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Sample records for isotopic fractionation studied

  1. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  2. Isotope Fractionation Studies in Prestellar Cores: The Case of Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - N and N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments. Charnley and Rodgers showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles (HCN and HNC) was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: L1521E, L1498, L1544, and L1521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards LI544 were obtained with N2H+ and NIH3, yielding ratios of 446 and >700, respectively. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  3. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Stable Strontium Isotope (δ88/86Sr) Fractionation in the Marine Realm: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Krabbenhöft, André

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the isotopic composition of natural substances is an important field of research within isotope geochemistry. Especially the investigation of the alkaline earth element strontium (Sr) plays an important role in geological and geochemical research. In order to quantify the degree of natural stable Sr isotope fractionation a double spike technique was developed in the frame of this study. This technique allows the precise determination of natural Sr isotope frac...

  5. An anion-exchange chromatographic study on boron isotopic fractionation at 2 MPa at 293 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musashi, Masaaki; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Oi, Takao; Nomura, Masao

    2006-10-27

    To study boron isotopic fractionation at high pressure, column chromatography operated in the breakthrough manner was performed at 2.0 MPa at 25.0 degrees C. The fractionation factor (S) between boron adsorbed onto strongly basic anion-exchange resin and boron in solution was obtained as 1.013, which was smaller than the values at 0.1 MPa (atmospheric pressure) found in literature. The pressure dependence of S was discussed based on the polymerization of boron in the solution and resin phases and on the occurrence of the pressure dependent isotope effect relating to the molar volume changes of boron species upon isotope substitution.

  6. Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Aquatic Primary Producers: Implications for Food Web Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondula, K. L.; Pace, M. L.; Cole, J. J.; Batt, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen in the organic matter of aquatic plants has a lower relative abundance of the deuterium isotope in comparison to hydrogen in the surrounding water due to a series of fractionation processes including photosynthesis and the biosynthesis of lipids. Expected differences between the deuterium values of different types of plant tissue have been used to observe terrestrial contributions to aquatic food webs and to discriminate organic matter sources in 3-isotope studies with more precision than in 2-isotope studies, however some values used in these studies are derived from an estimated fractionation value (ɛ) between water and plant tissue. We found significant differences in fractionation values between different groups of aquatic plants sampled from three system types: lakes, river, and coastal lagoon. Fractionation values between water and plant tissue of macrophytes and marine macroalgae were more similar to those of terrestrial plants and distinctly different than those of benthic microalgae and phytoplankton. Incorporating the variability in fractionation values between plant types will improve models and experimental designs used in isotopic food web studies for aquatic systems.

  7. Silicon isotope fractionation by marine siliceous sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, K. R.; Maldonado, M.

    2016-02-01

    The stable isotope composition of benthic sponge spicule silica is a potential source of palaeoceanographic information about past deep seawater chemistry. The silicon isotope composition of spicules has been shown to relate to the silicic acid concentration of ambient water. However, existing calibrations do exhibit a degree of scatter in the relationship, and there are many open questions surrounding the mechanism behind isotopic fractionation during biosilicification. Here, we present a new study of silicon isotopes in siliceous sponges, covering a range of ancestral lineages, marine environments and geographical locations, and the impact of cleaning methods of silicon isotope compositions. We show that the cleaning method has minimal impact on silicon isotope composition of sponge spicules. Our results highlight the importance of environmental and biological factors on silicon isotope fractionation, and we discuss the implications of these results on the use of palaeoceanographic applications of sponge spicules.

  8. Experimental study of relationship between average isotopic fractionation factor and evaporation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic fractionation is the basis of tracing the water cycle using hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Isotopic fractionation factors in water evaporating from free water bodies are mainly affected by temperature and relative humidity, and vary significantly with these atmospheric factors over the course of a day. The evaporation rate (E can reveal the effects of atmospheric factors. Therefore, there should be a certain functional relationship between isotopic fractionation factors and E. An average isotopic fractionation factor (α* was defined to describe isotopic differences between vapor and liquid phases in evaporation with time intervals of days. The relationship between α* and E based on the isotopic mass balance was investigated through an evaporation pan experiment with no inflow. The experimental results showed that the isotopic compositions of residual water were more enriched with time; α* was affected by air temperature, relative humidity, and other atmospheric factors, and had a strong functional relation with E. The values of α* can be easily calculated with the known values of E, the initial volume of water in the pan, and isotopic compositions of residual water.

  9. Can a sponge fractionate isotopes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Patel, S; Balani, M C

    1985-03-22

    The study has unequivocally demonstrated that siliceous sponges Spirastrella cuspidifera and Prostylyssa foetida from the same microecological niche exhibit a high degree of species specificity, while accumulating a host of heavy metal ions (Ni, Cr, Cd, Sn, Ti, Mo, Zr). S. cuspidifera accumulated, in addition, 60Co and 63Ni, showing discrimination against other radionuclides, 137Cs and 131I, present in the ambient waters receiving controlled low level waste discharges from a B.W.R. nuclear power station. P. foetida, on the other hand, accumulated only 131I and showed discrimination against other radionuclides including 60Co, although the stable iodine concentrations in both the sponges were the same. The specific activity of 60Co (in becquerels per gram of 59Co) in S. cuspidifera and 131I (in becquerels per gram of 127I) in P. foetida were at least two orders of magnitude greater than in the ambient sea water. That of 63Ni (in becquerels per gram of 62Ni) in S. cuspidifera, on the other hand, was lower by two orders of magnitude than in either abiotic matrices from the same environment. Thus, not only did both the species show bioaccumulation of a specific element, but also preferential uptake of isotopes of the same element, though they were equally available for intake. Such differential uptake of isotopes can possibly be explained in terms of two quite different mechanisms operating, each applicable in a particular case. One is that the xenobiotic isotope enters the environment in a physicochemical form or as a complex different from that of its natural counterpart. If equilibration with the latter is slow, so that the organism acquires the xenobiotic in an unfamiliar chemical context, it may treat it as a chemically distinct entity so that its concentration factor differs from that of stable isotope, thus changing the specific activity. Alternatively, if the xenobiotic is present in the same chemical form as the stable isotope, the only way in which specific

  10. Copper isotope fractionation by desert shrubs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete, Jesica U.; Viveros, Marian; Ellzey, Joanne T.; Borrok, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Copper has two naturally occurring stable isotopes of masses 63 and 65 which can undergo mass dependent fractionation during various biotic and abiotic chemical reactions. These interactions and their resulting Cu isotope fractionations can be used to determine the mechanisms involved in the cycling of Cu in natural systems. In this study, Cu isotope changes were investigated at the organismal level in the metal-accumulating desert plant, Prosopis pubescens. Initial results suggest that the lighter Cu isotope was preferentially incorporated into the leaves of the plant, which may suggest that Cu was actively transported via intracellular proteins. The roots and stems show a smaller degree of Cu isotope fractionation and the direction and magnitude of the fractionations was dependent upon the levels of Cu exposure. Based on this and previous work with bacteria and yeast, a trend is emerging that suggests the lighter Cu isotope is preferentially incorporated into biological components, while the heavier Cu isotope tends to become enriched in aqueous solutions. In bacteria, plants and animals, intracellular Cu concentrations are strictly regulated via dozens of enzymes that can bind, transport, and store Cu. Many of these enzymes reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I). These initial results seem to fit into a broader picture of Cu isotope cycling in natural systems where oxidation/reduction reactions are fundamental in controlling the distributions of Cu isotopes.

  11. Isotope fractionation of sandy-soil water during evaporation - an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Wen-Bo; Han, Liang-Feng; Tan, Hong-Bing; Wang, Shuai

    2017-06-01

    Soil samples containing water with known stable isotopic compositions were prepared. The soil water was recovered by using vacuum/heat distillation. The experiments were held under different conditions to control rates of water evaporation and water recovery. Recoveries, δ 18 O and δ 2 H values of the soil water were determined. Analyses of the data using a Rayleigh distillation model indicate that under the experimental conditions only loosely bound water is extractable in cases where the recovery is smaller than 100 %. Due to isotopic exchange between vapour and remaining water in the micro channels or capillaries of the soil matrix, isotopic fractionation may take place under near-equilibrium conditions. This causes the observed relationship between δ 2 H and δ 18 O of the extracted water samples to have a slope close to 8. The results of this study may indicate that, in arid zones when soil that initially contains water dries out, the slope of the relationship between δ 2 H and δ 18 O values should be close to 8. Thus, a smaller slope, as observed by some groundwater and soil water samples in arid zones, may be caused by evaporation of water before the water has entered the unsaturated zone.

  12. Oxygen isotopic fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, N.; Turchyn, A. V.; Lyons, T.; Bruchert, V.; Schrag, D. P.; Wall, J.

    2006-12-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) is understood to depend on a variety of environmental parameters, such as sulfate concentration, temperature, cell specific sulfate reduction rates, and the carbon substrate. What controls oxygen isotope fractionation during BSR is less well understood. Some studies have suggested that carbon substrate is important, whereas others concluded that there is a stoichiometric relationship between the fractionations of sulfur and oxygen during BSR. Studies of oxygen fractionation are complicated by isotopic equilibration between sulfur intermediates, particularly sulfite, and water. This process can modify the isotopic composition of the extracellular sulfate pool (δ18OSO4 ). Given this, the challenge is to distinguish between this isotopic equilibration and fractionations linked to the kinetic effects of the intercellular enzymes and the incorporation of sulfate into the bacterial cell. The δ18OSO4 , in concert with the sulfur isotope composition of sulfate (δ34SSO4), could be a powerful tool for understanding the pathways and environmental controls of BSR in natural systems. We will present δ18OSO4 data measured from batch culture growth of 14 different species of sulfate reducing bacteria for which sulfur isotope data were previously published. A general observation is that δ18OSO4 shows little isotopic change (kinetic effect during BSR and/or equilibration between sulfur intermediates and the isotopically light water (~-5‰) of the growth medium. Our present batch culture data do not allow us to convincingly isolate the magnitude and the controlling parameters of the kinetic isotope effect for oxygen. However, ongoing growth of mutant bacteria missing enzymes critical in the different steps of BSR may assist in this mission.

  13. Boron Isotope Fractionation in Bell Pepper

    OpenAIRE

    Geilert, Sonja; Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Voerkelius, Susanne; Eichert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Various plant compartments of a single bell pepper plant were studied to verify the variability of boron isotope composition in plants and to identify possible intra-plant isotope fractionation. Boron mass fractions varied from 9.8 mg/kg in the fruits to 70.0 mg/kg in the leaves. Boron (B) isotope ratios reported as δ11B ranged from -11.0‰ to +16.0‰ (U ≤ 1.9‰, k=2) and showed a distinct trend to heavier δ11B values the higher the plant compartments were located in the plant. A fractionatio...

  14. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordmann, Janine

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n( 238 U) / n( 235 U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n( 238 U) and n( 235 U), on Earth.

  15. Silicon isotope fractionation in rice and cucumber plants over a life cycle: Laboratory studies at different external silicon concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Wu, Lianghuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Li; Gao, Jianfei; Ding, Tiping

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the variations of silicon isotopes in terrestrial higher plants can be helpful toward elucidating the global biogeochemical silicon cycle. We studied silicon isotope fractionation in rice and cucumber plants over their entire life cycles. These two different silicon-absorbing plants were grown hydroponically at different external silicon concentrations. The ranges of δ30Si values in rice were -1.89‰ to 1.69‰, -1.81‰ to 1.96‰, and -2.08‰ to 2.02‰ at 0.17 mM, 1.70 mM, and 8.50 mM silicon concentrations, respectively. The ranges of δ30Si values in cucumber were -1.38‰ to 1.21‰, -1.33‰ to 1.26‰, and -1.62‰ to 1.40‰ at 0.085 mM, 0.17 mM, and 1.70 mM external silicon concentrations, respectively. A general increasing trend in δ30Si values from lower to upper plant parts reflected the preferential incorporation of lighter silicon isotopes from transpired water to biogenic opal. Furthermore, the active uptake mechanism regulated by several transporters might have also played an important role in the preferential transport of heavy silicon isotopes into aboveground plant parts. This suggested that silicon isotope fractionation in both rice and cucumber was a Rayleigh-like process. The data on δ30Si values for the whole plants and nutrient solutions indicated that biologically mediated silicon isotope fractionation occurred during silicon uptake by roots. At lower external silicon concentrations, heavy silicon isotopes entered plants more readily than light silicon isotopes. Conversely, at higher external silicon concentrations, light silicon isotopes entered plants more readily than heavy silicon isotopes.

  16. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Neil C; Böhlke, John Karl; Beloso, Abelardo D; Streger, Sheryl H; Heraty, Linnea J; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2007-04-15

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10 degrees C and 22 degrees C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22 degrees C and 615 h at 10 degrees C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were epsilon(18)O = -36.6 to -29.0% per hundred and epsilon(37)Cl = -14.5 to -11.5% per hundred, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using (18)O-enriched water (delta(18)O = +198% per hundred) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (delta(18)O = -8.1% per hundred) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio epsilon(18)O/epsilon(37)Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 +/- 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (epsilon(18)O/ epsilon(37)Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies.

  17. Chromium isotope fractionation in ferruginous sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kohen W.; Gueguen, Bleuenn; Cole, Devon B.; Francois, Roger; Kallmeyer, Jens; Planavsky, Noah; Crowe, Sean A.

    2018-02-01

    Ferrous Fe is a potent reductant of Cr(VI), and while a number of laboratory studies have characterized Cr isotope fractionation associated with Cr(VI) reduction by ferrous iron, the expression of this fractionation in real-world ferrous Fe-rich environments remains unconstrained. Here we determine the isotope fractionation associated with Cr(VI) reduction in modern ferrous Fe-rich sediments obtained from the previously well studied Lake Matano, Indonesia. Whole core incubations demonstrate that reduction of Cr(VI) within ferruginous sediments provides a sink for Cr(VI) leading to Cr(VI) concentration gradients and diffusive Cr(VI) fluxes across the sediment water interface. As reduction proceeded, Cr(VI) remaining in the overlying lake water became progressively enriched in the heavy isotope (53Cr), increasing δ53Cr by 2.0 ± 0.1‰ at the end of the incubation. Rayleigh distillation modelling of the evolution of Cr isotope ratios and Cr(VI) concentrations in the overlying water yields an effective isotope fractionation of εeff = 1.1 ± 0.2‰ (53Cr/52Cr), whereas more detailed diagenetic modelling implies an intrinsic isotope fractionation of εint = 1.80 ± 0.04‰. Parallel slurry experiments performed using anoxic ferruginous sediment yield an intrinsic isotope fractionation of εint = 2.2 ± 0.1‰. These modelled isotope fractionations are corroborated by direct measurement of the δ53Cr composition on the upper 0.5 cm of Lake Matano sediment, revealing an isotopic offset from the lake water of Δ53Cr = 0.21-1.81‰. The data and models reveal that effective isotope fractionations depend on the depth at which Cr(VI) reduction takes place below the sediment water interface-the deeper the oxic non-reactive zone, the smaller the effective fractionation relative to the intrinsic fractionation. Based on the geochemistry of the sediment we suggest the electron donors responsible for reduction are a combination of dissolved Fe(II) and 0.5 M HCl extractable (solid

  18. Isotopic fractionation of tritium in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Pierre; Fromm, Michel; Vichot, Laurent; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Guétat, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Isotopic fractionation of tritium is a highly relevant issue in radiation protection and requires certain radioecological considerations. Sound evaluation of this factor is indeed necessary to determine whether environmental compartments are enriched/depleted in tritium or if tritium is, on the contrary, isotopically well-distributed in a given system. The ubiquity of tritium and the standard analytical methods used to assay it may induce biases in both the measurement and the signification that is accorded to the so-called fractionation: based on an exhaustive review of the literature, we show how, sometimes large deviations may appear. It is shown that when comparing the non-exchangeable fraction of organically bound tritium (neOBT) to another fraction of tritium (e.g. tritiated water) the preparation of samples and the measurement of neOBT reported frequently led to underestimation of the ratio of tritium to hydrogen (T/H) in the non-exchangeable compartment by a factor of 5% to 50%. In the present study, corrections are proposed for most of the biological matrices studied so far. Nevertheless, the values of isotopic fractionation reported in the literature remain difficult to compare with each other, especially since the physical quantities and units often vary between authors. Some improvements are proposed to better define what should encompass the concepts of exchangeable and non-exchangeable fractions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Zn Isotope Fractionation during Sorption onto Kaolinite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinoiseau, Damien; Gélabert, Alexandre; Moureau, Julien; Louvat, Pascale; Benedetti, Marc F

    2016-02-16

    In this study, we quantify zinc isotope fractionation during its sorption onto kaolinite, by performing experiments under various pH, ionic strength, and total Zn concentrations. A systematic enrichment in heavy Zn isotopes on the surface of kaolinite was measured, with Δ(66)Znadsorbed-solution ranging from 0.11‰ at low pH and low ionic strength to 0.49‰ at high pH and high ionic strength. Both the measured Zn concentration and its isotopic ratio are correctly described using a thermodynamic sorption model that considers two binding sites: external basal surfaces and edge sites. Based on this modeling approach, two distinct Zn isotopic fractionation factors were calculated: Δ(66)Znadsorbed-solution = 0.18 ± 0.06‰ for ion exchange onto basal sites, and Δ(66)Znadsorbed-solution = 0.49 ± 0.06‰ for specific complexation onto edge sites. These two distinct factors indicate that Zn isotope fractionation is dominantly controlled by the chemical composition of the solution (pH, ionic strength).

  20. Sulfur isotope fractionation between fluid and andesitic melt: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, Adrian; Holtz, François; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Mandeville, Charles W.; Behrens, Harald; Knipping, Jaayke L.

    2014-01-01

    Glasses produced from decompression experiments conducted by Fiege et al. (2014a) were used to investigate the fractionation of sulfur isotopes between fluid and andesitic melt upon magma degassing. Starting materials were synthetic glasses with a composition close to a Krakatau dacitic andesite. The glasses contained 4.55–7.95 wt% H2O, ∼140 to 2700 ppm sulfur (S), and 0–1000 ppm chlorine (Cl). The experiments were carried out in internally heated pressure vessels (IHPV) at 1030 °C and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from QFM+0.8 log units up to QFM+4.2 log units (QFM: quartz–fayalite–magnetite buffer). The decompression experiments were conducted by releasing pressure (P) continuously from ∼400 MPa to final P of 150, 100, 70 and 30 MPa. The decompression rate (r) ranged from 0.01 to 0.17 MPa/s. The samples were annealed for 0–72 h (annealing time, tA) at the final P and quenched rapidly from 1030 °C to room temperature (T).The decompression led to the formation of a S-bearing aqueous fluid phase due to the relatively large fluid–melt partitioning coefficients of S. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to determine the isotopic composition of the glasses before and after decompression. Mass balance calculations were applied to estimate the gas–melt S isotope fractionation factor αg-m.No detectable effect of r and tA on αg-m was observed. However, SIMS data revealed a remarkable increase of αg-m from ∼0.9985 ± 0.0007 at >QFM+3 to ∼1.0042 ± 0.0042 at ∼QFM+1. Noteworthy, the isotopic fractionation at reducing conditions was about an order of magnitude larger than predicted by previous works. Based on our experimental results and on previous findings for S speciation in fluid and silicate melt a new model predicting the effect of fO2 on αg-m (or Δ34Sg–m) in andesitic systems at 1030 °C is proposed. Our experimental results as well as our modeling are of high importance for the interpretation of S isotope

  1. Studies of carbon--isotope fractionation. Annual progress report, December 1, 1974--November 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1975-12-01

    The vapor pressure isotope effect of /sup 13/C//sup 12/C-substitution in CClF/sub 3/ was measured at temperatures between 169/sup 0/ and 206/sup 0/K by means of cryogenic distillation. The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C-vapor pressure isotope effect in CHF/sub 3/ was also studied at temperatures between 161/sup 0/ and 205/sup 0/K by a similar method. The construction of a cryostat has progressed as scheduled. The investigation of carbon isotope exchange equilibria between carbon dioxide and various carbamates dissolved in various organic solvents has continued. The five-stage system of Taylor-Ghate design was improved to shorten the transient time. A single stage apparatus was designed, built, and tested. These systems are used to measure the equilibrium constants and various phase equilibria involved in the carbon dioxide--carbamate system. The investigation of the explicit method of total isotope effect has made progress. A satisfactory approximation was found for the classical partition function of a Morse oscillator. The method gives a reasonable result at rho identical with /sup 1///sub 2/..sqrt..(u/sub e//x/sub e/) greater than 1.5. The medium cluster approach was applied to isotopic methanes to investigate the effects of intermolecular distance and mutual orientations of molecules in the liquid upon vapor pressure isotope effect. It was found that all geometrical effects studied tend to vanish as the size of clusters is increased. Isotope effect in the zero-point energy shifts on condensation was calculated on the basis of London dispersion forces in liquid and a semi-empirical molecular orbital theory, and was favorably compared with experimental results. (auth)

  2. Carbon isotopic fractionation in live benthic foraminifera -comparison with inorganic precipitate studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses have been performed on live-stained aragonitic and calcitic benthic foraminifera and dissolved inorganic carbon from the Southern California Borderland to examine carbon isotopic fractionation in foraminifera. Temperature, salinity and pH data have also been collected to permit accurate determination of the delta 13 C of bicarbonate ion and thus aragonite-HCO 3 - and calcite-HCO 3 - isotopic enrichment factors (epsilonsub(ar-b) and epsilonsub(cl-b), respectively). Only species which precipitate in 18 O equilibrium have been considered. epsilonsub (ar-b) values based on Hoeglundina elegans range from 1.9 per mille at 2.7 deg C to 1.1 per mille at 9.5 deg C. The temperature dependence of epsilonsub(ar-b) is considerably greater than the equilibrium equation would predict and may be due to a vital effect. The calcitic foraminifera Cassidulina tortuosa, Cassidulina braziliensis, and Cassidulina limbata, Bank and Terrace dwellers, have similar delta 13 C values and yield an average epsilonsub(cl-b) value of -0.2 +- 0.1 per mille between 8 deg and 10 deg C. Calcitic Uvigerina curticosta, Uvigerina peregrina, and megalospheric B, argentea, Slope and Basin dwellers, are -0.7 +- 0.1 per mille enriched relative to ambient bicarbonate for 3 to 9 deg C. (author)

  3. A study of oxygen isotopic fractionation during bio-induced calcite precipitation in eutrophic Baldeggersee, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teranes, J.L.; McKenzie, J.A.; Bernasconi, S.M.; Lotter, A.F.; Sturm, M.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract—In order to better understand environmental factors controlling oxygen isotope shifts in autochthonous lacustrine carbonate sequences, we undertook an extensive one-year study (March, 1995 to February, 1996) of water-column chemistry and daily sediment trap material from a small lake in

  4. [Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes in the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniak, Iu E; Grigor'ev, A I; Skuratov, V M; Ivanova, S M; Pokrovskiĭ, B G

    2006-01-01

    Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes was studied in 9 human subjects in a chamber with normal air pressure imitating a space cabin. Mass-spectrometry of isotopes in blood, urine, saliva, and potable water evidenced increases in the contents of heavy H isotope (deuterium) in the body liquids as compared with water. These results support one of the theories according to which the human organism eliminates heavy stable isotopes of biogenous chemical elements.

  5. Oxygen isotope fractionation in double carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Böttcher, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in double carbonates of different crystal structures were calculated by the increment method. Synthesis experiments were performed at 60 °C and 100 °C to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionations involving PbMg[CO3]2. The calculations suggest that the double carbonates of calcite structure are systematically enriched in (18)O relative to those of aragonite and mixture structures. Internally consistent oxygen isotope fractionation factors are obtained for these minerals with respect to quartz, calcite and water at a temperature range of 0-1200 °C. The calculated fractionation factors for double carbonate-water systems are generally consistent with the data available from laboratory experiments. The experimentally determined fractionation factors for PbMg[CO3]2, BaMg[CO3]2 and CaMg[CO3]2 against H2O not only fall between fractionation factors involving pure carbonate end-members but are also close to the calculated fractionation factors. In contrast, experimentally determined carbon isotope fractionation factors between PbMg[CO3]2 and CO2 are much closer to theoretical predictions for the cerussite-CO2 system than for the magnesite-CO2 system, similar to the fractionation behavior for BaMg[CO3]2. Therefore, the combined theoretical and experimental results provide insights into the effects of crystal structure and exchange kinetics on oxygen isotope partitioning in double carbonates.

  6. Uranium Isotopic Fractionation in Soil Extractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; You, C.; Li, S.

    2008-12-01

    Acid leachable and residual fractions in soils were separated and used for precise U isotopic measurements, as well as other major and trace elements. Two soil profiles (HS and GS) located in a river terrace in central Taiwan were selected to examine the effect of α-recoil, as well as U mobilization during weathering and soil formation. The major and trace elements in leachable and residual fraction were determined by HR- ICP-MS and the U isotopic compositions of 234U/238U and 238U/235U were measured by MC-ICPMS. Prior to isotopic analyses, dissolved U was purified using TRU-spec resin. The external reproducibility of 234U/238U for IAPSO and in-house U standard (sample size of 2-5 ng U) is 1.1 ‰ (2σm, n=10) and 0.6 ‰ (2σm, n=36), respectively compared with that of 0.2 ‰ for 238U/235U (2σm, n=36). The U concentration shows no distinguishable difference at soil horizon in both profiles. The average (234U/238U)AR ratio in the leachable fraction, 1.40, deviates largely from the equilibrium value and appears to be affected by soil maturation and degree of weathering. On the other hand, the average (234U/238U)AR in the residual fraction (0.93) is also much lower than the equilibrium ratio. Further study will focus to examine if these ratios provide information on soil formation rate and/or chemical weathering rate.

  7. Ca isotopic fractionation patterns in forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, A. C.; Takagi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Calcium stable isotope ratios are an emerging tracer of the biogeochemical cycle of Ca that are just beginning to see significant application to forest ecosystems. The primary source of isotopic fractionation in these systems is discrimination against light Ca during uptake by plant roots. Cycling of vegetation-fractionated Ca establishes isotopically distinct Ca pools within a forest ecosystem. In some systems, the shallow soil exchangeable Ca pool is isotopically heavy relative to Ca inputs. This has been explained by preferential removal of light Ca from the soil. In other systems, the soil exchange pool is isotopically light relative to inputs, which is explained by recycling of plant-fractionated light Ca back into soil. Thus vegetation uptake of light Ca has been called on to account for both isotopically heavy and light Ca in the shallow soil exchange pools. We interpret patterns in ecosystem δ44Ca with the aid of a simple box model of the forest Ca cycle. We suggest that the δ44Ca of exchangeable Ca in the shallow soil pool primarily reflects the relative magnitude of three key fluxes in a forest Ca cycle, 1) the flux of external Ca into the system via weathering or atmospheric deposition, 2) the uptake flux of Ca from soils into the vegetation pool, and 3) the return flux of Ca to shallow soils via remineralization of leaf litter. Two observations that emerge from our model may aid in the application of Ca isotopes to provide insight into the forest Ca cycle. First, regardless of the magnitude of both vegetation Ca uptake and isotopic fractionation, the δ44Ca of the soil exchange pool will equal the input δ44Ca unless the plant uptake and remineralization fluxes are out of balance. A second observation is that the degree to which the shallow soil exchange pool δ44Ca can differ from the input ratio is controlled by the relative rates of biological uptake and external Ca input. Significant differences between soil exchange and input δ44Ca are seen only

  8. Chromium stable isotope fractionation in modern biogeochemical cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    . In the present study, the isotopic composition of Cr is traced along this pathway to fill gaps in the understanding of the Cr-isotope system in natural environments. The thesis can be divided into three parts: The first part focuses on Cr release during oxidative weathering. Isotopically light Cr in modern...... processes (biological productivity). In the third part the potential use of the Cr-isotope system in the marine environment is discussed. Incorporation into biogenic carbonates (bivalves, gastropods, corals) is accompanied by Cr-isotope fractionation, causing negative seawater-shell offsets. None...

  9. Studies on fractionation of ytterbium isotopes in Yb(III)-acetate/Yb-amalgam system. Even-odd effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, W.; Poninski, M.; Fiedler, R.

    1997-12-31

    The fractionation of ytterbium isotopes with the even and odd numbers of neutrons was investigated in a Yb(III)-acetate/Yb-amalgam exchange systems. The light isotope was preferentially fractionated to the amalgam phase. The values of the unit separation gain per mass difference,{epsilon}, were found to be -0.00054 for {sup 176/171}Yb and -0.00069 for {sup 176/174}Yb The difference which amounted to 0.00015 is an evidence for the occurrence of the so called `even-odd` effect. It was also found that the chemical isotope shift of ytterbium was monitored by optical isotope shift its atomic spectra. (author). 23 refs, 7 figs, 4 tabs.

  10. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  11. Silicon isotope fractionation between rice plants and nutrient solution and its significance to the study of the silicon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, T. P.; Tian, S. H.; Sun, L.; Wu, L. H.; Zhou, J. X.; Chen, Z. Y.

    2008-12-01

    The silicon isotope fractionation between rice plant and nutrient solution was studied experimentally. Rice plants were grown to maturity with the hydroponic culture in a naturally lit glasshouse. The nutrient solution was sampled for 14 times during the whole rice growth period. The rice plants were collected at various growth stages and different parts of the plants were sampled separately. The silica contents of the samples were determined by the gravimetric method and the silicon isotope compositions were measured using the SiF 4 method. In the growth process, the silicon content in the nutrient solution decreased gradually from 16 mM at starting stage to 0.1-0.2 mM at harvest and the amount of silica in single rice plant increased gradually from 0.00013 g at start to 4.329 g at harvest. Within rice plant the SiO 2 fraction in roots reduced continuously from 0.23 at the seedling stage, through 0.12 at the tiller stage, 0.05 at the jointing stage, 0.023 at the heading stage, to 0.009 at the maturity stage. Accordingly, the fraction of SiO 2 in aerial parts increased from 0.77, through 0.88, 0.95, 0.977, to 0.991 for the same stages. The silicon content in roots decreased from the jointing stage, through the heading stage, to the maturity stage, parallel to the decrease of silicon content in the nutrient solution. At the maturity stage, the silicon content increased from roots, through stem and leaves, to husks, but decreased drastically from husks to grains. These observations show that transpiration and evaporation may play an important role in silica transportation and precipitation within rice plants. It was observed that the δ30Si of the nutrient solution increased gradually from -0.1‰ at start to 1.5‰ at harvest, and the δ30Si of silicon absorbed by bulk rice plant increased gradually from -1.72‰ at start to -0.08‰ at harvest, reflecting the effect of the kinetic silicon isotope fractionation during silicon absorption by rice plants from nutrient

  12. Revised models of interstellar nitrogen isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirström, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.

    2018-03-01

    Nitrogen-bearing molecules in cold molecular clouds exhibit a range of isotopic fractionation ratios and these molecules may be the precursors of 15N enrichments found in comets and meteorites. Chemical model calculations indicate that atom-molecular ion and ion-molecule reactions could account for most of the fractionation patterns observed. However, recent quantum-chemical computations demonstrate that several of the key processes are unlikely to occur in dense clouds. Related model calculations of dense cloud chemistry show that the revised 15N enrichments fail to match observed values. We have investigated the effects of these reaction rate modifications on the chemical model of Wirström et al. (2012) for which there are significant physical and chemical differences with respect to other models. We have included 15N fractionation of CN in neutral-neutral reactions and also updated rate coefficients for key reactions in the nitrogen chemistry. We find that the revised fractionation rates have the effect of suppressing 15N enrichment in ammonia at all times, while the depletion is even more pronounced, reaching 14N/15N ratios of >2000. Taking the updated nitrogen chemistry into account, no significant enrichment occurs in HCN or HNC, contrary to observational evidence in dark clouds and comets, although the 14N/15N ratio can still be below 100 in CN itself. However, such low CN abundances are predicted that the updated model falls short of explaining the bulk 15N enhancements observed in primitive materials. It is clear that alternative fractionating reactions are necessary to reproduce observations, so further laboratory and theoretical studies are urgently needed.

  13. Isotopic fractionation of soil water during evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldo, P.R.; Salati, E.; Matsui, E.

    1974-01-01

    The study of the variation of D/H relation in soil water during evaporation is studied. The isotopic fractionation of soil water has been observed in two soils of light and heavy texture. Soil columns were utilized. Soil water has been extracted in a system operated under low pressure and the gaseous hydrogen was obtained by the decomposition of water through the use of metalic uranium and was analysed in a GD-150 mass spectrometer for its deuterium content. The variation of the delta sub(eta) 0 / 00 value during the evaporation showed that for water held at potentials below 15 atm, the deuterium content of soil water stays practically constant. For water held at potentials higher than 15 atm, corresponding to the third stage of evaporation, there is a strong tendency of a constant increase of delta sub(eta) 0 / 00 of the remaining water [pt

  14. Magnesium isotope fractionation in cation-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, T.; Yanase, S.; Kakihana, H.

    1987-01-01

    Band displacement chromatography of magnesium has been carried out successfully for the purpose of magnesium isotope separation by using a strongly acidic cation-exchange resin and the strontium ion as the replacement ion. A small but definite accumulation of the heavier isotopes ( 25 Mg, 26 Mg) has been observed at the front parts of the magnesium chromatograms. The heavier isotopes have been fractionated preferentially into the solution phase. The single-stage separation factors have been calculated for the 25 Mg/ 24 Mg and 26 Mg/ 24 isotopic pairs at 25 0 C. The reduced partition function ratios of magnesium species involved in the present study have been estimated

  15. Magnesium-isotope fractionation during low-Mg calcite precipitation in a limestone cave - Field study and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Buhl, D.; Richter, D.; Niedermayr, A.; Riechelmann, D.; Dietzel, M.; Schulte, U.

    2010-08-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of speleothem calcite and particularly that of stalagmites and flowstones is increasingly exploited as an archive of past environmental change in continental settings. Despite intensive research, including modelling and novel approaches, speleothem data remain difficult to interpret. A possible way foreword is to apply a multi-proxy approach including non-conventional isotope systems. For the first time, we here present a complete analytical dataset of magnesium isotopes (δ 26Mg) from a monitored cave in NW Germany (Bunker Cave). The data set includes δ 26Mg values of loess-derived soil above the cave (-1.0 ± 0.5‰), soil water (-1.2 ± 0.5‰), the carbonate hostrock (-3.8 ± 0.5‰), dripwater in the cave (-1.8 ± 0.2‰), speleothem low-Mg calcite (stalactites, stalagmites; -4.3 ± 0.6‰), cave loam (-0.6 ± 0.1‰) and runoff water (-1.8 ± 0.1‰) in the cave, respectively. Magnesium-isotope fractionation processes during weathering and interaction between soil cover, hostrock and solute-bearing soil water are non-trivial and depend on a number of variables including solution residence times, dissolution rates, adsorption effects and potential neo-formation of solids in the regolith and the carbonate aquifer. Apparent Mg-isotope fractionation between dripwater and speleothem low-Mg calcite is about 1000ln αMg-cc-Mg(aq) = -2.4‰. A similar Mg-isotope fractionation (1000ln αMg-cc-Mg(aq) ≈ -2.1‰) is obtained by abiogenic precipitation experiments carried out at aqueous Mg/Ca ratios and temperatures close to cave conditions. Accordingly, 26Mg discrimination during low-Mg calcite formation in caves is highly related to inorganic fractionation effects, which may comprise dehydration of Mg 2+ prior to incorporation into calcite, surface entrapment of light isotopes and reaction kinetics. Relevance of kinetics is supported by a significant negative correlation of Mg-isotope fractionation with the precipitation rate for

  16. Experimental Determination of Silicon Isotope Fractionation in Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    Full Text Available Analyzing variations in silicon (Si isotopes can help elucidate the biogeochemical Si cycle and Si accumulation processes of higher plants. Importantly, the composition of Si isotopes in higher plants has yet to be studied comprehensively and our knowledge of the distribution of Si isotopes in higher plants lags behind that of Si isotopes in marine organisms, such as diatoms. In the present study, we investigated the isotope fractionation that occurs during the uptake and transport of Si in rice, using a series of hydroponic experiments with different external concentrations of Si. We found that an active mechanism was responsible for the majority of Si uptake and transport at lower Si levels and that the uptake of Si by rice roots was significantly suppressed by both low temperature and metabolic inhibitors. In addition, light Si isotopes (28Si entered roots more readily than heavy Si isotopes (30Si when the active mechanism was inhibited. Therefore, we conclude that biologically mediated isotope fractionation occurs during the uptake of Si by rice roots. In addition, both active and passive Si uptake components co-exist in rice, and the fractionation effect is enhanced when more Si is absorbed by plants.

  17. Fractionation of Stable Isotopes in Atmospheric Aerosol Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl

    reactions and undergo complex chemical and physical changes during their lifetimes. In order to assess processes that form and alter aerosols, information provided by stable isotopes can be used to help constrain estimates on the strength of aerosol sources and sinks. This thesis studies (mass......-independent) fractionation processes of stable isotopes of C, N, O and S in order to investigate three different systems related to aerosols: 1. Post-depositional processes of nitrate in snow that obscure nitrate ice core records 2. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol generated by ozonolysis of X...... as required. The kndings provide important results for the studies' respective felds, including a description of the isotopic fractionation and quantum yield of nitrate photolysis in snow, equilibrium fractionation in secondary organic aerosol and fractionation constants of different oxidation pathways of SO2....

  18. Ruthenium isotope fractionation in protoplanetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Timo; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Kleine, Thorsten

    2018-02-01

    Mass-dependent Ru isotope variations (δ102/99Ru) and Ru concentrations were determined for 35 magmatic iron meteorites from the five major chemical groups (IIAB, IID, IIIAB, IVA, IVB). In addition, four equilibrated ordinary chondrites were analyzed. The IIAB, IIIAB and IVB iron meteorites display increasingly heavier Ru isotopic compositions with decreasing Ru content. Modeling demonstrates that the trends for these three iron groups can be reproduced by the incremental extraction of isotopically lighter Ru into solids, which leads to progressively heavier δ102/99Ru in the remaining melt. The modeling further shows that the Ru isotopic variations of the IIAB and IIIAB irons are consistent with derivation from parental melts with an ordinary chondrite-like δ102/99Ru, whereas the IVB irons more likely derive from a melt with heavier δ102/99Ru. This heavy Ru isotopic composition of the IVB parental melt probably results from high-temperature processing of the IVB precursor material. The Ru isotope systematics of the IID and IVA irons are more complex and show no correlation between δ102/99Ru and Ru content. Although most samples exhibit heavy Ru isotopic compositions, especially the late-crystallized irons of these groups deviate from the expected fractional crystallization trends. This deviation most likely results from mixing and re-equilibration of early-crystallized solids and late-stage liquids, followed by further fractional crystallization. The mixing might be related to the migration of liquids through a complex network of dendrites or to the overturn of a cumulate inner core, and bears testimony to the complex solidification history of at least some protoplanetary cores.

  19. Gallium isotope fractionation during Ga adsorption on calcite and goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Chen, JiuBin; Vetuschi Zuccolini, Marino; Birck, Jean-Louis; Liu, Yujie; Schott, Jacques

    2018-02-01

    Gallium (Ga) isotopic fractionation during its adsorption on calcite and goethite was investigated at 20 °C as a function of the solution pH, Ga aqueous concentration and speciation, and the solid to solution ratio. In all experiments Ga was found to be enriched in light isotopes at the solid surface with isotope fractionation △71Gasolid-solution up to -1.27‰ and -0.89‰ for calcite and goethite, respectively. Comparison of Ga isotopic data of this study with predictions for 'closed system' equilibrium and 'Rayleigh fractionation' models indicates that the experimental data are consistent with a 'closed system' equilibrium exchange between the fluid and the solid. The results of this study can be interpreted based on Ga aqueous speciation and the structure of Ga complexes formed at the solid surfaces. For calcite, Ga isotope fractionation is mainly triggered by increased Ga coordination and Ga-O bond length, which vary respectively from 4 and 1.84 Å in Ga(OH)4- to 6 and 1.94 Å in the >Ca-O-GaOH(OH2)4+ surface complex. For goethite, despite the formation of Ga hexa-coordinated >FeOGa(OH)20 surface complexes (Ga-O distances of 1.96-1.98 Å) both at acid and alkaline pH, a similar extent of isotope fractionation was found at acid and alkaline pH, suggesting that Ga(OH)4- is preferentially adsorbed on goethite for all investigated pH conditions. In addition, the observed decrease of Ga isotope fractionation magnitude observed with increasing Ga surface coverage for both calcite and goethite is likely related to the formation of Ga surface polymers and/or hydroxides with reduced Ga-O distances. This first study of Ga isotope fractionation during solid-fluid interactions suggests that the adsorption of Ga by oxides, carbonates or clay minerals could yield significant Ga isotope fractionation between secondary minerals and surficial fluids including seawater. Ga isotopes thus should help to better characterize the surficial biogeochemical cycles of gallium and its

  20. Nickel and zinc isotope fractionation in hyperaccumulating and nonaccumulating plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Teng-Hao-Bo; Cloquet, Christophe; Tang, Ye-Tao; Sterckeman, Thibault; Echevarria, Guillaume; Estrade, Nicolas; Morel, Jean-Louis; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2014-10-21

    Until now, there has been little data on the isotope fractionation of nickel (Ni) in higher plants and how this can be affected by plant Ni and zinc (Zn) homeostasis. A hydroponic cultivation was conducted to investigate the isotope fractionation of Ni and Zn during plant uptake and translocation processes. The nonaccumulator Thlaspi arvense, the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale and the Ni and Zn hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens were grown in low (2 μM) and high (50 μM) Ni and Zn solutions. Results showed that plants were inclined to absorb light Ni isotopes, presumably due to the functioning of low-affinity transport systems across root cell membrane. The Ni isotope fractionation between plant and solution was greater in the hyperaccumulators grown in low Zn treatments (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.90 to -0.63‰) than that in the nonaccumulator T. arvense (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.21‰), thus indicating a greater permeability of the low-affinity transport system in hyperaccumulators. Light isotope enrichment of Zn was observed in most of the plants (Δ(66)Zn(plant-solution) = -0.23 to -0.10‰), but to a lesser extent than for Ni. The rapid uptake of Zn on the root surfaces caused concentration gradients, which induced ion diffusion in the rhizosphere and could result in light Zn isotope enrichment in the hyperaccumulator N. caerulescens. In high Zn treatment, Zn could compete with Ni during the uptake process, which reduced Ni concentration in plants and decreased the extent of Ni isotope fractionation (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.11 to -0.07‰), indicating that plants might take up Ni through a low-affinity transport system of Zn. We propose that isotope composition analysis for transition elements could become an empirical tool to study plant physiological processes.

  1. Isotope Fractionation in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  2. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

    2009-06-18

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose

  3. Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.E.; Mathur, R.; Dohnalkova, A.C.; Wall, A.J.; Runkel, R.L.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    We measured the Cu isotopic composition of primary minerals and stream water affected by acid mine drainage in a mineralized watershed (Colorado, USA). The ??65Cu values (based on 65Cu/63Cu) of enargite (??65Cu = -0.01 ?? 0.10???; 2??) and chalcopyrite (??65Cu = 0.16 ?? 0.10???) are within the range of reported values for terrestrial primary Cu sulfides (-1??? waters (1.38??? ??? ??65Cu ??? 1.69???). The average isotopic fractionation (??aq-min = ??65Cuaq - ??65Cumin, where the latter is measured on mineral samples from the field system), equals 1.43 ?? 0.14??? and 1.60 ?? 0.14??? for chalcopyrite and enargite, respectively. To interpret this field survey, we leached chalcopyrite and enargite in batch experiments and found that, as in the field, the leachate is enriched in 65Cu relative to chalcopyrite (1.37 ?? 0.14???) and enargite (0.98 ?? 0.14???) when microorganisms are absent. Leaching of minerals in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans results in smaller average fractionation in the opposite direction for chalcopyrite (??aq-mino = - 0.57 ?? 0.14 ???, where mino refers to the starting mineral) and no apparent fractionation for enargite (??aq-mino = 0.14 ?? 0.14 ???). Abiotic fractionation is attributed to preferential oxidation of 65Cu+ at the interface of the isotopically homogeneous mineral and the surface oxidized layer, followed by solubilization. When microorganisms are present, the abiotic fractionation is most likely not seen due to preferential association of 65Cuaq with A. ferrooxidans cells and related precipitates. In the biotic experiments, Cu was observed under TEM to occur in precipitates around bacteria and in intracellular polyphosphate granules. Thus, the values of ??65Cu in the field and laboratory systems are presumably determined by the balance of Cu released abiotically and Cu that interacts with cells and related precipitates. Such isotopic signatures resulting from Cu sulfide dissolution should be useful for acid mine drainage

  4. Modes of planetary-scale Fe isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2006-12-01

    Fe isotope composition of lithospheric mantle xenoliths are representative for an undisturbed melt source, and second, HED and SNC meteorites, representing melting products of 4Vesta and Mars silicate mantles would be expected to show a similar fractionation towards heavy isotope compositions. This is not observed. Four international granitoid standards with SiO 2 contents between 60 and 70 wt.% yield δ56Fe/ 54Fe values between 0.118‰ and 0.132‰. An investigation of the alpine Bergell igneous rock suite revealed a positive correlation between Fe isotope compositions and SiO 2 contents — from gabbros and tonalites ( δ56Fe/ 54Fe ≈ 0.03 to 0.09‰) to granodiorites and silicic dykes ( δ56Fe/ 54Fe ≈ 0.14 to 0.23‰). Although in this suite δ56Fe/ 54Fe correlates with δ18O values and radiogenic isotopes, open-system behavior to explain the heavy iron is not undisputed. This is because an obvious assimilant with the required heavy Fe isotope composition has so far not been identified. Alternatively, the relatively heavy granite compositions might be obtained by fractional crystallisation of the melt. Ultimately, further detailed studies on natural rocks and the experimental determination of mineral/melt fractionation factors at magmatic conditions are required to unravel whether or not iron isotope fractionation takes place during partial mantle melting and crystal fractionation.

  5. [Carbon isotope fractionation in plants]: Annual technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Plants fractionate carbon isotopes during photosynthesis in ways which reflect photosynthetic pathway and environment. The fractionation is product of contributions from diffusion, carboxylation and other factors which can be understood using models which have been developed in our work. The object of our work is to use this fractionation to learn about the factors which control the efficiency of photosynthesis. Unlike previous studies, we do not rely principally on combustion methods, but instead develop more specific methods with substantially higher resolving power. We have recently developed a new short-term method for studying carbon isotope fractionation which promises to provide a level of detail about temperature, species, and light intensity effects on photosynthesis which has not been available until now. We are studying the isotopic compositions of metabolites (particularly aspartic acid) in C 3 plants in order to determine the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C 3 photosynthesis. We are studying the relative roles of diffusion and carboxylation in nocturnal CO 2 fixation in CAM plants. We are studying the use of isotopic content as an index of water-use efficiency in C 3 plants. We are developing new methods for studying carbon metabolism in plants. 3 refs

  6. Modeling nuclear field shift isotope fractionation in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this study nuclear field shift fractionations in solids (and chemically similar liquids) are estimated using calibrated density functional theory calculations. The nuclear field shift effect is a potential driver of mass independent isotope fractionation(1,2), especially for elements with high atomic number such as Hg, Tl and U. This effect is caused by the different shapes and volumes of isotopic nuclei, and their interactions with electronic structures and energies. Nuclear field shift isotope fractionations can be estimated with first principles methods, but the calculations are computationally difficult, limiting most theoretical studies so far to small gas-phase molecules and molecular clusters. Many natural materials of interest are more complex, and it is important to develop ways to estimate field shift effects that can be applied to minerals, solutions, in biomolecules, and at mineral-solution interfaces. Plane-wave density functional theory, in combination with the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), is much more readily adapted to complex materials than the relativistic all-electron calculations that have been the focus of most previous studies. DFT-PAW is a particularly effective tool for studying crystals with periodic boundary conditions, and may also be incorporated into molecular dynamics simulations of solutions and other disordered phases. Initial calibrations of DFT-PAW calculations against high-level all-electron models of field shift fractionation suggest that there may be broad applicability of this method to a variety of elements and types of materials. In addition, the close relationship between the isomer shift of Mössbauer spectroscopy and the nuclear field shift isotope effect makes it possible, at least in principle, to estimate the volume component of field shift fractionations in some species that are too complex even for DFT-PAW models, so long as there is a Mössbauer isotope for the element of interest. Initial results

  7. Soil tension mediates isotope fractionation during soil water evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaj, Marcel; McDonnell, Jeffrey

    2017-04-01

    Isotope tracing of the water cycle is increasing in its use and usefulness. Many new studies are extracting soil waters and relating these to streamflow, groundwater recharge and plant transpiration. Nevertheless, unlike isotope fractionation factors from open water bodies, soil water fractionation factors are poorly understood and until now, only empirically derived. In contrast to open water evaporation where temperature, humidity and vapor pressure gradient define fractionation (as codified in the well-known Craig and Gordon model), soil water evaporation includes additionally, fractionation by matrix effects. There is yet no physical explanation of kinetic and equilibrium fraction from soil water within the soil profile. Here we present a simple laboratory experiment with four admixtures of soil grain size (from sand to silt to clay). Oven-dried samples were spiked with water of known isotopic composition at different soil water contents. Soils were then stored in sealed bags and the headspace filled with dry air and allowed to equilibrate for 24hours. Isotopic analysis of the headspace vapor was done with a Los Gatos Inc. water vapor isotope analyzer. Soil water potential of subsamples were measured with a water potential meter. We show for the first time that soil tension controls isotope fractionation in the resident soil water. Below a Pf 3.5 the δ-values of 18O and 2H of the headspace vapor is more positive and increases with increasing soil water potential. Surprisingly, we find that the relationship between soil tension and equilibrium fractionation is independent of soil type. However, δ-values of each soil type plot along a distinct evaporation line. These results indicate that equilibrium fractionation is affected by soil tension in addition to temperature. Therefore, at high soil water tension (under dry conditions) equilibrium fractionation is not consistent with current empirical formulations that ignore these effects. These findings may have

  8. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  9. Quantification of Calcium Isotope Fractionation in Ectomycorrhizal Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, C. J.; Bryce, J. G.; Hobbie, E. A.; Colpaert, J. V.; Bullen, T. D.

    2005-12-01

    Calcium plays a significant role in many forest ecosystem processes and is required for plant growth. Within plants, calcium is a critical component of cell walls and membranes, signaling processes, and charge balances (1). Current efforts to quantify Ca cycling in ecosystems rely on large-scale ecosystem manipulations (e.g., 2) or mass balances (e.g., 3) and indirect chemical proxies, Ca/Sr or Sr isotopic systems (e.g., 4). The measurement of Ca isotopes may provide more direct information about the calcium sources and fluxes within and between the geological (mineral and soil) and biological (fungi and plants) components of terrestrial ecosystems. To examine calcium isotopic variability systematically, we measured the fractionation between roots and needles in cultured Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) seedlings. Our samples include roots and needles from trees grown at low or high nutrient supply rates (3% or 5% per day). Because mycorrhizal fungi are intimately involved in plant nutrient supply, we also tested whether mycorrhizal colonization by Suillus bovinus affected calcium isotopic fractionation. Initial results demonstrate that at a low nutrient supply rate there is a small but measurable fractionation (averaging 0.58 ‰) between the roots and needles of individual trees; the needles are enriched in 40Ca compared to the roots. The root-needle fractionation is unaffected by mycorrhizal colonization. Ongoing analyses will address both the consistency of the root-needle fractionation and the impacts of nutrient supply rate on fractionation. Preliminary results suggest that higher nutrient supply rates lead to decreased root-needle fractionation. Analyses underway will also address whether different fungal species ( Thelephora terrestris) affect the documented root-needle fractionation. Isotope signatures of calcium source materials will complete our sample suite and will be used to assess fractionation during uptake. Ultimately, the results of this study will

  10. Boron isotope fractionation in column chromatography with glucamine type fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Akinari; Makita, Yoji; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2008-01-01

    Glucamine type polymers have specific affinity toward boric acid and borate ion. Among them, Chelest Fiber GRY-L showed larger fractionation for boron isotopes than other polymers in our previous study. For this study, we used Chelest Fibers with different fiber lengths (1.0 mm, 0.5 mm, and 0.3 mm) as column packing materials to perform chromatographic separation of boron isotopes. The shorter fiber has larger packing density when packed into the column using a dry method. The 0.3-mm-long fiber has a larger backpressure than fibers of other lengths. Boron adsorption capacities were measured using the breakthrough operation. At this time, the 0.5-mm-long fiber showed the highest capacity. When we measured the isotope ratio profile for fibers of different length using column chromatography, 0.5-mm-long fibers displayed the highest boron isotope fractionation. The 0.5-mm-long fiber is promising as a packing material of column chromatography for boron isotope separation. We also changed operation methods. The lower eluent concentration and the slower flow rate are suitable for boron isotope separation. (author)

  11. Theoretical evaluation of isotopic fractionation factors in oxidation reactions of benzene, phenol and chlorophenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Paweł; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-09-01

    We have studied theoretically the rate determining steps of reactions of benzene with permanganate, perchlorate, ozone and dioxygen in the gas phase and aqueous solution as well as phenol and dichlorophenol in protonated and unprotonated forms in aqueous solution. Kinetic isotope effects were then calculated for all carbon atoms and based on their values isotopic fractionation factors corresponding to compound specific isotopic analysis have been evaluated. The influence of the oxidant, substituents, environment and protonation on the isotopic fractionation factors has been analyzed.

  12. Oxygen isotopic fractionation in the condensation of refractory smokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.; Thiemens, M.; Nuth, J.; Donn, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary measurements of the oxygen isotopic fractionation that occurs during the condensation of refractory metal oxide smokes. Fractionation occurred at temperatures in excess of 500 K during and/or subsequent to reaction of SiH4, Fe(CO)5, Al(CH3)3, and O2 in a H2 carrier gas. Observed isotopic fractionation was as high as -15 per mil/amu. The magnitude of the isotopic fractionation suggests that the process is kinetically controlled since the effect is greatly in excess of that expected for equilibrium isotopic exchange.

  13. Kinetic Isotopic Fractionation of Cd and Zn During Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloquet, C.; Carignan, J.; Libourel, G.

    2005-12-01

    The development of MC-ICPMS allowed to measure precisely isotopic compositions of transitional metals with a resolution generally better than +/- 0.15 per mil per atomic mass unit. The isotopic composition of such metals (Zn, Cd, Cu) varies in terrestrial and extra-terrestrial samples resulting most probably from phase transformations (solid-gas-solid) and/or biogenic fractionation. Up to now, very few experiments were conducted in order to document isotope fractionation during evaporation and condensation of metals. In this study, we report Cd and Zn elemental and isotopic variations measured in fly ashes collected from an urban waste combustor (UWC) equipped with various ash and flue gas filtration devices, including a heat transfer system. In the evacuation system, temperature drop from ca. 900 to 250 degree Celsius. This temperature range allows the evaporation and then condensation of Cd and Zn and probably fusion and oxido-reduction reactions. Indeed, the composition of combustion residues clearly indicates that most of the cadmium and part of the zinc were evacuated in the flue gases. Chemical analysis of the fly ashes collected along the thermal gradient suggest a massive condensation of semi-volatile elements such as Cd and Zn just above the heat transfer plate, which behave as a cold point in the evacuation system. As a first approximation, Cd and Zn contents are directly related to the amount metal condensates on more refractory particles. Leaching experiments on different fly ashes thermodynamic calculations confirmed the occurrence of soluble Cd and Zn salt condensates. The cadmium and Zn isotopic composition of bulk, leachate and residue samples provided variations as large as 1 per mil for delta 114Cd (114Cd/110Cd ratio) and up to 0.5 per mil for delta 66Zn (66Zn/64Zn ratio). Both Cd and Zn delta values are positively correlated to concentrations. According to the position of samples in the thermal gradient of the evacuation system, we suggest that

  14. Carbon isotope fractionation for cotton genotype selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Greigh de Brito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the carbon isotope fractionation as a phenomic facility for cotton selection in contrasting environments and to assess its relationship with yield components. The experiments were carried out in a randomized block design, with four replicates, in the municipalities of Santa Helena de Goiás (SHGO and Montividiu (MONT, in the state of Goiás, Brazil. The analysis of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ was performed in 15 breeding lines and three cultivars. Subsequently, the root growth kinetic and root system architecture from the selected genotypes were determined. In both locations, Δ analyses were suitable to discriminate cotton genotypes. There was a positive correlation between Δ and seed-cotton yield in SHGO, where water deficit was more severe. In this site, the negative correlations found between Δ and fiber percentage indicate an integrative effect of gas exchange on Δ and its association with yield components. As for root robustness and growth kinetic, the GO 05 809 genotype performance contributes to sustain the highest values of Δ found in MONT, where edaphoclimatic conditions were more suitable for cotton. The use of Δ analysis as a phenomic facility can help to select cotton genotypes, in order to obtain plants with higher efficiency for gas exchange and water use.

  15. Cadmium isotope fractionation of materials derived from various industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinková, Eva, E-mail: eva.cadkova@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Chrastný, Vladislav, E-mail: chrastny@fzp.czu.cz [Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Francová, Michaela, E-mail: michaela.francova@fzp.czu.cz [Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Šípková, Adéla, E-mail: adela.sipkova@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Čuřík, Jan, E-mail: jan.curik@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Myška, Oldřich, E-mail: oldrich.myska@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Mižič, Lukáš, E-mail: lukas.mizic@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • All studied industrial processes were accompanied by Cd isotope fractionation. • ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd values of the waste materials were discernible from primary sources. • Technology in use plays an important role in Cd isotope fractionation. - Abstract: Our study represents ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd {sub NIST3108} values of materials resulting from anthropogenic activities such as coal burning, smelting, refining, metal coating, and the glass industry. Additionally, primary sources (ore samples, pigment, coal) processed in the industrial premises were studied. Two sphalerites, galena, coal and pigment samples exhibited ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd{sub NIST3108} values of 1.0 ± 0.2, 0.2 ± 0.2, 1.3 ± 0.1, −2.3 ± 0.2 and −0.1 ± 0.3, respectively. In general, all studied industrial processes were accompanied by Cd isotope fractionation. Most of the industrial materials studied were clearly distinguishable from the samples used as a primary source based on ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd {sub NIST3108} values. The heaviest ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd{sub NIST3108} value of 58.6 ± 0.9 was found for slag resulting from coal combustion, and the lightest ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd{sub NIST3108} value of −23 ± 2.5 was observed for waste material after Pb refinement. It is evident that ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd {sub NIST3108} values depend on technological processes, and in case of incomplete Cd transfer from source to final waste material, every industrial activity creates differences in Cd isotope composition. Our results show that Cd isotope analysis is a promising tool to track the origins of industrial waste products.

