has been used for station-keeping of geostationary communications satellites since the 1980s. Solar electric propulsion has also benefitted from success on NASA Science Missions such as Deep Space One and Dawn. The xenon propellant loads for these applications have been in the 100s of kilograms range. Recent studies performed for NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) have demonstrated that SEP is critically enabling for both near-term and future exploration architectures. The high payoff for both human and science exploration missions and technology investment from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) are providing the necessary convergence and impetus for a 30-kilowatt-class SEP mission. Multiple 30-50- kilowatt Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM) concepts have been developed based on the maturing electric propulsion and solar array technologies by STMD with recent efforts focusing on an Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM). Xenon is the optimal propellant for the existing state-of-the-art electric propulsion systems considering efficiency, storability, and contamination potential. NASA mission concepts developed and those proposed by contracted efforts for the 30-kilowatt-class demonstration have a range of xenon propellant loads from 100s of kilograms up to 10,000 kilograms. This paper examines the status of the xenon industry worldwide, including historical xenon supply and pricing. The paper will provide updated information on the xenon market relative to previous papers that discussed xenon production relative to NASA mission needs. The paper will discuss the various approaches for acquiring on the order of 10 metric tons of xenon propellant to support potential near-term NASA missions. Finally, the paper will discuss acquisitions strategies for larger NASA missions requiring 100s of metric tons of xenon will be discussed.

  9. New constraints and prospects for sub-GeV dark matter scattering off electrons in xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Rouven; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-08-01

    We study in detail sub-GeV dark matter scattering off electrons in xenon, including the expected electron recoil spectra and annual modulation spectra. We derive improved constraints using low-energy XENON10 and XENON100 ionization-only data. For XENON10, in addition to including electron-recoil data corresponding to about 1-3 electrons, we include for the first time events corresponding to about 4-7 electrons. Assuming the scattering is momentum independent (FDM=1 ), this strengthens a previous cross-section bound by almost an order of magnitude for dark matter masses above 50 MeV. The available XENON100 data corresponds to events with about 4-50 electrons, and leads to a constraint that is comparable to the XENON10 bound above 50 MeV for FDM=1 . We demonstrate that a search for an annual modulation signal in upcoming xenon experiments (XENON1T, XENONnT, LZ) could substantially improve the above bounds even in the presence of large backgrounds. We also emphasize that in simple benchmark models of sub-GeV dark matter, the dark matter-electron scattering rate can be as high as one event every ten (two) seconds in the XENON1T (XENONnT or LZ) experiments, without being in conflict with any other known experimental bounds. While there are several sources of backgrounds that can produce single- or few-electron events, a large event rate can be consistent with a dark matter signal and should not be simply written off as purely a detector curiosity. This fact motivates a detailed analysis of the ionization-data ("S2") data, taking into account the expected annual modulation spectrum of the signal rate, as well as the DM-induced electron-recoil spectra, which are another powerful discriminant between signal and background.

  10. Heterogeneous Nuclear Reactor Models for Optimal Xenon Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Ishtiaq Ahmad

    Nuclear reactors are generally modeled as homogeneous mixtures of fuel, control, and other materials while in reality they are heterogeneous-homogeneous configurations comprised of fuel and control rods along with other materials. Similarly, for space-time studies of a nuclear reactor, homogeneous, usually one-group diffusion theory, models are used, and the system equations are solved by either nodal or modal expansion approximations. Study of xenon-induced problems has also been carried out using similar models and with the help of dynamic programming or classical calculus of variations or the minimum principle. In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space -time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine -xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear -quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem. To perform a variety of different additional useful studies, this formulation has potential for various extensions and variations; for example, different geometry of the problem, with possible extension to three dimensions, heterogeneous -homogeneous formulation to include, for example, homogeneously

  11. Transmission Electron Diffraction Studies of Xenon Adsorbed on Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, A. Q. D.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Adsorption studies of xenon on graphite were performed using the Hitachi HU-11B Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). It has been used as a Transmission High Energy Electron Diffraction (THEED) camera. This has been modified to include an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) environmental chamber. This chamber was isolated from the microscope vacuum by two 400 μm diameter differentially pumped apertures. Pressures of {~}10 ^{-6} torr and {~ }10^{-9} torr were achieved inside the microscope column and the environmental chamber respectively. The chamber was fitted with a new sample holder designed with double "O" rings. The sample was cooled with liquid helium. Previous THEED experiments by Venables et al and Schabes-Retchkiman and Venables revealed the presence of a 2D-solid incommensurate (I)-commensurate (C) phase transition as the temperature is lowered. These results were confirmed and extended in the present work. Hong et al have recently interpreted their X-ray diffraction experiments as showing an incommensurate-striped domain phase transition at {~}65rm K. No evidence was found for the existence of a striped domain structure on any part of the xenon phase diagram studied. Experiments of xenon adsorbed on the basal plane (0001) of graphite were carried out at pressures from {~}1.5 times 10^{-5} torr to {~}1.8 times 10^{-8} torr over a temperature range from 55K^.90K. A set of lattice parameter (misfit) measurements were made as a function of temperature at constant pressure with an accuracy of +/-0.1% rather than +/-0.3% previously obtained. The misfit data was fitted to a power law formula, i.e. misfit m = B_{rm o} (rm T - rm T_{rm o})^{rm A} , where A is a constant and equal to 0.8. It was found that B_{rm o} and T_{rm o} are functions of log(P). The data fell into two groups corresponding to two phase transitions. The same power law was used for both sets of data. Two transitions were found, one is I-C and

  12. Xenon in oklo al phosphate: implication for operational conditions of natural reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, A. P.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Pravdivtseva, O. V.

    2003-04-01

    New data for the Oklo natural reactor (Gabon), obtained by laser microprobe extraction and high precision noble gas mass-spectrometry, confirm our previous findings of large amount of anomalous Xe in U-free Al-phosphate adjacent to uraninite [1]. Compared with known fission spectra, the anomalous Xe is enriched in 132Xe, 131Xe and, to a less extent, 129Xe and 134Xe. It was suggested [1] that the observed Xe anomalies are due to chemical fractionation of Xe from β^ precursors (mainly I and Te) in isobaric decay chains. However, no mechanisms were proposed at that time. In this work, a follow-up to the previous studies, we explore the manner in which these anomalies may be produced. Apparently, under the temperatures present during the active periods of the Oklo reactor (300 - 450^oC), both I and Xe may easily diffuse out of U-oxides. Te in general is less mobile, due to slightly higher ionic radius, and has better retention than I and Xe. When the chain reaction is stopped, the temperature starts dropping and at the certain moment Xe formed from Te starts to retain in the Al-phosphate. Since that moment, accumulation of each Xe isotope must be proportional to decay time of corresponding Te isotope. This may in fact be responsible for the Xe anomalies found in Al-phosphate. 132Te, 131Te and 134Te have different half-lives and therefore ratios of these isotopes will not remain constant after the chain reaction is terminated due to the lack of water. Our calculation demonstrates that to produce the observed Xe anomalies the reactor must have been cycling with about 1frac{3}{4} hour period. Large concentration of fission products found in Al-phosphate also suggests that this material may be suitable for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. We are grateful to Don Bogard and to late Paul K. Kuroda with whom the idea of thermal cycling of Oklo reactor has been discussed. The Oklo sample was provided by Maurice Pagel and Yuri Dymkov. This work is supported by NASA grant

  13. Online ^{222}Rn removal by cryogenic distillation in the XENON100 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Gangi, P. Di; Giovanni, A. Di; Diglio, S.; Duchovni, E.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grandi, L.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Calloch, M. Le; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Piro, M.-C.; Pizzella, V.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Saldanha, R.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Shockley, E.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. v.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N.; Wang, H.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.; Cristescu, I.

    2017-06-01

    We describe the purification of xenon from traces of the radioactive noble gas radon using a cryogenic distillation column. The distillation column was integrated into the gas purification loop of the XENON100 detector for online radon removal. This enabled us to significantly reduce the constant ^{222}Rn background originating from radon emanation. After inserting an auxiliary ^{222}Rn emanation source in the gas loop, we determined a radon reduction factor of R > 27 (95% C.L.) for the distillation column by monitoring the ^{222}Rn activity concentration inside the XENON100 detector.

  14. X-ray detector for automatic exposure control using ionization chamber filled with xenon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, A; Yoshida, T

    2003-01-01

    This report refers to our newly developed X-ray detector for reliable automatic X-ray exposure control, which is to be widely used for X-ray diagnoses in various clinical fields. This new detector utilizes an ionization chamber filled with xenon gas, in contrast to conventional X-ray detectors which use ionization chambers filled with air. Use of xenon gas ensures higher sensitivity and thinner design of the detector. The xenon gas is completely sealed in the chamber, so that the influence of the changes in ambient environments is minimized. (author)

  15. Online {sup 222}Rn removal by cryogenic distillation in the XENON100 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. v. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lindemann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Meng, Y.; Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Lavina, L.S. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Cristescu, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-06-15

    We describe the purification of xenon from traces of the radioactive noble gas radon using a cryogenic distillation column. The distillation column was integrated into the gas purification loop of the XENON100 detector for online radon removal. This enabled us to significantly reduce the constant {sup 222}Rn background originating from radon emanation. After inserting an auxiliary {sup 222}Rn emanation source in the gas loop, we determined a radon reduction factor of R > 27 (95% C.L.) for the distillation column by monitoring the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration inside the XENON100 detector. (orig.)

  16. Determination of the subcutaneous tissue to blood partition coefficient in patients with severe leg ischaemia by a double isotope washout technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Jepsen, K; Faris, I; Henriksen, O;

    1982-01-01

    Knowledge of the tissue to blood partition coefficient (lambda) is essential for calculation of the perfusion coefficient in a single tissue based on measurements of the washout of locally injected isotopes. No measurements of lambda for Xenon in subcutaneous tissue in the leg have been done...

  17. Electron motion enhanced high harmonic generation in xenon clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Na; Bai, Ya; Peng, Peng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Atomic clusters presents an isolated system that models the bulk materials whose mechanism of HHG remains uncertain, and a promising medium to produce HHG beyond the limited conversion efficiency for gaseous atoms. Here we reveal that the oscillation of collective electron motion within clusters develops after the interaction of intense laser fields, and it significantly enhances the harmonic dipole and increases the quantum phase of the harmonics. Experimentally, the phase matching conditions of HHG from nanometer xenon clusters and atoms are distinguished, which confirms the enhanced internal field that was proposed theoretically a decade ago. The separation of HHG from atoms and clusters allows the determination of the amplitude of the HHG for clusters to be 5 orders higher, corresponding to 4 times higher conversion efficiency for atomic response. The finding provides an insight on the HHG mechanism of bulk materials and a means by which an efficient coherent X-ray source can be developed.

  18. Search for light dark matter in XENON10 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, J; Aprile, E; Arneodo, F; Baudis, L; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A I; Coelho, L C C; Dahl, C E; DeViveiros, L; Ferella, A D; Fernandes, L M P; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Giboni, K L; Gomez, R; Hasty, R; Kastens, L; Kwong, J; Lopes, J A M; Madden, N; Manalaysay, A; Manzur, A; McKinsey, D N; Monzani, M E; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orboeck, J; Plante, G; Santorelli, R; dos Santos, J M F; Schulte, S; Shagin, P; Shutt, T; Sorensen, P; Winant, C; Yamashita, M

    2011-07-29

    We report results of a search for light (≲10  GeV) particle dark matter with the XENON10 detector. The event trigger was sensitive to a single electron, with the analysis threshold of 5 electrons corresponding to 1.4 keV nuclear recoil energy. Considering spin-independent dark matter-nucleon scattering, we exclude cross sections σ(n)>7×10(-42)  cm(2), for a dark matter particle mass m(χ)=7  GeV. We find that our data strongly constrain recent elastic dark matter interpretations of excess low-energy events observed by CoGeNT and CRESST-II, as well as the DAMA annual modulation signal.

  19. Position Reconstruction in a Dual Phase Xenon Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Solovov, V N; Akimov, D Yu; Araújo, H M; Barnes, E J; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lüscher, R; Majewski, P; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2011-01-01

    We studied the application of statistical reconstruction algorithms, namely maximum likelihood and least squares methods, to the problem of event reconstruction in a dual phase liquid xenon detector. An iterative method was developed for in-situ reconstruction of the PMT light response functions from calibration data taken with an uncollimated gamma-ray source. Using the techniques described, the performance of the ZEPLIN-III dark matter detector was studied for 122 keV gamma-rays. For the inner part of the detector (R<100 mm), spatial resolutions of 13 mm and 1.6 mm FWHM were measured in the horizontal plane for primary and secondary scintillation, respectively. An energy resolution of 8.1% FWHM was achieved at that energy. The possibility of using this technique for improving performance and reducing cost of scintillation cameras for medical applications is currently under study.

  20. A New Electrostatically-focused UV HPD for Liquid Xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, Priscilla Brooks [University of Minnesota

    2013-07-10

    Appropriate photodetectors are a major challenge for liquid xenon technology as proposed by the next generation of double beta decay, solar neutrino, and dark matter searches. The primary photon signal is tiny and in the hard ultraviolet, the installation is cryogenic, and the sensors themselves must not introduce background. Hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) provide an easy substitute for a conventional PMT with the added advantages of low radioactivity, better area coverage, and single photoelectron counting. A computer-controlled test setup capable of characterizing optical properties of ultraviolet photodetectors was installed. It was used to compare photomultiplier tubes, silicon photomultipliers, avalanche photodiodes, and a novel-design custom HPD developed by the DEP company under this proposal.

  1. Reflectance dependence of polytetrafluoroethylene on thickness for xenon scintillation light

    CERN Document Server

    Haefner, Jonathan; Arthurs, Maris; Batista, Elizabeth; Morton, Daniel; Okunawo, Matt; Pushkin, Kirill; Sander, Aaron; Wang, Yuhan; Lorenzon, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Many rare event searches including dark matter direct detection and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments take advantage of the high VUV reflective surfaces made from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) reflector materials to achieve high light collection efficiency in their detectors. As the detectors have grown in size over the past decade, there has also been an increased need for ever thinner detector walls without significant loss in reflectance to reduce dead volumes around active noble liquids, outgassing, and potential backgrounds. We report on the experimental results to measure the dependence of the reflectance on thickness of two PTFE samples at wavelengths near 178 nm. No change in reflectance was observed as the thickness of a cylindrically shaped PTFE vessel immersed in liquid xenon was varied between 1 mm to 9.5 mm.

  2. A Linear RFQ Ion Trap for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatt, B.; Green, M.; Wodin, J.; DeVoe, R.; Fierlinger, P.; Gratta, G.; LePort, F.; Montero Diez, M.; Neilson, R.; O' Sullivan, K.; Pocar, A.; Baussan, E.; Breidenbach, M.; Conley, R.; Fairbank Jr., W.; Farine, J.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; Hauger, M.; Hodgson, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Neuchatel U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Alabama U.

    2008-01-14

    The design, construction, and performance of a linear radio-frequency ion trap (RFQ) intended for use in the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) are described. EXO aims to detect the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 136}Xe to {sup 136}Ba. To suppress possible backgrounds EXO will complement the measurement of decay energy and, to some extent, topology of candidate events in a Xe filled detector with the identification of the daughter nucleus ({sup 136}Ba). The ion trap described here is capable of accepting, cooling, and confining individual Ba ions extracted from the site of the candidate double-beta decay event. A single trapped ion can then be identified, with a large signal-to-noise ratio, via laser spectroscopy.

  3. Topological signature in the NEXT high pressure xenon TPC

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of Xe-136 in a high-pressure xenon gas TPC using electroluminescence to amplify the signal from ionization. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to use the topology of events with energies close to Qbb as an extra tool to reject background. In these proceedings we show with data from prototypes that an extra background rejection factor of 24.3 +- 1.4 (stat.)% can be achieved, while maintaining an efficiency of 66.7 +- 1.% for signal events. The performance expected in NEW, the next stage of the experiment, is to improve to 12.9% +- 0.6% background acceptance for 66.9% +- 0.6% signal efficiency.

  4. Diffusion Pore Imaging by Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Windschuh, Johannes; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements are widely used to derive parameters indirectly related to the microstructure of biological tissues and porous media. However, a direct imaging of cell or pore shapes and sizes would be of high interest. For a long time, determining pore shapes by NMR diffusion acquisitions seemed impossible, because the necessary phase information could not be preserved. Here we demonstrate experimentally using the measurement technique which we have recently proposed theoretically that the shape of arbitrary closed pores can be imaged by diffusion acquisitions, which yield the phase information. For this purpose, we use hyperpolarized xenon gas in well-defined geometries. The signal can be collected from the whole sample which mainly eliminates the problem of vanishing signal at increasing resolution of conventional NMR imaging. This could be used to non-invasively gain structural information inaccessible so far such as pore or cell shapes, cell density or axon integri...

  5. Investigation of many-body forces in krypton and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salacuse, J. J.; Egelstaff, P. A.

    1988-10-01

    The simplicity of the state dependence at relatively high temperatures of the many-body potential contribution to the pressure and energy has been pointed out previously [J. Ram and P. A. Egelstaff, J. Phys. Chem. Liq. 14, 29 (1984); A. Teitsima and P. A. Egelstaff, Phys. Rev. A 21, 367 (1980)]. In this paper, we investigate how far these many-body potential terms may be represented by simple models in the case of krypton on the 423-, 273-, 190-, and 150-K isotherms, and xenon on the 170-, 210-, and 270-K isotherms. At the higher temperatures the best agreement is found for the mean-field type of theory, and some consequences are pointed out. On the lower isotherms a state point is found where the many-body energy vanishes, and large departures from mean-field behavior are observed. This is attributed to the influence of short-ranged many-body forces.

  6. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  7. Anomalous osmosis resulting from preferential absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staverman, A.J.; Kruissink, C.A.; Pals, D.T.F.

    1965-01-01

    An explanation of the anomalous osmosis described in the preceding paper is given in terms of friction coefficients in the glass membrane. It is shown that anomalous osmosis may be expected when the friction coefficients are constant and positive provided that the membrane absorbs solute strongly an

  8. Anomalous osmosis resulting from preferential absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staverman, A.J.; Kruissink, C.A.; Pals, D.T.F.

    1965-01-01

    An explanation of the anomalous osmosis described in the preceding paper is given in terms of friction coefficients in the glass membrane. It is shown that anomalous osmosis may be expected when the friction coefficients are constant and positive provided that the membrane absorbs solute strongly an

  9. Isotopic chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  10. Isotopic Paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, R.

    Paleotemperature scales were calculated by H. C. Urey and others in the 1950s to assess past temperatures, and later work using the stable isotopes of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon employed standards such as Peedee belemnite (PDB) and Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW). Subsequently, subjects as diverse as ice volume and paleotemperatures, oceanic ice and sediment cores, Pleistocene/Holocene climatic changes, and isotope chronostratigraphy extending back to the Precambrian were investigated.

  11. Lowering the radioactivity of the photomultiplier tubes for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Contreras, H.; Goetzke, L.W.; Fernandez, A.J.M.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Bologna Univ., Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Arazi, L.; Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Gross, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Priel, N.; Vitells, O. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Arisaka, K.; Lyashenko, A.; Meng, Y.; Pantic, E.; Teymourian, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Arneodo, F.; Di Giovanni, A. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Auger, M.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Behrens, A.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Balan, C.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Bauermeister, B.; Fattori, S.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Beltrame, P. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Brown, A.; Lang, R.F.; Macmullin, S.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Brown, E.; Levy, C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Bruenner, S.; Hampel, W.; Kaether, F.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Rauch, L.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H.; Weber, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Schumann, M. [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cussonneau, J.P.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Lavina, L.S.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, Subatech, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Ferella, A.D.; Fulgione, W.; Laubenstein, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [Bologna Univ., Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino and Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P.; Wall, R. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Orrigo, S.E.A. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); IFIC, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Persiani, R. [Universite de Nantes, Subatech, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (FR); Bologna Univ., Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (IT); INFN, Bologna (IT); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    The low-background, VUV-sensitive 3-inch diameter photomultiplier tube R11410 has been developed by Hamamatsu for dark matter direct detection experiments using liquid xenon as the target material. We present the results from the joint effort between the XENON collaboration and the Hamamatsu company to produce a highly radio-pure photosensor (version R11410-21) for the XENON1T dark matter experiment. After introducing the photosensor and its components, we show the methods and results of the radioactive contamination measurements of the individual materials employed in the photomultiplier production. We then discuss the adopted strategies to reduce the radioactivity of the various PMT versions. Finally, we detail the results from screening 286 tubes with ultra-low background germanium detectors, as well as their implications for the expected electronic and nuclear recoil background of the XENON1T experiment. (orig.)

  12. Study of Static Adsorption Capacity of ACF for Xenon at 201 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The static adsorption performances of a series of active carbon fiber (ACF)for xenon at 201 K were measured with a model ASAP2010M specific surface area and aperture distribution instrument by changing the working gas of instrument from N2 to Xenon. Compared with grain active carbon(GAC): (1) the adsorption performance of Viscose-based ACF(VACF) adsorbents is better than that of GAC; (2) owing to the difference of aperture distribution, the adsorption performance of ACF with different radicales is different under the same experiment conditions though the specific surface area is similar; (3) there is no definite relationship between adsorption performance and specific surface area; (4) the VACF-A2 is the superior xenon adsorbent at the experimental temperature.Keyworls Active carbon fiber, CTBT, Xenon, Static adsorption, Adsorptive capacity, Adsorptive velocity

  13. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  14. Measurement of Low Energy Electronic Recoil Response and Electronic/Nuclear Recoils Discrimination in XENON100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jingqiang; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The XENON100 detector uses liquid xenon time projection chamber to search for nuclear recoils(NR) caused by hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The backgrounds are mostly electronic recoils(ER), thus it's crucial to distinguish NR from ER. Using high statistical calibration data from tritiated methane, AmBe and other sources in XENON100, the ER/NR discrimination under different electric fields are measured. The Photon yield and recombination fluctuation of low energy electronic recoils under different fields will also be presented and compared to results from NEST and other experiments, which is crucial to understanding the response of liquid xenon detectors in the energy regime of searching dark matter.

  15. Ionization and scintillation response of high-pressure xenon gas to alpha particles

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, V; Cárcel, S; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Díaz, J; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Veloso, J F C A; Webb, R; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure xenon gas is an attractive detection medium for a variety of applications in fundamental and applied physics. In this paper we study the transport properties of ionization electrons, and the mechanism of electron-ion recombination, in xenon gas at 10 bar pressure. For this purpose, we use a source of alpha particles in the NEXT-DEMO time projection chamber, the large scale prototype of the NEXT-100 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, in three different drift electric field configurations. Our electron drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion results are similar to expectations based on available electron scattering cross sections on pure xenon, favoring low-diffusion models. In addition, two types of measurements addressing the connection between the ionization and scintillation yields were performed. On the one hand we observe, for the first time in xenon gas, large event-by-event correlated fluctuations between the ionization and scintillation signals, similarly to what has already bee...

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow in stroke by 133Xenon inhalation and emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Henriksen, L; Paulson, O

    1981-01-01

    A rapidly rotating single-photon emission tomograph was used to study regional cerebral blood flow by 133Xenon inhalation. Using a rotation speed of 180 degrees/5 sec a tomographic picture of the average Xenon concentration in 3 slices is obtained. By taking a sequence of 4 one-minute tomograms...... normal subjects and 10 unselected patients with stroke. The CBF tomograms localized appropriate ischemic areas in all 10 patients. In one patient the conventional x-ray tomogram was negative, while the flow tomogram clearly showed a decreased flow in consonance with the clinical findings. Regional...... cerebral blood flow measured tomographically by 133Xenon inhalation circumvents the extra-cranial contamination and the superposition of intracranial tissues that hamper 133Xenon inhalation flow studies using stationary detectors....

  17. [Anesthesia and sedation by admixture of xenon-oxygen in dentistry. Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, S A; Zavodilenko, L A; Babikov, A S

    2014-01-01

    The modern out-patient dental treatment which is performed under combined anesthesia with of xenon-oxygen inhalations provides comfortable conditions for the doctor and the patient, effective anesthesia and safe level of the sedation controlled by dentist.

  18. Operation and technology development of the radioactive xenon and krypton detection equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wanno; Choi, Sangdo; Ji, Youngyong; Lim, Jong Myoung; Cho, Young Hyun; Kang, Han Beul; Lee, Hoon; Kang, Moon Ja; Choi, Kun Sik

    2013-03-15

    Operation and technology development of the radioactive xenon and krypton detection equipment - Advancement, independence of operation technology for BfS-IAR system(the simultaneous analysis of xenon and krypton) installed after North Korea nuclear tests in 2006 and establishment of background base-line for xenon and krypton radioactivity. - Enhanced detection and analysis capabilities for neighborhood nuclear activities through advanced research of noble gas detection technology. Results of the Project · The operation of xenon and krypton analysis system (BfS-IAR) · Operation of fixed adsorption system. · Operation of portable adsorption system · Exercise of emergency response and proficiency test with SAUNA. · Measurement of noble gas background at specific region in Korea. - Radioxenon levels at Dongdu Cheon is approximately 1.6 mBq/m{sup 3} · Development of automation filling system for absorber cooling.

  19. Index of refraction, Rayleigh scattering length, and Sellmeier coefficients in solid and liquid argon and xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Grace, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Like all the noble elements, argon and xenon are scintillators, \\emph{i.e.} they produce light when exposed to radiation. Large liquid argon detectors have become widely used in low background experiments, including dark matter and neutrino research. However, the index of refraction of liquid argon at the scintillation wavelength has not been measured and current Rayleigh scattering length calculations disagree with measurements. Furthermore, the Rayleigh scattering length and index of refraction of solid argon and solid xenon at their scintillation wavelengths have not been previously measured or calculated. We introduce a new calculation using previously measured data in liquid and solid argon and xenon to extrapolate the optical properties at the scintillation wavelengths using the Sellmeier dispersion relationship. As a point of validation, we compare our extrapolated index of refraction for liquid xenon against the measured value and find agreement within the uncertainties. This method results in a Rayle...

  20. Experimental studies of a zeeman-tuned xenon laser differential absorption apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, G J

    1973-06-01

    A Zeeman-tuned cw xenon laser differential absorption device is described. The xenon laser was tuned by axial magnetic fields up to 5500 G generated by an unusually large water-cooled dc solenoid. Xenon laser lines at 3.37 micro, 3.51 micro, and 3.99 micro were tuned over ranges of 6 A, 6 A, and 11 A, respectively. To date, this apparatus has been used principally to study the details of formaldehyde absorption lines lying near the 3 .508-micro xenon laser transition. These experiments revealed that the observed absorption spectrum of formaldehyde exhibits a sufficiently unique spectral structure that the present technique may readily be used to measure relative concentrations of formaldehyde in samples of polluted air.