  16. Molybdenum isotope fractionation in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu-Hsuan; Halliday, Alex N.; Siebert, Chris; Fitton, J. Godfrey; Burton, Kevin W.; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Harvey, Jason

    2017-02-01

    We report double-spike molybdenum (Mo) isotope data for forty-two mafic and fifteen ultramafic rocks from diverse locations and compare these with results for five chondrites. The δ98/95Mo values (normalized to NIST SRM 3134) range from -0.59 ± 0.04 to +0.10 ± 0.08‰. The compositions of one carbonaceous (CI) and four ordinary chondrites are relatively uniform (-0.14 ± 0.01‰, 95% ci (confidence interval)) in excellent agreement with previous data. These values are just resolvable from the mean of 10 mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) (0.00 ± 0.02‰, 95% ci). The compositions of 13 mantle-derived ultramafic xenoliths from Kilbourne Hole, Tariat and Vitim are more diverse (-0.39 to -0.07‰) with a mean of -0.22 ± 0.06‰ (95% ci). On this basis, the isotopic composition of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE or Primitive Mantle) is within error identical to chondrites. The mean Mo concentration of the ultramafic xenoliths (0.19 ± 0.07 ppm, 95% ci) is similar in magnitude to that of MORB (0.48 ± 0.13 ppm, 95% ci), providing evidence, either for a more compatible behaviour than previously thought or for selective Mo enrichment of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Intraplate and ocean island basalts (OIBs) display significant isotopic variability within a single locality from MORB-like to strongly negative (-0.59 ± 0.04‰). The most extreme values measured are for nephelinites from the Cameroon Line and Trinidade, which also have anomalously high Ce/Pb and low Mo/Ce relative to normal oceanic basalts. δ98/95Mo correlates negatively with Ce/Pb and U/Pb, and positively with Mo/Ce, explicable if a phase such as an oxide or a sulphide liquid selectively retains isotopically heavy Mo in the mantle and fractionates its isotopic composition in low degree partial melts. If residual phases retain Mo during partial melting, it is possible that the [Mo] for the BSE may be misrepresented by values estimated from basalts. This would be consistent with the high Mo

  17. Fe-isotope fractionation in magmatic-hydrothermal mineral deposits: A case study from the Renison Sn-W deposit, Tasmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawryk, Christine M.; Foden, John D.

    2015-02-01

    We present 50 new iron isotopic analyses of source granite and mineral separates from the Renison tin deposit in western Tasmania. The aim of the study is to characterise the composition of minerals within a tin deposit associated with a reduced, S-type magma. We have analysed bulk samples of granite, and separates of pyrrhotite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, magnetite, chalcopyrite and siderite by multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The isotopic compositions of mineral separates are consistent with theoretical predictions of equilibrium fractionation based on Mössbauer spectroscopy and other parametric calculations. Mineral-mineral pairs yield temperatures of formation that are in agreement with prior detailed fluid inclusion studies, but are spatially inconsistent with declining fluid temperatures with distance from the causative intrusion, limiting the use of Fe isotopes as a potential geothermometer, at least in this case. Comparison of our data with published data from other deposits clearly demonstrates that pyrite, magnetite and chalcopyrite from the hottest ore fluids (>300-400 °C) at Renison are isotopically heavier than minerals sampled from a deposit formed at similar temperatures, but associated with a more oxidised and less differentiated intrusion.

  18. Calcium isotope fractionation in ion-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.A.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Significant fractionation of the isotopes of calcium has been observed during elution through short ion-exchange columns packed with Dowex 50W-X8 resin. A double isotopic tracer was used to provide correction for instrumental fractionation effects. The absolute 40 Ca/ 44 Ca ratio is determined by this method to 0.05% and provides a measure of the fractionation of all Ca isotopes. It is found that the lighter isotopes are preferentially retained by the resin, with variations in 40 Ca/ 44 Ca between the first and last fractions of up to 1.1%. An estimate of the separation factor between batch solute and resin gives epsilon = 2.1 x 10 -4 . Details of the chemical or physical mechanisms causing isotope fractionation of Li, Na, Ca, and other elements during ion-exchange chromatography are not yet clear

  19. Isotopic Fractionation of Mercury in Great Lakes Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, L. E.; Keeler, G. J.; Blum, J. D.; Sherman, L. S.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a hazardous bioaccumulative neurotoxin, and atmospheric deposition is a primary way in which mercury enters terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the chemical processes and transport regimes that mercury undergoes from emission to deposition are not well understood. Thus the use of mercury isotopes to characterize the biogeochemical cycling of mercury is a rapidly growing area of study. Precipitation samples were collected in Chicago, IL, Holland, MI, and Dexter, MI from April 2007 - October 2007 to begin examining the isotopic fractionation of atmospheric mercury in the Great Lakes region. Results show that mass-dependent fractionation relative to NIST-3133 (MDF - δ202Hg) ranged from -0.8‰ to 0.2‰ (±0.2‰) in precipitation samples, while mass-independent fractionation (MIF - Δ199Hg) varied from 0.1‰ to 0.6‰ (±0.1‰). Although clear urban-rural differences were not observed, this may be due to the weekly collection of precipitation samples rather than collection of individual events, making it difficult to truly characterize the meteorology and source influences associated with each sample and suggesting that event-based collection is necessary during future sampling campaigns. Additionally, total vapor phase mercury samples were collected in Dexter, MI in 2009 to examine isotopic fractionation of mercury in ambient air. In ambient samples δ202Hg ranged from 0.3‰ to 0.5‰ (±0.1‰), however Δ199Hg was not significant. Because mercury in precipitation is predominantly Hg2+, while ambient vapor phase mercury is primarily Hg0, these results may suggest the occurrence of MIF during the oxidation of Hg0 to Hg2+ prior to deposition. Furthermore, although it has not been previously reported or predicted, MIF of 200Hg was also detected. Δ200Hg ranged from 0.0‰ to 0.2‰ in precipitation and from -0.1‰ to 0.0‰ in ambient samples. This work resulted in methodological developments in the collection and processing of

  20. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation in a Tropical Soil-Plant System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opfergelt, S.; Delstanche, S.; Cardinal, D.; Andre, L.; Delvaux, B.

    2006-12-01

    Silica fluxes to soil solutions and water streams are controlled by both abiotic and biotic processes occurring in a Si soil-plant cycle that can be significant in comparison with Si weathering input and hydrological output. The quantification of Si-isotopic fractionation by these processes is highly promising to study the Si soil-plant cycle. Therein, the fate of aqueous monosilicic acid H4SiO4, as produced by silicate weathering, may take four paths: (1) uptake by plants and recycling through falling litter, (2) formation of clay minerals, (3) specific adsorption onto Al and Fe oxides, (4) leaching in drainage waters and export from watersheds. Here we report on detailed Si-isotopic compositions of various Si pools in a tropical soil-plant system involving old stands of banana (Musa acuminata Colla, cv Grande Naine) cropped on a weathering sequence of soils derived from andesitic volcanic ash and pumice deposits in Cameroon, West Africa. Si-isotopic compositions were measured by MC-ICP-MS in dry plasma mode with external Mg doping with a reproducibility of 0.08 permil (2stdev). Results were expressed as delta29Si vs NBS28. The compositions were determined in plant parts, bulk soils, clay fractions (less than 2um) and stream waters used for crop irrigation. Of the weathering sequence, we selected young (Y) and old (O) volcanic soils (vs). Yvs are rich in weatherable minerals, and contain large amounts of pumice gravels; their clay fraction (10-35 percent) contains allophane, halloysite and ferrihydrite. Oppositely, Ovs are strongly weathered and fine clayey soils (75-96 percent clay) rich in halloysite, kaolinite, gibbsite and goethite. Intra-plant fractionation between roots and shoots and within shoots confirmed our previous data measured on banana plants grown in hydroponics. The bulk plant isotopic composition was heavier at Ovs than at Yvs giving a fractionation factor per atomic mass unit between plants and their irrigation water Si source (+0.61 permil) of

  1. First-principles models of equilibrium tellurium isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghnegahdar, M. A.; Schauble, E. A.; Fornadel, A. P.; Spry, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, equilibrium mass-dependent isotopic fractionation among representative Te-bearing species is estimated with first-principles thermodynamic calculations. Tellurium is a group 16 element (along with O, S, and Se) with eight stable isotopes ranging in mass from 120Te to 130Te, and six commonly-occurring oxidation states: -II, -I, 0, +II, +IV, and +VI. In its reduced form, Te(-II), tellurium has a unique crystal-chemical role as a bond partner for gold and silver in epithermal and orogenic gold deposits, which likely form when oxidized Te species (e.g., H2TeO3, TeO32-) or perhaps polytellurides (e.g., Te22-) interact with precious metals in hydrothermal solution. Te(IV) is the most common oxidation state at the Earth's surface, including surface outcrops of telluride ore deposits, where tellurite and tellurate minerals form by oxidation. In the ocean, dissolved tellurium tends to be scavenged by particulate matter. Te(VI) is more abundant than Te(IV) in the ocean water (1), even though it is thought to be less stable thermodynamically. This variety of valence states in natural systems and range of isotopic masses suggest that tellurium could exhibit geochemically useful isotope abundance variations. Tellurium isotope fractionations were determined for representative molecules and crystals of varying complexity and chemistry. Gas-phase calculations are combined with supermolecular cluster models of aqueous and solid species. These in turn are compared with plane-wave density functional theory calculations with periodic boundary conditions. In general, heavyTe/lightTe is predicted to be higher for more oxidized species, and lower for reduced species, with 130Te/125Te fractionations as large as 4‰ at 100οC between coexisting Te(IV) and Te(-II) or Te(0) compounds. This is a much larger fractionation than has been observed in naturally occurring redox pairs (i.e., Te (0) vs. Te(IV) species) so far, suggesting that disequilibrium processes may control

  2. Chlorine and bromine isotope fractionation of halogenated organic pollutants on gas chromatography columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Caiming; Tan, Jianhua; Xiong, Songsong; Liu, Jun; Fan, Yujuan; Peng, Xianzhi

    2017-09-08

    Compound-specific chlorine/bromine isotope analysis (CSIA-Cl/Br) has become a powerful approach to investigate degradation pathways and apportion sources of halogenated organic pollutants (HOPs) in the environment. CSIA-Cl/Br is usually conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which could be negatively impacted by isotope fractionation on GC columns. In this study, on-column Cl/Br isotope fractionation of 31 organochlorines and 4 organobromines was explored using GC-double focus magnetic-sector high resolution MS (GC-DFS-HRMS). Twenty-nine HOPs exhibited inverse Cl/Br isotope fractionation for which the heavier isotopologues eluted faster than the lighter ones on GC columns, and two polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB-138 and PCB-153) showed normal isotope fractionation, whereas the rest four HOPs did not show observable isotope fractionation. The isotope fractionation extents varied from -13.0‰ to 73.1‰. Mechanisms of the on-column Cl/Br isotope fractionation were tentatively elucidated with a modified two-film model. The results demonstrate that integrating peak area as complete as possible for separable chromatographic peaks and integrating the middle retention-time segments for the inseparable peaks are helpful to improve precision and accuracy of the CSIA-Cl/Br data. The findings of this study will shed light on development of CSIA-Cl/Br methods with respect to improving precision and accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

  4. Effect of Nutrient-limitation on the Microbial S-isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, M.; Bosak, T.; Ono, S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) utilizes sulfate as an electron acceptor and produces sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. This process controls much of the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sedimentary sulfides and sulfates, but the magnitude of S-isotope fractionations in natural environments often exceeds those in laboratory cultures. This difference may be due to many factors and environmental stresses, including the limitation by essential nutrients. However, none of the studies to date investigated the effect of nutrients such as nitrogen, iron, or phosphate, on sulfur isotope fractionation by sulfate reducing microbes. Here, we examine the influence of N and Fe limitation on multiple-S isotope fractionation by a marine sulfate reducing bacterium by reducing the concentrations of N and Fe in a defined medium by 10 to 1000 times. Nitrogen limitation reduces the growth rate and the cellular yield, but increases the respiration rate without altering the magnitude of isotope fractionation. In contrast, S-isotope fractionation was up to 40% larger in iron-limited than in iron-replete cultures. This increase in sulfur isotope fractionation is accompanied by a decrease in the growth rate, the cellular yield, the respiration rate, and the cytochrome c content. Thus, iron limitation increases the reversibility of microbial sulfate reduction pathway, possibly by affecting iron-containing respiratory complexes such as cytochromes and iron-sulfur proteins. The apparent influence of iron limitation on S-isotope fractionation is relevant to the interpretations of sulfur isotope data in modern and ancient environments. Some areas where iron limitation may lead to large observed S-isotope effects include iron-limited deep open ocean sediments, whereas smaller S-isotope effects would be expected where Fe is more bioavailable (e.g., in anoxic basins, where Fe enrichment occurs due to Fe shuttling).

  5. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17 degrees C nights, 23 degrees C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4 per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in (13)C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0 per thousand at 27 degrees C/33 degrees C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process

  6. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  7. Observations of Nitrogen Isotope Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets [1]. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - Nand N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments [2]. Charnley and Rodgers [3,4] showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: Ll521E, Ll498, Ll544, and Ll521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards Ll544 were obtained with N2H(+) and NH3 yielding ratios of 446 and greater than 700, respectively [5,6]. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  8. Fractionation of Stable Isotopes in Atmospheric Aerosol Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl

    Aerosols - particles suspended in air - are the single largest uncertainty in our current understanding of Earth's climate. They also affect human health, infrastructure and ecosystems. Aerosols are emitted either directly into the atmosphere or are formed there for instance in response to chemical...... reactions and undergo complex chemical and physical changes during their lifetimes. In order to assess processes that form and alter aerosols, information provided by stable isotopes can be used to help constrain estimates on the strength of aerosol sources and sinks. This thesis studies (mass......-independent) fractionation processes of stable isotopes of C, N, O and S in order to investigate three different systems related to aerosols: 1. Post-depositional processes of nitrate in snow that obscure nitrate ice core records 2. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol generated by ozonolysis of X...

  9. Molybdenum isotope fractionation during adsorption to organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth K.; Perakis, Steven; Pett-Ridge, Julie C.

    2018-01-01

    Organic matter is of emerging interest as a control on molybdenum (Mo) biogeochemistry, and information on isotope fractionation during adsorption to organic matter can improve interpretations of Mo isotope variations in natural settings. Molybdenum isotope fractionation was investigated during adsorption onto insolubilized humic acid (IHA), a surrogate for organic matter, as a function of time (2–170 h) and pH (2–7). For the time series experiment performed at pH 4.2, the average Mo isotope fractionation between the solution and the IHA (Δ98Mosolution-IHA) was 1.39‰ (± 0.16‰, 2σ, based on 98Mo/95Mo relative to the NIST 3134 standard) at steady state. For the pH series experiment, Mo adsorption decreased as pH increased from 2.0 to 6.9, and the Δ98Mosolution-IHA increased from 0.82‰ to 1.79‰. We also evaluated natural Mo isotope patterns in precipitation, foliage, organic horizon, surface mineral soil, and bedrock from 12 forested sites in the Oregon Coast Range. The average Mo isotope offset observed between precipitation and organic (O) horizon soil was 2.1‰, with light Mo isotopes adsorbing preferentially to organic matter. Fractionation during adsorption to organic matter is similar in magnitude and direction to prior observations of Mo fractionation during adsorption to Fe- and Mn- (oxyhydr)oxides. Our finding that organic matter influences Mo isotope composition has important implications for the role of organic matter as a driver of trace metal retention and isotopic fractionation.

  10. Calcium isotope fractionation in a silicate dominated Cenozoic aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxia; DePaolo, Donald J.; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun

    2018-04-01

    To understand the characteristics of Ca isotope composition and fractionation in silicate-dominated Quaternary aquifer system, hydrochemical and isotope studies (87Sr/86Sr, 13CDIC and 44/40Ca) were conducted on groundwater, sediment and rock samples from the Datong basin, China. Along the groundwater flow path from the basin margin to the center, groundwater hydrochemical type evolves from Ca-HCO3 to Na-HCO3/Na-Cl type, which results from aluminosilicate hydrolysis, vertical mixing, cation exchange between CaX2 and NaX, and calcite/dolomite precipitation. These processes cause the decrease in groundwater Ca concentration and the associated modest fractionation of groundwater Ca isotopes along the flowpath. The groundwater δ44/40Ca value varies from -0.11 to 0.49‰. The elevated δ44/40Ca ratios in shallow groundwater are attributed to vertical mixing involving addition of irrigation water, which had the average δ44/40Ca ratio of 0.595‰. Chemical weathering of silicate minerals and carbonate generates depleted δ44/40Ca signatures in groundwater from Heng Mountain (east area) and Huanghua Uplift (west area), respectively. Along the groundwater flow path from Heng Mountain to central area of east area, cation exchange between CaX2 and NaX on clay mineral results in the enrichment of heavier Ca isotope in groundwater. All groundwater samples are oversaturated with respect to calcite and dolomite. The groundwater environment rich in organic matter promotes the precipitation of carbonate minerals via the biodegradation of organic carbon, thereby further promoting the elevation of groundwater δ44/40Ca ratios.

  11. Lithium isotope fractionation by diffusion in minerals Part 2: Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Frank; Chaussidon, Marc; Bruce Watson, E.; Mendybaev, Ruslan; Homolova, Veronika

    2017-12-01

    Recent experiments have shown that lithium isotopes can be significantly fractionated by diffusion in silicate liquids and in augite. Here we report new laboratory experiments that document similarly large lithium isotopic fractionation by diffusion in olivine. Two types of experiments were used. A powder-source method where lithium from finely ground spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) diffused into oriented San Carlos olivine, and piston cylinder annealing experiments where Kunlun clinopyroxene (∼30 ppm lithium) and oriented San Carlos olivine (∼2 ppm lithium) were juxtaposed. The lithium concentration along traverses across the run products was measured using both laser ablation as a source for a Varian 820-MS quadrupole mass spectrometer and a CAMECA 1270 secondary ion mass spectrometer. The CAMECA 1270 was also used to measure the lithium isotopic fractionation across olivine grains recovered from the experiments. The lithium isotopes were found to be fractionationed by many tens of permil in the diffusion boundary layer at the grain edges as a result of 6Li diffusing significantly faster than 7Li. The lithium concentration and isotopic fractionation data across the olivine recovered from the different experiments were modeled using calculations in which lithium was assumed to be of two distinct types - one being fast diffusing interstitial lithium, the other much less mobile lithium on a metal site. The two-site diffusion model involves a large number of independent parameters and we found that different choices of the parameters can produce very comparable fits to the lithium concentration profiles and associated isotopic fractionation. Because of this nonuniqueness we are able to determine only a range for the relative diffusivity of 6Li compared to 7Li. When the mass dependence of lithium diffusion is parameterized as D6Li /D7Li =(7 / 6) β , the isotope fractionation for diffusion along the a and c crystallographic direction of olivine can be fit by β = 0.4 ± 0

  12. Study and validity of {sup 13}C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and {sup 2}H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotte, J.F. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Casabianca, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Lheritier, J. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Perrucchietti, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Sanglar, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Waton, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France)]. E-mail: mf.grenier-loustalot@sca.cnrs.fr

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The {delta} {sup 13}C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H){sub I} ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C{sub 4} syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C{sub 4} syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying.

  13. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotte, J.F.; Casabianca, H.; Lheritier, J.; Perrucchietti, C.; Sanglar, C.; Waton, H.; Grenier-Loustalot, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The δ 13 C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H) I ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C 4 syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C 4 syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying

  14. Particle-size fractionation and stable carbon isotope distribution applied to the study of soil organic matter dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, C.; Feller, C.; Balesdent, J.; Victoria, R.; Plenecassagne, A.

    1985-01-01

    The present Note concerns the dynamics of organic matter in soils under forest (C 3 -type vegetation) and 12 and 50 years old sugar-cane (C 4 -type vegetation) cultivation. The decomposition rate of ‘forest organic matter” and the accumulation rate of “sugar-cane organic matter” are estimated through 13 C measurements of total soil and different organic fractions (particle-size, fractionation) [fr

  15. The lack of potassium-isotopic fractionation in Bishunpur chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.; Wang, Jingyuan; Zanda, B.; Bourot-Denise, M.; Hewins, R.H.

    2000-01-01

    In a search for evidence of evaporation during chondrule formation, the mesostases of 11 Bishunpur chondrules and melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts in 7 of them have been analyzed for their alkali element abundances and K-isotopic compositions. Except for six points, all areas of the chondrules that were analyzed had δ41K compositions that were normal within error (typically ±3%, 2s̀). The six “anomalous” points are probably all artifacts. Experiments have shown that free evaporation of K leads to large 41K enrichments in the evaporation residues, consistent with Rayleigh fractionation. Under Rayleigh conditions, a 3% enrichment in δ41K is produced by ∼12% loss of K. The range of L-chondrite-normalized K/Al ratios (a measure of the K-elemental fractionation) in the areas analyzed vary by almost three orders of magnitude. If all chondrules started out with L-chondrite-like K abundances and the K loss occurred via Rayleigh fractionation, the most K-depleted chondrules would have had compositions of up to δ41K ≅ 200%. Clearly, K fractionation did not occur by evaporation under Rayleigh conditions. Yet experiments and modeling indicate that K should have been lost during chondrule formation under currently accepted formation conditions (peak temperature, cooling rate, etc.). Invoking precursors with variable alkali abundances to produce the range of K/Al fractionation in chondrules does not explain the K-isotopic data because any K that was present should still have experienced sufficient loss during melting for there to have been a measurable isotopic fractionation. If K loss and isotopic fractionation was inevitable during chondrule formation, the absence of K-isotopic fractionation in Bishunpur chondrules requires that they exchanged K with an isotopically normal reservoir during or after formation. There is evidence for alkali exchange between chondrules and rim-matrix in all unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. However, melt inclusions can have

  16. The isotopic fractionation of carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen, and oxygen during illicit production of cocaine base in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallette, Jennifer R; Casale, John F; Jones, Laura M; Morello, David R

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements have become a key component in sourcing the origin of illicit cocaine seized within the United States. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the process by which isotopes may be fractionated during illicit cocaine processing. In a controlled observational study, there was apparent isotopic fractionation of carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen, and oxygen. To investigate the potential source of the fractionation, cocaine base was fractionally precipitated from a dilute sulfuric acid solution with dilute ammonium hydroxide. The values of δ 13 C, δ 15 N, δ 2 H, and δ 18 O for each fraction were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). There was an equilibrium fractionation observed in all measured stable isotopes. Early fractions were depleted, and later fractions were enriched, with 15 N and 2 H being the most affected. The described trend is opposite of the Rayleigh distillation observed for cocaine hydrochloride precipitation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Diversity of sulfur isotope fractionations by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detmers, Jan; Brüchert, Volker; Habicht, K S

    2001-01-01

    .0 to 42.0 per thousand. Salinity, incubation temperature, pH, and phylogeny had no systematic effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation. There was no correlation between isotope fractionation and sulfate reduction rate. The type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase also had no effect on fractionation...... sulfate reducers and cover a broad range of natural marine and freshwater habitats. Experimental conditions were designed to achieve optimum growth conditions with respect to electron donors, salinity, temperature, and pH. Under these optimized conditions, experimental fractionation factors ranged from 2....... Sulfate reducers that oxidized the carbon source completely to CO2 showed greater fractionations than sulfate reducers that released acetate as the final product of carbon oxidation. Different metabolic pathways and variable regulation of sulfate transport across the cell membrane all potentially affect...

  18. Chromium Stable Isotope Fractionation - An Indicator of Hexavalent Chromium Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T. M.; Bullen, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in surface water and ground water, and is also of interest in oceanography. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions thus control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions, and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is the most important reaction controlling attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our results show that Cr(VI) reduction favors the lighter isotopes and leads to enrichment of heavier isotopes in the remaining Cr(VI). Cr isotope measurements thus show great promise as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction. We report here the first measurements of the magnitude of Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction and variations in δ 53Cr values obtained from three contaminated sites. Experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by suspensions of magnetite and unamended sediments from a local pond, Urbana, IL and San Francisco Estuary near Martinez, CA. Suspensions were incubated anaerobically with constant shaking, and complete Cr(VI) reduction occurred within a few days. Cr(VI) from intermediate time points in the experiments was purified via ion exchange and 53Cr/52Cr ratios were measured via TIMS with a double isotope spike. The instantaneous per mil fractionation, ɛ , was calculated assuming a Rayleigh fractionation model. The ɛ for Cr(VI) reduction on magnetite surfaces yielded a fractionation of -3.5 ‰ . The ɛ values for the pond and estuary sediments were -3.5 ‰ and -3.3 ‰ respectively. The size of this Cr isotope fractionation is encouraging, as current precision is 0.2 \\permil. δ 53Cr values in dissolved Cr(VI) from three contaminated sites range from 1.1 ‰ to 5.8 ‰ , suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred and has induced isotopic fractionation in these settings. δ 53Cr values measured from Cr(VI) in plating baths show little or no

  19. Assessing Mass-dependent Isotope Fractionation of Cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T.; Frei, R.; Rosing, M.

    2008-12-01

    Earth surface and ocean oxygenation is governed by a variety of processes and is recorded in the concentration-, speciation- and isotope-distribution of several redox sensitive elements in sediments throughout the history of earth. To quantify the redox state from a known distribution is complicated though, since the distribution often also is influenced by non-redox processes and other poorly constrained inputs. Hence a multi-proxy approach is required to constrain the oxidation history of earth. Here the REE (Rare Earth Elements) and yttrium patterns provide us with a valuable tool, as they both can be used as chemical fingerprint for seawater and also contain the redox sensitive element Cerium. In present days seawater Cerium is less abundant than its neighboring REE (negative cerium anomaly), since trivalent cerium is readily oxidized to the less soluble tetravalent cerium and subsequently scavenged by settling particles. The onset of a negative cerium anomaly can thus help to pinpoint, when the redox conditions of the oceans changed from reducing to oxidizing. In the present study we have developed a double spike technique to determine Cerium mass dependent isotope fractionation using a TIMS. The spike composition was chosen to minimize the propagated error in the data deconvolution and to reduce the sensitivity to barium interferences. For samples the barium interference was minimized by a oxidation-reduction of cerium on ln-resin. The Double-spike technique was compared to ICP-MS standard sample bracketing technique for pure cerium standard solutions, where the analytical precision of the δ142/140Ce was better than 0.01% (2SD). Also some oxidation, precipitation experiments at different pH have been performed in order to determine whether there is an isotopic fractionation associated with the oxidation. Preliminary results will be presented.

  20. Site-specific equilibrium isotopic fractionation of oxygen, carbon and calcium in apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufort, Julie; Ségalen, Loïc; Gervais, Christel; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Blanchard, Marc; Balan, Etienne

    2017-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of biogenic apatite is an important geochemical marker that can record environmental parameters and is widely used to infer past climates, biomineralization processes, dietary preferences and habitat of vertebrates. In this study, theoretical equilibrium isotopic fractionation of oxygen, carbon and calcium in hydroxyapatite and carbonate-bearing hydroxyapatite is investigated using first-principles methods based on density-functional theory and compared to the theoretical isotopic fractionation properties of calcite, CO2 and H2O. Considering the variability of apatite crystal-chemistry, special attention is given to specific contributions of crystal sites to isotopic fractionation. Significant internal fractionation is calculated for oxygen and carbon isotopes in CO3 between the different structural sites occupied by carbonate groups in apatite (typically 7‰ for both 18O/16O and 13C/12C fractionation at 37 °C). Compared with calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation, occurrence of A-type substitution in apatite structure, in addition to the main B-type substitution, could explain the larger temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionation measured at low temperature between carbonate in apatite and water. Theoretical internal fractionation of oxygen isotopes between carbonate and phosphate in B-type carbonated apatite (∼8‰ at 37 °C) is consistent with experimental values obtained from modern and well-preserved fossil bio-apatites. Concerning calcium, theoretical results suggest a small fractionation between apatite and calcite (-0.17‰ at 37 °C). Internal fractionation reaching 0.8‰ at 37 °C occurs between the two Ca sites in hydroxyapatite. Furthermore, the Ca isotopic fractionation properties of apatite are affected by the occurrence of carbonate groups, which could contribute to the variability observed on natural samples. Owing to the complexity of apatite crystal-chemistry and in light of the theoretical

  1. Diatom-induced silicon isotopic fractionation in Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, F.; Damien, C.; Jean-Louis, T.; Anthony, W.; Luc, A.

    2006-12-01

    We measured silicon-isotopic composition of dissolved silicon and biogenic silica collected by sequential melting from spring 2003 Antarctic pack ice (Australian sector). Sea ice is a key ecosystem in the Southern Ocean and its melting in spring has been often thought to have a seeding effect for the surface waters, triggering blooms in the mixed layer. This work is the first investigation of the silicon isotopes' proxy in sea ice and allows to estimate the activity of sea-ice diatoms in the different brine structures and the influence of sea- ice diatoms on the spring ice edge blooms. The relative use of the dissolved silicon pool by sea-ice diatoms is usually assessed by calculating nutrient:salinity ratios in the brines. However such an approach is biased by difficulties in evaluating the initial nutrient concentrations in the different brines structures, and by the impossibility to account for late sporadic nutrient replenishments. The silicon-isotopic composition of biogenic silica is a convenient alternative since it integrates an average Si utilization on all generations of diatoms. Measurements were performed on a MC-ICP-MS, in dry plasma mode using external Mg doping. Results are expressed as delta29Si relative to the NBS28 standard. From three sea ice cores with contrasted physico-chemical characteristics, we report significant isotopic fractionations linked to the diatoms activity, with distinct silicon biogeochemical dynamics between different brine structure. The diatoms in snow ice and in brine pockets of frazil or congelation ice have the most positive silicon-isotopic composition (+0.53 to +0.86 p.mil), indicating that they grow in a closed system and use a significant part of the small dissolved silicon pool. In the brine channels and skeletal layer, diatoms display a relatively less positive Si-isotopic composition (+0.41 to +0.70 p.mil), although it is still heavier compared to equilibrium fractionation (+0.38 p.mil). This suggests that they have

  2. Measurements of Volatile Circumstellar Isotopes: Effects of Fractionation vs. Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie

    The origin, evolution, and fate of our Universe and/or Galaxy have puzzled humankind for centuries. One approach to answering this question is to gain further understanding of stellar evolution, since stars are fundamental in galaxy development and evolution. A compilation of stellar composition can reveal the age, dynamics, and possibly the evolutionary state of a galaxy. In particular the volatile isotope ratios carry an imprint of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Primitive materials, such as meteorites and IDPs, have revealed a component of ``atypical" isotopic signatures of these fundamental elements denoting a possible stellar origin. Understanding the processes by which these elements derive is essential for astrophysics on cosmochemical, galactic, stellar, and planetary scales. We propose to analyze data obtained from the Herschel Space Observatory of circumstellar envelopes to definitively measure C, N, and O isotope ratios and test current models of photo-selective isotope fractionation vs. nucleosynthetically determined values. This proposal augments data from the Herschel Space Observatory, primarily from the HIFISTARS program and MESS, though the entire Herschel archive will be searched for relevant data. The broader implications for this study include fundamental data necessary for furthering our current understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis, circumstellar chemistry, Galactic chemical evolution, and the origin of presolar grains found in primitive materials. We will focus on isotopologues of species formed in thermochemical equilibrium and trace their natal, nucleosynthetic isotope ratios. We will analyze Herschel data obtained for a survey of evolved stars with varying degrees of nuclear processing, evolutionary states, and envelope chemistry (e.g. oxygen-rich vs. carbon-rich). A full circumstellar model will be developed for each source to address specific affects that may influence either the ratios or chemistry. The isotope ratios of 12C

  3. Oxygen isotope fractionation in phosphates: the role of dissolved complex anions in isotope exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation factors for phosphates were calculated by means of the increment method. The results suggest that Ag3PO4 and BiPO4 are enriched in (18)O relative to AgPO4, and the three phosphates are consistently depleted in (18)O relative to Ba3[PO4]2; fluorapatite and chlorapatite exhibit a similar behaviour of oxygen isotope fractionation with consistent enrichment of (18)O relative to hydroxyapatite. The valence, radii and coordination of metal cations play a quantitative role in dictating the (18)O/(16)O partitioning in these phosphates of different compositions. The calculated fractionation factors for the Ag3PO4-H2O system are in agreement with experimental determinations derived from enzyme-catalysed isotope exchange between dissolved inorganic phosphate and water at the longest reaction durations at low temperatures. This demonstrates that the precipitated Ag3PO4 has completely captured the oxygen isotope fractionation in the dissolved inorganic phosphate. The calculated fractionation factors for the F/Cl-apatite-water systems are in agreement with the enzyme-catalysed experimental fractionations for the dissolved phosphate-water system at the longest reaction durations but larger than fractionations derived from bacteria-facilitated exchange and inorganic precipitation experiments as well as natural observations. For the experimental calibrations of oxygen isotope fractionation involving the precipitation of dissolved phosphate species from aqueous solutions, the fractionation between precipitate and water is primarily dictated by the isotope equilibration between the dissolved complex anions and water prior to the precipitation. Therefore, the present results provide a quantitative means to interpret the temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionation in inorganic and biogenic phosphates.

  4. Carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation in scleractinian corals: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swart, P.K. (Miami Univ., FL (USA). Comparative Sedimentology Lab.)

    1983-01-01

    The present theories on the fractionation of stable isotopes in scleractinian corals are critically discussed in the light of data available on primary productivity, respiration and stable isotope chemistry. These data support a model of fractionation in which the carbon and oxygen isotopes are decoupled. Calcification occurs from a reservoir of carbon dioxide derived from both organic and inorganic sources. Photosynthesis preferentially fixes /sup 12/C and thereby leaves behind /sup 13/C. Increases in the rate of photosynthesis therefore also enrich the carbon isotope ratio of the skeleton. From theoretical considerations, photosynthesis has little effect on the oxygen isotope ratio of the skeleton, a fact confirmed by available data. The process of respiration adds depleted carbon and oxygen to the calcification reservoirs. The varying correlations between carbon and oxygen isotopes seen in hermatypic corals are caused by changes in the relationship between photosynthesis and respiration at different geographical localities. The isotopic compositions in the skeletons of non-zooxanthellate corals, which show a consistent positive correlation, can also be explained by the above scenario.

  5. Isotope Fractionation of Water During Evaporation Without Condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappa, Christopher D.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Smith, Jared D.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic events engendering liquid water evaporation have received much attention over the last century, but remain incompletely understood. We present measurements of isotope fractionation occurring during free molecular evaporation from liquid microjets and show that the isotope ratios of evaporating molecules exhibit dramatic differences from equilibrium vapor values, strong variations with the solution deuterium mole fraction, and a clear temperature dependence. These results indicate the existence of an energetic barrier to evaporation and that the evaporation coefficient of water is less than unity. These new insights into water evaporation promise to advance our understanding of the processes that control the formation and lifetime of clouds in the atmosphere.

  6. Cadmium isotope fractionation of materials derived from various industrial processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinková, Eva; Chrastný, Vladislav; Francová, Michaela; Šípková, Adéla; Čuřík, Jan; Myška, Oldřich; Mižič, Lukáš

    2016-01-25

    Our study represents ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values of materials resulting from anthropogenic activities such as coal burning, smelting, refining, metal coating, and the glass industry. Additionally, primary sources (ore samples, pigment, coal) processed in the industrial premises were studied. Two sphalerites, galena, coal and pigment samples exhibited ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 values of 1.0±0.2, 0.2±0.2, 1.3±0.1, -2.3±0.2 and -0.1±0.3, respectively. In general, all studied industrial processes were accompanied by Cd isotope fractionation. Most of the industrial materials studied were clearly distinguishable from the samples used as a primary source based on ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values. The heaviest ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 value of 58.6±0.9 was found for slag resulting from coal combustion, and the lightest ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 value of -23±2.5 was observed for waste material after Pb refinement. It is evident that ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values depend on technological processes, and in case of incomplete Cd transfer from source to final waste material, every industrial activity creates differences in Cd isotope composition. Our results show that Cd isotope analysis is a promising tool to track the origins of industrial waste products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium isotope fractionation in liquid chromatography with benzo-18-crown-6 resin in aqueous hydrobromic acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takuya; Oi, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography operated in a breakthrough mode was employed to study calcium isotope fractionation in the aqueous hydrobromic acid medium. Highly porous silica beads, the inner pores of which were embedded with a benzo-18-crown-6 ether resin, were used as column packing material. Enrichment of heavier isotopes of calcium was observed in the frontal part of respective calcium chromatograms. The values of the isotope fractionation coefficient were on the order of 10 -3 . The observed isotope fractionation coefficient was dependent on the concentration of hydrobromic acid in the calcium feed solution; a higher HBr concentration resulted in a smaller fractionation coefficient value. The present calcium isotope effects were most probably mass-dependent, indicating that they mostly came from isotope effects based on molecular vibration. Molecular orbital calculations supported the present experimental results in a qualitative fashion. Chromatography operated in aqueous HBr media is a better system of Ca isotope separation than that operated in aqueous HCl media. (author)

  8. Oxygen-isotope fractionation between marine biogenic silica and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheney, Ronald K.; Knauth, L. Paul

    1989-12-01

    A stepwise fluorination technique has been used to selectively react away the water component of hydrous silica in order to better investigate the oxygen-isotope fractionation between biogenic opal and seawater, and to determine whether all taxa produce opal which is suitable for oxygen isotope paleothermometry. δ 18O of the tetrahedrally coordinated silicate oxygen of siliceous sponge spicules grown at a wide variety of temperatures varies independently of temperature. δ 18O from an Eocene radiolarian ooze sample is much more enriched than would be expected from any reasonable isotopic temperature curve, given the probable growing temperature of the sample. δ 18O of diatom samples seems to vary systematically with temperature and to conform approximately to the isotopic temperature curve for diatom frustules obtained by Labeyrie and coworkers using an entirely different analytical technique. Sponges appear to precipitate silica in isotopic disequilibrium with seawater oxygen, and old radiolarian silica may exchange readily with cold oceanic bottom water. Neither will apparently be useful for paleo-climate reconstructions. Diatoms may be useful in deducing ancient surface-water temperatures, but the systematic variation of α with temperature for diatoms may not be related to the quartz-H 2O equilibrium isotope fractionation.

  9. Diet-consumer nitrogen isotope fractionation for prolonged fasting arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizota, Chitoshi; Yamanaka, Toshiro

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen acquisition for cellular metabolism during diapause is a primary concern for herbivorous arthropods. Analyses of naturally occurring stable isotopes of nitrogen help elucidate the mechanism. Relevant articles have cited (58 times up to mid-June 2011) anomalously elevated δ(15)N (per mil deviation of (15)N/(14)N, relative to atmospheric nitrogen=0 ‰) values (diet-consumer nitrogen isotope fractionation; up to 12 ‰) for a prolonged fasting raspberry beetle (Byturus tomentosus Degeer (Coleoptera: Byturidae)), which feeds on red raspberries (Rubus idaeus: δ(15)N= ~ +2 ‰). Biologists have hypothesised that extensive recycling of amino acid nitrogen is responsible for the prolonged fasting. Since this hypothesis was proposed in 1995, scientists have integrated biochemical and molecular knowledge to support the mechanism of prolonged diapausing of animals. To test the validity of the recycling hypothesis, we analysed tissue nitrogen isotope ratios for four Japanese arthropods: the shield bug Parastrachia japonensis Scott (Hemiptera: Cydnidae), the burrower bug Canthophorus niveimarginatus Scott (Hemiptera: Cydnidae), leaf beetle Gastrophysa atrocyanea Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and the Japanese oak silkworm Antheraea yamamai (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae), all of which fast for more than 6 months as part of their life-history strategy. Resulting diet-consumer nitrogen isotope discrimination during fasting ranged from 0 to 7‰, as in many commonly known terrestrial arthropods. We conclude that prolonged fasting of arthropods does not always result in anomalous diet-consumer nitrogen isotope fractionation, since the recycling process is closed or nearly closed with respect to nitrogen isotopes.

  10. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionation during reoxidative sulfur cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellerin, André; Bui, Thi Hao; Rough, Mikaella

    2015-01-01

    The multiple sulfur isotope composition of porewater sulfate from the anoxic marine sapropel of Mangrove Lake, Bermuda was measured in order to establish how multiple sulfur isotopes are fractionated during reoxidative sulfur cycling. The porewater-sulfate d34S and D33S dataset exhibits the disti......The multiple sulfur isotope composition of porewater sulfate from the anoxic marine sapropel of Mangrove Lake, Bermuda was measured in order to establish how multiple sulfur isotopes are fractionated during reoxidative sulfur cycling. The porewater-sulfate d34S and D33S dataset exhibits......, informed by the chemistry of sulfur intermediate compounds in Mangrove Lake, reveals that sulfate reduction produces a relatively small intrinsic fractionation and that an active reoxidative sulfur cycle increases the fractionation of the measured values. Based on the model results, the reoxidative cycle...... of Mangrove Lake appears to include sulfide oxidation to elemental sulfur followed by the disproportionation of the elemental sulfur to sulfate and sulfide. This model also indicates that the reoxidative sulfur cycle of Mangrove Lake turns over from 50 to 80% of the sulfide produced by microbial sulfate...

  11. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  12. Cadmium Isotope Fractionation in Cigarette Smoke and in the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.; Shafer, M. M.; Adams, S.

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium is a documented carcinogen, linked to several human cancers, including breast cancer, where its estrogenic properties are the suspected mode of action. An improved understanding of exposure pathways is critical to reducing the public health impacts of Cd exposure. Cigarette smoking is likely the major exposure vector for smokers, with dietary contributions also a major factor, however the specific apportionment of these sources, as well as possible occupational components has been difficult to characterize. We are exploring the use of cadmium stable isotope fractionation as a tool to help improve source attribution for this toxic environmental contaminant. The general lack of fractionation in the bulk silicate earth allows for Cd isotopes to act as an excellent tool for tracking anthropogenic sources of Cd as well as potential biochemical fractionation during incorporation into plant and animal food sources. Tobacco leaves are naturally enriched in Cd and cigarettes are a very efficient delivery mechanism for Cd to the body. Importantly, the combustion process provides a mechanism for further fractionation of Cd stable isotopes. Particulates in main stream and side stream cigarette smoke were collected onto quartz filters. The necessary mass of Cd (>50 ng) was collected by optimization of the mechanical smoking instrument to collect smoke aerosols from up to three cigarettes onto one filter, and thus also minimizing filter matrix biases. We modified existing geochemical methods for the isolation of the Cd fraction: the particulates were acid digested and the Cd fraction separated by passing through an anion exchange resin. The Cd fractions were analyzed by multicollector ICP-MS (Neptune Plus), and it was demonstrated that the main stream particulates are isotopically heavy and side stream particulates are light relative to NIST 3108, mass-difference-normalized: average δ112Cd/110Cd, δ112Cd/111Cd, δ114Cd/111Cd, and δ116Cd/112Cd values of 0.801, 1.58, 1

  13. Photochemistry on Pluto: part II HCN and nitrogen isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, Kathleen; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Hamel, Mark; Jessup, Kandis-Lea; Hue, Vincent; Kammer, Josh; Filwett, Rachael

    2017-11-01

    We have converted our Titan one-dimensional photochemical model to simulate the photochemistry of Pluto's atmosphere and include condensation and aerosol trapping in the model. We find that condensation and aerosol trapping are important processes in producing the HCN altitude profile observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The nitrogen isotope chemistry in Pluto's atmosphere does not appear to significantly fractionate the isotope ratio between N2 and HCN as occurs at Titan. However, our simulations only cover a brief period of time in a Pluto year, and thus only a brief portion of the solar forcing conditions that Pluto's atmosphere experiences. More work is needed to evaluate photochemical fractionation over a Pluto year. Condensation and aerosol trapping appear to have a major impact on the altitude profile of the isotope ratio in HCN. Since ALMA did not detect HC15N in Pluto's atmosphere, we conclude that condensation and aerosol trapping must be much more efficient for HC15N compared to HC14N. The large uncertainty in photochemical fractionation makes it difficult to use any potential current measurement of 14N/15N in N2 to determine the origin of Pluto's nitrogen. More work is needed to understand photochemical fractionation and to evaluate how condensation, sublimation and aerosol trapping will fractionate N2 and HCN.

  14. Assessing kinetic fractionation in brachiopod calcite using clumped isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Bajnai, David; Fiebig, Jens; Tomašových, Adam; Milner Garcia, Sara; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Raddatz, Jacek; Löffler, Niklas; Primo-Ramos, Cristina; Brand, Uwe

    2018-01-01

    Brachiopod shells are the most widely used geological archive for the reconstruction of the temperature and the oxygen isotope composition of Phanerozoic seawater. However, it is not conclusive whether brachiopods precipitate their shells in thermodynamic equilibrium. In this study, we investigated the potential impact of kinetic controls on the isotope composition of modern brachiopods by measuring the oxygen and clumped isotope compositions of their shells. Our results show that clumped and...

  15. Monitoring biodegradation of hydrocarbons by stable isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorer, Conrad; Fischer, Anko; Herrmann, Steffi; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade, several studies have demonstrated that stable isotope tools are highly applicable for monitoring anaerobic biodegradation processes. An important methodological approach is to characterize distinct degradation pathways with respect to the specific mechanism of C-H-bond cleavage and to quantify the extent of biodegradation by compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA). Here, enrichment factors (ɛbulk) needed for a CSIA field site approach must be determined in laboratory reference experiments. Recent research results from different laboratories have shown that single ɛbulk values for similar degradation pathways can be highly variable; thus, the use of two-dimensional compound specific isotope analysis (2D-CSIA) has been encouraged for characterizing biodegradation pathways more precisely. 2D-CSIA for hydrocarbons can be expressed by the slope of the linear regression for hydrogen versus carbon discrimination known as lambda ≈ ɛHbulk/ɛCbulk. We determined the carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation for the biodegradation of benzene, toluene and xylenes by various reference cultures. Specific enzymatic reactions initiating different biodegradation pathways could be distinguished by 2D-CSIA. For the aerobic di- and monohydroxylation of the benzene ring, lambda values always lower than 9 were observed. Enrichment cultures degrading benzene anaerobically produced significant different values: lambda values between 8-19 were oberved for nitrate-reducing consortia, whereas sulfate-reducing and methanogenic consortia showed always lambda values greater than 20 [1,2]. The observed variations suggest that (i) aerobic benzene biodegradation can be distinguished from anaerobic biodegradation, and (ii) that more than a single mechanism seems to exist for the activation of benzene under anoxic conditions. lambda values for anaerobic toluene degradation initiated by the enzyme benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS) ranged from 4 to 41, tested with strains using

  16. Silicon isotopic fractionation in marine sponges: A new model for understanding silicon isotopic variations in sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Martin; Sutton, Jill; Ellwood, Michael J.; Sambridge, Malcolm; Maher, William; Eggins, Stephen; Kelly, Michelle

    2010-04-01

    The silicon (Si) isotope ( δ30Si) composition of deep-sea sponges from near Antarctica, subantarctic waters (Tasmania Seamounts) and subtropical waters north of New Zealand vary widely between + 0.87‰ and - 3.40‰ (vs. NBS28). Depth profiles show that sponge δ30Si compositions trend to lower values with increasing depth. This is exemplified by sponges from the Tasmania Seamounts where δ30Si varies from + 0.87‰ to - 3.13‰ over a depth range from 100 m to 1200 m. These changes in δ30Si of sponges are inconsistent with a Rayleigh type isotope fractionation model requiring constant δ30Si fractionation between sponge and seawater. We conclude that overall Si isotope fractionation Δ30Si ( δ30Si sponge - δ30Si seawater) is influenced by seawater Si concentration, with more fractionated (lower) isotope values being associated with sponges collected from waters high in Si. We invoke and fit a model whereby the Δ30Si fractionation varies as a function Si influx and efflux. Using this model it appears that Δ30Si fractionation during transport into the sponge is constant at - 1.34‰. The model also shows asymptotic behaviour with Δ30Si trending towards a maximum of - 6.02‰ at very high Si concentrations. These results suggest that the δ30Si composition of fossil spicules may be useful for reconstruction paleo-Si concentrations during the past.

  17. Iron and zinc isotope fractionation during uptake and translocation in rice (Oryza sativa) grown in oxic and anoxic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Tim; Markovic, Tamara; Kirk, Guy J. D.; Schönbächler, Maria; Rehkämper, Mark; Zhao, Fangjie J.; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2015-11-01

    Stable isotope fractionation is emerging quickly as a powerful novel technique to study metal uptake and translocation in plants. Fundamental to this development is a thorough understanding of the processes that lead to isotope fractionation under differing environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated Zn and Fe isotope fractionation in rice grown to maturity in anaerobic and aerobic soils under greenhouse conditions. The overall Zn isotope fractionation between the soil and above ground plant material was negligible in aerobic soil but significant in anaerobic soil with isotopically lighter Zn in the rice plant. The observed range of fractionation is in line with previously determined fractionations of Zn in rice grown in hydroponic solutions and submerged soils and emphasizes the effect of taking up different chemical forms of Zn, most likely free and organically complexed Zn. The Zn in the grain was isotopically lighter than in the rest of the above ground plant in rice grown in aerobic and anaerobic soils alike. This suggests that in the course of the grain loading and during the translocation within the plant important biochemical and/or biophysical processes occur. The isotope fractionation observed in the grains would be consistent with an unidirectional controlled transport from shoot to grain with a fractionation factor of α ≈ 0.9994. Iron isotopes showed an isotopic lighter signature in shoot and grain compared to the bulk soil or the leachate in aerobic and anaerobic soils alike. The negative direction of isotopic fractionation is consistent with possible changes in the redox state of Fe occurring during the uptake and translocation processes. The isotope fractionation pattern between shoots and grain material are different for Zn and Fe which finally suggests that different mechanisms operate during translocation and grain-loading in rice for these two key micronutrients.

  18. Zn isotopic fractionation caused by sorption on goethite and 2-Lines ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillot, F.; Maréchal, C.; Ponthieu, M.; Cacaly, S.; Morin, G.; Benedetti, M.; Hazemann, J. L.; Proux, O.; Guyot, F.

    2008-10-01

    Zn isotopic fractionation caused by sorption on 2-Lines ferrihydrite (Fh2L) and goethite was investigated to assess the role of reactions at the Fe-oxyhydroxide/water interface in changes of the isotopic distribution of Zn. Since sorption reactions are ubiquitous in Earth's surface environments, it is important to evaluate their influence on the isotopic distribution of Zn before it can be used to track and quantify contributions of various sources and/or biogeochemical processes involving this element. Our results show that Zn isotopes are fractionated upon sorption on Fe-oxyhydroxides with an enrichment of the heavy isotopes present on the solid's surface. This fractionation appears to proceed through an equilibrium mechanism and yields different (Δ 66/64Zn) sorbed-aqueous values for Zn sorption on goethite [(Δ 66/64Zn) sorbed-aqueous around +0.29‰] and Fh2L [(Δ 66/64Zn) sorbed-aqueous around +0.53‰]. These different magnitudes of Zn fractionation are related to structural differences between Zn complexes existing on the surface of goethite (octahedrally coordinated Zn by oxygen atoms) and Fh2L (tetrahedrally coordinated Zn by oxygen atoms), as evidenced by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and CD-MUSIC modeling. These results show the importance of accounting for reactions at the Fe-oxyhydroxide/water interface when dealing with the isotopic distribution of Zn at the Earth's surface. Considering the large range of other possible sorbents (Mn or Al oxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, biologic surfaces, etc.) and the importance of reactions at sorbent/water interfaces for other non-traditional stable isotopes (i.e. Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu) that are increasingly used in environmental studies, these results emphasize the need for further experimental studies that are needed to quantify the isotopic fractionation of these elements possibly accompanying their sorption.

  19. Iron isotope fractionation during pyrite formation in a sulfidic Precambrian ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, John M.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Middag, Rob; Gault-Ringold, Melanie; George, Ejin; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.

    2018-04-01

    The chemical response of the Precambrian oceans to rising atmospheric O2 levels remains controversial. The iron isotope signature of sedimentary pyrite is widely used to trace the microbial and redox states of the ocean, yet the iron isotope fractionation accompanying pyrite formation in nature is difficult to constrain due to the complexity of the pyrite formation process, difficulties in translating the iron isotope systematics of experimental studies to natural settings, and insufficient iron isotope datasets for natural euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic) marine basins where pyrite formation occurs. Herein we demonstrate, that a large, permil-level shift in the isotope composition of dissolved iron occurs in the Black Sea euxinic water column during syngenetic pyrite formation. Specifically, iron removal to syngenetic pyrite gives rise to an iron isotope fractionation factor between Fe(II) and FeS2 of 2.75 permil (‰), the largest yet reported for reactions under natural conditions that do not involve iron redox chemistry. These iron isotope systematics offer the potential to generate permil-level shifts in the sedimentary pyrite iron isotope record due to partial drawdown of the oceanic iron inventory. The implication is that the iron stable isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrites may record fundamental regime shifts between pyrite formation under sulfur-limited conditions and pyrite formation under iron-limited conditions. To this end, the iron isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrite may best represent the extent of euxinia in the past global ocean, rather than its oxygenation state. On this basis, the reinterpreted sedimentary pyrite Fe isotope record suggests a fundamental shift towards more sulfidic oceanic conditions coincident with the 'Great Oxidation Event' around 2.3 billion years ago. Importantly, this does not require the chemical state of the ocean to shift from mainly de-oxygenated to predominantly oxygenated in parallel with the permanent rise

  20. Calcium isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low-temperature geochemistry, biology and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Moynier; Toshiyuki Fujii

    2017-01-01

    Stable Ca isotopes are fractionated between bones, urine and blood of animals and between soils, roots and leaves of plants by >1000?ppm for the 44Ca/40Ca ratio. These isotopic variations have important implications to understand Ca transport and fluxes in living organisms; however, the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation are unclear. Here we present ab initio calculations for the isotopic fractionation between various aqueous species of Ca and show that this fractionation can be up to 3000?...

  1. Molecular controls on Cu and Zn isotopic fractionation in Fe-Mn crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, S. H.; Sherman, D. M.; Vance, D.; Hein, J. R.

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic systems of the transition metals are increasingly being developed as oceanic tracers, due to their tendency to be fractionated by biological and/or redox-related processes. However, for many of these promising isotope systems the molecular level controls on their isotopic fractionations are only just beginning to be explored. Here we investigate the relative roles of abiotic and biotic fractionation processes in controlling modern seawater Cu and Zn isotopic compositions. Scavenging to Fe-Mn oxides represents the principal output for Cu and Zn to sediments deposited under normal marine (oxic) conditions. Using Fe-Mn crusts as an analogue for these dispersed phases, we investigate the phase association and crystal chemistry of Cu and Zn in such sediments. We present the results of an EXAFS study that demonstrate unequivocally that Cu and Zn are predominantly associated with the birnessite (δ-MnO2) phase in Fe-Mn crusts, as previously predicted from sequential leaching experiments (e.g., Koschinsky and Hein, 2003). The crystal chemistry of Cu and Zn in the crusts implies a reduction in coordination number in the sorbed phase relative to the free metal ion in seawater. Thus, theory would predict equilibrium fractionations that enrich the heavy isotope in the sorbed phase (e.g., Schauble, 2004). In natural samples, Fe-Mn crusts and nodules are indeed isotopically heavy in Zn isotopes (at ∼1‰) compared to deep seawater (at ∼0.5‰), consistent with the predicted direction of equilibrium isotopic fractionation based on our observations of the coordination environment of sorbed Zn. Further, ∼50% of inorganic Zn‧ is chloro-complexed (the other ∼50% is present as the free Zn2+ ion), and complexation by Cl- is also predicted to favour equilibrium partitioning of light Zn isotopes into the dissolved phase. The heavy Zn isotopic composition of Fe-Mn crusts and nodules relative to seawater can therefore be explained by an inorganic fractionation during

  2. Validation of a simple isotope method for estimating true calcium fractional absorption in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W; McCabe, G P; Martin, B R; Weaver, C M

    2011-01-01

    We validated a single oral isotope method for estimating fractional calcium absorption determined by double isotope methods in adolescents. Developed equations with an oral isotope including a single blood draw or spot urine collection can be used to evaluate fractional calcium absorption in adolescents which allows flexibility in developing protocols. This study was designed to develop and validate a simpler, less expensive single oral isotope method for determining fractional calcium (Ca) absorption in adolescents. We used our database of 31 observations from ten white and 12 black adolescent girls aged 10-15 years who participated in metabolic and kinetic studies. Tracer data following oral ((44)Ca) and intravenous (IV, (42)Ca) administration of calcium stable isotopes and samples in serum and urine from various time points up to 4 days were used to develop methods using multiple regression analysis based on a single measurement of enriched stable isotope/tracee defined as tracer/tracee (TT) in serum (TT(serum)) or urine (TT(urine)). Reference values for fractional calcium absorption were from oral/IV stable isotope ratios in 24-h serum or urine and full kinetic modeling. The strongest equation using a single blood sample had R (2) = 0.94 (p single urine sample had R (2) = 0.95 (p single blood draw or urine collection for determining fractional calcium absorption were successfully validated in healthy, non-obese white and black adolescent girls aged 10-15 years. The equations well-predicted fractional calcium absorption in Asian adolescent boys and girls.

  3. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of quinoline and 3-methylquinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mingchao; Zhang, Wenbing; Fang, Jun; Liang, Qianqiong; Liu, Dongxuan

    2017-08-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has been used extensively to investigate the biodegradation of various organic pollutants. To date, little isotope fractionation information is available for the biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. In this study, we report on the carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during quinoline and 3-methylquinoline aerobic microbial degradation by a Comamonas sp. strain Q10. Degradation of quinoline and 3-methylquinoline was accompanied by isotope fractionation. Large hydrogen and small carbon isotope fractionation was observed for quinoline while minor carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation effects occurred for 3-methylquinoline. Bulk carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors (ε bulk ) for quinoline biodegradation were -1.2 ± 0.1 and -38 ± 1‰, respectively, while -0.7 ± 0.1 and -5 ± 1‰ for 3-methylquinoline, respectively. This reveals a potential advantage for employing quinoline as the model compound and hydrogen isotope analysis for assessing aerobic biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. The apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIE C ) values of carbon were 1.008 ± 0.0005 for quinoline and 1.0048 ± 0.0005 for 3-methylquinoline while AKIE H values of hydrogen of 1.264 ± 0.011 for quinoline and 1.0356 ± 0.0103 for 3-methylquinoline were obtained. The combined evaluation of carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation yields Λ values (Λ = Δδ 2 H/Δδ 13 C ≈ εH bulk /εC bulk ) of 29 ± 2 for quinoline and 8 ± 2 for 3-methylquinoline. The results indicate that the substrate specificity may have a significant influence on the isotope fractionation for the biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. The substrate-specific isotope enrichment factors would be important for assessing the behavior and fate of quinolinic compounds in the environment.