  1. AXEL-a high pressure xenon gas TPC for neutrinoless double beta decay search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kiseki; Ichikawa, Atsuko K.; Nakaya, Tsuyoshi; Minamino, Akihiro; Ban, Sei; Yanagita, Saori; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Hirose, Masanori; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Ueshima, Kota; Miuchi, Kentaro

    2017-02-01

    To search for neutrinoless double beta decay, we have started developing a high pressure xenon gas time projection chamber as the AXEL (A Xenon ElectroLuminescence detector) project since 2014. We proposed a new scheme to measure energy deposit using electroluminescence lights to achieve high energy resolution, large mass and strong background rejection power. Important performances of compositions of our new readout scheme are shown: electric field simulation, VUV sensitivity of MPPC in high pressure gaseous xenon, response of MPPC for large amount of photons. To demonstrate as a whole system, we constructed a small prototype detector using 64 MPPCs filled with 4 bar xenon gas. Result of measurement with a 57Co gamma-ray source are shown.

  2. Lowering the radioactivity of the photomultiplier tubes for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L’Aquila (Italy); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Bologna and INFN-Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institut für Physik & Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Arazi, L. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-23

    The low-background, VUV-sensitive 3-inch diameter photomultiplier tube R11410 has been developed by Hamamatsu for dark matter direct detection experiments using liquid xenon as the target material. We present the results from the joint effort between the XENON collaboration and the Hamamatsu company to produce a highly radio-pure photosensor (version R11410-21) for the XENON1T dark matter experiment. After introducing the photosensor and its components, we show the methods and results of the radioactive contamination measurements of the individual materials employed in the photomultiplier production. We then discuss the adopted strategies to reduce the radioactivity of the various PMT versions. Finally, we detail the results from screening 286 tubes with ultra-low background germanium detectors, as well as their implications for the expected electronic and nuclear recoil background of the XENON1T experiment.

  3. Vacuum Ultraviolet Xenon Excimer Light Source Excited by a Pulsed Jet Discharge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eiji FUTAGAMI; Toshiaki TAKADA; Junji KAWANAKA; Shoichi KUBODERA; Wataru SASAKI; Kou KUROSAWA; Kenichi MITSUHASHI; Tatsushi IGARASHI

    1995-01-01

      We have developed a new xenon excimer light source in vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). The use of a pulsed gas jet discharge realized efficient cluster excitation and spatially localized emission in VUV with an extremely long pulse duration...

  4. Anomalous diffraction in hyperbolic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Boardman, Allan D; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that light is subject to anomalous (i.e., negative) diffraction when propagating in the presence of hyperbolic dispersion. We show that light propagation in hyperbolic media resembles the dynamics of a quantum particle of negative mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. The negative effective mass implies time reversal if the medium is homogeneous. Such property paves the way to diffraction compensation, spatial analogue of dispersion compensating fibers in the temporal domain. At variance with materials exhibiting standard elliptic dispersion, in inhomogeneous hyperbolic materials light waves are pulled towards regions with a lower refractive index. In the presence of a Kerr-like optical response, bright (dark) solitons are supported by a negative (positive) nonlinearity.

  5. Anomalous diffraction in hyperbolic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Boardman, Allan D.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that light is subject to anomalous (i.e., negative) diffraction when propagating in the presence of hyperbolic dispersion. We show that light propagation in hyperbolic media resembles the dynamics of a quantum particle of negative mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. The negative effective mass implies time reversal if the medium is homogeneous. Such property paves the way to diffraction compensation, i.e., spatial analog of dispersion compensating fibers in the temporal domain. At variance with materials exhibiting standard elliptic dispersion, in inhomogeneous hyperbolic materials light waves are pulled towards regions with a lower refractive index. In the presence of a Kerr-like optical response, bright (dark) solitons are supported by a negative (positive) nonlinearity.

  6. Can pulsed xenon ultraviolet light systems disinfect aerobic bacteria in the absence of manual disinfection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinadatha, Chetan; Villamaria, Frank C; Ganachari-Mallappa, Nagaraja; Brown, Donna S; Liao, I-Chia; Stock, Eileen M; Copeland, Laurel A; Zeber, John E

    2015-04-01

    Whereas pulsed xenon-based ultraviolet light no-touch disinfection systems are being increasingly used for room disinfection after patient discharge with manual cleaning, their effectiveness in the absence of manual disinfection has not been previously evaluated. Our study indicates that pulsed xenon-based ultraviolet light systems effectively reduce aerobic bacteria in the absence of manual disinfection. These data are important for hospitals planning to adopt this technology as adjunct to routine manual disinfection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Xenon neuroprotection in experimental stroke: interactions with hypothermia and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Siyuan P; Lei, Beilei; James, Michael L; Lascola, Christopher D; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Jung, Jin Yong; Maze, Mervyn; Franks, Nicholas P; Pearlstein, Robert D; Sheng, Huaxin; Warner, David S

    2012-12-01

    Xenon has been proven to be neuroprotective in experimental brain injury. The authors hypothesized that xenon would improve outcome from focal cerebral ischemia with a delayed treatment onset and prolonged recovery interval. Rats were subjected to 70 min temporary focal ischemia. Ninety minutes later, rats were treated with 0, 15, 30, or 45% Xe for 20 h or 0 or 30% Xe for 8, 20, or 44 h. Outcome was measured after 7 days. In another experiment, after ischemia, rats were maintained at 37.5° or 36.0°C for 20 h with or without 30% Xe. Outcome was assessed 28 days later. Finally, mice were subjected to intracerebral hemorrhage with or without 30% Xe for 20 h. Brain water content, hematoma volume, rotarod function, and microglial activation were measured. Cerebral infarct sizes (mean±SD) for 0, 15, 30, and 45% Xe were 212±27, 176±55, 160±32, and 198±54 mm, respectively (P=0.023). Neurologic scores (median±interquartile range) followed a similar pattern (P=0.002). Infarct size did not vary with treatment duration, but neurologic score improved (P=0.002) at all xenon exposure durations (8, 20, and 44 h). Postischemic treatment with either 30% Xe or subtherapeutic hypothermia (36°C) had no effect on 28-day outcome. Combination of these interventions provided long-term benefit. Xenon improved intracerebral hemorrhage outcome measures. Xenon improved focal ischemic outcome at 7, but not 28 days postischemia. Xenon combined with subtherapeutic hypothermia produced sustained recovery benefit. Xenon improved intracerebral hemorrhage outcome. Xenon may have potential for clinical stroke therapy under carefully defined conditions.

  8. Shadowing in the muon-xenon inelastic scattering cross section at 490 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.R.; Carroll, T.J.; Halliwell, C.; Jaffe, D.E.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S. (Univ. Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)); Aid, S.; Kunori, S.; O' Day, S.; Ramberg, E.J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.A.; Steinberg, P.H.; Talaga, R. (Univ. Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)); Anthony, P.L.; Baker, M.D.; Busza, W.; Osborne, L.; Ryan, J.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Bartlett, J.; Coutrakon, G.; Hanlon, J.; Kirk, T.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Melanson, H.; Montgomery, H.E.; Morfin, J.G.; Salgado, C.; Wolbers, S.A. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Bhatti, A.A.; Davisson, R.; Dougherty, W.; Jansen, D.M.; Lord, J.J.; Lubatti, H.J.; Wilkes, J.; Zhao, T. (Univ. Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)); Braun, H.M.; Ecker, U.; Roeser, A. (Univ. Wuppertal (Germany)); Conrad, J.M.; Fang, G.; Michael, D.G.; Nickerson, R.B.; Pipkin, F.M.; Schmitt, M.; Wilson, R. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Derado, I.; Eckardt, V.; Fermilab E665 Collaboration

    1992-08-13

    Inelastic scattering of 490 GeV {mu}{sup +} from deuterium and xenon nuclei has been studied for x{sub Bj}>0.001. The ratio of the xenon/deuterium cross section per nucleon is observed to vary with x{sub Bj}, with a depletion in the kinematic range 0.001

  9. Design and construction of a cryogenic distillation device for removal of krypton for liquid xenon dark matter detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhou; Bao, Lei; Hao, Xihuan; Ju, Yonglin

    2014-01-01

    Liquid xenon (Xe) is one of the commendable detecting media for the dark matter detections. However, the small content of radioactive krypton-85 ((85)Kr) always exists in the commercial xenon products. An efficient cryogenic distillation system to remove this krypton (Kr) from commercial xenon products has been specifically designed, developed, and constructed in order to meet the requirements of the dark matter experiments with high- sensitivity and low-background. The content of krypton in regular commercial xenon products can be reduced from 10(-9) to 10(-12), with 99% xenon collection efficiency at maximum flow rate of 5 kg/h (15SLPM). The purified xenon gases produced by this distillation system can be used as the detecting media in the project of Panda X, which is the first dark matter detector developed in China.

  10. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic

  11. Minimum alveolar concentration-awake of Xenon alone and in combination with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T; Nakata, Y; Ishiguro, Y; Niimi, Y; Suwa, K; Morita, S

    2000-11-01

    The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC)-awake is a traditional index of hypnotic potency of an inhalational anesthetic. The MAC-awake of xenon, an inert gas with anesthetic properties (MAC = 71%), has not been determined. It is also unknown how xenon interacts with isoflurane or sevoflurane on the MAC-awake. In the first part of the study, 90 female patients received xenon, nitrous oxide (N2O), isoflurane, or sevoflurane supplemented with epidural anesthesia (n = 36 for xenon and n = 18 per group for other anesthetics). In the second part, 72 additional patients received either xenon or N2O combined with the 0.5 times MAC-awake concentration of isoflurane or sevoflurane (0.2% and 0.3%, respectively, based on the results of the first part; n = 18 per group). During emergence, the concentration of an assigned anesthetic (xenon or N2O only in the second part) was decreased in 0. 1 MAC decrements every 15 min from 0.8 MAC or from 70% in the case of N2O until the patient followed the command to either open her eyes or to squeeze and release the investigator's hand. The concentration midway between the value permitting the first response to command and that just preventing it was defined as the MAC-awake. The MAC-awake were as follows: xenon, 32.6 +/- 6.1% (mean +/- SD) or 0.46 +/- 0.09 MAC; N2O, 63.3 +/- 7.1% (0.61 +/- 0.07 MAC); isoflurane, 0.40 +/- 0.07% (0.35 +/- 0.06 MAC); and sevoflurane, 0.59 +/- 0.10% (0.35 +/- 0.06 MAC). Addition of the 0.5 MAC-awake concentrations of isoflurane and sevoflurane reduced the MAC-awake of xenon to 0.50 +/- 0.15 and 0.51 +/- 0.16 times its MAC-awake as a sole agent, but that of N2O to the values significantly greater than 0.5 times its MAC-awake as a sole agent (0.68 +/- 0.12 and 0.66 +/- 0.14 times MAC-awake; P MAC-awake of xenon is 33% or 0.46 times its MAC. In terms of the MAC-fraction, this is smaller than that for N2O but greater than those for isoflurane and sevoflurane. Unlike N2O, xenon interacts additively with isoflurane

  12. Krypton assay in xenon at the ppq level using a gas chromatographic system combined with a mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lindemann, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a new method to measure krypton traces in xenon at so far unprecedented low concentrations. This is a mandatory task for many near-future low-background particle physics detectors. Our system is based on a cryogenic gas chromatographic krypton/xenon separation and a subsequent mass spectroscopic krypton quantification. We prove this system to reach a detection limit of 8 ppq (parts per quadrillion) and present results of distilled xenon with krypton concentrations below 1 ppt.

  13. High efficiency noble gas electron impact ion source for isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, A. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dahl, D. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ward, M. B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-01

    An electron impact ion source has been designed for generation of noble gas ions in a compact isotope separator. The source utilizes a circular filament that surrounds an ionization chamber, enabling multiple passes of electrons through the ionization chamber. This report presents ion optical design and the results of efficiency and sensitivity measurements performed in an ion source test chamber and in the compact isotope separator. The cylindrical design produced xenon ions at an efficiency of 0.37% with a sensitivity of ~24 µA /Pa at 300 µA of electron current.

  14. XENON IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK (PPD-Xe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti, K.; Mathew, K. J., E-mail: kattathu.mathew@srs.gov [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-20

    Relationships among solar system Xe components as observed in the solar wind, in planetary atmospheres, and in meteorites are investigated using isotopic correlations. The term PPD-Xe is used for components inferred to have been present in the molecular cloud material that formed the protoplanetary disk (PPD). The evidence of the lack of simple relationships between terrestrial atmospheric Xe and solar or meteoritic components is confirmed. Xe isotopic correlations indicate a heterogeneous PPD composition with variable mixing ratios of the nucleosynthetic component Xe-HL. Solar Xe represents a bulk PPD component, and the isotopic abundances did not change from the time of incorporation into the interior of Mars through times of regolith implantations to the present.

  15. Cation location in microporous zeolite, SSZ-13, probed with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Na Ra; Kim, Su Hyun; Shin, Hye Sun; Jang, Ik Jun; Cho, Sung June

    2013-06-01

    The location of metal ion, Ag2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ and Y3+ in the SSZ-13 has been investigated with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum. It was referred that the location of the metal ion varies depending on the corresponding charge. The ion-exchanged Ag ion was located in the alpha-cage to interact directly with xenon. Others multivalent cation contributed little with xenon because these were present near the six membered rings where xenon cannot access.

  16. An homeopathic cure to pure Xenon large diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, C D R; Freitas, E.D.C.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Monrabal, F.; Monteiro, C.M.B.; Santos, J. M. F. Dos; Veloso, J.F.C.A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J

    2016-01-01

    The NEXT neutrinoless double beta decay experiment will use a high- pressure gas electroluminescence-based TPC to search for the decay of Xe-136. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to reconstruct the topology of events with energies close to Qbb. The rejection potential associated to the topology reconstruction is limited by our capacity to prop- erly reconstruct the original path of the electrons in the gas. This reconstruction is limited by different factors that include the geometry of the detector, the density of the sensors in the tracking plane and the separation among them, etc. Ultimately, the resolution is limited by the physics of electron diffusion in the gas. In this paper we present a series of molecular additives that can be used in Xenon gas at very low partial pressure to reduce both longitudinal and transverse diffusion. We will show the results of different Monte-Carlo simulations of electron transport in the gas mixtures from wich we have extracted the value of...

  17. Conceptual Design of the Nuclear Electronic Xenon Ion System (NEXIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monheiser, Jeff; Polk, Jay; Randolph, Tom

    2004-01-01

    In support of the NEXIS program, Aerojet-Redmond Operations, with review and input from the JPL and Boeing, has completed the design for a development model (DM) discharge chamber assembly and main discharge cathode assembly. These efforts along with the work by JPL to develop the carbon-carbon-composite ion optics assembly have resulted in a complete ion engine design. The goal of the NEXIS program is to significantly advance the current state of the art by developing an ion engine capable of operating at an input power of 20kW, an Isp of 7500 sec and have a total xenon through put capability of 2000 kg. In this paper we will describe the methodology used to design the discharge chamber and cathode assemblies and describe the resulting final design. Specifics will include the concepts used for the mounting of the ion optics along with the concepts used for the gimbal mounts. In addition, we will present results of a vibrational analysis showing how the engine will respond to a typical Delta IV heavy vibration spectrum.

  18. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K; Ongari, Daniele; Xu, Wenqian; Mohamed, Mona H; Haranczyk, Maciej; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2017-08-10

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas, but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycling from anesthetic gas mixtures can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low-temperature distillation to recover Xe; this method is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose a much simpler and more efficient system to recover and recycle Xe from exhaled anesthetic gas mixtures at room temperature using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity and Xe/O2 , Xe/N2 and Xe/CO2 selectivity at room temperature. The in situ synchrotron measurements suggest that Xe is occupies the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Noble Liquid (Xenon or Krypton) Totally Active Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Main Goals\\\\ \\\\ Determine ionization and scintillation yields in liquid Xenon (LXe) or Krypton.\\\\ \\\\ Determine the electron lifetime and photon mean free path in LXe or LKr. \\\\ \\\\ Determine energy resolution of LXe or LKr via ionization or scintillation.\\\\ \\\\ Determine correlation of fluctuations between ionization and scintillation. Summary of Results \\\\ \\\\ -~measured the electron lifetime in LXe, ($\\tau$~$>$~400 $\\mu$s).\\\\ \\\\ -~measured the energy to create an ionization electron in LXe, W=9.8 eV.\\\\ \\\\ -~measured the energy to create a LXe scintillation photon, W$ _{s} $~=~14.2~eV. \\\\ \\\\ -~measured the anticorrelation of scintillation and ionization yields. \\\\ \\\\ -~measured the energy resolution in LXe via ionization, $ sigma _{E} / $E=0.07\\%/$\\sqrt$E(GeV). \\\\ \\\\ -~measured resolution in LXe via scintillation $ sigma _{E} / $E=0.24\\%/$\\sqrt$E(GeV)+0.26\\%. \\\\ \\\\ -~measured electron drift velocity in LXe:~neat (2.5 mm/$\\mu$s), doped (4.4~mm/$\\mu$s). \\\\ \\\\ -~measured the photon mean free path in LXe vs $ lambd...

  20. Monte Carlo model for electron degradation in xenon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Mukundan, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a Monte Carlo model for studying the local degradation of electrons in the energy range 9-10000 eV in xenon gas. Analytically fitted form of electron impact cross sections for elastic and various inelastic processes are fed as input data to the model. Two dimensional numerical yield spectrum, which gives information on the number of energy loss events occurring in a particular energy interval, is obtained as output of the model. Numerical yield spectrum is fitted analytically, thus obtaining analytical yield spectrum. The analytical yield spectrum can be used to calculate electron fluxes, which can be further employed for the calculation of volume production rates. Using yield spectrum, mean energy per ion pair and efficiencies of inelastic processes are calculated. The value for mean energy per ion pair for Xe is 22 eV at 10 keV. Ionization dominates for incident energies greater than 50 eV and is found to have an efficiency of 65% at 10 keV. The efficiency for the excitation process is 30%...

  1. Reactivity of Xenon with Ice at Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Bonev, Stanimir A.; Hochlaf, Majdi; Maynard-Casely, Helen E.

    2013-06-01

    We report results from high pressure and temperature experiments that provide evidence for the reactivity of xenon with water ice at pressures above 50 GPa and a temperature of 1500 K—conditions that are found in the interiors of Uranus and Neptune. The x-ray data are sufficient to determine a hexagonal lattice with four Xe atoms per unit cell and several possible distributions of O atoms. The measurements are supplemented with ab initio calculations, on the basis of which a crystallographic structure with a Xe4O12H12 primitive cell is proposed. The newly discovered compound is formed in the stability fields of superionic ice and η-O2, and has the same oxygen subnetwork as the latter. Furthermore, it has a weakly metallic character and likely undergoes sublattice melting of the H subsystem. Our findings indicate that Xe is expected to be depleted in the atmospheres of the giant planets as a result of sequestration at depth.

  2. Multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of xenon: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajic, S.J.; Compton, R.N.; Tang, X.; L' Huiller, A.; Lambropoulos, P.

    1988-11-01

    Photoelectron energy and angular distributions for resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of xenon via the three-photon-allowed 7s(3/2)/sub 1//sup 0/ and 5d(3/2)/sub 1//sup 0/ states have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. The electron kinetic energy spectra give the probability of leaving Xe/sup +/ in either the /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/ or /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ core. The measured branching ratio for leaving each ionic core is used to test the theoretical description of the REMPI process. Measurements of both the angular distributions and the (3+1) REMPI via the 5d state are adequately reproduced by multichannel quantum defect theory. However, measurements of angular distributions for the electrons resulting from (3+1) via the 7s(3/2)/sub 1//sup 0/ state into Xe/sup +/ /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ (core preserving) or Xe/sup +/ /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/ (core changing) are in striking disagreement with theory. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  3. Simulation of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Arslanbekov, R. R.; Kolobov, V. I.

    2004-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the efficiency of excimer lamps can be drastically increased in a pulsed regime. A one-dimensional simulation of pulsed excimer lamps has been performed by Carman and Mildren (2003 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 36 19) (C&M). However, some computational results of the work of C&M are questionable and need to be revisited. In this paper, a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in xenon has been simulated for operating conditions similar to those of C&M to better understand plasma dynamics in a pulsed regime. Our simulation results differ considerably from the computational results of C&M. Although these differences do not affect profoundly the plasma macro parameters measured in the C&M experiments, they offer a better understanding of plasma dynamics in pulsed DBDs and form a solid foundation for computational optimization of excimer lamps. It was found that the dynamics of breakdown and the current pulse depend significantly on the initial densities of species after a previous pulse, and so it is important to accurately simulate the plasma evolution in both the afterglow and active stages. It seems possible to modify the power deposition in the plasma by varying external discharge parameters such as the amplitude and the rise time of the applied voltage, and to modify the plasma composition by changing the pulse repetition rate and plasma decay in the afterglow stage.

  4. Simulation of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, E A [St Petersburg State University, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, A A [St Petersburg State University, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Arslanbekov, R R [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville (United States); Kolobov, V I [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville (United States)

    2004-11-07

    Recently, it has been shown that the efficiency of excimer lamps can be drastically increased in a pulsed regime. A one-dimensional simulation of pulsed excimer lamps has been performed by Carman and Mildren (2003 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 36 19) (C and M). However, some computational results of the work of C and M are questionable and need to be revisited. In this paper, a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in xenon has been simulated for operating conditions similar to those of C and M to better understand plasma dynamics in a pulsed regime. Our simulation results differ considerably from the computational results of C and M. Although these differences do not affect profoundly the plasma macro parameters measured in the C and M experiments, they offer a better understanding of plasma dynamics in pulsed DBDs and form a solid foundation for computational optimization of excimer lamps. It was found that the dynamics of breakdown and the current pulse depend significantly on the initial densities of species after a previous pulse, and so it is important to accurately simulate the plasma evolution in both the afterglow and active stages. It seems possible to modify the power deposition in the plasma by varying external discharge parameters such as the amplitude and the rise time of the applied voltage, and to modify the plasma composition by changing the pulse repetition rate and plasma decay in the afterglow stage.

  5. NEST: A Comprehensive Model for Scintillation Yield in Liquid Xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Szydagis, M; Kazkaz, K; Mock, J; Stolp, D; Sweany, M; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Walsh, N; Woods, M

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive model for explaining scintillation yield in liquid xenon is introduced. We unify various definitions of work function which abound in the literature and incorporate all available data on electron recoil scintillation yield. This results in a better understanding of electron recoil, and facilitates an improved description of nuclear recoil. An incident gamma energy range of O(1 keV) to O(1 MeV) and electric fields between 0 and O(10 kV/cm) are incorporated into this heuristic model. We show results from a Geant4 implementation, but because the model has a few free parameters, implementation in any simulation package should be simple. We use a quasi-empirical approach, with an objective of improving detector calibrations and performance verification. The model will aid in the design and optimization of future detectors. This model is also easy to extend to other noble elements. In this paper we lay the foundation for an exhaustive simulation code which we call NEST (Noble Element Simulation Tech...

  6. Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

  7. Is Missing Xenon in the Earth's Inner Core

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Li; Zou, Guangtian; Ma, Yanming

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric studies of Earth have shown that more than 90% of xenon (Xe) is depleted if compared to the abundance of chondritic meteorites1,2. This missing Xe paradox remains a long-standing mystery and has become an extensive debate2-18. Earlier high pressure experimental and theoretical studies3-5 that were unable to find the reaction of Xe with iron (Fe), the main constituent of the Earth's inner core, seemingly excluded the Earth's inner core from the Xe reservoir. Here we report the first evidence on the chemical reaction of Xe with Fe at conditions of Earth's inner core predicted through our developed first-principles structure searching technique unbiased by any known structural knowledge. We find that Xe and Fe form stable inter-metallic compound of XeFe3 stoichiometry by adopting a Cu3Au-type cubic structure. By virtue of an unusual Xe -> Fe charge transfer, Xe loses its chemical inertness by opening up the completed filled 5p electron shell and thereby functions as a 5p-like element, while Fe is neg...

  8. Production of fusion radionuclides: Molybdenum-99/ Iodine - 131 and Xenon-133; Produccion de los radionucleidos de fision: Molibdeno-99, Yodo-131 y Xenon-133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina, M.; Carrillo, D.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents a new radiochemical method for industrial production of the radionuclides: molybdenum-99, iodine-131 and xenon-133. The above mentioned method based on the alkaline metathesis reaction of irradiated uranium (IV) fluoride, presents the best characteristics for the proposed objective. The study deals with the analysis of that reaction and the separation and purification processes. (Author) 71 refs.

  9. Recovery index, attentiveness and state of memory after xenon or isoflurane anaesthesia: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Performance of patients immediately after anaesthesia is an area of special interest and so a clinical trial was conducted to compare Xenon with Isoflurane anaesthesia. In order to assess the early cognitive recovery the syndrome short test (SST) according to Erzigkeit (Geromed GmbH) was applied. Methods ASA I and II patients undergoing long and short surgical interventions were randomised to receive either general anaesthesia with Xenon or Isoflurane. The primary endpoint was the validated SST which covering memory disturbances and attentiveness. The test was used on the day prior to intervention, one and three hours post extubation. The secondary endpoint was the recovery index (RI) measured after the end of the inhalation of Xenon or Isoflurane. In addition the Aldrete score was evaluated up to 180 min. On the first post-operative day the patients rated the quality of the anaesthetic using a scoring system from 1-6. Results The demographics of the groups were similar. The sum score of the SST delivered a clear trend one hour post extubation and a statistically significant superiority for Xenon three hours post extubation (p Aldrete score was significantly higher for 45 min. The scoring system results were also better after Xenon anaesthesia (p < 0.001). Conclusions The results show that recovery from anaesthesia and the early return of post-operative cognitive functions are significantly better after Xenon anaesthesia compared to Isoflurane. The results of the RI for Xenon are similar with the previously published results. Trial Registration The trial was registered with the number ISRCTN01110844 http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/pf/01110844. PMID:20459661

  10. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    CERN Document Server

    Sadofyev, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries ``anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the ``anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the ``anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and {\\it qualitative} difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are {\\it model-dependent} and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  11. Anomalous magnetic moment with heavy virtual leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Alexander [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Liu, Tao [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Steinhauser, Matthias [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    We compute the contributions to the electron and muon anomalous magnetic moment induced by heavy leptons up to four-loop order. Asymptotic expansion is applied to obtain three analytic expansion terms which show rapid convergence.

  12. Anomalous magnetic moment with heavy virtual leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Kurz, Alexander; Marquard, Peter; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We compute the contributions to the electron and muon anomalous magnetic moment induced by heavy leptons up to four-loop order. Asymptotic expansion is applied to obtain three analytic expansion terms which show rapid convergence.

  13. Anomalous Fractional Diffusion Equation for Transport Phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiuhuaZENG; HouqiangLI; 等

    1999-01-01

    We derive the standard diffusion equation from the continuity equation and by discussing the defectiveness of earlier proposed equations,we get the generalized fractional diffusion equation for anomalous diffusion.

  14. Anomalous magnetic moment with heavy virtual leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Alexander [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Liu, Tao; Steinhauser, Matthias [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    We compute the contributions to the electron and muon anomalous magnetic moment induced by heavy leptons up to four-loop order. Asymptotic expansion is applied to obtain three analytic expansion terms which show rapid convergence.

  15. Investigation of Isotope Anomalies in Meteorites and their Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jesper Christian

    and earliest evolution of the solar system through the chemical and isotopic study of meteorites. One area of cosmochemistry that has benefited from high-precision mass spectrometry is that of early solar system chronology. Several radioactive isotopes with short and long half-lives are known to have been...... thermal events caused by the actively accreting protosun, an initial well-mixed disk could evolve to isotopic heterogeneity over time. Such extensive thermal processing is likely recorded in a range of elements as any element present in anomalous presolar carrier grains would be isotopically distinct from....... Moreover, high-precision tungsten and zirconium isotope results for bulk meteorites and inclusions help constrain the nature and degree of processing experienced by dust and gas present in the protoplanetary disk. Our results show that short-lived radionuclei 182Hf and 26Al had different stellar sources...

  16. Signal velocity for anomalous dispersive waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, F. (Bologna Univ. (Italy))

    1983-03-11

    The concept of signal velocity for dispersive waves is usually identified with that of group velocity. When the dispersion is anomalous, this interpretation is not correct since the group velocity can assume nonphysical values. In this note, by using the steepest descent method first introduced by Brillouin, the phase velocity is shown to be the signal velocity when the dispersion is anomalous in the full range of frequencies.

  17. Anomalous transport due to scale anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Chernodub, M N

    2016-01-01

    We show that the scale anomaly in field theories leads to new anomalous transport effects that emerge in external electromagnetic field in inhomogeneous gravitational background. In inflating geometry the QED scale anomaly generates electric current which flows in opposite direction with respect to background electric field. In static spatially inhomogeneous gravitational background the dissipationless electric current flows transversely both to the magnetic field axis and to the gradient of the inhomogeneity. The anomalous currents are proportional to the beta function of the theory.

  18. Anomalous magnetism in hydrogenated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, N. A.; Lado, J. L.; Jacob, D.; Fernández-Rossier, J.

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the problem of local moment formation in graphene due to chemisorption of individual atomic hydrogen or other analogous sp 3 covalent functionalizations. We describe graphene with the single-orbital Hubbard model, so that the H chemisorption is equivalent to a vacancy in the honeycomb lattice. To circumvent artifacts related to periodic unit cells, we use either huge simulation cells of up to 8 ×105 sites, or an embedding scheme that allows the modeling of a single vacancy in an otherwise pristine infinite honeycomb lattice. We find three results that stress the anomalous nature of the magnetic moment (m ) in this system. First, in the noninteracting (U =0 ) zero-temperature (T =0 ) case, the m (B ) is a continuous smooth curve with divergent susceptibility, different from the stepwise constant function found for single unpaired spins in a gapped system. Second, for U =0 and T >0 , the linear susceptibility follows a power law ∝T-α with an exponent of α =0.77 different from the conventional Curie law. For U >0 , in the mean-field approximation, the integrated moment is smaller than m =1 μB , in contrast with results using periodic unit cells. These three results highlight the fact that the magnetic response of the local moment induced by sp 3 functionalizations in graphene is different from that of local moments in gapped systems, for which the magnetic moment is quantized and follows a Curie law, and from Pauli paramagnetism in conductors, for which linear susceptibility can be defined at T =0 .

  19. Setup for SiPM characterization in liquid xenon for the nEXO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufschmidt, Patrick; Bayerlein, Reimund; Jamil, Ako; Schneider, Judith; Wagenpfeil, Michael; Wredel, Gerrit; Ziegler, Tobias; Anton, Gisela; Hoessl, Juergen; Michel, Thilo [ECAP, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen Nuernberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The nEXO (next enriched xenon observatory) is a future experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of Xe-136 with a single-phase time-projection-chamber filled with liquid xenon. Besides position resolved detection of the released charge with low noise electronics, efficient collection and detection of the xenon scintillation light with its short wavelength of 175 nm is important to obtain good energy resolution. Due to the demands on radiopurity of the materials employed in the detector, Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) shall be used to detect the scintillation light. Dedicated SiPMs, compatible with the requirements of the experiment, have to be developed. In order to characterize SiPMs - for example with respect to photon detection efficiency at 175 nm, cross-talk probability, dark-rate, after-pulse probability - we have set up a SiPM test stand in which SiPMs can be operated in liquid or in gaseous xenon. Cooling is performed with a cold finger immersed in liquid nitrogen. Scintillation photons are produced by the interaction of alpha particles from a radioactive source. In addition to the SiPMs, a VUV-sensitive photomultiplier tube is present in the xenon cell so that coincidence measurements can be performed. In this contribution we present the status of our test setup.

  20. Nitrous oxide and xenon enhance phospholipid-N-methylation in rat brain synaptic plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, J L; Janicki, P K; Franks, J J

    1995-01-01

    Halothane and isoflurane increase the rate of phospholipid methylation (PLM) in rat brain synaptosomal membranes, a process linked to the coupling of neuronal excitation to neurotransmitter release. In contrast, synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA) pumping is reduced by exposure to halothane, isoflurane, xenon and nitrous oxide (N2O). To examine further the relationship between PLM, PMCA and anesthetic action, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant concentrations of two less potent anesthetic gases, N2O and xenon, on PLM in SPM. Biochemical assays were performed on SPM exposed to 1.3 MAC of N2O (2 atm), 1.3 MAC of xenon (1.23 atm) or an equivalent pressure of helium for control. N2O or xenon exposure increased PLM to 115% or 113%, respectively, of helium control (p xenon depressed PMCA activity to 78% and 85% of control (p < 0.05). Observations that PLM and PMCA are both altered by a wide variety of inhalation anesthetic agents at clinically relevant partial pressures lend support to a possible involvement and interaction of these processes in anesthetic action.

  1. Qualification Tests of the R11410-21 Photomultiplier Tubes for the XENON1T Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, P; Cichon, D; Danisch, M; Franco, D; Kaether, F; Kish, A; Lindner, M; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Mayani, D; Rauch, L; Wei, Y; Wulf, J

    2016-01-01

    The Hamamatsu R11410-21 photomultiplier tube is the photodetector of choice for the XENON1T dual-phase time projection chamber. The device has been optimized for a very low intrinsic radioactivity, a high quantum efficiency and a high sensitivity to single photon detection. A total of 248 tubes are currently operated in XENON1T, selected out of 321 tested units. In this article the procedures implemented to evaluate the large number of tubes prior to their installation in XENON1T are described. The parameter distributions for all tested tubes are shown, with an emphasis on those selected for XENON1T, of which the impact on the detector performance is discussed. All photomultipliers have been tested in a nitrogen atmosphere at cryogenic temperatures, with a subset of the tubes being tested in gaseous and liquid xenon, simulating their operating conditions in the dark matter detector. The performance and evaluation of the tubes in the different environments is reported and the criteria for rejection of PMTs are...

  2. New constraints and discovery potential of sub-GeV dark matter with xenon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    Existing xenon dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments can probe the DM-nucleon interaction of DM with a sub-GeV mass through a search for photon emission from the recoiling xenon atom. We show that LUX's constraints on sub-GeV DM, which utilize the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals, are approximately 3 orders of magnitude more stringent than previous xenon constraints in this mass range, derived from the XENON10 and XENON100 S2-only searches. The new LUX constraints provide the most stringent direct detection constraints for DM particles with a mass below 0.5 GeV. In addition, the photon emission signal in LUX and its successor LZ maintain the discrimination between background and signal events so that an unambiguous discovery of sub-GeV DM is possible. We show that LZ has the potential to reconstruct the DM mass with ≃20 % accuracy for particles lighter than 0.5 GeV.

  3. Positron emission tomography study of regional cerebral blood flow and flow-metabolism coupling during general anaesthesia with xenon in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rex, S; Meyer, P. T; Baumert, J.-H; Rossaint, R; Fries, M; Büll, U; Schaefer, W. M

    2008-01-01

    Background The effects of xenon on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are controversial. Moreover, the precise sites of action at which xenon exerts its effects in the human brain remain to be established...

  4. Iodine-xenon studies and the relax mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Ash, R. D.; Lyon, I. C.; Johnston, W. A.; Hutchison, R.; Bridges, J. C.; Turner, G.

    1994-07-01

    RELAX combines a resonance ionization ion source with a cryogenic sample concentrator to achieve ultrasensitivity. Gas is extracted from samples using either a continuous wave laser microprobe based on an argon-ion laser or a filament microfurnace. Recent refinements in the operating procedure have resulted in optimum sensitivities such that detection rates of 1 cps are achieved from fewer than 500 atoms. A Xe-128 spike reservoir has also been added and characterized, allowing accurate determinations of absolute amounts of gas. We have completed a preliminary study of the iodine-xenon system in samples from the Bjurbole and Parnallee meteorites. Bjurbole chondrules ranging in mass from 5.45 mg to 260 micrograms were analyzed by laser microprobe. The results from these samples are consistent with an effectively uniform formation age, suggesting that the use of Bjurbole chondrules for calibration of this chronometer can be extended to samples in this size range. Samples from two chondrules from the Parnallee meteorite have been analyzed to date. An alpha-cristobalite-bearing chondrule (designated CB1) was found to have a formation age 4.62 +/- 0.44 Ma after Bjurboele, while a porphyritic olivine macrochondrule appears to have been reset after the decay of I-129(t1/2 17 Ma). Consideration of these results alongside Ar-Ar data from the macrochondrule and whole rock samples suggests that Parnallee has a complex history: The macrochondrule underwent an early postcrystallization degassing event but appears to have been essentially unaffected by the later (1.9 Ga) partial resetting of the bulk meteorite.

  5. A New Wide-Range Equation of State for Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John H.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a new wide-range equation of state (EOS) for xenon. Three different prior EOS models predicted significant variations in behavior along the high pressure Hugoniot from an initial liquid state at 163.5 K and 2.97 g/cm3, which is near the triple point. Experimental measurements on Sandia's Z machine as well as density functional theory based molecular dynamics calculations both invalidate the prior EOS models in the pressure range from 200 to 840 GPa. The reason behind these EOS model disagreements is found to lie in the contribution from the thermal electronic models. A new EOS, based upon the standard separation of the Helmholtz free energy into ionic and electronic components, is constructed by combining the successful parts of prior models with a semi-empirical electronic model. Both the fluid and fcc solid phases are combined in a wide-range, multi-phase table. The new EOS is tabulated on a fine temperature and density grid, to preserve phase boundary information, and is available as table number 5191 in the LANL SESAME database. Improvements over prior EOS models are found not only along the Hugoniot, but also along the melting curve and in the region of the liquid-vapor critical point. *Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Measurement of the absolute reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) immersed in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, F.; Lindote, A.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Silva, C.; Bras, P.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Lopes, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of a detector using liquid xenon (LXe) as a scintillator is strongly dependent on the collection efficiency for xenon scintillation light, which in turn is critically dependent on the reflectance of the surfaces that surround the active volume. To improve the light collection in such detectors the active volume is usually surrounded by polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) reflector panels, used due to its very high reflectance—even at the short wavelength of scintillation light of LXe (peaked at 178 nm). In this work, which contributed to the overall R&D effort towards the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment, we present experimental results for the absolute reflectance measurements of three different PTFE samples (including the material used in the LUX detector) immersed in LXe for its scintillation light. The obtained results show that very high bi-hemispherical reflectance values (>= 97%) can be achieved, enabling very low energy thresholds in liquid xenon scintillator-based detectors.

  7. A simple high-sensitivity technique for purity analysis of xenon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, D S; Hall, C; Kaufman, L; Langford, T; Slutsky, S; Yen, Y R

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development and performance of a high-sensitivity purity-analysis technique for gaseous xenon. The gas is sampled at macroscopic pressure from the system of interest using a UHV leak valve. The xenon present in the sample is removed with a liquid-nitrogen cold trap, and the remaining impurities are observed with a standard vacuum mass-spectroscopy device. Using calibrated samples of xenon gas spiked with known levels of impurities, we find that the minimum detectable levels of N2, O2, and methane are 1 ppb, 160 ppt, and 60 ppt respectively. This represents an improvement of about a factor of 10,000 compared to measurements performed without a coldtrap.

  8. Determination of Xenon in Air by a Pulse-discharge Helium Ionization Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhan-ying; CHANG Yin-zhong; LIU Shu-jiang; ZHANG Hai-tao; WANG Shi-lian; LI Qi

    2012-01-01

    A pulse-discharge helium ionization detector(Valco,PD-D3-I) was used to measure xenon concentration in air.The dependences of the detector relative response on various gas chromatograph parameters were investigated.Based on the well prepared gas connections for the detector system and optimized gas ehromatography(GC) working conditions,the atmospheric xenon concentration could be measured by the cheap GC method with a detection level of 0.7×10-9(parts by volume).Moreover,the xenon concentration in the ground level air around our laboratory was measured with the result of 0.085 × 10-6(parts by volume) and RSD of 0.91%.

  9. Dark matter results from 100 live days of XENON100 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Askin, A; Baudis, L; Behrens, A; Bokeloh, K; Brown, E; Bruch, T; Bruno, G; Cardoso, J M R; Chen, W-T; Choi, B; Cline, D; Duchovni, E; Fattori, S; Ferella, A D; Gao, F; Giboni, K-L; Gross, E; Kish, A; Lam, C W; Lamblin, J; Lang, R F; Levy, C; Lim, K E; Lin, Q; Lindemann, S; Lindner, M; Lopes, J A M; Lung, K; Undagoitia, T Marrodán; Mei, Y; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orrigo, S E A; Pantic, E; Persiani, R; Plante, G; Ribeiro, A C C; Santorelli, R; dos Santos, J M F; Sartorelli, G; Schumann, M; Selvi, M; Shagin, P; Simgen, H; Teymourian, A; Thers, D; Vitells, O; Wang, H; Weber, M; Weinheimer, C

    2011-09-23

    We present results from the direct search for dark matter with the XENON100 detector, installed underground at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN, Italy. XENON100 is a two-phase time-projection chamber with a 62 kg liquid xenon target. Interaction vertex reconstruction in three dimensions with millimeter precision allows the selection of only the innermost 48 kg as the ultralow background fiducial target. In 100.9 live days of data, acquired between January and June 2010, no evidence for dark matter is found. Three candidate events were observed in the signal region with an expected background of (1.8 ± 0.6) events. This leads to the most stringent limit on dark matter interactions today, excluding spin-independent elastic weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) nucleon scattering cross sections above 7.0 × 10(-45) cm(2) for a WIMP mass of 50 GeV/c(2) at 90% confidence level.

  10. Probe of Multi-electron Dynamics in Xenon by Caustics in High Order Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Faccialà, Davide; Bruner, Barry D; Ciriolo, Anna G; De Silvestri, Sandro; Devetta, Michele; Negro, Matteo; Soifer, Hadas; Stagira, Salvatore; Dudovich, Nirit; Vozzi, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the giant resonance in Xenon by high-order harmonic generation spectroscopy driven by a two-color field. The addition of a non-perturbative second harmonic component parallel to the driving field breaks the symmetry between neighboring sub-cycles resulting in the appearance of spectral caustics at two distinct cut-off energies. By controlling the phase delay between the two color components it is possible to tailor the harmonic emission in order to amplify and isolate the spectral feature of interest. In this paper we demonstrate how this control scheme can be used to investigate the role of electron correlations that give birth to the giant resonance in Xenon. The collective excitations of the giant dipole resonance in Xenon combined with the spectral manipulation associated with the two color driving field allow to see features that are normally not accessible and to obtain a quantitative good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions.

  11. Bonding xenon and krypton on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski Ludwik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present density functional theory (DFT calculation results of krypton and xenon atoms interaction on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal. A pseudo-potential approach in the generalised gradient approximation (GGA was applied using the ABINIT program package. To compute the unit cell parameters, the 25 atom super-cell was chosen. It has been revealed that close to the surface of a potential well is formed for xenon and krypton atom due to its interaction with the atoms of oxygen and uranium. Depth and shape of the well is the subject of ab initio calculations in adiabatic approximation. The calculations were performed both for the case of oxygenic and metallic surfaces. It has been shown that the potential well for the oxygenic surface is deeper than for the metallic surface. The thermal stability of immobilising the atoms of krypton and xenon in the potential wells were evaluated. The results are shown in graphs.

  12. Numerical simulation and experiment of optothermal response of biological tissue irradiated by continuous xenon lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meizhen Huang; Yaxing Tong

    2012-01-01

    A finite element method computation model for analyzing optothermal interaction of polychromatic light and biology tissue is proposed and proven by experiment.A continuous xenon lamp is employed as an example.First,the spectral energy distribution of the xenon lamp is measured and found to be equivalent to a series of quasi-chromatic light with different central wavelengths,different energies,and certain bandwidth.Next,according to the reported thermal and optical parameters of porcine skin and porcine liver,the temporal temperature distributions of these tissues irradiated by each quasi-chromatic light are simulated.Then,the thermal effect is superimposed to obtain the whole optothermal temporal temperature distribution.Moreover,the optothermal response experiments of fresh porcine skin and porcine liver tissues irradiated by continuous xenon lamp are carried out.The results of the simulation and experiment are analyzed and compared,and are found to be commendably matched.

  13. Status of the 2D Bayesian analysis of XENON100 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Stefan [JGU, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The XENON100 experiment is located in the underground laboratory at LNGS in Italy. Since Dark Matter particles will only interact very rarely with normal matter, an environment with ultra low background, which is shielded from cosmic radiation is needed. The standard analysis of XENON100 data has made use of the profile likelihood method (a most frequent approach) and still provides one of the most sensitive exclusion limits to WIMP Dark Matter. Here we present work towards a Bayesian approach to the analysis of XENON100 data, where we attempt to include the measured primary (S1) and secondary (S2) scintillation signals in a more complete way. The background and signal models in the S1-S2 space have to be defined and a corresponding likelihood function, describing these models, has to be constructed.

  14. Probe of Multielectron Dynamics in Xenon by Caustics in High-Order Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccialà, D.; Pabst, S.; Bruner, B. D.; Ciriolo, A. G.; De Silvestri, S.; Devetta, M.; Negro, M.; Soifer, H.; Stagira, S.; Dudovich, N.; Vozzi, C.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the giant resonance in xenon by high-order harmonic generation spectroscopy driven by a two-color field. The addition of a nonperturbative second harmonic component parallel to the driving field breaks the symmetry between neighboring subcycles resulting in the appearance of spectral caustics at two distinct cutoff energies. By controlling the phase delay between the two color components it is possible to tailor the harmonic emission in order to amplify and isolate the spectral feature of interest. In this Letter we demonstrate how this control scheme can be used to investigate the role of electron correlations that give birth to the giant resonance in xenon. The collective excitations of the giant dipole resonance in xenon combined with the spectral manipulation associated with the two-color driving field allow us to see features that are normally not accessible and to obtain a good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions.

  15. Xenon behavior in TiN: A coupled XAS/TEM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bès, R.; Gaillard, C.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Gavarini, S.; Martin, P.; Cardinal, S.; Esnouf, C.; Malchère, A.; Perrat-Mabilon, A.

    2013-03-01

    Titanium nitride is a refractory material that is being considered as an inert matrix in future Generation IV nuclear reactors, in particular in relation to the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor. The main role of this matrix would be to act as a barrier against the release of fission products, in particular gaseous ones like xenon. This release phenomenon will be enhanced by high temperatures expected in the fuel vicinity: 1200 °C under normal conditions, and up to 1800 °C under accidental conditions. It is therefore necessary to investigate the behavior of volatile fission products in TiN under high temperature and irradiation. Indeed, these basic data are very useful to predict the volatile fission products released under these extreme conditions. Our previous work has shown that Xe introduced by ion implantation in sintered TiN tends to be released as a result of annealing, due to a transport mechanism towards the sample surface. The aim of the present work is to determine under which physical state Xe is in TiN. Xenon was first introduced using ion implantation at 800 keV in TiN samples obtained by hot pressing at several concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 8 at.%. Secondly, samples were annealed at high temperature, from 1000 °C to 1500 °C. Xe was then characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The formation of intragranular xenon bubbles was demonstrated, and the xenon concentration which is sufficient to form bubbles is found to be lower than 0.4 at.% under our experimental conditions. These bubbles were found unpressurised at 15 K. Their size increases with the temperature and the local xenon concentration. For the highest xenon concentrations, a mechanism involving the formation of a Xe interconnected bubble network is proposed to explain Xe massive release observed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry experiments.

  16. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne [Department of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Western State Colorado University, 128 Hurst Hall, Gunnison, CO 81230 (United States); McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Pier, Jeffrey R., E-mail: mstaylor@western.edu [Division of Astronomical Sciences, NSF 4201 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  17. On the Source of Astrometric Anomalous Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-01

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed "anomalous refraction" by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale (~2°) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  18. Cassini observation of Jovian anomalous continuum radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sheng-Yi; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Kurth, W. S.; Fischer, G.; Schippers, P.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    Jovian anomalous continuum is a narrowband electromagnetic radiation near 10 kHz that can escape from Jupiter's magnetosphere to interplanetary space. One possible source mechanism is the magnetosheath re-radiation of the Jovian low frequency radio emissions such as the quasiperiodic (QP) radio emissions, broadband kilometric radiation (bKOM) and non-thermal continuum. Jovian anomalous continuum was consistently observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument from 2000 to 2004, right before the Saturn orbit insertion, which means the radiation can be detected as far as 8 AU away from Jupiter. An analysis of intensity versus radial distance shows that the Jovian anomalous continuum has a line source rather than a point source, consistent with the theory that the emission is radiated by the whole length of the magnetotail. The emissions are modulated at the system III period of Jupiter and are unpolarized. Since the lower cutoff frequency of the anomalous continuum is related to the plasma frequency in the magnetosheath of Jupiter, which is a function of solar wind density, the recurrent variations of the lower cutoff frequency can be used as a remote diagnostic of the solar wind condition at Jupiter. We propose that the frequency dispersion, a unique characteristic of the anomalous continuum, is likely a comprehensive effect of both the slow group velocity near the local plasma frequency and the refraction/scattering of the waves by density structures as they propagate in the magnetosheath.

  19. Computation and Analysis of the Global Distribution of the Radioxenon Isotope 133Xe based on Emissions from Nuclear Power Plants and Radioisotope Production Facilities and its Relevance for the Verification of the Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotawa, Gerhard; Becker, Andreas; Kalinowski, Martin; Saey, Paul; Tuma, Matthias; Zähringer, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Monitoring of radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, is a crucial element of the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The capability of the noble gas network, which is currently under construction, to detect signals from a nuclear explosion critically depends on the background created by other sources. Therefore, the global distribution of these isotopes based on emissions and transport patterns needs to be understood. A significant xenon background exists in the reactor regions of North America, Europe and Asia. An emission inventory of the four relevant xenon isotopes has recently been created, which specifies source terms for each power plant. As the major emitters of xenon isotopes worldwide, a few medical radioisotope production facilities have been recently identified, in particular the facilities in Chalk River (Canada), Fleurus (Belgium), Pelindaba (South Africa) and Petten (Netherlands). Emissions from these sites are expected to exceed those of the other sources by orders of magnitude. In this study, emphasis is put on 133Xe, which is the most prevalent xenon isotope. First, based on the emissions known, the resulting 133Xe concentration levels at all noble gas stations of the final CTBT verification network were calculated and found to be consistent with observations. Second, it turned out that emissions from the radioisotope facilities can explain a number of observed peaks, meaning that atmospheric transport modelling is an important tool for the categorization of measurements. Third, it became evident that Nuclear Power Plant emissions are more difficult to treat in the models, since their temporal variation is high and not generally reported. Fourth, there are indications that the assumed annual emissions may be underestimated by factors of two to ten, while the general emission patterns seem to be well understood. Finally, it became evident that 133Xe sources mainly influence the sensitivity of the

  20. Self-shielding effect of a single phase liquid xenon detector for direct dark matter search

    CERN Document Server

    Minamino, A; Ashie, Y; Hosaka, J; Ishihara, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Mitsuda, C; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, Y; Namba, T; Ogawa, H; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Ueshima, K; Ebizuka, Y; Ota, A; Suzuki, S; Hagiwara, H; Hashimoto, Y; Kamada, S; Kikuchi, M; Kobayashi, N; Nagase, T; Nakamura, S; Tomita, K; Uchida, Y; Fukuda, Y; Sato, T; Nishijima, K; Maruyama, T; Motoki, D; Itow, Y; Kim, Y D; Lee, J I; Moon, S H; Lim, K E; Cravens, J P; Smy, M B

    2009-01-01

    Liquid xenon is a suitable material for a dark matter search. For future large scale experiments, single phase detectors are attractive due to their simple configuration and scalability. However, in order to reduce backgrounds, they need to fully rely on liquid xenon's self-shielding property. A prototype detector was developed at Kamioka Observatory to establish vertex and energy reconstruction methods and to demonstrate the self-shielding power against gamma rays from outside of the detector. Sufficient self-shielding power for future experiments was obtained.

  1. Noninvasive xenon-133 measurements of cerebral blood flow using stationary detectors compared with dynamic emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Vorstrup, S; Lassen, N A;

    1986-01-01

    Repeated bedside measurements of CBF have been made possible by the recent development of a mobile unit with 10 stationary detectors using the intravenous xenon-133 method. To evaluate this technique, comparative CBF studies at rest and following the application of a cerebral vasodilatory stimulus...... (acetazolamide, 1 g i.v.) were performed with the mobile equipment and with xenon-133 single-photon emission inhalation tomography in patients with cerebrovascular disease. The CBF level and the flow response to acetazolamide as determined with the two methods were well correlated, although at low flow levels...