  4. Mg isotope systematics during magmatic processes: Inter-mineral fractionation in mafic to ultramafic Hawaiian xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracke, A.; Tipper, E. T.; Klemme, S.; Bizimis, M.

    2018-04-01

    Observed differences in Mg isotope ratios between bulk magmatic rocks are small, often on a sub per mill level. Inter-mineral differences in the 26Mg/24Mg ratio (expressed as δ26Mg) in plutonic rocks are on a similar scale, and have mostly been attributed to equilibrium isotope fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Here we report Mg isotope data on minerals in spinel peridotite and garnet pyroxenite xenoliths from the rejuvenated stage of volcanism on Oahu and Kauai, Hawaii. The new data are compared to literature data and to theoretical predictions to investigate the processes responsible for inter-mineral Mg isotope fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Theory predicts up to per mill level differences in δ26Mg between olivine and spinel at magmatic temperatures and a general decrease in Δ26Mgolivine-spinel (=δ26Mgolivine - δ26Mgspinel) with increasing temperature, but also with increasing Cr# in spinel. For peridotites with a simple petrogenetic history by melt depletion, where increasing depletion relates to increasing melting temperatures, Δ26Mgolivine-spinel should thus systematically decrease with increasing Cr# in spinel. However, most natural peridotites, including the Hawaiian spinel peridotites investigated in this study, are overprinted by variable extents of melt-rock reaction, which disturb the systematic primary temperature and compositionally related olivine-spinel Mg isotope systematics. Diffusion, subsolidus re-equilibration, or surface alteration may further affect the observed olivine-spinel Mg isotope fractionation in peridotites, making Δ26Mgolivine-spinel in peridotites a difficult-to-apply geothermometer. The available Mg isotope data on clinopyroxene and garnet suggest that this mineral pair is a more promising geothermometer, but its application is restricted to garnet-bearing igneous (garnet pyroxenites) and metamorphic rocks (eclogites). Although the observed δ26Mg variation is on a sub per mill range in bulk magmatic rocks

  5. Isotope-geochemical studies on fractions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for determining the origin and evolution of DOC for purposes of groundwater dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, S.

    1994-01-01

    The laboratory work consisted in developing and testing methods of extraction and enrichment of individual high-purity DOC fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and low-molecular substances) with the aim of preparing large quantities of groundwaters (> 1000 l) with low DOC concentrations so as to obtain sufficient sampling material. Chemical characterisation of DOC consisted in an analysis of humic and fulvic acids with regard to element composition (C, H, N, O, S) and inorganic trace elements. Isotopic characterization of the DOC fractions consisted in determining 14 C, 13 C, and 2 H levels. For the first time δ 34 S and δ 15 N relations in humic and fulvic acids dissolved in groundwater were determined. (orig./DG) [de

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of water isotope fractionation during ice crystal growth in clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guoping; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for simulating water isotope fractionation during diffusion-limited ice crystal growth by vapor deposition from water-oversaturated air. These conditions apply to the growth of snow crystals in clouds where the vapor composition is controlled by the presence of both ice crystals and water droplets. Modeling of water condensation with the LB method has the advantage of allowing concentration fields to evolve based on local conditions so that the controls on grain shapes of the condensed phase can be studied simultaneously with the controls on isotopic composition and growth rate. Water isotope fractionation during snow crystal growth involves kinetic effects due to diffusion of water vapor in air, which requires careful consideration of the boundary conditions at the ice-vapor interface. The boundary condition is relatively simple for water isotopes because the molecular exchange rate for water at the interface is large compared to the crystal growth rate. Our results for the bulk crystal isotopic composition are consistent with simpler models using analytical solutions for radial geometry. However, the model results are sufficiently different for oxygen isotopes that they could affect the interpretation of D-excess values of snow and ice. The extent of vapor oversaturation plays a major role in determining the water isotope fractionation as well as the degree of dendritic growth. Departures from isotopic equilibrium increase at colder temperatures as diffusivity decreases. Dendritic crystals are isotopically heterogeneous. Isotopic variations within individual snow crystals could yield information on the microphysics of ice condensation as well as on the accommodation or sticking coefficient of water associated with vapor deposition. Our results are ultimately a first step in implementing LB models for kinetically controlled condensation or precipitation reactions, but needs to be extended also to cases where the

  7. Iron isotopic fractionation between silicate mantle and metallic core at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Dauphas, Nicolas; Roskosz, Mathieu; Hu, Michael Y.; Yang, Hong; Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.; Hu, Justin Y.; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2017-02-01

    The +0.1‰ elevated 56Fe/54Fe ratio of terrestrial basalts relative to chondrites was proposed to be a fingerprint of core-mantle segregation. However, the extent of iron isotopic fractionation between molten metal and silicate under high pressure-temperature conditions is poorly known. Here we show that iron forms chemical bonds of similar strengths in basaltic glasses and iron-rich alloys, even at high pressure. From the measured mean force constants of iron bonds, we calculate an equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between silicate and iron under core formation conditions in Earth of ~0-0.02‰, which is small relative to the +0.1‰ shift of terrestrial basalts. This result is unaffected by small amounts of nickel and candidate core-forming light elements, as the isotopic shifts associated with such alloying are small. This study suggests that the variability in iron isotopic composition in planetary objects cannot be due to core formation.

  8. Tellurium stable isotope fractionation in chondritic meteorites and some terrestrial samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Manuela A.; Hammond, Samantha J.; Parkinson, Ian J.

    2018-02-01

    provide a record of the nebular formation environment. The Te stable isotope fractionation of the carbonaceous chondrites CI and CM (and CO potentially) overlap within uncertainty with data for terrestrial Te standard solutions, sediments and ore samples. Assuming the silicate Earth displays similar Te isotope fractionation as the studied terrestrial samples, the data indicate that the late veneer might have been delivered by material similar to CI or CM (or possibly) CO carbonaceous chondrites in terms of Te isotope composition. Nine terrestrial samples display resolvable Te stable isotope fractionation of 0.85 and 0.60‰ for δ130/125Te for sediment and USGS geochemical exploration reference samples, respectively. Tellurium isotopes therefore have the potential to become a new geochemical sedimentary proxy, as well as a proxy for ore-exploration.

  9. Molybdenum isotope fractionation and speciation in a euxinic lake—Testing ways to discern isotope fractionation processes in a sulfidic setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Tais W.; Wirth, Stefanie B.

    2017-06-01

    The molybdenum (Mo) isotope composition in euxinic shales has been used as a proxy for the global distribution of anoxic conditions in ancient oceans, and since more recently also as a proxy for sulfide concentrations in depositional environments. However, there is currently no way to distinguish isotope fractionation at low bottom water sulfide concentrations in ‘local’ basins from ‘global’ secular isotope variations associated with changing seawater composition. This uncertainty is challenging the use of Mo isotopes for paleoceanographic reconstructions. To explore this further, we present new data from sediments deposited over the past ~ 9800 years in one of the best studied euxinic localities in the world: Lake Cadagno in Switzerland. The sample set allows us to test ways to discern isotope fractionation processes at play in a highly restricted euxinic basin. Most of our drill core samples (n = 18) show high δ98Mo values similar to previously studied shallow sediments, indicative of quantitative Mo removal from the water column (Dahl et al. 2010a). However, a few samples (n = 3) deposited between about 1200 and 3400 years ago carry low δ98Mo values and have been isotopically fractionated in the lake. Sedimentological and geochemical characterizations show that these δ98Mo-fractionated sediments formed during times of frequent injection of O2- and sediment-rich river water into the deep sulfidic water column. A positive correlation between δ98Mo and sedimentary Mo contents suggests that isotope fractionation occurred during times of non-quantitative Mo removal, although Mn-oxide cycling at the chemocline might also contribute a subordinate proportion of (98Mo-depleted) molybdenum into the sulfidic zone. Sedimentary Mo/U enrichments relative to oxic lake water further supports the hypothesis that a particulate Mo shuttle was most efficient during times of quantitative Mo removal. Therefore, periods with inefficient Mo capture are ascribed to

  10. Theoretical isotopic fractionation between structural boron in carbonates and aqueous boric acid and borate ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Etienne; Noireaux, Johanna; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Montouillout, Valérie; Blanchard, Marc; Pietrucci, Fabio; Gervais, Christel; Rustad, James R.; Schott, Jacques; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2018-02-01

    The 11B/10B ratio in calcite and aragonite is an important proxy of oceanic water pH. However, the physico-chemical mechanisms underpinning this approach are still poorly known. In the present study, we theoretically determine the equilibrium isotopic fractionation properties of structural boron species in calcium carbonates, BO33-, BO2(OH)2- and B(OH)4- anions substituted for carbonate groups, as well as those of B(OH)4- and B(OH)3 species in vacuum. Significant variability of equilibrium isotopic fractionation properties is observed among these structural species which is related to their contrasted coordination state, Bsbnd O bond lengths and atomic-scale environment. The isotopic composition of structural boron does not only depend on its coordination number but also on its medium range environment, i.e. farther than its first coordination shell. The isotopic fractionation between aqueous species and their counterparts in vacuum are assessed using previous investigations based on similar quantum-mechanical modeling approaches. At 300 K, the equilibrium isotope composition of structural trigonal species is 7-15‰ lighter than that of aqueous boric acid molecules, whereas substituted tetrahedral borate ions are heavier than their aqueous counterparts by 10-13‰. Although significant uncertainties are known to affect the theoretical prediction of fractionation factors between solids and solutions, the usually assumed lack of isotopic fractionation during borate incorporation in carbonates is challenged by these theoretical results. The present theoretical equilibrium fractionation factors between structural boron and aqueous species differ from those inferred from experiments which may indicate that isotopic equilibrium, unlike chemical equilibrium, was not reached in most experiments. Further research into the isotopic fractionation processes at the interface between calcium carbonates and aqueous solution as well as long duration experiments aimed at

  11. Pressure-dependent boron isotopic fractionation observed by column chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musashi, M.; Oi, T.; Matsuo, M.; Nomura, M.

    2007-12-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation factor ( S ) between boron taken up in strongly basic anion exchange resin and boron in aqueous solution was determined by breakthrough column chromatography at 5 and 17 MPa at 25°C, using 0.1 mmol/L boric acid solution as feed solution. The S values obtained were 1.018 and 1.012, respectively, which were smaller than the value reported by using the same chromatographic method at atmospheric pressure at 25°C with the boron concentration of 10 mmol/L, but were larger than the values at the same condition with much higher concentration of 100 and 501 mmol/L, indicating that borate-polymerization reducing the isotopic fractionation was negligible. However, calculations based on the theory of isotope distribution between two phases estimated that 21% (5MPa) and 47% (17MPa) of boron taken up in the resin phase was in the three-coordinated B(OH)3-form, instead of in the four-coordinated B(OH)4--form, at high pressures even with the very diluted solution. We discussed this discrepancy by introducing (1) hydration or (2) a partial molar volume difference between isotopic molecules. It was inferred that borate ions were partially dehydrated upon transfer from the solution phase to the resin phase at high pressures, which resulted in smaller S values compared with those at the atmospheric pressure. Alternatively, it was likely that the S value decreased with increasing pressure, because the difference of the partial isotopic molar volumes between 10B(OH)3 and 11B(OH)3 was larger than that between 10B(OH)4- and 11B(OH)4-. If either will be the case, the influence of a pressure upon the isotope effect may not be negligible for boron isotopic exchange equilibrium. This knowledge is crucial for the principle of the boron isotopic pH-metry reconstructing a chemical variation at the paleo-deep oceanic environment where the early life may have been evolved.

  12. Reporting and measurement of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, B. A.; Blum, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Hg isotope analysis by MC-ICP-MS is an important new approach for fingerprinting Hg sources and monitoring Hg redox reactions and bioaccumulation, especially with the recent discovery of mass independent Hg isotope fractionation. Unfortunately research groups have adopted different standards, definitions of delta values, and methods of isotopic measurement. We suggest that a single standard, NIST SRM 3133, be adopted for reporting the isotopic variability of Hg isotopes. Isotope ratios should be determined by sample-standard bracketing (SSB) during analysis and reported as permil (‰) deviation from SRM 3133. For the highest precision and accuracy, a Tl internal standard along with SSB should be used to correct instrumental mass bias. Measurement routines should also include on-peak zero corrections and matching of concentration and matrix between the samples and bracketing standard. For samples that display mass-dependent fractionation (MDF), only one delta value needs to be reported (δ202/198Hg). Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) (Jackson et al., 2006; Bergquist et al., 2006; Bergquist and Blum, submitted) requires additional nomenclature, and we suggest reporting MIF as the deviation in isotope ratios from the theoretical mass dependent kinetic isotope fractionation (Δxxx/198Hg)¬. External reproducibility should be monitored by analysis of secondary standards. For studies of MDF, we use an in-house secondary standard solution made from metallic Hg mined from Almaden Spain and obtain a δ202Hg of -0.55 ±0.06‰ (2SD). For studies of MIF, we use NRCC CRM DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and obtain a mean value of δ202Hg of +0.19 ±0.13‰ (2SD), Δ201Hg of +0.89 ±0.07‰ (2SD) , and Δ199Hg of +1.07 ±0.08‰ (2SD).

  13. Reliability of stable Pb isotopes to identify Pb sources and verifying biological fractionation of Pb isotopes in goats and chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hokuto; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Yabe, John; Liazambi, Allan; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Darwish, Wageh Sobhy; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Stable Pb isotope ratios (Pb-IRs) have been recognized as an efficient tool for identifying sources. This study carried out at Kabwe mining area, Zambia, to elucidate the presence or absence of Pb isotope fractionation in goat and chicken, to evaluate the reliability of identifying Pb pollution sources via analysis of Pb-IRs, and to assess whether a threshold for blood Pb levels (Pb-B) for biological fractionation was present. The variation of Pb-IRs in goat decreased with an increase in Pb-B and were fixed at certain values close to those of the dominant source of Pb exposure at Pb-B > 5 μg/dL. However, chickens did not show a clear relationship for Pb-IRs against Pb-B, or a fractionation threshold. Given these, the biological fractionation of Pb isotopes should not occur in chickens but in goats, and the threshold for triggering biological fractionation is at around 5 μg/dL of Pb-B in goats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Large sulfur isotope fractionations in Martian sediments at Gale crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Freissinet, C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eldridge, D. L.; Fischer, W. W.; Grotzinger, J. P.; House, C. H.; Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Vaniman, D. T.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Dottin, J. W., III; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Farley, K. A.; Glavin, D. P.; Johnson, S. S.; Knudson, C. A.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-González, R.; Pavlov, A. A.; Plummer, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Stern, J. C.; Steele, A.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.

    2017-09-01

    Variability in the sulfur isotopic composition in sediments can reflect atmospheric, geologic and biological processes. Evidence for ancient fluvio-lacustrine environments at Gale crater on Mars and a lack of efficient crustal recycling mechanisms on the planet suggests a surface environment that was once warm enough to allow the presence of liquid water, at least for discrete periods of time, and implies a greenhouse effect that may have been influenced by sulfur-bearing volcanic gases. Here we report in situ analyses of the sulfur isotopic compositions of SO2 volatilized from ten sediment samples acquired by NASA’s Curiosity rover along a 13 km traverse of Gale crater. We find large variations in sulfur isotopic composition that exceed those measured for Martian meteorites and show both depletion and enrichment in 34S. Measured values of δ34S range from -47 +/- 14‰ to 28 +/- 7‰, similar to the range typical of terrestrial environments. Although limited geochronological constraints on the stratigraphy traversed by Curiosity are available, we propose that the observed sulfur isotopic signatures at Gale crater can be explained by equilibrium fractionation between sulfate and sulfide in an impact-driven hydrothermal system and atmospheric processing of sulfur-bearing gases during transient warm periods.

  15. Aphids alter host-plant nitrogen isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alex C. C.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.; Hurley, Katherine B.

    2011-01-01

    Plant sap-feeding insects and blood-feeding parasites are frequently depleted in 15N relative to their diet. Unfortunately, most fluid-feeder/host nitrogen stable-isotope studies simply report stable-isotope signatures, but few attempt to elucidate the mechanism of isotopic trophic depletion. Here we address this deficit by investigating the nitrogen stable-isotope dynamics of a fluid-feeding herbivore-host plant system: the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, feeding on multiple brassicaceous host plants. M. persicae was consistently more than 6‰ depleted in 15N relative to their hosts, although aphid colonized plants were 1.5‰ to 2.0‰ enriched in 15N relative to uncolonized control plants. Isotopic depletion of aphids relative to hosts was strongly related to host nitrogen content. We tested whether the concomitant aphid 15N depletion and host 15N enrichment was coupled by isotopic mass balance and determined that aphid 15N depletion and host 15N enrichment are uncoupled processes. We hypothesized that colonized plants would have higher nitrate reductase activity than uncolonized plants because previous studies had demonstrated that high nitrate reductase activity under substrate-limiting conditions can result in increased plant δ15N values. Consistent with our hypothesis, nitrate reductase activity in colonized plants was twice that of uncolonized plants. This study offers two important insights that are likely applicable to understanding nitrogen dynamics in fluid-feeder/host systems. First, isotopic separation of aphid and host depends on nitrogen availability. Second, aphid colonization alters host nitrogen metabolism and subsequently host nitrogen stable-isotope signature. Notably, this work establishes a metabolic framework for future hypothesis-driven studies focused on aphid manipulation of host nitrogen metabolism. PMID:21646532

  16. Iron isotope fractionation and the oxygen fugacity of the mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Helen M; McCammon, Catherine A; Peslier, Anne H; Halliday, Alex N; Teutsch, Nadya; Levasseur, Sylvain; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2004-06-11

    The oxygen fugacity of the mantle exerts a fundamental influence on mantle melting, volatile speciation, and the development of the atmosphere. However, its evolution through time is poorly understood. Changes in mantle oxidation state should be reflected in the Fe3+/Fe2+ of mantle minerals, and hence in stable iron isotope fractionation. Here it is shown that there are substantial (1.7 per mil) systematic variations in the iron isotope compositions (delta57/54Fe) of mantle spinels. Spinel delta57/54Fe values correlate with relative oxygen fugacity, Fe3+/sigmaFe, and chromium number, and provide a proxy of changes in mantle oxidation state, melting, and volatile recycling.

  17. Isotope Fractionation by Diffusion in Liquids (Final Technical Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Frank [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-11-09

    The overall objective of the DOE-funded research by grant DE-FG02-01ER15254 was document and quantify kinetic isotope fractionations during chemical and thermal (i.e., Soret) diffusion in liquids (silicate melts and water) and in the later years to include alloys and major minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. The research involved both laboratory experiments and applications to natural settings. The key idea is that major element zoning on natural geologic materials is common and can arise for either changes in melt composition during cooling and crystallization or from diffusion. The isotope effects associated with diffusion that we have documented are the key for determining whether or not the zoning observed in a natural system was the result of diffusion. Only in those cases were the zoning is demonstrably due to diffusion can use independently measured rates of diffusion to constrain the thermal evolution of the system.

  18. Uranium isotope fractionation resulting from UF6 vapor distillation from containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedge, W.D.; Turner, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    This empirical study for possible isotopic fractionation due to UF 6 vapor distillation from valved containers was performed to determine the effects of repeated vapor sampling. Four different experiments were performed, each of which varied by the method of measuring the isotopic contents and/or by the difference in temperature gradients as follows: The ratio of the parent UF 6 to the desublimed UF 6 collected at liquid nitrogen temperature and homogenized was measured by sampling the containers. The ratio of the parent UF 6 to the desublimed UF 6 collected at liquid nitrogen temperature and homogenized was measured by direct comparison to each other without subsampling. The ratio of the parent UF 6 to the desublimed UF 6 collected at liquid nitrogen and ice-water temperatures and homogenized was measured by indirect comparison to a common UF 6 reference material without subsampling. The ratio of the parent UF 6 to the desublimed UF 6 collected at liquid nitrogen temperature without homogenizing was measured by indirect comparison to a common UF 6 reference. Gas-phase, relative mass spectrometry was used for all isotopic measurements. Results of the study indicate that fractionation does occur. The U-235 isotope becomes more enriched in the parent container as the UF 6 is vaporized from it and desublimed into the receiving cylinder; i.e., the vaporized fraction is enriched in the U-238 isotope. The degree of fractionation indicates that the separation is due to the U-238 isotope of UF 6 having a higher vapor pressure than the U-235 isotope of UF 6 . 3 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Theory of isotopic fractionation on facetted ice crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nelson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The currently used "kinetic-fractionation" (KF model of the differential incorporation of water-molecule isotopologues into vapor-grown ice omits surface processes on crystal facets that may be important in temperature reconstructions. This article introduces the "surface-kinetic" fractionation model, a model that includes such surface processes, and shows that differences in deposition coefficients for water isotopologues can produce isotopic fractionation coefficients that significantly differ from those of KF theory. For example, if the deposition coefficient of H218O differs by just 5% from that of ordinary water (H216O, the resulting fractionation coefficient at 20% supersaturation may deviate from the KF value by up to about ±17‰, and even more at greater supersaturation. As a result, the surface-kinetic theory may significantly change how fractionation depends on supersaturation. Moreover, the model introduces possible new temperature dependencies from the deposition coefficients. These parameters need to be constrained by new laboratory measurements.

  20. D/H isotopic fractionation effects in the H2-H2O system: An in-situ experimental study at supercritical water conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foustoukos, D.; Mysen, B. O.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the effect of temperature on the relative distribution of volatiles in supercritical aqueous solutions is important to constrain elemental and isotopic partitioning/fractionation effects in systems applicable to planetary interiors where the temperature-pressure conditions are often beyond existing experimental or theoretical datasets. For example, very little exists for the fundamental equilibria between H2, D2 and HD (H2 + D2 = 2HD), which, in turn, constrains the internal D/H isotope exchange and the evolution of HD in H2-containing systems such as H2-CH4 and H2-H2O. Theoretical calculations considering the partition functions of the molecules predict that with temperature increase, the equilibrium constant of this reaction approximates values that correspond to the stochastic distribution of species. These calculations consider pure harmonic vibrational frequencies, which, however, do not apply to the diatomic molecule of hydrogen, especially because anharmonic oscillations are anticipated to become stronger at high temperatures. Published experimental data have been limited to conditions lower than 468°C with large uncertainties at elevated temperatures. To address the lack of experimental data, a series of hydrothermal diamond anvil experiments has been conducted utilizing vibrational spectroscopy as a novel quantitative method to explore the relative distribution of H- and D-bearing volatiles in the H2-D2-D2O-H2O-Ti-TiO2 system. The fundamentals of this methodology are based on the distinct Raman frequency shift resulting from deuterium substitution in the H-H and O-H bonds. In detail, H2O-D2O solutions (1:1) were reacted with Ti metal (for 3-9hrs) at 600-800°C and pressures of 0.5-1 GPa, leading to formation of H2, D2, HD and HDO species through Ti oxidation and H-D isotope exchange reactions. Experimental results obtained in-situ and in the quenched gas phase, indicate a significant deviation from the theoretical estimate of the equilibrium

  1. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bekins, B.A.; Phillips, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field-scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local-scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O 2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample-based estimates of "apparent" parameters with "true" (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non-Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2 threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Böhlke, John Karl; Bekins, Barbara A.; Phillips, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field‐scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local‐scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample‐based estimates of “apparent” parameters with “true“ (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non‐Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport.

  3. Effect of Different Carbon Substrates on Nitrate Stable Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer; Einsiedl, Florian

    2012-01-01

    -labeled water and 18O-labeled nitrite were added to the microcosm experiments to study the effect of putative backward reactions of nitrite to nitrate on the stable isotope fractionation. We found no evidence for a reverse reaction. Significant variations of the stable isotope enrichment factor ε were observed......In batch experiments, we studied the isotope fractionation in N and O of dissolved nitrate during dentrification. Denitrifying strains Thauera aromatica and “Aromatoleum aromaticum strain EbN1” were grown under strictly anaerobic conditions with acetate, benzoate, and toluene as carbon sources. 18O...... of nitrate transport across the cell wall compared to the kinetics of the intracellular nitrate reduction step of microbial denitrification....

  4. Observations of Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Geppert, W. D.; Persson, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Primitive Solar System materials (e.g. chondrites. IDPs, the Stardust sample) show large variations in isotopic composition of the major volatiles (H, C, N, and O ) even within samples, witnessing to various degrees of processing in the protosolar nebula. For ex ample. the very pronounced D enhancements observed in IDPs [I] . are only generated in the cold. dense component of the interstellar medium (ISM), or protoplanetary disks, through ion-molecule reactions in the presence of interstellar dust. If this isotopic anomaly has an interstellar origin, this leaves open the possibility for preservation of other isotopic signatures throughout the form ation of the Solar System. The most common form of carbon in the ISM is CO molecules, and there are two potential sources of C-13 fractionation in this reservoir: low temperature chemistry and selective photodissociation. While gas-phase chemistry in cold interstellar clouds preferentially incorporates C-13 into CO [2], the effect of self-shielding in the presence of UV radiation instead leads to a relative enhancement of the more abundant isotopologue, 12CO. Solar System organic material exhibit rather small fluctuations in delta C-13 as compared to delta N-15 and delta D [3][1], the reason for which is still unclear. However, the fact that both C-13 depleted and enhanced material exists could indicate an interstellar origin where the two fractionation processes have both played a part. Formaldehyde (H2CO) is observed in the gas-phase in a wide range of interstellar environments, as well as in cometary comae. It is proposed as an important reactant in the formation of more complex organic molecules in the heated environments around young stars, and formaldehyde polymers have been suggested as the common origin of chondritic insoluable organic matter (IOM) and cometary refractory organic solids [4]. The relatively high gas-phase abundance of H2CO observed in molecular clouds (10(exp- 9) - 10(exp- 8) relative to H2) makes

  5. The fractionation of selenium isotopic exchange between Se (0) and Se (IV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, T. D.; Jianming, Z.; Qin, H.; Xu, W.

    2016-12-01

    Selenium (Se) has six naturally stable isotopes, 74Se, 76Se, 77Se, 78Se, 80Se, and 82Se; with the relative abundance of 0.89%, 9.37%, 7.64%, 23.77%, 49.61%, and 8.73%, respectively. According to the previous work, the variations in δ82/76Se suggested that biogeochemical cycling in earth surface can lead to significant Se isotopic fractionation [1]. It was now believed that the abiotic and biotic reduction for Se (IV) and Se (VI) oxyanion was the main processes for Se isotope fractionation in natural systems. However, recently, the theoretical calculation by first-principles shows that equilibrium Se isotope fractionation between SeO32-and SeO42- can reach Δ82/76Se =13.3‰ at the 25 °, and have a trend of heavy Se isotopes enrichment as SeO42- > SeO3 2- > HSeO3- > SeO2 > selenoamino acids > alkylselenides > Se (0) or H2Se >HSe-[2]. So we take a new idea that the significant isotopic fractionation of Se may be caused by the combined role of Se reduction and isotopic exchange. In the past years, the study of the mechanism of Se isotope fractionation was mainly focused on the reduction of Se oxyanion, but for the fractionation by the isotope exchange between different Se speciation is poorly studied. Therefore, we take the isotope exchange between Se (0) and Se (IV) as an example, to compare the isotope fractionation of Se under the different reaction conditions. Experiment was conducted using 10 mg Se (0) particles mixed with 2 mg/L Se (IV) solution in different medium (MQ-water, 0.1mol/L and 1mol / L NaOH), and the time lasted for 96 days. The value of δ82/76Se in Se (IV) solution from the initial -1.20 ‰ to 2.22‰, 4.20‰ and 6.69‰, respectively. From this experiment we can know, with the increasement of alkalinity in medium solution, the rate for oxidation of Se (0) oxidized by the dissolved oxygen is gradually to increase, and can gain more free electrons for the reaction of the isotopic exchange between Se (0) and Se (IV), and make the rate of isotopic

  6. Carbon isotope fractionation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in euxinic Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole Rita Elisabeth; Bristow, L. A.; Cox, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    in the chemocline. We sought to determine whether a distinct isotopic signature of GSB and PSB in the chemocline persists in the settling fraction and in the sediment. To answer these questions, we also sought investigated C-isotope fractionation in the water column, settling material, and sediment of Lake Cadagno......, compared these values to C-isotope fractionation of isolated anoxygenic phototroph cultures, and took a mass balance approach to investigate relative contributions to the bulk fractionation signature. We found a large C-isotope fractionation between dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and particulate organic...

  7. Uranium isotope fractionation induced by aqueous speciation: Implications for U isotopes in marine CaCO3 as a paleoredox proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinming; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2017-10-01

    Natural variations of 238U/235U in marine CaCO3 rocks are being explored as a novel paleoredox proxy to investigate oceanic anoxia events. Although it is generally assumed that U isotopes in CaCO3 directly record 238U/235U of seawater, recently published laboratory experiments demonstrate slight U isotope fractionation during U(VI) incorporation into abiotic calcium carbonates. This fractionation is hypothesized to depend on aqueous U(VI) speciation, which is controlled by pH, ionic strength, pCO2 and Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations. Secular variation in seawater chemistry could lead to changes in aqueous U(VI) speciation, and thus, may affect the extent of U isotope fractionation during U(VI) incorporation into CaCO3. In this study, we combine estimates of seawater composition over the Phanerozoic with a model of aqueous U speciation and isotope fractionation to explore variations in the expected offset between the U isotope composition of seawater and primary marine CaCO3 through time. We find that U isotope fractionation between U in primary marine CaCO3 and seawater could have varied between 0.11 and 0.23‰ over the Phanerozoic due to secular variations in seawater chemistry. Such variations would significantly impact estimates of the extent of marine anoxia derived from the U isotope record. For example, at the Permo-Triassic boundary, this effect might imply that the estimated extent of anoxia is ∼32% more extreme than previously inferred. One significant limitation of our model is that the existing experimental database covers only abiotic carbonate precipitation, and does not include a possible range of biological effects which might enhance or suppress the range of isotopic fractionation calculated here. As biotic carbonates dominate the marine carbonate record, more work is need to assess controls on U isotopic fractionation into biotic marine carbonates.

  8. Site-specific and multielement approach to the determination of liquid-vapor isotope fractionation parameters. The case of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, I.; Naulet, N.; Martin, M.L.; Martin, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Isotope fractionation phenomena occurring at the natural abundance level in the course of liquid-vapor transformation have been investigated by using the SNIF-NMR method (site-specific natural isotope fractionation studied by NMR) which has a unique capability of providing simultaneous access to fractionation parameters associated with different molecular isotopomers. This new approach has been combined with the determination of overall carbon and hydrogen fractionation effects by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The results of distillation and evaporation experiments of alcohols performed in technical conditions of practical interest have been analyzed according to the Rayleigh-type model. In order to check the performance of the column, unit fractionation factors were measured beforehand for water and for the hydroxylic sites of methanol and ethanol for which liquid-vapor equilibrium constants were already known. Inverse isotope effects are determined in distillation experiments for the overall carbon isotope ratio and for the site-specific hydrogen isotope ratios associated with the methyl and methylene sites of methanol and ethanol. In contrast, normal isotope effects are produced by distillation for the hydroxylic sites and by evaporation for all the isotopic ratios

  9. Kinetic fractionation of stable nitrogen isotopes during amino acid transamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macko, S.A.; Fogel Estep, M.L.; Engel, M.H.; Hare, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluates a kinetic isotope effect involving 15 N, during the transamination reactions catalyzed by glutamic oxalacetic transaminase. During the transfer of amino nitrogen from glutamic acid to oxaloacetate to form aspartic acid, 14 NH 2 reacted 1.0083 times faster than 15 NH 2 . In the reverse reaction transferring NH 2 from aspartic acid to α-ketoglutarate, 14 NH 2 was incorporated 1.0017 times faster than 15 NH 2 . Knowledge of the magnitude and sign of these isotope effects will be useful in the interpretation of the distribution of 15 N in biological and geochemical systems. (author)

  10. Normal and Inverse Diffusive Isotope Fractionation of Deuterated Toluene and Benzene in Aqueous Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo; Jin, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Diffusive isotope fractionation of organic contaminants in aqueous solution is difficult to quantify, and only a few experimental data sets are available for compounds of environmental interest. In this study, we investigate diffusive fractionation of perdeuterated and nondeuterated benzene...... of the two monoaromatic hydrocarbons. Toluene showed a normal diffusive isotope effect (DC7D8/DC7H8 = 0.96) with enrichment of the nondeuterated isotopologue in the direction of the diffusive and transverse dispersive fluxes. Conversely, the measured trends for benzene indicate inverse diffusive...... fractionation (DC6D6/DC6H6 = 1.02), with a remarkably faster diffusion rate of the perdeuterated isotopologue that was enriched in the downgradient portion of the diffusion tubes and at the fringes of the contaminant plumes in the flow-through setup. These outcomes can neither be interpreted as mass...

  11. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Bohlke, John Karl; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br– as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (e18O/e37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ~0.8 (e18O/e15N), which is within the range of values reported previously for denitrification. However, the magnitudes of the individual apparent in situ isotope fractionation effects for perchlorate and nitrate were appreciably smaller than those reported in homogeneous closed systems (0.2 to 0.6 times), even after adjustment for dilution. These results indicate that (1) isotope fractionation factor ratios (e18O/e37Cl, e18O/e15N) derived from homogeneous laboratory systems (e.g. pure culture studies) can be used qualitatively to confirm the occurrence of in situ biodegradation of both perchlorate and nitrate, but (2) the magnitudes of the individual apparent e values cannot be used quantitatively to estimate the in situ extent of biodegradation of either anion.

  12. Carbon Isotope Fractionation of 1,2-Dibromoethane by Biological and Abiotic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster van Groos, Paul G; Hatzinger, Paul B; Streger, Sheryl H; Vainberg, Simon; Philp, R Paul; Kuder, Tomasz

    2018-03-20

    1,2-Dibromethane (EDB) is a toxic fuel additive that likely occurs at many sites where leaded fuels have impacted groundwater. This study quantified carbon (C) isotope fractionation of EDB associated with anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation, abiotic degradation by iron sulfides, and abiotic hydrolysis. These processes likely contribute to EDB degradation in source zones (biodegradation) and in more dilute plumes (hydrolysis). Mixed anaerobic cultures containing dehalogenating organisms (e.g., Dehaloccoides spp.) were examined, as were aerobic cultures that degrade EDB cometabolically. Bulk C isotope enrichment factors (ε bulk ) associated with biological degradation covered a large range, with mixed anaerobic cultures fractionating more (ε bulk from -8 to -20‰) than aerobic cultures (ε bulk from -3 to -6‰). ε bulk magnitudes associated with the abiotic processes (dihaloelimination by FeS/FeS 2 and hydrolysis) were large but fairly well constrained (ε bulk from -19 to -29‰). As expected, oxidative mechanisms fractionated EDB less than dihaloelimination and substitution mechanisms, and biological systems exhibited a larger range of fractionation, potentially due to isotope masking effects. In addition to quantifying and discussing ε bulk values, which are highly relevant for quantifying in situ EDB degradation, an innovative approach for constraining the age of EDB in the aqueous phase, based on fractionation during hydrolysis, is described.

  13. Mass-Dependent and -Independent Fractionation of Mercury Isotopes in Aquatic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, B. A.; Joel, B. D.; Jude, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Mercury is a globally distributed and highly toxic pollutant. Although Hg is a proven health risk, much of the natural cycle of Hg is not well understood and new approaches are needed to track Hg and the chemical transformations it undergoes in the environment. Recently, we demonstrated that Hg isotopes exhibit two types of isotope fractionation: (1) mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and (2) mass independent fractionation (MIF) of only the odd isotopes (Bergquist and Blum, 2007). The observation of large MIF of Hg isotopes (up to 5 permil) is exciting because only a few other isotopic systems have been documented to display large MIF, the most notable of which are oxygen and sulfur. In both cases, the application of MIF has proven very useful in a variety of fields including cosmochemistry, paleoclimatology, physical chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, and biogeochemistry. Both MDF and MIF isotopic signatures are observed in natural samples, and together they open the door to a new method for tracing Hg pollution and for investigating Hg behavior in the environment. For example, fish record MDF that appears to be related to size and age. Additionally, fish display MIF signatures that are consistent with the photo-reduction of methylmercury (Bergquist and Blum, 2007). If the MDF and MIF in ecosystems can be understood, the signatures in fish could inform us about the sources and processes transforming Hg and why there are differences in the bioaccumulation of Hg in differing ecosystems and populations of fish. This requires sampling of a variety of ecosystems, the sampling of many components of the ecosystems, and the use of other tracers such as carbon and nitrogen isotopes. We have expanded our studies of aquatic ecosystems to include several lakes in North America. Similar to other isotopic systems used to study food web dynamics and structure (i.e., C and N), the MDF of Hg in fish appears to be related to size and age. The MDF recorded in fish likely reflects

  14. Constraining calcium isotope fractionation (d44/40Ca) in modern and fossil scleractinian coral skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Pretet Chloé; Samankassou Elias; Felis Thomas; Reynaud Stéphanie; Böhm Florian; Eisenhauer Anton; Ferrier-Pagès Christine; Gattuso Jean-Pierre; Camoin Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the influence of environmental (temperature salinity) and biological (growth rate inter generic variations) parameters on calcium isotope fractionation (d44/40Ca) in scleractinian coral skeleton to better constrain this record. Previous studies focused on the d44/40Ca record in different marine organisms to reconstruct seawater composition or temperature but only few studies investigated corals. This study presents measurements performed on modern corals from n...

  15. Constraining calcium isotope fractionation (δ44/40Ca) in modern and fossil scleractinian coral skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Pretet, Chloé; Samankassou, Elias; Felis, Thomas; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Böhm, Florian; Eisenhauer, Anton; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Camoin, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the influence of environmental (temperature, salinity) and biological (growth rate, inter-generic variations) parameters on calcium isotope fractionation (δ44/40Ca) in scleractinian coral skeleton to better constrain this record. Previous studies focused on the δ44/40Ca record in different marine organisms to reconstruct seawater composition or temperature, but only few studies investigated corals. This study presents measurements performed on modern corals f...

  16. Evidence of isotopic fractionation of natural uranium in cultured human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Avazeri, Emilie; Malard, Véronique; Vidaud, Claude; Reiller, Pascal E.; Ortega, Richard; Nonell, Anthony; Isnard, Hélène; Chartier, Frédéric; Bresson, Carole

    2016-12-01

    The study of the isotopic fractionation of endogen elements and toxic heavy metals in living organisms for biomedical applications, and for metabolic and toxicological studies, is a cutting-edge research topic. This paper shows that human neuroblastoma cells incorporated small amounts of uranium (U) after exposure to 10 µM natural U, with preferential uptake of the 235U isotope with regard to 238U. Efforts were made to develop and then validate a procedure for highly accurate n(238U)/n(235U) determinations in microsamples of cells. We found that intracellular U is enriched in 235U by 0.38 ± 0.13‰ (2σ, n = 7) relative to the exposure solutions. These in vitro experiments provide clues for the identification of biological processes responsible for uranium isotopic fractionation and link them to potential U incorporation pathways into neuronal cells. Suggested incorporation processes are a kinetically controlled process, such as facilitated transmembrane diffusion, and the uptake through a high-affinity uranium transport protein involving the modification of the uranyl (UO22+) coordination sphere. These findings open perspectives on the use of isotopic fractionation of metals in cellular models, offering a probe to track uptake/transport pathways and to help decipher associated cellular metabolic processes.

  17. Stable Te isotope fractionation in tellurium-bearing minerals from precious metal hydrothermal ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornadel, Andrew P.; Spry, Paul G.; Haghnegahdar, Mojhgan A.; Schauble, Edwin A.; Jackson, Simon E.; Mills, Stuart J.

    2017-04-01

    The tellurium isotope compositions of naturally-occurring tellurides, native tellurium, and tellurites were measured by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and compared to theoretical values for equilibrium mass-dependent isotopic fractionation of representative Te-bearing species estimated with first-principles thermodynamic calculations. Calculated fractionation models suggest that 130/125Te fractionations as large as 4‰ occur at 100 °C between coexisting tellurates (Te VI) and tellurides (Te -II) or or native tellurium Te(0), and smaller, typically calaverite, krennerite) and (Au,Ag)2Te minerals (i.e., petzite, hessite). In general, heavyTe/lightTe is predicted to be higher for more oxidized species, and lower for reduced species. Tellurides in the system Au-Ag-Te and native tellurium analyzed in this study have values of δ130/125Te = -1.54‰ to 0.44‰ and δ130/125Te = -0.74‰ to 0.16‰, respectively, whereas those for tellurites (tellurite, paratellurite, emmonsite and poughite) range from δ130/125Te = -1.58‰ to 0.59‰. Thus, the isotopic composition for both oxidized and reduced species are broadly coincident. Calculations of per mil isotopic variation per amu for each sample suggest that mass-dependent processes are responsible for fractionation. In one sample of coexisting primary native tellurium and secondary emmonsite, δ130/125Te compositions were identical. The coincidence of δ130/125Te between all oxidized and reduced species in this study and the apparent lack of isotopic fractionation between native tellurium and emmonsite in one sample suggest that oxidation processes cause little to no fractionation. Because Te is predominantly transported as an oxidized aqueous phase or as a reduced vapor phase under hydrothermal conditions, either a reduction of oxidized Te in hydrothermal liquids or deposition of Te from a reduced vapor to a solid is necessary to form the common tellurides and native tellurium in

  18. Oxygen isotope fractionation between bird bone phosphate and drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, Romain; Angst, Delphine; Legendre, Serge; Buffetaut, Eric; Fourel, François; Adolfssen, Jan; André, Aurore; Bojar, Ana Voica; Canoville, Aurore; Barral, Abel; Goedert, Jean; Halas, Stanislaw; Kusuhashi, Nao; Pestchevitskaya, Ekaterina; Rey, Kevin; Royer, Aurélien; Saraiva, Antônio Álamo Feitosa; Savary-Sismondini, Bérengère; Siméon, Jean-Luc; Touzeau, Alexandra; Zhou, Zhonghe; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions of bone phosphate (δ18Op) were measured in broiler chickens reared in 21 farms worldwide characterized by contrasted latitudes and local climates. These sedentary birds were raised during an approximately 3 to 4-month period, and local precipitation was the ultimate source of their drinking water. This sampling strategy allowed the relationship to be determined between the bone phosphate δ18Op values (from 9.8 to 22.5‰ V-SMOW) and the local rainfall δ18Ow values estimated from nearby IAEA/WMO stations (from -16.0 to -1.0‰ V-SMOW). Linear least square fitting of data provided the following isotopic fractionation equation: δ18Ow = 1.119 (±0.040) δ18Op - 24.222 (±0.644); R 2 = 0.98. The δ18Op-δ18Ow couples of five extant mallard ducks, a common buzzard, a European herring gull, a common ostrich, and a greater rhea fall within the predicted range of the equation, indicating that the relationship established for extant chickens can also be applied to birds of various ecologies and body masses. Applied to published oxygen isotope compositions of Miocene and Pliocene penguins from Peru, this new equation computes estimates of local seawater similar to those previously calculated. Applied to the basal bird Confuciusornis from the Early Cretaceous of Northeastern China, our equation gives a slightly higher δ18Ow value compared to the previously estimated one, possibly as a result of lower body temperature. These data indicate that caution should be exercised when the relationship estimated for modern birds is applied to their basal counterparts that likely had a metabolism intermediate between that of their theropod dinosaur ancestors and that of advanced ornithurines.

  19. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  20. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  1. Strontium isotope fractionation during strontianite (SrCO3) dissolution, precipitation and at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Harrison, Anna L.; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In this study we examine the behavior of stable Sr isotopes between strontianite [SrCO3] and reactive fluid during mineral dissolution, precipitation, and at chemical equilibrium. Experiments were performed in batch reactors at 25 °C in 0.01 M NaCl solutions wherein the pH was adjusted by bubbling of a water saturated gas phase of pure CO2 or atmospheric air. The equilibrium Sr isotope fractionation between strontianite and fluid after dissolution of the solid under 1 atm CO2 atmosphere was estimated as Δ88/86SrSrCO3-fluid = δ88/86Sr SrCO3 - δ88/86Srfluid = -0.05 ± 0.01‰. On the other hand, during strontianite precipitation, an enrichment of the fluid phase in 88Sr, the heavy isotopomer, was observed. The evolution of the δ88/86Srfluid during strontianite precipitation can be modeled using a Rayleigh distillation approach and the estimated, kinetically driven, fractionation factor αSrCO3-fluid between solid and fluid is calculated to be 0.99985 ± 0.00003 corresponding to Δ88/86SrSrCO3-fluid = -0.15‰. The obtained results further support that under chemical equilibrium conditions between solid and fluid a continuous exchange of isotopes occurs until the system approaches isotopic equilibrium. This isotopic exchange is not limited to the outer surface layer of the strontianite crystal, but extends to ∼7-8 unit cells below the crystal surface. The behavior of Sr isotopes in this study is in excellent agreement with the concept of dynamic equilibrium and it suggests that the time needed for achievement of chemical equilibrium is generally shorter compared to that for isotopic equilibrium. Thus it is suggested that in natural Sr-bearing carbonates an isotopic change may still occur close to thermodynamic equilibrium, despite no observable change in aqueous elemental concentrations. As such, a secondary and ongoing change of Sr isotope signals in carbonate minerals caused by isotopic re-equilibration with fluids has to be considered in order to use Sr

  2. Multi-factorial in vivo stable isotope fractionation: causes, correlations, consequences and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hanns-Ludwig; Robins, Richard J; Werner, Roland A

    2015-01-01

    Many physical and chemical processes in living systems are accompanied by isotope fractionation on H, C, N, O and S. Although kinetic or thermodynamic isotope effects are always the basis, their in vivo manifestation is often modulated by secondary influences. These include metabolic branching events or metabolite channeling, metabolite pool sizes, reaction mechanisms, anatomical properties and compartmentation of plants and animals, and climatological or environmental conditions. In the present contribution, the fundamentals of isotope effects and their manifestation under in vivo conditions are outlined. The knowledge about and the understanding of these interferences provide a potent tool for the reconstruction of physiological events in plants and animals, their geographical origin, the history of bulk biomass and the biosynthesis of defined representatives. It allows the use of isotope characteristics of biomass for the elucidation of biochemical pathways and reaction mechanisms and for the reconstruction of climatic, physiological, ecological and environmental conditions during biosynthesis. Thus, it can be used for the origin and authenticity control of food, the study of ecosystems and animal physiology, the reconstruction of present and prehistoric nutrition chains and paleaoclimatological conditions. This is demonstrated by the outline of fundamental and application-orientated examples for all bio-elements. The aim of the review is to inform (advanced) students from various disciplines about the whole potential and the scope of stable isotope characteristics and fractionations and to provide them with a comprehensive introduction to the literature on fundamental aspects and applications.

  3. Fractionation of Mercury Stable Isotopes during Microbial Methylmercury Production by Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Sarah E; Schaefer, Jeffra K; Barkay, Tamar; Reinfelder, John R

    2016-08-02

    The biological production of monomethylmercury (MeHg) in soils and sediments is an important factor controlling mercury (Hg) accumulation in aquatic and terrestrial food webs. In this study we examined the fractionation of Hg stable isotopes during Hg methylation in nongrowing cultures of the anaerobic bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Both organisms showed mass-dependent, but no mass-independent fractionation of Hg stable isotopes during Hg methylation. Despite differences in methylation rates, the two bacteria had similar Hg fractionation factors (αr/p = 1.0009 and 1.0011, respectively). Unexpectedly, δ(202)Hg values of MeHg for both organisms were 0.4‰ higher than the value of initial inorganic Hg after about 35% of inorganic Hg had been methylated. These results indicate that a (202)Hg-enriched pool of inorganic Hg was preferentially utilized as a substrate for methylation by these organisms, but that multiple intra- and/or extracellular pools supplied inorganic Hg for biological methylation. Understanding the controls of the Hg stable isotopic composition of microbially produced MeHg is important to identifying bioavailable Hg in natural systems and the interpretation of Hg stable isotopes in aquatic food webs.

  4. Calcium isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low-temperature geochemistry, biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    Stable Ca isotopes are fractionated between bones, urine and blood of animals and between soils, roots and leaves of plants by >1000 ppm for the 44Ca/40Ca ratio. These isotopic variations have important implications to understand Ca transport and fluxes in living organisms; however, the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation are unclear. Here we present ab initio calculations for the isotopic fractionation between various aqueous species of Ca and show that this fractionation can be up to 3000 ppm. We show that the Ca isotopic fractionation between soil solutions and plant roots can be explained by the difference of isotopic fractionation between the different first shell hydration degree of Ca2+ and that the isotopic fractionation between roots and leaves is controlled by the precipitation of Ca-oxalates. The isotopic fractionation between blood and urine is due to the complexation of heavy Ca with citrate and oxalates in urine. Calculations are presented for additional Ca species that may be useful to interpret future Ca isotopic measurements.

  5. Micro-scale novel stable isotope fractionation during weathering disclosed by femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, J. A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2012-12-01

    standard-sample-bracketing laser ablation analyses on sulfides, oxides and silicates agree within 0.15 permil to measurements done by solution MC-ICP-MS after chromatographic matrix separation. With our laser ablation method all compartments of the weathering zone can be analysed with minimal sample preparation [2]. In a first application, we investigate Si isotope fractionation during deep (10 m) core stone weathering, where crystalline rock is altered, producing secondary clay minerals along 20 micrometer wide (biogenic?) alteration textures. While unweathered centers of plagioclase grains show a homogenous Si isotope composition of δ30Si = -0.20 ± 0.17 permil (2SD, n=12), the secondary weathering products found in fissures within and between plagioclase grains consistently show negative δ30Si values - as low as -1.13 permil. Comparison with isotope studies at the soil and catchment scale suggests that the isotopic weathering signatures found in dissolved and particulate Si in rivers can be traced to processes operating at the micro scale. [1] Horn & von Blanckenburg, Spectrochimica Acta B. 62, 2007 [2] Steinhoefel et al., Chem. Geol. 286, 2011

  6. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains nonsteady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic isotope fractionation often assumes first-order or Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the latter solved under the quasi-steady state assumption. Both formulations lead to a constant isotope fractionation factor, therefore they may return incorrect estimations of isotopic effects and misleading interpretations of isotopic signatures when fractionation is not a steady process. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitrification in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate (2006) in which high and variable 15N-N2O enrichment during N2O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N2O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. When Michaelis-Menten kinetics were coupled to Monod kinetics to describe biomass and enzyme dynamics, and the quasi-steady state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observed concentrations, and variable and inverse isotope fractionations. These results imply a substantial revision in modeling isotopic effects, suggesting that steady state kinetics such as first-order, Rayleigh, and classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics should be superseded by transient kinetics in conjunction with biomass and enzyme dynamics.

  7. Carbon isotope fractionation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane during base-catalyzed persulfate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesi, Massimo; Thomson, Neil R.; Aravena, Ramon; Sra, Kanwartej S.; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Treatability and C fractionation of 1,1,1-TCA by base-catalyzed S 2 O 8 2− was studied. • The rate of degradation of 1,1,1-TCA increased with a higher OH − :S 2 O 8 2− ratio. •Base-catalyzed S 2 O 8 2− can potentially treat recalcitrant compound like 1,1,1-TCA. • An enrichment factor of −7.0‰ independent of the OH − :S 2 O 8 2− ratio was obtained. • Carbon isotope can potentially be used to estimate the ISCO treatment efficacy. -- Abstract: The extent of carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) by a base-catalyzed persulfate (S 2 O 8 2− ) treatment system was investigated. Significant destruction of 1,1,1-TCA was observed at a pH of ∼12. An increase in the NaOH:S 2 O 8 2− molar ratio from 0.2:1 to 8:1 enhanced the reaction rate of 1,1,1-TCA by a factor of ∼5 to yield complete (>99.9%) destruction. An average carbon isotope enrichment fractionation factor which was independent of the NaOH:S 2 O 8 2− molar ratio of −7.0 ± 0.2‰ was obtained. This significant carbon isotope fractionation and the lack of dependence on changes in the NaOH:S 2 O 8 2− molar ratio demonstrates that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used in situ as a performance assessment tool to estimate the degradation effectiveness of 1,1,1-TCA by a base-catalyzed persulfate system

  8. Nitrogen in peridotite xenoliths: Lithophile behavior and magmatic isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokochi, Reika; Marty, Bernard; Chazot, Gilles; Burnard, Pete

    2009-08-01

    In order to document the origin and speciation of nitrogen in mantle-derived rocks and minerals, the N and Ar contents and isotopic compositions were investigated for hydrous and anhydrous peridotite xenoliths from Ataq, Yemen, from Eifel, Germany, and from Massif Central, France. Nitrogen and Ar were extracted by stepwise combustion with a fine temperature resolution, followed by fusion in a platinum crucible. A large isotopic disequilibrium of up to 25.4‰ is observed within single peridotite xenoliths, with δ 15N values as low as -17.3‰ in phlogopite whereas clinopyroxene and olivine show positive δ 15N values. Identical Sr isotopic ratios of phlogopite, clinopyroxene and whole rock in this wehrlite sample are consistent with crystallization from a common reservoir, suggesting that the light N signature of phlogopite might be the result of isotopic fractionation during N uptake from the host magma. The nitrogen concentration is systematically high in phlogopite, (7.6-25.7 ppm), whereas that of bulk peridotite xenoliths is between 0.1 and 0.8 ppm. The high N content of phlogopite is at least partly due to host magma-mineral interaction, and may also suggest the occurrence of N as NH4+ that substituted for K + during mineral growth in mafic magmas. Such speciation is consistent with the fact that N and Rb contents correlate well for a set of samples from mantle regions that were affected by subduction-related metasomatism and magmatism. The N/Rb ratios of these samples are comparable with values estimated for subduction zone magmas, but are one order of magnitude lower than the N/Rb ratios characterizing subducting slabs. This difference suggests preferential release of N relative to alkalis in the forearc region. N/ 40Ar ∗ ratios of minerals from analyzed mantle xenoliths are much higher than those of vesicles in MORBs and OIBs, requiring either the occurrence of nitrogen speciation in the mantle more compatible than Ar, significant loss of fluid phase

  9. What Drives Carbon Isotope Fractionation by the Terrestrial Biosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Christopher; Rastogi, Bharat

    2017-11-01

    During photosynthesis, terrestrial plants preferentially assimilate the lighter and much more abundant form of carbon, 12C, which accounts for roughly 99% of naturally occurring forms of this element. This photosynthetic preference for lighter carbon is driven principally by differences in molecular diffusion of carbon dioxide with differing 13C/12C across stomatal pores on leaves, followed by differences in carboxylation rates by the Rubisco enzyme that is central to the process of photosynthesis. As a result of these slight preferences, which work out to about a 2% difference in the fixation rates of 12CO2 versus 13CO2 by C3 vegetation, plant tissues are depleted in the heavier form of carbon (13C) relative to atmospheric CO2. This difference has been exploited in a wide range of scientific applications, as the photosynthetic isotope signature is passed to ecosystem carbon pools and through ecological food webs. What is less appreciated is the signature that terrestrial carbon exchanges leave on atmospheric CO2, as the net uptake of carbon by land plants during their growing season not only draws down the local CO2 concentration, it also leaves behind relatively more CO2 molecules containing 13C. The converse happens outside the growing season, when autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration predominate. During these periods, atmospheric CO2 concentration increases and its corresponding carbon isotope composition becomes relatively depleted in 13C as the products of photosynthesis are respired, along with some small isotope fractionation that happen downstream of the initial photosynthetic assimilation. Similar phenomena were first observed at shorter time scales by the eminent carbon cycle scientist, Charles (Dave) Keeling. Keeling collected samples of air in glass flasks from sites along the Big Sur coast that he later measured for CO2 concentration and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in his lab (Keeling, 1998). From these samples, Keeling observed increasing

  10. Differential Isotopic Fractionation during Cr(VI) Reduction by an Aquifer-Derived Bacterium under Aerobic versus Denitrifying Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2012-01-27

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Finally, despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) cometabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε was ~2‰ aerobically and ~0.4‰ under denitrifying conditions).

  11. Molybdenum isotope fractionation by cyanobacterial assimilation during nitrate utilization and N₂ fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, A L; Scheiderich, K; Maresca, J A; Liermann, L J; Brantley, S L

    2011-01-01

    We measured the δ⁹⁸Mo of cells and media from molybdenum (Mo) assimilation experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, grown with nitrate as a nitrogen (N) source or fixing atmospheric N₂. This organism uses a Mo-based nitrate reductase during nitrate utilization and a Mo-based dinitrogenase during N₂ fixation under culture conditions here. We also demonstrate that it has a high-affinity Mo uptake system (ModABC) similar to other cyanobacteria, including marine N₂-fixing strains. Anabaena variabilis preferentially assimilated light isotopes of Mo in all experiments, resulting in fractionations of -0.2‰ to -1.0‰ ± 0.2‰ between cells and media (ε(cells-media)), extending the range of biological Mo fractionations previously reported. The fractionations were internally consistent within experiments, but varied with the N source utilized and for different growth phases sampled. During growth on nitrate, A. variabilis consistently produced fractionations of -0.3 ± 0.1‰ (mean ± standard deviation between experiments). When fixing N₂, A. variabilis produced fractionations of -0.9 ± 0.1‰ during exponential growth, and -0.5 ± 0.1‰ during stationary phase. This pattern is inconsistent with a simple kinetic isotope effect associated with Mo transport, because Mo is likely transported through the ModABC uptake system under all conditions studied. We present a reaction network model for Mo isotope fractionation that demonstrates how Mo transport and storage, coordination changes during enzymatic incorporation, and the distribution of Mo inside the cell could all contribute to the total biological fractionations. Additionally, we discuss the potential importance of biologically incorporated Mo to organic matter-bound Mo in marine sediments. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Molybdenum isotope fractionation by cyanobacterial assimilation during nitrate utilization and N2fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, A L; Scheiderich, K; Maresca, J A; Liermann, L J; Brantley, S L

    2011-01-01

    We measured the δ98Mo of cells and media from molybdenum (Mo) assimilation experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, grown with nitrate as a nitrogen (N) source or fixing atmospheric N2. This organism uses a Mo-based nitrate reductase during nitrate utilization and a Mo-based dinitrogenase during N2 fixation under culture conditions here. We also demonstrate that it has a high-affinity Mo uptake system (ModABC) similar to other cyanobacteria, including marine N2-fixing strains. Anabaena variabilis preferentially assimilated light isotopes of Mo in all experiments, resulting in fractionations of −0.2‰ to −1.0‰ ± 0.2‰ between cells and media (εcells–media), extending the range of biological Mo fractionations previously reported. The fractionations were internally consistent within experiments, but varied with the N source utilized and for different growth phases sampled. During growth on nitrate, A. variabilis consistently produced fractionations of −0.3 ± 0.1‰ (mean ± standard deviation between experiments). When fixing N2, A. variabilis produced fractionations of −0.9 ± 0.1‰ during exponential growth, and −0.5 ± 0.1‰ during stationary phase. This pattern is inconsistent with a simple kinetic isotope effect associated with Mo transport, because Mo is likely transported through the ModABC uptake system under all conditions studied. We present a reaction network model for Mo isotope fractionation that demonstrates how Mo transport and storage, coordination changes during enzymatic incorporation, and the distribution of Mo inside the cell could all contribute to the total biological fractionations. Additionally, we discuss the potential importance of biologically incorporated Mo to organic matter-bound Mo in marine sediments. PMID:21092069

  13. Fractionation of silver isotopes in native silver explained by redox reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Ryan; Arribas, Antonio; Megaw, Peter; Wilson, Marc; Stroup, Steven; Meyer-Arrivillaga, Danilo; Arribas, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    Scant data exist on the silver isotope composition of native silver specimens because of the relative newness of the technique. This study increases the published dataset by an order of magnitude and presents 80 silver new isotope analyses from native silver originating from a diverse set of worldwide deposits (8 deposit types, 33 mining districts in five continents). The measured isotopic range (defined as δ109Ag/107Ag in per mil units compared to NIST 978 Ag isotope standard) is +2.1 to -0.86‰ (2σ errors less than 0.015); with no apparent systematic correlations to date with deposit type or even within districts. Importantly, the data centering on 0‰ all come from high temperature hypogene/primary deposits whereas flanking and overlapping data represent secondary supergene deposits. To investigate the causes for the more fractionated values, several laboratory experiments involving oxidation of silver from natural specimens of Ag-rich sulfides and precipitation and adsorption of silver onto reagent grade MnO2 and FeOOH were conducted. Simple leach experiments demonstrate little Ag isotope fractionation occurred through oxidation of Ag from native Ag (Δsolution-native109Ag = 0.12‰). In contrast, significant fractionation occurred through precipitation of native Ag onto MnO2 (up to Δsolution-MnO2109Ag = 0.68‰, or 0.3amu). Adsorption of silver onto the MnO2 and FeOOH did not produce as large fractionation as precipitation (mean value of Δsolution-MnO2109Ag = 0.10‰). The most likely cause for the isotopic variations seen relates to redox effects such as the reduction of silver from Ag (I) to Ag° that occurs during precipitation onto the mineral surface. Since many Ag deposits have halos dominated by MnO2 and FeOOH phases, potential may exist for the silver isotope composition of ores and surrounding geochemical haloes to be used to better understand ore genesis and potential exploration applications. Aside from the Mn oxides, surface fluid silver

  14. Relationship between microbial sulfate reduction rates and sulfur isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu'Ura, F.