  2. 900-L liquid xenon cryogenic system operation for the MEG experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, T; Mihara, S; Hisamatsu, Y; Iawamoto, W; Mori, T; Nishiguchi, H; Otani, W; Sawada, R; Uchiyama, Y; Nishitani, T

    2009-01-01

    A cryogenic system for the MEG (muon rare decay) experiment has started operation at the Paul Sherrer Institute in Zurich. The main part of the MEG detector is the 900-L liquid xenon calorimeter for gamma ray detection, equipped with 850 photo multipliers directly immersed in liquid xenon. A 200 W pulse tube cryocooler enabled LN2-free operation of this calorimeter. A liquid purification system; using a liquid pump and a zero boil-off 1000-L cryogenic buffer dewar is also included in the system. The first entire engineering run was carried out in November-December 2007 and satisfactory cryogenic performances were confirmed.

  3. First-principles calculation of the reflectance of shock-compressed xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, G. E.; Saitov, I. M., E-mail: saitovilnur@gmail.com; Stegailov, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    Within electron density functional theory (DFT), the reflectance of radiation from shock-compressed xenon plasma is calculated. The dependence of the reflectance on the frequency of the incident radiation and on the plasma density is considered. The Fresnel formula is used. The expression for the longitudinal dielectric tensor in the long-wavelength limit is used to calculate the imaginary part of the dielectric function (DF). The real part of the DF is determined by the Kramers-Kronig transformation. The results are compared with experimental data. An approach is proposed to estimate the plasma frequency in shock-compressed xenon.

  4. Spin polarization of xenon films at low-temperature induced by {sup 3}He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biskup, N.; Kalechofsky, N.; Candela, D

    2003-05-01

    We have measured the {sup 129}Xe spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} for xenon films adsorbed on silica gel in an 8 T magnetic field at dilution refrigerator temperatures, both with and without {sup 3}He filling the sample cell. Without {sup 3}He, T{sub 1} increases rapidly as the temperature is lowered. With {sup 3}He, T{sub 1} is considerably shortened, and is consistent with temperature-independent quantum relaxation. Using this technique, it is possible to brute-force polarize large quantities of xenon in high B/T conditions.

  5. Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, P; Dahl, C E

    2011-02-14

    We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al.. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well-described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

  6. Effects of xenon irradiation of the stellate ganglion region on fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Fukami; Komoda, Akihiro; Aratani, Satoko; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Kawate, Mariko; Nakatani, Kou; Akiyama, Masako; Makita, Koshi; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to determine the effect of xenon irradiation of the stellate ganglion region on fibromyalgia. [Subjects] The study included 5 men and 22 women (age, 56.4 ± 16.3 years [range, 25–84 years]) who were diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the modified 2010 criteria of the American College of Rheumatology between July and August 2013. [Methods] Bilateral xenon light irradiation (0.38–1.1 μm) around the stellate ganglion was performed in the supine position by...

  7. The isotope hydrology of Quaternary climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, W G

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the links between climate change and human migration and culture is an important theme in Quaternary archaeology. While oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes in high-latitude ice cores provide the ultimate detailed record of palaeoclimate extending back to the Middle Pleistocene, groundwater can act as a climate archive for areas at lower latitudes, permitting a degree of calibration for proxy records such as lake sediments, bones, and organic matter. Not only can oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes be measured on waters, but the temperature of recharge can be calculated from the amount of the atmospheric noble gases neon, argon, krypton, and xenon in solution, while residence time can be estimated from the decay of the radioisotopes carbon-14, chlorine-36, and krypton-81 over timescales comparable to the ice core record. The Pleistocene-Holocene transition is well characterised in aquifers worldwide, and it is apparent that isotope-temperature relationships of the present day are not necessarily transferable to past climatic regimes, with important implications for the interpretation of proxy isotope data. Groundwaters dating back to one million years, i.e., to beyond the Middle Pleistocene, are only found in major aquifer basins and information is relatively sparse and of low resolution. Speleothem fluid inclusions offer a way of considerably increasing this resolution, but both speleothem formation and large-scale groundwater recharge requires humid conditions, which may be relatively infrequent for areas currently experiencing arid climates. Both types of record therefore require caution in their interpretation when considering a particular archaeological context.

  8. Theory of the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2006-01-01

    The theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is "particle physics in a nutshell" and as such is interesting, exciting and difficult. The current precision of the experimental value for this quantity, improved significantly in the past several years due to experiment E821 at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is so high that a large number of subtle effects not relevant previously, become important for the interpretation of the experimental result. The theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is at the cutting edge of current research in particle physics and includes multiloop calculations in both QED and electroweak theory, precision low-energy hadron physics, isospin violations and scattering of light by light. Any deviation between the theoretical prediction and the experimental value might be interpreted as a signal of an as-yet-unknown new physics. This book provides a comprehensive review of the theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment.

  9. Soft-/rapidity- anomalous dimensions correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, Alexey A

    2016-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between ultraviolet singularities of soft factors for multi-particle production and rapidity singularities of soft factors for multi-parton scattering. This correspondence is a consequence of a conformal mapping between scattering geometries. The correspondence is valid to all orders of perturbation theory and in this way provides a proof of rapidity renormalization procedure for multi-parton scattering soft factors (including the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) soft factor as a special case). As a by-product we obtain an exact relation between the rapidity anomalous dimension and the well-known soft anomalous dimension. The three-loop rapidity anomalous dimensions for TMD and a general multi-parton scattering are derived.

  10. Minimal flavour violation and anomalous top decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas [Theoretische Physik 1, Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Gadatsch, Stefan [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomatic Physics, P.O. Box 41882, 1009 Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    Any experimental evidence of anomalous top-quark couplings will open a window to study physics beyond the standard model (SM). However, all current flavour data indicate that nature is close to ''minimal flavour violation'', i.e. the pattern of flavour violation is given by the CKM matrix, including the hierarchy of parameters. In this talk we present results of the conceptual test of minimal flavour violation for the anomalous charged as well as flavour changing top-quark couplings. Our analysis is embedded in two-Higgs doublet model of type II (2HDM-II). Including renormalization effects, we calculate the top decay rates taking into account anomalous couplings constrained by minimal flavour violation.

  11. Electroweak Baryogenesis with Anomalous Higgs Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Yue, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We investigate feasibility of efficient baryogenesis at the electroweak scale within the effective field theory framework based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In this framework the LHC Higgs boson is described by a singlet scalar field, which, therefore, admits new interactions. Assuming that Higgs couplings with the eletroweak gauge bosons are as in the Standard Model, we demonstrate that the Higgs cubic coupling and the CP-violating Higgs-top quark anomalous couplings alone may drive the a strongly first-order phase transition. The distinguished feature of this transition is that the anomalous Higgs vacuum expectation value is generally non-zero in both phases. We identify a range of anomalous couplings, consistent with current experimental data, where sphaleron rates are sufficiently fast in the 'symmetric' phase and are suppressed in the 'broken' phase and demonstrate that the desired baryon asymmetry can indeed be generated in this framework. This range of the Higgs anomal...

  12. Anomalous magnetohydrodynamics in the extreme relativistic domain

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The evolution equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics are derived in the extreme relativistic regime and contrasted with the treatment of hydromagnetic nonlinearities pioneered by Lichnerowicz in the absence of anomalous currents. In particular we explore the situation where the conventional vector currents are complemented by the axial-vector currents arising either from the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons of a spontaneously broken symmetry or because of finite fermionic density effects. After expanding the generally covariant equations in inverse powers of the conductivity, the relativistic analog of the magnetic diffusivity equation is derived in the presence of vortical and magnetic currents. While the anomalous contributions are generally suppressed by the diffusivity, they are shown to disappear in the perfectly conducting limit. When the flow is irrotational, boost-invariant and with vanishing four-acceleration the corresponding evolution equations are explicitly integrated so that the various physic...

  13. The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    CERN Document Server

    Jegerlehner, Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    This research monograph covers extensively the theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment and provides estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. The muon anomalous magnetic moment is one of the most precisely measured quantities in elementary particle physics and provides one of the most stringent tests of relativistic quantum field theory as a fundamental theoretical framework. It allows for an extremely precise check of the standard model of elementary particles and of its limitations. This book reviews the present state of knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment a=(g-2)/2 of the muon. Recent experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory now reach the unbelievable precision of 0.5 parts per million, improving the accuracy of previous g-2 experiments at CERN by a factor of 14. In addition, quantum electrodynamics and electroweak and hadronic effects are reviewed. Since non-perturbative hadronic effects play a key role for the precision test, their evaluation is described in detail. Perspectives fo...

  14. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.; Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.

    2009-05-01

    We present initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [2]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. As a test case, we apply the code to modeling flows in the HSX stellarator. Due to variations in the neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  15. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel[Dissertation 17527

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M. I

    2008-07-01

    In nuclear fuel, in approximately one quarter of the fissions, one of the two formed fission products is gaseous. These are mainly the noble gases xenon and krypton with isotopes of xenon contributing up to 90% of the product gases. These noble fission gases do not combine with other species, and have a low solubility in the normally used uranium oxide matrix. They can be dissolved in the fuel matrix or precipitate in nanometer-sized bubbles within the fuel grain, in micrometer-sized bubbles at the grain boundaries, and a fraction also precipitates in fuel pores, coming from fuel fabrication. A fraction of the gas can also be released into the plenum of the fuel rod. With increasing fission, and therefore burn-up, the ceramic fuel material experiences a transformation of its structure in the 'cooler' rim region of the fuel. A subdivision occurs of the original fuel grains of few microns size into thousands of small grains of sub-micron sizes. Additionally, larger pores are formed, which also leads into an increasing porosity in the fuel rim, called high burn-up structure. In this structure, only a small fraction of the fission gas remains in the matrix, the major quantity is said to accumulate in these pores. Because of this accumulation, the knowledge of the quantities of gas within these pores is of major interest in consideration to burn-up, fuel performance and especially for safety issues. In case of design based accidents, i.e. rapidly increasing temperature transients, the behavior of the fuel has to be estimated. Various analytical techniques have been used to determine the Xe concentration in nuclear fuel samples. The capabilities of EPMA (Electron Probe Micro-Analyser) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) have been studied and provided some qualitative information, which has been used for determining Xe-matrix concentrations. First approaches combining these two techniques to estimate pore pressures have been recently reported. However

  16. Maximum reasonable radioxenon releases from medical isotope production facilities and their effect on monitoring nuclear explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Theodore W; Kephart, Rosara; Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Miley, Harry S; Saey, Paul R J

    2013-01-01

    Fission gases such as (133)Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of (99)Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Stocki et al., 2005; Saey, 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5 × 10(9) Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers.

  17. Anomalous mass dimension in multiflavor QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doff, A.; Natale, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Models of strongly interacting theories with a large mass anomalous dimension (γm) provide an interesting possibility for the dynamical origin of the electroweak symmetry breaking. A laboratory for these models is QCD with many flavors, which may present a nontrivial fixed point associated to a conformal region. Studies based on conformal field theories and on Schwinger-Dyson equations have suggested the existence of bounds on the mass anomalous dimension at the fixed points of these models. In this note we discuss γm values of multiflavor QCD exhibiting a nontrivial fixed point and affected by relevant four-fermion interactions.

  18. Anomalous Feeding of the Left Upper Lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Christopher; Itagaki, Shinobu; Lajam, Fouad; Flores, Raja M

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old woman who presented with massive hemoptysis. Computed tomographic angiography revealed an anomalous vessel arising from the abdominal aorta, coursing anteriorly and through the diaphragm, and feeding the left upper lobe. At operation the vessel was found to anastomose to the left upper lobe lingula, which contained multiple vascular abnormalities and arteriovenous fistulas. The vessel was ligated, and the affected portion of the left upper lobe was resected. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of an upper lobe is an especially rare form of a Pryce type 1 abnormality. Recognition of these unusual anatomic variants is crucial to successful treatment and avoidance of adverse events.

  19. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  20. Electron attachment of oxygen in a drift chamber filled with xenon + 10% methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Y.; Hayashibara, I.; Ohsugi, T.; Sakanoue, T.; Taketani, A.; Terunuma, N.; Suzuki, Y.; Tsukamoto, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukushima, Y.

    1988-06-01

    The existence of O/sub 2/ contamination attenuates the pulse height and degrades its resolution in a drift chamber filled with xenon-methane (90/10) gas. The first measurement of the electron attachment coefficient due to oxygen in such a mixture is reported.

  1. Electron attachment of oxygen in a drift chamber filled with xenon + 10% methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Y.; Hayashibara, I.; Ohsugi, T.; Sakanoue, T.; Taketani, A.; Terunuma, N.; Suzuki, Y.; Tsukamoto, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukushima, Y.; Kohriki, T.; Nakamura, S.; Sakuda, M.; Watase, Y.

    1988-06-01

    The existence of O 2 contamination attenuates the pulse height and degrades its resolution in a drift chamber filled with xenon-methane (90/10) gas. The first measurement of the electron attachment coefficient due to oxygen in such a mixture is reported.

  2. Reflectance measurements of PTFE, Kapton, and PEEK for xenon scintillation light for the LZ detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, M.; Batista, E.; Haefner, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Morton, D.; Neff, A.; Okunawo, M.; Pushkin, K.; Sander, A.; Stephenson, S.; Wang, Y.; LZ Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    LZ (LUX-Zeplin) is an international collaboration that will look for dark matter candidates, WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), through direct detection by dual-phase time projection chamber (TPC) using liquid xenon. The LZ detector will be located nearly a mile underground at SURF, South Dakota, shielded from cosmic background radiation. Seven tons active mass of liquid xenon will be used for detecting the weak interaction of WIMPs with ordinary matter. Over three years of operation it is expected to reach the ultimate sensitivity of 2x10-48 cm2 for a WIMP mass of 50 GeV. As for many other rare event searches, high light collection efficiency is essential for LZ detector. Moreover, in order to achieve greater active volume for detection as well as reduce potential backgrounds, thinner detector walls without significant loss in reflectance are desired. Reflectance measurements of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Kapton, and PEEK for xenon scintillation light (178 nm), conducted at the University of Michigan using the Michigan Xenon Detector (MiX) will be presented. The University of Michigan, LZ Collaboration, The US Department of Energy.

  3. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our

  4. Metal-organic framework with optimally selective xenon adsorption and separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debasis; Simon, Cory M.; Plonka, Anna M.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xianyin; Smit, Berend; Parise, John B.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear energy is among the most viable alternatives to our current fossil fuel-based energy economy. The mass deployment of nuclear energy as a low-emissions source requires the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel to recover fissile materials and mitigate radioactive waste. A major concern with reprocessing used nuclear fuel is the release of volatile radionuclides such as xenon and krypton that evolve into reprocessing facility off-gas in parts per million concentrations. The existing technology to remove these radioactive noble gases is a costly cryogenic distillation; alternatively, porous materials such as metal-organic frameworks have demonstrated the ability to selectively adsorb xenon and krypton at ambient conditions. Here we carry out a high-throughput computational screening of large databases of metal-organic frameworks and identify SBMOF-1 as the most selective for xenon. We affirm this prediction and report that SBMOF-1 exhibits by far the highest reported xenon adsorption capacity and a remarkable Xe/Kr selectivity under conditions pertinent to nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  5. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our e

  6. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  7. XAMS - development of liquid xenon detector technology for dark matter searches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most promising detector technologies to directly detect weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter are time projection chambers (TPCs) filled with dual-phase (liquid and gaseous) xenon. The hypothetical WIMP could scatter with atoms in the liquid and the transferred recoil ene

  8. A liquid xenon ionization chamber in an all-fluoropolymer vessel

    CERN Document Server

    LePort, F; Baussan, E; Breidenbach, M; Conley, R; DeVoe, R; Diez, M M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Fierlinger, P; Flatt, B; Gratta, G; Green, M; Hall, C; Hall, K; Hallman, D; Hargrove, C K; Hodgson, J; Jeng, S; Koffas, T; Leonard, D S; Mackay, D; Martin, Y; Neilson, R; O'Sullivan, K; Odian, A; Ounalli, L; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Rowson, P C; Schenker, D; Sinclair, D; Skarpaas, K V; Stekhanov, V; Strickland, V; Virtue, C; Vuilleumier, J L; Vuilleumier, J M; Waldman, S J; Wamba, K; Weber, P; Wodin, J; Woisard, D

    2006-01-01

    A novel technique has been developed to build vessels for liquid xenon ionization detectors entirely out of ultra-clean fluoropolymer. We describe the advantages in terms of low radioactivity contamination, provide some details of the construction techniques, and show the energy resolution achieved with a prototype all-fluoropolymer ionization detector.

  9. Two-body depolarized cils spectra of krypton and xenon at 295 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, M.; Moraldi, M.; Barocchi, F.; Magli, R.; Bafile, U.

    1981-10-01

    We have experimentally determined the two-body depolarized CILS spectra of krypton and xenon at room temperature between 2 and 120 cm-1. Comparison of the first three even experimental moments of the spectra with theoretical calculations shows, as in argon, the necessity of introducing a short-range negative contribution to the induced pair polarizability.

  10. Safety and efficacy of xenon in routine use as an inhalational anaesthetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard); S. Armbruster (S.); W. Schairer (W.); A.M. Landstra (A. M.); A. Trouwborst (Adrianus); G.J. van Daal; A. Kusuma (Ari); W. Erdmann (Wilhelm)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract 40 patients (24 male, 16 female, aged 21-59 years) of American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II who were undergoing routine surgery took part in a randomised, double-blind comparison of the anaesthetic efficacy and potency of xenon and nitrous oxide and their eff

  11. A liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the MEG and MEG II liquid xenon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorelli, G., E-mail: giovanni.signorelli@pi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Baldini, A.M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Nicolò, D. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Grassi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Papa, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Sergiampietri, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    We designed, built and operated a liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the liquid xenon calorimeter of the MEG experiment. The target was used throughout the entire data taking period, from 2008 to 2013 and it is being refurbished and partly re-designed to be integrated and used in the MEG-II experiment.

  12. A Liquid Xenon Ionization Chamber in an All-fluoropolymer Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LePort, F.; Pocar, A.; Bartoszek, L.; DeVoe, R.; Fierlinger, P.; Flatt, B.; Gratta, G.; Green, M.; Montero Diez, M.; Neilson, R.; O' Sullivan, K.; Wodin, J.; Woisard, D.; Baussan, E.; Breidenbach, M.; Conley, R.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Applied Plastics Technology, Bristol

    2007-02-26

    A novel technique has been developed to build vessels for liquid xenon ionization detectors entirely out of ultra-clean fluoropolymer. We describe the advantages in terms of low radioactivity contamination, provide some details of the construction techniques, and show the energy resolution achieved with a prototype all-fluoropolymer ionization detector.

  13. Modeling Xenon Tank Pressurization using One-Dimensional Thermodynamic and Heat Transfer Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Ryan P.; Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step in understanding what ground support equipment (GSE) is required to provide external cooling during the loading of 5,000 kg of xenon into 4 aluminum lined composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), a modeling analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel. The goals of the analysis were to predict xenon temperature and pressure throughout loading at the launch facility, estimate the time required to load one tank, and to get an early estimate of what provisions for cooling xenon might be needed while the tanks are being filled. The model uses the governing thermodynamic and heat transfer equations to achieve these goals. Results indicate that a single tank can be loaded in about 15 hours with reasonable external coolant requirements. The model developed in this study was successfully validated against flight and test data. The first data set is from the Dawn mission which also utilizes solar electric propulsion with xenon propellant, and the second is test data from the rapid loading of a hydrogen cylindrical COPV. The main benefit of this type of model is that the governing physical equations using bulk fluid solid temperatures can provide a quick and accurate estimate of the state of the propellant throughout loading which is much cheaper in terms of computational time and licensing costs than a Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis while capturing the majority of the thermodynamics and heat transfer.

  14. Cluster formation restricts dynamic nuclear polarization of xenon in solid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Pourfathi, M.; Kara, H.

    2012-01-01

    During dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 1.5 K and 5 T, Xe-129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a homogeneous xenon/1-propanol/trityl-radical solid mixture exhibit a single peak, broadened by H-1 neighbors. A second peak appears upon annealing for several hours at 125 K. Its...

  15. The effect of xenon on isoflurane protection against experimental myocardial infarction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumert, J.H.; Hein, M.; Gerets, C.; Baltus, T.; Hecker, K.E.; Rossaint, R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate if the protective effects of xenon and isoflurane against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion damage would be additive. DESIGN: A prospective, randomized laboratory investigation. SETTING: An animal laboratory of a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-six pigs (female Ger

  16. XAMS - development of liquid xenon detector technology for dark matter searches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most promising detector technologies to directly detect weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter are time projection chambers (TPCs) filled with dual-phase (liquid and gaseous) xenon. The hypothetical WIMP could scatter with atoms in the liquid and the transferred recoil

  17. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  18. The isotope effect in H3S superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczęśniak, R.; Durajski, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    The experimental value of H3S a isotope coefficient decreases from 2.37 to 0.31 in the pressure range from 130 GPa to 200 GPa. We have shown that the value of 0.31 is correctly reproduced in the framework of the classical Eliashberg approach in the harmonic approximation. On the other hand, the anomalously large value of the isotope coefficient (2.37) may be associated with the strong renormalization of the normal state by the electron density of states.

  19. Optical and electron spin resonance studies of xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates containing nitrogen and oxygen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltnev, Roman E; Bykhalo, Igor B; Krushinskaya, Irina N; Pelmenev, Alexander A; Khmelenko, Vladimir V; Mao, Shun; Meraki, Adil; Wilde, Scott C; McColgan, Patrick T; Lee, David M

    2015-03-19

    We present the first observations of excimer XeO* molecules in molecular nitrogen films surrounding xenon cores of nanoclusters. Multishell nanoclusters form upon the fast cooling of a helium jet containing small admixtures of nitrogen and xenon by cold helium vapor (T = 1.5 K). Such nanoclusters injected into superfluid helium aggregate into porous impurity-helium condensates. Passage of helium gas with admixtures through a radio frequency discharge allows the storage of high densities of radicals stabilized in impurity-helium condensates. Intense recombination of the radicals occurs during destruction of such condensates and generates excited species observable because of optical emission. Rich spectra of xenon-oxygen complexes have been detected upon destruction of xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates. A xenon environment quenches metastable N((2)D) atoms but has a much weaker effect on the luminescence of N((2)P) atoms. Electron spin resonance spectra of N((4)S) atoms trapped in xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates have been studied. High local concentrations of nitrogen atoms (up to 10(21) cm(-3)) stabilized in xenon-nitrogen nanoclusters have been revealed.

  20. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matsekh, Anna M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  1. Anomalous human behavior detection: An Adaptive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, C. van; Halma, A.; Schutte, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of anomalies (outliers or abnormal instances) is an important element in a range of applications such as fault, fraud, suspicious behavior detection and knowledge discovery. In this article we propose a new method for anomaly detection and performed tested its ability to detect anomalous

  2. Anomalous Hall Effect for chiral fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P -M

    2014-01-01

    Semiclassical chiral fermions manifest the anomalous spin-Hall effect: when put into a pure electric field, they suffer a side jump, analogous to what happens to their massive counterparts in non-commutative mechanics. The transverse shift is consistent with the conservation of the angular momentum. In a pure magnetic field a cork-screw-like, spiraling motion is found.

  3. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage. The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, high-voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, 3} a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the nominal operating HV, and 4} fold analysis test. Each must be completed successfully before proceeding onto the next. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on Proposal 13163 from Cycle 20. For additional MAMA recovery information, see STIS ISR 98-02R.

  4. Anomalous human behavior detection: An Adaptive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, C. van; Halma, A.; Schutte, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of anomalies (outliers or abnormal instances) is an important element in a range of applications such as fault, fraud, suspicious behavior detection and knowledge discovery. In this article we propose a new method for anomaly detection and performed tested its ability to detect anomalous b

  5. Anomalous pulmonary venous return: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gyeong Min; Kang, MinJin; Lee, Han Bee; Bae, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jaehe; Kim, Jae Hyung; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kang, Tae Kyung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return is a type of congenital pulmonary venous anomaly. We present a rare type of partial pulmonary venous return, subaortic vertical vein drains left lung to superior vena cava, accompanying hypoplasia of the ipsilateral lung and pulmonary artery. We also review the previous report and relationship of these structures.

  6. Anomalous atomic volume of alpha-Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollar, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    .3%. The comparison between the LDA and GGA results show that the anomalously large atomic volume of alpha-Pu relative to alpha-Np can be ascribed to exchange-correlation effects connected with the presence of low coordinated sites in the structure where the f electrons are close to the onset of localization...

  7. Anomalous solutions to the strong CP problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Anson

    2015-04-10

    We present a new mechanism for solving the strong CP problem using a Z_{2} discrete symmetry and an anomalous U(1) symmetry. A Z_{2} symmetry is used so that two gauge groups have the same theta angle. An anomalous U(1) symmetry makes the difference between the two theta angles physical and the sum unphysical. Two models are presented where the anomalous symmetry manifests itself in the IR in different ways. In the first model, there are massless bifundamental quarks, a solution reminiscent of the massless up quark solution. In the IR of this model, the η^{'} boson relaxes the QCD theta angle to the difference between the two theta angles-in this case zero. In the second model, the anomalous U(1) symmetry is realized in the IR as a dynamically generated mass term that has exactly the phase needed to cancel the theta angle. Both of these models make the extremely concrete prediction that there exist new colored particles at the TeV scale.

  8. Anomalous transports in a time-delayed system subjected to anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ru-Yin; Tong, Lu-Mei; Nie, Lin-Ru; Wang, Chaojie; Pan, Wanli

    2017-02-01

    We investigate anomalous transports of an inertial Brownian particle in a time-delayed periodic potential subjected to an external time-periodic force, a constant bias force, and the Lévy noise. By means of numerical calculations, effect of the time delay and the Lévy noise on its mean velocity are discussed. The results indicate that: (i) The time delay can induce both multiple current reversals (CRs) and absolute negative mobility (ANM) phenomena in the system; (ii) The CRs and ANM phenomena only take place in the region of superdiffusion, while disappear in the regions of normal diffusion; (iii) The time delay can cause state transition of the system from anomalous →normal →anomalous →normal →anomalous →normal transport in the case of superdiffusion.