    2009-12-01

    Sulfate reduction is one of the common processes to obtain energy for certain types of microorganisms.They use hydrogen gas or organic substrates as electron donor and sulfates as electron acceptor, and reduce sulfates to sulfides. Sulfate reducing microbes extend across domains Archea and Bacteria, and are believed to be one of the earliest forms of terrestrial life (Shen 2004). The origin of 34S-depleted (light) sulfide sulfur, especially δ34S bacteria (SRB) to explain the 34S-depleted sulfide sulfur. [Experiments] To compare the result with Canfield et al. (2006), I used Desulfovibrio desulfuricans for my laboratory culture experiment. D. desulfuricans was inoculated into glass vials, which contain 40ml of liquid culture media slightly modified from DSMZ #63 medium.Excess amount of Fe (II) is added to the DSMZ#63 medium to precipitate sulfide as iron sulfide. The vials were incubated at 25°C, 30°C, and 37°C, respectively. 21 vials were used for one temperature and sulfide and sulfate was collected from each three glass vials at every 12 hours from 72 hours to 144 hours after start of incubation. The sulfide was precipitated as iron sulfide and the sulfate was precipitated as barite. Sulfur isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide were measured by standard method using Delta Plus mass-spectrometer. [Results and Discussion] The fractionation between sulfide and sulfate ranged from 2.7 to 11.0. The fractionation values varied among the different incubation temperature and growth phase of D. desulfuricans. The maximum fractionation values of three incubation temperatures were 9.9, 11.0, and 9.7, for 25 °C, 30°C, and 37°C, respectively. These results were different from standard model and Canfield et al. (2006). I could not find the clear correlation between ∂34S values and incubation temperatures in this experiment. The measured fractionation values during the incubation varied with incubation stage. The fractionation values clearly increased with

  15. CO2-dependent carbon isotope fractionation in the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Elise B.; Carter, Susan J.; Pearson, Ann

    2017-09-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of marine sedimentary organic matter is used to resolve long-term histories of pCO2 based on studies indicating a CO2-dependence of photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation (εP). It recently was proposed that the δ13C values of dinoflagellates, as recorded in fossil dinocysts, might be used as a proxy for pCO2. However, significant questions remain regarding carbon isotope fractionation in dinoflagellates and how such fractionation may impact sedimentary records throughout the Phanerozoic. Here we investigate εP as a function of CO2 concentration and growth rate in the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense. Experiments were conducted in nitrate-limited chemostat cultures. Values of εP were measured on cells having growth rates (μ) of 0.14-0.35 d-1 and aqueous carbon dioxide concentrations of 10.2-63 μmol kg-1 and were found to correlate linearly with μ/[CO2(aq)] (r2 = 0.94) in accord with prior, analogous chemostat investigations with eukaryotic phytoplankton. A maximum fractionation (εf) value of 27‰ was characterized from the intercept of the experiments, representing the first value of εf determined for an algal species employing Form II RubisCO-a structurally and catalytically distinct form of the carbon-fixing enzyme. This value is larger than theoretical predictions for Form II RubisCO and not significantly different from the ∼25‰ εf values observed for taxa employing Form ID RubisCO. We also measured the carbon isotope contents of dinosterol, hexadecanoic acid, and phytol from each experiment, finding that each class of biomarker exhibits different isotopic behavior. The apparent CO2-dependence of εP values in our experiments strengthens the proposal to use dinocyst δ13C values as a pCO2 proxy. Moreover, the similarity between the εf value for A. tamarense and the consensus value of ∼25‰ indicates that the CO2-sensitivity of carbon isotope fractionation saturates at similar CO2 levels across all three

  16. Carbon isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethenes during oxidation by Fe{sup 2+} activated persulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Massimo, E-mail: m2marche@uwaterloo.ca [Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalunya 08028 (Spain); Earth and Environmental Department, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Aravena, Ramon [Earth and Environmental Department, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sra, Kanwartej S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Thomson, Neil R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalunya 08028 (Spain); Mancini, Silvia [Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    The increased use of persulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) for in situ chemical oxidation to treat groundwater and soils contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCs) requires unbiased methods to assess treatment performance. Stable carbon isotope analysis offers a potential tool for assessing the in situ treatment performance of persulfate at sites contaminated with CHCs. This study investigated the extent of C isotope fractionation during oxidation of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) by persulfate activated by ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}). An average carbon isotope enrichment factor {epsilon}{sub bulk} of - 4.9 Per-Mille-Sign for PCE, - 3.6 Per-Mille-Sign for TCE and - 7.6 Per-Mille-Sign for cis-DCE were obtained in batch experiments. Variations in the initial S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}/Fe{sup 2+}/CHC molar ratios did not result in any significant differences in carbon isotope fractionation. The occurrence of carbon isotope fractionation during oxidation and the lack of dependence of enrichment factors upon the S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}/Fe{sup 2+}/CHC molar ratio demonstrate that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used at contaminated sites as an additional technique to estimate treatment efficacy during oxidation of CHCs by Fe{sup 2+} activated persulfate. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performance of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is still difficult to assess. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the potential of carbon isotope analysis as a new assessing tool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C isotope of PCE, TCE and DCE oxidized by persulfate activated by Fe{sup 2+} was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enrichment factors of - 4.9 Per-Mille-Sign for PCE, - 3.6 Per-Mille-Sign for TCE and - 7.6 Per-Mille-Sign for cisDCE were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon isotope can potentially be used to estimate the ISCO treatment efficacy.

  17. Mass dependent stable isotope fractionation of mercury during mer mediated microbial degradation of monomethylmercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritee, K.; Barkay, Tamar; Blum, Joel D.

    2009-03-01

    Controlling bioaccumulation of toxic monomethylmercury (MMHg) in aquatic food chains requires differentiation between biotic and abiotic pathways that lead to its production and degradation. Recent mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements of natural samples suggest that Hg isotope ratios can be a powerful proxy for tracing dominant Hg transforming pathways in aquatic ecosystems. Specifically, it has been shown that photo-degradation of MMHg causes both mass dependent (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) of Hg isotopes. Because the extent of MDF and MIF observed in natural samples (e.g., fish, soil and sediments) can potentially be used to determine the relative importance of pathways leading to MMHg accumulation, it is important to determine the potential role of microbial pathways in contributing to the fractionation, especially MIF, observed in these samples. This study reports the extent of fractionation of Hg stable isotopes during degradation of MMHg to volatile elemental Hg and methane via the microbial Hg resistance ( mer) pathway in Escherichia coli carrying a mercury resistance ( mer) genetic system on a multi-copy plasmid. During experimental microbial degradation of MMHg, MMHg remaining in reactors became progressively heavier (increasing δ202Hg) with time and underwent mass dependent Rayleigh fractionation with a fractionation factor α202/198 = 1.0004 ± 0.0002 (2SD). However, MIF was not observed in any of the microbial MMHg degradation experiments indicating that the isotopic signature left by mer mediated MMHg degradation is significantly different from fractionation observed during DOC mediated photo-degradation of MMHg. Additionally, a clear suppression of Hg isotope fractionation, both during reduction of Hg(II) and degradation of MMHg, was observed when the cell densities increased, possibly due to a reduction in substrate bioavailability. We propose a multi-step framework for understanding the extent of fractionation seen in our MMHg

  18. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between mammalian bone-phosphate and environmental drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, B.; Kolodny, V.; Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    The delta 18 O of mammalian bone-phosphate varies linearly with delta 18 O of environmental water, but is not in isotopic equilibrium with that water. This situation is explained by a model of delta 18 O in body water in which the important fluxes of exchangeable oxygen through the body are taken into account. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between body and environmental drinking water is dependent on the rates of drinking and respiration. Isotopic fractionation can be estimated from physiological data and the estimates correlate very well with observed fractionation. Species whose water consumption is large relative to its energy expenditure is sensitive to isotopic ratio changes in environmental water. (author)

  19. The molecular mechanism of Mo isotope fractionation during adsorption to birnessite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenki, L.E.; Weeks, C.L.; Bargar, J.R.; Spiro, T.G.; Hein, J.R.; Anbar, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    Fractionation of Mo isotopes during adsorption to manganese oxides is a primary control on the global ocean Mo isotope budget. Previous attempts to explain what drives the surprisingly large isotope effect ??97/95Modissolved-??97/95Moadsorbed=1.8??? have not successfully resolved the fractionation mechanism. New evidence from extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis and density functional theory suggests that Mo forms a polymolybdate complex on the surfaces of experimental and natural samples. Mo in this polynuclear structure is in distorted octahedral coordination, while Mo remaining in solution is predominantly in tetrahedral coordination as MoO42- Our results indicate that the difference in coordination environment between dissolved Mo and adsorbed Mo is the cause of isotope fractionation. The molecular mechanism of metal isotope fractionation in this system should enable us to explain and possibly predict metal isotope effects in other systems where transition metals adsorb to mineral surfaces. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Copper isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low temperature geochemistry and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moynier, Frédéric; Abe, Minori; Nemoto, Keisuke; Albarède, Francis

    2013-06-01

    Isotope fractionation between the common Cu species present in solution (Cu+, Cu2+, hydroxide, chloride, sulfide, carbonate, oxalate, and ascorbate) has been investigated using both ab initio methods and experimental solvent extraction techniques. In order to establish unambiguously the existence of equilibrium isotope fractionation (as opposed to kinetic isotope fractionation), we first performed laboratory-scale liquid-liquid distribution experiments. Upon exchange between HCl medium and a macrocyclic complex, the 65Cu/63Cu ratio fractionated by -1.06‰ to -0.39‰. The acidity dependence of the fractionation was appropriately explained by ligand exchange reactions between hydrated H2O and Cl- via intramolecular vibrations. The magnitude of the Cu isotope fractionation among important Cu ligands was also estimated by ab initio methods. The magnitude of the nuclear field shift effect to the Cu isotope fractionation represents only ˜3% of the mass-dependent fractionation. The theoretical estimation was expanded to chlorides, hydroxides, sulfides, sulfates, and carbonates under different conditions of pH. Copper isotope fractionation of up to 2‰ is expected for different forms of Cu present in seawater and for different sediments (carbonates, hydroxides, and sulfides). We found that Cu in dissolved carbonates and sulfates is isotopically much heavier (+0.6‰) than free Cu. Isotope fractionation of Cu in hydroxide is minimal. The relevance of these new results to the understanding of metabolic processes was also discussed. Copper is an essential element used by a large number of proteins for electron transfer. Further theoretical estimates of δ65Cu in hydrated Cu(I) and Cu(II) ions, Cu(II) ascorbates, and Cu(II) oxalate predict Cu isotope fractionation during the breakdown of ascorbate into oxalate and account for the isotopically heavy Cu found in animal kidneys.

  1. Fractionation of carbon isotopes by thermophilic methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, M.V.; Belyaev, S.S.; Zyakun, A.M.; Bondar, V.A.; Shipin, O.P.; Laurinavichus, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors investigated the pattern of fractionation of stable carbon isotopes by the thermophilic methane-forming bacteria under different growth conditions and at various rates of formation of methane. A pure culture of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was used in the experiments under the following growth conditions: temperature 65-70 0 C; pH 7.2-7.6; NaCl content 0-0.9 g/liter. The methanogenic bacteria were cultivated in 0.15 liter flasks in mineral medium. A mixture of CO 2 and H 2 in a 1:4 ratio by volume served as the sole carbon and energy source. In all experiments, not more than 5% of the initial CO 2 level was utilized. The rate of methane generation was altered by adjusting the physicochemical growth parameters (temperature from 45-70 0 C, salinity from 0.9 to 40 g/liter NaCl, pH from 6.3 to 7.2). Methane in the samples was quantitatively determined in a chromatograph which had a flame-ionization detector and a column containing Porapak Q sorbent at T = 120 0 C. The carrier gas was CO 2 . The average specific rate of methane formation was calculated as ml CH 4 per mg dry biomass of bacteria per h. Soluble mineral carbon was isolated form the acidified culture liquid in the form of CO 2 and was quantitatively determined in a Chrom-4 chromatography provided with a katharometer and a column containing activated charcoal at T = 150 0 . The gas carrier was helium. The isotopic composition of carbon was determined in a CH-7 mass-spectrometer and was expressed in 13 C values (per thousand) with respect to the international PDB standard

  2. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (-4.3 to -16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from -27.5 to -25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic carbonate

  3. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenviro......Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  4. Fractionation of mercury stable isotopes during coal combustion and seawater flue gas desulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shuyuan; Yuan, Dongxing; Lin, Haiying; Sun, Lumin; Lin, Shanshan

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, fractionation of mercury isotopes during coal combustion and seawater flue gas desulfurization (SFGD) in a coal-fired power plant using a SFGD system was investigated. Fourteen samples were collected from the power plant. The samples were pretreated with a combustion-trapping method and were analyzed with a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS). Compared with the raw coal, the bottom ash was enriched with lighter mercury isotopes with δ 202 Hg values ranging from −0.45 to −0.03‰. The fly ash was enriched with lighter mercury isotopes with δ 202 Hg values ranging from −1.49 to −0.73‰ for Chinese coal and from −1.47 to −0.62‰ for Indonesian coal. The δ 202 Hg of fresh seawater and desulfurized seawater was found to be −1.32 and −0.32‰ respectively. These δ 202 Hg values indicated that the desulfurized seawater was enriched with heavier mercury isotopes. Based upon the calculated results obtained from the mass balance equation, it was suggested that the stack emissions were enriched with lighter mercury isotopes. Mass independent fractionation was observed in most of the samples with a Δ 199 Hg/Δ 201 Hg ratio of approximately 0.96. The results help in improving the understanding of mercury isotope fractionation during coal combustion and SFGD, and are also useful in tracing the mercury emissions from coal fired power plants. - Highlights: • Spread of 1.5‰ was observed in δ 202 Hg values of raw coals and coal related samples. • The δ 202 Hg values were more negative in fly ash than those in the raw coal. • The flue gas had a significant Hg fractionation after desulfurization. • The stack emissions were enriched with lighter isotopes compared with the raw coal.

  5. Effect of Ca content on equilibrium Ca isotope fractionation between orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhong; Zhou, Chen; Qin, Tian; Kang, Jin-Ting; Huang, Shichun; Wu, Zhongqing; Huang, Fang

    2017-12-01

    -cpx can be used as an independent thermometer with a precision comparable to elemental thermometers. Because most naturally occurring minerals are solid solutions with variable chemical compositions, this study presents a guideline to explore the concentration effect on equilibrium isotope fractionation among minerals.

  6. Fe (hydro) oxide controls Mo isotope fractionation during the weathering of granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibing; Ma, Jinlong; Li, Jie; Wei, Gangjian; Zeng, Ti; Li, Lei; Zhang, Le; Deng, Wenfeng; Xie, Luhua; Liu, Zhifeng

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the fractionation mechanisms of Mo isotopes and seeking the main hosts of light δ98/95Mo during chemical weathering of continental rocks is a prerequisite for constraining heavy δ98/95Mo input into rivers. This study investigates the Mo concentrations and δ98/95Mo values of bulk samples, chemical extractions, and clay fractions of weathering products in a granite weathering profile in Guangdong province, South China, as well as in surrounding stream water. Results from bulk samples show that the τ MoTiO2 values systematically decrease from 59.1% to -77.0%, and δ98/95Mo values systematically increase from -1.46‰ to -0.17‰, upwards in the profile (from 30 to 0 m depth). Atmospheric input has a limited effect on δ98/95Mo variations in the weathering profile. Adsorption and desorption processes of Fe (hydro) oxide are the dominant factors controlling the variations in δ98/95Mo, with light Mo isotopes preferentially adsorbed by Fe (hydro) oxide, and released during desorption process, whereas the incongruent dissolution of primary minerals has little effect. Organic materials and the clay fraction are not the main hosts of light δ98/95Mo, as indicated by the results of chemical extractions, which show that a large proportion (41.5-86.2%) of total Mo with light δ98/95Mo (-1.57‰ to -0.59‰) is associated with Fe (hydro) oxide. Moreover, a significant positive correlation exists between Mo concentrations and δ98/95Mo in the Fe (hydro) oxide extractions from bulk samples. Finally, δ98/95Mo in stream water indicates the release of heavier δ98/95Mo into river water during the chemical weathering of granite rock. The results advance our understanding the mechanisms of Mo isotope fractionation during chemical weathering and its isotopic mass balance in Earth's surface system.

  7. Lightning and Mass Independent Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation in Nebular Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Lightning has long been postulated as the agent of Chondru|e formation in the solar nebula, but it may have an additional role to play as well. Lightning bolts of almost any scale will both vaporize dust and liberate oxygen atoms that will then interact with both nebular gases as well as the refractory silicate vapor as it re-condenses. Such processes should result in the addition of the heavy oxygen isotopes to the growing silicate grains while the light oxygen-16 becomes part of the gas phase water. This process will proceed to some extent throughout the history of any turbulent nebula and will result in the gradual increase of O-16 in the gas phase and in a much larger relative increase in the O-17 and O-18 content of the nebular dust. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the production of such "heavy oxygen enriched", non-mass-dependently-fractionated dust grains in a high voltage discharge in a hydrogen rich gas containing small quantities of silane, pentacarbonyl iron and oxygen.

  8. Cr-isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of ultramafic rocks and its impact on river waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Mondal, Sisir K.

    into the sea. The aim of the study is to recognize Cr isotope fractionation processes within the mining-area and the impact of the mine runoff on the δ53Cr of the nearby river. The weathering profile shows a distinct upward trend to more negative δ53Cr values. While the well preserved rocks at the base closely......We investigated Cr isotope fractionation during soil formation from Precambrian ultramafic rocks. A soil profile was logged in an active open-cast chromite mine (Sukinda Valley, India). In addition, mine and river waters, as well as seawater were collected to trace the Cr-isotope signal...... fractionation, where Cr(VI) lost to runoff is enriched in the heavier 53Cr. At the same time, the residual Cr(III) pools become enriched in the lighter 52Cr. Waters collected within the chromite mine have δ53Cr values corresponding to the unweathered host rock. Before reaching the mine, river waters have δ53Cr...

  9. Mercury isotope fractionation during transfer from post-desulfurized seawater to air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuyuan; Lin, Kunning; Yuan, Dongxing; Gao, Yaqin; Sun, Lumin

    2016-12-15

    Samples of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) in the post-desulfurized seawater discharged from a coal-fired power plant together with samples of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) over the post-desulfurized seawater surface were collected and analyzed to study the mercury isotope fractionation during transfer from post-desulfurized seawater to air. Experimental results showed that when DGM in the seawater was converted to GEM in the air, the δ 202 Hg and Δ 199 Hg values were changed, ranging from -2.98 to -0.04‰ and from -0.31 to 0.64‰, respectively. Aeration played a key role in accelerating the transformation of DGM to GEM, and resulted in light mercury isotopes being more likely to be enriched in the GEM. The ratio Δ 199 Hg/Δ 201 Hg was 1.626 in all samples, suggesting that mercury mass independent fractionation occurred owing to the nuclear volume effect during the transformation. In addition, mass independent fractionation of mercury even isotopes was found in the GEM above the post-desulfurized seawater surface in the aeration pool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation between the binding energy of neutrons in nuclei and anomalous fractionation of isotopes in medico-biological objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykovskij, Yu.A.; Timoshin, V.T.; Laptev, I.D.; Manykin, Eh.A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser mass-spectrometry is used to investigate isotope ratio in medico-biological objects (MBO). Anomalous fractionation of carbon, oxygen, silicon, sulphur, potassium and calcium isotopes in MBO is detected. Correlation between neutron binding energy in isotopic nuclei and isotope anomalous fractionation of some elements in MBO is determined

  11. Zinc Isotope Variability in Three Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Predictive Model for Determining Isotopic Fractionation during Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Gonzalez, R; Weiss, D

    2015-10-20

    The zinc (Zn) isotope compositions of feed materials and combustion byproducts were investigated in three different coal-fired power plants, and the results were used to develop a generalized model that can account for Zn isotopic fractionation during coal combustion. The isotope signatures in the coal (δ(66)ZnIRMM) ranged between +0.73 and +1.18‰, values that fall well within those previously determined for peat (+0.6 ±2.0‰). We therefore propose that the speciation of Zn in peat determines the isotope fingerprint in coal. All of the bottom ashes collected in these power plants were isotopically depleted in the heavy isotopes relative to the coals, with δ(66)ZnIRMM values ranging between +0.26‰ and +0.64‰. This suggests that the heavy isotopes, possibly associated with the organic matter of the coal, may be preferentially released into the vapor phase. The fly ash in all of these power plants was, in contrast, enriched in the heavy isotopes relative to coal. The signatures in the fly ash can be accounted for using a simple unidirectional fractionation model with isotope fractionation factors (αsolid-vapor) ranging between 1.0003 and 1.0007, and we suggest that condensation is the controlling process. The model proposed allows, once the isotope composition of the feed coal is known, the constraining of the Zn signatures in the byproducts. This will now enable the integration of Zn isotopes as a quantitative tool for the source apportionment of this metal from coal combustion in the atmosphere.

  12. Boron geochemistry from some typical Tibetan hydrothermal systems: Origin and isotopic fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenjie; Tan, Hongbing; Zhang, Yanfei; Wei, Haizhen; Dong, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tibetan plateau is characterized by intense hydrothermal activity and abnormal enrichment of trace elements in geothermal waters. Hydrochemistry and B isotope samples from geothermal waters in Tibet were systematically measured to describe the fractionation mechanisms and provide constraints on potential B reservoirs. B concentrations range from 0.35 to 171.90 mg/L, and isotopic values vary between −16.57 ‰ and +0.52 ‰. Geothermal fields along the Indus-Yarlung Zangbo suture zone and N–S rifts are observed with high B concentrations and temperatures. The similar hydrochemical compositions of high-B geothermal waters with magmatic fluid and consistent modeling of B isotopic compositions with present δ 11 B values imply that the B in high-B geothermal waters is mainly contributed by magmatic sources, probably through magma degassing. In contrast, geothermal fields in other regions of the Lhasa block have relatively low B concentrations and temperatures. After considering the small fractionation factor and representative indicators of Na/Ca, Cl/HCO 3 , Na + K and Si, the conformity between modeling results and the isotopic compositions of host rocks suggests that the B in low-temperature geothermal fields is mainly sourced from host rocks. According to simulated results, the B in some shallow geothermal waters not only originated from mixing of cold groundwater with deep thermal waters, but it was also contributed by equilibration with marine sedimentary rocks with an estimated proportion of 10%. It was anticipated that this study would provide useful insight into the sources and fractionation of B as well as further understanding of the relationships between B-rich salt lakes and geothermal activities in the Tibetan plateau. - Highlights: • Chemical and boron isotopic data of geothermal waters in Tibetan plateau were introduced. • Unusual enrichment of boron in Tibetan geothermal waters is related to magmatic and host rocks. • Boron

  13. Solute Isotope Fractionation by Diffusion in Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, I. C.; Sposito, G.

    2009-12-01

    In natural systems where molecular diffusion plays an important role, isotope distributions can be highly sensitive to the mass dependence of solute diffusion coefficients (D) in liquid water. Isotope geochemistry studies routinely assume that this mass-dependence (heretofore essentially unknown) either is negligible (as predicted by hydrodynamic theories) or follows a kinetic-theory-like inverse square root relation. However, experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the mass-dependence of D is intermediate between these hydrodynamic and kinetic theory predictions for alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halides, and noble gases (Richter et al., 2006; Bourg and Sposito, 2007, 2008; Bourg et al., 2009). In this talk, we present a general description of the influence of solute valence and radius on the mass-dependence of D for mono-atomic solutes in liquid water. We explain the molecular-scale origin of this mass-dependence and highlight its applications in geochemistry and groundwater hydrology. Bourg I.C., and Sposito G. (2007) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 5583-5589. Bourg I.C., and Sposito G. (2008) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72, 2237-2247. Bourg I.C., Richter F.M., et al. (2009) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, in preparation. Richter F.M., Mendybaev R.A., et al. (2006) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70, 277-289.

  14. Oxygen Isotope Fractionation between Coexisting Calcite and Dolomite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J N

    1964-09-18

    The oxygen isotopic composition of calcite from carbonate rocks of the lower unit of the Flagstaff formation (Paleocene) exposed along the western margin of the Wasatch Plateau, Utah, is about 7 per mil lower than that of coexisting dolomite, suggesting that isotopic equilibration of these two minerals can occur at relatively low temperatures. Unlike recent isotopic evidence presented by Degens and Epstein, the data do not preclude a primary chemical origin for the dolomite.

  15. Stable Isotope Signatures of Middle Palaeozoic Ahermatypic Rugose Corals – Deciphering Secondary Alteration, Vital Fractionation Effects, and Palaeoecological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, Michal; Berkowski, Blazej; López Correa, Matthias; Jarochowska, Emilia; Joachimski, Michael; Belka, Zdzislaw

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates stable isotope signatures of five species of Silurian and Devonian deep-water, ahermatypic rugose corals, providing new insights into isotopic fractionation effects exhibited by Palaeozoic rugosans, and possible role of diagenetic processes in modifying their original isotopic signals. To minimize the influence of intraskeletal cements on the observed signatures, the analysed specimens included unusual species either devoid of large intraskeletal open spaces ('button corals': Microcyclus, Palaeocyclus), or typified by particularly thick corallite walls (Calceola). The corals were collected at four localities in the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland), Mader Basin (Morocco) and on Gotland (Sweden), representing distinct diagenetic histories and different styles of diagenetic alteration. To evaluate the resistance of the corallites to diagenesis, we applied various microscopic and trace element preservation tests. Distinct differences between isotopic compositions of the least-altered and most-altered skeleton portions emphasise a critical role of material selection for geochemical studies of Palaeozoic corals. The least-altered parts of the specimens show marine or near-marine stable isotope signals and lack positive correlation between δ13C and δ18O. In terms of isotopic fractionation mechanisms, Palaeozoic rugosans must have differed considerably from modern deep-water scleractinians, typified by significant depletion in both 18O and 13C, and pronounced δ13C-δ18O co-variance. The fractionation effects exhibited by rugosans seem similar rather to the minor isotopic effects typical of modern non-scleractinian corals (octocorals and hydrocorals). The results of the present study add to growing evidence for significant differences between Scleractinia and Rugosa, and agree with recent studies indicating that calcification mechanisms developed independently in these two groups of cnidarians. Consequently, particular caution is needed in using

  16. Oxygen isotope study of the highly fractionated Podlesí granite system, Krušné hory Mts., Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Karel; Pudilová, M.; Breiter, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 2 (2005), s. 139-143 ISSN 1214-1119 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : né hory/Erzgebirge Mts. * granite * oxygen isotopes Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.geology.cz/bulletin/contents/2005/vol80no2/139_zak.pdf

  17. Isotope dilution analysis for urinary fentanyl and its main metabolite, norfentanyl, in patients by isotopic fractionation using capillary gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sera, Shoji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi [Fukuyama Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Sameshima, Teruko; Kawasaki, Koichi; Oda, Toshiyuki

    1998-07-01

    Isotope dilution analysis was applied to determine urinary excretion of fentanyl (FT) and its main metabolite, norfentanyl (Nor-FT), by isotopic fractionation using a capillary gas chromatograph equipped with a surface ionization detector (SID). Urinary FT was determined quantitatively in the range of 0.4-40 ng/ml using deuterium labeled FT (FT-{sup 2}H{sub 19}), as an internal standard. We also performed isotope dilution analysis of Nor-FT in urine. N-Alkylation was necessary to sensitively detect Nor-FT with SID. Methyl derivative was selected from 3 kinds of N-alkyl derivatives to increase sensitivity and peak resolution, and to prevent interference with urinary compound. Nor-FT concentration was quantitatively determined in the range of 10-400 ng/ml using deuterium labeled Nor-FT (Nor-FT-{sup 2}H{sub 10}). No endogenous compounds or concomitant drugs interfered with the detection of FT and Nor-FT in the urine of patients. The present method will be useful for pharmacokinetic studies and the evaluation of drug interactions in FT metabolism. (author)

  18. Isotope dilution analysis for urinary fentanyl and its main metabolite, norfentanyl, in patients by isotopic fractionation using capillary gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera, Shoji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi; Sameshima, Teruko; Kawasaki, Koichi; Oda, Toshiyuki

    1998-01-01

    Isotope dilution analysis was applied to determine urinary excretion of fentanyl (FT) and its main metabolite, norfentanyl (Nor-FT), by isotopic fractionation using a capillary gas chromatograph equipped with a surface ionization detector (SID). Urinary FT was determined quantitatively in the range of 0.4-40 ng/ml using deuterium labeled FT (FT- 2 H 19 ), as an internal standard. We also performed isotope dilution analysis of Nor-FT in urine. N-Alkylation was necessary to sensitively detect Nor-FT with SID. Methyl derivative was selected from 3 kinds of N-alkyl derivatives to increase sensitivity and peak resolution, and to prevent interference with urinary compound. Nor-FT concentration was quantitatively determined in the range of 10-400 ng/ml using deuterium labeled Nor-FT (Nor-FT- 2 H 10 ). No endogenous compounds or concomitant drugs interfered with the detection of FT and Nor-FT in the urine of patients. The present method will be useful for pharmacokinetic studies and the evaluation of drug interactions in FT metabolism. (author)

  19. Contrasting Effects of Carbon and Sulfur on Fe-Isotope Fractionation between Metal and Silicate Melt during Planetary Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, S. M.; Shahar, A.

    2015-12-01

    There are numerous studies that show well-resolved Fe isotope fractionations in igneous materials from different planetary bodies. Potential explanations for these fractionations include a non-chondritic bulk planetary Fe isotopic composition, and equilibrium fractionation between Fe-alloys or minerals and silicate melts during planetary differentiation, mantle melting, or fractional crystallization. This is further complicated by the fact that these processes are not mutually exclusive, making the interpretation of Fe isotope data a complex task. Here we present new experimental results investigating the effect of C on Fe isotope fractionation between molten peridotite and an Fe-alloy. Experiments were conducted at 1 GPa and 1850° C for 0.5 - 3 hours on a mixture of an 54Fe-spiked peridotite and Fe-metal with and without Ni metal in an end-loaded piston cylinder at the Geophysical Laboratory. Carbon saturation was achieved with a graphite capsule, and resulted in C contents of the Fe-alloy in our experiments ranging from 3.8 - 4.9 wt. %. The metal and silicate phases from half of each experiment were separated manually and dissolved in concentrated acids. Iron was separated from matrix elements by anion exchange chromatagraphy. Iron-isotopic compositions were determined with the Nu Plasma II MC-ICP-MS at GL. The other half of each experiment was used for quantitative microbeam analysis. Equilibrium was assessed with a time series and the three-isotope exchange method. The Ni-free experiments resulted in no resolvable Fe isotope fractionation between the Fe-C-alloy and molten silicate. This is in contrast to the results of Shahar et al. (2015) which showed a fractionation for Δ57Fe of ~0.18 ‰ between a peridotite and an Fe-alloy with a similar S abundance to C in these experiments. The one experiment thus far that contained Ni (~4 wt. % in the alloy) showed a resolvable fractionation between the Fe-Ni-C alloy and silicate of ~0.10 ‰. Shahar et al. found a

  20. Determination of the interchangeable heavy-metal fraction in soils by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaebler, H.E.; Bahr, A.; Mieke, B.

    1999-01-01

    An isotope dilution technique using enriched stable isotopes is applied to determine the interchangeable heavy-metal fraction in soils. Metals in two soil samples are extracted at constant pH, with water, NH 4 NO 3 , and EDTA. A spike of enriched stable isotopes is added to the suspension of sample and eluant at the beginning of the extraction. The heavy-metal fraction which exchanges with the added spike during the extraction is called the interchangeable fraction. The extractable heavy-metal fractions are obtained from the heavy-metal concentrations in the eluates. Isotope ratios and concentrations are determined by HR-ICP-MS. The isotope dilution technique described enables both the extractable and the interchangeable heavy-metal fractions to be determined in the same experiment. The combination of both results gives additional information on elemental availability under different conditions that cannot be obtained by analyzing the extractable heavy-metal fractions alone. It is demonstrated that in some cases different eluants just shift the distribution of the interchangeable fraction of an element between the solid and liquid phases (e.g., Pb and Cd in a topsoil sample) while the amount of the interchangeable fraction itself remains constant. For other elements, as Ni, Zn, and Cr, the use of different eluants (different pH, complexing agents) sometimes enlarges the interchangeable fraction. (orig.)

  1. What is the Role of the Transition State in Soret and Chemical Diffusion Induced Isotopic Fractionation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, G.

    2013-12-01

    For over six decades, Urey's (1) statistical mechanical model of isotopic fractionation based on partition functions with quantized energy levels have enjoyed enormous success in quantitatively explaining equilibrium isotopic fractionation in a wide variety of geochemical systems For example, the interpretation of oxygen isotopic variations in carbonate systems (e.g. foraminiferas), in terms of partition functions with quantized energy levels, forms the basis for paleothermometry (2). Recent observations of isotopic fractionation from chemical and thermal (Soret) diffusion (3-7) appear to challenge our theoretical understanding of mass-transport and isotopic fractionation (8, 9). For example, a recently proposed quantum mechanical model of Soret diffusion, which correctly predicts the isotopic fractionation in thermal gradients for isotopes of Mg, Ca, Fe, Si, and possibly oxygen, was critiqued as being unphysical. First, it was argued that the zero point energies needed to explain the magnitude of isotopic fractionation in basalt melts were unrealistically high based on infrared spectra of these melts. Second, it was argued that the chemical diffusion isotopic fractionation (beta) factors expected from these zero-point energies were also unphysical (10). A recently proposed collision-momentum transfer model partially explains observed fractionation factors, although it fails miserably (by a factor of 3) to account for the isotopic fractionation of Mg isotopes (11). In this presentation, I will review recent observations and models of isotopic fractionation in geochemical melts with thermal gradients and expand upon previous work (8, 12) to show how transition state theory can simultaneously explain mass-transport induced isotopic fractionation, including kinetic, equilibrium, and Soret isotopic fractionation. I show this by providing a few example calculations of the kinetic fractionation factors (a.k.a. beta factors) expected in chemical diffusion as well as

  2. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during...

  3. Can Lightning Produce Significant Levels of Mass-Independent Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation in Nebular Dust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Paquette, John A.; Farquhar, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent evidence that oxide grains condensed from a plasma will contain oxygen that is mass independently fractionated compared to the initial composition of the vapor, we present a first attempt to evaluate the potential magnitude of this effect on dust in the primitive solar nebula. This assessment relies on previous studies of nebular lightning to provide reasonable ranges of physical parameters to form a very simple model to evaluate the plausibility that lightning could affect a significant fraction of nebular dust and that such effects could cause a significant change in the oxygen isotopic composition of solids in the solar nebula over time. If only a small fraction of the accretion energy is dissipated as lightning over the volume of the inner solar nebula, then a large fraction of nebular dust will be exposed to lightning. If the temperature of such bolts is a few percent of the temperatures measured in terrestrial discharges, then dust will vaporize and recondense in an ionized environment. Finally, if only a small average decrease is assumed in the O-16 content of freshly condensed dust, then over the last 5 million years of nebular accretion the average delta O-17 of the dust could increase by more than 30 per mil. We conclude that it is possible that the measured " slope 1" oxygen isotope line measured in meteorites and their components represents a time-evolution sequence of nebular dust over the last several million years of nebular evolution O-16-rich materials formed first, then escaped further processing as the average isotopic composition of the dust graduaUy became increasingly depleted in O-16 .

  4. Malate synthase: proof of a stepwise Claisen condensation using the double-isotope fractionation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.D.; O'Keefe, S.J.; Knowles, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Although aldolase-catalyzed condensations proceed by stepwise mechanisms via the intermediacy of nucleophilic enol(ate)s or enamines, the mechanisms of those enzymes that catalyze Claisen-type condensations are unclear. The reaction pathway followed by an enzyme from this second group, malate synthase, has been studied by the double-isotope fractionation method to determine whether the reaction is stepwise or concerted. In agreement with earlier work, a deuterium kinetic isotope effect /sup D/(V/K) of 1.3 +/- 0.1 has been found when [ 2 H 3 ]acetyl-CoA is the substrate. The 13 C isotope effect at the aldehydic carbon of glyoxylate has also been measured. For this determination, the malate product was quantitatively transformed into a new sample of malate having the carbon of interest at C-4. This material was decarboxylated by malic enzyme to produce the appropriate CO 2 for isotope ratio mass spectrometric analysis. The 13 C isotope effect with [ 1 H 3 ]acetyl-CoA is 1.0037 +/- 0.0004. By use of the known values of the intermolecular and intramolecular deuterium effects and of 13 (V/K)/sub H/, the value of the 13 C isotope effect when deuteriated [ 2 H 3 ]acetyl-CoA is the substrate can be predicted for three possible mechanisms. The results show clearly that the two salient characteristics of enzymes that catalyze Claisen-like condensations, namely, the absence of enzyme-catalyzed proton exchange with solvent and the inversion of the configuration at the nucleophilic center, which had been suggestive of a concerted pathway, are not mechanistically diagnostic

  5. Controls on stable sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionation experiments during bacterial sulfate reduction were performed with recently isolated strains of cold-adapted sulfate-reducing bacteria from Arctic marine sediments with year-round temperatures below 2 degreesC. The bacteria represent quantitatively important members...... fractionations varied by less than 5.8 parts per thousand with respect to temperature and sulfate reduction rate, whereas the difference in sulfur isotopic fractionation between bacteria with different carbon oxidation pathways was as large as 17.4 parts per thousand. Incubation of sediment slurries from two...... at different temperatures. In the Arctic sediments where these bacteria are abundant the isotopic differences between dissolved sulfate, pyrite, and acid-volatile sulfide are at least twice as large as the experimentally determined isotopic fractionations. On the basis of bacterial abundance and cell...

  6. Insights Into Nitrogen Isotope Fractionation in Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, K. A.; Swart, P. K.; Ellis, G. S.

    2002-12-01

    Environmental integrity in the Florida Reef tract and the Caribbean has been the center of concern for the past 15-20 years. Both the recreational and scientific communities alike have noticed an overall decline in coral reef health. This decline has manifested itself in the form of increased fleshy macroalgae growth and reduced coral cover, and in some cases, wide-scale coral mortality. Given the increasing dependence on a tourism-oriented economy in both South Florida and the Caribbean, much attention has been focused on maintaining reef longevity. A high nutrient load is believed to be the leading cause of degradation in the predominantly oligotrophic environment. Various studies have cited increased run off and input of anthropogenic wastes as the origin of these nutrients. It has also been suggested that the stable isotopes of nitrogen may provide a tracer with which to recognize the impact of anthropogenic nutrients within the coral reefs ecosystem. However, in utilizing both nitrogen and carbon stable isotopic methods on samples of particulate organic matter (POM) taken over the last three years, we find little evidence of the input of anthropogenic waste. δ15N values of POM fluctuate between +1 and +9 per mille, but usually remain in the +4 to +6 per mille range. Additionally, δ13C values are even more consistent, maintaining a balance between -19 to -21 per mille. These data are consistent with natural open-ocean values for δ15N and δ13C, indicating a lack of intense and prolonged exposure to anthropogenic wastes in the Florida Keys.

  7. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in the search for life on early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Desmarais, D.

    1989-01-01

    The utility of measurements of C-13/C-12 ratios in organic vs inorganic deposits for searching for signs of life on early Mars is considered. It is suggested that three assumptions are necessary. First, if there was life on Mars, it caused the fractionation of carbon isotopes in analogy with past biological activity on earth. Second, the fractionation would be detectable. Third, if a fractionation would be observed, there exist no abiotic explanations for the observed fractionation pattern.

  8. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, D.

    2010-10-15

    }. Allowing R{sub b} to vary as R{sub p}{sup 1/2}, consistent with available precipitation rate studies, produces a better fit to some trace element and isotopic data than a model where R{sub b} is constant. This model can account for most of the experimental data in the literature on the dependence of {sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca and metal/Ca fractionation in calcite as a function of precipitation rate and temperature, and also accounts for {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O variations with some assumptions. The apparent temperature dependence of Ca isotope fractionation in calcite may stem from the dependence of R{sub b} on temperature; there should be analogous pH dependence at pH < 6. The proposed model may be valuable for predicting the behavior of isotopic and trace element fractionation for a range of elements of interest in low-temperature aqueous geochemistry. The theory presented is based on measureable thermo-kinetic parameters in contrast to models that equire hyper-fast diffusivity in near-surface layers of the solid.

  9. Carbon isotope fractionation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane during base-catalyzed persulfate treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Massimo, E-mail: m2marche@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Thomson, Neil R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sra, Kanwartej S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lographia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain 08028 (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Treatability and C fractionation of 1,1,1-TCA by base-catalyzed S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} was studied. • The rate of degradation of 1,1,1-TCA increased with a higher OH{sup −}:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} ratio. •Base-catalyzed S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} can potentially treat recalcitrant compound like 1,1,1-TCA. • An enrichment factor of −7.0‰ independent of the OH{sup −}:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} ratio was obtained. • Carbon isotope can potentially be used to estimate the ISCO treatment efficacy. -- Abstract: The extent of carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) by a base-catalyzed persulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−}) treatment system was investigated. Significant destruction of 1,1,1-TCA was observed at a pH of ∼12. An increase in the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio from 0.2:1 to 8:1 enhanced the reaction rate of 1,1,1-TCA by a factor of ∼5 to yield complete (>99.9%) destruction. An average carbon isotope enrichment fractionation factor which was independent of the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio of −7.0 ± 0.2‰ was obtained. This significant carbon isotope fractionation and the lack of dependence on changes in the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio demonstrates that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used in situ as a performance assessment tool to estimate the degradation effectiveness of 1,1,1-TCA by a base-catalyzed persulfate system.

  10. Equilibrium mercury isotope fractionation between dissolved Hg(II) species and thiol-bound Hg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiederhold, Jan G.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Daniel, Kelly; Infante, Ivan; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Stable Hg isotope ratios provide a new tool to trace environmental Hg cycling. Thiols (-SH) are the dominant Hg-binding groups in natural organic matter. Here, we report experimental and computational results on equilibrium Hg isotope fractionation between dissolved Hg(II) species and thiol-bound

  11. Oxygen isotope fractionation and algal symbiosis in benthic foraminifera from the Gulf of Elat, Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchardt, B.; Hansen, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    In order to investigate possible isotopic fractionations due to algal symbiosis the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of shell carbonate from symbiont-free and symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera have been compared to that of molluscs living at the same locality. The material was collected over a depth profile in the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), Israel, covering the interval from 4 to 125 metres. After corrections variations for temperature with depth, characteristic 18 O-depletions were observed in the foraminiferal shell carbonate when compared to the molluscs. These depletions are interpreted as 1) a constant vital effect seen in all the foraminifera studied and 2) an additional, light-dependent vital effect observed in the symbiont-bearing forms only, caused by incorporation of photosynthetic oxygen formed by the symbiotic algae. This additional vital effect emphasizes the difficulties in applying foraminifera to oxygen isotope palaeotemperature analyses. No well-defined differences in carbon isotope compositions are observed between symbiont-bearing and symbiont-free foraminifera. (author)

  12. Carbon isotope fractionation between amorphous calcium carbonate and calcite in earthworm-produced calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versteegh, E.A.A.; Black, S.; Hodson, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we investigate carbon isotope fractionation during the crystallization of biogenic calcium carbonate. Several species of earthworm including Lumbricus terrestris secrete CaCO 3 . Initially a milky fluid comprising micro-spherules of amorphous CaCO 3 (ACC) is secreted into pouches of the earthworm calciferous gland. The micro-spherules coalesce and crystalize to form millimetre scale granules, largely comprising calcite. These are secreted into the earthworm intestine and from there into the soil. L. terrestris were cultured for 28 days in two different soils, moistened with three different mineral waters at 10, 16 and 20 °C. The milky fluid in the calciferous glands, granules in the pouches of the calciferous glands and granules excreted into the soil were collected and analysed by FTIR spectroscopy to determine the form of CaCO 3 present and by IRMS to determine δ 13 C values. The milky fluid was ACC. Granules removed from the pouches and soil were largely calcite; the granules removed from the pouches contained more residual ACC than those recovered from the soil. The δ 13 C values of milky fluid and pouch granules became significantly more negative with increasing temperature (p ≤ 0.001). For samples from each temperature treatment, δ 13 C values became significantly (p ≤ 0.001) more negative from the milky fluid to the pouch granules to the soil granules (−13.77, −14.69 and −15.00 respectively at 10 °C; −14.37, −15.07 and −15.18 respectively at 16 °C and −14.89, −15.41 and −15.65 respectively at 20 °C). Fractionation of C isotopes occurred as the ACC recrystallized to form calcite with the fractionation factor ε calcite-ACC  = −1.20 ± 0.52‰. This is consistent with the crystallization involving dissolution and reprecipitation rather than a solid state rearrangement. Although C isotopic fractionation has previously been described between different species of dissolved inorganic carbon and

  13. Sulfur isotopic fractionation of carbonyl sulfide during degradation by soil bacteria and enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamezaki, Kazuki; Hattori, Shohei; Ogawa, Takahiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Kato, Hiromi; Katayama, Yoko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2017-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas that possess great potential for tracer of carbon cycle (Campbell et al., 2008). COS is taken up by vegetation during photosynthesis like absorption of carbon dioxide but COS can not emit by respiration of vegetation, suggesting possible tracer for gross primary production. However, some studies show the COS-derived GPP is larger than the estimates by using carbon dioxide flux because COS flux by photolysis and soil flux are not distinguished (e.g. Asaf et al., 2013). Isotope analysis is a useful tool to trace sources and transformations of trace gases. Recently our group developed a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions of COS using nanomole level samples: the direct isotopic analytical technique of on-line gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions S+ enabling us to easily analyze sulfur isotopes in COS (Hattori et al., 2015). Soil is thought to be important as both a source and a sink of COS in the troposphere. In particular, soil has been reported as a large environmental sink for atmospheric COS. Bacteria isolated from various soils actively degrade COS, with various enzymes such as carbonic anhydrase and COSase (Ogawa et al., 2013) involved in COS degradation. However, the mechanism and the magnitude of bacterial contribution in terms of a sink for atmospheric COS is still uncertain. Therefore, it is important to quantitatively evaluate this contribution using COS sulfur isotope analysis. We present isotopic fractionation constants for COS by laboratory incubation experiments during degradation by soil bacteria and COSase. Incubation experiments were conducted using strains belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia, Cupriavidus, and Thiobacillus, isolated from natural soil or activated sludge and enzyme purified from a bacteria. As a result, the isotopic compositions of OCS were increased during degradation of

  14. The status of applying stable isotope in the studies of environmental science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Zhipeng; Zhang Liwen; Zhu Tan; Feng Yinchang

    2007-01-01

    The stable isotope composition is characteristic in the pollution source, and it is relatively fixed in the process of transferring and reaction. At present the precise analysis result of stable isotope ratio can be obtained easily. So the stable isotopes can be applied to the pollution affair arbitration and source study. The concept and analytical method of stable isotopes are introduced. The research status of the stable isotopes in the field of environmental science and the isotope fractionation is reviewed. (authors)

  15. Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris Mutants Lacking Periplasmic Hydrogenases or the Type I Tetraheme Cytochrome c3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, M.; Ono, S.; Bosak, T.

    2012-12-01

    A large fraction of anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds relies on microbial sulfate reduction. Sulfur isotope fractionation by these microbes has been widely used to trace the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and carbon, but intracellular mechanisms behind the wide range of fractionations observed in nature and cultures are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the influence of electron transport chain components on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by culturing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (Tp1-c3). The mutants were grown both in batch and continuous cultures. All tested mutants grew on lactate or pyruvate as the sole carbon and energy sources, generating sulfide. Mutants lacking cytoplasmic and periplasmic hydrogenases exhibited similar growth physiologies and sulfur isotope fractionations to their parent strains. On the other hand, a mutant lacking Tp1-c3 (ΔcycA) fractionated the 34S/32S ratio more than the wild type, evolving H2 in the headspace and exhibiting a lower specific respiration rate. In the presence of high concentrations of pyruvate, the growth of ΔcycA relied largely on fermentation rather than sulfate reduction, even when sulfate was abundant, producing the largest sulfur isotope effect observed in this study. Differences between sulfur isotope fractionation by ΔcycA and the wild type highlight the effect of electron transfer chains on the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation. Because Tp1-c3 is known to exclusively shuttle electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases to transmembrane complexes, electron transfers in the absence of Tp1-c3 should bypass the periplasmic hydrogen cycling, and the loss of reducing equivalents in the form of H2 can impair the flow of electrons from organic acids to sulfur, increasing isotope fractionation. Larger fractionation by ΔcycA can inform interpretations of sulfur isotope data at an environmental scale as well

  16. Mercury stable isotope fractionation in a tropical ecosystem including human hair: New insights for an isotope balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffont, Laure; Sonke, Jeroen; Maurice, Laurence; Behra, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Mercury contamination is an environmental problem in the Amazon basin still relevant today as impacts on human health are poorly studied. In Bolivia, indigenous people have elevated methylmercury concentrations (between 2719 and 23701 ng.g-1) in their hair. This highly toxic molecule is formed after methylation of inorganic Hg released by chemical and physical weathering and from human activities. The aim of our study is to propose a first isotope balance in a Bolivian Amazon ecosystem, through variations in Hg isotopic compositions. The discovery of mass-independent fracionation (MIF) of odd-isotopes in our organic samples (fish and human hair) opened a new way of research in tracing the sources and the processes involved in the cycle of Hg. Four types of samples are studied: liquid Hg0 from gold mining, sediment samples, fish coming from the Beni River basin (from the main channel and an associated floodplain lake) and hair from gold miners and fish-eating native populations. Hg isotopic compositions were analyzed on a Thermo-Finnigan Neptune MC-ICP-MS at the LMTG after sample digestion by HCl/HNO3 or by H2O2/HNO3 for fish samples, at 120°C. The δ202Hg values (relative to NIST 3133) are signicantly different with respect to the external precision on UM-Almaden#2 of 0.18 ‰ (2σ, n = 42): -0.34 ± 0.02 ‰ for liquid mercury, between -1.33 and -0.81 ‰ for bottom and floodplain sediments (n=18), between -0.87 and 2.22 ‰ for miners hair (n=26), +1.29 ± 0.41 ‰ for native hair (n=13) and between -0.91 and -0.21 ‰ for fish samples (n=53). A large mass-independent isotope fractionation (MIF) was observed for odd isotope ratios in all hair samples and fish samples whereas weak anomalies were measured for sediment samples: - ∆199Hg anomaly: -0.12 to -0.04 ‰ for sediment, -0.22 to +0.63 ‰ for fish samples and +0.13 to +1.63 ‰ for hair - ∆201Hg anomaly: -0.12 to -0.02 ‰ for sediment, -0.21 to +0.43 ‰ for fish samples and +0.06 to +1.25 ‰ for hair

  17. Nitrogen isotope dynamics and fractionation during sedimentary denitrification in Boknis Eck, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dähnke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The global marine nitrogen cycle is constrained by nitrogen fixation as a source of reactive nitrogen, and denitrification or anammox on the sink side. These processes with their respective isotope effects set the marine nitrate 15N-isotope value (δ15N to a relatively constant average of 5‰. This value can be used to better assess the magnitude of these sources and sink terms, but the underlying assumption is that sedimentary denitrification and anammox, processes responsible for approximately one-third of global nitrogen removal, have little to no isotope effect on nitrate in the water column. We investigated the isotope fractionation in sediment incubations, measuring net denitrification and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope fractionation in surface sediments from the coastal Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck, northern Germany, a site with seasonal hypoxia and dynamic nitrogen turnover. Sediment denitrification was fast, and regardless of current paradigms assuming little fractionation during sediment denitrification, we measured fractionation factors of 18.9‰ for nitrogen and 15.8‰ for oxygen in nitrate. While the input of nitrate to the water column remains speculative, these results challenge the current view of fractionation during sedimentary denitrification and imply that nitrogen budget calculations may need to consider this variability, as both preferential uptake of light nitrate and release of the remaining heavy fraction can significantly alter water column nitrate isotope values at the sediment–water interface.

  18. Nitrogen isotope dynamics and fractionation during sedimentary denitrification in Boknis Eck, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähnke, K.; Thamdrup, B.

    2013-05-01

    The global marine nitrogen cycle is constrained by nitrogen fixation as a source of reactive nitrogen, and denitrification or anammox on the sink side. These processes with their respective isotope effects set the marine nitrate 15N-isotope value (δ15N) to a relatively constant average of 5‰. This value can be used to better assess the magnitude of these sources and sink terms, but the underlying assumption is that sedimentary denitrification and anammox, processes responsible for approximately one-third of global nitrogen removal, have little to no isotope effect on nitrate in the water column. We investigated the isotope fractionation in sediment incubations, measuring net denitrification and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope fractionation in surface sediments from the coastal Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck, northern Germany), a site with seasonal hypoxia and dynamic nitrogen turnover. Sediment denitrification was fast, and regardless of current paradigms assuming little fractionation during sediment denitrification, we measured fractionation factors of 18.9‰ for nitrogen and 15.8‰ for oxygen in nitrate. While the input of nitrate to the water column remains speculative, these results challenge the current view of fractionation during sedimentary denitrification and imply that nitrogen budget calculations may need to consider this variability, as both preferential uptake of light nitrate and release of the remaining heavy fraction can significantly alter water column nitrate isotope values at the sediment-water interface.

  19. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunde [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Laboratory of Basin Hydrology and Wetland Eco-restoration, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Aiguo, E-mail: aiguozhou@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • The effect of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation was evaluated. • The enrichment factors was independent concentration of NO{sub 3}{sup −}, or SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. • Cl{sup −} significantly influenced the carbon isotope fractionation. - Abstract: Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from −6.3 ± 0.8 to 10 ± 1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes.

  20. Biological fractionation of lead isotopes in Sprague-Dawley rats lead poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    Full Text Available It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems.24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance and the low-lead animal feed (diet administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS.There are significant differences (p<0.05 in lead isotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of (204Pb/(206Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when (204Pb/(206Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group.The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for (204Pb/(206Pb ratio under high-dose exposure.

  1. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bruce S. [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Lollar, Barbara Sherwood [Earth Sciences Department, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B1 (Canada); Passeport, Elodie [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Department, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E5 (Canada); Sleep, Brent E., E-mail: sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining “observable” DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C{sub 0}), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (D{sub mech}/D{sub eff}). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C{sub 0}/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C{sub 0}/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1 m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (< 100 years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with “typical” well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where D{sub mech}/D{sub eff} is

  2. Mass-Independent Fractionation of Oxygen Isotope in Earth Wind: First Principle Calculations for Photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, A.; Nanbu, S.; Kasai, Y.; Ozima, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mass-independently fractionated oxygen isotope were reported on metal particles extracted from Apollo lunar soils [1, 2], but these origins are still unknown. Since the substantial fraction of Earth-escaping O+ flux (Earth Wind, EW hereafter), comparable to the amount of the anomalous oxygen implanted on the metal particles, could reach the lunar surface [3], Ozima et al. [4] suggested that EW may be responsible to the anomalous oxygen. The purpose is to test this EW hypothesiss, we study oxygen isotopic ratios of O+ at the upper atmosphere. From quantum chemical calculations of photo-dissociation of O2, we show the results in mass-independent isotopic fractionation of oxygen, thereby in conformity with the EW hypothesis. First principles reaction dynamics simulations were performed to compute the photolysis rate for the B3Σu- ← X3Σg- electronic transition, for Schumann-Runge band. With the assumption of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, we performed the wave-packet dynamics for the nuclei-motion in the potential energy curves determined by the first step calculation. Quantum chemical program package [5] was used for the first step calculation, and the quantum dynamics was carried out by our own program package. Assuming the quantum yield of the corresponding photolysis is unity, the photo-absorption cross section can be correlated with the photolysis rate. Therefore, following the time dependent approach, the autocorrelation function (A(t) = ) was numerically computed by the second step calculation. Finally, the theoretical spectrum as a function of wavelength of excitation light was estimated by the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function A(t) [6]. Calculated absorption cross sections for C16O showed similar wavelength dependence with experiment [7], although the absolute magnitude was yet to be calibrated for a quantitative comparison. Assuming Boltzmann distribution at 1200 K, we estimated enrichment factors defined as σι(λ)/σ16(λ) - 1 (i

  3. Equilibrium Iron Isotope Fractionation at Ultra-High Pressures: Focus on Mantle-Core Differentiation. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, V. B.

    2009-12-01

    Iron isotope fractionation studies provide an insight into chemical and phase transformations accompanying high-pressure core-mantle differentiation processes in planetary interiors. A method for determination of equilibrium iron isotope fractionation factors (β-factors) at wide range of pressures (up to ~ 150 GPa) was recently established (Polyakov et al., 2005, 2007; Polyakov 2009). The method consists in obtaining 57Fe partial vibration densities of states (PVDOS) at different pressures from synchrotron inelastic nuclear resonance x-ray scattering (INRXS) experiments followed by calculations of iron β-factors from the 57Fe PVDOS. Using INRXS-derived 57Fe PVDOS of Fe-metal (Mao et al., 2001), ferropericlase (FeP) (Lin et al., 2006), and postperovskite (PPV) (Mao et al., 2006), it was shown (Polyakov, 2009) that at high pressures FeP and PPV are enriched in heavy iron isotopes relative to Fe-metal contrary to the low-pressure iron isotope fractionation regularity. Earth's core may contain also Ni, Si, S, H, C, etc. along with iron. I estimated effect of these elements on iron β-factors using INRXS-derived 57Fe PVDOS for Fe0.92Ni0.08 and Fe0.85Si0.15 (Lin et al., 2003), FeS (Kobayashi et al., 2004), Fe3S (Lin et al., 2004), FeHx (Mao et al., 2004), Fe3C (Gao et al., 2008). Additions of Ni and Si to Fe-metal do not affect the iron β-factor contrary to additions of S, H, and C (see figure), which reduce the iron β-factors and aid in heavy iron isotope enrichment of silicate fraction during metal-silicate differentiation. This consits with the explanation of the observed enrichment (~ 0.1‰ for 57Fe/54Fe) of Earth's basalts in heavy isotopes with respect to those from Vesta and Mars (Poitrasson et al., 2004; Weyer et al., 2005; Shoenberg and von Blanckenburg, 2006) in terms of the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation during core-mantle differentiation processes as proposed in Polyakov (2009). Figure. Pressure dependence of 57Fe/54Fe β-factors. Open circles

  4. Joint interpretation of enantiomer and stable isotope fractionation for chiral pesticides degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    introduce a modeling approach with the aim of unifying and integrating the interpretation of isotopic and enantiomeric fractionation. The model is based on the definition of enantiomer-specific isotopologues and jointly predicts the evolution of concentration, enantiomer fractionation, as well as changes...

  5. Observations of Isotope Fractionation in Prestellar Cores: Interstellar Origin of Meteoritic Hot Spot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing. Here, we show the results of models and observations of the nitrogen and carbon fractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  6. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in leaf waxes in the Alaskan Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, William C.; Russell, James M.; Giblin, Anne E.; Welker, Jeffrey M.; Klein, Eric S.; Huang, Yongsong

    2017-09-01

    Leaf wax hydrogen isotopes (δDwax) are increasingly utilized in terrestrial paleoclimate research. Applications of this proxy must be grounded by studies of the modern controls on δDwax, including the ecophysiological controls on isotope fractionation at both the plant and landscape scales. Several calibration studies suggest a considerably smaller apparent fractionation between source water and waxes (εapp) at high latitudes relative to temperate or tropical locations, with major implications for paleoclimatic interpretations of sedimentary δDwax. Here we investigate apparent fractionation in the Arctic by tracing the isotopic composition of leaf waxes from production in modern plants to deposition in lake sediments using isotopic observations of precipitation, soil and plant waters, living leaf waxes, and waxes in sediment traps in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska. We also analyze a lake surface sediment transect to compare present-day vegetation assemblages to εapp at the watershed scale. Source water and εapp were determined for live specimens of Eriophorum vaginatum (cottongrass) and Betula nana (dwarf birch), two dominant tundra plants in the Brooks Range foothills. The δD of these plants' xylem water closely tracks that of surface soil water, and reflects a summer-biased precipitation source. Leaf water is enriched by 23 ± 15‰ relative to xylem water for E. vaginatum and by 41 ± 19‰ for B. nana. Evapotranspiration modeling indicates that this leaf water enrichment is consistent with the evaporative enrichment expected under the climate conditions of northern Alaska, and that 24-h photosynthesis does not cause excessive leaf water isotope enrichment. The εapp determined for our study species average -89 ± 14‰ and -106 ± 16‰ for B. nana n-alkanes and n-acids, respectively, and -182 ± 10‰ and -154 ± 26‰ for E. vaginatum n-alkanes and n-acids, which are similar to the εapp of related species in temperate and tropical

  7. Biological fractionation of lead isotopes in Sprague-Dawley rats lead poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Duojian; Xie, Qing; Wang, Jingyu

    2012-01-01

    It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate) via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces) were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance) and the low-lead animal feed (diet) administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). There are significant differences (pblood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of (204)Pb/(206)Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when (204)Pb/(206)Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for (204)Pb/(206)Pb ratio under high-dose exposure.

  8. Biological Fractionation of Lead Isotopes in Sprague-Dawley Rats Lead Poisoned via the Respiratory Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Duojian; Xie, Qing; Wang, Jingyu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. Methods 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate) via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces) were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance) and the low-lead animal feed (diet) administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results There are significant differences (pisotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of 204Pb/206Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when 204Pb/206Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. Conclusions The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for 204Pb/206Pb ratio under high-dose exposure. PMID:23300678

  9. Aqueous speciation is likely to control the stable isotopic fractionation of cerium at varying pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Masato; Tanimizu, Masaharu; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2017-12-01

    Cerium (Ce) can be used as a plaeoredox proxy as shown by a recent study of stable isotopic fractionation of Ce during adsorption and precipitation. However, the experiments in that study were performed at pH conditions lower than that of natural seawater. In the current study, adsorption and precipitation experiments were performed at pH 6.80, 8.20, and 11.00 with 2.25 mM dissolved carbonate to simulate Ce isotopic fractionation in the natural environment and examine the relationship between isotopic fractionation and Ce speciation in the liquid phase. Mean isotopic fractionation factors between liquid and solid phases (αLq-So) of Ce adsorbed on ferrihydrite did not depend on pH conditions or dissolved Ce species. In the Ce/δ-MnO2 system,αLq-So values decreased from 1.000411 (±0.000079) to 1.000194 (±0.000067) with increasing pH or number of carbonate ions, from Ce3+ to Ce(CO3)2-. In the Ce/precipitation system at pH 8.20 and 11.00 where Ce(CO3)2- is present in solution, the αLq-So values were 0.999821 (±0.000071) and 0.999589 (±0.000074), respectively, meaning that lighter isotope enrichment was observed in the liquid phase, which is the contrary to those of the other systems. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses were also performed to investigate the coordination structure of the adsorbed or precipitated Ce species that control the isotopic fractionation during adsorption. Even at higher pH, where Ce(CO3)+ or Ce(CO3)2- are the dominant dissolved species, the first coordination sphere of Ce in the solid phase in the Ce/ferrihydrite and Ce/precipitation systems was similar to that observed at pH 5.00 where Ce3+ was the main species in solution. A slight elongation in the Cesbnd O bond length in the solid phase at pH 11.00, where negatively charged dissolved species are dominant in the liquid phase, may cause a decrease in isotopic fractionation in the Ce/δ-MnO2 system. The coordination environment of Ce may not change significantly

  10. Oxygen isotopic fractionation of O₂ during adsorption and desorption processes using molecular sieve at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Insu; Kusakabe, Minoru; Lee, Jong Ik

    2014-06-15

    Cryogenic trapping using molecular sieves is commonly used to collect O2 extracted from silicates for (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O analyses. However, gases which interfere with (17)O/(16)O analysis, notably NF3, are also trapped and their removal is essential for accurate direct measurement of the (17)O/(16)O ratio. It is also necessary to identify and quantify any isotopic fractionation associated with the use of cryogenic trapping using molecular sieves. The oxygen isotopic compositions of O2 before and after desorption from, and adsorption onto, 13X and 5A molecular sieves (MS13X and MS5A) at 0°C, -78°C, -114°C, and -130°C were measured in order to determine the oxygen isotopic fractionation at these temperatures. We also investigated whether isotopic fractionation occurred when O2 gas was transferred sequentially into a second cold finger, also containing molecular sieve. It was confirmed that significant oxygen isotopic fractionation occurs between the gaseous O2 and that adsorbed onto molecular sieve, if desorption and adsorption are incomplete. As the fraction of released or untrapped O2 becomes smaller with decreasing trapping temperature (from 0 to -130°C), the isotopic fractionation becomes larger. Approximately half of the total adsorbed O2 is released from the molecular sieve during desorption at -114°C, which is the temperature recommended for separation from NF3 (retained on the molecular sieve), and this will interfere with (17)O/(16)O measurements. The use of a single cold finger should be avoided, because partial desorption is accompanied by oxygen isotopic fractionation, thereby resulting in inaccurate isotopic data. The use of a dual cold finger arrangement is recommended because, as we have confirmed, the transfer of O2 from the first trap to the second is almost 100%. However, even under these conditions, a small isotopic fractionation (0.18 ± 0.05‰ in δ(17)O values and 0.26 ± 0.06‰ in δ(18)O values) occurred, with O2 in

  11. Analytical modelling of stable isotope fractionation of volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Daniel; Cornaton, Fabien; Höhener, Patrick; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Analytical models were developed that simulate stable isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near a point source contamination in the unsaturated zone. The models describe diffusive transport of VOCs, biodegradation and source ageing. The mass transport is governed by Fick's law for diffusion. The equation for reactive transport of VOCs in the soil gas phase was solved for different source geometries and for different boundary conditions. Model results were compared to experimental data from a one-dimensional laboratory column and a radial-symmetric field experiment. The comparison yielded a satisfying agreement. The model results clearly illustrate the significant isotope fractionation by gas phase diffusion under transient state conditions. This leads to an initial depletion of heavy isotopes with increasing distance from the source. The isotope evolution of the source is governed by the combined effects of isotope fractionation due to vaporisation, diffusion and biodegradation. The net effect can lead to an enrichment or depletion of the heavy isotope in the remaining organic phase, depending on the compound and element considered. Finally, the isotope evolution of molecules migrating away from the source and undergoing degradation is governed by a combined degradation and diffusion isotope effect. This suggests that, in the unsaturated zone, the interpretation of biodegradation of VOC based on isotopic data must always be based on a model combining gas phase diffusion and degradation.

  12. Observations of nitrogen isotope fractionation in deeply embedded protostars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wampfler, Susanne Franziska; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; Bizzarro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) The terrestrial planets, comets, and meteorites are significantly enriched in 15N compared to the Sun and Jupiter. While the solar and jovian nitrogen isotope ratio is believed to represent the composition of the protosolar nebula, a still unidentified process has caused 15N-enrichment......(Abridged) The terrestrial planets, comets, and meteorites are significantly enriched in 15N compared to the Sun and Jupiter. While the solar and jovian nitrogen isotope ratio is believed to represent the composition of the protosolar nebula, a still unidentified process has caused 15N...

  13. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Baker, Joel A.; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2008-01-01

    be controlled by isotope fractionation between the free and complexed iron.We have determined the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation induced by organic ligand activity in experiments with solutions having co-existing inorganic Fe(III) species and siderophore complexes, Fedesferrioxamine B (at pH 2). The two......-type fractionation during precipitation, this experiment yielded an isotope fractionation factor of a56Fesolution-solid=1.00027. Calculations based on these results indicate that isotopic re-equilibration is unlikely to significantly affect our determined equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically...... and organically complexed Fe. To determine the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically and organically bound Fe(III), experiments with variable proportions of inorganic Fe were carried out at 25 °C. Irrespective of the proportion of inorganic Fe, equilibrium fractionation factors were within...

  14. Biosynthetic origin of acetic acid using SNIF-NMR; Determinacao da origem biossintetica de acido acetico atraves da tecnica 'Site Specific Natural Isotopic Fractionation Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNIF-NMR)'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffo, Elisangela Fabiana; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: giba_04@yahoo.com.br

    2006-05-15

    The main purpose of this work is to describe the use of the technique Site-Specific Natural Isotopic Fractionation of hydrogen (SNIF-NMR), using {sup 2}H and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, to investigate the biosynthetic origin of acetic acid in commercial samples of Brazilian vinegar. This method is based on the deuterium to hydrogen ratio at a specific position (methyl group) of acetic acitained by fermentation, through different biosynthetic mechanisms, which result in different isotopic ratios. We measured the isotopic ratio of vinegars obtained through C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, and CAM biosynthetic mechanisms, blends of C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} (agrins) and synthetic acetic acid. (author)

  15. Oxygen isotope fractionation in the siderite-water system between 8.5 and 62 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Joep; Fernandez, Alvaro; Müller, Inigo A.; Lever, Mark; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2018-01-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of siderites can be used to deduce the temperature and/or oxygen isotope composition of the fluids from which they precipitated. Previous siderite-water oxygen isotope fractionation calibrations are not well constrained at temperatures below 33 °C where most of the siderite forms at the Earth's surface. Moreover, the few experimental low temperature calibration points available are possibly inaccurate as the corresponding siderites may not have formed in equilibrium with the solution. In this study, we synthesized siderite in the laboratory from 8.5 to 62 °C, using both active-degassing experiments and microbial cultures. We used the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, which significantly reduces the equilibration time of oxygen isotopes among all dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species and water to minimize siderite formation out of equilibrium. Our calibration is based on many more data points than previous calibrations and significantly reduces the uncertainty in siderite-water oxygen isotope fractionation in natural siderites formed at low temperatures. The best fit equation is 1000 * ln α = 19.67 ± 0.42(103/T) -36.27 ± 1.34 where α (1000+δ18Osiderite/1000+δ18Owater) is the fractionation factor and T is the temperature in Kelvin.

  16. Calcium isotopic fractionation in mantle peridotites by melting and metasomatism and Ca isotope composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin-Ting; Ionov, Dmitri A.; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Chen-Lei; Golovin, Alexander V.; Qin, Li-Ping; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Huang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    To better constrain the Ca isotopic composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) and explore the Ca isotope fractionation in the mantle, we determined the Ca isotopic composition of 28 peridotite xenoliths from Mongolia, southern Siberia and the Siberian craton. The samples are divided in three chemical groups: (1) fertile, unmetasomatized lherzolites (3.7-4.7 wt.% Al2O3); (2) moderately melt-depleted peridotites (1.3-3.0 wt.% Al2O3) with no or very limited metasomatism (LREE-depleted cpx); (3) strongly metasomatized peridotites (LREE-enriched cpx and bulk rock) further divided in subgroups 3a (harzburgites, 0.1-1.0% Al2O3) and 3b (fertile lherzolites, 3.9-4.3% Al2O3). In Group 1, δ44/40Ca of fertile spinel and garnet peridotites, which experienced little or no melting and metasomatism, show a limited variation from 0.90 to 0.99‰ (relative to SRM 915a) and an average of 0.94 ± 0.05‰ (2SD, n = 14), which defines the Ca isotopic composition of the BSE. In Group 2, the δ44/40Ca is the highest for three rocks with the lowest Al2O3, i.e. the greatest melt extraction degrees (average 1.06 ± 0.04 ‰, i.e. ∼0.1‰ heavier than the BSE estimate). Simple modeling of modal melting shows that partial melting of the BSE with 103 ln ⁡αperidotite-melt ranging from 0.10 to 0.25 can explain the Group 2 data. By contrast, δ44/40Ca in eight out of nine metasomatized Group 3 peridotites are lower than the BSE estimate. The Group 3a harzburgites show the greatest δ44/40Ca variation range (0.25-0.96‰), with δ44/40Ca positively correlated with CaO and negatively correlated with Ce/Eu. Chemical evidence suggests that the residual, melt-depleted, low-Ca protoliths of the Group 3a harzburgites were metasomatized, likely by carbonate-rich melts/fluids. We argue that such fluids may have low (≤0.25‰) δ44/40Ca either because they contain recycled crustal components or because Ca isotopes, similar to trace elements and their ratios, may be fractionated by kinetic and

  17. Natural Isotopic Fractionation of 238U/235U in the Water Column of the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, S. J.; Brennecka, G.; Anbar, A. D.; Colman, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    The natural fractionation of long-lived uranium isotopes (238U, 235U) is being explored as a paleoredox proxy. While uranium behaves conservatively in oxic seawater, it is readily removed to sediments under reducing conditions. Measurements of δ238/235U in black shales and marine sediments deposited under sulfidic conditions suggest that uranium removed in such environments is isotopically heavy. However, this fractionation process has not been directly demonstrated in a present-day marine environment, nor is the specific mechanism of fractionation known. The euxinic water column of the Black Sea provides an ideal laboratory for studying uranium isotope fractionation. Uranium in Black Sea sediments is 0.35-0.84‰ heavy in δ238/235U relative to open ocean seawater (Weyer et al. 2008). We therefore expect that dissolved uranium in the Black Sea water column should be correspondingly light. Furthermore, direct measurements of δ238/235U versus depth could be used in combination with sediment δ238/235U to infer the dominant locations of U removal and constrain specific mechanisms of fractionation. Here we present the first δ238/235U depth profile from the water column of the Black Sea. The measurements were made on a Neptune MC-ICP-MS, using a 236U-233U double spike to correct for instrumental mass bias, following preconcentration and purification with UTEVA resin. With this method, we are able to measure δ238/235U with a 2σ precision of 0.07‰ on 100 ng samples. Our results show that δ238/235U decreases monotonically with depth (Fig. 1). At the surface, δ238/235U values are similar to those in the open ocean. At 2000m, δ238/235U is 0.28‰ lighter than open ocean seawater, while uranium concentrations are depleted by ~44% relative to conservative mixing. As expected, δ238/235U in the water column is always lighter than the underlying sediments, confirming that 238U is preferentially removed to marine sediments under sulfidic conditions. Fig 1. (left) Depth

  18. Steady state fractionation of heavy noble gas isotopes in a deep unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Alan M.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore steady state fractionation processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ), we measured argon, krypton, and xenon isotope ratios throughout a ∼110 m deep UZ at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in Nevada, USA. Prior work has suggested that gravitational settling should create a nearly linear increase in heavy-to-light isotope ratios toward the bottom of stagnant air columns in porous media. Our high-precision measurements revealed a binary mixture between (1) expected steady state isotopic compositions and (2) unfractionated atmospheric air. We hypothesize that the presence of an unsealed pipe connecting the surface to the water table allowed for direct inflow of surface air in response to extensive UZ gas sampling prior to our first (2015) measurements. Observed isotopic resettling in deep UZ samples collected a year later, after sealing the pipe, supports this interpretation. Data and modeling each suggest that the strong influence of gravitational settling and weaker influences of thermal diffusion and fluxes of CO2 and water vapor accurately describe steady state isotopic fractionation of argon, krypton, and xenon within the UZ. The data confirm that heavy noble gas isotopes are sensitive indicators of UZ depth. Based on this finding, we outline a potential inverse approach to quantify past water table depths from noble gas isotope measurements in paleogroundwater, after accounting for fractionation during dissolution of UZ air and bubbles.

  19. Influence of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase on stable isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalo, Muna; Einsiedl, Florian; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Stichler, Willibald

    2008-03-01

    The stable isotopes of sulfate are often used as a tool to assess bacterial sulfate reduction on the macro scale. However, the mechanisms of stable isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen at the enzymatic level are not yet fully understood. In batch experiments with water enriched in 18O we investigated the effect of different nitrite concentrations on sulfur isotope fractionation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. With increasing nitrite concentrations, we found sulfur isotope enrichment factors ranging from -11.2 ± 1.8‰ to -22.5 ± 3.2‰. Furthermore, the δ18O values in the remaining sulfate increased from approximately 50-120‰ when 18O-enriched water was supplied. Since 18O-exchange with ambient water does not take place in sulfate, but rather in intermediates of the sulfate reduction pathway (e.g. SO32-), we suggest that nitrite affects the steady-state concentration and the extent of reoxidation of the metabolic intermediate sulfite to sulfate during sulfate reduction. Given that nitrite is known to inhibit the production of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase, our results suggest that the activity of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase regulates the kinetic isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen during bacterial sulfate reduction. Our novel results also imply that isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction strongly depends on the cell internal enzymatic regulation rather than on the physico-chemical features of the individual enzymes.

  20. High-Temperature Equilibrium Isotope Fractionation of Non-Traditional Stable Isotopes: Experiments, Theory, and Applications (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E. D.; Lazar, G. C.; Macris, C. A.; Manning, C. E.; Schauble, E. A.; Shahar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Experiments are crucial for validating our understanding of stable isotope fractionation at high temperatures. The three-isotope method has been applied with success in the Si, Mg, Fe, and Ni isotope systems to date. The results of these experiments can be compared with expectations from theory and measurements of natural samples. Qualitative insights into the partitioning of heavy and light isotopes between mineral phases are gained by treating the force constant for relevant bonds, Kf j, as electrostatic in origin. The ionic model, based on the mean bond strength as defined by Pauling, has obvious limitations but is useful for rationalizing structures and site occupancies in silicates and oxide minerals and is equally useful in formulating expectations for isotope fractionation between phases. In some cases, as in Fe isotopes in spinels, the expectations are contrary to predictions based on modeling but similar to observations in natural samples. Experimental verification is required. The force constant for a bond between cation i (Mg, Fe, etc.) and anion j (e.g., O) can be written in terms of mean bond strengths si and sj (as defined by Pauling) as Kf,ij = sisj e2 (1-n)/(4 π ɛο r3ij ) where ɛo is the electric constant (vacuum permittivity for simplicity), e is the charge of an electron, n is the exponent in the Born-Mayer formulation for ion repulsion (Born and Mayer 1932), and rij is the interatomic spacing. This equation shows explicitly that larger values for the force constant Kf correspond to smaller coordination numbers (via si and sj). We therefore expect an inverse relationship between isotope ratios (heavy/light) and coordination of its oxygen bond partners in silicate and oxides minerals and this is verified in mantle minerals. Our work with Fe isotope partitioning in mantle spinels suggests that coordination may be equally important as oxidation state, recognizing that these distinctions are not orthogonal. Recent work on the Mg isotopic

  1. Isotopic study of Karst water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovsek-Sefman, H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of the isotopic composition of water formed part of an extended investigation of the water drainage system in the Slovenian Karst. These studies were planned to complement geological and speleological investigations which are already being performed in this area, with the knowledge of the mechanism of changes in the isotopic composition of water in the natural environment on some smaller locations, Planina cave near Postojna where the vertical percolation of meteoric water through the karstified carbonate ceiling was studied and the water catchment areas of some small rivers, Ljubljanica, Rizana and Idrijca. Mass spectrometric investigations of the isotopic composition of some elements ( 18 O, D, 13 C and T) in water and in dissolved carbonates, as well as the isotopic composition of 18 O and 13 C in cave carbonates were performed. The results allow to conclude that the waters in karst aquifers in spite of producing the homogenisation to a great extent, qualitative determination of the retention time and of the prevailing sources for some springs and surface and underground water flows is nevertheless possible. The isotopic composition of 18 O in water and of 18 O and 13 C in dissolved carbonates depends on climatic conditions and on denudation processes. The investigation of cave carbonates revealed that they have different isotopic compositions of 18 O and 13 C because of different locations and also different ages

  2. Equilibrium isotopic fractionation in the kaolinite, quartz, water system : Prediction from first-principles density-functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Meheut, M.; Lazzeri, M.; Balan, Etienne; Mauri, F.

    2007-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation factors for oxygen, hydrogen and silicon have been calculated using first-principles methods for the kaolinite, quartz, water (ice and gas water) system. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained for mineral-water oxygen isotope fractionation. This approach gives reliable results on isotopic fractionation factors as a function of temperature, within a relative precision of typically 5%. These calculations provide independent quantitative constraints on th...

  3. Isotope Fractionations Associated With Degassing of CO2 Aqueous Solutions and its Implications for Carbonate Clumped Isotope Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W.; Niles, P.; Daeron, M.; Eiler, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Bicarbonate dehydration (HCO3-+H+→H2CO3→CO2+H2O) and dehydroxylation (HCO3-→CO2+OH-) are important reactions in solutions containing dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and are involved in multiple geologic processes, including cryogenic carbonate formation, speleothem deposition and air-sea CO2 exchange. Current understandings of the isotope fractionations that accompany these reactions are very limited. Here we present a model of the isotopic fractionations accompanying dehydration of carbonic acid in aqueous solution, using techniques from ab initio, transition state and statistical thermodynamic theory, and tests of this model based on measurements of experimental and natural carbonates produced by degassing of CO2 from aqueous solutions. Our model predicts that the isotopologues of carbonic acid containing heavy isotopes dehydrate more slowly than the normal isotopologues, such that fractionations between product CO2 and reactant H2CO3 are ~-25‰ for δ13C and ~-9‰ for δ18O at 300K. Expression of these isotope fractionations during degassing of CO2 from aqueous solutions should lead to increases in the δ13C and δ18O of residual DIC species, and in carbonate minerals that precipitate from that DIC; this phenomenon could explain the non-equilibrium isotopic compositions of some cryogenic carbonates and speleothems. The carbonate clumped isotope thermometer constrains carbonate formation temperatures based on the proportions of 13C-18O bonds in the carbonate mineral lattice [1]; the lower the formation temperature, the greater the proportion of 13C-18O bonds. By extending our above model to include the multiply- substituted isotopologues, we predict that isotope fractionations accompanying dehydration of carbonic acid decrease the proportion of 13C-18O bonds in the remaining DIC pool relative to their expected equilibrium abundances, and therefore lead to an apparent overestimation of carbonate formation temperatures as determined by the carbonate

  4. Silicon isotope fractionation by marine sponges and the reconstruction of the silicon isotope composition of ancient deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Rocha, Christina L.

    2003-05-01

    The silicon isotope composition (δ30Si) of biogenic opal provides a view of the silica cycle at times in the past. Reconstructions require the knowledge of silicon isotope fractionation during opal biomineralization. The δ30Si of specimens of hexactinellid sponges and demosponges growing in the modern ocean ranged from -1.2‰ to -3.7‰ (n = 6), corresponding to the production of opal that has a δ30Si value 3.8‰ ± 0.8‰ more negative than seawater silicic acid and a fractionation factor (α) of 0.9964. This is three times the fractionation observed during opal formation by marine diatoms and terrestrial plants and is the largest fractionation of silicon isotopes observed for any natural process on Earth. The δ30Si values of sponge spicules across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary at Ocean Drilling Program Site 689 on Maud Rise range from -1.1‰ to -3.0‰, overlapping the range observed for sponges growing in modern seawater.

  5. The effect of the isotopic composition of oxygen on the non-mass-dependent isotopic fractionation in the formation of ozone by discharge of O2. [from meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jongmann; Epstein, Samuel

    1987-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation processes in the formation of O3 by 20-kV 60-kHz discharge of O2 in a fused silica container at 77 K are investigated experimentally, with a focus on the effects of changes in the isotopic composition of O2, the O2 pressure, the degree of O3 formation, and the discharge geometry on the isotope abundances in the postdischarge O2 and O3. The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with the predictions of theoretical models involving vibrational anharmonicity and symmetry effects on O3 predissociation. In experiments using O2 enriched with O-17 and O-18, the heavy isotope is enriched in the residual O2 and not in the O3, whereas the opposite is true when atmospheric isotope abundances are used. It is inferred that the predissociation rate depends on the symmetry and mass of the O3 molecules and not on self-shielding or symmetry effects in the reactant O2. The potential value of the present findings for studies of anomalous isotope abundances in meteorites is indicated.

  6. Mg isotope fractionation in biogenic carbonates of deep-sea coral, benthic foraminifera, and hermatypic coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Tanimizu, Masaharu; Inoue, Mayuri; Suzuki, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Nozomu; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2011-11-01

    High-precision Mg isotope measurements by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were applied for determinations of magnesium isotopic fractionation of biogenic calcium carbonates from seawater with a rapid Mg purification technique. The mean δ(26)Mg values of scleractinian corals, giant clam, benthic foraminifera, and calcite deep-sea corals were -0.87‰, -2.57‰, -2.34‰, and -2.43‰, suggesting preferential precipitation of light Mg isotopes to produce carbonate skeleton in biomineralization. Mg isotope fractionation in deep-sea coral, which has high Mg calcite skeleton, showed a clear temperature (T) dependence from 2.5 °C to 19.5 °C: 1,000 × ln(α) = -2.63 (±0.076) + 0.0138 (±0.0051) × T(R(2) = 0.82, p coral. Since the precipitation rates of deep-sea coral and benthic foraminifera are several orders of magnitude different, the results suggest that kinetic isotope fractionation may not be a major controlling factor for high-Mg calcite. The Mg isotope fractionation factors and the slope of temperature dependence from deep-sea corals and benthic foraminifera are similar to that for an inorganically precipitated calcite speleothem. Taking into account element partitioning and the calcification rate of biogenic CaCO(3), the similarity among inorganic minerals, deep-sea corals, and benthic foraminiferas may indicate a strong mineralogical control on Mg isotope fractionation for high-Mg calcite. On the other hand, δ(26)Mg in hermatypic corals composed of aragonite has been comparable with previous data on biogenic aragonite of coral, sclerosponges, and scaphopad, regardless of species differences of samples.

  7. A Teaching Exercise to Introduce Stable Isotope Fractionation of Metals into Geochemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dominik J.; Harris, Caroline; Maher, Kate; Bullen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the isotopic composition of elements have been widely used to study earth's climate, biosphere, and interior, and more recently to track the fate of contaminants. Within the broad range of elements that exhibit measureable isotopic variations, metal stable isotopes are increasingly applied across the biological, geological,…

  8. Oxygen isotope fractionation between human phosphate and water revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daux, Valérie; Lécuyer, Christophe; Héran, Marie-Anne

    2008-01-01

    to investigate the impact of solid food consumption on the oxygen isotope composition of the total ingested water (drinking water+solid food water). The results, along with those from three, smaller published data sets, can be considered as random estimates of a unique delta18OW/delta18OP linear relationship......-dominated and cereal-free diets, which may have been the diets of some of our early ancestors, the shift is a little higher and the application of the regression equation would slightly overestimate delta18OW in these cases....

  9. Calculation of Site-specific Carbon-isotope Fractionation in Pedogenic Oxide Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustad, James R.; Zarzycki, Piotr

    2008-07-29

    Ab initio molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry techniques are used to calculate the structure, vibrational frequencies, and carbon-isotope fractionation factors of the carbon dioxide component [CO2(m)] of soil (oxy)hydroxide minerals goethite, diaspore, and gibbsite. We have identified two possible pathways of incorporation of CO2(m) into (oxy)hydroxide crystal structures: one in which the C4+ substitutes for four H+ [CO2(m)A] and another in which C4+ substitutes for (Al3+,Fe3+) + H+ [CO2(m)B]. Calculations of isotope fractionation factors give large differences between the two structures, with the CO2(m)A being isotopically lighter than CO2(m)B by ≈10 per mil in the case of gibbsite and nearly 20 per mil in the case of goethite. The reduced partition function ratio of CO2(m)B structure in goethite differs from CO2(g) by <1 per mil. The predicted fractionation for gibbsite is >10 per mil higher, close to those measured for calcite and aragonite. The surprisingly large difference in the carbon-isotope fractionation factor between the CO2(m)A and CO2(m)B structures within a given mineral suggests that the isotopic signatures of soil (oxy)hydroxide could be heterogeneous.

  10. Determination of kinetic isotopic fractionation of water during bare soil evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Maria; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Graf, Alexander; Rothfuss, Youri

    2017-04-01

    A process-based understanding of the water cycle in the atmosphere is important for improving meteorological and hydrological forecasting models. Usually only net fluxes of evapotranspiration - ET are measured, while land-surface models compute their raw components evaporation -E and transpiration -T. Isotopologues can be used as tracers to partition ET, but this requires knowledge of the isotopic kinetic fractionation factor (αK) which impacts the stable isotopic composition of water pools (e.g., soil and plant waters) during phase change and vapor transport by soil evaporation and plant transpiration. It is defined as a function of the ratio of the transport resistances in air of the less to the most abundant isotopologue. Previous studies determined αK for free evaporating water (Merlivat, 1978) or bare soil evaporation (Braud et al. 2009) at only low temporal resolution. The goal of this study is to provide estimates at higher temporal resolution. We performed a soil evaporation laboratory experiment to determine the αK by applying the Craig and Gordon (1965) model. A 0.7 m high column (0.48 m i.d.) was filled with silt loam (20.1 % sand, 14.9 % loam, 65 % silt) and saturated with water of known isotopic composition. Soil volumetric water content, temperature and the isotopic composition (δ) of the soil water vapor were measured at six different depths. At each depth microporous polypropylene tubing allowed the sampling of soil water vapor and the measurement of its δ in a non-destructive manner with high precision and accuracy as detailed in Rothfuss et al. (2013). In addition, atmospheric water vapor was sampled at seven different heights up to one meter above the surface for isotopic analysis. Results showed that soil and atmospheric δ profiles could be monitored at high temporal and vertical resolutions during the course of the experiment. αK could be calculated by using an inverse modeling approach and the Keeling (1958) plot method at high temporal

  11. Study of the argillaceous fraction of sedimentary sequences of Meuse and Gard. Reconstitution of the diagenetic history and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the targets. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, D.

    2002-01-01

    Very low permeable argillaceous rocks like Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones or Vraconian siltstones were chosen to host a research laboratory built to determine the physico-chemical properties of the host formations for a potential underground disposal of radioactive waste. Knowledge and understanding of post-sedimentary modifications are of prime importance for definition of these properties; evaluation and quantification of the post-sedimentary changes represent the aim of this study, focused specifically on the clay material of the sequences. Samples were taken from two drillings (HTM102 and MAR501). In the HTM102 core samples, illite and mixed-layers illite/smectite are the dominant clay components of most clay fractions. Systematic SEM and TEM observations and isotopic K-Ar and Rb-Sr analyses pointed to diagenetic neo-formations of carbonates (calcite, dolomite) and clays. For instance, veils and laths of authigenic clay particles around old detrital ones can distinctly be observed. The epoch, duration and extent of the diagenetic activity(ies) are difficult to evaluate because of an overall detrital contribution even in the finest granulometric fractions. However; analysis of a bentonite layer in the sequence provides a diagenetic reference for the authigenic clay material. Correlation between relative sea level and authigenesis of smectite-rich mineral has been outlined. Chemistry of diagenetic fluids also seems to be reliable with sea level variations. These observations argue in favour of diagenetic activities limited in restricted rock volumes. The case study of MAR501 is close to the HTM102 one: smectite-rich illite/smectite mixed-layers represent the major component of the clay fraction and K-Ar values argue ire the sense of a mixing between detrital and younger clay populations. Diagenetic glauconites in the sequence yield are age close to 93,7 ±0,3 Ma for Vraconian level, in agreement with stratigraphical data. The case study of a clay-filled fault

  12. Carbon-13 isotopic composition of distillation fractions of some Egyptian crude oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.I.M.; Hamza, M.S.; Abd Elsamie, S.G.

    1991-01-01

    13 C/ 13 C ratios were determined for some crude oil fields in the Gulf of Suez and Western Desert provinces. The crude oil was subjected to distillation at atmospheric pressure and subsequently under vacuum. Distillation fractions were collected at 25 degree C intervals. Carbon-13 content of these distillation fractions showed some differences in the degree of isotopic fractionation. The results were interpreted in view of the age of the source rocks and the degree of maturation process. The carbon-13 content of distillation fractions may be helpful in revealing petroleum mechanisms which can be exploited in exploration.4 fig

  13. Scientific study of 13C/12C carbon and 18O/16O oxygen stable isotopes biological fractionation in grapes in the Black Sea, Don Basin and the Western Caspian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The report presents the results of a study of carbon and oxygen stable isotopes in carbohydrates and intracellular water of red and white grapes of 2016 wine-growing season in the Crimean peninsula areas, South-west coast of the Greater Caucasus, the Don basin and the Western Caspian region. The mass concentration of reducing sugars in the studied grape samples has been from 17.5 to 25.0 g/100 ml, titrated acids concentration (based on tartaric acid – from 6.0 to 9.1 g/l, the buffer capacity 34.1–63.2 mg-Eq/l. Red and white wine made from respective grapes contained from 0.5 to 3.6 g/l of residual sugar; from 11.1 to 14.5% ethanol by volume; buffer capacity was 35.2–52.6 mg-Eq/l. It has been found that the δ13CVPDB values for carbohydrates of red and white grape varieties as a result of biological fractionation of carbon isotopes in the agro-climatic conditions of plant growth for the studied geographical areas are ranging from − 26.74 to − 20.74‰ (the Crimean peninsula; from − 27.31 to − 21.58‰ (South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus, from − 27.33 to − 24.73‰ (Don Basin and from − 26.64 to − 23.17‰ (West Caspian. The δ13CVPDB values for ethanol of the red and white dry wines range from − 28.52 to − 24.26‰ (the Crimean peninsula; from − 29.23 to − 24.52‰ (South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus; from − 28.97 to − 26.22‰ (Don Basin; from − 29.14 to − 25.22‰ (Western Caspian. Compared with the surface water and groundwater (averages from δ18OVSMOW− 13.90 to − 6.38‰ and with precipitation (averages from δ18OVSMOW − 10.30 to − 9.04‰ the δ18OVSMOW values in intracellular water of grapes are the following: for the Crimean peninsula grapes, from 0.40 to 4.97‰; the South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus, from -2.11 to 6.29‰; the Don Basin, from − 2.21 to 6.26‰; the Western Caspian, from − 0.24 to 1.44‰. It has been noted that in conditions of

  14. Uranium stable isotope fractionation in the Black Sea: Modern calibration of the 238U/235U paleo-redox proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, John M.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Middag, Rob; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.

    2017-04-01

    The isotopic compositions of redox-sensitive metals, including uranium (U), in marine sediments have recently emerged as powerful diagnostic tracers of the redox state of the ancient ocean-atmosphere system. Reliable interpretation of sedimentary isotopic information requires a thorough understanding of the environmental controls on isotopic fractionation in modern anoxic environments before being applied to the paleo-record. In this study, the relationship between ocean anoxia and the isotopic fractionation of U was investigated in the water column and sediments of the Black Sea, the world's largest anoxic basin. Paired measurements of 238U/235U and U concentration, supported by other redox parameters, were obtained for water column and sediment samples collected during the 2013 GA04N GEOTRACES expedition to the Black Sea. Removal of U from the water column occurs during the redox transition of soluble U(VI) to relatively insoluble U(IV), resulting in up to 43% of U being removed from solution in euxinic bottom waters. Uranium reduction and removal is accompanied by a progressive shift in 238U/235U towards isotopically light values in the water column as heavier 238U is preferentially exported to sediments over lighter 235U. This gives rise to apparent isotope enrichment factors of ε = -0.63 ± 0.09‰ and ε = -0.84 ± 0.11‰ when U removal is modelled by Rayleigh and closed system equilibrium isotope fractionation, respectively. These ε values fall within the range determined for bacterial U reduction experiments, and together with a striking correlation between the distributions of U and H2S, implicate microbially-mediated U(VI)-U(IV) reduction as the primary mechanism controlling U isotopic shifts in the Black Sea. The 238U/235U of underlying sediments is related to the the 238U/235U of Black Sea bottom waters through the isotope enrichment factor of the U reduction reaction but the relationship between sedimentary and water column 238U/235U is complicated

  15. Applications of Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry in Sports Drug Testing Accounting for Isotope Fractionation in Analysis of Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Thomas; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The misuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) in sports aiming at enhancing athletic performance has been a challenging matter for doping control laboratories for decades. While the presence of a xenobiotic AAS or its metabolite(s) in human urine immediately represents an antidoping rule violation, the detection of the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone necessitates comparably complex procedures. Concentration thresholds and diagnostic analyte ratios computed from urinary steroid concentrations of, e.g., testosterone and epitestosterone have aided identifying suspicious doping control samples in the past. These ratios can however also be affected by confounding factors and are therefore not sufficient to prove illicit steroid administrations. Here, carbon and, in rare cases, hydrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has become an indispensable tool. Importantly, the isotopic signatures of pharmaceutical steroid preparations commonly differ slightly but significantly from those found with endogenously produced steroids. By comparing the isotope ratios of endogenous reference compounds like pregnanediol to that of testosterone and its metabolites, the unambiguous identification of the urinary steroids' origin is accomplished. Due to the complex urinary matrix, several steps in sample preparation are inevitable as pure analyte peaks are a prerequisite for valid IRMS determinations. The sample cleanup encompasses steps such as solid phase or liquid-liquid extraction that are presumably not accompanied by isotopic fractionation processes, as well as more critical steps like enzymatic hydrolysis, high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation, and derivatization of analytes. In order to exclude any bias of the analytical results, each step of the analytical procedure is optimized and validated to exclude, or at least result in constant, isotopic fractionation. These efforts are explained in detail. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of atmospheric [CO2] on carbon isotope fractionation and magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Veronica

    1997-01-01

    The influences of atmospheric carbon dioxide on the fractionation of carbon isotopes and the magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite were investigated using samples of the calcareous alga Amphiroa and benthic foraminifer Sorites grown in the Biosphere 2 Ocean system under variable atmospheric CO2 concentrations (approximately 500 to 1200 ppm). Carbon isotope fractionation was studied in both the organic matter and the skeletal carbonate. Magnesium analysis was to be performed on the carbonate removed during decalcification. These data have not been collected due to technical problems. Carbon isotope data from Amphiroa yields a linear relation between [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg)values suggesting that the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthesis is positively correlated with atmospheric [CO2]. [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values for Sorites produce a relation that is best described by a hyperbolic function where Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values increase between 300 and 700 ppm and decrease from 700 to 1200 ppm. Further investigation of this relation and Sorites physiology is needed.

  17. Zinc isotope fractionation during adsorption onto Mn oxyhydroxide at low and high ionic strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Allison L.; Dong, Shuofei; Wilkes, Elise B.; Wasylenki, Laura E.

    2015-05-01

    Marine ferromanganese sediments represent one of the largest sinks from global seawater for Zn, a critical trace metal nutrient. These sediments are variably enriched in heavier isotopes of Zn relative to deep seawater, and some are among the heaviest natural samples analyzed to date. New experimental results demonstrate that adsorption of Zn to poorly crystalline Mn oxyhydroxide results in preferential association of heavier isotopes with the sorbent phase. At low ionic strength our experimental system displayed a short-lived kinetic isotope effect, with light isotopes adsorbed to birnessite (Δ66/64Znadsorbed-dissolved ∼ -0.2‰). After 100 h the sense of fractionation was opposite, such that heavier isotopes were preferentially adsorbed at steady state, but the magnitude of Δ66/64Znadsorbed-dissolved was indistinguishable from zero (+0.05 ± 0.08‰). At high ionic strength, we observed preferential sorption of heavy isotopes, with a strong negative correlation between Δ66/64Znadsorbed-dissolved and the percentage of Zn on the birnessite. Values of Δ66/64Znadsorbed-dissolved ranged from nearly +3‰ at low surface loading to +0.16‰ at high surface loading. Based on previous EXAFS work we infer that Zn adsorbs first as tetrahedral, inner-sphere complexes at low surface loading, with preferential incorporation of heavier isotopes relative to the octahedral Zn species predominating in solution. As surface loading increases, so does the proportion of Zn adsorbing as octahedral complexes, thus diminishing the magnitude of fractionation between the dissolved and adsorbed pools of Zn. The magnitude of fractionation at high ionic strength is also governed by aqueous speciation of Zn in synthetic seawater; a substantial fraction of Zn ions reside in chloro complexes, which preferentially incorporate light Zn isotopes, and this drives the adsorbed pool to be heavier relative to the bulk solution than it was at low ionic strength. Our results explain the observation

  18. Differentiation analysis of boron isotopic fractionation in different forms within plant organ samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aide; Xu, Qingcai; Wei, Gangjian; Zhu, Huayu; Chen, Xuefei

    2018-03-01

    As a critical micronutrient, boron (B) plays an important role in plant growth and embryonic development. To further understand the effects of B uptake, transportation and isotopic fractionation, the contents and isotopic compositions of hydro-soluble B in the sap and structural B fixed in the cell within individual plant tissues were investigated. The B isotope ratio was determined by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The δ 11 B values in hydro-soluble and structural B in the investigated plant samples ranged from -1.57‰ to +11.30‰ and from +6.57‰ to +16.64‰, respectively. Different fractionation factors of the B isotopes, in the range of 0.9954-1.0150, were observed in these samples, indicating that in most plant tissues, the heavy isotope ( 11 B) was preferentially enriched in structural B, which was fixed into the cell. However, there was a reversal in the fractionation of B isotopic compositions in the fruit samples compared with the other plant tissue samples. It is more powerful to examine the molecular mechanisms of B transport, uptake and utilization than the use of limited plant organ samples containing a mixture of hydro-soluble and structural B within different intra-plant compartments and in inter-plant interactions. These isotopic shifts, which may be used as important isotopic indicators, contribute to the surface processes interactions in the plant-soil system and the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of B in the uptake and absorption by different plant species in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stable Chlorine Isotope Study: Application to Early Solar System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mala,ira. M/; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2010-01-01

    A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the Cl-37/Cl-35 ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For example, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each

  20. Atomic and Molecular Isotope Ratios in Circumstellar Envelopes: Fractionation vs. Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie

    The long standing question of "What are the origin, evolution, and fate of our Universe and/or Galaxy?" has puzzled humankind for centuries. One approach to answering this question is to gain further understanding of stellar evolution, since stars are fundamental in galaxy development and evolution. A compilation of stellar composition can reveal the age, dynamics, and possibly the evolutionary state of a galaxy. Stars are the factories of heavy elements, including carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, that are key to the chemical complexity associated with planetary systems. Primitive materials, such as meteorites and IDPs, have revealed a component of "atypical" isotopic signatures of these fundamental elements denoting a possible stellar origin. Understanding the processes by which these elements derive is essential for astrophysics on cosmochemical, galactic, stellar, and planetary scales. We propose to analyze data obtained from the Herschel Space Observatory of circumstellar envelopes to definitively measure C, N, and O isotope ratios and test current models of photo-selective isotope fractionation vs. nucleosynthetically determined values. This proposal augments completed programs from the Herschel Space Observatory, namely the the HIFISTARS program (PI: Bujarrabal), which at the time of proposal submission a significant portion of data will no longer be under proprietary regulations (https://nhscsci.ipac.caltech.edu/sc/).) The broader implications for this study include fundamental data necessary for furthering our current understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis, circumstellar chemistry, Galactic chemical evolution, and the origin of presolar grains found in primitive materials. We will focus on isotopologues of species formed in thermochemical equilibrium and trace their natal, nucleosynthetic isotope ratios. We will analyze Herschel data obtained for a survey of evolved stars with varying degrees of nuclear processing, evolutionary states, and envelope chemistry

  1. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation during cellulose metabolism in Lemna gibba L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakir, D.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Lemna gibba L. B3 was grown under heterotrophic, photoheterotrophic, and autotrophic conditions in water having a variety of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions. The slopes of the linear regression lines between the isotopic composition of water and leaf cellulose indicated that under the three growth conditions about 40, 70, and 100% of oxygens and carbon-bound hydrogens of cellulose exchanged with those of water prior to cellulose formation. Using the equations of the linear relationships, we estimated the overall fractionation factors between water and the exchanged oxygen and carbon bound-hydrogen of cellulose. At least two very different isotope effects must determine the hydrogen isotopic composition of Lemna cellulose. One reflects the photosynthetic reduction of NADP, while the second reflects exchange reactions that occur subsequent to NADP reduction. Oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose apparently is determined by a single type of exchange reaction with water. Under different growth conditions, variations in metabolic fluxes affect the hydrogen isotopic composition of cellulose by influencing the extent to which the two isotope effects mentioned above are recorded. The oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose is not affected by such changes in growth conditions

  2. A Simple Mechanism for Fractionating Oxygen Isotopes in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, N. M.

    2009-01-01

    Lightning in the Solar Nebula is caused by the tribo-electric charging of dust grains carried by massive turbulent flows and driven by the accretion energy in the disk: it has long been one agent assumed responsible for the formation of chondrules. The degree to which charge separation can occur is dependent upon a number of factors, including the concentration of radioactive sources and the total level of ionization in the nebula, and these factors determine the maximum energy likely to be released by a single bolt. While chondrule formation requires a massive discharge, even a small lightning bolt can vaporize grains in the ionized discharge channel. Experimental studies have shown that silica, iron silicate and iron oxide grains formed from a high voltage discharge in hydrogen rich gas containing some oxygen produces solids that are enriched in O-17 and O-18 relative to the composition of the starting gas. Vaporization of silicates produces SiO, metal and free oxygen atoms in each discharge and these species will immediately begin to recondense from the hot plasma. Freshly condensed grains are incrementally enriched in heavy oxygen while the gas is enriched in O-16. Repeated evaporation and condensation of silicates in continuously occurring lightning discharges will monotonically increase the fractionation of oxygen isotopes between the O-17 and O-18 rich dust and the O-16 rich gas. The first mass independently fractionated refractory oxide particles were produced in the lab following the condensation of a flowing gas mixture containing variable amounts of hydrogen, silane, pentacarbonyl iron and oxygen that passed through a high voltage discharge powered by a Tesla coil. While the exact chemical pathway is still uncertain, the most probable reaction mechanisms involve oxidation of the growing refractory clusters by O3, OH or O atoms. This model has some interesting consequences for chemical processes in the early solar nebula. Chemical fractionation of

  3. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction. Mechanisms. 3. Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect. Uday Maitra and. J Chandrasekhar are members of the Organic. Chemistry faculty in. Indian Institute of. Science at Bangalore. The previous articles of this series were: 1. Isotopes as markers, May. 1997. 2. Primary kinetic isotope effect.

  4. Chemical and isotopic compositions of bottled waters sold in Korea: chemical enrichment and isotopic fractionation by desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Go-Eun; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Shin, Woo-Jin; Bong, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Choi, Man-Sik

    2012-01-15

    A total of 54 Korean bottled waters were investigated to characterize their origins and types using elemental and isotopic composition, as well as to identify elemental and isotopic changes in desalinated marine water that arise due to desalination. The different types of bottled water displayed a wide pH range (3.42 to 7.21). The elemental compositions of still and sparkling waters were quite similar, whereas desalinated marine water was clearly distinguished by its high concentrations of Ca, Mg, B, and Cl. In addition, desalinated marine water had much higher isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen (-0.5 and -2‰, respectively) than still and sparkling waters (-8.4 and -57‰). The elemental composition of desalinated marine water was adjusted through post-treatment procedures; in particular, boron was greatly enriched during desalination processes. The carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ(13)C(DIC) values) varied widely according to the origins of the bottled waters (-25.6 to -13.6‰ for still water, -31.2 to -26.7‰ for sparkling water, and -24.1 to -6.3‰ for desalinated marine water). This indicates that carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon are significantly fractionated by desalination processes and re-modified through post-treatment procedures. The results suggest that combined elemental and stable isotopic tracers are useful for identifying the origin of bottled water, verifying elemental and isotopic modifications during desalination processes, and characterizing various water types of bottled waters. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Fractionation of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes at the hydrate gas forming in the sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashkina, V.I.; Esikov, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The paper gives data on isotope composition of interstitial and near-bottom waters sampled in a region of gas-hydrate formation in the Sea of Okhotsk. The studies show that heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen is used in gas-hydrate formation, with the result that isotope composition of its constitution water constitutes δ 18 O=+1.99per mille, δD=+23per mille relatively to SMOW. Formation of autogenic carbonates leads to isotope exchange with interstitial water wich, in turn, changes its primary isotope composition in the direction of increasing of O-18 content. The near-bottom waters are isotope-light relatively to the SMOW standard and to the mean isotope composition of interstitial water in the studied region of gas-hydrate spreading. (orig.) [de

  6. Preparation of starch and other carbon fractions from higher plant leaves for stable carbon isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanek, W; Heintel, S; Richter, A

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the carbon isotope composition of starch and cellulose still relies on chemical isolation of these water-insoluble plant constituents and subsequent elemental analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) of the purified fractions, while delta(13)C values of low-molecular-weight organic compounds are now routinely measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Here we report a simple and reliable method for processing milligram quantities of dried plant material for the analysis of the carbon isotope composition of lipids, soluble sugars, starch and cellulose from the same sample. We evaluated three different starch preparation methods, namely (1) enzymatic hydrolysis by alpha-amylase, (2) solubilization by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) followed by precipitation with ethanol, and (3) partial hydrolysis by HCl followed by precipitation of the resulting dextrins by ethanol. Starch recovery for three commercially available native starches (from potato, rice and wheat) varied from 48 to 81% for the techniques based on precipitation, whereas the enzymatic technique exhibited yields between 99 and 105%. In addition, the DMSO and HCl techniques introduced a significant (13)C fractionation of up to 1.9 per thousand, while the carbon isotope composition of native starches analyzed after enzymatic digestion did not show any significant difference from that of untreated samples. The enzymatic starch preparation method was then incorporated into a protocol for determination of delta(13)C signatures of lipids, soluble carbohydrates, starch and crude cellulose. The procedure is based on methanol/chloroform/water extraction of dried and ground leaf material. After recovery of the chloroform phase (lipid fraction), the methanol/water phase was deionized by ion exchange (soluble carbohydrate fraction) and the pellet treated with heat-stable alpha-amylase (starch fraction). The remaining insoluble material was subjected

  7. Calculation of site-specific carbon-isotope fractionation in pedogenic oxide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James R; Zarzycki, Piotr

    2008-07-29

    Ab initio molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry techniques are used to calculate the structure, vibrational frequencies, and carbon-isotope fractionation factors of the carbon dioxide component [CO(2)(m)] of soil (oxy)hydroxide minerals goethite, diaspore, and gibbsite. We have identified two possible pathways of incorporation of CO(2)(m) into (oxy)hydroxide crystal structures: one in which the C(4+) substitutes for four H(+) [CO(2)(m)(A)] and another in which C(4+) substitutes for (Al(3+),Fe(3+)) + H(+) [CO(2)(m)(B)]. Calculations of isotope fractionation factors give large differences between the two structures, with the CO(2)(m)(A) being isotopically lighter than CO(2)(m)(B) by approximately 10 per mil in the case of gibbsite and nearly 20 per mil in the case of goethite. The reduced partition function ratio of CO(2)(m)(B) structure in goethite differs from CO(2)(g) by 10 per mil higher, close to those measured for calcite and aragonite. The surprisingly large difference in the carbon-isotope fractionation factor between the CO(2)(m)(A) and CO(2)(m)(B) structures within a given mineral suggests that the isotopic signatures of soil (oxy)hydroxide could be heterogeneous.

  8. Effects of trace element concentration on enzyme controlled stable isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Silvia A; Hirschorn, Sarah K; Elsner, Martin; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent E; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood

    2006-12-15

    The effects of iron concentration on carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of toluene by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 were investigated using a low iron medium and two different high iron media. Mean carbon enrichment factors (epsilonc) determined using a Rayleigh isotopic model were smaller in culture grown under high iron conditions (epsilonc = -1.7+/-0.1%) compared to low iron conditions (epsilonc = -2.5+/-0.3%). Mean hydrogen enrichment factors (epsilonH) were also significantly smaller for culture grown under high iron conditions (epsilonH = -77 +/-4%) versus low iron conditions (EpsilonH = -159+/-11%). A mechanistic model for enzyme kinetics was used to relate differences in the magnitude of isotopic fractionation for low iron versus high iron cultures to the efficiency of the enzymatic transformation. The increase of carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors at low iron concentrations suggests a slower enzyme-catalyzed substrate conversion step (k2) relative to the enzyme-substrate binding step (k-l) at low iron concentration. While the observed differences were subtle and, hence, do not significantly impact the ability to use stable isotope analysis in the field, these results demonstrated that resolvable differences in carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation were related to low and high iron conditions. This novel result highlights the need to further investigate the effects of other trace elements known to be key components of biodegradative enzymes.