  9. Collateral Ventilation to Congenital Hyperlucent Lung Lesions Assessed on Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: an Initial Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Nam Kug; Park, Seung Il; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Ellen Ai Rhan [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to evaluate the resistance to collateral ventilation in congenital hyperlucent lung lesions and to correlate that with the anatomic findings on xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT was successfully and safely performed in eight children (median age: 5.5 years, 4 boys and 4 girls) with congenital hyperlucent lung lesions. Functional assessment of the lung lesions on the xenon map was done, including performing a time-xenon value curve analysis and assessing the amplitude of xenon enhancement (A) value, the rate of xenon enhancement (K) value and the time of arrival value. Based on the A value, the lung lesions were categorized into high or low (A value > 10 Hounsfi eld unit [HU]) resistance to collateral ventilation. In addition, the morphologic CT findings of the lung lesions, including cyst, mucocele and an accessory or incomplete fissure, were assessed on the weighted-average CT images. The xenon-enhanced CT radiation dose was estimated. Five of the eight lung lesions were categorized into the high resistance group and three lesions were categorized into the low resistance group. The A and K values in the normal lung were higher than those in the low resistance group. The time of arrival values were delayed in the low resistance group. Cysts were identified in five lesions, mucocele in four, accessory fissure in three and incomplete fissure in two. Either cyst or an accessory fissure was seen in four of the five lesions showing high resistance to collateral ventilation. The xenon-enhanced CT radiation dose was 2.3 {+-} 0.6 mSv. Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT can help visualize and quantitate various degrees of collateral ventilation to congenital hyperlucent lung lesions in addition to assessing the anatomic details of the lung

  10. Double discharges in unipolar-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhai; Neiger, Manfred

    2003-07-01

    Excitation of dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamps by unipolar short square pulses is studied in this paper. Two discharges with different polarity are excited by each voltage pulse (double discharge phenomenon). The primary discharge occurs at the top or at the rising flank of the applied unipolar square pulse, which is directly energized by the external circuit. The secondary discharge with the reversed polarity occurs at the falling flank or shortly after the falling flank end (zero external voltage) depending on the pulse width, which is energized by the energy stored by memory charges deposited by the primary discharge. Fast-speed ICCD imaging shows the primary discharge has a conic discharge appearance with a channel broadening on the anode side. This channel broadening increases with increasing the pulse top level. Only the anode-side surface discharge is observed in the primary discharge. The surface discharge on the cathode side which is present in bipolar sine voltage excitation is not observed. On the contrary, the secondary discharge has only the cathode-side surface discharge. The surface discharge on the anode side is not observed. The secondary discharge is much more diffuse than the primary discharge. Time-resolved emission measurement of double discharges show the secondary discharge emits more VUV xenon excimer radiation but less infrared (IR) xenon atomic emission than the primary discharge. It was found that the IR xenon atomic emission from the secondary discharge can be reduced by shortening the pulse width. The energy efficiency of unipolar-pulsed xenon excimer lamps (the overall energy efficiency of double discharges) is much higher than that obtained under bipolar sine wave excitation. The output VUV spectrum under unipolar pulse excitation is found to be identical to that under sine wave excitation and independent of injected electric power.

  11. Phase behavior of mixed submonolayer films of krypton and xenon on graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrykiejew, A.; Sokołowski, S.

    2012-04-01

    Using the results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles, we discuss the phase behavior of mixed submonolayer films of krypton and xenon adsorbed on the graphite basal plane. The calculations have been performed using two- and three-dimensional models of the systems studied. It has been demonstrated that out-of-plane motion does not affect the properties of the films as long as the total density is well below the monolayer completion and at moderate temperatures. For the total densities close to the monolayer completion, the promotion of particles to the second layer considerably affects the film properties. Our results are in a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. The melting point of submonolayer films has been shown to exhibit non-monotonous changes with the film composition, and reaches minimum for the xenon concentration of about 50%. At the temperatures below the melting point, the structure of solid phases depends upon the film composition and the temperature; one can also distinguish commensurate and incommensurate phases. Two-dimensional calculations have demonstrated that for the xenon concentration between about 15% and 65% the adsorbed film exhibits the formation of a superstructure, in which each Xe atom is surrounded by six Kr atoms. This superstructure is stable only at very low temperatures and transforms into the mixed commensurate (√{3}× √{3})R30° phase upon the increase of temperature. Such a superstructure does not appear when a three-dimensional model is used. Grand canonical ensemble calculations allowed us to show that for the xenon concentration of about 3% the phase diagram topology of monolayer films changes from the krypton-like (with incipient triple point) to the xenon-like (with ordinary triple point).

  12. Retinal endoilluminator toxicity of xenon and light-emitting diode (LED) light source: rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bahri; Dinç, Erdem; Yilmaz, S Necat; Altiparmak, U Emrah; Yülek, Fatma; Ertekin, Sevda; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yakın, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates retinal toxicity due to endoillumination with the light-emitting diode (LED) light source in comparison to endoillumination with xenon light source. Twenty-five eyes of 14 New Zealand pigmented rabbits were used in the study. The LED light (Omesis Medical Systems, Turkey) group was composed of 7 right eyes, while the other 7 right eyes constituted the xenon group (420 nm filter, 357mW/cm(2)) (Bright Star; DORC, Zuidland, Netherlands). Eleven untreated left eyes composed the control group. Twenty gauge pars plana incision 1.5 mm behind the limbus was performed in the right eyes. Twenty gauge bullet type fiberoptic endoilluminator was inserted into the eye from the incision without any pars plana vitrectomy. Fiberoptic endoilluminator was placed in such a way that it was directed toward visual streak of the rabbit retina with a 5 mm distance to retinal surface. Endoillumination was then applied for 20 min with a maximum light intensity for LED and xenon light. In left control eyes, no surgical procedure and no endoillumination were performed. One week after the endoillumination procedure, both eyes of the rabbits were enucleated following electroretinography. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin to evaluate morphologic changes. Retina tissues were assessed by active caspase-3 staining. There was no difference in the shape of the waveforms recorded in the eyes endoilluminated with LED light and xenon light sources compared to control eyes both before and after endoillumination application (p > 0.05). Microscopic evaluation of the retinas with hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated that all study groups have normal histologic properties similar to control group. No apoptosis positive cells were found within all sections in all groups. When the LED light source is used with maximum power and limited duration for endoillumination in rabbit eyes it does not produce phototoxic effects that may be detectable by electrophysiology

  13. Towards a Better Understanding of the Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Di; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Recent experimental efforts to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions in the anomalous Hall effect are reviewed. Benefited from the experimental control of artificial impurity density in single crystalline magnetic thin films, a comprehensive physical picture of the anomalous Hall effect involving multiple competing scattering processes has been established. Some new insights into the microscopic mechanisms of the anomalous Hall effect are discussed.

  14. Xenon migration in UO2 under irradiation studied by SIMS profilometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, B.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Garnier, C.; Raimbault, L.; Sainsot, P.; Epicier, T.; Delafoy, C.; Fraczkiewicz, M.; Gaillard, C.; Toulhoat, N.; Perrat-Mabilon, A.; Peaucelle, C.

    2013-09-01

    During Pressurized Water Reactor operation, around 25% of the created Fission Products (FP) are Xenon and Krypton. They have a low solubility in the nuclear fuel and can either (i) agglomerate into bubbles which induce mechanical stress in the fuel pellets or (ii) be released from the pellets, increasing the pressure within the cladding and decreasing the thermal conductivity of the gap between pellets and cladding. After fifty years of studies on the nuclear fuel, all mechanisms of Fission Gas Release (FGR) are still not fully understood. This paper aims at studying the FGR mechanisms by decoupling thermal and irradiation effects and by assessing the Xenon behavior for the first time by profilometry. Samples are first implanted with 136Xe at 800 keV corresponding to a projected range of 140 nm. They are then either annealed in the temperature range 1400-1600 °C, or irradiated with heavy energy ions (182 MeV Iodine) at Room Temperature (RT), 600 °C or 1000 °C. Depth profiles of implanted Xenon in UO2 are determined by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). It is shown that Xenon is mobile during irradiation at 1000 °C. In contrast, thermal treatments do not induce any Xenon migration process: these results are correlated to the formation of Xenon bubbles observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. At depths lower than about 40 nm (zone 1), no bubbles are observed, At depths in between 40 nm and 110 nm (zone 2), a large number of small bubbles (around 2 nm in diameter) can be observed. By comparing with the SRIM profile, it appears that this area corresponds to the maximum of the defect profile, The third zone displays two bubble populations. The first population has the same size than the bubbles present in zone 2. The bubble size of the second population is significantly larger (up to around 10 nm). A STEM micrograph is presented in Fig. 4. It highlights the Xenon bubbles more clearly. It appears that the largest bubbles are located mainly near dislocations

  15. Anomalously high Arabian Sea productivity conditions during MIS 13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ziegler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Marine isotope stage (MIS 13 (~500 000 years ago has been recognized as atypical in many paleoclimate records and, in particular, it has been connected to an exceptionally strong summer monsoon in East Asia. Here we present a multi-proxy study of a sediment core taken from the Murray Ridge at intermediate water depth in the northern Arabian Sea that covers the last 750 000 years. Our results indicate that upwelling driven primary productivity conditions were anomalously high during MIS 13 and led to extreme carbonate dissolution and glauconitization. We argue that an extreme summer monsoon circulation was probably not responsible for these aberrant conditions, because such an event does not show up in the Antarctic methane record and transient modeling results. As an alternative, we propose that high productivity was related to the onset of an intensive meridional overturning circulation in the Atlantic Ocean at the end of the Mid-Pleistocene transition. This led to an increased supply of nutrient-rich deep waters into the Indian Ocean euphotic zone, thereby triggering the observed productivity maximum.

  16. Stable isotope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  17. Iron isotope composition of some Archean and Proterozoic iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Little, Crispin T. S.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2012-03-01

    Fe isotopes can provide new insight into redox-dependent biogeochemical processes. Precambrian iron formations (IF) are deserving targets for Fe isotope studies because they are composed predominantly of authigenic Fe phases and record a period of unprecedented iron deposition in Earth's history. We present Fe isotope data for bulk samples from 24 Archean and Proterozoic IF and eight Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich deposits. These data reveal that many Archean and early Paleoproterozoic iron formations were a sink for isotopically heavy Fe, in contrast to later Proterozoic and Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich rocks. The positive δ56Fe values in IF are best explained by delivery of particulate ferric oxides formed in the water column to the sediment-water interface. Because IF are a net sink for isotopically heavy Fe, there must be a corresponding pool of isotopically light Fe in the sedimentary record. Earlier work suggested that Archean pyritic black shales were an important part of this light sink before 2.35 billion years ago (Ga). It is therefore likely that the persistently and anomalously low δ56Fe values in shales are linked with the deposition of isotopically heavy Fe in IF in the deeper parts of basins. IF deposition produced a residual isotopically light dissolved Fe pool that was captured by pyritic Fe in shales. Local dissimilatory Fe reduction in porewater and associated diagenetic reactions resulting in pyrite and carbonate precipitation may have further enhanced Fe isotope heterogeneity in marine sediments, and an 'iron shuttle' may have transported isotopically light Fe from shelf sediments to the basin. Nevertheless, water-column processing of hydrothermally delivered Fe likely had the strongest influence on the bulk iron isotope composition of Archean and Paleoproterozoic iron formations and other marine sediments.

  18. Systematic T1 improvement for hyperpolarized 129xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Maricel; Babcock, Earl; Blümler, Peter; Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Tullney, Kathlynne

    2015-03-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-(129)Xe was improved at typical storage conditions (i.e. low and homogeneous magnetic fields). Very long wall relaxation times T(1)(wall) of about 18 h were observed in uncoated, spherical GE180 glass cells of ∅=10 cm which were free of rubidium and not permanently sealed but attached to a standard glass stopcock. An "aging" process of the wall relaxation was identified by repeating measurements on the same cell. This effect could be easily removed by repeating the initial cleaning procedure. In this way, a constant wall relaxation was ensured. The Xe nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1/T1(Xe-Xe) due to van der Waals molecules was investigated too, by admixing three different buffer gases (N(2), SF(6) and CO(2)). Especially CO(2) exhibited an unexpected high efficiency (r) in shortening the lifetime of the Xe-Xe dimers and hence prolonging the total T1 relaxation even further. These measurements also yielded an improved accuracy for the van der Waals relaxation for pure Xe (with 85% (129)Xe) of T(1)(Xe-Xe)=(4.6±0.1)h. Repeating the measurements with HP (129)Xe in natural abundance in mixtures with SF6, a strong dependence of T(1)(Xe-Xe) and r on the isotopic enrichment was observed, uncovering a shorter T(1)(Xe-Xe) relaxation for the (129)Xe in natural composition as compared to the 85% isotopically enriched gas.

  19. Xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique in children with bronchiolitis obliterans: correlation of xenon and CT density values with pulmonary function test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Seo, Joon Beom; Chae, Eun Jin; Lee, Jeongjin [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea); Hong, Soo-Jong; Yu, Jinho; Kim, Byoung-Ju [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Krauss, Bernhard [Siemens Medical Solutions AG-Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique is a recently introduced, promising functional lung imaging method. To expand its clinical applications evidence of additional diagnostic value of xenon ventilation CT over conventional chest CT is required. To evaluate the usefulness of xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique in children with bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). Seventeen children (age 7-18 years; 11 boys) with BO underwent xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique. Xenon and CT density values were measured in normal and hyperlucent lung regions on CT and were compared between the two regions. Volumes of hyperlucent regions and ventilation defects were calculated with thresholds determined by visual and histogram-based analysis. Indexed volumes of hyperlucent lung regions and ventilation defects were correlated with pulmonary function test results. Effective doses of xenon CT were calculated. Xenon (14.6 {+-} 6.4 HU vs 26.1 {+-} 6.5 HU; P < 0.001) and CT density (-892.8 {+-} 25.4 HU vs -812.3 {+-} 38.7 HU; P < 0.001) values were significantly lower in hyperlucent regions than in normal lung regions. Xenon and CT density values showed significant positive correlation for the entire lung in 16 children ({gamma} = 0.55 {+-} 0.17, P < 0.001 or =0.017) and for hyperlucent regions in 13 children ({gamma} = 0.44 {+-} 0.16, P < 0.001 or =0.001-0.019). Indexed volumes and volume percentages of hyperlucent lung regions and ventilation defects showed strong negative correlations with forced expiratory volume [FEV1, ({gamma} = -0.64-0.85, P {<=} 0.006)], FEV1/forced vital capacity [FVC, ({gamma} = -0.63-0.84, P {<=} 0.008)], and forced midexpiratory flow rate [FEF{sub 25-75}, ({gamma} = -0.68-0.88, P {<=} 0.002). Volume percentages of xenon ventilation defects (35.0 {+-} 16.4%)] were not significantly different from those of hyperlucent lung regions (38.2 {+-} 18.6%). However, mismatches between the

  20. Ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses using xenon-enhanced dynamic single-energy CT and dual-energy CT: a feasibility study in a nasal cast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Sven F.; Helck, Andreas D.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C. [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Moeller, Winfried; Eickelberg, Oliver [Institute for Lung Biology and Disease (iLBD) and Comprehensive Pneumology Center (CPC), Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg, Munich (Germany); Becker, Sven [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Munich (Germany); Schuschnig, Uwe [Pari Pharma GmbH, Graefelfing (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    To show the feasibility of dual-energy CT (DECT) and dynamic CT for ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses in a nasal cast. In a first trial, xenon gas was administered to a nasal cast with a laminar flow of 7 L/min. Dynamic CT acquisitions of the nasal cavity and the sinuses were performed. This procedure was repeated with pulsating xenon flow. Local xenon concentrations in the different compartments of the model were determined on the basis of the enhancement levels. In a second trial, DECT measurements were performed both during laminar and pulsating xenon administration and the xenon concentrations were quantified directly. Neither with dynamic CT nor DECT could xenon-related enhancement be detected in the sinuses during laminar airflow. Using pulsating flow, dynamic imaging showed a xenon wash-in and wash-out in the sinuses that followed a mono-exponential function with time constants of a few seconds. Accordingly, DECT revealed xenon enhancement in the sinuses only after pulsating xenon administration. The feasibility of xenon-enhanced DECT for ventilation imaging was proven in a nasal cast. The superiority of pulsating gas flow for the administration of gas or aerosolised drugs to the paranasal sinuses was demonstrated. (orig.)

  1. Design and First Results of the CoDeX Liquid-Xenon Compton-Imaging Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Brian; Cahn, Sidney; Bernard, Ethan; Boulton, Elizabeth; Destefano, Nicholas; Edwards, Blair; Hackenburg, Ariana; Horn, Markus; Larsen, Nicole; Nikkel, James; Wahl, Christopher; Gai, Moshe; McKinsey, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    CoDeX (Compton-imaging Detector in Xenon) is an R&D Compton gamma-ray imaging detector that uses 30 kg of xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Time projection relative to the initial scintillation signal provides the vertical interaction positions, and either PMT-sensed gas electroluminescence or a charge-sensitive amplifier quantifies the drifted ionization signal. Detector features to enable Compton imaging are a pair of instrumented wire grids added to sense the horizontal position of clouds of drifted electrons that traverse the detector. Each wire is individually amplified in the cold xenon environment. Design choices addressing the thermodynamic and xenon purity constraints of this system will be discussed. We will also discuss the mechanical designs, engineering challenges, and performance of this Compton-imaging detector.

  2. Halothane, isoflurane, xenon, and nitrous oxide inhibit calcium ATPase pump activity in rat brain synaptic plasma membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franks, J J; Horn, J L; Janicki, P K; Singh, G

    1995-01-01

    .... For studies of anesthetic effects on PMCA activity, Ca2+ uptake or Pi release was measured in SPM exposed to halothane, isoflurane, xenon, and nitrous oxide at partial pressures ranging from 0 to 1.6 MAC equivalents...

  3. Study on LXe system for particle detector (2). Boiling heat transfer characteristics of LXe; Ryushi kenshutsu yo ekitai Xenon shisutemu no kenkyu (2). Ekitai Xenon no futto netsudentatsu tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruyama, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2000-05-29

    In the experiments using a large quantity of liquid xenon as caloric meter, in order to catch the scintillation light generated by collision of the injected high-energy particles with the liquid Xenon, a plurality of photomultiplier cells is arranged in the liquid. At this time, density variation of the liquid is caused as the chip resistance for signal processing generates heat in the liquid Xenon, and makes influence on the scintillation light. Therefore, the basic data concerning heat transfer characteristics such as convection and boiling of the liquid Xenon are necessary. In this study, the heat transfer characteristics of the liquid Xenon is investigated using a Xenon liquefier including a pulse tube-refrigerating machine. Platinum fine wire horizontally placed and a copper round plate are used as a heating element. The system for the experiment is an installation of installing the small pulse tube refrigerating machine for 80K to a glass Dewar. Experimental values of natural convection region and the nucleate boiling region agree comparatively well with the calculation results according to empirical formula. (NEDO)

  4. Anomalous Coronary Artery: Run of a Lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael Stuart; Sehgal, Sankalp; Smukler, Naomi; Suber, LaDouglas Jarod; Saththasivam, Pooven

    2016-09-01

    The anatomy of the coronary circulation is well described with incidence of congenital anomalies of approximately 0.3% to 1.0%. Although often incidental, 20% are life-threatening. A 25-year-old woman with syncopal episodes collapsed following a 10-km run. Coronary anatomy evaluation showed an anomalous left main coronary artery originating from the right sinus of valsalva and following a course between the aorta and the pulmonary outflow tract. Percutaneous coronary intervention was followed by eventual surgical revascularization. Abnormal course of coronary arteries plays a role in the pathogenesis of sudden death on exertion. Origin of the left main coronary from the right sinus of valsalva is a rare congenital anomaly. The expansion of the roots of the aorta and pulmonary trunk with exertion lead to compression of the coronary artery and syncope. Our patient raises awareness of a potentially fatal coronary artery path. Intraoperative identification of anomalous coronaries by utilizing intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography was critical.

  5. Anomalous interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhansu S Biswal; Debajyoti Choudhury; Rohini M Godbole; Ritesh K Singh

    2007-11-01

    We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider operating at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV and with an integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 is shown to be able to constrain the vertex at the few per cent level, with even higher sensitivity for some of the couplings. However, lack of sufficient number of observables as well as contamination from the vertex limits the precision to which anomalous part of the coupling can be probed.

  6. Anomalous electromagnetism of pions and magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, U.-J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2005-04-15

    Pions and magnons - the Goldstone bosons of the strong interactions and of magnetism - share a number of common features. Pion and magnon fields couple anomalously to electromagnetism through the conserved Goldstone-Wilczek current of their topological Skyrmion excitations. In the pion case, this coupling gives rise to the decay of the neutral pion into two photons. In the magnon case, the anomalous coupling leads to photonmagnon conversion in an external magnetic field. A measurement of the conversion rate in quantum Hall ferromagnets determines the anyon statistics angle of baby-Skyrmions. If photon-magnon conversion also occurs in antiferromagnets, baby-Skyrmions carry electric charge and may represent the Cooper-pairs of high-temperature superconductors.

  7. Remote sensing and characterization of anomalous debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, R.; Beavers, W.; Lambour, R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Kansky, J.; Stansbery, E.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of orbital debris data shows a band of anomalously high debris concentration in the altitude range between 800 and 1000 km. Analysis indicates that the origin is the leaking coolant fluid from nuclear power sources that powered a now defunct Soviet space-based series of ocean surveillance satellites. A project carried out to detect, track and characterize a sample of the anomalous debris is reported. The nature of the size and shape of the sample set, and the possibility of inferring the composition of the droplets were assessed. The technique used to detect, track and characterize the sample set is described and the results of the characterization analysis are presented. It is concluded that the nature of the debris is consistent with leaked Na-K fluid, although this cannot be proved with the remote sensing techniques used.

  8. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  9. Anomalous enthalpy relaxation in vitreous silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here, we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy...... the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica....

  10. Anomalous Symmetry Fractionalization and Surface Topological Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In addition to possessing fractional statistics, anyon excitations of a 2D topologically ordered state can realize symmetry in distinct ways, leading to a variety of symmetry-enriched topological (SET phases. While the symmetry fractionalization must be consistent with the fusion and braiding rules of the anyons, not all ostensibly consistent symmetry fractionalizations can be realized in 2D systems. Instead, certain “anomalous” SETs can only occur on the surface of a 3D symmetry-protected topological (SPT phase. In this paper, we describe a procedure for determining whether a SET of a discrete, on-site, unitary symmetry group G is anomalous or not. The basic idea is to gauge the symmetry and expose the anomaly as an obstruction to a consistent topological theory combining both the original anyons and the gauge fluxes. Utilizing a result of Etingof, Nikshych, and Ostrik, we point out that a class of obstructions is captured by the fourth cohomology group H^{4}(G,U(1, which also precisely labels the set of 3D SPT phases, with symmetry group G. An explicit procedure for calculating the cohomology data from a SET is given, with the corresponding physical intuition explained. We thus establish a general bulk-boundary correspondence between the anomalous SET and the 3D bulk SPT whose surface termination realizes it. We illustrate this idea using the chiral spin liquid [U(1_{2}] topological order with a reduced symmetry Z_{2}×Z_{2}⊂SO(3, which can act on the semion quasiparticle in an anomalous way. We construct exactly solved 3D SPT models realizing the anomalous surface terminations and demonstrate that they are nontrivial by computing three-loop braiding statistics. Possible extensions to antiunitary symmetries are also discussed.

  11. Blow up Analysis for Anomalous Granular Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    20 p.; International audience; We investigate in this article the long-time behaviour of the solutions to the energy-dependant, spatially-homogeneous, inelastic Boltzmann equation for hard spheres. This model describes a diluted gas composed of hard spheres under statistical description, that dissipates energy during collisions. We assume that the gas is ''anomalous'', in the sense that energy dissipation increases when temperature decreases. This allows the gas to cool down in finite time. W...

  12. Anomalous Mirror Symmetry Generated by Optical Illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokichi Sugihara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new concept of mirror symmetry, called “anomalous mirror symmetry”, which is physically impossible but can be perceived by human vision systems because of optical illusion. This symmetry is characterized geometrically and a method for creating cylindrical surfaces that create this symmetry is constructed. Examples of solid objects constructed by a 3D printer are also shown.

  13. Anomalous CMB polarization and gravitational chirality

    OpenAIRE

    Contaldi, Carlo R.; Magueijo, Joao; Smolin, Lee

    2008-01-01

    We consider the possibility that gravity breaks parity, with left and right handed gravitons coupling to matter with a different Newton's constant and show that this would affect their zero-point vacuum fluctuations during inflation. Should there be a cosmic background of gravity waves, the effect would translate into anomalous CMB polarization. Non-vanishing TB (and EB) polarization components emerge, revealing interesting experimental targets. Indeed if reasonable chirality is present a TB ...

  14. The Discovery of Anomalous Microwave Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Leitch, Erik M.; Readhead, A. C. R.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the first detection of anomalous microwave emission, in the Owens Valley RING5M experiment, and its interpretation in the context of the ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments of the early 1990s. The RING5M experiment was one of the first attempts to constrain the anisotropy power on sub-horizon scales, by observing a set of -size fields around the North Celestial Pole (NCP). Fields were selected close to the NCP to allow continuous integrati...

  15. Improvement of xenon purification system using a combination of a pulse tube refrigerator and a coaxial heat exchanger

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wan-Ting; Cussonneau, J -P; Donnard, J; Duval, S; Lemaire, O; Calloch, M Le; Ray, P Le; Mohamad-Hadi, A -F; Morteau, E; Oger, T; Scotto-Lavina, L; Stutzmann, J -S; Thers, D; Briend, P; Haruyama, T; Mihara, S; Tauchi, T

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a compact cryogenic system with a pulse tube refrigerator and a coaxial heat exchanger. This liquefaction-purification system not only saves the cooling power used to reach high gaseous recirculation rate, but also reduces the impurity level with high speed. The heat exchanger operates with an efficiency of 99%, which indicates the possibility for fast xenon gas recirculation in a highpressurized large-scale xenon storage with much less thermal losses.

  16. The Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon

    CERN Document Server

    Jegerlehner, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    This book reviews the present state of knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment a=(g-2)/2 of the muon. The muon anomalous magnetic moment amy is one of the most precisely measured quantities in elementary particle physics and provides one of the most stringent tests of relativistic quantum field theory as a fundamental theoretical framework. It allows for an extremely precise check of the standard model of elementary particles and of its limitations. Recent experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory now reach the unbelievable precision of 0.5 parts per million, improving the accuracy of previous g-2 experiments at CERN by a factor of 14. A major part of the book is devoted to the theory of the anomalous magnetic moment and to estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. Quantum electrodynamics and electroweak and hadronic effects are reviewed. Since non-perturbative hadronic effects play a key role for the precision test, their evaluation is described in detail. After the overview of theory, the exper...

  17. Anomalous dominance, immune parameters, and spatial ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, M

    1993-02-01

    In a sample of male and female subjects in late adolescence, we investigated the relationship of spatial abilities to anomalous dominance and immune parameters as suggested by Geschwind's model of cerebral lateralization (Geschwind & Galaburda, 1985) In addition to the behavioral markers asthma/allergies, migraine, and myopia, we measured IgE and Ig total in blood serum. Atypical handedness, atypical language dominance, and atypical visuospatial dominance were found to be connected with spatial giftedness, and atypical handedness was related to immune vulnerability in males. This outcome provided some support for the Geschwind model in men. In women, spatial giftedness was related to immune vulnerability, but no indicator of anomalous dominance was connected with either giftedness, or immune parameters. Thus, the central thesis of the Geschwind model, i.e., elevated prenatal testosterone effects on the developing brain cause anomalous dominance and, as side effects, spatial giftedness and immune vulnerability, and all these consequences should be related to each other, was not confirmed by our data for females.

  18. Neoclassical and anomalous flows in stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, A. S.; Marine, T.; Spong, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    The impact of magnetic geometry and plasma profiles on flows and viscosities in stellarators is investigated. This work examines both neoclassical and anomalous flows for a number of configurations including a particular focus on the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) and other quasi-symmetric configurations. Neoclassical flows and viscosities are calculated using the PENTA code [1]. For anomalous flows, the neoclassical viscosities from PENTA are used in a transport code that includes Reynolds stress flow generation [2]. This is done for the standard quasi-helically symmetric configuration of HSX, a symmetry-breaking mirror configuration and a hill configuration. The impact of these changes in the magnetic geometry on neoclassical viscosities and flows in HSX are discussed. Due to variations in neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. These effects are shown to vary as the ratio of electron to ion temperature varies. In particular, as the ion temperature increases relative to the electron flow shear is shown to increase. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  19. The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, F. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Theorie der Elementarteilchen

    2008-07-01

    The muon anomalous magnetic moment is one of the most precisely measured quantities in elementary particle physics and provides one of the most stringent tests of relativistic quantum field theory as a fundamental theoretical framework. It allows for an extremely precise check of the standard model of elementary particles and of its limitations. This book reviews the present state of knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment a=(g-2)/2 of the muon. Recent experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory now reach the unbelievable precision of 0.5 parts per million, improving the accuracy of previous g-2 experiments at CERN by a factor of 14. A major part of the book is devoted to the theory of the anomalous magnetic moment and to estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. In addition, quantum electrodynamics and electroweak and hadronic effects are reviewed. Since non-perturbative hadronic effects play a key role for the precision test, their evaluation is described in detail. Perspectives for future improvements of the theoretical and experimental precision are considered. This reference text requires some basic knowledge of relativistic quantum field theory and elementary particle theory. (orig.)

  20. Anomalous dissolution of metals and chemical corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGUTIN M. DRAZIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of the anomalous behavior of some metals, in particular Fe and Cr, in acidic aqueous solutions during anodic dissolution. The anomaly is recognizable by the fact that during anodic dissolutionmore material dissolves than would be expected from the Faraday law with the use of the expected valence of the formed ions. Mechanical disintegration, gas bubble blocking, hydrogen embrittlement, passive layer cracking and other possible reasons for such behavior have been discussed. It was shown, as suggested by Kolotyrkin and coworkers, that the reason can be, also, the chemical reaction in which H2O molecules with the metal form metal ions and gaseous H2 in a potential independent process. It occurs simultaneously with the electrochemical corrosion process, but the electrochemical process controls the corrosion potential. On the example of Cr in acid solution itwas shown that the reason for the anomalous behavior is dominantly chemical dissolution, which is considerably faster than the electrochemical corrosion, and that the increasing temperature favors chemical reaction, while the other possible reasons for the anomalous behavior are of negligible effect. This effect is much smaller in the case of Fe, but exists. The possible role of the chemical dissolution reacton and hydrogen evolution during pitting of steels and Al and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue are discussed.

  1. Fission xenon in trinities from the first nuclear test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, Alexander; Pravdivtseva, Olga; Hohenberg, Charles

    2008-04-01

    Trinitites, greenish glassy remnants found in the crater of the first nuclear test, refer to the molten material of the desert where the Trinity test was conducted. Recently the Los Alamos Lab^1 suggested that the sand was first vaporized by the fireball and then precipitated onto a cooler desert surface forming trinitites. We measured the Xe mass-spectra during stepped pyrolysis of two trinitites and found an unusual Xe isotopic structure, dominated by ^132Xe and ^131Xe compared to the nominal fission yield spectra, which cannot be due to n-capture or any other nuclear processes. This structure is caused by the chemical separation of the immediate neutron-rich fission products, a process similar to CFF observed in the Oklo natural reactor^2. When quantitatively applied to our observations it suggests that 17 min after the test one of the samples had a temperature of 1390^oC, while 5 min after the test the other was at 1320^oC. These results contribute to a reconstruction of the cooling history of the trinities and a demonstration of which formation scenario is the more likely. ^1V. Montoya et al, Denver X-ray Conf. (2007), ^2A. Meshik, C. Hohenberg and O. Pravdivtseva, PRL 93, 182302 (2004).

  2. NEXT Long-Duration Test Plume and Wear Characteristics after 16,550 h of Operation and 337 kg of Xenon Processed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) program is developing the next-generation ion propulsion system with significant enhancements beyond the state-of-the-art. The NEXT ion propulsion system provides improved mission capabilities for future NASA science missions to enhance and enable Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship-type NASA missions. As part of a comprehensive thruster service life assessment utilizing both testing and analyses, a Long-Duration Test (LDT) was initiated to validate and qualify the NEXT propellant throughput capability to a qualification-level of 450 kg, 1.5 times the mission-derived throughput requirement of 300 kg. This wear test is being conducted with a modified, flight-representative NEXT engineering model ion thruster, designated EM3. As of June 25, 2008, the thruster has accumulated 16,550 h of operation: the first 13,042 h at the thruster full-input-power of 6.9 kW with 3.52 A beam current and 1800 V beam power supply voltage. Operation since 13,042 h, i.e., the most recent 3,508 h, has been at an input power of 4.7 kW with 3.52 A beam current and 1180 V beam power supply voltage. The thruster has processed 337 kg of xenon (Xe) surpassing the NSTAR propellant throughput demonstrated during the extended life testing of the Deep Space 1 flight spare. The NEXT LDT has demonstrated a total impulse of 13.3 106 N s; the highest total impulse ever demonstrated by an ion thruster. Thruster plume diagnostics and erosion measurements are obtained periodically over the entire NEXT throttle table with input power ranging 0.5 to 6.9 kW. Observed thruster component erosion rates are consistent with predictions and the thruster service life assessment. There have not been any observed anomalous erosion and all erosion estimates indicate a thruster throughput capability that exceeds 750 kg of Xe, an equivalent of 36,500 h of continuous operation at the full-power operating condition. This paper presents the erosion measurements and plume

  3. Index of refraction, Rayleigh scattering length, and Sellmeier coefficients in solid and liquid argon and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Emily; Butcher, Alistair; Monroe, Jocelyn; Nikkel, James A.

    2017-09-01

    Large liquid argon detectors have become widely used in low rate experiments, including dark matter and neutrino research. However, the optical properties of liquid argon are not well understood at the large scales relevant for current and near-future detectors. The index of refraction of liquid argon at the scintillation wavelength has not been measured, and current Rayleigh scattering length calculations disagree with measurements. Furthermore, the Rayleigh scattering length and index of refraction of solid argon and solid xenon at their scintillation wavelengths have not been previously measured or calculated. We introduce a new calculation using existing data in liquid and solid argon and xenon to extrapolate the optical properties at the scintillation wavelengths using the Sellmeier dispersion relationship.

  4. A neuro-fuzzy controller for xenon spatial oscillations in load-following operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Man Gyun [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Upadhyaya, Belle R. [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A neuro-fuzzy control algorithm is applied for xenon spatial oscillations in a pressurized water reactor. The consequent and antecedent parameters of the fuzzy rules are tuned by the gradient descent method. The reactor model used for computer simulations is a two-point xenon oscillation model. The reactor core is axially divided into two regions and each region has one input and one output and is coupled with the other region. The interaction between the regions of the reactor core is treated by a decoupling scheme. This proposed control method exhibits very responses to a step or a ramp change of target axial offest without any residual flux oscillations. 9 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  5. Mirror dark matter will be confirmed or excluded by XENON1T

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, J D

    2016-01-01

    Mirror dark matter, where dark matter resides in a hidden sector exactly isomorphic to the standard model, can be probed via direct detection experiments by both nuclear and electron recoils if the kinetic mixing interaction exists. In fact, the kinetic mixing interaction appears to be a prerequisite for consistent small scale structure: Mirror dark matter halos around spiral galaxies are dissipative - losing energy via dark photon emission. This ongoing energy loss requires a substantial energy input, which can be sourced from ordinary supernovae via kinetic mixing induced processes in the supernova's core. Astrophysical considerations thereby give a lower limit on the kinetic mixing strength, and indeed lower limits on both nuclear and electron recoil rates in direct detection experiments can be estimated. We show here that these lower limits are expected to be surpassed by both nuclear recoil and electron recoil searches in forthcoming XENON experiments including LUX and XENON1T. Thus, we anticipate that t...

  6. Mirror dark matter will be confirmed or excluded by XENON1T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. D.; Foot, R.

    2017-03-01

    Mirror dark matter, where dark matter resides in a hidden sector exactly isomorphic to the standard model, can be probed via direct detection experiments by both nuclear and electron recoils if the kinetic mixing interaction exists. In fact, the kinetic mixing interaction appears to be a prerequisite for consistent small scale structure: Mirror dark matter halos around spiral galaxies are dissipative - losing energy via dark photon emission. This ongoing energy loss requires a substantial energy input, which can be sourced from ordinary supernovae via kinetic mixing induced processes in the supernova's core. Astrophysical considerations thereby give a lower limit on the kinetic mixing strength, and indeed lower limits on both nuclear and electron recoil rates in direct detection experiments can be estimated. We show here that potentially all of the viable parameter space will be probed in forthcoming XENON experiments including LUX and XENON1T. Thus, we anticipate that these experiments will provide a definitive test of the mirror dark matter hypothesis.

  7. 2D simulations of short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, E.A.; Kudryavtsev, A.A. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Arslanbekov, R.R. [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Self-consistent two-dimensional (2D) simulations of short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in pure xenon have been performed. It is shown that during short current pulse the traversal inhomogeneity of the plasma parameters can be important only at the end of the current pulse as an edge effect close to the side walls. During the current pulse, the gap voltage drops until the ionization wave reaches the cathode so the current in the cathode sheath is the displacement current. This means that almost all of the absorbed power is deposited into excitation of xenon atoms and not to the ion heating in the cathode sheath as in the traditional glow discharges. This fact is one of the reasons of high efficiency of short-pulsed DBD. The developed model allows one to estimate the temporal position of the plasma-sheath boundary. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Variational Assimilation for Xenon Dynamical Forecasts in Neutronic using Advanced Background Error Covariance Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Ponçot, Angélique; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Erhard, Patrick; Gratton, Serge; Thual, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Data assimilation method consists in combining all available pieces of information about a system to obtain optimal estimates of initial states. The different sources of information are weighted according to their accuracy by the means of error covariance matrices. Our purpose here is to evaluate the efficiency of variational data assimilation for the xenon induced oscillations forecasts in nuclear cores. In this paper we focus on the comparison between 3DVAR schemes with optimised background error covariance matrix B and a 4DVAR scheme. Tests were made in twin experiments using a simulation code which implements a mono-dimensional coupled model of xenon dynamics, thermal, and thermal-hydraulic processes. We enlighten the very good efficiency of the 4DVAR scheme as well as good results with the 3DVAR one using a careful multivariate modelling of B.

  9. Xenon and halogenated alkanes track putative substrate binding cavities in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, D A; Rosenzweig, A C; Frederick, C A; Lippard, S J

    2001-03-27

    To investigate the role of protein cavities in facilitating movement of the substrates, methane and dioxygen, in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH), we determined the X-ray structures of MMOH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) cocrystallized with dibromomethane or iodoethane, or by using crystals pressurized with xenon gas. The halogenated alkanes bind in two cavities within the alpha-subunit that extend from one surface of the protein to the buried dinuclear iron active site. Two additional binding sites were located in the beta-subunit. Pressurization of two crystal forms of MMOH with xenon resulted in the identification of six binding sites located exclusively in the alpha-subunit. These results indicate that hydrophobic species bind preferentially in preexisting cavities in MMOH and support the hypothesis that such cavities may play a functional role in sequestering and enhancing the availability of the physiological substrates for reaction at the active site.

  10. Development and Characterization of a Multi-APD Xenon Electroluminescence TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Lux, T; Ballester, O; Bordoni, S; Gil-Botella, I; Hamer, N; Illa, J; Mañas, G Jover; Martin-Mari, C; Palomares, C; Rico, J; Sanchez, F; Santorelli, R; Verdugo, A

    2014-01-01

    The performance of an electroluminescence (EL) time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi avalanche photodiode (APD) readout was studied in pure xenon at 3.8 bar. Intercalibration and reconstruction methods were developed and applied to the data yielding energy resolutions as good as 5.3$+-$0.1 % FWHM for 59.5 keV gammas from 241-Am. The result was verified with a Monte Carlo (MC) based on Geant4 and Penelope predicting 5.2 % FWHM for the used setup. Point resolutions of about 0.5 mm were obtained by a pitch of 15 mm between the APDs. The results show that a multi-APD readout is a competitive technology for EL detectors filled with pure xenon with possible applications as Compton Cameras.

  11. Ab initio electron scattering cross-sections and transport in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, G. J.; McEachran, R. P.; Cocks, D. G.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Dujko, S.; White, R. D.

    2016-09-01

    Ab initio fully differential cross-sections for electron scattering in liquid xenon are developed from a solution of the Dirac-Fock scattering equations, using a recently developed framework (Boyle et al 2015 J. Chem. Phys. 142 154507) which considers multipole polarizabilities, a non-local treatment of exchange, and screening and coherent scattering effects. A multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation accounting for the full anisotropic nature of the differential cross-section is used to calculate transport properties of excess electrons in liquid xenon. The results were found to agree to within 25% of the measured mobilities and characteristic energies over the reduced field range of 10-4-1 Td. The accuracies are comparable to those achieved in the gas phase. A simple model, informed by highly accurate gas-phase cross-sections, is presented to improve the liquid cross-sections, which was found to enhance the accuracy of the transport coefficient calculations.

  12. Search for solar axions in XMASS, a large liquid-xenon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Hiraide, K; Hirano, S; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, K; Moriyama, S; Nakagawa, K; Nakahata, M; Ogawa, H; Oka, N; Sekiya, H; Suzuki, A Shinozaki Y; Takeda, A; Takachio, O; Ueshima, K; Umemoto, D; Yamashita, M; Yang, B S; Tasaka, S; Liu, J; Martens, K; Hosokawa, K; Miuchi, K; Murata, A; Onishi, Y; Otsuka, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Kim, Y H; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, J S; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Masuda, K; Nishitani, Y; Takiya, H; Uchida, H; Kim, N Y; Kim, Y D; Kusaba, F; Motoki, D; Nishijima, K; Fujii, K; Murayama, I; Nakamura, S

    2012-01-01

    XMASS, a low-background, large liquid-xenon detector, was used to search for solar axions that would be produced by bremsstrahlung and Compton effects in the Sun. With an exposure of 5.6ton days of liquid xenon, the model-independent limit on the coupling for mass $\\ll$ 1keV is $|g_{aee}|< 5.4\\times 10^{-11}$ (90% C.L.), which is a factor of two stronger than the existing experimental limit. The bounds on the axion masses for the DFSZ and KSVZ axion models are 1.9 and 250eV, respectively. In the mass range of 10-40keV, this study produced the most stringent limit, which is better than that previously derived from astrophysical arguments regarding the Sun to date.

  13. Modeling Integrated High-Yield IFE Target Explosions in Xenon Filled Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatenejad, Milad; Moses, Gregory

    2010-11-01

    We will present the results of several radiation-hydrodynamics simulations which model the aftermath of an exploding high yield (200 MJ) indirect drive target in a xenon filled reactor chamber. The goal is to determine the radial extent to which debris from the target and hohlraum expands into the target chamber. The 1D radiation-hydrodynamics code BUCKY is used to perform integrated simulations of the target explosion beginning from ignition and includes interactions between the chamber gas and tungsten first wall. The 3D radiation-hydrodynamics code Cooper will be used to model the growth of fluid instabilities as the target material expands into the xenon gas. Cooper will also be used to investigate the early-time interaction between the burning target and hohlraum shortly after ignition.

  14. Spectroscopy of Ba and Ba$^+$ deposits in solid xenon for barium tagging in nEXO

    CERN Document Server

    Mong, B; Walton, T; Chambers, C; Craycraft, A; Benitez-Medina, C; Hall, K; Fairbank, W; Albert, J B; Auty, D J; Barbeau, P S; Basque, V; Beck, D; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Cao, G F; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Daniels, T; Daugherty, S J; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dilling, J; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fabris, L; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Heffner, M; Hughes, M; Jiang, X S; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Krucken, R; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; Ling, J; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Moore, D; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Retiere, F; Rowson, P C; Rozo, M P; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Walton, J; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zhao, Y B

    2014-01-01

    Progress on a method of barium tagging for the nEXO double beta decay experiment is reported. Absorption and emission spectra for deposits of barium atoms and ions in solid xenon matrices are presented. Excitation spectra for prominent emission lines, temperature dependence and bleaching of the fluorescence reveal the existence of different matrix sites. A regular series of sharp lines observed in Ba$^+$ deposits is identified with some type of barium hydride molecule. Lower limits for the fluorescence quantum efficiency of the principal Ba emission transition are reported. Under current conditions, an image of $\\le10^4$ Ba atoms can be obtained. Prospects for imaging single Ba atoms in solid xenon are discussed.

  15. Interaction of cover and target with xenon gas in the IFE-reaction chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuteev, Boris V. [State Technical Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-01

    Interaction of a direct drive target and a cover, which is shielding the target against gas particle and heat flows in the reaction chamber of the Inertial Confinement Reactor, is considered. The cover is produced from solid gas -deuterium, neon of xenon. It is shown that at the SOMBRERO parameters the xenon cover with 5.6-mm size significantly reduces the heat flows onto the 4-mm target. The gas drag produces the deceleration of the target much larger than that for the cover due to large mass difference between them. The distance between the target and the cover is about 15 mm at the explosion point, which is sufficient for normal irradiation of the target by laser beams. Protection of the target against the wall radiation is necessary during the flight. Along with creation of reflecting layers over the target surface ablating layers from solid hydrogen or neon seem to be a solution. (author)

  16. Search for solar axions in XMASS, a large liquid-xenon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hieda, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Hiraide, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hirano, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nakagawa, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M.; Ogawa, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Oka, N. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Sekiya, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); and others

    2013-07-09

    XMASS, a low-background, large liquid-xenon detector, was used to search for solar axions that would be produced by bremsstrahlung and Compton effects in the Sun. With an exposure of 5.6 ton days of liquid xenon, the model-independent limit on the coupling for mass ≪1 keV is |g{sub aee}|<5.4×10{sup −11} (90% C.L.), which is a factor of two stronger than the existing experimental limit. The bounds on the axion masses for the DFSZ and KSVZ axion models are 1.9 and 250 eV, respectively. In the mass range of 10–40 keV, this study produced the most stringent limit, which is better than that previously derived from astrophysical arguments regarding the Sun to date.

  17. Barium Tagging in Liquid Xenon for the nEXO Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Scott; nEXO Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    nEXO is a next-generation experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of xenon-136 in a liquid xenon time projection chamber. Positive observation of this decay would determine the neutrino to be a MAJORANA particle, as well as measure the absolute neutrino mass scale. In order to greatly reduce background contributions to this search, the collaboration is developing several ``barium tagging'' techniques to recover and identify the decay daughter, barium-136. Barium tagging may be available for a second phase of nEXO operation, allowing for neutrino mass sensitivity beyond the inverted mass hierarchy. Tagging methods for this phase include barium-ion capture on a probe with identification by resonance ionization laser spectroscopy. Inclusion of an argon ion gun in this system allows for improved cleaning and preparation of the barium deposition substrate, with recent results reported in this presentation.

  18. Search for Two-Neutrino Double Electron Capture of $^{124}$Xe with XENON100

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Agostini, F; Alfonsi, M; Amaro, F D; Anthony, M; Arneodo, F; Barrow, P; Baudis, L; Bauermeister, B; Benabderrahmane, M L; Berger, T; Breur, P A; Brown, A; Brown, E; Bruenner, S; Bruno, G; Budnik, R; Bütikofer, L; Calvén, J; Cardoso, J M R; Cervantes, M; Cichon, D; Coderre, D; Colijn, A P; Conrad, J; Cussonneau, J P; Decowski, M P; de Perio, P; Di Gangi, P; Di Giovanni, A; Diglio, S; Duchovni, E; Fei, J; Ferella, A D; Fieguth, A; Franco, D; Fulgione, W; Rosso, A Gallo; Galloway, M; Gao, F; Garbini, M; Geis, C; Goetzke, L W; Greene, Z; Grignon, C; Hasterok, C; Hogenbirk, E; Itay, R; Kaminsky, B; Kessler, G; Kish, A; Landsman, H; Lang, R F; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Calloch, M Le; Levy, C; Lin, Q; Lindemann, S; Lindner, M; Lopes, J A M; Manfredini, A; Undagoitia, T Marrodán; Masbou, J; Massoli, F V; Masson, D; Mayani, D; Meng, Y; Messina, M; Micheneau, K; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Murra, M; Naganoma, J; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orrigo, S E A; Pakarha, P; Pelssers, B; Persiani, R; Piastra, F; Pienaar, J; Piro, M -C; Plante, G; Priel, N; Rauch, L; Reichard, S; Reuter, C; Rizzo, A; Rosendahl, S; Rupp, N; Santos, J M F dos; Sartorelli, G; Scheibelhut, M; Schindler, S; Schreiner, J; Schumann, M; Lavina, L Scotto; Selvi, M; Shagin, P; Silva, M; Simgen, H; Sivers, M v; Stein, A; Thers, D; Tiseni, A; Trinchero, G; Tunnell, C D; Wall, R; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wei, Y; Weinheimer, C; Wulf, J; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Two-neutrino double electron capture is a rare nuclear decay where two electrons are simultaneously captured from the atomic shell. For $^{124}$Xe this process has not yet been observed and its detection would provide a new reference for nuclear matrix element calculations. We have conducted a search for two-neutrino double electron capture from the K-shell of $^{124}$Xe using 7636 kg$\\cdot$d of data from the XENON100 dark matter detector. Using a Bayesian analysis we observed no significant excess above background, leading to a lower 90 % credibility limit on the half-life $T_{1/2}>6.5\\times10^{20}$ yr. We also evaluated the sensitivity of the XENON1T experiment, which is currently being commissioned, and find a sensitivity of $T_{1/2}>6.1\\times10^{22}$ yr after an exposure of 2 t$\\cdot$yr.

  19. Optimization of a single-phase liquid xenon Compton camera for 3γ medical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego Manzano, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is focused on the characterization and optimization of a single-phaseliquid xenon Compton camera for medical imaging applications. The detector has been conceived to exploit the advantages of an innovative medical imaging technique called 3γ imaging, which aims to obtain aprecise 3D location of a radioactive source with high sensitivity and an important reduction of the dose administered to the patient. The 3γ imaging technique is based on the detection in co...

  20. Surface coatings as xenon diffusion barriers on plastic scintillators : Improving Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the ability of transparent surface coatings to reduce xenon diffusion into plastic scintillators. The motivation for the work is improved radioxenon monitoring equipment, used with in the framework of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A large part of the equipment used in this context incorporates plastic scintillators which are in direct contact with the radioactive gas to be detected. One problem with such setup is that radioxenon...

  1. Evaluation of hemodynamic effects of xenon in dogs undergoing hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben C. Franceschi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The anesthetic gas xenon is reported to preserve hemodynamic stability during general anesthesia. However, the effects of the gas during shock are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Xe on hemodynamic stability and tissue perfusion in a canine model of hemorrhagic shock. METHOD: Twenty-six dogs, mechanically ventilated with a fraction of inspired oxygen of 21% and anesthetized with etomidate and vecuronium, were randomized into Xenon (Xe; n = 13 or Control (C; n = 13 groups. Following hemodynamic monitoring, a pressure-driven shock was induced to reach an arterial pressure of 40 mmHg. Hemodynamic data and blood samples were collected prior to bleeding, immediately after bleeding and 5, 20 and 40 minutes following shock. The Xe group was treated with 79% Xe diluted in ambient air, inhaled for 20 minutes after shock. RESULT: The mean bleeding volume was 44 mL.kg-1 in the C group and 40 mL.kg-1 in the Xe group. Hemorrhage promoted a decrease in both the cardiac index (p<0.001 and mean arterial pressure (p<0.001. These changes were associated with an increase in lactate levels and worsening of oxygen transport variables in both groups (p<0.05. Inhalation of xenon did not cause further worsening of hemodynamics or tissue perfusion markers. CONCLUSIONS: Xenon did not alter hemodynamic stability or tissue perfusion in an experimentally controlled hemorrhagic shock model. However, further studies are necessary to validate this drug in other contexts.

  2. An Interactive Code for a Pressurized Water Reactor Incorporating Temperature and Xenon Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Xenon-135 is the most significant fission product poidon because of its enormous thermal neutron absorption cross section and relatively large...density (atoms/cm ) 02’ = Microscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section of 235U (cm2) A perturbation in neuton flux ( o’) is directly...fission yield NJI = 1351 decay constant (sec- ) AkX = 135Xe decay constant (sec-I ) = 135Xe thermal neutron absorption cross section (cm 2) Let I(t

  3. Spectroscopy of Ba and Ba$^+$ deposits in solid xenon for barium tagging in nEXO

    OpenAIRE

    Mong, B.; Cook, S; Walton, T.; Chambers, C.; Craycraft, A.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Hall, K.; Fairbank Jr., W.; Albert, J. B.; Auty, D. J.; Barbeau, P. S.; Basque, V.; Beck, D.; Breidenbach, M.; Brunner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Progress on a method of barium tagging for the nEXO double beta decay experiment is reported. Absorption and emission spectra for deposits of barium atoms and ions in solid xenon matrices are presented. Excitation spectra for prominent emission lines, temperature dependence and bleaching of the fluorescence reveal the existence of different matrix sites. A regular series of sharp lines observed in Ba$^+$ deposits is identified with some type of barium hydride molecule. Lower limits for the fl...