  9. Calcium and strontium isotope fractionation during precipitation from aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and reaction rate; II. Aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKhatib, Mahmoud; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2017-07-01

    In order to study Strontium (Sr) partitioning and isotope fractionation of Sr and Calcium (Ca) in aragonite we performed precipitation experiments decoupling temperature and precipitation rates (R∗, μmol/m2 h) in the interval of about 2.3-4.5 μmol/m2 h. Aragonite is the only pure solid phase precipitated from a stirred solutions exposed to an atmosphere of NH3 and CO2 gases throughout the spontaneous decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. The order of reaction with respect to Ca ions is one and independent of temperature. However, the order of reaction with respect to the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is temperature dependent and decreases from three via two to one as temperature increases from 12.5 and 25.0 to 37.5 °C, respectively. Strontium distribution coefficient (DSr) increases with decreasing temperature. However, R∗ responds differently depending on the initial Sr/Ca concentration and temperature: at 37.5 °C DSr increase as a function of increasing R∗ but decrease for 12.5 and 25 °C. Not seen at 12.5 and 37.5 °C but at 25 °C the DSr-R∗ gradient is also changing sign depending on the initial Sr/Ca ratio. Magnesium (Mg) adsorption coefficient between aragonite and aqueous solution (DMg) decreases with temperature but increases with R∗ in the range of 2.4-3.8 μmol/m2 h. Strontium isotope fractionation (Δ88/86Sraragonite-aq) follows the kinetic type of fractionation and become increasingly negative as a function of R∗ for all temperatures. In contrast Ca isotope fractionation (Δ44/40Caaragonite-aq) shows a different behavior than the Sr isotopes. At low temperatures (12.5 and 25 °C) Ca isotope fractionation (Δ44/40Caaragonite-aq) becomes positive as a function of R∗. In contrast, at 37.5 °C and as a function of increasing R∗ the Δ44/40Caaragonite-aq show a Sr type like behavior and becomes increasingly negative. Concerning both the discrepant behavior of DSr as a function of temperature as well as for the Ca isotope fractionation as a

  10. Lithium isotopic separation: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Sandra Helena Goulart de

    1998-01-01

    In order to get the separation of natural isotopes of lithium by electrolytic amalgamation, an electrolytic cell with a confined mercury cathode was used to obtain data for the design of a separation stage. The initial work was followed by the design of a moving mercury cathode electrolytic cell and three experiments with six batches stages were performed for the determination of the elementary separation factor. The value obtained, 1.053, was ill agreement: with the specialized literature. It was verified in all experiments that the lithium - 6 isotope concentrated in the amalgam phase and that the lithium - 7 isotope concentrated in the aqueous phase. A stainless-steel cathode for the decomposition of the lithium amalgam and the selective desamalgamation were also studied. In view of the results obtained, a five stages continuous scheme was proposed. (author)

  11. Stable isotope fractionation in response to variable fluid residence time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogeochemical processes governing groundwater quantity and quality are often inferred from fluid samples that are the flux-weighted average of a heterogeneous system. This connection has been demonstrated for solutes subject to transport and equilibrium constraints, in which the steady state concentration - discharge relationship is cast in terms of the choice of expression for residence time distribution (Maher, 2011). Here, we examine the extent to which the spatial correlation of the permeability field, which governs the fluid residence time distribution, exerts a principle control on the partitioning of stable isotopes between reactant and product species during heterogeneous reactions in groundwater systems. We demonstrate this relationship using numerical simulations of δ53Cr fractionation due to abiotic CrO42- reduction by Fe2+, implemented in the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. The chemically homogeneous redox reaction generates Cr3+ with an isotope ratio distinct from the reactant pool, and in turn this product species precipitates as a mineral phase Cr(OH)3(s) through a non-fractionating reaction. The corresponding chromate δ53Cr enrichment across a homogeneous domain varies from a maximum value set by the kinetic fractionation factor (αk) at high mean fluid residence times, to a value reaction-limited to transport-limited regimes. For physically heterogeneous flow fields, the transition in isotopic fractionation from a reaction-limited to a transport-limited regime becomes variable, and falls between the upper and lower bounds set by the homogeneous simulations at slow and fast precipitation rates, respectively. Our results show that while minimal variation occurs in the steady-state isotopic profile of the reactant species (δ53Cr of CrO42-), the combined effects of the precipitation rate and the heterogeneous structure of the porous media lead to a wide range in the steady state isotopic composition of the product species (δ53Cr of Cr3

  12. Salinity dependent hydrogen isotope fractionation in alkenones produced by coastal and open ocean haptophyte algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M'boule, D.; Chivall, D.; Sinke-Schoen, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.; van der Meer, M.T.J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope fractionation in alkenones produced by haptophyte algae is a promising new proxy for paleosalinity reconstructions. To constrain and further develop this proxy the coastal haptophyte Isochrysis galbana and the open ocean haptophyte alga Emiliania huxleyi were cultured at

  13. New insights into the rate dependence of sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetta, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Sanford, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    The vast majority of experiments concerning the isotope partitioning of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are conducted under artificially optimized growth conditions. In contrast, many natural environments supporting SRB reflect limited nutrient availability. In this study, we couple the cell-specific reduction rate of a common SRB to the characteristic partitioning of stable sulfur isotopes. However, our method is novel in that we regulate the addition of electron donor such that cell growth is minimized and cell-specific reduction rates are constant, thus simulating the low reactivity characteristic of natural conditions. Anoxic bioreactors containing equal amounts of Desulfovibrio vulgariswere continuously injected with formate to control the rate of dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR). Cell growth was minimized through two means, (1) a high initial culture density ensured the ratio of nutrients per cell was low; (2) the oxidation state of carbon in formate is unfavorable to cell biomass accumulation. Negligible cell growth was verified by flow cytometry. Four controlled DSR rates ranging from 0.32 to 1.8 µmole/hour exhibited fractionation factor (ɛ) values ranging from 9‰ to 4‰ over 1200 to 300 hours, respectively. These results demonstrate a unique value of ɛ for each rate of DSR, where larger S isotope partitioning is characteristic of a slower cell-specific rate of sulfate reduction. The results of this study provide a unique dataset that can be used to constrain variations in ɛ as a function of DSR rate. Specifically, the dataset offers a foundation to test recently proposed analytical models and predict variations in observed ɛ as a result of a multi-step reactive pathway. Based on these results, we suggest a novel rate expression for incorporation into reactive transport models. Such a rate law supports extrapolation of experimental behavior into natural conditions over modern to geologic timescales.

  14. Chromium isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of the Antrim Basalts: An insight into the global Cr geochemical cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Frei, Robert

    Cr isotopes fractionate during oxidative weathering of the continents; the oxidation of Cr (III) bearing minerals produces soluble Cr (VI) which is enriched in the heavy isotope, Cr (VI) is lost to local rivers resulting in a Cr depleted, isotopically light residual soil [1] [2]. To date, research...

  15. Fractionation in position-specific isotope composition during vaporization of environmental pollutants measured with isotope ratio monitoring by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julien, Maxime; Parinet, Julien; Nun, Pierrick; Bayle, Kevin; Höhener, Patrick; Robins, Richard J.; Remaud, Gérald S.

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation of pollutants in terrestrial or aqueous environments is a well-recognized means by which to track different processes during remediation. As a complement to the common practice of measuring the change in isotope ratio for the whole molecule using isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS), position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA) can provide further information that can be exploited to investigate source and remediation of soil and water pollutants. Position-specific fractionation originates from either degradative or partitioning processes. We show that isotope ratio monitoring by 13 C NMR (irm- 13 C NMR) spectrometry can be effectively applied to methyl tert-butylether, toluene, ethanol and trichloroethene to obtain this position-specific data for partitioning. It is found that each compound exhibits characteristic position-specific isotope fractionation patterns, and that these are modulated by the type of evaporative process occurring. Such data should help refine models of how remediation is taking place, hence back-tracking to identify pollutant sources. - Highlights: • Position-Specific Isotope Analysis (PSIA) by 13 C NMR spectrometry. • PSIA on isotope fractionation during several vaporization processes. • PSIA for isotope profiling in environment pollutants. • Intramolecular 13 C reveal normal and inverse effects, bulk values being unchanged. - PSIA in pollutants during evaporation processes shows more detailed information for discerning the nature of the process involved than does bulk isotope measurements

  16. Diffusion-driven magnesium and iron isotope fractionation in Hawaiian olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, F.-Z.; Dauphas, N.; Helz, R.T.; Gao, S.; Huang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion plays an important role in Earth sciences to estimate the timescales of geological processes such as erosion, sediment burial, and magma cooling. In igneous systems, these diffusive processes are recorded in the form of crystal zoning. However, meaningful interpretation of these signatures is often hampered by the fact that they cannot be unambiguously ascribed to a single process (e.g., magmatic fractionation, diffusion limited transport in the crystal or in the liquid). Here we show that Mg and Fe isotope fractionations in olivine crystals can be used to trace diffusive processes in magmatic systems. Over sixty olivine fragments from Hawaiian basalts show isotopically fractionated Mg and Fe relative to basalts worldwide, with up to 0.4??? variation in 26Mg/24Mg ratios and 1.6??? variation in 56Fe/54Fe ratios. The linearly and negatively correlated Mg and Fe isotopic compositions [i.e., ??56Fe=(??3.3??0.3)????26Mg], co-variations of Mg and Fe isotopic compositions with Fe/Mg ratios of olivine fragments, and modeling results based on Mg and Fe elemental profiles demonstrate the coupled Mg and Fe isotope fractionation to be a manifestation of Mg-Fe inter-diffusion in zoned olivines during magmatic differentiation. This characteristic can be used to constrain the nature of mineral zoning in igneous and metamorphic rocks, and hence determine the residence times of crystals in magmas, the composition of primary melts, and the duration of metamorphic events. With improvements in methodology, in situ isotope mapping will become an essential tool of petrology to identify diffusion in crystals. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes in the chemical and biochemical oxidation of sulfide to sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maass, I.; Wetzel, K.; Weise, G.; Heyer, J.

    1983-01-01

    The behaviour of sulfur isotopes in the chemical and biochemical oxidation of marcasite (FeS 2 ) to sulfate has been investigated in rest and shaker cultures at 30 0 C. The microbiological oxidation was carried out using a mixed culture of Thiobacillus. The results show a considerably faster formation of sulfate in the biochemical oxidation in comparison with the chemical oxidation. Isotope analyses of the formed sulfates indicate no or only very small isotope fractionations depending on experimental conditions. The highest enrichment of 32 S in the sulfate is 1.7 per mille. In accordance with the results of other authors it is concluded that in both chemical and biochemical weathering of sedimentary sulfides resulting in the formation of sulfates isotope effects are not of importance. (author)

  18. Statistical analysis of lead isotope data in provenance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on tracing artifacts to ore sources which is different from assigning ore samples to time epochs. Until now, archaeometrists working with lead isotopes have used the ratio methods developed by geochronologists. For provenance studies, however, the use of composition data (the fraction of each of the four isotopes) leads to fewer arbitrary choices, two standard types of plots (labelled ternary and canonical variable, and a consistent method of discriminant analysis for separating groups of samples from different sources

  19. Thorium isotopes in colloidal fraction of water from San Marcos Dam, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Lares, M.; Melgoza, A.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.

    2013-07-01

    The main interest of this stiidy is to assess the contents and distribution of Th-series isotopes in colloidal fraction of surface water from San Marcos dam, because the suspended particulate matter serves as transport medium for several pollutants. The aim of this work was to assess the distribution of thorium isotopes (232Th and 230Th) contained in suspended matter. Samples were taken from three surface points along the San Marcos dam: water input, midpoint, and near to dam wall. In this last point, a depth sampling was also carried out. Here, three depth points were taken at 0.4, 8 and 15 meters. To evaluate the thorium behavior in surface water, from every water sample the colloidal fraction was separated, between 1 and 0.1 μm. Thorium isotopes concentraron in samples were obtained by alpha spectrometry. Activity concentrations obtained of 232Th and 230Th in surface points ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 Bq ṡ L-1, whereas in depth points ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 Bq ṡ L-1, respectively. The results show that 230Th is in higher concentration than 232Th in colloidal fraction. This can be attributed to a preference of these colloids to adsorb uranium. Thus, the activity ratio 230Th/232Th in colloidal fraction showed values from 2.3 to 10.2. In surface points along the dam, 230Th activity concentration decreases while 232Th concentration remains constant. On the other hand, activity concentrations of both isotopes showed a pointed out enhancement with depth. The results have shown a possible lixiviation of uranium from geological substrate into the surface water and an important fractionation of thorium isotopes, which suggest that thorium is non-homogeneously distributed along San Marcos dam.

  20. Sulfur Isotope Fractionation Due to SO2 Photolysis in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, J. R.; Blackie, D.; Stark, G.; Pickering, J.

    2012-12-01

    The discovery of unusual (i.e. mass-independent) sulfur isotope fractionation (or MIF) in Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary rocks has promised to yield insights into the rise of O2 and the nature of the sulfur cycle on ancient Earth [1], but interpretation has been hampered by the lack of a clear mechanism for the sulfur isotope signature. Proposed MIF mechanisms include SO2 photolysis [1-4], atmospheric S3 (thiozone) formation, and thermal sulfate reduction in sediments [5]. Studies focusing only on SO2 photolysis, including measurements of isotopic cross sections [6], have yielded results differing greatly from theory [4], and have resulted in improbable interpretations [7]. In addition to ancient rocks, there are sulfur isotope MIF signatures in polar ice core sulfates associated with massive Plinian eruptions over the past ~1000 years (e.g., [8]). The ice core MIF signatures differ significantly from the ancient Earth MIF signatures, suggesting a different source mechanism. SO2 photolysis can generate sulfur isotope MIF signatures in two ways: 1) self-shielding by an optically-thick column of SO2, and 2) isotope-dependent differences in absorption line intensities and widths, which are espcially important for optically-thin conditions. The MIF signatures in ice core sulfates appear to be consistent with self-shielding in an optically-thick plume, but the Archean MIF clearly is not. To address the optically-thin case, we've made high-resolution ultraviolet cross section measurements of the sulfur isotopologues of SO2 made with the UV FTS at Imperial College. We measured cross sections at 1 cm-1 spectral resolution for 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2 and for a 36SO2/34SO2 mixture. Incorporating these cross sections into a simple atmospheric photochemical model with a solar UV flux, we find sulfur MIF signatures for SO and S that.are consistent with the Archean pyrites. We also find that additional mass-dependent fractionation during self-shielding by 32SO2 places an

  1. Nitrogen isotope fractionations in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and in the Miller-Urey reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Chan Kung; Hayatsu, R.; Studier, M.H.; Clayton, R.N.; Chicago Univ., IL; Chicago Univ., IL

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen isotope fractionations have been measured in Fischer-Tropsch and Miller-Urey reactions in order to determine whether these processes can account for the large 15 N/ 14 N ratios found in organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites. Polymeric material formed in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction was enriched in 15 N by only 3 promille relative to the starting material (NH 3 ). The 15 N enrichment in polymers from the Miller-Urey reaction was 10-12 promille. Both of these fractionations are small compared to the 80-90 promille differences observed between enstatite chondrites and carbonaceous chondrites. These large differences are apparently due to temporal or spatial variations in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in the solar nebula, rather than to fractionation during the production of organic compounds. (orig.)

  2. Evaluating Volatility-controlled Isotope Fractionation During Planet Formation: Kinetics versus Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E. D.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in our ability to measure stable isotope ratios of light, rock-forming elements, including those for Zn, K, Fe, Si, and Mg, among others, has resulted in an emerging hypothesis that collisions among rocky planetesimals, planetary embryos, and/or proto-planets caused losses of moderately volatile elements (e.g., K) and "common" or moderately refractory elements (e.g., Mg and Si). The primary evidence is in the form of heavy isotope enrichments in rock-forming elements relative to the chondrite groups that are thought to be representative of planetary precursors. Equilibrium volatility-controlled isotope fractionation for planetesimal magma oceans might have occurred for bodies larger than 0.1% of an Earth mass (½ the mass of Pluto) as these bodies had sufficient gravity to overpower the escape velocities of hot gas at 2000K. Both Jean's escape and viscous drag hydrodynamic escape can obviate the escape velocity limit but will fractionate by mass, not by volatility. Equilibrium vapor/melt fractionation is qualitatively consistent with the greater disparity in 29Si/28Si between Earth and chondrites than in 25Mg/24Mg. However, losses of large masses of vapor are required to record the fractionation in the melts. We consider that if Earth was derived from E chondrite-like materials, the bulk composition of the Earth, assuming refractory Ca was retained, requires > 60% loss of Mg. This is a lot of vapor loss for a process relying on at least intermittent equilibrium, although it comports with the isotopic lever-rule requirements. Paradoxically, the alternative of evaporative loss of rock-forming elements requires less total mass loss. For example, the calculated Mg and Si isotopic compositions of residues resulting from evaporation of chondritic melts can fit the Mg and Si isotopic compositions of Earth, Mars, and angrites with varying background pressures and with total mass losses of near 5% or less. These mass losses are closer to, and even lower than

  3. Barium isotope fractionation during experimental formation of the double carbonate BaMn[CO3](2) at ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Michael E; Geprägs, Patrizia; Neubert, Nadja; von Allmen, Katja; Pretet, Chloé; Samankassou, Elias; Nägler, Thomas F

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we present the first experimental results for stable barium (Ba) isotope ((137)Ba/(134)Ba) fractionation during low-temperature formation of the anhydrous double carbonate BaMn[CO(3)](2). This investigation is part of an ongoing work on Ba fractionation in the natural barium cycle. Precipitation at a temperature of 21±1°C leads to an enrichment of the lighter Ba isotope described by an enrichment factor of-0.11±0.06‰ in the double carbonate than in an aqueous barium-manganese(II) chloride/sodium bicarbonate solution, which is within the range of previous reports for synthetic pure BaCO (3) (witherite) formation.

  4. Fundamental studies in isotope chemistry. Progress report, 1 July 1976--30 Jun 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigeleisen, J.; Harris, T.H.

    1977-01-01

    The current thrust of the program is the use of isotope effects to study the fundamental properties of matter, measurement and calculation of isotope fractionation factors of systems of potential technological importance and the correlation of isotope effects with molecular structure. The first measurements of the isotopic fractionation factors for two components in a solution were completed by the study of argon-krypton mixtures. The measurements cover the range from pure argon to pure krypton and extrapolate very well to previous measurements on the pure components. The vapor pressure isotope effects between solid-vapor and liquid-vapor for the rare gases neon, argon, and krypton is given

  5. The ecophysiology of sulfur isotope fractionation by sulfate reducing bacteria in response to variable environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, W.; Bradley, A. S.; Johnston, D. T.; Pereira, I. A. C.; Venceslau, S.; Wallace, C.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reducers (MSR) drive the Earth's biogeochemical sulfur cycle. At the heart of this energy metabolism is a cascade of redox transformations coupling organic carbon and/or hydrogen oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate to sulfide. The sulfide produced is depleted in the heavier isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. The magnitude of discrimination (fractionation) depends on: i) the cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (csSRR, Kaplan & Rittenberg (1964) Can. J. Microbio.; Chambers et al. (1975) Can. J. Microbio; Sim et al. (2011) GCA; Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS), ii) the ambient sulfate concentration (Harrison & Thode (1958) Research; Habicht et al. (2002) Science; Bradley et al. in review), iii) both sulfate and electron donor availability, or iv) an intrinsic physiological limitation (e.g. cellular division rate). When neither sulfate nor electron donor limits csSRR a more complex function relates the magnitude of isotope fractionation to cell physiology and environmental conditions. In recent and on-going work we have examined the importance of enzyme-specific fractionation factors, as well as the influence of electron donor or electron acceptor availability under carefully controlled culture conditions (e.g. Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS). In light of recent advances in MSR genetics and biochemistry we utilize well-characterized mutant strains, along with a continuous-culture methodology (Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS) to further probe the fractionation capacity of this metabolism under controlled physiological conditions. We present our latest findings on the magnitude of S and D/H isotope fractionation in both wild type and mutant strains. We will discuss these in light of recent theoretical advances (Wing & Halevy (2014) PNAS), examining the mode and relevance of MSR isotope fractionation in the laboratory to modern and ancient environmental settings, particularly anoxic marine sediments.

  6. Fractionation of Nitrogen Isotopes by Plants with Different Types of Mycorrhiza in Mountain Tundra Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzin, Igor; Makarov, Mikhail; Maslov, Mikhail; Tiunov, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    We studied nitrogen concentration and nitrogen isotope composition in plants from four mountain tundra ecosystems in the Khibiny Mountains. The ecosystems consisted of a toposequence beginning with the shrub-lichen heath (SLH) on the ridge and upper slope, followed by the Betula nana dominated shrub heath (SH) on the middle slope, the cereal meadow (CM) on the lower slope and the sedge meadow (SM) at the bottom of the slope. The inorganic nitrogen concentration of the soils from the studied ecosystems were significantly different; the SLH soil was found to contain the minimum concentration of N-NH4+ and N-NO3- , while in the soils of the meadow ecosystems these concentrations were much higher. The concentration of nitrogen in leaves of the dominant plant species in all of the ecosystems is directly connected with the concentration of inorganic nitrogen in the soils, regardless of the plant's mycorrhizal symbiosis type. However, such a correlation is not apparent in the case of plant roots, especially for plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza. The majority of plant species with these types of mycorrhiza in the SH and particularly in the CM were enriched in 15N in comparison with the SLH (such plants were not found within the SM). This could be due to several reasons: 1) the decreasing role of mycorrhiza in nitrogen consumption and therefore in the fractionation of isotopes in the relatively-N-enriched ecosystems; 2) the use of relatively-15N-enriched forms of nitrogen for plant nutrition in meadow ecosystems. This heavier nitrogen isotope composition in plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza in ecosystems with available nitrogen enriched soils doesn't correspond to the classical idea of mycorrhiza decreasing participation in nitrogen plant nutrition. The analysis of the isotope composition of separate labile forms of nitrogen makes it possible to explain the phenomenon. Not all arbuscular mycorrhizal species within the sedge meadow

  7. Iron Isotope Fractionation in Microbial and Non-Biological Precipitates, and the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Boettcher, M. E.; Hofmann, B.; Walczyk, T.

    2001-12-01

    We have investigated biotic and abiotic stable iron isotope fractionation pathways in experiments, the low-T natural environment, and the human body. Fe samples were analysed using a Nu Plasma Multicollector ICP-MS. All measured samples plot on the theoretically predicted exponential fractionation line in the Delta57Fe versus Delta56Fe space, demonstrating absence of ArN or ArO interferences. An experimental calibration of Fe isotope fractionation during abiotic formation of iron (III) oxyhydroxide and iron(II) minerals from aqueous solution resulted in significant differences: (a) During fast precipitation of FeOOH during alkalization of a Fe(III)Cl3 solution at room temperature the solid is only slightly enriched by about 0.1permil in 57Fe compared to the solution. (b) Slow precipitation of akaganeite (beta-FeOOH) from aqueous Fe(III)Cl3 solution leads to a depletion of 57Fe by about -2.2permil in the solid phase without a significant influence of temperature. (c) Precipitation of FeOOH during oxidation of aqueous Fe(II) solutions by oxygen yields an enrichment of up to 4.8permil in 57Fe in the solid phase. (d) Iron(II) carbonate precipitation between 20 and 60C leads to an almost negligible depletion in 57Fe compared to aqueous ferrous ions. Interpretation: Large enrichment of the heavy isotope is observed where Fe is oxidised, whereas small to interme-diate depletions of heavy Fe isotopes occur upon forma-tion of Fe-minerals without change in redox state. Addi-tionally, kinetic effects, the speciation of the aqueous solution, or the effect of crystal structures may have to be considered. Biotic isotope fractionation by microorganisms was investigated at two field sites. In a Fe mine (Gonzen, Switzerland), Fe-precipitating microbes (Gallionella ferrugina and Leptohrix ochtraceae) have formed Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides that are ca. 0.6permil heavier in Delta57Fe than the Fe-rich parent solutions. At Cady Mts, California, filamentous fabrics of goethite, thought to

  8. Mass Dependency of Isotope Fractionation of Gases Under Thermal Gradient and Its Possible Implications for Planetary Atmosphere Escaping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Physical processes that unmix elements/isotopes of gas molecules involve phase changes, diffusion (chemical or thermal), effusion and gravitational settling. Some of those play significant roles for the evolution of chemical and isotopic compositions of gases in planetary bodies which lead to better understanding of surface paleoclimatic conditions, e.g. gas bubbles in Antarctic ice, and planetary evolution, e.g. the solar-wind erosion induced gas escaping from exosphere on terrestrial planets.. A mass dependent relationship is always expected for the kinetic isotope fractionations during these simple physical processes, according to the kinetic theory of gases by Chapman, Enskog and others [3-5]. For O-bearing (O16, -O17, -O18) molecules the alpha O-17/ alpha O-18 is expected at 0.5 to 0.515, and for S-bearing (S32,-S33. -S34, -S36) molecules, the alpha S-33/ alpha S-34 is expected at 0.5 to 0.508, where alpha is the isotope fractionation factor associated with unmixing processes. Thus, one isotope pair is generally proxied to yield all the information for the physical history of the gases. However, we recently] reported the violation of mass law for isotope fractionation among isotope pairs of multiple isotope system during gas diffusion or convection under thermal gradient (Thermal Gradient Induced Non-Mass Dependent effect, TGI-NMD). The mechanism(s) that is responsible to such striking observation remains unanswered. In our past studies, we investigated polyatomic molecules, O2 and SF6, and we suggested that nuclear spin effect could be responsible to the observed NMD effect in a way of changing diffusion coefficients of certain molecules, owing to the fact of negligible delta S-36 anomaly for SF6.. On the other hand, our results also showed that for both diffusion and convection under thermal gradient, this NMD effect is increased by lower gas pressure, bigger temperature gradient and lower average temperature, which indicate that the nuclear spin effect may

  9. Multiple sulfur isotopes fractionations associated with abiotic sulfur transformations in Yellowstone National Park geothermal springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyshny, Alexey; Druschel, Gregory; Mansaray, Zahra F; Farquhar, James

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a quantification of main (hydrogen sulfide and sulfate), as well as of intermediate sulfur species (zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), thiosulfate, sulfite, thiocyanate) in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hydrothermal springs and pools. We combined these measurements with the measurements of quadruple sulfur isotope composition of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide and zero-valent sulfur. The main goal of this research is to understand multiple sulfur isotope fractionation in the system, which is dominated by complex, mostly abiotic, sulfur cycling. Water samples from six springs and pools in the Yellowstone National Park were characterized by pH, chloride to sulfate ratios, sulfide and intermediate sulfur species concentrations. Concentrations of sulfate in pools indicate either oxidation of sulfide by mixing of deep parent water with shallow oxic water, or surface oxidation of sulfide with atmospheric oxygen. Thiosulfate concentrations are low (hot parent water body. In two pools δ(34)S values of sulfate varied significantly from the values calculated from this model. Sulfur isotope fractionation between ZVS and hydrogen sulfide was close to zero at pH < 4. At higher pH zero-valent sulfur is slightly heavier than hydrogen sulfide due to equilibration in the rhombic sulfur-polysulfide - hydrogen sulfide system. Triple sulfur isotope ((32)S, (33)S, (34)S) fractionation patterns in waters of hydrothermal pools are more consistent with redox processes involving intermediate sulfur species than with bacterial sulfate reduction. Small but resolved differences in ∆(33)S among species and between pools are observed. The variation of sulfate isotopic composition, the origin of differences in isotopic composition of sulfide and zero-valent sulfur, as well as differences in ∆(33)S of sulfide and sulfate are likely due to a complex network of abiotic redox reactions, including disproportionation pathways.

  10. Molecular carbon isotopic fractionation of algal lipids during decomposition in natural oxic and anoxic seawaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyi Sun; Jihong Dai; Haibing Ding [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Marine Sciences; Li Zou [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Marine Sciences; Ocean Univ. of China, Qingdao (China). College of Environmental Science and Engineering; Culp, R.A. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Marine Sciences; Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Center for Applied Isotope Study; Scranton, M.I. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Marine Sciences Research Center

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate molecular carbon isotopic fractionation of algal lipids during oxic and anoxic degradation, Emiliania huxleyi (a marine haptophyte) was incubated in seawater collected from two depths (30 and 930 m) in the Cariaco Basin. Three classes of algal lipids (alkenones, fatty acids, and sterols) showed a degradation pattern characterized by complete loss in oxic seawater within 2-3 months (the only exception was 16:0 fatty acid), but 10-40% of initial algal lipids remained in the anoxic seawater after 3 months incubation. Oxic degradation rate constants of alkenones and fatty acids were generally 2-3 times higher than those derived from anoxic incubations. However, two sterols had similar degradation rate constants in oxic and anoxic seawater. There was little preferential degradation of 37:3 relative to 37:2 alkenone in oxic and anoxic seawater, leading to insignificant changes for U{sub 37}{sup k} (paleotemperature indicator) in spite of alkenone degradation. During oxic and anoxic degradation, the same three classes of algal lipids exhibited different patterns of molecular carbon isotopic fractionation: depletion (4 per mil to 6 per mil relative to initial value) in {sup 13}C for alkenones, enrichment (+2 per mil to + 7 per mil relative to initial value) for fatty acids, and no change for sterols. We postulate that the contrasting molecular isotopic fractionation patterns, which depend on the structure of the lipid compounds, are likely caused by different degradation reactions at specific functional groups, where the carbon atoms may have dissimilar isotopic ratios from other carbon atoms in the molecules due to the differences in original precursors and synthesis pathways. Laboratory observation of these patterns of lipid fractionations during decomposition of a single phytoplankton material suggests that diagenetic processes can alter the molecular isotopic signals of preserved organic matter in a variety of ways. (author)

  11. Development of U isotope fractionation as an indictor or U(VI) reduction in uranium plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, Craig [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Johnson, Thomas [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-02-16

    This is the final report for a university research project that advanced development of a new technology for identifying chemical reduction of uranium contamination in groundwater at the Rifle Field Challenge site. Reduction changes mobile hexavalent uranium into immobile U(IV). The stable isotope ratio (238U/235U) measurements of U using multicollector ICP-mass spectrometry were performed to understand the chemical reduction and sorption processes during various field experiments. In addition laboratory experiments were performed to better understand the isotopic fractionations. The main objectives of this project were completed during the project period and two peer-reviewed articles were published to disseminate the information gained.

  12. Calcium Isotope Fractionation during Carbonate Weathering in the Northern Guangdong, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Mao, G.; Wei, G.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-12-01

    CO2 is consumed during the weathering of carbonates, whereas carbonates are precipitated rapidly in the oceans, which are pivotal to modulate atmospheric CO2, oceanic pH and climate. Calcium carbonate in limestone is one of the largest reservoirs of carbon at the Earth's surface, so calcium is an important element that links the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and the atmosphere. Compared with silicate rocks, carbonate rocks have more rapid rates of physical and chemical erosions, so the carbonate weathering will respond more quickly to the climatic changes. In the southeast of China, enormous of carbonate rocks are widely distributed. Due to the influence of the subtropical monsoon climate, the rocks experienced strong chemical weathering and pedogenic process, resulting in red weathering crust of carbonate rocks. This type of weathering crust is geochemistry-sensitive and ecology-vulnerable, which can provide important insights into the recycle of supergene geochemistry in the karst areas. In this study, we report calcium isotopic compositions of saprolites from a weathering profile developed on argillaceous carbonate rocks in northern Guangdong, South China. The acid-leachable fraction, which was extracted by 1N hydrochloride acid, showed limited variation of δ44/40Ca(NIST 915a) spanning from 0.55 ± 0.06‰ (2SD) to 0.72 ± 0.05‰ (2SD) despite CaO content ranging from 0.01 wt.% to 45.7 wt.%, implying that Ca isotope didn't fractionate much which may due to the congruent dissolution of limestone minerals. In contrast, radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the whole rocks changed with depth from 0.710086 ± 6 (2SE) at the base rock to 0.722164± 8 (2SE) at the top-soil, which are possibly attributed to the mixing effect between carbonate and silicate fractions. Sr is an analogue for Ca due to its similar ionic size and charge; however, these two systems can differ in certain respects. The coupled study of Ca and Sr will be helpful to verify sources of Ca and the

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation in the mangrove Avicennia marina has implications for food web and blue carbon research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleway, Jeffrey J.; Mazumder, Debashish; Baldock, Jeffrey A.; Saintilan, Neil

    2018-05-01

    The ratio of stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) is commonly used to track the flow of energy among individuals and ecosystems, including in mangrove forests. Effective use of this technique requires understanding of the spatial variability in δ13C among primary producer(s) as well as quantification of the isotopic fractionations that occur as C moves within and among ecosystem components. In this experiment, we assessed δ13C variation in the cosmopolitan mangrove Avicennia marina across four sites of varying physico-chemical conditions across two estuaries. We also compared the isotopic values of five distinct tissue types (leaves, woody stems, cable roots, pneumatophores and fine roots) in individual plants. We found a significant site effect (F3, 36 = 15.78; P report for A. marina is greater than that reported in most other ecosystems. This has implications for studies of estuarine carbon cycling. The consistent and large size of the fractionation from leaf to woody stem (∼2.0‰) and mostly consistent fractionation from leaf to root tissues (>3.0‰) means that it may now be possible to partition the individual contributions of various mangrove tissues to estuarine food webs. Similarly, the contributions of mangrove leaves, woody debris and belowground sources to blue carbon stocks might also be quantified. Above all, however, our results emphasize the importance of considering appropriate mangrove tissue types when using δ13C to trace carbon cycling in estuarine systems.

  14. Cr-isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of ultramafic rocks and its impact on river waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Mondal, Sisir K.

    We investigated Cr isotope fractionation during soil formation from Precambrian ultramafic rocks. A soil profile was logged in an active open-cast chromite mine (Sukinda Valley, India). In addition, mine and river waters, as well as seawater were collected to trace the Cr-isotope signal...... fractionation, where Cr(VI) lost to runoff is enriched in the heavier 53Cr. At the same time, the residual Cr(III) pools become enriched in the lighter 52Cr. Waters collected within the chromite mine have δ53Cr values corresponding to the unweathered host rock. Before reaching the mine, river waters have δ53Cr...... values as heavy as +1.33±0.05‰. Where the drainage water merges with the river water, a slightly positively fractionated δ53Cr value (0.03±0.019‰) reflects a mixed isotope signal. With increasing distance from the mine, river water δ53Cr again becomes increasingly positively fractionated, indicating...

  15. Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation in three zircon standards (Plešovice, Qinghu and Temora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Ya; Li, Xian-Hua; Griffin, William L; Tang, Yan-Jie; Pearson, Norman J; Liu, Yu; Chu, Mei-Fei; Li, Qiu-Li; Tang, Guo-Qiang; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y

    2015-11-23

    To understand the behavior of Li in zircon, we have analyzed the abundance and isotopic composition of Li in three zircon standards (Plešovice, Qinghu and Temora) widely used for microbeam analysis of U-Pb ages and O-Hf isotopes. We have mapped Li concentration ([Li]) on large grains, using a Cameca 1280HR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS). All zircons have a rim 5-20 μm wide in which [Li] is 5 to 20 times higher than in the core. Up to ~20‰ isotopic fractionation is observed on a small scale in the rims of a single zircon grain. The measured δ(7)Li values range from -14.3 to 3.7‰ for Plešovice, -22.8 to 1.4‰ for Qinghu and -4.7 to 16.1‰ for Temora zircon. The [Li] and δ(7)Li are highly variable at the rims, but relatively homogenous in the cores of the grains. From zircon rim to core, [Li] decreases rapidly, while δ(7)Li increases, suggesting that the large isotopic variation of Li in zircons could be caused by diffusion. Our data demonstrate that homogeneous δ(7)Li in the cores of zircon can retain the original isotopic signatures of the magmas, while the bulk analysis of Li isotopes in mineral separates and in bulk-rock samples may produce misleading data.

  16. Mass dependent fractionation of stable chromium isotopes in mare basalts: Implications for the formation and the differentiation of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnand, Pierre; Parkinson, Ian J.; Anand, Mahesh

    2016-02-01

    We present the first stable chromium isotopic data from mare basalts in order to investigate the similarity between the Moon and the Earth's mantle. A double spike technique coupled with MC-ICP-MS measurements was used to analyse 19 mare basalts, comprising high-Ti, low-Ti and KREEP-rich varieties. Chromium isotope ratios (δ53Cr) for mare basalts are positively correlated with indices of magmatic differentiation such as Mg# and Cr concentration which suggests that Cr isotopes were fractionated during magmatic differentiation. Modelling of the results provides evidence that spinel and pyroxene are the main phases controlling the Cr isotopic composition during fractional crystallisation. The most evolved samples have the lightest isotopic compositions, complemented by cumulates that are isotopically heavy. Two hypotheses are proposed to explain this fractionation: (i) equilibrium fractionation where heavy isotopes are preferentially incorporated into the spinel lattice and (ii) a difference in isotopic composition between Cr2+ and Cr3+ in the melt. However, both processes require magmatic temperatures below 1200 °C for appreciable Cr3+ to be present at the low oxygen fugacities found in the Moon (IW -1 to -2 log units). There is no isotopic difference between the most primitive high-Ti, low-Ti and KREEP basalts, which suggest that the sources of these basalts were homogeneous in terms of stable Cr isotopes. The least differentiated sample in our sample set is the low-Ti basalt 12016, characterised by a Cr isotopic composition of -0.222 ± 0.025‰, which is within error of the current BSE value (-0.124 ± 0.101‰). The similarity between the mantles of the Moon and Earth is consistent with a terrestrial origin for a major fraction of the lunar Cr. This similarity also suggests that Cr isotopes were not fractionated by core formation on the Moon.

  17. Assessment of nitrogen and oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrification and its expression in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L; Buchwald, Carolyn; Santoro, Alyson E; Frame, Caitlin

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification is a microbially-catalyzed process whereby ammonia (NH(3)) is oxidized to nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and subsequently to nitrate (NO(3)(-)). It is also responsible for production of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), a climatically important greenhouse gas. Because the microbes responsible for nitrification are primarily autotrophic, nitrification provides a unique link between the carbon and nitrogen cycles. Nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios have provided insights into where nitrification contributes to the availability of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-), and where it constitutes a significant source of N(2)O. This chapter describes methods for determining kinetic isotope effects involved with ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation, the two independent steps in the nitrification process, and their expression in the marine environment. It also outlines some remaining questions and issues related to isotopic fractionation during nitrification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiogenic age and isotopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is one of an annual collection of reports presenting data from the Geochronology Section of the Continental Geoscience Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). The main purpose of this collection is to make geochronological and other radiogenic isotope data produced by the section available promptly to the geological community. Reports make full presentation of the data, relate these to field settings and make comparatively short interpretations. Other geochronological and isotope data produced in the laboratory but published in outside journals or separate GSC publications are summarized at the end of this report. Report 5 contains 24 papers from most regions of Canada, but particularly from British Columbia. The Geochronology Laboratory has, over the years, provided substantial U-Pb dating for the Cordilleran Division of the Geological Survey of Canada in Vancouver, and the results of a number of these studies are presented this year. A compilation of K-Ar ages is given. (figs., tabs., refs.)

  19. Radiogenic age and isotopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This is one of an annual collection of reports presenting data from the Geochronology Section of the Continental Geoscience Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). The main purpose of this collection is to make geochronological and other radiogenic isotope data produced by the section available promptly to the geological community. Reports make full presentation of the data, relate these to field settings and make comparatively short interpretations. Other geochronological and isotope data produced in the laboratory but published in outside journals or separate GSC publications are summarized at the end of this report. Reports in this issue give U-Pb zircon ages for rocks in Newfoundland, Yukon Territory, Manitoba, Ontario, and the Northwest Territories; present a compilation of K-Ar ages; and discuss Precambrian activity in New Brunswick, the geochronology of rock from the Northwest Territories, and reconnaissance Nd studies of rocks from the Northwest Territories. (figs., tabs., refs.)

  20. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-06-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

  1. Transpiration flow controls Zn transport in Brassica napus and Lolium multiflorum under toxic levels as evidenced from isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couder, Eléonore; Mattielli, Nadine; Drouet, Thomas; Smolders, Erik; Delvaux, Bruno; Iserentant, Anne; Meeus, Coralie; Maerschalk, Claude; Opfergelt, Sophie; Houben, David

    2015-11-01

    Stable zinc (Zn) isotope fractionation between soil and plant has been used to suggest the mechanisms affecting Zn uptake under toxic conditions. Here, changes in Zn isotope composition in soil, soil solution, root and shoot were studied for ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) and rape (Brassica napus L.) grown on three distinct metal-contaminated soils collected near Zn smelters (total Zn 0.7-7.5%, pH 4.8-7.3). The Zn concentrations in plants reflected a toxic Zn supply. The Zn isotopic fingerprint of total soil Zn varied from -0.05‰ to +0.26 ± 0.02‰ (δ66Zn values relative to the JMC 3-0749L standard) among soils, but the soil solution Zn was depleted in 66Zn, with a constant Zn isotope fractionation of about -0.1‰ δ66Zn unit compared to the bulk soil. Roots were enriched with 66Zn relative to soil solution (δ66Znroot - δ66Znsoil solution = Δ66Znroot-soil solution = +0.05 to +0.2 ‰) and shoots were strongly depleted in 66Zn relative to roots (Δ66Znshoot-root = -0.40 to -0.04 ‰). The overall δ66Zn values in shoots reflected that of the bulk soil, but were lowered by 0.1-0.3 ‰ units as compared to the latter. The isotope fractionation between root and shoot exhibited a markedly strong negative correlation (R2 = 0.83) with transpiration per unit of plant weight. Thus, the enrichment with light Zn isotopes in shoot progressed with increasing water flux per unit plant biomass dry weight, showing a passive mode of Zn transport by transpiration. Besides, the light isotope enrichment in shoots compared to roots was larger for rape than for rye grass, which may be related to the higher Zn retention in rape roots. This in turn may be related to the higher cation exchange capacity of rape roots. Our finding can be of use to trace the biogeochemical cycles of Zn and evidence the tolerance strategies developed by plants in Zn-excess conditions.

  2. Temperature dependence of oxygen isotope acid fractionation for modern and fossil tooth enamels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Benjamin H; Cerling, Thure E; Levin, Naomi E

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen isotope ratio of CO(2) liberated from structural carbonate in tooth enamel apatite was measured at phosphoric acid reaction temperatures of 25 degrees C, 60 degrees C and 90 degrees C, and it was found that apparent acid fractionation factors for pristine enamel, fossilized enamel, and calcite follow different temperature relationships. Using sealed vessel reactions normalized to alpha(25) = 1.01025 (the fractionation factor for calcite at 25 degrees C), the apparent fractionation factor at 90 degrees C (alpha*(90)) for pristine enamel ranged between 1.00771 and 1.00820, and between 1.00695 and 1.00772 for fossilized enamel. Apparent fractionation factors for common acid bath reactions are similar to those for sealed vessel reactions. A significant correlation exists between alpha*(90) and F(-) content, suggesting that change in the acid fractionation factor may be related to the replacement of OH(-) with F(-) during fossilization of bioapatite. These results have important implications for making accurate comparisons between modern and fossil tooth enamel delta(18)O values, and for the uniformity of isotope data produced in different laboratories using different acid reaction temperatures.

  3. New insight on Li and B isotope fractionation during serpentinization derived from batch reaction investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christian T.; Meixner, Anette; Kasemann, Simone A.; Bach, Wolfgang

    2017-11-01

    Multiple batch experiments (100 °C, 200 °C; 40 MPa) were conducted, using Dickson-type reactors, to investigate Li and B partitioning and isotope fractionation between rock and water during serpentinization. We reacted fresh olivine (5 g; Fo90; [B] = turnover of about 70% and a serpentinization mineral assemblage matching equilibrium thermodynamic computational results (EQ3/6) developed after 224 days runtime. Characterization of concomitant fluid samples indicated a distinct B incorporation into solid phases ([B]final_200 °C = 55.61 μg/g; DS/FB200 °C = 13.42) and a preferential uptake of the lighter 10B isotope (Δ11BS-F = -3.46‰). Despite a low reaction turnover at 100 °C (minor preference of the 6Li isotope. At 100 °C Li enrichment of secondary phases exceeded Li release by olivine breakdown ([Li]final_100 °C = 2.10 μg/g; DS/FLi100 °C = 11.3) and it was accompanied by preferential incorporation of heavier 7Li isotope that might be due to incorporation of a 7Li enriched fluid fraction into chrysotile nanotubes.

  4. Isotopic and molecular fractionation in combustion; three routes to molecular marker validation, including direct molecular 'dating' (GC/AMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, L. A.; Klouda, G. A.; Benner, B. A.; Garrity, K.; Eglinton, T. I.

    The identification of unique isotopic, elemental, and molecular markers for sources of combustion aerosol has growing practical importance because of the potential effects of fine particle aerosol on health, visibility and global climate. It is urgent, therefore, that substantial efforts be directed toward the validation of assumptions involving the use of such tracers for source apportionment. We describe here three independent routes toward carbonaceous aerosol molecular marker identification and validation: (1) tracer regression and multivariate statistical techniques applied to field measurements of mixed source, carbonaceous aerosols; (2) a new development in aerosol 14C metrology: direct, pure compound accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) by off-line GC/AMS ('molecular dating'); and (3) direct observation of isotopic and molecular source emissions during controlled laboratory combustion of specific fuels. Findings from the combined studies include: independent support for benzo( ghi)perylene as a motor vehicle tracer from the first (statistical) and second (direct 'dating') studies; a new indication, from the third (controlled combustion) study, of a relation between 13C isotopic fractionation and PAH molecular fractionation, also linked with fuel and stage of combustion; and quantitative data showing the influence of both fuel type and combustion conditions on the yields of such species as elemental carbon and PAH, reinforcing the importance of exercising caution when applying presumed conservative elemental or organic tracers to fossil or biomass burning field data as in the first study.

  5. Stable carbon isotopic fractionations associated with inorganic carbon fixation by anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Stefan; Strous, Marc; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Baas, Marianne; Schubert, Carsten J; Jetten, Mike S M; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2004-06-01

    Isotopic analyses of Candidatus "Brocadia anammoxidans," a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that anaerobically oxidizes ammonium (anammox), show that it strongly fractionates against (13)C; i.e., lipids are depleted by up to 47 per thousand versus CO(2). Similar results were obtained for the anammox bacterium Candidatus "Scalindua sorokinii," which thrives in the anoxic water column of the Black Sea, suggesting that different anammox bacteria use identical carbon fixation pathways, which may be either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl coenzyme A pathway.

  6. Blizzards to hurricanes: computer modeling of hydrology, weathering, and isotopic fractionation across hydroclimatic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard MT Webb; David L. Parkhurst

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) was used to simulate hydrology, weathering, and isotopic fractionation in the Andrews Creek watershed in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado and the Icacos River watershed in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. WEBMOD includes hydrologic modules derived from the USGS...

  7. Copper in soil fractions and runoff in a vineyard catchment: Insights from copper stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsányi, Izabella; Chabaux, François; Granet, Mathieu; Meite, Fatima; Payraudeau, Sylvain; Duplay, Joëlle; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the fate of copper (Cu) fungicides in vineyard soils and catchments is a prerequisite to limit the off-site impact of Cu. Using Cu stable isotopes, Cu retention in soils and runoff transport was investigated in relation to the use of Cu fungicides and the hydrological conditions in a vineyard catchment (Rouffach, Haut-Rhin, France; mean slope: 15%). The δ(65)Cu values of the bulk vineyard soil varied moderately through the depth of the soil profiles (-0.12 to 0.24‰±0.08‰). The values were in the range of those of the fungicides (-0.21 to 0.11‰) and included the geogenic δ(65)Cu value of the untreated soil (0.08‰). However, δ(65)Cu values significantly differed between particle-size soil fractions (-0.37±0.10‰ in fine clays and 0.23±0.07‰ in silt). Together with the soil mineralogy, the results suggested Cu isotope fractionation primarily associated with the clay and fine clay fractions that include both SOM and mineral phases. The vegetation did not affect the Cu isotope patterns in the vineyard soils. Cu export by runoff from the catchment accounted for 1% of the applied Cu mass from 11th May to 20(th) July 2011, covering most of the Cu use period. 84% of the exported Cu mass was Cu bound to suspended particulate matter (SPM). The runoff displayed δ(65)Cu values from 0.52 to 1.35‰ in the dissolved phase (stable isotopes may allow identifying the Cu distribution in the soil fractions and their contribution to Cu export in runoff from Cu-contaminated catchments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A model of mercury cycling and isotopic fractionation in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, David E.; Blum, Joel D.

    2018-01-01

    Mercury speciation and isotopic fractionation processes have been incorporated into the HAMOCC offline ocean tracer advection code. The model is fast enough to allow a wide exploration of the sensitivity of the Hg cycle in the oceans, and of human exposure to Hg via monomethyl-Hg incorporation into fish. Vertical particle transport of Hg appears to play a discernable role in setting present-day Hg distributions, which we surmise by the fact that in simulations without particle transport, th...

  9. Fractionated Spacecraft Architectures Seeding Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathieu, Charlotte; Weigel, Annalisa

    2006-01-01

    The report introduces the concept of spacecraft fractionation, which transforms a traditional monolithic spacecraft into a network of elements where a free-flying payload module is supported by nearby...

  10. Zircon trace element and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Hf, Pb) effects of assimilation-fractional crystallization of pegmatite magma: A case study of the Guangshigou biotite pegmatites from the North Qinling Orogen, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Feng; Liu, Jia-Jun; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Zhang, Shuai; Zhai, De-Gao; Liu, Gang; Wang, Gong-Wen; Zhang, Hong-Yuan; Sha, Ya-Zhou; Yang, Shang-Song

    2018-03-01

    Evidence for open-system magmatic processes related to wallrock assimilation accompanied by fractional crystallization (AFC) is present in the Guangshigou biotite pegmatites, North Qinling Orogen. The biotite pegmatite-gneiss contacts generally coincide with the greatest enrichment of U and Th. Zircon Usbnd Pb dating constrains the crystallization ages of the biotite pegmatite (rim zone-415 ± 2.6 Ma; internal zone-413.5 ± 2.5 Ma), in line with a pyrite Pbsbnd Pb isochron age (413 ± 22 Ma). Metamict areas in zircon show generally elevated concentrations of trace elements and expulsion of radioactive Pb. Internal zone samples, representing uncontaminated magma, have negative to positive zircon ( 413 Ma) εHf(t) (- 1.53 - + 3.24), low εNd(t) values (- 2.4), and old Hf and Nd model ages (tDM2 = 1.5-1.19 Ga, T2DM = 1.35 Ga, respectively), indicating a dominantly recycled Mesoproterozoic lower crustal material with involvement of some juvenile materials in the source region. The magmatic oxygen fugacity (fO2) and crystallization temperatures ranges from - 24.81 to - 13.34 of log fO2 and 570 °C to 793 °C, respectively. Compared to the internal zone, pegmatite rim samples display a variable and lower εNd(t) values (- 3.9 to - 2.8) and T2DM (1.47-1.37 Ga), but similar Hf isotopic compositions, favouring a three-component isotopic mixing model (recycled Mesoproterozoic lower crust materials, juvenile materials, and host gneiss). Pronounced variations of Ti, Y, U, Th, Hf, and REE concentrations in zircon from grain to grain in individual samples and from area to area within individual grains suggest a fluctuating crystallization environment in hybridized magma from which the rim-hosted zircons crystallized. Variable and high radiogenic Pb ratios of pyrites forming in the hybridized magma were inherited from the matrix. Zircons from both zones exhibit similar Hf isotope patterns, indicating the rim-hosted zircons crystallized during the early stage of hybridization of

  11. Oxygen isotope fractionation in the CaCO3-DIC-H2O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Laurent S.; Watkins, James M.; McGregor, Helen V.

    2017-10-01

    The oxygen isotope ratio (δ18O) of inorganic and biogenic carbonates is widely used to reconstruct past environments. However, the oxygen isotope exchange between CaCO3 and H2O rarely reaches equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects (KIE) commonly complicate paleoclimate reconstructions. We present a comprehensive model of kinetic and equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation between CaCO3 and water (αc/w) that accounts for fractionation between both (a) CaCO3 and the CO32- pool (α c / CO32-) , and (b) CO32- and water (α CO32- / w) , as a function of temperature, pH, salinity, calcite saturation state (Ω), the residence time of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in solution, and the activity of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase. The model results suggest that: (1) The equilibrium αc/w is only approached in solutions with low Ω (i.e. close to 1) and low ionic strength such as in the cave system of Devils Hole, Nevada. (2) The sensitivity of αc/w to the solution pH and/or the mineral growth rate depends on the level of isotopic equilibration between the CO32- pool and water. When the CO32- pool approaches isotopic equilibrium with water, small negative pH and/or growth rate effects on αc/w of about 1-2‰ occur where these parameters covary with Ω. In contrast, isotopic disequilibrium between CO32- and water leads to strong (>2‰) positive or negative pH and growth rate effects on α CO32-/ w (and αc/w) due to the isotopic imprint of oxygen atoms derived from HCO3-, CO2, H2O and/or OH-. (3) The temperature sensitivity of αc/w originates from the negative effect of temperature on α CO32-/ w and is expected to deviate from the commonly accepted value (-0.22 ± 0.02‰/°C between 0 and 30 °C; Kim and O'Neil, 1997) when the CO32- pool is not in isotopic equilibrium with water. (4) The model suggests that the δ18O of planktic and benthic foraminifers reflects a quantitative precipitation of DIC in isotopic equilibrium with a high-pH calcifying fluid, leading

  12. Experimental Determination of Zinc Isotope Fractionation in Complexes with the Phytosiderophore 2'-Deoxymugeneic Acid (DMA) and Its Structural Analogues, and Implications for Plant Uptake Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Tamara; Manzoor, Saba; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Kirk, Guy Jd; Vilar, Ramon; Weiss, Dominik J

    2017-01-03

    The stable isotope signatures of zinc and other metals are increasingly used to study plant and soil processes. Complexation with phytosiderophores is a key reaction and understanding the controls of isotope fractionation is central to such studies. Here, we investigated isotope fractionation during complexation of Zn 2+ with the phytosiderophore 2'-deoxymugeneic acid (DMA), and with three commercially available structural analogues of DMA: EDTA, TmDTA, and CyDTA. We used ion exchange chromatography to separate free and complexed zinc, and identified appropriate cation exchange resins for the individual systems. These were Chelex-100 for EDTA and CyDTA, Amberlite CG50 for TmDTA and Amberlite IR120 for DMA. With all the ligands we found preferential partitioning of isotopically heavy zinc in the complexed form, and the extent of fractionation was independent of the Zn:ligand ratio used, indicating isotopic equilibrium and that the results were not significantly affected by artifacts during separation. The fractionations (in ‰) were +0.33 ± 0.07 (1σ, n = 3), + 0.45 ± 0.02 (1σ, n = 2), + 0.62 ± 0.05 (1σ, n = 3) and +0.30 ± 0.07 (1σ, n = 4) for EDTA, TmDTA, CyDTA, and DMA, respectively. Despite the similarity in Zn-coordinating donor groups, the fractionation factors are significantly different and extent of fractionation seems proportional to the complexation stability constant. The extent of fractionation with DMA agreed with observed fractionations in zinc uptake by paddy rice in field experiments, supporting the possible involvement of DMA in zinc uptake by rice.

  13. Extending isotopic fractionation in phytoplankton for Phanerozoic pCO2 reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, C. R.; Agostini, S.; Weijers, J.; Schouten, S.; S Sinninghe Damsté, J.

    2017-12-01

    The atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (pCO2) is a keystone in many earth system dynamics, including the biosphere, carbon cycle, and climate. In order to better understand the impact of today's exceptional increases in pCO2 on the future, we look to secular trends in pCO2. Photosynthetic carbon isotopic fractionation (Ɛp), calculated from the difference between the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of environmental CO2 and biomass, has some of the lowest uncertainty in estimation among CO2 proxies. However, Ɛp is generally applied to species-specific compounds which have an evolution-limited record (e.g. alkenones limited ca. 50 Ma). To extend the use of Ɛp, we explore the general phytoplankton biomarker phytane. As the fossilized side-chain of chlorophyll, phytane is spatially and temporally ubiquitous, with the potential to record pCO2 back to the earliest photoautotrophs in the geologic record. To develop and validate its potential as a pCO2 proxy, we explored phytane in modern environments, in a multi-proxy case study, and in a Phanerozoic reconstruction. As a proof-of-concept, the δ13C of phytane was tested in modern environments at naturally-occurring CO2 vents in Japan and Italy, which showed clear fractionation over the steep CO2 gradient. This was then further tested in a multi-proxy assessment in DSDP site 467 that spans the last 15 Ma, looking at both well-established (i.e. alkenones) and potential (i.e. phytane, steranes, hopanes) pCO2 proxies; phytane represented the average δ13C for these biomarkers. Finally, the δ13C of phytane data over the Phanerozoic was compiled, showing agreement with literature reconstructions of pCO2. Current pCO2 reconstructions are derived from many different types of proxies, which can create incongruities and inconsistencies throughout time, making this single well-constrained proxy that ubiquitously spans the geologic record a useful addition to the palaeo-detective's toolbox.

  14. Processes controlling silicon isotopic fractionation in a forested tropical watershed: Mule Hole Critical Zone Observatory (Southern India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riotte, Jean; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Zambardi, Thomas; Audry, Stéphane; Barboni, Doris; Anupama, Krishnamurthy; Prasad, Srinivasan; Chmeleff, Jérôme; Poitrasson, Franck; Sekhar, Muddu; Braun, Jean-Jacques

    2018-05-01

    that up to 4100 mol ha-1 yr-1 of silica is taken up by vegetation, which is almost twice as large as that initially estimated from the elemental budget. The additional Si flux taken up, and likely stored in woody stems, was estimated assuming that Si isotopes followed a steady-state model for the whole Si plant uptake and then followed a Rayleigh model once in the plants. The δ30Si value of the additional Si flux taken up should be close to 0‰, i.e., enriched in light Si isotopes compared to the litter. If steady-state conditions apply, the source could correspond to soil ASi dissolution or deep (saprolite) root uptake. At the outlet of the watershed, the stream exhibits low δ30Si values (0.28-0.71‰) during peak flows and high δ30Si values (1.29-1.61‰) during the recessions at the end of the rainy season. Heavy δ30Si signatures are consistent with the expected domination of seepage at the end of floods. The light δ30Si values during peak flow are slightly lower than the overland flow signature and reflect either a sampling bias of overland flow or a minor but significant contribution of another Si source within the stream, possibly the partial dissolution of phytoliths from the suspended load, with slight isotopic fractionation. This study confirms that vegetation controls the silicon cycle in this dry tropical forest. It also shows that silicon isotopes yield a better grasp of the mass balance and sources and potential mechanisms involved than the consideration of only silicon concentrations. However, this proxy still relies on working hypotheses, notably steady-state and/or Rayleigh fractionation models, which need to be confirmed in further studies.

  15. Isotopic fractionation of Li during cooling of mantle peridotite from Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Casey, J. F.; Snow, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Lithium isotopic compositions for mineral separates of coexisting olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and bulk rocks of fresh Gakkel Ridge peridotites were analyzed by MC-ICPMS. Major and trace element compositions of the component minerals were measured in-situ with electron microprobe and LA-ICPMS. These rocks are absolutely fresh, with opx (0.9 to 1.7 ppm) ≥ olivine (0.4 to 0.9 ppm), which reveals an inverse order of those found in "equilibrated" mantle peridotites (Seitz and Woodland, 2000). The lithium isotopic compositions indicate a systematic mineral variation with δ7Liolivine (7.14‰ to 15.09‰) > δ7Liopx (1.81‰ to 3.66‰) > δ7Licpx (-2.43‰ to -0.39‰). The δ7Li values of cpx are negatively correlated with their lithium concentrations with the lightest value for the most enriched cpx grains. There is a first order negative linear correlation between Δolivine-cpx (δ7Liolivine- δ7Licpx) and ol/cpxD (Liolivine/Licpx). Collectively, these observations suggest that these inter-mineral fractionations may be related to a re-distribution of Li between minerals as a result of sub-solidus cooling driven by temperature or pressure sensitive inter-mineral partitioning. Li6 can diffuse much faster than Li7 does owing to the large relative mass difference, which results a large isotopic fractionation by diffusion along with the re-distribution during cooling. Alternatively, Li exchange via melt-rock reaction may have occurred. However, the systematic correlation between inter- mineral lithium partitioning and inter-mineral isotopic fractionation together with the unaltered nature of the bulk rock δ7Li values argues against the presence of significant melt-rock reaction, unless the reaction did not change the bulk lithium systematics.

  16. Stable chromium isotopic composition of meteorites and metal-silicate experiments: Implications for fractionation during core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnand, P.; Williams, H. M.; Parkinson, I. J.; Wood, B. J.; Halliday, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present new mass independent and mass dependent Cr isotope compositions for meteorites measured by double spike thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Small differences in both mass independent 53Cr and 54Cr relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth are reported and are very similar to previously published values. Carbonaceous chondrites are characterised by an excess in 54Cr compared to ordinary and enstatite chondrites which make mass independent Cr isotopes a useful tool for distinguishing between meteoritic groups. Mass dependent stable Cr isotope compositions for the same samples are also reported. Carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites are identical within uncertainty with average δ53 Cr values of - 0.118 ± 0.040 ‰ and - 0.143 ± 0.074 ‰ respectively. The heaviest isotope compositions are recorded by an enstatite chondrite and a CO carbonaceous chondrite, both of which have relatively reduced chemical compositions implying some stable Cr isotope fractionation related to redox processes in the circumstellar disk. The average δ53 Cr values for chondrites are within error of the estimate for the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) also determined by double spiking. The lack of isotopic difference between chondritic material and the BSE provides evidence that Cr isotopes were not fractionated during core formation on Earth. A series of high-pressure experiments was also carried out to investigate stable Cr isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and no demonstrable fractionation was observed, consistent with our meteorites data. Mass dependent Cr isotope data for achondrites suggest that Cr isotopes are fractionated during magmatic differentiation and therefore further work is required to constrain the Cr isotopic compositions of the mantles of Vesta and Mars.