  4. Investigation of the scintillation light from liquid argon doped with xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerskjöld, Maxim; Lindblad, Thomas; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Székely, Géza

    1993-11-01

    The scintillation light induced by 241Am 5.5 MeV α- particles in liquid argon doped with about 2% xenon detected with a fused silica UV photomultiplier tube is investigated. The pulse-height spectrum, the anode pulse shape and the attenuation of the light output are measured. The latter measurement was the main task of the present investigation and an effective half-length of more than 35 mm was found.

  5. Ab-initio electron scattering cross-sections and transport in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Brunger, Michael; Buckman, Steve; Dujko, Sasa; White, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Ab-initio electron - liquid phase xenon fully differential cross-sections for electrons scattering in liquid xenon are developed from a solution of the Dirac-Fock scattering equations, using a recently developed framework [1] which considers multipole polarizabilities, a non-local treatment of exchange, and screening and coherent scattering effects. A multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation accounting for the full anisotropic nature of the differential cross-section is used to calculate transport properties of excess electrons in liquid xenon. The results were found to agree to within 25% of the measured mobilities and characteristic energies over the reduced field range of 10^{-4} to 1 Td. The accuracies are comparable to those achieved in the gas phase. A simple model, informed by highly accurate gas-phase cross-sections, is presented to transform highly accurate gas-phase cross-sections to improve the liquid cross-sections, which was found to enhance the accuracy of the transport coefficient calculatio...

  6. Influence of different illuminations with xenon or microwave sulfur lamp on jointing and tillering of wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The emission of microwave sulfur lamp is mainly composed of visible light. The sulfur lamp, producing little infrared radiation, has high efficiency, long duration of illumination and less energy consumption. In order to probe the agricultural application of the lamp, experiments were carried out with wheat (cv. Yangmai 158) to emphatically study illuminating effects of xenon or sulfur lamp on tillering, jointing and net photosynthetic rate during tillering and jointing periods. Results indicated that there is almost no difference in net photosynthetic rate of wheat leaves growing under different lamps. Xenon lamp significantly advanced the time of jointing, decreased number of tillers, number of total leaves per plant and leaf size, as well as inhibited root growth. In contrast with xenon lamp, sulfur lamp evidently delays the time of heading and grain maturation, increased number of heads per plant, head length, total number of grains per plant, head weight and total grain weight per plant, accordingly significantly increased yield per plant. Strong infrared radiation might be the main cause to influence jointing and tillering. The development characteristics of wheat under sulfur lamp were much similar with those in natural condition.

  7. Highly Accelerated Aging Method for Poly(ethylene terephthalate Film Using Xenon Lamp with Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Funabashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available PET films were degraded at temperature higher than 100°C with steam and xenon light by using the newly developed system. Degradation products obtained using the proposed and conventional systems were essentially the same, as indicated by the similar increase in the intensity of the carbonyl peak near 1685 cm−1 in the FT-IR spectra of irradiated specimens and spectrum of original PET film. Elastic moduli derived from the stress-strain (SS curves obtained in tensile tests were almost the same in the case of the proposed and conventional systems and were independent of the heating temperature, light intensity, and irradiation time. Tensile strength of degraded PET films decreases with increasing heating temperature. Tensile strengths of PET films degraded at same temperature decrease linearly with increasing intensity of xenon light. The lifetime at 90% strength of PET films was calculated. Attempts were made to express this lifetime as functions of the light intensity and the reciprocal of the absolute temperature by using the Eyring model. Estimated lifetime 15.9 h of tensile test using Eyring model for PET film agreed with the lifetime 22.7 h derived from data measured using the xenon weather meter.

  8. Progress in characterization of the Photomultiplier Tubes for XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lyashenko, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    We report on the progress in characterization of the Hamamatsu model R11410-21 Photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for XENON1T dark matter experiment. The absolute quantum efficiency (QE) of the PMT was measured at low temperatures down to -110 $^0$C (a typical the PMT operation temperature in liquid xenon detectors) in a spectral range from 154.5 nm to 400 nm. At -110 $^0$C the absolute QE increased by 10-15\\% at 175 nm compared to that measured at room temperature. A new low power consumption, low radioactivity voltage divider for the PMTs is being developed. The measurement results showed that the PMT with the current version of the divider demonstrated a linear response (within 5\\%) down to 5$\\cdot$10$^4$ photoelectrons at a rate of 200 Hz. The radioactive contamination induced by the PMT and the PMT voltage divider materials satisfies the requirements for XENON1T detector not to exceed a total radioactive contamination in the detector of 0.5 evts/year/1tonn. Most of the PMTs received from the manufacturer showe...

  9. The health of SUSY after the Higgs discovery and the XENON100 data

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, Maria Eugenia; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the implications for the status and prospects of supersymmetry of the Higgs discovery and the last XENON data. We focus mainly, but not only, on the CMSSM and NUHM models. Using a Bayesian approach we determine the distribution of probability in the parameter space of these scenarios. This shows that, most probably, they are now beyond the LHC reach. This negative chances increase further (at more than 95% c.l.) if one includes dark matter constraints in the analysis, in particular the last XENON100 data. However, the models would be probed completely by XENON1T. The mass of the LSP neutralino gets essentially fixed around 1 TeV. We do not incorporate ad hoc measures of the fine-tuning to penalize unnatural possibilities: such penalization arises automatically from the careful Bayesian analysis itself, and allows to scan the whole parameter space. In this way, we can explain and resolve the apparent discrepancies between the previous results in the literature. Although SUSY has become hard to detec...

  10. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter and CE$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, D. [Fermilab; Chen, C. J. [Northwestern U.; Crisler, M. [PNL, Richland; Cwiok, T. [Northwestern U.; Dahl, C. E. [Fermilab; Grimsted, A. [Evanston Township High School; Gupta, J. [Northwestern U.; Jin, M. [Northwestern U.; Puig, R. [Northwestern U.; Temples, D. [Northwestern U; Zhang, J. [Northwestern U.

    2017-02-28

    A 30-gram xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in liquid xenon. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind PMT to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time-of-nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a $^{252}$Cf neutron source indicate that, for a thermodynamic "Seitz" threshold of 8.3 keV, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is between 11 and 25 keV. This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at the thresholds studied, setting a 90% CL upper limit of $6.3\\times10^{-7}$ bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF$_3$I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for WIMP and CE$\

  11. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, T.

    1973-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra have been obtained behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon at initial pressures of 0.1 and 1.0 torr using a rotating drum spectrograph and the OSU (The Ohio State University) arc-driven shock tube. These spectra were used to determine the qualitative nature of the flow as well as for making estimates of the available test time. The (n+1,n) and (n,n) band spectra of N2(+) (1st negative) were observed in the test gas behind incident shock waves in air at p1=1.0 torr and Us=9-10 km/sec. Behind reflected shock waves in air, the continuum of spectra appeared to cover almost the entire wavelength of 2,500-7,000 A for the shock-heated test gas. For xenon, the spectra for the incident shock wave cases for p1=0.1 torr show an interesting structure in which two intensely bright regions are witnessed in the time direction. The spectra obtained behind reflected shock waves in xenon were also dominated by continuum radiation but included strong absorption spectra due to FeI and FeII from the moment the reflected shock passed and on.

  12. Limits on GeV-scale WIMPs using charge signals in XENON100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Various theoretical models and recent experimental results have led to growing interest in the search for WIMP-like dark matter in the mass range of a few GeV. One important class of detector used in this study is based on the liquid-gas, dual-phase Xenon time projection chamber (as in XENON100 and LUX). These detectors nominally use both scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals to localize collision events in their sensitive volumes and thus reject background events, but it is known that the efficiency for detecting small S1 signals (such as are expected from a GeV-scale WIMP interaction) is much smaller than the efficiency for detecting an S2 from the same recoil. By removing the requirement of an observed S1 signal, one can thus effectively lower the energy threshold of the detector, and study GeV-scale WIMPs with greater sensitivity. With this in mind, we measure the rate of WIMP candidates in 225 live days of XENON100 data in events with small S2 signals (with or without an accompanying S1) and which pass other simple selection cuts optimized for GeV-scale WIMPs. This rate is then used to set a limit on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section for the mass range 1-10 GeV.

  13. Measurement of light and charge yield of low-energy electronic recoils in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Goetzke, L W; Anthony, M; Plante, G; Weber, M

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the light and charge yield of liquid xenon on the applied electric field and recoil energy is important for dark matter detectors using liquid xenon time projections chambers. Few measurements have been made of this field dependence at recoil energies less than 10 keV. In this paper we present results of such measurements using a specialized detector. Recoil energies are determined via the Compton coincidence technique at four drift fields relevant for liquid xenon dark matter detectors: 0.19, 0.48, 1.02, and 2.32 kV/cm. Mean recoil energies down to 1 keV were measured with unprecedented precision. We find that the charge and light yield are anti-correlated above 3 keV, and that the field dependence becomes negligible below 6 keV. However, below 3 keV we find a charge yield significantly higher than expectation and a reconstructed energy deviating from linearity.

  14. Intramolecular proton transfer and tunnelling reactions of hydroxyphenylbenzoxazole derivatives in Xenon at 15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walla, Peter J. [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department 010, Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany) and Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Technical University of Brunswick, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Hans-Sommerstr. 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)]. E-mail: pwalla@gwdg.de; Nickel, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department 010, Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-06-06

    We investigated the site dependence and the tunnelling processes of the intramolecular proton and deuteron transfer in the triplet state of the compounds 2-(2'-hydroxy-4'-methylphenyl)benzoxazole (m-MeHBO) and 2-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methylphenyl)benzoxazoles (o-MeHBO) and their deuterio-oxy analogues in a solid xenon matrix. After singlet excitation there occurs an ultrafast intramolecular enol {yields} keto proton transfer and subsequent intersystem crossing mainly to the keto triplet state. In the triplet state of m-MeHBO, the proton transfer back to the lower enol triplet state is governed by tunnelling processes. In o-MeHBO, however, the enol triplet state is higher and therefore normally no tunnel reaction can be observed. Because of the external heavy atom-effect in a xenon matrix, we were able to investigate the reverse enol-keto-tunnelling after exciting directly the enol triplet state of deuterated o-MeHBO. The time constants of the reverse enol-keto tautomerization are similar to those of the normal keto-enol tautomerization. In a xenon matrix, the observed site-selective phosphorescence spectra are very well-resolved vibrationally. This allowed the study of the tunnel rates in different well-defined sites. The vibrational energies obtained in the spectra are in good agreement with vibrational energies found in resonant Raman and IR spectra of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO)

  15. High-accuracy measurement of the emission spectrum of liquid xenon in the vacuum ultraviolet region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keiko, E-mail: fujii-keiko-nv@ynu.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Endo, Yuya; Torigoe, Yui; Nakamura, Shogo [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Kasami, Katsuyu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Mihara, Satoshi; Saito, Kiwamu; Sasaki, Shinichi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); The Graduate School of Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Tawara, Hiroko [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    The emission spectrum of cryogenic liquid xenon in the vacuum ultraviolet region was measured by irradiating liquid xenon with gamma-rays from a radioactive source. To achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio, we employed coincident photon counting. Additionally, the charge of the photo-sensor signals was measured to estimate the number of detected photons accurately. In addition, proper corrections were incorporated for the wavelength; response functions of the apparatus obtained using a low-pressure mercury lamp, and photon detection efficiencies of the optical system were considered. The obtained emission spectrum is found to be in the shape of a Gaussian function, with the center at 57,199±34 (stat.)±33 (syst.) cm{sup −1} (174.8±0.1 (stat.)±0.1 (syst.) nm) and the full width at half maximum of 3328±72 (stat.)±65 (syst.) cm{sup −1} (10.2±0.2 (stat.)±0.2 (sys.) nm). These results are the most accurate values obtained in terms of the data acquisition method and the calibration for the experimental system and provide valuable information regarding the high-precision instruments that employ a liquid-xenon scintillator.

  16. NEXT: Searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay with a gas-xenon TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novella, P, E-mail: pau.novella@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    Although different techniques are used to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay, the common challenges for all the existing or planned experiments are to achieve a good energy resolution and large background rejection factors. The NEXT collaboration addresses these two challenges with a high-pressure gas-Xenon TPC. Natural Xenon consists of almost 9% of {sup 136}Xe, a {beta}{beta}{sup 0{nu}} candidate emitter, and can be easily enriched. When used as a calorimeter, {sup 136}Xe yields an excellent energy resolution. This fact, combined with the expected long life of the {beta}{beta}{sup 2{nu}} mode, accounts for negligible intrinsic backgrounds up to masses of 1 ton. Furthermore, external backgrounds can be rejected with high efficiency by means of the electron tracking capabilities of the TPC. A detector containing about 100 kg of enriched Xenon is expected to be installed at Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) within the next 5 years, with the twofold aim of exploring the degenerated hierarchy of the neutrino mass and providing deep understanding of the experimental techniques which allow extrapolation to larger detectors.

  17. Generation of soft x-ray radiation by laser irradiation of a gas puff xenon target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Szczurek, M. [Military Univ. of Technology, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Optoelectronics] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Plasmas produced from laser-irradiated gas puff xenon targets, created by pulsed injection of xenon with high-pressure solenoid valve, offer the possibility of realizing a debrisless x-ray point source for the x-ray lithography applications. In this paper the authors present results of the experimental investigations on the x-ray generation from a gas puff xenon target irradiated with nanosecond high-power laser pulses produced using two different laser facilities: a Nd:glass laser operating at 1.06 {micro}m, which generated 10--15 J pulses in 1 ns FWHM, and Nd:glass slab laser, producing pulses of 10 ns duration with energy reaching 12 J for a 0.53 {micro}m wavelength or 20 J for 1.05 {micro}m. To study the x-ray emission different x-ray diagnostic methods have been used. X-ray spectra were registered using a flat CsAP crystal spectrograph with an x-ray film or a curved KAP crystal spectrograph with a convex curvature to an x-ray CCD readout detector. X-ray images have been taken using pinhole cameras with an x-ray film or a CCD array. X-ray yield was measured with the use of semiconductor detectors (silicon photodiodes or diamond photoconductors).

  18. Evaluation of periventricular hypodensity in adult hydrocephalus with CT cisternography and xenon-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Masaru (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-06-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternography and Xenon-enhanced CT were employed to evaluate the periventricular hypodensity (PVH). CT cisternography was performed on adult cases with suspected communicating hydrocephalus, of which 43 cases showing ventricular reflux were investigated. In those cases in which significant transition of metrizamide into the area of PVH was followed after the ventricular reflux and stasis, the shunt operation was effective. The PVH disappeared post-operatively. However, in cases with PVH in which the metrizamide penetration did not occur, the PVH did not disappear post-operatively and clinical improvement was not detected. Xenon-enhanced CT was performed in six cases. Three cases exhibited communicating hydrocephalus, in which the area of PVH was not enhanced by metrizamide with CT cisternography. The other cases demonstrated acute high pressure hydrocephalus. The PVH in the former cases was neither enhanced by Xenon nor metrizamide, while the latter was enhanced significantly. Studies suggested that the reversible PVH was the result of an abnormally increased transition of cerebrospinal fluid through the ependymal layer, while the irreversible PVH resulted from the axonal destruction or demyelination of the periventricular white matter.

  19. Characterisation of NEXT-DEMO using xenon K$_{\\alpha}$ X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Lorca, D; Laing, A; Ferrario, P; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Álvarez, V; Borges, F I G; Camargo, M; Cárcel, S; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Díaz, J; Esteve, R; Fernandes, L M P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Irastorza, I G; Labarga, L; Liubarsky, I; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martínez-Lema, G; Martínez, A; Miller, T; Monrabal, F; Monserrate, M; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; Nebot-Guinot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Seguí, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Webb, R; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2014-01-01

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe in a high pressure gas TPC using electroluminescence (EL) to amplify the signal from ionization. Understanding the response of the detector is imperative in achieving a consistent and well understood energy measurement. The abundance of xenon k-shell x-ray emission during data taking has been identified as a multitool for the characterisation of the fundamental parameters of the gas as well as the equalisation of the response of the detector. The NEXT-DEMO prototype is a ~1.5 kg volume TPC filled with natural xenon. It employs an array of 19 PMTs as an energy plane and of 256 SiPMs as a tracking plane with the TPC light tube and SiPM surfaces being coated with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) which acts as a wavelength shifter for the VUV scintillation light produced by xenon. This paper presents the measurement of the properties of the drift of electrons in the TPC, the effects of the EL production region, and the extraction of p...

  20. Primary and secondary scintillation measurements in a Xenon Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, L M P; Freitas, E D C; Monteiro, C M B; Santos, J M F dos [Instrumentation Centre, Physics Department, University of Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Ball, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Yahlali, N [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Nygren, D, E-mail: pancho@gian.fis.uc.p [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    NEXT is a new experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay using a 100 kg radio-pure high-pressure gaseous xenon TPC. The detector requires excellent energy resolution, which can be achieved in a Xe TPC with electroluminescence readout. Hamamatsu R8520-06SEL photomultipliers are good candidates for the scintillation readout. The performance of this photomultiplier, used as VUV photosensor in a gas proportional scintillation counter, was investigated. Initial results for the detection of primary and secondary scintillation produced as a result of the interaction of 5.9 keV X-rays in gaseous xenon, at room temperature and at pressures up to 3 bar, are presented. An energy resolution of 8.0% was obtained for secondary scintillation produced by 5.9 keV X-rays. No significant variation of the primary scintillation was observed for different pressures (1, 2 and 3 bar) and for electric fields up to 0.8 V cm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} in the drift region, demonstrating negligible recombination luminescence. A primary scintillation yield of 81 {+-} 7 photons was obtained for 5.9 keV X-rays, corresponding to a mean energy of 72 {+-} 6 eV to produce a primary scintillation photon in xenon.

  1. Pulse-shape discrimination and energy resolution of a liquid-argon scintillator with xenon doping

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Christopher G; Lippincott, W Hugh; Nikkel, James A; Shin, Yunchang; McKinsey, Daniel N

    2014-01-01

    Liquid-argon scintillation detectors are used in fundamental physics experiments and are being considered for security applications. Previous studies have suggested that the addition of small amounts of xenon dopant improves performance in light or signal yield, energy resolution, and particle discrimination. In this study, we investigate the detector response for xenon dopant concentrations from 9 +/- 5 ppm to 1100 +/- 500 ppm xenon (by weight) in 6 steps. The 3.14-liter detector uses tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) wavelength shifter with dual photomultiplier tubes and is operated in single-phase mode. Gamma-ray-interaction signal yield of 4.0 +/- 0.1 photoelectrons/keV improved to 5.0 +/- 0.1 photoelectrons/keV with dopant. Energy resolution at 662 keV improved from (4.4 +/- 0.2)% ({\\sigma}) to (3.5 +/- 0.2)% ({\\sigma}) with dopant. Pulse-shape discrimination performance degraded greatly at the first addition of dopant, slightly improved with additional additions, then rapidly improved near the end of our dopa...

  2. PETALO, a new concept for a Positron Emission TOF Apparatus based on Liquid xenOn

    CERN Document Server

    Benlloch-Rodriguez, J M

    2016-01-01

    This master thesis presents a new type of Positron Emission TOF Apparatus using Liquid xenOn (PETALO). The detector is based in the Liquid Xenon Scintillating Cell (LXSC). The cell is a box filled with liquid xenon (LXe) whose transverse dimensions are chosen to optimize packing and with a thickness optimized to contain a large fraction of the incoming photons. The entry and exit faces of the box (relative to the incoming gammas direction) are instrumented with large silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), coated with a wavelength shifter, tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). The non-instrumented faces are covered by reflecting Teflon coated with TPB. In this thesis we show that the LXSC can display an energy resolution of 5% FWHM, much better than that of conventional solid scintillators such as LSO/LYSO. The LXSC can measure the interaction point of the incoming photon with a resolution in the three coordinates of 1 mm. The very fast scintillation time of LXe (2 ns) and the availability of suitable sensors and electronic...

  3. Measurements of the equations of state and spectrum of nonideal xenon plasma under shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y; Chen, Q F

    2010-08-01

    Experimental equations of state on generation of nonideal xenon plasma by intense shock wave compression was presented in the ranges of pressure of 2-16 GPa and temperature of 31-50 kK, and the xenon plasma with the nonideal coupling parameter Γ range from 0.6-2.1 was generated. The shock wave was produced using the flyer plate impact and accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light gas gun. Gaseous specimens were shocked from two initial pressures of 0.80 and 4.72 MPa at room temperature. Time-resolved spectral radiation histories were recorded by using a multiwavelength channel pyrometer. The transient spectra with the wavelength range of 460-700 nm were recorded by using a spectrometer to evaluate the shock temperature. Shock velocity was measured and particle velocity was determined by the impedance matching methods. The equations of state of xenon plasma and ionization degree have been discussed in terms of the self-consistent fluid variational theory.

  4. Crossover Equation of State Models Applied to the Critical Behavior of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrabos, Y.; Lecoutre, C.; Marre, S.; Guillaument, R.; Beysens, D.; Hahn, I.

    2015-03-01

    The turbidity () measurements of Güttinger and Cannell (Phys Rev A 24:3188-3201, 1981) in the temperature range along the critical isochore of homogeneous xenon are reanalyzed. The singular behaviors of the isothermal compressibility () and the correlation length () predicted from the master crossover functions are introduced in the turbidity functional form derived by Puglielli and Ford (Phys Rev Lett 25:143-146, 1970). We show that the turbidity data are thus well represented by the Ornstein-Zernike approximant, within 1 % precision. We also introduce a new crossover master model (CMM) of the parametric equation of state for a simple fluid system with no adjustable parameter. The CMM model and the phenomenological crossover parametric model are compared with the turbidity data and the coexisting liquid-gas density difference (). The excellent agreement observed for , , , and in a finite temperature range well beyond the Ising-like preasymptotic domain confirms that the Ising-like critical crossover behavior of xenon can be described in conformity with the universal features estimated by the renormalization-group methods. Only 4 critical coordinates of the vapor-liquid critical point are needed in the (pressure, temperature, molecular volume) phase surface of xenon.

  5. Supernova neutrino physics with xenon dark matter detectors: A timely perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Rafael F; Reichard, Shayne; Selvi, Marco; Tamborra, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter detectors that utilize liquid xenon have now achieved tonne-scale targets, giving them sensitivity to all flavours of supernova neutrinos via coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering. Considering for the first time a realistic detector model, we simulate the expected supernova neutrino signal for different progenitor masses and nuclear equations of state in existing and upcoming dual-phase liquid xenon experiments. We show that the proportional scintillation signal (S2) of a dual-phase detector allows for a clear observation of the neutrino signal and guarantees a particularly low energy threshold, while the backgrounds are rendered negligible during the supernova burst. XENON1T (XENONnT and LZ; DARWIN) experiments will be sensitive to a supernova burst up to 25 (35; 65) kpc from Earth at a significance of more than 5 sigma, observing approximately 35 (123; 704) events from a 27 solar-mass supernova progenitor at 10 kpc. Moreover, it will be possible to measure the average neutrino energy of a...

  6. Ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses using xenon-enhanced dynamic single-energy CT and dual-energy CT: a feasibility study in a nasal cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Sven F; Möller, Winfried; Becker, Sven; Schuschnig, Uwe; Eickelberg, Oliver; Helck, Andreas D; Reiser, Maximilian F; Johnson, Thorsten R C

    2012-10-01

    To show the feasibility of dual-energy CT (DECT) and dynamic CT for ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses in a nasal cast. In a first trial, xenon gas was administered to a nasal cast with a laminar flow of 7 L/min. Dynamic CT acquisitions of the nasal cavity and the sinuses were performed. This procedure was repeated with pulsating xenon flow. Local xenon concentrations in the different compartments of the model were determined on the basis of the enhancement levels. In a second trial, DECT measurements were performed both during laminar and pulsating xenon administration and the xenon concentrations were quantified directly. Neither with dynamic CT nor DECT could xenon-related enhancement be detected in the sinuses during laminar airflow. Using pulsating flow, dynamic imaging showed a xenon wash-in and wash-out in the sinuses that followed a mono-exponential function with time constants of a few seconds. Accordingly, DECT revealed xenon enhancement in the sinuses only after pulsating xenon administration. The feasibility of xenon-enhanced DECT for ventilation imaging was proven in a nasal cast. The superiority of pulsating gas flow for the administration of gas or aerosolised drugs to the paranasal sinuses was demonstrated. • Ventilation of the paranasal sinuses is poorly understood. • Dual-energy CT ventilation imaging has been explored using phantom simulation. • Xenon can be seen in the paranasal sinuses using pulsating xenon flow. • Dual-energy CT uses a lower radiation dose compared with dynamic ventilation CT.

  7. Unexpected variations in the triple oxygen isotope composition of stratospheric carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegel, Aaron A; Cole, Amanda S; Hoag, Katherine J; Atlas, Elliot L; Schauffler, Sue M; Boering, Kristie A

    2013-10-29

    We report observations of stratospheric CO2 that reveal surprisingly large anomalous enrichments in (17)O that vary systematically with latitude, altitude, and season. The triple isotope slopes reached 1.95 ± 0.05(1σ) in the middle stratosphere and 2.22 ± 0.07 in the Arctic vortex versus 1.71 ± 0.03 from previous observations and a remarkable factor of 4 larger than the mass-dependent value of 0.52. Kinetics modeling of laboratory measurements of photochemical ozone-CO2 isotope exchange demonstrates that non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation alone quantitatively account for the (17)O anomaly in CO2 in the laboratory, resolving long-standing discrepancies between models and laboratory measurements. Model sensitivities to hypothetical mass-dependent isotope effects in reactions involving O3, O((1)D), or CO2 and to an empirically derived temperature dependence of the anomalous kinetic isotope effects in ozone formation then provide a conceptual framework for understanding the differences in the isotopic composition and the triple isotope slopes between the laboratory and the stratosphere and between different regions of the stratosphere. This understanding in turn provides a firmer foundation for the diverse biogeochemical and paleoclimate applications of (17)O anomalies in tropospheric CO2, O2, mineral sulfates, and fossil bones and teeth, which all derive from stratospheric CO2.