  17. Compound specific isotopic fractionation patterns suggest different carbon metabolisms among Chloroflexus-like bacteria in hot spring microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Meer, M.T.J. van der; Schouten, S.; Leeuw, J.W. de; Ward, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope fractionations between dissolved inorganic carbon and lipid biomarkers suggest photoautotrophy by Chloroflexus-like organisms in sulfidic and nonsulfidic Yellowstone hot springs. Where co-occurring, cyanobacteria appear to cross-feed Chloroflexus-like organisms supporting

  18. Decoding mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes in modern atmosphere using cosmogenic 35S: A five-isotope approach and possible implications for Archean sulfur isotope records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Thiemens, M. H.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, X.; Huang, X.; Chen, K.; Zhang, Z.; Tao, J.

    2017-12-01

    The signature of sulfur isotopic mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) observed in Archean sediments have been interpreted as a proxy of the origins and evolution of atmospheric oxygen and early life on Earth [1]. Photochemistry of SOx in the short (reactions of elemental sulfur [6], and relevant experiments are being conducted to test the isotope effect. Although combustion is unlikely in Archean, recombination reactions may occur in other previously unappreciated processes such as volcanism and may contribute in part to the heavily depleted 36S in some Paleoarchean records [5,7]. The roles of both photochemical and non-photochemical reactions in the variability of Archean S-MIF records require further analysis in the future. Refs: [1] Farquhar et al., Science 2000; [2] Shaheen et al., PNAS 2014; [3] Lin et al., PNAS 2016; [4] Wacey et al., Precambrian Res 2015; [5] Muller et al., PNAS 2016; [6] Babikov, PNAS 2017; [7] Shen et al., EPSL, 2009.

  19. Ice-vapor equilibrium fractionation factor of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellehøj, Mads Dam; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: The equilibrium fractionation factors govern the relative change in the isotopic composition during phase transitions of water. The commonly used results, which were published more than 40 years ago, are limited to a minimum temperature of -33 degrees C. This limits the reliability...... in cold regions. With recent instrumental developments it is now possible to test the accuracy of the earlier results as well as extend the temperature range. METHODS: Novel measurements were made of the ice-vapor equilibrium fractionation factor between 0 degrees C and -40 degrees C, from a unique...... experimental setup using both a Picarro cavity ringdown spectrometer and a TC/EA IRMS system. Using both systems allows for continuous monitoring of the equilibrium state of the system as well as testing for reproducibility. RESULTS: The results of the experiments show fractionation factors for H-2 and O-18...

  20. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  1. Stable isotope studies: Progress report, March 1985--August 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takanobu.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been carried out in the following areas: Stable Isotope Fractionation (1) Effects of chemical poisons and surface modifiers on polycrystalline platinum electrode surfaces have been investigated with a goal to develop a new form of heterogeneous catalyst for the hydrogen isotope exchange between dihydrogen and water. (2) A new nitrogen-15 fractionation process has been developed, based on the isotope exchange between liquid N 2 O 3 -N 2 O 4 mixture and their vapor phase at a subambient temperature and a raised pressure. (3) A closed chemical recycle process has been developed for use in connection with the refluxer in the Nitrox-type nitrogen-15 plant. Isotope Effects (1) The vapor pressure isotope effect (VPIE) study of liquid fluoromethanes have been completed. (2) The VPIE study of solid and liquid ammonia has been completed. (3) A theoretical foundation of the additivity for the vibrational zero-point energy (ZPE) has been developed. Studies of Liquid Ammonia. With an aim to study intermolecular interaction (and the inversion phenomenon, in particular) in liquid ammonia, and to further investigate various ammonia solutions, a molecular dynamics (MD) study has been initiated. An MD program has been completed, and force field functions have been developed for an ensemble of non-rigid ammonia molecules. 107 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs

  2. Diagenetic fractionation of carbon isotopes in particulate and dissolved organic matter in sediments from Skan Bay, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperin, M.J.; Reeburgh, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Isotope fractionation during organic matter diagenesis was investigated by measuring detailed depth distributions of stable carbon isotope ratios in sediment particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoirs. The δ 13 C value of the POC shifted systematically from -19 per-thousand at the surface to -21 per-thousand at 10 cm. Significant trends were also apparent in the δ 13 C-DOC profile. Proceeding down-core, DOC became isotopically heavier between 0 and 5 cm and isotopically lighter at greater depths. Two mechanisms could account for the observed down-core shift in δ 13 C-POC: (a) temporal changes in the isotope ratios of deposited organic matter and (b) isotope fractionation associated with diagenesis. The δ 15 C-DOC depth distribution is sensitive to which mechanism controls the isotopic composition of the POC reservoir. A diagenetic model that couples POC and DOC reservoirs was used to discriminate between temporal changes and diagenetic alteration of the POC isotopic composition. The model indicated that observed trends in δ 13 C-POC and δ 13 C-DOC depth distributions are consistent with isotopic fractionation of POC during diagenesis

  3. Deuterium isotope fractionation between ortho-alkyl substituted phenols and t-butylthiol in oxygen bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawer, A.; Jelenska-Kazimierczuk, M.; Szydlowski, J.

    1998-01-01

    Equilibrium isotope effect in the exchange reaction of deuterium between phenol(P), 2-isopropyl phenol (IPP), 2,6-diisopropyl phenol (DIPP), 2,6-diterbutyl phenol (DTBP) and tertbutylthiol (TBT) has been studied in 296 K. The fractionation factors (α) have been measured in cyclohexane and carbon tetrachloride solutions and in a few oxygen bases: acetone, 1,4-dioxane, ethyl formate, ethyl ether, tetrahydrofurane, N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide. Using chemical shifts of phenol OH protons, the thermodynamic parameters of complex formation with the oxygen bases have been determined. The experimental data show that lnα correlates with the formation enthalpy of the phenol-oxygen base complex in DIPP-TBT-base system but there is no simple correlation in IPP-TBT-base system. Furthermore, it was found that in DTBT-TBT-base system lnα depends linearly on the basicity of the solvent (DN parameters). On the other hand, lnα correlates with acidic parameters of the solvents (AN) in IPP-TBT-base and P-TBT-base systems. All above correlations are explained by taking into account two competition processes: self association of phenol molecules and their solvation by oxygen bases. (author)

  4. Liquid-Vapor Argon Isotope Fractionation from the Triple Point to the Critical Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, J. T.; Linderstrøm-Lang, C. U.; Bigeleisen, J.

    1972-01-01

    twice the statistical scatter of the present data, the present results for the lnα are systematically 5% lower than calculations from vapor pressure data. It is shown that T2 lnα is a linear function of (ρc−ρg), the density difference between the liquid and vapor, in the range 84–120°K......The statistical thermodynamic treatment of the equilibrium between a nonideal liquid mixture of isotopes and a vapor phase is extended to include isotope effects on the equation of state of the gas. The result is particularly simple when the isotopic partition functions in a given phase...... are compared at the same molar volume. The isotope fractionation factor α for 36Ar∕40Ar between liquid and vapor has been measured from the triple point to the critical temperature. The results are compared with previous vapor pressure data, which cover the range 84–102°K. Although the agreement is within...

  5. Second Study of Hyper-Fractionated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Method. Hyper-fractionated radiotherapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas is designed to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice daily 1.25 Gy fractions resulted in a higher incidence of late damage than conventional radiotherapy using 2 Gy daily fractions treating to a total of 60 Gy. The current trial therefore used a lower dose per fraction of 1.2 Gy and lower total dose of 72 Gy, with 60 fractions given over a period of 6 weeks.

  6. The Paleocene Eocene carbon isotope excursion in higher plant organic matter: Differential fractionation of angiosperms and conifers in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Stefan; Woltering, Martijn; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Sluijs, Appy; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2007-06-01

    A study of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene (P-E) sediments deposited on the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean reveals relatively high abundances of terrestrial biomarkers. These include dehydroabietane and simonellite derived from conifers (gymnosperms) and a tetra-aromatic triterpenoid derived from angiosperms. The relative percentage of the angiosperm biomarker of the summed angiosperm + conifer biomarkers was increased at the end of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), different when observed with pollen counts which showed a relative decrease in angiosperm pollen. Stable carbon isotopic analysis of these biomarkers shows that the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) during the PETM amounts to 3‰ for both conifer biomarkers, dehydroabietane and simonellite, comparable to the magnitude of the CIE inferred from marine carbonates, but significantly lower than the 4.5‰ of the terrestrial C 29n-alkane [M. Pagani, N. Pedentchouk, M. Huber, A. Sluijs, S. Schouten, H. Brinkhuis, J.S. Sinninghe Damsté, G.R. Dickens, and the IODP Expedition 302 Expedition Scientists (2006), Arctic's hydrology during global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. Nature, 442, 671-675.], which is a compound sourced by both conifers and angiosperms. Conspicuously, the angiosperm-sourced aromatic triterpane shows a much larger CIE of 6‰ and suggests that angiosperms increased in their carbon isotopic fractionation during the PETM. Our results thus indicate that the 4.5‰ C 29n-alkane CIE reported previously represents the average CIE of conifers and angiosperms at this site and suggest that the large and variable CIE observed in terrestrial records may be partly explained by the variable contributions of conifers and angiosperms. The differential response in isotopic fractionation of angiosperms and conifers points to different physiological responses of these vegetation types to the rise in temperature, humidity, and greenhouse gases during the PETM.

  7. Oxygen isotope fractionations across individual leaf carbohydrates in grass and tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marco M; Gamarra, Bruno; Kahmen, Ansgar; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Saurer, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Almost no δ 18 O data are available for leaf carbohydrates, leaving a gap in the understanding of the δ 18 O relationship between leaf water and cellulose. We measured δ 18 O values of bulk leaf water (δ 18 O LW ) and individual leaf carbohydrates (e.g. fructose, glucose and sucrose) in grass and tree species and δ 18 O of leaf cellulose in grasses. The grasses were grown under two relative humidity (rH) conditions. Sucrose was generally 18 O-enriched compared with hexoses across all species with an apparent biosynthetic fractionation factor (ε bio ) of more than 27‰ relative to δ 18 O LW , which might be explained by isotopic leaf water and sucrose synthesis gradients. δ 18 O LW and δ 18 O values of carbohydrates and cellulose in grasses were strongly related, indicating that the leaf water signal in carbohydrates was transferred to cellulose (ε bio  = 25.1‰). Interestingly, damping factor p ex p x , which reflects oxygen isotope exchange with less enriched water during cellulose synthesis, responded to rH conditions if modelled from δ 18 O LW but not if modelled directly from δ 18 O of individual carbohydrates. We conclude that δ 18 O LW is not always a good substitute for δ 18 O of synthesis water due to isotopic leaf water gradients. Thus, compound-specific δ 18 O analyses of individual carbohydrates are helpful to better constrain (post-)photosynthetic isotope fractionation processes in plants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Near-global distribution of CO isotopic fractionation in the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, C. A.; Buzan, E. M.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.

    2016-05-01

    The first near-global (-85° to 85°) measurements of the isotopic fractionation of 13CO relative to 12CO have been obtained from 5 to 90 km using the ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer). These observations have been compared to predictions from WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model). The highest positive fractionation (i.e. relatively more 13CO) values of over 100‰ are observed in the lower thermosphere during winter in both hemispheres, whereas the highest negative fractionation (i.e. relatively more 12CO) is observed in the mesosphere in the summer at high latitudes (due to the highly fractionating effect that UV light has on CO2) and year round in the tropics. Agreement between measurements and model results is generally good at high altitude, although ACE shows a stronger fractionation effect from CO2 photolysis than predicted by WACCM. In the lower atmosphere, agreement is qualitatively good, although there is a distinct discrepancy at 40 km in all seasons, which is likely a retrieval artifact.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Irradiation-driven Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Analogs of Protoplanetary Hydrous Silicate Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Laurent, Boris; Leroux, Hugues; Remusat, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The origin of hydrogen in chondritic components is poorly understood. Their isotopic composition is heavier than the solar nebula gas. In addition, in most meteorites, hydrous silicates are found to be lighter than the coexisting organic matter. Ionizing irradiation recently emerged as an efficient hydrogen fractionating process in organics, but its effect on H-bearing silicates remains essentially unknown. We report the evolution of the D/H of hydrous silicates experimentally irradiated by electrons. Thin films of amorphous silica, amorphous “serpentine,” and pellets of crystalline muscovite were irradiated at 4 and 30 keV. For all samples, irradiation leads to a large hydrogen loss correlated with a moderate deuterium enrichment of the solid residue. The entire data set can be described by a Rayleigh distillation. The calculated fractionation factor is consistent with a kinetically controlled fractionation during the loss of hydrogen. Furthermore, for a given ionizing condition, the deuteration of the silicate residues is much lower than the deuteration measured on irradiated organic macromolecules. These results provide firm evidence of the limitations of ionizing irradiation as a driving mechanism for D-enrichment of silicate materials. The isotopic composition of the silicate dust cannot rise from a protosolar to a chondritic signature during solar irradiations. More importantly, these results imply that irradiation of the disk naturally induces a strong decoupling of the isotopic signatures of coexisting organics and silicates. This decoupling is consistent with the systematic difference observed between the heavy organic matter and the lighter water typically associated with minerals in the matrix of most carbonaceous chondrites.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF IRRADIATION-DRIVEN HYDROGEN ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION IN ANALOGS OF PROTOPLANETARY HYDROUS SILICATE DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent [IMPMC, CNRS UMR 7590, Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, IRD, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CP 52, 57 rue Cuvier, Paris F-75231 (France); Laurent, Boris; Leroux, Hugues, E-mail: mathieu.roskosz@mnhn.fr [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, Université Lille 1, CNRS UMR 8207, Bâtiment C6, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-11-20

    The origin of hydrogen in chondritic components is poorly understood. Their isotopic composition is heavier than the solar nebula gas. In addition, in most meteorites, hydrous silicates are found to be lighter than the coexisting organic matter. Ionizing irradiation recently emerged as an efficient hydrogen fractionating process in organics, but its effect on H-bearing silicates remains essentially unknown. We report the evolution of the D/H of hydrous silicates experimentally irradiated by electrons. Thin films of amorphous silica, amorphous “serpentine,” and pellets of crystalline muscovite were irradiated at 4 and 30 keV. For all samples, irradiation leads to a large hydrogen loss correlated with a moderate deuterium enrichment of the solid residue. The entire data set can be described by a Rayleigh distillation. The calculated fractionation factor is consistent with a kinetically controlled fractionation during the loss of hydrogen. Furthermore, for a given ionizing condition, the deuteration of the silicate residues is much lower than the deuteration measured on irradiated organic macromolecules. These results provide firm evidence of the limitations of ionizing irradiation as a driving mechanism for D-enrichment of silicate materials. The isotopic composition of the silicate dust cannot rise from a protosolar to a chondritic signature during solar irradiations. More importantly, these results imply that irradiation of the disk naturally induces a strong decoupling of the isotopic signatures of coexisting organics and silicates. This decoupling is consistent with the systematic difference observed between the heavy organic matter and the lighter water typically associated with minerals in the matrix of most carbonaceous chondrites.

  11. Growth phase dependent hydrogen isotopic fractionation in alkenone-producing haptophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolhowe, M. D.; Prahl, F. G.; Probert, I.; Maldonado, M.

    2009-08-01

    Recent works have investigated use of the hydrogen isotopic composition of C37 alkenones (δDK37s, lipid biomarkers of certain haptophyte microalgae, as an independent paleosalinity proxy. We discuss herein the factors impeding the success of such an application and identify the potential alternative use of δDK37s measurements as a proxy for non-thermal, physiological stress impacts on the U37K' paleotemperature index. Batch-culture experiments with the haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi (CCMP 1742) were conducted to determine the magnitude and variability of the isotopic contrasts between individual C37 alkenones. Further experiments were conducted with Emiliania huxleyi (CCMP 1742) andGephyrocapsa oceanica (PZ3-1) to determine whether, and to what extent, δDK37s varies between the physiological extremes of nutrient-replete exponential growth and nutrient-depleted senescence. Emiliania huxleyi was observed to exhibit an isotopic contrast between di- and tri-unsaturated C37 alkenones (αK37:3-K37:2≈0.97) that is nearly identical to that reported recently by others for environmental samples. Furthermore, this contrast appears to be constant with growth stage. The consistency of the offset across different growth stages suggests that a single, well-defined value for αK37:3-K37:2 may exist and that its use in an isotope mass-balance will allow accurate determination of δD values for individual alkenones without having to rely on time- and labor-intensive chemical separations. The isotopic fractionation between growth medium and C37 alkenones was observed to increase dramatically upon the onset of nutrient-depletion-induced senescence, suggesting that δDK37s may serve as an objective tool for recognizing and potentially correcting, at least semi-quantitatively, for the effects of nutrient stress on U37K' temperature records.

  12. Chromium isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of a modern basaltic weathering profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Frei, Robert

    2O Cr (OH) 2+ + 2H+ (1) (ii) The continuing oxidation of Cr(III) and Cr(OH)2+ to Cr(VI) oxyanions, CrO42-, HCrO4- and Cr2O72-. Cr3+ +H2O HCrO4- + 7H+ +3e- (2) Cr(OH)2+ + 2H2O HCrO4- + 5H+ + 3e- (3) This process predominates in the soil horizons and is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation...

  13. Mass-independent isotopic fractionation of tin in a chemical exchange reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T.; Moynier, F.

    2008-12-01

    Tin isotopes were fractionated by the liquid-liquid extraction technique with a crown ether, dicyclohexano-18- crown-6 (DC18C6). Tin dichloride was dissolved in HCl to create solutions, 0.1 mol dm-3 (M) Sn(II) in various [HCl]. The organic phase was 0.1 M DC18C6 in 1,2-dichloroethane. A 5 cm3 aqueous solution and a 5 cm3 organic solution were mixed in a glass vial with a stirrer bar, and the glass vial was sealed. The two phases were stirred by a magnetic stirrer, and after the equilibrium, the two phases were separated by centrifugation. An aliquot of the upper aqueous solution was taken for analysis. These procedures were carried out at room temperature. The Sn concentration in the equilibrated aqueous phase was analyzed by ICP-AES. In order to avoid any matrix effect, possible trace of organic materials from DC18C6 was separated from the Sn on a micro-column anion-exchange resin in HBr/HNO3. An aliquot of the aqueous phase was once dried by heating and then dissolved into a HBr solution. Sn was strongly adsorbed while organic materials went through. Finally Sn was collected in a HNO3 solution. A solution containing 300 ppb of Sn in 0.05 M HNO3 was prepared for isotopic analysis. Isotopic ratios of Sn in all samples were analyzed with the MC-ICP-MS Nu plasma 500 HR at ENS Lyon coupled with a desolvating nebulizer Nu DSN-100 (with a typical precision of <100 ppm). The instrumental mass bias was controlled by bracketing each of the samples with standards. Because 120Sn is the most abundant isotopes, the isotope ratios have been measured as mSn/120Sn (m : 116, 117, 118, 119, 122, and 124). 114Sn and 115Sn were not analyzed due to their low abundances. Possible interferences with Cd on the masses 116, with Te on the mass 120, 122 and 124 were verified to be under the detection of the ICP-MS. Odd atomic mass isotopes (117Sn and 119Sn) showed deficits of enrichment comparing to the even atomic mass isotopes (116Sn, 118Sn, 122Sn, and 124Sn). This odd-even staggering

  14. Molybdenum isotope variations in calc-alkaline lavas from the Banda arc, Indonesia: Assessing the effect of crystal fractionation in creating isotopically heavy continental crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wille, Martin; Nebel, Oliver; Pettke, Thomas; Vroon, Pieter Z.; König, Stephan; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies report a large Mo isotope variability of up to 1‰ (expressed in δ98/95MoNIST3134) in convergent margin lavas. These isotopic variations have been associated with subduction zone processes and ultimately may account for heavy and variable isotope signatures in evolved continental

  15. What governs the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation? - A case for varying proportions of isotopically-distinct, convective and stratiform rain fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, P. K.; araguas Araguas, L.; Belachew, D.; Schumacher, C.; Funk, A. B.; Longstaffe, F. J.; Terzer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Beginning with the pioneering work of Dansgaard in 1953, stable water isotope ratios have been observed to be different in precipitation from different clouds, such as convective showers and continuous frontal rain, hydrologically more or less organized systems, or those with or without `bright bands' in radar reflectivity. The variability in isotope ratios of precipitation has always been interpreted, however, using a Rayleigh distillation framework, with lower isotope ratios resulting from condensation at lower temperatures and/or greater air mass distillation, a lack of below-cloud evaporation or in-cloud re-cycling, etc. Rayleigh distillation based approaches do not account for the fact that tropical and midlatitude precipitation consists of varying proportions of two fundamental rain types - widespread but lower intensity, stratiform and spatially-limited but higher intensity, convective - which form under very different cloud dynamical and microphysical environments. Using rain type fraction and isotope data from a large set of monitoring stations, we will show that differences in cloud processes impart characteristic isotope signatures to the two rain types and that their changing proportions during storm events are primarily responsible for precipitation isotope variability. As a result, isotope ratios can be used to partition precipitation into convective or stratiform rain fractions, which is important for understanding cloud feedbacks and atmospheric circulation response to precipitation, as well as climate impacts on the water cycle. We will also discuss the changing character of tropical and midlatitude precipitation over the past several decades and its implications.

  16. Community N and O isotope fractionation by sulfide-dependent denitrification and anammox in a stratified lacustrine water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Christine B.; Zopfi, Jakob; Blees, Jan; Veronesi, Mauro; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2014-01-01

    we do not yet understand the exact controls on the observed N (and O) isotope fractionation in the Lake Lugano north basin, our study implies that caution is advised when assuming canonical (i.e., high) N isotope effects for NO3- reduction and NH4+ oxidation in natural environments. In Lake Lugano, the community N (and O) isotope effects by sulfide-dependent denitrification and anammox in a natural ecosystem appear to be significantly lower than for organotrophic denitrification and aerobic ammonium oxidation.

  17. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous articles of this series, we discussed the use of isotopes to trace the nature of reactive intermediates and also to obtain information about minima and transition states through quantitative measurements of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. In this part, we describe an ingenious way of studying dynamic ...

  18. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms Isotopes as Markers. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 23-28. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous articles of this series, we discussed the use of isotopes to trace the nature of reactive intermediates and also to obtain information about minima and transition states through quan- titative measurements of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. In this part, we describe an ingenious way of studying dynamic ...

  20. Laboratory measurements of HDO/H2O isotopic fractionation during ice deposition in simulated cirrus clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Kara D; Clouser, Benjamin W; Bolot, Maximilien; Sarkozy, Laszlo; Ebert, Volker; Saathoff, Harald; Möhler, Ottmar; Moyer, Elisabeth J

    2017-05-30

    The stable isotopologues of water have been used in atmospheric and climate studies for over 50 years, because their strong temperature-dependent preferential condensation makes them useful diagnostics of the hydrological cycle. However, the degree of preferential condensation between vapor and ice has never been directly measured at temperatures below 233 K (-40 °C), conditions necessary to form cirrus clouds in the Earth's atmosphere, routinely observed in polar regions, and typical for the near-surface atmospheric layers of Mars. Models generally assume an extrapolation from the warmer experiments of Merlivat and Nief [Merlivat L, Nief G (1967) Tellus 19:122-127]. Nonequilibrium kinetic effects that should alter preferential partitioning have also not been well characterized experimentally. We present here direct measurements of HDO/H 2 O equilibrium fractionation between vapor and ice ([Formula: see text]) at cirrus-relevant temperatures, using in situ spectroscopic measurements of the evolving isotopic composition of water vapor during cirrus formation experiments in a cloud chamber. We rule out the recent proposed upward modification of [Formula: see text], and find values slightly lower than Merlivat and Nief. These experiments also allow us to make a quantitative validation of the kinetic modification expected to occur in supersaturated conditions in the ice-vapor system. In a subset of diffusion-limited experiments, we show that kinetic isotope effects are indeed consistent with published models, including allowing for small surface effects. These results are fundamental for inferring processes on Earth and other planets from water isotopic measurements. They also demonstrate the utility of dynamic in situ experiments for studying fractionation in geochemical systems.

  1. Cotransport of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and hematite colloids in saturated porous media: Mechanistic insights from mathematical modeling and phosphate oxygen isotope fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dengjun; Jin, Yan; Jaisi, Deb P

    2015-11-01

    The fate and transport of individual type of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in porous media have been studied intensively and the corresponding mechanisms controlling ENPs transport and deposition are well-documented. However, investigations regarding the mobility of ENPs in the concurrent presence of another mobile colloidal phase such as naturally occurring colloids (colloid-mediated transport of ENPs) are largely lacking. Here, we investigated the cotransport and retention of engineered hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HANPs) with naturally occurring hematite colloids in water-saturated sand columns under environmentally relevant transport conditions, i.e., pH, ionic strength (IS), and flow rate. Particularly, phosphate oxygen isotope fractionation of HANPs during cotransport was explored at various ISs and flow rates to examine the mechanisms controlling the isotope fractionation of HANPs in abiotic transport processes (physical transport). During cotransport, greater mobility of both HANPs and hematite occurred at higher pHs and flow rates, but at lower ISs. Intriguingly, the mobility of both HANPs and hematite was substantially lower during cotransport than the individual transport of either, attributed primarily to greater homo- and hetero-aggregation when both particles are copresent in the suspension. The shapes of breakthrough curves (BTCs) and retention profiles (RPs) during cotransport for both particles evolved from blocking to ripening with time and from flat to hyperexponential with depth, respectively, in response to decreases in pH and flow rate, and increases in IS. The blocking BTCs and RPs that are flat or hyperexponential can be well-approximated by a one-site kinetic attachment model. Conversely, a ripening model that incorporates attractive particle-particle interaction has to be employed to capture the ripening BTCs that are impacted by particle aggregation during cotransport. A small phosphate oxygen isotope fractionation (≤1.8‰) occurred

  2. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Baker, Joel A.; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2008-01-01

    In oxic oceans, most of the dissolved iron (Fe) exists as complexes with siderophore-like, strongly coordinating organic ligands. Thus, the isotope composition of the little amount of free inorganic Fe that is available for precipitation and preservation in the geological record may largely...... be controlled by isotope fractionation between the free and complexed iron.We have determined the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation induced by organic ligand activity in experiments with solutions having co-existing inorganic Fe(III) species and siderophore complexes, Fedesferrioxamine B (at pH 2). The two...... differently complexed Fe(III) pools were separated by addition of Na2CO3, which led to immediate precipitation of the inorganic Fe without causing significant dissociation of Fe-desferrioxamine complexes. Experiments using enriched 57Fe tracer showed that isotopic equilibration between the 57Fe...

  3. Method for the analysis of oxygen isotopic composition of soil phosphate fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Iris; Shaviv, Avi; Klass, Tatania; Roberts, Kathryn; Paytan, Adina

    2010-10-01

    The isotopic signature of oxygen in phosphate (δ(18)O(P)) of various soil fractions may shed light on P transformations, including phosphorus (P) recycling by soil microorganisms, uptake by plants and P adsorption, precipitation and release by oxides and minerals, thus increasing our understanding on P cycling and lability in soils. We developed and tested a protocol to extract and purify inorganic phosphate (Pi) from different soil fractions distinguished by binding strength and precipitate it as silver phosphate (Ag(3)PO(4)) for δ(18)O(P) analysis. Soil P is extracted sequentially using water, NaHCO(3), NaOH and HCl and Pi in each solution is purified and precipitated as Ag(3)PO(4). The unique characteristics and possible interferences of the soil solution extracts are addressed. Two agricultural soil samples receiving reclaimed wastewater or fresh water were analyzed, and results indicate that all soil fractions analyzed have been impacted to some degree by biologically enzyme mediated cycling of P in the soil.

  4. Fractional Absorption of Active Absorbable Algal Calcium (AAACa and Calcium Carbonate Measured by a Dual Stable-Isotope Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Abrams

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa, obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI, with that of calcium carbonate. In 10 postmenopausal women volunteers aged 59 to 77 years (mean ± S.D., 67 ± 5.3, the fractional calcium absorption of AAACa and CaCO3 was measured by a dual stable isotope method. 44Ca-enriched CaCO3 and AAACa were administered in all subjects one month apart. After a fixed-menu breakfast and pre-test urine collection (Urine 0, 42Ca-enriched CaCl2 was intravenously injected, followed by oral administration of 44Ca-enriched CaCO3 without carrier 15 minutes later, and complete urine collection for the next 24 hours (Urine 24. The fractional calcium absorption was calculated as the ratio of Augmentation of 44Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24/ augmentation of 42Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24. Differences and changes of 44Ca and 42Ca were corrected by comparing each with 43Ca. Fractional absorption of AAACa (mean ± S.D., 23.1 ± 6.4, was distinctly and significantly higher than that of CaCO3 (14.7 ± 6.4; p = 0.0060 by paired t-test. The mean fractional absorption was approximately 1.57-times higher for AAACa than for CaCO3. The serum 25(OH vitamin D level was low (mean ± S.D., 14.2 ± 4.95 ng/ml, as is common in this age group in Japan. Among the parameters of the bone and mineral metabolism measured, none displayed a significant correlation with the fractional absorption of CaCO3 and AAACa. Higher fractional absorption of AAACa compared with CaCO3 supports previous reports on the more beneficial effect of AAACa than CaCO3 for osteoporosis.

  5. Small changes in Cu redox state and speciation generate large isotope fractionation during adsorption and incorporation of Cu by a phototrophic biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutaud, Margot; Méheut, Merlin; Glatzel, Pieter; Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Viers, Jérôme; Rols, Jean-Luc; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the importance of phototrophic biofilms in metal cycling in freshwater systems, metal isotope fractionation linked to metal adsorption and uptake by biofilm remains very poorly constrained. Here, copper isotope fractionation by a mature phototrophic biofilm during Cu surface adsorption and incorporation was studied in batch reactor (BR) and open drip flow reactor (DFR) systems at ambient conditions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (both Near Edge Structure, XANES, and Extended Fine Structure, EXAFS) at Cu K-edge of the biofilm after its interaction with Cu in BR experiments allowed characterizing the molecular structure of assimilated Cu and quantifying the degree of CuII to CuI reduction linked to Cu assimilation. For both BR and DFR experiments, Cu adsorption caused enrichment in heavy isotope at the surface of the biofilm relative to the aqueous solution, with an apparent enrichment factor for the adsorption process, ε65Cuads, of +1.1 ± 0.3‰. In contrast, the isotope enrichment factor during copper incorporation into the biofilm (ε65Cuinc) was highly variable, ranging from -0.6 to +0.8‰. This variability of the ε65Cuinc value was likely controlled by Cu cellular uptake via different transport pathways resulting in contrasting fractionation. Specifically, the CuII storage induced enrichment in heavy isotope, whereas the toxicity response of the biofilm to Cu exposure resulted in reduction of CuII to CuI, thus yielding the biofilm enrichment in light isotope. EXAFS analyses suggested that a major part of the Cu assimilated by the biofilm is bound to 5.1 ± 0.3 oxygen or nitrogen atoms, with a small proportion of Cu linked to sulfur atoms (NS < 0.6) of sulfhydryl groups. XANES analyses showed that the proportion of CuIIvs CuI, compared to the initial CuII/CuI ratio, decreased by 14% after the first hour of reaction and by 6% after 96 h of reaction. The value of ε65Cuinc of the biofilm exhibited a similar trend over time of exposure. Our study

  6. Fractionation, concentration and flow: A model coupling stable isotope ratios to fluid travel time and chemical reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2014-12-01

    From the point of infiltration to the point of discharge, the chemical signature imparted to fluid flowing through catchments represents the weathering flux from the landscape. The magnitude of this flux is linked to both the time water spends in the system and the time required for reactions to influence fluid chemistry. The ratio of these characteristic times is often represented as a Damköhler number (Da), which links the parameters governing reactivity and flow. Stable isotope ratios are now commonly applied to identify and even quantify the processes and rates of primary mineral weathering, secondary mineral formation and biogeochemical cycling within catchments. Here, we derive a series of fractionation-discharge relationships for a variety of governing chemical rate laws utilizing Da coefficients. These equations can be used to isolate and quantify the effects of (1) fluid travel time distributions and (2) chemical weathering efficiency on observed stable isotope ratios. The analytical solutions are verified against multi-component reactive transport simulations of stable isotope fractionation in homogeneous and spatially correlated heterogeneous flow fields using the CrunchTope code and evaluated against field observations. We demonstrate that for an irreversible reaction, the relationship between stable isotope enrichment and reactant concentration obeys a Rayleigh-type model across a wide range of reaction rates. However, this relationship is violated when a heterogeneous travel time distribution is considered. This observation highlights an important discrepancy in the commonly assumed relationship between fractionation and concentration for irreversible reactions. We further extend our derivation to consider isotope fractionation associated with a reversible reaction (i.e. a kinetically controlled approach to equilibrium) in a steady-state flow field. Due to the dependence of the observed isotope ratio on the flow rate, kinetic enrichment and

  7. Sulfur Isotopic Fractionation During Vacuum Ultraviolet Photolysis of SO2: Implication for Meteorites and Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S.; Jackson, T. L.; Rude, B.; Ahmed, M.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    Several sulfur bearing gas phase species existed in the solar nebula, including H2S, SO2, SiS, OCS, CS2, CS, NS and SO as a consequence of multiple available chemical valence states (S2- to S6+). Sulfur directly condensed into refractory phases in the solar nebula under reducing conditions. Mass independent (MI) sulfur isotopic compositions have been measured in chondrules and organics from chondritic meteorites. Large 33S excesses in sulfides from achondrite meteoritic groups have also been found suggesting that refractory sulfide minerals condensed from a nebular gas with an enhanced carbon to oxygen ratio. Photochemical reactions in the early solar nebula have been inferred to be a leading process in generating MI sulfur compositions. Previously, we have reported wavelength dependent mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions (with a varying degree in D33S and D36S) in the product elemental sulfur during vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photodissociation of H2S. Recently we performed photodissociation of SO2 experiments in the wavelength region 98 to 200 nm at low pressures (0.5 torr) using the VUV photons from the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron in a differentially pumped reaction chamber. To our knowledge, this is the first ever experiment to determine the isotopic fractionation in VUV photodissociation of SO2. At VUV energy region, SO2 is mostly predissociative. The measured sulfur isotopic compositions in the product elemental sulfur are MI and dependent on the wavelength. These new results support the previous finding from photodissociation of other di- and tri-atomic molecules (CO, N2, H2S) that predissociative photodissociation produces MI isotopic products and is a quantum mechanically driven selective phenomenon. These new results are useful because (i) they are important in interpreting meteoritic data and decipher sulfur chemistry in the early nebula which is indicative of the redox condition of the nebula (ii) SO2 photolysis in the atmosphere of early

  8. Simultaneous determination of mass-dependent isotopic fractionation and radiogenic isotope variation of strontium in geochemical samples by multiple collector-ICP-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Hirata, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to determine 88 Sr/ 86 Sr and 87 Sr/ 86 Sr simultaneously. The former variation reflects the mass-dependent isotopic fractionation through the physico-chemical processes, and the latter originates from β-decay of the parent nuclide 87 Rb as well as the mass-dependent isotopic fractionation. In order to determine the mass-dependent isotopic fractionation, the mass-discrimination effect on 88 Sr/ 86 Sr was externally corrected by an exponential law using Zr. For the radiogenic growth of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr, the mass-dependent isotopic fractionation effect on 87 Sr/ 86 Sr was corrected by a conventional correction technique using the 88 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio. The reproducibility of the 88 Sr/ 86 Sr and 87 Sr/ 86 Sr measurements for a high-purity Sr chemical reagent was 0.06 per mille (2SD, n=20) and 0.07 per mille (2SD, n=20), respectively. Strontium isotopic ratios ( 88 Sr/ 86 Sr and 87 Sr/ 86 Sr) were measured on six geochemical reference materials (igneous rock: JB-1a and JA-2; carbonate mineral: JLs-1, JDo-1, JCp-1 and JCt-1) and one seawater sample. The resulting 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios obtained here were consistent with previously published data within the analytical uncertainties. The resulting 88 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios for igneous rock samples did not vary significantly within the samples, whereas the carbonate samples showed enrichments of the lighter Sr isotopes over the seawater sample. The 88 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of geochemical samples could reflect the physico-chemical processes for the sample formation. Also, a combined discussion of 88 Sr/ 86 Sr and 87 Sr/ 86 Sr of samples will render multi-dimensional information on geochemical processes. (author)

  9. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane. I - Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. II - Sodium ion exclusion at various ionic strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T. B.; Hanshaw, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of distilled water and of 0.01N NaCl forced to flow at ambient temperature under a hydraulic pressure drop of 100 bars across a montmorillonite disk compacted to a porosity of 35% by a pressure of 330 bars. The ultrafiltrates in both experiments were depleted in D by 2.5% and in O-18 by 0.8% relative to the residual solution. No additional isotopic fractionation due to a salt-filtering mechanism was observed at NaCl concentrations up to 0.01N. Adsorption is most likely the principal mechanism which produces isotopic fractionation, but molecular diffusion may play a minor role. The results suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of ground water during passage through compacted clayey sediments should be a common occurrence, in accord with published interpretations of isotopic data from the Illinois and Alberta basins. It is shown how it is possible to proceed from the ion exchange capacity of clay minerals and, by means of the Donnan membrane equilibrium concept and the Teorell-Meyer-Siever theory, develop a theory to explain why and to what extent ultrafiltration occurs when solutions of known concentration are forced to flow through a clay membrane.

  10. Experimental evaporation of hyperacid brines: Effects on chemical composition and chlorine isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; van Bergen, Manfred J.; Eggenkamp, H. G. M.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperacid brines from active volcanic lakes are some of the chemically most complex aqueous solutions on Earth. Their compositions provide valuable insights into processes of elemental transfer from a magma body to the surface and interactions with solid rocks and the atmosphere. This paper describes changes in chemical and δ37Cl signatures observed in a 1750 h isothermal evaporation experiment on hyperacid (pH 0.1) sulphate-chloride brine water from the active lake of Kawah Ijen volcano (Indonesia). Although gypsum was the only evaporite mineral identified in the evolving brine, decreasing Si concentrations may ultimately result in amorphous silica precipitation. Geochemical simulations predict the additional formation of elemental sulphur at lower water activities (aH2O ≤ 0.65) that were not reached in the experiment. Absence of other sulphates and halides despite the high load of dissolved elements (initial TDS ca. 100 g/kg) can be attributed to increased solubility of metals, promoted by extensive formation of complexes between the variety of cations and the major anions (HSO4-, Cl-, F-) present. Chlorine deviations from a conservative behaviour point to losses of gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl(g)) and consequently an increase in Br/Cl ratios. Chlorine isotope fractionation that accompanied the escape of HCl(g) showed a marked change in sign and magnitude in the course of progressive evaporation of the brine. The calculated factor of fractionation between HCl(g) and dissolved Cl for the initial interval (before 500 h) is positive (1000lnαHCl(g)-Cldiss. = + 1.55 ± 0.49‰to + 3.37 ± 1.11‰), indicating that, at first, the escaping HCl(g) was isotopically heavier than the dissolved Cl remaining in the brine. Conversely, fractionation shifted to the opposite direction in the subsequent interval (1000lnαHCl(g)-Cldiss. = 5.67 ± 0.17‰to - 5.64 ± 0.08‰), in agreement with values reported in literature. It is proposed that Cl isotopic fractionation in

  11. Ammonium in thermal waters of Yellowstone National Park: processes affecting speciation and isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, J.M.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Böhlke, J.K.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Ball, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, largely in reduced form (NH4(T)≈NH4(aq)++NH3(aq)o), has been documented in thermal waters throughout Yellowstone National Park, with concentrations ranging from a few micromolar along the Firehole River to millimolar concentrations at Washburn Hot Springs. Indirect evidence from rock nitrogen analyses and previous work on organic compounds associated with Washburn Hot Springs and the Mirror Plateau indicate multiple sources for thermal water NH4(T), including Mesozoic marine sedimentary rocks, Eocene lacustrine deposits, and glacial deposits. A positive correlation between NH4(T) concentration and δ18O of thermal water indicates that boiling is an important mechanism for increasing concentrations of NH4(T) and other solutes in some areas. The isotopic composition of dissolved NH4(T) is highly variable (δ15N = −6‰ to +30‰) and is positively correlated with pH values. In comparison to likely δ15N values of nitrogen source materials (+1‰ to +7‰), high δ15N values in hot springs with pH >5 are attributed to isotope fractionation associated with NH3(aq)o loss by volatilization. NH4(T) in springs with low pH typically is relatively unfractionated, except for some acid springs with negative δ15N values that are attributed to NH3(g)o condensation. NH4(T) concentration and isotopic variations were evident spatially (between springs) and temporally (in individual springs). These variations are likely to be reflected in biomass and sediments associated with the hot springs and outflows. Elevated NH4(T) concentrations can persist for 10s to 1000s of meters in surface waters draining hot spring areas before being completely assimilated or oxidized.

  12. The temporal evolution of magnesium isotope fractionation during hydromagnesite dissolution, precipitation, and at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Berninger, Ulf-Niklas; Pérez-Fernàndez, Andrea; Chmeleff, Jérôme; Mavromatis, Vasileios

    2018-04-01

    This study provides experimental evidence of the resetting of the magnesium (Mg) isotope signatures of hydromagnesite in the presence of an aqueous fluid during its congruent dissolution, precipitation, and at equilibrium at ambient temperatures over month-long timescales. All experiments were performed in batch reactors in aqueous sodium carbonate buffer solutions having a pH from 7.8 to 9.2. The fluid phase in all experiments attained bulk chemical equilibrium within analytical uncertainty with hydromagnesite within several days, but the experiments were allowed to continue for up to 575 days. During congruent hydromagnesite dissolution, the fluid first became enriched in isotopically light Mg compared to the dissolving hydromagnesite, but this Mg isotope composition became heavier after the fluid attained chemical equilibrium with the mineral. The δ26Mg composition of the fluid was up to ∼0.35‰ heavier than the initial dissolving hydromagnesite at the end of the dissolution experiments. Hydromagnesite precipitation was provoked during one experiment by increasing the reaction temperature from 4 to 50 °C. The δ26Mg composition of the fluid increased as hydromagnesite precipitated and continued to increase after the fluid attained bulk equilibrium with this phase. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that mineral-fluid equilibrium is dynamic (i.e. dissolution and precipitation occur at equal, non-zero rates at equilibrium). Moreover the results presented in this study confirm (1) that the transfer of material from the solid to the fluid phase may not be conservative during stoichiometric dissolution, and (2) that the isotopic compositions of carbonate minerals can evolve even when the mineral is in bulk chemical equilibrium with its coexisting fluid. This latter observation suggests that the preservation of isotopic signatures of carbonate minerals in the geological record may require a combination of the isolation of fluid-mineral system

  13. Isotopic distributions, element ratios, and element mass fractions from enrichment-meter-type gamma-ray measurements of MOX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.; Parker, J.L.; Haycock, D.L.; Dragnev, T.

    1991-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectra from ''infinitely'' thick mixed oxide samples have been measured. The plutonium isotopics, the U/Pu ratio, the high-Z mass fractions (assuming only plutonium, uranium, and americium), and the low-Z mass fraction (assuming the matrix is only oxygen) can be determined by carefully analyzing the data. The results agree well with the chemical determination of these parameters. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Iron Availability Influences Silicon Isotope Fractionation in Two Southern Ocean Diatoms (Proboscia inermis and Eucampia antarctica and a Coastal Diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Meyerink

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The fractionation of silicon (Si isotopes was measured in two Southern Ocean diatoms (Proboscia inermis and Eucampia Antarctica and a coastal diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana that were grown under varying iron (Fe concentrations. Varying Fe concentrations had no effect on the Si isotope enrichment factor (ε in T. pseudonana, whilst E. Antarctica and P. inermis exhibited significant variations in the value of ε between Fe-replete and Fe-limited conditions. Mean ε values in P. inermis and E. Antarctica decreased from (± 1SD −1.11 ± 0.15‰ and −1.42 ± 0.41 ‰ (respectively under Fe-replete conditions, to −1.38 ± 0.27 ‰ and −1.57 ± 0.5 ‰ (respectively under Fe-limiting conditions. These variations likely arise from adaptations in diatoms arising from the nutrient status of their environment. T. pseudonana is a coastal clone typically accustomed to low Si but high Fe conditions whereas E. Antarctica and P. inermis are typically accustomed to High Si, High nitrate low Fe conditions. Growth induced variations in silicic acid (Si(OH4 uptake arising from Fe-limitation is the likely mechanism leading to Si-isotope variability in E. Antarctica and P. inermis. The multiplicative effects of species diversity and resource limitation (e.g., Fe on Si-isotope fractionation in diatoms can potentially alter the Si-isotope composition of diatom opal in diatamaceous sediments and sea surface Si(OH4. This work highlights the need for further in vitro studies into intracellular mechanisms involved in Si(OH4 uptake, and the associated pathways for Si-isotope fractionation in diatoms.

  15. Studies of control materials of isotope transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Tetsuji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Araki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Mitsutane; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Abe, Fujio; Numazawa, Takenori [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    To control wavelength of laser, the physical properties of control materials of molecular excitation and isotope should be studied. We carried out isotopic enrichment, Si thin film growth, and preparation of boron isotope crystal and to make a calculation code of nuclear transmutation simulation. A gas circulation system for developing isotope laser was produced in order to control of molecular vibration excitation. We developed a single straight system of silicon isotope enrichment and silicon thin film preparation by infrared laser. When laser irradiated Si{sub 2}F{sub 6}, unreacted Si{sub 2}F{sub 6} contained 99.72% of {sup 28}Si at about 956 cm{sup -1} wavelength. When SiF{sub 4} or Si{sub 2}F{sub 6} with enriched isotope were directly decomposed by the plasma CVD method at about from 350 to 450degC, the yield of silicon crystal was about 28%. A homogeneous crystal with 10 mm diameter was obtained as the control material of boron isotope. The computer code for simulation of nuclear transmutation was improved to calculate the displacement damage, change of composition, induced radioactivity and decay heat. (S.Y.)

  16. Pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (δ13C and δD Py-CSIA) of soil organic matter size fractions under four vegetation covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Almendros, Gonzalo; De la Rosa, José M.; González-Pérez, José A.

    2015-04-01

    A chemical characterization of soil organic matter (SOM) under different ground cover from a Mediterranean climate (Doñana National Park, Andalusia, Spain) is approached using bulk δ15N, δ13C, δ18O and δD isotopic analysis (C/TC-IRMS) and δ13C and δD pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (Py-CSIA: Py-GC-C/TC-IRMS). Soil samples were collected in sandy soils, Arenosols (WRB 2006) from the Doñana National Park (SW Spain) under different vegetation cover: cork oak (Quercus suber, QS), eagle fern (Pteridium aquilinum, PA), pine (Pinus pinea, PP) and rockrose (Halimium halimifolium, HH). Two size fractions; coarse (C: 1-2 mm) and fine (F: soil. A complete conventional analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) of these samples have been studied in detail (Jiménez-Morillo et al., 2015). Bulk isotopic analysis of stable light elements (δ15N, δ13C, δ18O and δD) revealed particular isotopic signatures showing differences related with the main vegetation cover and the different soil size fraction. All samples had a carbon isotopic signature between -26 and -29 ‰, which indicated that the organic matter in the two fractions of each soil sample derived from C3-type plants. The bulk δD isotopic signature in whole soil sample indicate a lower deuterium fractionation occurs in SOM under arboreal than under no-arboreal vegetation, this can be caused by the occurrence of a higher water evaporation rate under bush vegetation and/or to differences due to leaf morphology as previously described (Leaney et al., 1985). A δ15N vs. δ18O chart may provide some clues about N origin in the soil and particularly about the original source of nitrates (Kendall et al., 1996). In in all sample and size fractions our values are in the chart area corresponding to NO3 in precipitation, with lighter δ18O (c. 20 ‰) values compatible with fertilizers may be from adjacent crops. In addition we were able to assign δ13C and δD values for a number of specific SOM compounds released

  17. Radiogenic age and isotopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is one of an annual collection of reports presenting data from the Geochronology Section of the Continental Geoscience Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). The main purpose of this collection is to make geochronological and other radiogenic isotope data produced by the section available promptly to the geological community. Reports make full presentation of the data, relate these to field settings and make comparatively short interpretations. Other geochronological and isotope data produced in the laboratory but published in outside journals or separate GSC publications are summarized at the end of this report. Reports in this issue cover methods for Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses; 40 Ar- 39 Ar ages for the New Quebec Crater and for basaltic rocks; U-Pb ages for a differentiated mafic sill in the Ogilvie Mountains, plutonic rocks in the Contwoyto-Nose Lakes are, zircons from the Anton Complex, the Clinton-Colden gabbro-anorthosite intrusion, the Himag plutonic suite, the Campbell granite, the Central Gneiss Belt, Silurian granites, a metarhyolite, plagiogranite and gabbro, and the Wage shear zone; Rb-Sr ages for granitic rocks; K-Ar and Rb-Sr geochronology of granites; a compilation of K-Ar ages; ages of archean and proterozoic mylonites and pre-Misi granitoid domes; and reconnaissance geochronology of Baffin Island

  18. Metabolic studies in man using stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.; Jung, K.; Krumbiegel, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this project, stable isotope compounds and stable isotope pharmaceuticals were used (with emphasis on the application of 15 N) to study several aspects of nitrogen metabolism in man. Of the many methods available, the 15 N stable isotope tracer technique holds a special position because the methodology for application and nitrogen isotope analysis is proven and reliable. Valid routine methods using 15 N analysis by emission spectrometry have been demonstrated. Several methods for the preparation of biological material were developed during our participation in the Coordinated Research Programme. In these studies, direct procedures (i.e. use of diluted urine as a samples without chemical preparation) or rapid isolation methods were favoured. Within the scope of the Analytical Quality Control Service (AQCS) enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies were prepared and are now available through the International Atomic Energy Agency. The materials are of special importance as the increasing application of stable isotopes as tracers in medical, biological and agricultural studies has focused interest on reliable measurements of biological material of different origin. 24 refs

  19. Study of neutron-deficient Sn isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, G.

    1982-05-01

    The formation of neutron deficient nuclei by heavy ion reactions is investigated. The experimental technique is presented, and the results obtained concerning Sn et In isotopes reported: first excited states of 106 Sn, high spin states in 107 Sn and 107 In; Yrast levels of 106 Sn, 107 Sn, 108 Sn; study of neutron deficient Sn and In isotopes formed by the desintegration of the compound nucleus 112 Xe. All these results are discussed [fr

  20. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes and selenium between coexisting sulfide minerals from the Besshi deposit, Central Shikoku, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M.; Kase, K.; Tsutsumi, M.

    1984-07-01

    Fractionation of sulfur isotopes and selenium was measured between coexisting pyrite and chalcopyrite and between coexisting pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite from the Besshi deposit of Kieslager-type, Central Shikoku, Japan. In all the pyrite-chalcopyrite pairs studied, 34S is enriched in pyrite relative to chalcopyrite, while selenium is enriched conversely in chalcopyrite relative to pyrite. The mean △34Spy-cp value is +0.53±0.36 per mil, and the mean value of the distribution coefficient of selenium, Dcp-py, is 2.58±0.64. In all the pyrrhotite-chalcopyrite pairs studied, the two minerals are very close to each other both in sulfur isotope and Se/S ratios. The mean △34Spo-cp value is -0.08±0.16 per mil and the mean Dcp-po value is 0.99±0.05. The results have been discussed in comparison with similar data obtained for the Hitachi deposits of Kieslager-type, Japan (Yamamoto et al. 1983).

  1. Determination of isotope fractionation effect using a double spike (242Pu+240Pu) during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Parab, A.R.; Khodade, P.S.; Jain, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope fractionation effect during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium has been investigated using a double spike ( 242 Pu+ 240 Pu) and the determination of concentration of plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is reported. (author). 6 refs., 2 tables

  2. Reassessment of the C-13/C-12 and C-14/C-12 isotopic fractionation ratio and its impact on high-precision radiocarbon dating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahrni, Simon M.; Southon, John R.; Santos, Guaciara M.; Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of radiocarbon measurement results (C-14/C-12 isotopic ratios or sample activities) are corrected for isotopic fractionation processes (measured as C-13/C-12 isotopic ratios) that occur in nature, in sample preparation and measurement. In 1954 Harmon Craig suggested a value of 2.0

  3. Reassessment of the 13C/12C and 14C/12C isotopic fractionation ratio and its impact on high-precision radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrni, Simon M.; Southon, John R.; Santos, Guaciara M.; Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2017-09-01

    The vast majority of radiocarbon measurement results (14C/12C isotopic ratios or sample activities) are corrected for isotopic fractionation processes (measured as 13C/12C isotopic ratios) that occur in nature, in sample preparation and measurement. In 1954 Harmon Craig suggested a value of 2.0 for the fractionation ratio b that is used to correct 14C/12C ratios for shifts in the 13C/12C ratios and this value has been applied by the radiocarbon community ever since. While theoretical considerations suggest moderate deviations of b from 2.0, some measurements have suggested larger differences (e.g. b = 2.3, measured by Saliège and Fontes in 1984). With the high precision attained in radiocarbon measurements today (±2‰), even a relatively small deviation of b from 2.0 can impact the accuracy of radiocarbon data, and it is, therefore, of interest to re-evaluate the fractionation corrections. In the present study, the fractionation ratio b was determined by independent experiments on the chemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to elemental carbon (graphitization reaction) and on the photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by C3 and C4 plants. The results yielded b = 1.882 ± 0.019 for the reduction of CO2 to solid graphite and b = 1.953 ± 0.025 for the weighted mean of measurements involving C3 and C4 photosynthesis pathways. In addition, the analysis of over 9600 full-sized OX-I and OX-II normalizing standards measured between 2002 and 2012 confirms b values lower than 2.0. The obtained values are in good agreement with quantum mechanical estimates of the equilibrium fractionation and classic kinetic fractionation as well as with results from other light three-isotope systems (oxygen, magnesium, silicon and sulfur). While the value of the fractionation ratio varies with the relative importance of kinetic and equilibrium fractionation, the values obtained in the present study cluster around b = 1.9. Our findings suggest that a significant fraction of all samples

  4. Field experimentation in isotope-aided studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, F.

    1990-01-01

    Isotopic-aided studies involve the application of isotopically labelled fertilizer as tracers for the quantitative and precise determination of the fate of specific nutrient elements in the soil/plant system. The planning of isotopic-aided studies requires a different approach from that followed in the design of normal fertilizer trials because of the cost and supply of isotopically labelled materials, the use of highly specialized equipment and the need for skillful trained staff in the use of isotope techniques both in the field/greenhouse and the laboratory. This report is intended to highlight the main points to be considered while applying those techniques in the field or greenhouse. It has been well established that nuclear techniques are a powerful tool in agricultural research. One should take advantage of the use of such techniques if the following criteria are met: The isotope method is the only way to solve a particular question or to obtain a specific piece of information. There are other methods available for such a purpose but the nuclear method provides a direct and quick means to obtain the needed information resulting in higher economic return

  5. Microbial Oxidation of Hg(0) - Its Effect on Hg Stable Isotope Fractionation and Methylmercury Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Nathan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Barkay, Tamar [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Reinfelder, John [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-28

    relationship between Hg concentrations and rates of denitrification in enrichment cultures. In part III of our project, we examined in more detail the effects of microbial interactions on Hg transformations. We discovered that both sulfate reducing and iron reducing bacteria coexist in freshwater sediments and both microbial groups contribute to mercury methylation. We showed that mercury methylation by sulfate reducing and iron reducing bacteria are temporally and spatially separated processes. We also discovered that methanogens can methylate mercury. We showed that Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1 methylated Hg at comparable rates, but with higher yields, than those observed for sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron-reducing bacteria. Finally, we demonstrated that syntrophic interactions between different microbial groups increase mercury methylation rates. We showed that Hg methylation rates are stimulated via inter-species hydrogen and acetate transfer (i) from sulfate-reducing bacteria to methanogens and (ii) from fermenters to the sulfate-reducing bacteria. In part IV of the project, we studied Hg bioavailability and Hg isotope fractionation. We demonstrated that thiol-bound Hg is bioavailable to mercury resistant bacteria. We found that uptake of Hg from Hg-glutathione and Hg-cysteine complexes does not require functioning glutathione and cystine/cysteine transport systems. We demonstrated that a wide range of methylmercury complexes (e.g. MeHgOH, MeHg-cysteine, and MeHg-glutathione) are bioavailable to mercury resistant bacteria. The rate of MeHg demethylation varies more between different species of mercury resistant bacteria than among MeHg complexes. We showed that microbial demethylation of MeHg depends more on the species of microorganism than on the types and relative concentrations of thiols or other MeHg ligands present. Finally, we demonstrated that Hg methylation by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 imparts mass

  6. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation as a biomarker for nitrogen use efficiency in ruminants: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Dewhurst, R J; Cheng, L; Cabrita, A R J; Fonseca, A J M; Nozière, P; Makowski, D; Fouillet, H; Ortigues-Marty, I

    2017-12-29

    Animal proteins are naturally 15N enriched relative to the diet and the extent of this difference (Δ15Nanimal-diet or N isotopic fractionation) has been correlated to N use efficiency (NUE; N gain or milk N yield/N intake) in some recent ruminant studies. The present study used meta-analysis to investigate whether Δ15Nanimal-diet can be used as a predictor of NUE across a range of dietary conditions, particularly at the level of between-animal variation. An additional objective was to identify variables related to N partitioning explaining the link between NUE and Δ15Nanimal-diet. Individual values from eight publications reporting both NUE and Δ15Nanimal-diet for domestic ruminants were used to create a database comprising 11 experimental studies, 41 treatments and individual animal values for NUE (n=226) and Δ15Nanimal-diet (n=291). Data were analyzed by mixed-effect regression analysis taking into account experimental factors as random effects on both the intercept and slope of the model. Diets were characterized according to the INRA feeding system in terms of N utilization at the rumen, digestive and metabolic levels. These variables were used in a partial least squares regression analysis to predict separately NUE and Δ15Nanimal-diet variation, with the objective of identifying common variables linking NUE and Δ15Nanimal-diet. For individuals reared under similar conditions (within-study) and at the same time (within-period), the variance of NUE and Δ15Nanimal-diet not explained by dietary treatments (i.e. between-animal variation plus experimental error) was 35% and 55%, respectively. Mixed-effect regression analysis conducted with treatment means showed that Δ15Nanimal-diet was significantly and negatively correlated to NUE variation across diets (NUE=0.415 -0.055×Δ15Nanimal-diet). When using individual values and taking into account the random effects of study, period and diet, the relationship was also significant (NUE=0.358 -0.035×Δ15Nanimal

  7. Evaporative fractionation of volatile stable isotopes and their bearing on the origin of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James M. D.; Moynier, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The Moon is depleted in volatile elements relative to the Earth and Mars. Low abundances of volatile elements, fractionated stable isotope ratios of S, Cl, K and Zn, high μ (238U/204Pb) and long-term Rb/Sr depletion are distinguishing features of the Moon, relative to the Earth. These geochemical characteristics indicate both inheritance of volatile-depleted materials that formed the Moon and planets and subsequent evaporative loss of volatile elements that occurred during lunar formation and differentiation. Models of volatile loss through localized eruptive degassing are not consistent with the available S, Cl, Zn and K isotopes and abundance data for the Moon. The most probable cause of volatile depletion is global-scale evaporation resulting from a giant impact or a magma ocean phase where inefficient volatile loss during magmatic convection led to the present distribution of volatile elements within mantle and crustal reservoirs. Problems exist for models of planetary volatile depletion following giant impact. Most critically, in this model, the volatile loss requires preferential delivery and retention of late-accreted volatiles to the Earth compared with the Moon. Different proportions of late-accreted mass are computed to explain present-day distributions of volatile and moderately volatile elements (e.g. Pb, Zn; 5 to >10%) relative to highly siderophile elements (approx. 0.5%) for the Earth. Models of early magma ocean phases may be more effective in explaining the volatile loss. Basaltic materials (e.g. eucrites and angrites) from highly differentiated airless asteroids are volatile-depleted, like the Moon, whereas the Earth and Mars have proportionally greater volatile contents. Parent-body size and the existence of early atmospheres are therefore likely to represent fundamental controls on planetary volatile retention or loss. PMID:25114311

  8. Evaporative fractionation of volatile stable isotopes and their bearing on the origin of the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James M D; Moynier, Frederic

    2014-09-13

    The Moon is depleted in volatile elements relative to the Earth and Mars. Low abundances of volatile elements, fractionated stable isotope ratios of S, Cl, K and Zn, high μ ((238)U/(204)Pb) and long-term Rb/Sr depletion are distinguishing features of the Moon, relative to the Earth. These geochemical characteristics indicate both inheritance of volatile-depleted materials that formed the Moon and planets and subsequent evaporative loss of volatile elements that occurred during lunar formation and differentiation. Models of volatile loss through localized eruptive degassing are not consistent with the available S, Cl, Zn and K isotopes and abundance data for the Moon. The most probable cause of volatile depletion is global-scale evaporation resulting from a giant impact or a magma ocean phase where inefficient volatile loss during magmatic convection led to the present distribution of volatile elements within mantle and crustal reservoirs. Problems exist for models of planetary volatile depletion following giant impact. Most critically, in this model, the volatile loss requires preferential delivery and retention of late-accreted volatiles to the Earth compared with the Moon. Different proportions of late-accreted mass are computed to explain present-day distributions of volatile and moderately volatile elements (e.g. Pb, Zn; 5 to >10%) relative to highly siderophile elements (approx. 0.5%) for the Earth. Models of early magma ocean phases may be more effective in explaining the volatile loss. Basaltic materials (e.g. eucrites and angrites) from highly differentiated airless asteroids are volatile-depleted, like the Moon, whereas the Earth and Mars have proportionally greater volatile contents. Parent-body size and the existence of early atmospheres are therefore likely to represent fundamental controls on planetary volatile retention or loss. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Numerical study of fractional nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    KAUST Repository

    Klein, Christian

    2014-10-08

    Using a Fourier spectral method, we provide a detailed numerical investigation of dispersive Schrödinger-type equations involving a fractional Laplacian in an one-dimensional case. By an appropriate choice of the dispersive exponent, both mass and energy sub- and supercritical regimes can be identified. This allows us to study the possibility of finite time blow-up versus global existence, the nature of the blow-up, the stability and instability of nonlinear ground states and the long-time dynamics of solutions. The latter is also studied in a semiclassical setting. Moreover, we numerically construct ground state solutions of the fractional nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  10. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn; Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    of Cr(III)-species (Cr3+, CrCl2+ and CrCl2 +) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ∼1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr3+, intermediates in CrCl2+ and the lightest in CrCl2 +/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ∼25% Cr...... in the mass-bias corrected 53Cr/52Cr (μ53Cr* of 5.2ppm) and 54Cr/52Cr (μ54Cr* of 13.5ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high...