  8. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel[Dissertation 17527

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M. I

    2008-07-01

    In nuclear fuel, in approximately one quarter of the fissions, one of the two formed fission products is gaseous. These are mainly the noble gases xenon and krypton with isotopes of xenon contributing up to 90% of the product gases. These noble fission gases do not combine with other species, and have a low solubility in the normally used uranium oxide matrix. They can be dissolved in the fuel matrix or precipitate in nanometer-sized bubbles within the fuel grain, in micrometer-sized bubbles at the grain boundaries, and a fraction also precipitates in fuel pores, coming from fuel fabrication. A fraction of the gas can also be released into the plenum of the fuel rod. With increasing fission, and therefore burn-up, the ceramic fuel material experiences a transformation of its structure in the 'cooler' rim region of the fuel. A subdivision occurs of the original fuel grains of few microns size into thousands of small grains of sub-micron sizes. Additionally, larger pores are formed, which also leads into an increasing porosity in the fuel rim, called high burn-up structure. In this structure, only a small fraction of the fission gas remains in the matrix, the major quantity is said to accumulate in these pores. Because of this accumulation, the knowledge of the quantities of gas within these pores is of major interest in consideration to burn-up, fuel performance and especially for safety issues. In case of design based accidents, i.e. rapidly increasing temperature transients, the behavior of the fuel has to be estimated. Various analytical techniques have been used to determine the Xe concentration in nuclear fuel samples. The capabilities of EPMA (Electron Probe Micro-Analyser) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) have been studied and provided some qualitative information, which has been used for determining Xe-matrix concentrations. First approaches combining these two techniques to estimate pore pressures have been recently reported. However

  9. Resolving the stellar sources of isotopically rare presolar silicate grains through Mg and Fe isotopic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Messenger, Scott, E-mail: lan-anh.n.nguyen@nasa.gov [Robert M. Walker Laboratory for Space Science, Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We conducted multi-element isotopic analyses of 11 presolar silicate grains from the Acfer 094 meteorite having unusual O isotopic compositions. Eight grains are {sup 18}O-rich, one is {sup 16}O-rich, and two are extremely {sup 17}O-rich. We constrained the grains' stellar sources by measuring their Si and Mg isotopic ratios, and also the {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe and {sup 57}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratios for five grains. The Mg and Fe isotopic measurements were conducted after surrounding matrix grains were removed for more accurate ratios. Most of the {sup 18}O-rich silicates had anomalous Mg isotopic ratios, and their combined isotopic constraints are consistent with origins in low-mass Type II supernovae (SNe II) rather than high-metallicity stars. The isotopic ratios of the {sup 16}O-rich silicate are also consistent with an SN origin. Mixing small amounts of interior stellar material with the stellar envelope replicated all measured isotopic ratios except for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si and {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe in some grains. The {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si ratios of all SN-derived grains are matched by doubling the {sup 29}Si yield in the Ne- and Si-burning zones. The {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratios of the grains imply elemental fractionation in the Si/S zone, or introduction of isotopically solar Fe by secondary processing. The two highly {sup 17}O-rich silicates exhibited significant {sup 25}Mg and/or {sup 26}Mg enrichments and their isotopic ratios are best explained by strong dilution of 1.15 M {sub ☉} CO nova matter. We estimate that ∼12% and 1% of presolar silicates have SN and nova origins, respectively, similar to presolar SiC and oxides. This implies that asymptotic giant branch stars are the dominant dust producers in the galaxy.

  10. Contemporary Use of Anomalous Diffraction in Biomolecular Structure Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Q.; Hendrickson, W.

    2017-01-01

    The normal elastic X-ray scattering that depends only on electron density can be modulated by an ?anomalous? component due to resonance between X-rays and electronic orbitals. Anomalous scattering thereby precisely identifies atomic species, since orbitals distinguish atomic elements, which enables the multi- and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD and SAD) methods. SAD now predominates in de novo structure determination of biological macromolecules, and we focus here on the prevailing SAD method. We describe the anomalous phasing theory and the periodic table of phasing elements that are available for SAD experiments, differentiating between those readily accessible for at-resonance experiments and those that can be effective away from an edge. We describe procedures for present-day SAD phasing experiments and we discuss optimization of anomalous signals for challenging applications. We also describe methods for using anomalous signals as molecular markers for tracing and element identification. Emerging developments and perspectives are discussed in brief.

  11. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  12. Conformal Sigma Models with Anomalous Dimensions and Ricci Solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Nitta, M

    2004-01-01

    We present new non-Ricci-flat Kahler metrics with U(N) and O(N) isometries as target manifolds of conformally invariant sigma models with an anomalous dimension. They are so-called Ricci solitons, special solutions to a Ricci-flow equation. These metrics explicitly contain the anomalous dimension and reduce to Ricci-flat Kahler metrics on the canonical line bundles over certain coset spaces in the limit of vanishing anomalous dimension.

  13. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a m

  14. Mbosi: An anomalous iron with unique silicate inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward J.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Davis, Andrew M.; Clarke, Roy S., Jr.; Wasson, John T.

    1996-09-01

    The Mbosi iron meteorite contains millimeter size silicate inclusions. Mbosi is an ungrouped iron meteorite with a Ge/Ga ratio >10, which is an anomalous property shared with the five-member IIF iron group, the Eagle Station pallasites and four other ungrouped irons. Neither the IIF group nor the four other ungrouped irons are known to have silicate inclusions. Chips from three Mbosi inclusions were studied, but most of the work concentrated on a whole 3.1 mm circular inclusion. This inclusion consists of a mantle and a central core of different mineralogies. The mantle is partially devitrified quartz-normative glass, consisting of microscopic crystallites of two pyroxenes and plagioclase, which are crystalline enough to give an x-ray powder diffraction pattern but not coarse enough to permit analyses of individual minerals. The core consists of silica. The bulk composition does not match any known meteorite type, although there is a similarity in mode of occurrence to quartz-normative silicate inclusions in some HE irons. Mbosi silicate appears to be unique. The bulk rare earth element (REE) pattern of the mantle is flat at ≅ 7×C1; the core is depleted in REE but shows a small positive Eu anomaly. The O-isotope composition of bulk silicate lies on a unit slope mixing line (parallel and close to the C3 mixing line) that includes the Eagle Station pallasites and the iron Bocaiuva (related to the IIF irons); all of these share the property of having Ge/Ga ratios >10. It is concluded that Mbosi silicate represents a silica-bearing source rock that was melted and injected into metal. Melting occurred early in the history of the parent body because the metal now shows a normal Widmanstätten structure with only minor distortion that was caused when the parent body broke up and released meteorites into interplanetary space. The cause of Ge/Ga ratios being >10 in these irons is unknown. The fact that silicates in Mbosi, Bocaiuva (related to IIF irons) and the Eagle

  15. Hic Sunt Leones: Anomalous Scaling In Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, L.; Gabellani, S.; Provenzale, A.; Rebora, N.

    In recent years the spatio-temporal intermittency of precipitation fields has often been quantified in terms of scaling and/or multifractal behaviour. In this work we anal- yse the spatial scaling properties of precipitation intensity fields measured during the GATE radar experiment, and compare the results with those obtained from surrogate data generated by nonlinearly filtered, linear stochastic processes and from random shuffling of the original data. The results of the study suggest a spurious nature of the spatial multifractal behaviour of the GATE fields and indicate that claims of multifrac- tality and anomalous scaling in rainfall may have to be reconsidered.

  16. The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, V W; Earle, W; Efstathiadis, E F; Hare, M; Hazen, E S; Krienen, F; Miller, J P; Rind, O; Roberts, B L; Sulak, Lawrence R; Trofimov, A V; Brown, H N; Bunce, G M; Danby, G T; Larsen, R; Lee, Y Y; Meng, W; Mi, J L; Morse, W M; Pai, C; Prigl, R; Sanders, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Tanaka, M; Warburton, D; Orlov, Yu F; Winn, D; Grossmann, A; Jungmann, Klaus; zu Putlitz, Gisbert; Debevec, P T; Deninger, W; Hertzog, D W; Polly, C; Sedykh, S; Urner, D; Haeberlen, U; Cushman, P B; Duong, L; Giron, S; Kindem, J; McNabb, R; Miller, D; Timmermans, C; Zimmerman, D; Druzhinin, V P; Fedotovich, G V; Khazin, B I; Logashenko, I B; Ryskulov, N M; Serednyakov, S I; Shatunov, Yu M; Solodov, E P; Yamamoto, A; Iwasaki, M; Kawamura, M; Deng, H; Dhawan, S K; Farley, Francis J M; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Hughes, V W; Kawall, D; Redin, S I; Steinmetz, A

    1998-01-01

    A new experiment is underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory to measure the g-2 value of the muon to a precision of 0.35 ppm, which would improve our present knowledge by a factor of 20. In its initial run the muon anomalous g-value was found to be a/sub mu //sup + /=1165925(15)*10/sup -9/ [13 ppm], in good agreement with the previous CERN measurements and with approximately the same uncertainty. The current scientific motivations for this experiment are discussed, and the experiment is described. (30 refs).

  17. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Kagome Ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linda; Wicker, Christina; Suzuki, Takehito; Checkelsky, Joseph; Joseph Checkelsky Team

    The ferromagnetic kagome lattice is theoretically known to possess topological band structures. We have synthesized large single crystals of a kagome ferromagnet Fe3Sn2 which orders ferromagnetically well above room temperature. We have studied the electrical and magnetic properties of these crystals over a broad temperature and magnetic field range. Both the scaling relation of anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility show that the ferromagnetism of Fe3Sn2 is unconventional. We discuss these results in the context of magnetism in kagome systems and relevance to the predicted topological properties in this class of compounds. This research is supported by DMR-1231319.

  18. Anomalous CMB polarization and gravitational chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Contaldi, Carlo R; Smolin, Lee

    2008-01-01

    We consider the possibility that gravity breaks parity, with left and right handed gravitons coupling to matter with a different Newton's constant and show that this would affect their zero-point vacuum fluctuations during inflation. Should there be a cosmic background of gravity waves, the effect would translate into anomalous CMB polarization. Non-vanishing TB (and EB) polarization components emerge, revealing interesting experimental targets. Indeed if reasonable chirality is present a TB measurement would provide the easiest way to detect a gravitational wave background. We speculate on the theoretical implications of such an observation.

  19. Anomalous Redshift of Some Galactic Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yi-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous redshifts of some galactic objects such as binary stars, early-type stars in the solar neighborhood, and O stars in a star clusters are discussed. It is shown that all these phenomena have a common characteristic, that is, the redshifts of stars increase as the temperature rises. This characteristic cannot be explained by means of the Doppler Effect but can by means of the soft-photon process proposed by Yijia Zheng (arXiv:1305.0427 [astro-ph.HE]).

  20. Development of a liquid xenon Compton telescope dedicated to functional medical imaging; Etude et developpement d'un telescope compton au xenon liquide dedie a l'imagerie medicale fonctionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignon, C

    2007-12-15

    Functional imaging is a technique used to locate in three dimensions the position of a radiotracer previously injected in a patient. The two main modalities used for a clinical application to detect tumors, the SPECT and the PET, use solid scintillators as a detection medium. The objective of this thesis was to investigate the possibility of using liquid xenon in order to benefit from the intrinsic properties of this medium in functional imaging. The feasibility study of such a device has been performed by taking into account the technical difficulties specific to the liquid xenon. First of all, simulations of a liquid xenon PET has been performed using Monte-Carlo methods. The results obtained with a large liquid xenon volume are promising : we can expect a reduction of the injected activity of radiotracer, an improvement of the spatial resolution of the image and a parallax free camera. The second part of the thesis was focused on the development of a new concept of medical imaging, the three gamma imaging, based on the use of a new emitter: the 44 scandium. Associated to a classical PET camera, the Compton telescope is used to infer the incoming direction of the third gamma ray by triangulation. Therefore, it is possible to reconstruct the position of each emitter in three dimensions. This work convinced the scientific community to support the construction and characterization of a liquid xenon Compton telescope. The first camera dedicated to small animal imaging should then be operational in 2009. (author)

  1. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  2. Diffraction Anomalous Near-Edge Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltaji, Habib O., Jr.

    1995-11-01

    To determine the atomic structure about atom of an element in a sample of a condensed multicomponent single crystal, contrast radiation is proposed with the use of Diffraction Anomalous Near-Edge Structure (DANES), which combines the long-range order sensitivity of the x-ray diffraction and short-range order of the x-ray absorption near-edge techniques. This is achieved by modulating the photon energy of the x-ray beam incident on the sample over a range of energies near an absorption edge of the selected element. Due to anomalous dispersion, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray absorption, the DANES intensity with respect to the selected element is obtained in a single experiment. I demonstrate that synchrotron DANES measurements for the single crystal of thin film and the powder samples and provide the same local atomic structural information as the x-ray absorption near-edge with diffraction condition and can be used to provide enhanced site selectivity. I demonstrate calculations of DAFS intensity and measurements of polarized DANES and XANES intensity.

  3. Anomalous Enthalpy Relaxation in Vitreous Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzheng eYue

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is a challenge to calorimetrically determine the glass transition temperature (Tg of vitreous silica. Here we demonstrate that this challenge mainly arises from the extreme sensitivity of the Tg to the hydroxyl content in vitreous silica, but also from the irreversibility of its glass transition when repeating the calorimetric scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica.

  4. Hydrodynamic Waves in an Anomalous Charged Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, Navid; Rezaei, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We study the collective excitations in a relativistic fluid with an anomalous conserved charge. In $3+1$ dimensions, in addition to two ordinary sound modes we find two propagating modes in presence of an external magnetic field: one with a velocity proportional to the coefficient of gauge-gravitational anomaly coefficient and the other with a velocity which depends on both chiral anomaly and the gauge gravitational anomaly coefficients. While the former is the Chiral Alfv\\'en wave recently found in arXiv:1505.05444, the latter is a new type of collective excitations originated from the density fluctuations. We refer to these modes as the Type-M and Type-D chiral Alfv\\'en waves respectively. We show that the Type-M Chiral Alfv\\'en mode is split into two chiral Alfv\\'en modes when taking into account the effect of dissipation processes in the fluid. In 1+1 dimensions we find only one propagating mode associated with the anomalous effects. We explicitly compute the velocity of this wave and show that in contras...

  5. Limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-08-01

    Limits on the anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings are presented from a simultaneous fit to the data samples of three gauge boson pair final states in pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV: Wγ production with the W boson decaying to eν or μν, W boson pair production with both of the W bosons decaying to eν or μν, and WW or WZ production with one W boson decaying to eν and the other W boson or the Z boson decaying to two jets. Assuming identical WWγ and WWZ couplings, 95% C.L. limits on the anomalous couplings of -0.30<Δκ<0.43 (λ=0) and -0.20<λ<0.20 (Δκ=0) are obtained using a form factor scale Λ=2.0 TeV. Limits found under other assumptions on the relationship between the WWγ and WWZ couplings are also presented.

  6. Anomalous Dispersion in a Sand Bed River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. N.; Tucker, G. E.; Benson, D. M.

    2009-04-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in non-local, heavy-tailed models of sediment transport and dispersion that are governed by fractional order differential equations. These models have a firm mathematical foundation and have been successfully applied in a variety of transport systems, but their use in geomorphology has been minimal because the data required to validate the models is difficult to acquire. We use data from a nearly 50-year-old tracer experiment to test a fluvial bed load transport model with a two unique features. First, the model uses a heavy-tailed particle velocity distribution with a divergent second moment to reproduce the anomalously high fraction of tracer mass observed in the downstream tail of the spatial distribution. Second, the model partitions mass into a detectable mobile phase and an undetectable, immobile phase. This two-phase transport model predicts two other features observed in the data: a decrease in the amount of detected tracer mass over the course of the experiment and the high initial velocity of the tracer plume. Because our model uses a heavy-tailed velocity distribution with a divergent second moment it is non-local and non-Fickian and able to reproduce aspects of the data that a local, Fickian model cannot. The model's successful prediction of the observed concentration profiles provides some of the first evidence of anomalous dispersion of bed load in a natural river.

  7. Minimal flavor violation and anomalous top decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas; Gadatsch, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Top-quark physics at the LHC may open a window to physics beyond the Standard Model and even lead us to an understanding of the phenomenon of “flavor.” However, current flavor data is a strong hint that no “new physics” with a generic flavor structure can be expected at the TeV scale. In turn, if there is “new physics” at the TeV scale, it must be “minimally flavor violating.” This has become a widely accepted assumption for “new physics” models. In this paper we propose a model-independent scheme to test minimal flavor violation for the anomalous charged Wtq, q∈{d,s,b} and flavor-changing Vtq, q∈{u,c} and V∈{Z,γ,g} couplings within an effective field theory framework, i.e., in a model-independent way. We perform a spurion analysis of our effective field theory approach and calculate the decay rates for the anomalous top-quark decays in terms of the effective couplings for different helicities by using a two-Higgs doublet model of type II, under the assumption that the top-quark is produced at a high-energy collision and decays as a quasi-free particle.

  8. Minimal Flavour Violation and Anomalous Top Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Top quark physics at the LHC may open a window to physics beyond the standard model and even lead us to an understanding of the phenomenon "flavour". However, current flavour data is a strong hint that no "new physics" with a generic flavour structure can be expected in the TeV scale. In turn, if there is "new physics" at the TeV scale, it must be "minimally flavour violating". This has become a widely accepted assumption for "new physics" models. In this paper we propose a way to test the concept of minimal flavour violation for the anomalous charged $Wtq$, $q\\in\\{d,s,b\\}$, and flavour-changing $Vtq$, $q\\in\\{u,c\\}$ and $V\\in\\{Z,\\gamma,g\\}$, couplings within an effective field theory framework, i.e. in a model independent way. We perform a spurion analysis of our effective field theory approach and calculate the decay rates for the anomalous top-quark decays in terms of the effective couplings for different helicities by using a two-Higgs doublet model of type II (2HDM-II), under the assumption that the top-q...

  9. Discovering anomalous events from urban informatics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajah, Kasthuri; Subbaraju, Vigneshwaran; Weerakoon, Dulanga; Misra, Archan; Tam, La Thanh; Athaide, Noel

    2017-05-01

    Singapore's "smart city" agenda is driving the government to provide public access to a broader variety of urban informatics sources, such as images from traffic cameras and information about buses servicing different bus stops. Such informatics data serves as probes of evolving conditions at different spatiotemporal scales. This paper explores how such multi-modal informatics data can be used to establish the normal operating conditions at different city locations, and then apply appropriate outlier-based analysis techniques to identify anomalous events at these selected locations. We will introduce the overall architecture of sociophysical analytics, where such infrastructural data sources can be combined with social media analytics to not only detect such anomalous events, but also localize and explain them. Using the annual Formula-1 race as our candidate event, we demonstrate a key difference between the discriminative capabilities of different sensing modes: while social media streams provide discriminative signals during or prior to the occurrence of such an event, urban informatics data can often reveal patterns that have higher persistence, including before and after the event. In particular, we shall demonstrate how combining data from (i) publicly available Tweets, (ii) crowd levels aboard buses, and (iii) traffic cameras can help identify the Formula-1 driven anomalies, across different spatiotemporal boundaries.

  10. Individual-specific transgenerational marking of fish populations based on a barium dual-isotope procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelga-Suarez, Gonzalo; Moldovan, Mariella; Garcia-Valiente, America; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Alonso, J Ignacio Garcia

    2012-01-01

    The present study focuses on the development and evaluation of an individual-specific transgenerational marking procedure using two enriched barium isotopes, (135)Ba and (137)Ba, mixed at a given and selectable molar ratio. The method is based on the deconvolution of the isotope patterns found in the sample into four molar contribution factors: natural xenon (Xe nat), natural barium (Ba nat), Ba135, and Ba137. The ratio of molar contributions between Ba137 and Ba135 is constant and independent of the contribution of natural barium in the sample. This procedure was tested in brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) kept in captivity. Trout were injected with three different Ba137/Ba135 isotopic signatures ca. 7 months and 7 days before spawning to compare the efficiency of the marking procedure at long and short term, respectively. The barium isotopic profiles were measured in the offspring by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Each of the three different isotopic signatures was unequivocally identified in the offspring in both whole eggs and larvae. For 9 month old offspring, the characteristic barium isotope signatures could also be detected in the otoliths even in the presence of a high and variable amount of barium of natural isotope abundance. In conclusion, it can be stated that the proposed dual-isotope marking is inheritable and can be detected after both long-term and short-term marking. Furthermore, the dual-isotope marking can be made individual-specific, so that it allows identification of offspring from a single individual or a group of individuals within a given fish group.

  11. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. SPALAX new generation: New process design for a more efficient xenon production system for the CTBT noble gas network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topin, Sylvain; Greau, Claire; Deliere, Ludovic; Hovesepian, Alexandre; Taffary, Thomas; Le Petit, Gilbert; Douysset, Guilhem; Moulin, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    The SPALAX (Système de Prélèvement Automatique en Ligne avec l'Analyse du Xénon) is one of the systems used in the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) to detect radioactive xenon releases following a nuclear explosion. Approximately 10 years after the industrialization of the first system, the CEA has developed the SPALAX New Generation, SPALAX-NG, with the aim of increasing the global sensitivity and reducing the overall size of the system. A major breakthrough has been obtained by improving the sampling stage and the purification/concentration stage. The sampling stage evolution consists of increasing the sampling capacity and improving the gas treatment efficiency across new permeation membranes, leading to an increase in the xenon production capacity by a factor of 2-3. The purification/concentration stage evolution consists of using a new adsorbent Ag@ZSM-5 (or Ag-PZ2-25) with a much larger xenon retention capacity than activated charcoal, enabling a significant reduction in the overall size of this stage. The energy consumption of the system is similar to that of the current SPALAX system. The SPALAX-NG process is able to produce samples of almost 7 cm(3) of xenon every 12 h, making it the most productive xenon process among the IMS systems.

  13. Quantitative analysis of dynamic airway changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation on xenon-enhanced chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Joon; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Eun-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Heung-Woo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Heon [Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the dynamic changes in airways in response to methacholine and salbutamol inhalation and to correlate the xenon ventilation index on xenon-enhanced chest CTs in asthmatics. Thirty-one non-smokers (6 normal, 25 asthmatics) underwent xenon-enhanced chest CT and pulmonary function tests. Images were obtained at three stages (basal state, after methacholine inhalation and after salbutamol inhalation), and the total xenon ventilation index (TXVI) as well as airway values were measured and calculated. The repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. TXVI in the normal group did not significantly change (P > 0.05) with methacholine and salbutamol. For asthmatics, however, the TXVI significantly decreased after methacholine inhalation and increased after salbutamol inhalation (P < 0.05). Of the airway parameters, the airway inner area (IA) significantly increased after salbutamol inhalation in all airways (P < 0.01) in asthmatics. Airway IA, wall thickness and wall area percentage did not significantly decrease after methacholine inhalation (P > 0.05). IA of the large airways was well correlated with basal TXVI, FEV{sub 1} and FVC (P < 0.05). Airway IA is the most reliable parameter for reflecting the dynamic changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation, and correlates well with TXVI in asthmatics on xenon-enhanced CT. (orig.)

  14. Synthesis and stability of xenon oxides Xe2O5 and Xe3O2 under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaele, Agnès; Worth, Nicholas; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Pascarelli, Sakura; Mathon, Olivier; Mezouar, Mohamed; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    The noble gases are the most inert group of the periodic table, but their reactivity increases with pressure. Diamond-anvil-cell experiments and ab initio modelling have been used to investigate a possible direct reaction between xenon and oxygen at high pressures. We have now synthesized two oxides below 100 GPa (Xe2O5 under oxygen-rich conditions, and Xe3O2 under oxygen-poor conditions), which shows that xenon is more reactive under pressure than predicted previously. Xe2O5 was observed using X-ray diffraction methods, its structure identified through ab initio random structure searching and confirmed using X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies. The experiments confirm the recent prediction of Xe3O2 as a stable xenon oxide under high pressure. Xenon atoms adopt mixed oxidation states of 0 and +4 in Xe3O2 and +4 and +6 in Xe2O5. Xe3O2 and Xe2O5 form extended networks that incorporate oxygen-sharing XeO4 squares, and Xe2O5 additionally incorporates oxygen-sharing XeO5 pyramids. Other xenon oxides (XeO2, XeO3) are expected to form at higher pressures.

  15. [Anomalous Properties of Water and Aqueous Solutions at Low Temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    Water has many anomalous properties below the room temperature. The temperature range overlaps with that of the Earth's atmosphere and also with that natural life forms favor. We review the origin of the anomalous properties of water and aqueous solutions in association with the hypothetical second critical point and liquid-liquid phase separation of water hidden in the supercooled state of liquid water.

  16. Bootstrapping Rapidity Anomalous Dimensions for Transverse-Momentum Resummation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ye; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2017-01-01

    Soft function relevant for transverse-momentum resummation for Drell-Yan or Higgs production at hadron colliders are computed through to three loops in the expansion of strong coupling, with the help of bootstrap technique and supersymmetric decomposition. The corresponding rapidity anomalous dimension is extracted. An intriguing relation between anomalous dimensions for transverse-momentum resummation and threshold resummation is found.

  17. Bootstrapping Rapidity Anomalous Dimension for Transverse-Momentum Resummation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ye [Fermilab; Zhu, Hua Xing [MIT, Cambridge, CTP

    2016-04-05

    Soft function relevant for transverse-momentum resummation for Drell-Yan or Higgs production at hadron colliders are computed through to three loops in the expansion of strong coupling, with the help of bootstrap technique and supersymmetric decomposition. The corresponding rapidity anomalous dimension is extracted. An intriguing relation between anomalous dimensions for transverse-momentum resummation and threshold resummation is found.

  18. An algorithm for DLP on anomalous elliptic curves over Fp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝跃飞; 裴定一

    2002-01-01

    This paper improves the method of discrete logarithm on anomalous elliptic curves, and establishes an isomorphism from E(Fp) to Fp which can be more easily implemented. Fruthermore, we give an optimized algorithm for discrete logarithm on anomalous elliptic curves E(Fp).

  19. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  20. Detecting quark anomalous electroweak couplings at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Sheng-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We study the dimension-6 quark anomalous electroweak couplings in the formulation of linearly realized effective Lagrangian. We investigate the constraints on these anomalous couplings from the $pp \\rightarrow W^+W^-$ process in detail at the LHC. With additional kinematic cuts, we find that the 14 TeV LHC can provide a test of anomalous couplings of $O(0.1-1)\\,{\\rm TeV}^{-2}$. The $pp \\rightarrow ZZ/Z\\gamma/\\gamma\\gamma$ processes can provide a good complement as they are sensitive to those anomalous couplings which do not affect the $pp \\rightarrow W^+W^-$ process. Those processes that only contain anomalous triple vertices, like $p p \\to W^* \\to l \