  11. Predicting trace metal solubility and fractionation in Urban soils from isotopic exchangeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, L C; Young, S D; Tye, A M; Bailey, E H

    2017-12-01

    Metal-salt amended soils (MA, n = 23), and historically-contaminated urban soils from two English cities (Urban, n = 50), were investigated to assess the effects of soil properties and contaminant source on metal lability and solubility. A stable isotope dilution method, with and without a resin purification step, was used to measure the lability of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. For all five metals in MA soils, lability (%E-values) could be reasonably well predicted from soil pH value with a simple logistic equation. However, there was evidence of continuing time-dependent fixation of Cd and Zn in the MA soils, following more than a decade of storage under air-dried conditions, mainly in high pH soils. All five metals in MA soils remained much more labile than in Urban soils, strongly indicating an effect of contaminant source on metal lability in the latter. Metal solubility was predicted for both sets of soil by the geochemical speciation model WHAM-VII, using E-value as an input variable. For soils with low metal solution concentrations, over-estimation of Cd, Ni and Zn solubility was associated with binding to the Fe oxide fraction while accurate prediction of Cu solubility was dependent on humic acid content. Lead solubility was most poorly described, especially in the Urban soils. Generally, slightly poorer estimation of metal solubility was observed in Urban soils, possibly due to a greater incidence of high pH values. The use of isotopically exchangeable metal to predict solubility is appropriate both for historically contaminated soils and where amendment with soluble forms of metal is used, as in toxicological trials. However, the major limitation to predicting solubility may lie with the accuracy of model input variables such as humic acid and Fe oxide contents where there is often a reliance on relatively crude analytical estimations of these variables. Trace metal reactivity in urban soils depends on both soil properties and the original source material

  12. Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

    2003-10-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P < 0.003, r{sup 2} = 0.86). A multiple regression model that included initial CH{sub 4} concentration and CH{sub 4} oxidation rate as independent variables

  13. Stable oxygen isotopic fractionation during photolytic O(2) consumption in stream waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomicki, K M; Schiff, S L

    2008-10-15

    Oxygen (O(2)) is required for life in higher organisms, however, processes such as respiration, the oxidation of reduced inorganic species, and the photolytic breakdown of dissolved organic matter (DOM) decrease the O(2) concentrations in aquatic systems. Filtered, inoculated, and sterile samples of stream waters from Ontario, Canada, were incubated in natural sunlight to examine the effects of photolysis of DOM, respiration, and abiotic reactions on O(2) consumption and delta(18)O of dissolved oxygen (delta(18)O-O(2)). Oxygen consumption rates in the light were up to an order of magnitude greater than in the dark, suggesting light-mediated processes controlled O(2) consumption. Rates of O(2) loss were the same for each treatment (i.e. filtered, inoculated, and sterile) indicating that photolysis was the dominant O(2) consuming process over respiration in these incubations. O(2) consumption rates were different between streams, even when normalized to the change in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), signifying that DOM photolability varied among streams. During DOM breakdown to CO(2), the lighter (16)O isotopomer was preferentially consumed. Fractionation factors observed for photolysis, respiration, and abiotic reactions ranged between 0.988 and 0.995, and were similar in both the light and in the dark incubations in all streams. These fractionation factors are not a function of O(2) consumption rates, and are outside the range published for respiration (0.975-0.982). In current models of O(2) and delta(18)O-O(2), photolysis and respiration are not considered separately and the isotopic fractionation during respiration that is measured in the dark is used in the light. In these incubations, DOM degradation and abiotic reactions are important O(2) consuming and delta(18)O-O(2) fractionating processes. Current models of O(2) and delta(18)O-O(2) incorporate photolysis of DOM and other abiotic processes into the respiratory component of O(2) consumption, thereby

  14. Plasma nitrogen isotopic fractionation and feed efficiency in growing beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheadon, N M; McGee, M; Edwards, G R; Dewhurst, R J

    2014-05-01

    Fractionation of N isotopes occurs in many metabolic reactions which causes tissue proteins to become enriched in ¹⁵N while urea (urine) is depleted in ¹⁵N relative to the diet. We investigated ¹⁵N enrichment of whole plasma and its relationship with feed conversion efficiency (FCE) in growing beef heifers (n 84) offered 2 kg/d of concentrates with grass silage ad libitum. Heifers were on average 299 (SD 48·3) d old and weighed 311 (SD 48·8) kg. Plasma was obtained on day 79 (n 84) of the experiment and from a subset of animals (n 20) on four occasions between days 16 and 79. Silage DM intake (DMI) averaged 4·1 (SD 0·74) kg/d and concentrate DMI was 1·72 kg/d. Mean mid-test live weight was 333 (SD 47·6) kg, daily gain was 0·53 (SD 0·183) kg, FCE (g live-weight gain/g DMI) was 0·09 (SD 0·028) and residual feed intake (RFI) was 0 (SD 0·428). N isotopic fractionation (Δ¹⁵N; plasma δ¹⁵N - diet δ¹⁵N) averaged 3·58 ‰ on day 79 (n 84) and 3·90 ‰ for the subset of heifers. There was no relationship between Δ¹⁵N and RFI. Plasma δ¹⁵N and Δ¹⁵N were related to both FCE (negative) and animal weight (positive) for the whole population, and repeatable for the subset of animals over four time points. These relationships of Δ¹⁵N with FCE and animal weight are consistent with the anticipated negative relationship with N-use efficiency. There is potential to use Δ¹⁵N to provide rapid, low-cost estimates of FCE in cattle.

  15. Paleoclimate studies in Brazil using carbon isotopes in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessenda, Luiz C. R.; Valencia, E. P. E.; Aravena, R.; Telles, E. C. C.; Boulet, R.

    This chapter presents carbon isotope data of soil organic matter (SOM), collected in natural forest ecosystems in different sites from Brazil. The studied areas are located in Londrina (Southern part of the country), Piracicaba (Southeast), Salitre (Central) and Altamira (Northern). This study is part of the research program on tropical and sub-tropical soils in Brazil, of which the main objective is to use carbon isotopes to provide information on vegetation changes and their relationships with climatic changes during the Holocene. 14C data of charcoal samples, the humin fraction and soil organic matter (SOM) contents, indicate that the organic matter of this area is at least of Holocene age. 13C data in SOM indicate that C4 plants were the dominant vegetation in Londrina and Piracicaba during the early and middle Holocene, while C3 plants were the dominant vegetation in Altamira and probably a mixture of C3 and C4 plants occurred in Salitre during the Holocene.

  16. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  17. Modeling position-specific isotope fractionation of organic micropollutants degradation via different reaction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    : dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model successfully reproduces the multi-element isotope data, and precisely captures the dual element isotope trends, characterizing the different degradation pathways. Besides illustrating the model capability of mechanistic evaluation...

  18. Cooling-induced fractionation of mantle Li isotopes from the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongjun; Snow, Jonathan E.; Casey, John F.; Yu, Junbao

    2011-01-01

    Li isotopic compositions of magmatic rocks have gained considerable attention recently as probes of mantle-scale processes. However, the concentrations and isotopic composition of Li in mantle minerals from mid-ocean ridges remain relatively unconstrained. This is largely because of the general presence of seawater alteration in abyssal peridotites. Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions for mineral separates of coexisting olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and bulk rocks of serpentine-free Gakkel Ridge peridotites were investigated. Bulk rocks have Li contents of 1.6 to 2.7 ppm and δ7Li values of 3 to 5‰, which fall within the range of reported normal pristine “MORB mantle” values. Lithium concentrations vary in the order cpx (2.1-4.7 ppm) > opx (0.9-1.7 ppm) ≥ olivine (0.4-0.9 ppm), the opposite found in “equilibrated” mantle peridotite xenoliths (Seitz and Woodland, 2000). The Li isotopic compositions indicate a systematic mineral variation with δ7Liolivine (7.14‰-15.09‰) > δ7Liopx (1.81‰-3.66‰) > δ7Licpx (-2.43‰ - -0.39‰). The δ7Li values of cpx are negatively correlated with their Li concentrations with the lightest value for the most enriched cpx grains. There is a first order negative linear correlation between Δolivine-cpx (δ7Liolivine - δ7Licpx) and ol/cpxD (Liolivine/Licpx). Numerical simulations indicate that the observed systematic inter-mineral variations of Li concentrations and isotopic compositions could be explained by a cooling driven diffusive redistribution between minerals in a closed system if there is a temperature dependent partitioning of Li between olivine and clinopyroxene. The studied Gakkel Ridge abyssal peridotites may alternatively have cooled under a variable cooling rate with a rapid cooling before the Li system was closed, which is less likely given the tectonic setting. Our calculations confirm that Li systematics in minerals, especially in coexisting mineral phases could potentially be used

  19. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Bhaumik

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... Stable isotopes of benthic foraminifera have widely been applied in micropalaeontological research to understand vital effects in foraminifera. Isotopic fractionations are mainly controlled by ontogeny, bottom/pore water chemistry, habitat preference, kinetic effect and respiration. Discontinuous abundance.

  20. Isotopic fractionation of fentanyl and its deuterated analogues by capillary gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera, Shoji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation of fentanyl (FT) and its deuterated analogues by gas chromatography using capillary columns (CBP1 and CBP5) has been investigated. Seven kinds of analogues were labeled with 5 to 19 deuterium atoms at the anilino, propionyl and/or phenylethyl group of FT. The retention times of deuterated FT in CBP1 and CBP5 columns are inversely proportional to the number of labeled deuterium atoms in the molecule. The difference in free enegy changes (ΔΔG) had a linear relationship with the number of labeled deuterium atoms, except for labeling at anilino and phenylethyl group. The contribution of a deuterium atom to the ΔΔG value was estimated to be 1.13 cal/mol in CBP1 and 1.40 cal/mol in CBP5, respectively. While, its contribution in the propiony group was 2.84 cal/mol in CBP1 and 2.48 cal/mol in CBP5, respectively. An important factor in separation by GC may differences in interactions between the stationary phase of the column with the three dimensional protrusive moiety in the molecule. (author)

  1. Isotopic fractionation of fentanyl and its deuterated analogues by capillary gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sera, Shoji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi [Fukuyama Univ., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    Isotopic fractionation of fentanyl (FT) and its deuterated analogues by gas chromatography using capillary columns (CBP1 and CBP5) has been investigated. Seven kinds of analogues were labeled with 5 to 19 deuterium atoms at the anilino, propionyl and/or phenylethyl group of FT. The retention times of deuterated FT in CBP1 and CBP5 columns are inversely proportional to the number of labeled deuterium atoms in the molecule. The difference in free enegy changes ({Delta}{Delta}G) had a linear relationship with the number of labeled deuterium atoms, except for labeling at anilino and phenylethyl group. The contribution of a deuterium atom to the {Delta}{Delta}G value was estimated to be 1.13 cal/mol in CBP1 and 1.40 cal/mol in CBP5, respectively. While, its contribution in the propiony group was 2.84 cal/mol in CBP1 and 2.48 cal/mol in CBP5, respectively. An important factor in separation by GC may differences in interactions between the stationary phase of the column with the three dimensional protrusive moiety in the molecule. (author)

  2. Isotopic fractionation in proteins as a measure of hydrogen bond length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Ross H., E-mail: r.mckenzie@uq.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2015-07-28

    If a deuterated molecule containing strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds is placed in a hydrogenated solvent, it may preferentially exchange deuterium for hydrogen. This preference is due to the difference between the vibrational zero-point energy for hydrogen and deuterium. It is found that the associated fractionation factor Φ is correlated with the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. This correlation has been used to determine the length of the H-bonds (donor-acceptor separation) in a diverse range of enzymes and has been argued to support the existence of short low-barrier H-bonds. Starting with a potential energy surface based on a simple diabatic state model for H-bonds, we calculate Φ as a function of the proton donor-acceptor distance R. For numerical results, we use a parameterization of the model for symmetric O–H⋯O bonds [R. H. McKenzie, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 196 (2012)]. We consider the relative contributions of the O–H stretch vibration, O–H bend vibrations (both in plane and out of plane), tunneling splitting effects at finite temperature, and the secondary geometric isotope effect. We compare our total Φ as a function of R with NMR experimental results for enzymes, and in particular with an earlier model parametrization Φ(R), used previously to determine bond lengths.

  3. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation during Bacterial Acetylene Fermentation: Potential for Life Detection in Hydrocarbon-Rich Volatiles of Icy Planet(oid)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence G; Baesman, Shaun M; Oremland, Ronald S

    2015-11-01

    We report the first study of stable carbon isotope fractionation during microbial fermentation of acetylene (C2H2) in sediments, sediment enrichments, and bacterial cultures. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) averaged 3.7 ± 0.5‰ for slurries prepared with sediment collected at an intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay and 2.7 ± 0.2‰ for a pure culture of Pelobacter sp. isolated from these sediments. A similar KIE of 1.8 ± 0.7‰ was obtained for methanogenic enrichments derived from sediment collected at freshwater Searsville Lake, California. However, C2H2 uptake by a highly enriched mixed culture (strain SV7) obtained from Searsville Lake sediments resulted in a larger KIE of 9.0 ± 0.7‰. These are modest KIEs when compared with fractionation observed during oxidation of C1 compounds such as methane and methyl halides but are comparable to results obtained with other C2 compounds. These observations may be useful in distinguishing biologically active processes operating at distant locales in the Solar System where C2H2 is present. These locales include the surface of Saturn's largest moon Titan and the vaporous water- and hydrocarbon-rich jets emanating from Enceladus. Acetylene-Fermentation-Isotope fractionation-Enceladus-Life detection.

  4. Isotropic fractionation applied to studies on evapotranspiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldo, P.R.; Sousa, A.P.; Salati, E.

    1980-01-01

    To check the possibility of using the stable isotopes Deuterium and Oxygen-18 in research on the water dynamics of the soil-plant-atmosphere system, the variation in content of these isotopes was studied in plant-water. Results have indicated that enrichment of heavy elements in water from leaves is directly proportional to the atmosphere temperature and inversely proportional to the relative humidity. It also became evident that, through correlation between Δ sub(D) and Δ 18 values obtained for leaf-water, the variation in water requirement of a plant can be established in relation to the different growth stages. Variations that occur in water flow in the soil-plant-atmosphere system can also be determined using the same correlation, but as a function of the different hours of the day. In the present study, these correlations showed that the maximum water requirement occurred between 12:00 and 16:00h and that between 16:00 and 20:00h the water lost by the plant during the day began to be replaced until the dynamic equilibrium of the plant was reached. Further studies using the above method need to be carried out aimed at quantitative analysis of water-losing process. (Author) [pt

  5. Isotopic studies in soil and plant nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasricha, N.S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important peaceful applications of isotopes is in research for the enhancement of our understanding for increased crop production and better management of resources with higher economic efficiency and environmental safety. Nuclear techniques helped in generating useful information on such aspects as use-efficiency of fertilizer nutrients, quantifying their losses from soil and their biological transformations. Such information was, hitherto, obtained indirectly by conventional methods. Radio and stable isotopes have also been successfully employed for getting information in such diverse fields as soil erosion, turnover of soil organic matter, pesticide retention in soil ground water recharge etc. The property of 137 Cs adhering tightly to certain exchange surface in soil and its chemically inert nature has made it a useful tool for soil erosion studies. In this paper, applications of isotopes in the research and other such studies as degradation, movement and retention of pesticides, movement of nitrate in soil, biological and ammoniacal nitrogen fixation in soil is discussed

  6. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Sergey S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ 13 C, δ 18 O and Δ 17 O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated 13 CO/ 12 CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in 13 C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH 4 ) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH 4 to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in 13 C, were found significant when explicitly simulated. The

  7. Distribution of lipid biomarkers and carbon isotope fractionation in contrasting trophic environments of the South East Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tolosa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of lipid biomarkers and their stable carbon isotope composition was investigated on suspended particles from different contrasting trophic environments at six sites in the South East Pacific. High algal biomass with diatom-related lipids (24-methylcholesta-5,24(28-dien-3β-ol, C25 HBI alkenes, C16:4 FA, C20:5 FA was characteristic in the upwelling zone, whereas haptophyte lipids (long-chain (C37-C39 unsaturated ketones were proportionally most abundant in the nutrient-poor settings of the centre of the South Pacific Gyre and on its easter edge. The dinoflagellate–sterol, 4α-23,24-trimethylcholest-22(E-en-3β-ol, was a minor contributor in all of the studied area and the cyanobacteria-hydrocarbon, C17n-alkane, was at maximum in the high nutrient low chlorophyll regime of the subequatorial waters near the Marquesas archipelago.

    The taxonomic and spatial variability of the relationships between carbon photosynthetic fractionation and environmental conditions for four specific algal taxa (diatoms, haptophytes, dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria was also investigated. The carbon isotope fractionation factor (εp of the 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28-dien-3β-ol diatom marker, varied over a range of 16% along the different trophic systems. In contrast, εp of dinoflagellate, cyanobacteria and alkenone markers varied only by 7–10‰. The low fractionation factors and small variations between the different phytoplankton markers measured in the upwelling area likely reveals uniformly high specific growth rates within the four phytoplankton taxa, and/or that transport of inorganic carbon into phytoplankton cells may not only occur by diffusion but also by other carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCM. In contrast, in the oligotrophic zone, i.e. gyre and eastgyre, relatively high εp values, especially for the diatom marker

  8. Influence of 15N enrichment on the net isotopic fractionation factor during the reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, O.; Levegue, J.; Henault, C.

    2007-01-01

    or relatively low (15)N enrichment levels and requires a good knowledge of the isotopic fractionation effect inherent to this biological mechanism. This paper reports the measurement of the net and instantaneous isotopic fractionation factor (alpha(i)(s/p)) during the denitrification of NO(3)(-) to N(2)O over......Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, is mainly emitted from soils during the denitrification process. Nitrogen stable-isotope investigations can help to characterise the N(2)O source and N(2)O production mechanisms. The stable-isotope approach is increasingly used with (15)N natural abundance...

  9. Modeling of isotope fractionation at the catchment scale: How promising is compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) as a tool for analyzing diffuse pollution by agrochemicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, S. R.; van Meerveld, H. J.; Waterloo, M. J.; Broers, H. P.; van Breukelen, B. M.

    2012-04-01

    Concentration measurements are indispensable for the assessment of subsurface and surface water pollution by agrochemicals such as pesticides. However, monitoring data is often ambiguous and easily misinterpreted as a decrease in concentration could be caused by transformation, dilution or changes in the application of the pesticide. In this context, compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has recently emerged as a complementary monitoring technique. It is based on the measurement of the isotopic composition (e.g. δ13C and δ2H) of the contaminant. Since transformation processes are likely accompanied by isotope fractionation, thus a change in this composition, CSIA offers the opportunity to gain additional knowledge about transport and degradation processes as well as to track pollutants back to their sources. Isotopic techniques have not yet been applied in a comprehensive way in the analysis of catchment-wide organic pollution. We therefore incorporated fractionation processes associated with the fate of pesticides into the numerical flow and solute transport model HydroGeoSphere in order to assess the feasibility of CSIA within the context of catchment monitoring. The model was set up for a hypothetical hillslope transect which drains into a river. Reactive solute transport was driven by two pesticides applications within one year and actual data for rainfall and potential evapotranspiration from a meteorological station in the Netherlands. Degradation of the pesticide was assumed to take place at a higher rate under the prevailing oxic conditions in the topsoil than in deeper, anoxic subsurface layers. In terms of CSIA, these two degradation pathways were associated with different strengths of isotope fractionation for both hydrogen and carbon atoms. By simulating changes in δ13C and δ2H, the share of the oxic and the anoxic reaction on the overall degradation could be assessed. Model results suggest that CSIA is suitable for assessing degradation of

  10. New estimates of oxygen isotope fractionation by plants and soils - Implications for the isotopic composition of the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angert, A.; Luz, B.

    2002-01-01

    Oxygen concentration and δ 18 O of O 2 have been monitored in light and heavy soils. Steep oxygen gradients were present at the heavy soil site (minimal O 2 concentration was 1% at 150cm depth) and δ 18 O values typically ranged from 0 per mille to -1.6 per mille relative to air O 2 . In the light-soil site, the O 2 concentration was 20.38% to 20.53% and δ 18 O values ranged from -0.06±0.015 per mille to 0.06±0.015 per mille relative to atmospheric O 2 . The fractionation in soil respiration was estimated from the observed [O 2 ] and δ 18 O profiles and their change with time by a five-box numerical model. Diffusion due to concentration and temperature gradients was taken into account. Good agreement was found between the model results and the measured values. The average discrimination against 18 O in the two study sites was 12±1 per mille. The current understanding of the composition of air O 2 attributes the magnitude of the fractionation in soil respiration to biochemical mechanisms alone. Thus the discrimination against 18 O is assumed to be 18 per mille in cyanide-sensitive dark respiration and 25 per mille to 30 per mille in cyanide-resistant respiration. The discrimination we report is significantly less than in dark respiration. This overall low discrimination is explained by slow diffusion in soil aggregates, and in root tissues that results in low O 2 concentration in the consumption site. Since about half of the terrestrial respiration occurs in soils, our new discrimination estimate lowers significantly the discrimination value for terrestrial uptake. Higher then currently assumed discrimination was found in experiments with illuminated plants. This high discrimination might compensate for the low discrimination found in soils. (author)

  11. Kinetic stable Cr isotopic fractionation between aqueous Cr(III)-Cl-H2O complexes at 25 °C: Implications for Cr(III) mobility and isotopic variations in modern and ancient natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babechuk, Michael G.; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Reitter, Elmar; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2018-02-01

    The stable Cr isotope fractionation preserved in natural substances has been attributed predominantly to Cr(III)-Cr(VI) redox transformations. However, non-redox reaction pathways (e.g., ligand-promoted dissolution, ligand exchange, adsorption of Cr(III)) are liable to contribute to isotopic fractionation in natural systems given that soluble Cr(III)-ligands have been directly documented or modeled in several marine, continental, and hydrothermal environments. This study isolates the stable Cr isotope fractionation accompanying Cl-H2O ligand exchange during the transformation of three aqueous species in the Cr(III)-Cl-H2O system, [CrCl2(H2O)4]+aq (abr. CrCl2+ or S1), [CrCl(H2O)5]2+aq (abr. CrCl2+ or S2), and [Cr(H2O)6]3+aq (abr. Cr3+ or S3), at low pH (≤2). In dilute HCl (0.01 to 1 M), Cr3+ is the kinetically favoured species and transformation of CrCl2+ to CrCl2+ to Cr3+ via 2 steps of dechlorination/hydrolyzation begins immediately upon dissolution of a Cr(III)-Cl solid. Individual species are separated with cation exchange chromatography at different stages of transformation and inter- and intra-species (across an elution peak of one species) isotopic fractionation of up to 1 and 2‰ (δ53/52Cr), respectively, is documented. Comparison of peak elution characteristics with Cr-Cl-H-O isotopologue mass abundances suggests mass-dependent sorting of isotopologues alone cannot explain intra-species fractionation, supporting a previously published proposal that preferential adsorption of light Cr isotopes on the resin is driven by vibrational energy effects. The transformation of CrCl2+ to CrCl2+ is faster than CrCl2+ to Cr3+ and the rates of both transformations increase with solution pH. Preferential reaction of light Cr(III) isotopes into product species occurs during each transformation, consistent with closed-system, kinetic fractionation during Cl-H2O ligand exchange. Inter-species fractionation is assessed using time-series experiments beginning from the

  12. Measurement of Hepatic Protein Fractional Synthetic Rate with Stable Isotope Labeling Technique in Thapsigargin Stressed HepG2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juquan; Zhang, Xiao-jun; Boehning, Darren; Brooks, Natasha C.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2012-01-01

    Severe burn-induced liver damage and dysfunction is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ER stress has been shown to regulate global protein synthesis. In the current study, we induced ER stress in vitro and estimated the effect of ER stress on hepatic protein synthesis. The aim was two-fold: (1) to establish an in vitro model to isotopically measure hepatic protein synthesis and (2) to evaluate protein fractional synthetic rate (FSR) in response to ER stress. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) were cultured in medium supplemented with stable isotopes 1,2-13C2-glycine and L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine. ER stress was induced by exposing the cells to 100 nM of thapsigargin (TG). Cell content was collected from day 0 to 14. Alterations in cytosolic calcium were measured by calcium imaging and ER stress markers were confirmed by Western blotting. The precursor and product enrichments were detected by GC-MS analysis for FSR calculation. We found that the hepatic protein FSR were 0.97±0.02 and 0.99±0.05%/hr calculated from 1,2-13C2-glycine and L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine, respectively. TG depleted ER calcium stores and induced ER stress by upregulating p-IRE-1 and Bip. FSR dramatically decreased to 0.68±0.03 and 0.60±0.06%/hr in the TG treatment group (pisotope tracer incorporation technique is a useful method for studying the effects of ER stress on hepatic protein synthesis. PMID:22298954

  13. Study of the argillaceous fraction of sedimentary sequences of Meuse and Gard. Reconstitution of the diagenetic history and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the targets. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic aspects; Etude de la fraction argileuse de sequences sedimentaires de la Meuse et du Gard. Reconstitution de l'histoire diagenetique et des caracteristiques physico-chimiques des cibles. Aspects mineralogiques, geochimiques et isotopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, D

    2002-01-01

    Very low permeable argillaceous rocks like Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones or Vraconian siltstones were chosen to host a research laboratory built to determine the physico-chemical properties of the host formations for a potential underground disposal of radioactive waste. Knowledge and understanding of post-sedimentary modifications are of prime importance for definition of these properties; evaluation and quantification of the post-sedimentary changes represent the aim of this study, focused specifically on the clay material of the sequences. Samples were taken from two drillings (HTM102 and MAR501). In the HTM102 core samples, illite and mixed-layers illite/smectite are the dominant clay components of most clay fractions. Systematic SEM and TEM observations and isotopic K-Ar and Rb-Sr analyses pointed to diagenetic neo-formations of carbonates (calcite, dolomite) and clays. For instance, veils and laths of authigenic clay particles around old detrital ones can distinctly be observed. The epoch, duration and extent of the diagenetic activity(ies) are difficult to evaluate because of an overall detrital contribution even in the finest granulometric fractions. However; analysis of a bentonite layer in the sequence provides a diagenetic reference for the authigenic clay material. Correlation between relative sea level and authigenesis of smectite-rich mineral has been outlined. Chemistry of diagenetic fluids also seems to be reliable with sea level variations. These observations argue in favour of diagenetic activities limited in restricted rock volumes. The case study of MAR501 is close to the HTM102 one: smectite-rich illite/smectite mixed-layers represent the major component of the clay fraction and K-Ar values argue ire the sense of a mixing between detrital and younger clay populations. Diagenetic glauconites in the sequence yield are age close to 93,7 {+-}0,3 Ma for Vraconian level, in agreement with stratigraphical data. The case study of a clay-filled fault

  14. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms Distinguishing between Single Minima and Rapidly Equilibrating Structures. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 29-37 ...

  15. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms - Distinguishing between Single Mimima and Rapidly Equilibrating Structures. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1315-1323 ...

  16. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    applications of isotopic substitution for studying reaction mechanisms and dynamic structures. Suggested Reading. • B K Carpenter. Determination of Organic Reaction Mechanisms. John. Wiley. New York, 1984. • F A Carey and R J Sundberg. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Part A. 3rd. Ed. Plenum Press. New York, 1990.

  17. Single fraction versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Majumder

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Different fractionation of radiation has same response and toxicity in treatment of vertebral bone metastasis. Single fraction RT may be safely used to treat these cases as this is more cost effective and less time consuming. Studies may be conducted to find out particular subgroup of patients to be benefitted more by either fractionation schedule; however, our study cannot comment on that issue.

  18. Computational prediction of Mg-isotope fractionation between aqueous [Mg(OH2)6]2+ and brucite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, Christopher A.; Casey, William H.; Ohlin, C. André

    2018-04-01

    The fractionation factor in the magnesium-isotope fractionation between aqueous solutions of magnesium and brucite changes sign with increasing temperature, as uncovered by recent experiments. To understand this behavior, the Reduced Partition Function Ratios and isotopic fractionation factors (Δ26/24Mgbrucite-Mg(aq)) are calculated using molecular models of aqueous [Mg(OH2)6]2+ and the mineral brucite at increasing levels of density functional theory. The calculations were carried out on the [Mg(OH2)6]2+·12H2O cluster, along with different Pauling-bond-strength-conserving models of the mineral lattice of brucite. Three conclusions were reached: (i) all levels of theory overestimate bond distances in the aqua ion complex relative to Tutton's salts; (ii) the calculations predict that brucite at 298.15 K is always enriched in the heavy isotope, in contrast with experimental observations; (iii) the temperature dependencies of Wimpenny et al. (2014) and Li et al. (2014) could only be achieved by fixing the bond distances in the [Mg(OH2)6]2+·12H2O cluster to values close to those observed in crystals that trap the hydrated ion.

  19. Efficiency of monolaurin in mitigating ruminal methanogenesis and modifying C-isotope fractionation when incubating diets composed of either C3 or C4 plants in a rumen simulation technique (Rusitec) system

    OpenAIRE

    Klevenhusen, Fenja; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Hofstetter, Thomas B.; Bolotin, Jakov; Kunz, Carmen; Soliva, Carla R.

    2017-01-01

    Mitigation of methanogenesis in ruminants has been an important goal for several decades. Free lauric acid, known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, has a low palatability; therefore, in the present study the aim was to evaluate the mitigation efficacy of its esterified form (monolaurin). Further, 13C-isotope abundance (δ13C) and 13C-12C fractionation during methanogenesis and fermentation were determined to evaluate possible microbial C-isotope preferences. Using the rumen simulation techni...

  20. Mg and Ca isotope fractionation during CaCO3 biomineralisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Veronica T-C; Williams, R J P; Makishima, Akio; Belshawl, Nick S; O'Nions, R Keith

    2004-10-08

    The natural variation of Mg and Ca stable isotopes of carbonates has been determined in carbonate skeletons of perforate foraminifera and reef coral together with Mg/Ca ratios to assess the influence of biomineralisation processes. The results for coral aragonite suggest its formation, in terms of stable isotope behaviour, approximates to inorganic precipitation from a seawater reservoir. In contrast, results for foraminifera calcite suggest a marked biological control on Mg isotope ratios presumably related to its low Mg content compared with seawater. The bearing of these observations on the use of Mg and Ca isotopes as proxies in paleoceanography is considered. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  1. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in pollen of Atlas cedar: first steps towards a new palaeoecological proxy for Northwest Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Benjamin; Fletcher, William; Ryan, Peter; Grant, Helen; Ilmen, Rachid

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotopes can provide information on climate and the environmental conditions at different growth stages of the plant, both past and present. Carbon isotope discrimination in plant tissue is already well understood, and can be used as a drought stress indicator for semi-arid regions. Stable carbon isotope ratios measured directly on pollen provides the potential for the development of long-term environmental proxies (spanning thousands of years), as pollen is well preserved in the environment. Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica Endl. Manetti ex Carrière), is an ideal test case to develop a pollen stable carbon isotope proxy. The tree grows across a wide altitudinal and climatic range and is extremely sensitive to moisture availability. The pollen is abundant, and easily identifiable to the species level in pollen analysis because different cedar species are geographically confined to different regions of the world. In 2015 we sampled 76 individual cedar trees across latitudinal, altitudinal and environmental gradients, highly focused on the Middle Atlas region of Morocco, with 25 additional samples from botanical gardens across Europe and the US to extend these gradients. Here, we report new stable carbon isotope data from pollen, leaf and stem wood from these samples with a view to assessing and quantifying species-specific fractionation effects associated with pollen production. The isotopic response of individual trees at local and wider geographical scales to altitude and climatic conditions is presented. This research forms part of an ongoing PhD project working to develop and calibrate a modern carbon isotope proxy in Atlas cedar pollen, which can ultimately be applied to fossil sequences and complement existing multi-proxy records (e.g. pollen analysis in lake sediments, tree-rings).

  2. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K.E.

    1978-04-01

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, /sup 242/Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 ..mu..b in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, ..cap alpha..xn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z/sub 1/ + Z/sub 2/ = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of /sup 228/Pu, /sup 230/Pu, /sup 232/Cm, or /sup 238/Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes.

  3. Towards a palaeosalinity proxy: hydrogen isotopic fractionation between source water and lipids produced via different biosynthetic pathways in haptophyte algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Heinzelmann, Sandra M.; Kasper, Sebastian; Sinke-Schoen, Daniëlle; Sininnghe-Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2014-05-01

    Palaeosalinity is one of the most important oceanographic parameters that cannot currently be quantified with reasonable accuracy from sedimentary records. Hydrogen isotopic fractionation between water and alkenones is dependent, amongst other factors, upon the salinity in which alkenone-producing haptophyte algae grow and is represented by the fractionation factor, α, increasing with salinity.1 As such, the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones is emerging as a palaeosalinity proxy. Understanding the mechanism behind the sensitivity of fractionation to salinity is important for the correct application of the proxy, however this mechanism is currently unknown. Here we present hydrogen isotopic compositions of lipids produced via different biosynthetic pathways from batch cultures of Emiliania huxleyi CCMP 1516 and Isochrysis galbana CCMP 1323 grown over a range of salinities and discuss the possible sources of the sensitivity of hydrogen isotope fractionation to salinity. α for C37 alkenones (produced via an unknown biosynthetic pathway but assumed to be acetogenic; e.g.2) and that for C14:0, C16:0, and C18:1 fatty acids (acetogenic) from exponential growth phase I. galbana show a similar sensitivity to salinity, increasing at 0.0013-0.0019 per salinity unit (S-1). Meanwhile, in exponential growth phase E. huxleyi, α for C37 alkenones and α for brassicasterol (mevalonate pathway) increase at 0.0015-0.0022 S-1, but α for phytol (methylerythritol pathway) shows no significant relationship with salinity. These results suggest that fractionation is sensitive to salinity for lipids formed both in the chloroplast and cytosol. They also suggest that the sensitivity may either originate in glyceralde-3-phosphate or pyruvate but is then lost through hydrogen exchange with cell water during sugar rearrangements in the methylerythritol pathway or sensitivity originates with the production and consumption of acetate. References Schouten, S., Ossebaar, J., Schreiber

  4. Iron and oxygen isotope fractionation during iron UV photo-oxidation: Implications for early Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Nicole X.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Greenwood, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) contain appreciable amounts of ferric iron (Fe3+). The mechanism by which ferrous iron (Fe2+) was oxidized into Fe3+ in an atmosphere that was globally anoxic is highly debated. Of the three scenarios that have been proposed to explain BIF formation, photo-oxidation by UV photons is the only one that does not involve life (the other two are oxidation by O2 produced by photosynthesis, and anoxygenic photosynthesis whereby Fe2+ is directly used as electron donor in place of water). We experimentally investigated iron and oxygen isotope fractionation imparted by iron photo-oxidation at a pH of 7.3. The iron isotope fractionation between precipitated Fe3+-bearing lepidocrocite and dissolved Fe2+ follows a Rayleigh distillation with an instantaneous 56Fe/54Fe fractionation factor of + 1.2 ‰. Such enrichment in the heavy isotopes of iron is consistent with the values measured in BIFs. We also investigated the nature of the mass-fractionation law that governs iron isotope fractionation in the photo-oxidation experiments (i.e., the slope of the δ56Fe-δ57Fe relationship). The experimental run products follow a mass-dependent law corresponding to the high-T equilibrium limit. The fact that a ∼3.8 Gyr old BIF sample (IF-G) from Isua (Greenland) falls on the same fractionation line confirms that iron photo-oxidation in the surface layers of the oceans was a viable pathway to BIF formation in the Archean, when the atmosphere was largely transparent to UV photons. Our experiments allow us to estimate the quantum yield of the photo-oxidation process (∼0.07 iron atom oxidized per photon absorbed). This yield is used to model iron oxidation on early Mars. As the photo-oxidation proceeds, the aqueous medium becomes more acidic, which slows down the reaction by changing the speciation of iron to species that are less efficient at absorbing UV-photons. Iron photo-oxidation in centimeter to meter-deep water ponds would take months to years to

  5. Assessment of diffusive isotopic fractionation in polar firn, and application to ice core trace gas records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buizert, C.; Sowers, T.; Blunier, T.

    2013-01-01

    During rapid variations of the atmospheric mixing ratio of a trace gas, diffusive transport in the porous firn layer atop ice sheets and glaciers alters the isotopic composition of that gas relative to the overlying atmosphere. Records of past atmospheric trace gas isotopic composition from ice...

  6. Isotope studies on soil and fertilizer nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Reductions in isotope cost in the 1960s and equipment innovations, have extended compared to 1940, the research of soil and plant scientists so that 15 N is now an indispensable tool when working with N. Leadership of FAO/IAEA coordinated research programmes and the Nitrogen Laboratory of the Tennessee Valley Authority helped greatly in bringing about this expanded usage. Recognized isotope effects are of insufficient magnitude to invalidate tracer measurements of field crop uptake in the treatment year if enrichment of 0.3 at.% excess 15 N or greater is employed. Thus, use of 15 N depleted tracer with potential of 0.366% 15 N differential from the standard isotope ratio of N in air is feasible. Its manufacture has allowed further economy in the isotope tag and ultimate treatment of field-scale plots. Interest in Δ 15 N measurements for predicting the NO - 3 contaminant source in surface and ground waters has depreciated. Variations in natural isotope ratio of soil N commonly exceed the differences in Δ 15 N values of the presumed source materials. 15 N provides the only correct measure of fertilizer N utilization efficiency. The field study examples of irrigated maize demonstrate that little or no fertilizer N is likely to escape the root zone where the rate applied does not exceed that required for maximum yield; also, that light and frequent irrigations afford higher yields than heavier, less frequent irrigations. Delaying fertilizer N applications until the crop is well established affords not only higher yields, but greater residual fertilizer N for future crops. Measured effective root activity for absorbing NO - 3 has been invaluable in estimating fertilizer requirements of a crop in relation to residual mineral N in soil at planting and projecting the depth at which the NO - 3 becomes an environmental hazard. The tag likewise is indispensable in determining symbiotic N fixation

  7. Effects of alkalinity and salinity at low and high light intensity on hydrogen isotope fractionation of long-chain alkenones produced by

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, G.M.; Pfannerstill, E.Y.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; van der Meer, M.T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, hydrogen isotopes of longchainalkenones have been shown to be a promising proxy forreconstructing paleo sea surface salinity due to a strong hydrogenisotope fractionation response to salinity across differentenvironmental conditions. However, to date, the decouplingof the

  8. Stable isotope ratio measurements of Cu and Zn in mineral dust (bulk and size fractions) from the Taklimakan Desert and the Sahel and in aerosols from the eastern tropical North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuofei; Weiss, Dominik J; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Kreissig, Katharina; Sun, Youbin; Baker, Alex R; Formenti, Paola

    2013-09-30

    Accurate characterization of the stable isotope composition of Cu and Zn in major global mineral dust sources and in aerosols is central to the application of these isotope systems to the studies of global geochemical processes and cycles. We test here for the first time Cu and Zn isotope ratios within a well-defined source-receptor setting on the continent-ocean interface and determine the isotope composition of (i) bulk surface soil dust samples from the Sahel region, (ii) individual size fractions of surface dust samples from the Taklimakan Desert, and (iii) aerosols collected in the equatorial eastern North Atlantic region. This is achieved reducing the blank contribution during the ion exchange step using small resin and acid volumes and using a second ion exchange passage to purify the Cu fraction. We find no significant correlation between size fractions and isotope ratios in the two samples analyzed from the Taklimakan Desert. Mass balance calculations suggest that isotope ratios of bulk samples are within the analytical precision of the Sahel surface soil dust suggesting important non-crustal sources, in line with calculated enrichment factors, and possibly of anthropogenic origin. Using previously reported δ(66)Zn values for anthropogenic emission from Europe, preliminary calculations suggest that up to 55% of Zn arriving at the sampling points in the equatorial eastern North Atlantic region could be of anthropogenic origin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Accurate and sensitive determination of molar fractions of {sup 13}C-Labeled intracellular metabolites in cell cultures grown in the presence of isotopically-labeled glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Fernández, Mario [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julián Clavería 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Rodríguez-González, Pablo, E-mail: rodriguezpablo@uniovi.es [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julián Clavería 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Hevia Sánchez, David; González-Menéndez, Pedro; Sainz Menéndez, Rosa M. [University Institute of Oncology (IUOPA), University of Oviedo, Julián Clavería 6, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); García Alonso, J. Ignacio [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julián Clavería 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2017-05-29

    This work describes a methodology based on multiple linear regression and GC-MS for the determination of molar fractions of isotopically-labeled intracellular metabolites in cell cultures. Novel aspects of this work are: i) the calculation of theoretical isotopic distributions of the different isotopologues from an experimentally measured value of % 13C enrichment of the labeled precursor ii) the calculation of the contribution of lack of mass resolution of the mass spectrometer and different fragmentation mechanism such as the loss or gain of hydrogen atoms in the EI source to measure the purity of the selected cluster for each metabolite and iii) the validation of the methodology not only by the analysis of gravimetrically prepared mixtures of isotopologues but also by the comparison of the obtained molar fractions with experimental values obtained by GC-Combustion-IRMS based on {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C isotope ratio measurements. The method is able to measure molar fractions for twenty-eight intracellular metabolites derived from glucose metabolism in cell cultures grown in the presence of {sup 13}C-labeled Glucose. The validation strategies demonstrate a satisfactory accuracy and precision of the proposed procedure. Also, our results show that the minimum value of {sup 13}C incorporation that can be accurately quantified is significantly influenced by the calculation of the spectral purity of the measured cluster and the number of {sup 13}C atoms of the labeled precursor. The proposed procedure was able to accurately quantify gravimetrically prepared mixtures of natural and labeled glucose molar fractions of 0.07% and mixtures of natural and labeled glycine at molar fractions down to 0.7%. The method was applied to initial studies of glucose metabolism of different prostate cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Determination of molar fractions of {sup 13}C-labeled metabolites in cell cultures. • The method is based on multiple linear regression and GC-MS.

  10. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include food sources for animals, water sources for plants, pollution sources...

  11. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State-Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula, Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N=15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  12. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milan, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15, This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar core. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotop c enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites, However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores, We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N-15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D emichment. These calculations therefore support the view that Solar System N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage, We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  13. Isotopic fractionation of boron in growing corals and its palaeoenvironmental implication

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Xiao, Y.K.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Zhang, C.G.; Wei, H.Z.; Liu, W.G.; Zhou, W.J.

    observed in this study, gave the average pH va l ues of sea water to be 8.85, 8.17, 7.76 and 8.22 respe c ti vely. This indicates the closeness of a43 value of 0.980 with that of the well - accepted r e ported a43 of 0.981 as the recalculated p... function calculati ons and boron adsorption e x- periments on ion exchange resin. Thereafter, a lower a43 of 0.968 was determined 7 based on adsorption exper i ments of boron onto marine clays. Moreover, Hemming et al. 8 calculated a fractionation...

  14. Mass spectrometric determination of magnesium isotopic ratios and its corrections for electron multiplier discrimination and mass fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhongguo

    1989-01-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of magnesium isotopic ratios by the use of uranyl nitrate added to magnesium samples to act as a binding agent is reported. Prebaking empty filaments and preheating filaments with deposited magnesium samples on its surface in a vacuum are employed to reduce the Na signal from the thenium-ribbon. Methods for correcting magnesium isotopic ratios for electron multiplier discrimination and mass fractionation are described in detail. The results of the determination of natural magnesium isotopic ratios are 25 Mg/ 24 Mg = 0.12660 (1±0.01%) and 26 Mg/ 24 Mg = 0.13938 (1±0.10%). The magnesium isotopic ratios of rich - 26 Mg-2 sample and rich- 25 Mg-1 sample are 24 Mg/ 26 Mg = 0.003463 (1±0.2%), 25 Mg/ 26 Mg = 0.001656 (±0.2%) and 24 Mg/ 25 Mg = 0.006716 (1±0.2%), 26 Mg/ 25 Mg = 0.007264 (1±0.2%) respectively

  15. Modeling 3D-CSIA data: Carbon, chlorine, and hydrogen isotope fractionation during reductive dechlorination of TCE to ethene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Breukelen, Boris M; Thouement, Héloïse A A; Stack, Philip E; Vanderford, Mindy; Philp, Paul; Kuder, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    Reactive transport modeling of multi-element, compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) data has great potential to quantify sequential microbial reductive dechlorination (SRD) and alternative pathways such as oxidation, in support of remediation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater. As a key step towards this goal, a model was developed that simulates simultaneous carbon, chlorine, and hydrogen isotope fractionation during SRD of trichloroethene, via cis-1,2-dichloroethene (and trans-DCE as minor pathway), and vinyl chloride to ethene, following Monod kinetics. A simple correction term for individual isotope/isotopologue rates avoided multi-element isotopologue modeling. The model was successfully validated with data from a mixed culture Dehalococcoides microcosm. Simulation of Cl-CSIA required incorporation of secondary kinetic isotope effects (SKIEs). Assuming a limited degree of intramolecular heterogeneity of δ 37 Cl in TCE decreased the magnitudes of SKIEs required at the non-reacting Cl positions, without compromising the goodness of model fit, whereas a good fit of a model involving intramolecular CCl bond competition required an unlikely degree of intramolecular heterogeneity. Simulation of H-CSIA required SKIEs in H atoms originally present in the reacting compounds, especially for TCE, together with imprints of strongly depleted δ 2 H during protonation in the products. Scenario modeling illustrates the potential of H-CSIA for source apportionment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Uranium stable isotope fractionation in the Black Sea: Modern calibration of the

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolison, J.M.; Stirling, C.H.; Middag, R.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of redox-sensitive metals, including uranium (U), in marine sediments have recently emerged aspowerful diagnostic tracers of the redox state of the ancient ocean–atmosphere system. Reliable interpretation of sedimentaryisotopic information requires a thorough understanding

  17. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ahmad, Ward Said; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰).

  18. In situ localization of NADP-malic enzyme in bundle sheath cells and leaf carbon isotope fractionation in two C4 grasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavan, S.; Andreo, C.S.; Maurino, V.G.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique, we have provided further evidence on the subcellular localization of the NADP-dependent malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) in the bundle sheath chloroplasts of some C 4 grasses, including the two bluestem grasses Andropogon gerardi Vitman and Schizachyrium scoparium (Michx.) Nash, common C 4 grasses of the prairies in the Great Plains. Leaf carbon isotope fractionation studies of the two bluestem species, grown in close proximity to each other, indicate that though both belong to the NADP-malic enzyme subtype of C 4 plants, their δ 13 C values differ by 1.5‰. (author)

  19. Expanding the isotopic toolbox: Applications of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to food web studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah B Vander Zanden; David X Soto; Gabriel J Bowen; Keith A Hobson; Keith A Hobson

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applicat...

  20. Expanding the Isotopic Toolbox: Applications of Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratios to Food Web Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Zanden, Hannah B.; Soto, David X.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Hobson, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applicatio...

  1. Rb–Sr and Sm–Nd isotope systematics and geochemical studies on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It consists of pillowed basalts, basaltic andesites, andesites (BBA) and rhyolites interlayered with ferruginous chert that were formed under submarine condition. Rhyolites were divided into type-I and II based on their REE abundances and HREE fractionation. Rb–Sr and Sm–Nd isotope studies were carried out on the rock ...

  2. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the 13 C content of soil CO 2 , CaCO 3 , precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The 13 C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing 13 C content with depth decreasing 13 C with altitude and reduced 13 C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO 2 loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids

  3. In-situ, high pressure and temperature experimental determination of hydrogen isotope fractionation between coexisting hydrous melt and silicate-saturated aqueous fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, B. O.

    2012-12-01

    - and pressure range of the experiments discussed here, water in melts is much less important than silicate in aqueous fluid because even at the lowest temperature and pressure conditions studied (450C/101 MPa), the water content in the melt is so high (> 4 wt%) that further increase in total water by increasing temperature and pressure predominantly increases the concentration of molecular H2O in the melts. Water dissolved in molecular form does not affect the silicate melt structure significantly. Therefore, in the deep crust and upper mantle, isotope fractionation factors between fluid and condensed silicate materials (melts and minerals) can differ substantially from isotope fractionation between pure H2O condensed silicate materials. [1] Foustoukos, D. I., and Mysen, B. O. (2012), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 86, 88-102. [2] Mysen, B. O. (2010), Amer. Mineral., 95, 1807-1816. [3] O'Neil, J. R., and Truesdell, A. E. (1993), pp. 17-25 in Stable isotope geochemistry: A tribute to Samuel Epstein, (eds.: H. P. Taylor, J. R. O'Neil and I. R. Kaplan), The Geochemical Society, Calgary.

  4. Stable isotope (C, O) and monovalent cation fractionation upon synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyl apatite (CHAP) via calcite transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Schmiedinger, Iris; Wacker, Ulrike; Conrad, Anika C.; Grathoff, Georg; Schmidt, Burkhard; Bahlo, Rainer; Gehlken, Peer-L.; Fiebig, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate-bearing hydroxyl-apatite (CHAP) is of fundamental and applied interest to the (bio)geochemical, paleontological, medical and material science communities, since it forms the basic mineral phase in human and animal teeth and bones. In addition, it is found in non-biogenic phosphate deposits. The stable isotope and foreign element composition of biogenic CHAP is widely used to estimate the formation conditions. This requires careful experimental calibration under well-defined boundary conditions. Within the DFG project EXCALIBOR, synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyapatite was conducted via the transformation of synthetic calcite powder in aqueous solution as a function of time, pH, and temperature using batch-type experiments. The aqueous solution was analyzed for the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbonate (gas irmMS), the oxygen isotope composition of water (LCRDS), and the cationic composition. The solid was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, micro Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, elemental analysis (EA, ICP-OES) and gas irmMS. Temperature was found to significantly impact the transformation rate of calcite to CHAP. Upon complete transformation, CHAP was found to contain up to 5% dwt carbonate, depending on the solution composition (e.g., pH), both incorporated on the A and B type position of the crystal lattice. The oxygen isotope fractionation between water and CHAP decreased with increasing temperature with a tentative slope shallower than those reported in the literature for apatite, calcite or aragonite. In addition, the presence of dissolved NH4+, K+ or Na+ in aqueous solution led to partial incorporation into the CHAP lattice. How these distortions of the crystal lattice may impact stable isotope discrimination is subject of future investigations.

  5. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PERSON, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The literature survey for the fractional crystallization study of material from tank 241-S-112 is completed, fulfilling the requirements of the Test Plan for Tank 241-S-112 Fractional Crystallization Study (Herting 2003). Crystallization involves the formation of one or more solid phases from a fluid phase or an amorphous solid phase. It is applied extensively in the chemical industry, both as a purification process and a separation process. The main advantage of crystallization over distillation is the production of substances with a very high purity, at a low level of energy consumption, and at relatively mild process conditions. Crystallization is one of the older operations in the chemical industry; therefore, practical experience can usually be used for the design and operation of industrial crystallizers. In addition, advances in the understanding of crystallization kinetics can be useful in the control, design, and scale-up of industrial crystallizers. Research work is currently underway; e.g., the CrysCODE (Crystallizer Control and Design) project, littu://www.aui.tudelft.nl/uroiect/Cn/scode/crvscode.htm, at the Delft University of Technology, with the goal of improving the performance and controllability of industrial crystallizers by means of better control and improved design methodologies. Recent developments in fluid dynamics and reactor technology (e.g., compartment approaches) have led to a better understanding of processes and scale-up phenomena. The ultimate aim of such research is to develop a knowledge-based design frame for optimization of industrial crystallization units. Development work is in progress on a rigorous design analysis model for the description of the crystallization process as a function of the reactor geometry, crystallization kinetics, and operating conditions. One modeling effort is aimed at improving the predictive crystallizer model by implementing a population balance equation that depends on two variables: the size and

  6. Isotope fractionation in aqua-gas systems: Cl(2)-HCl-Cl(-), Br(2)-HBr-Br(-) and H(2)S-S(2-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnacki, Maciej; Hałas, Stanisław

    2012-01-01

    We report calculated values of isotope fractionation factors between chlorine, bromine and sulphide hydrated anions and respective gaseous compounds: hydrogen chloride, hydrogen bromide, molecular chlorine and bromine and hydrogen sulphide. For the calculation of the reduced partition function ratios (β-factors) of hydrated Cl(-), Br(-) and S(2-) anions, we used a model of a cluster composed of the considered ion surrounded by two shells of H(2)O molecules. Only the electrostatic interaction between ion and water molecules treated as electric dipoles was taken into account. The β-factors for the gaseous compounds (HCl, Cl(2), HBr, Br(2) and H(2)S) were calculated from vibrational frequencies reported by Urey and Greiff [Isotopic Exchange Equilibria, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 57, 321 (1935)] and Schauble et al. [Theoretical Estimates Equilibrium Chlorine-Isotope Fractionation, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 67, 3267 (2003)]. Low-temperature isotope fractionation between chlorine-hydrated anion and hydrogen chloride attains 1.55-1.68‰ (this work), which is in good agreement with experimental data (1.4-1.8‰) [Z.D. Sharp, J.D. Barnes, T.P. Fischer and M. Halick, An Experimental Determination of Chlorine Isotope Fractionation in Acid Systems and Applications to Volcanic Fumaroles, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74, 264 (2010)]. The predicted isotope fractionations for hydrated bromine and HBr, Br(2) gases are very small, 1000 ln α, do not exceed 0.8‰; thus, the expected variations of bromine isotope composition in aqua-gas systems will require enhanced precision for their detection. In contrast, the sulphur isotope fractionation between H(2)S( gas ) and S(2-) attains 6.0‰ at room temperature and drops nearly linearly to 3.1‰ at 350°C.

  7. Experimental calibration of vanadium partitioning and stable isotope fractionation between hydrous granitic melt and magnetite at 800 °C and 0.5 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; Prytulak, Julie; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2018-04-01

    Vanadium has multiple oxidation states in silicate melts and minerals, a property that also promotes fractionation of its isotopes. As a result, vanadium isotopes vary during magmatic differentiation, and can be powerful indicators of redox processes at high temperatures if their partitioning behaviour can be determined. To quantify the partitioning and isotope fractionation factor of V between magnetite and melt, piston cylinder experiments were performed in which magnetite and a hydrous, haplogranitic melt were equilibrated at 800 °C and 0.5 GPa over a range of oxygen fugacities ({f_{{{O}2}}}), bracketing those of terrestrial magmas. Magnetite is isotopically light with respect to the coexisting melt, a tendency ascribed to the VI-fold V3+ and V4+ in magnetite, and a mixture of IV- and VI-fold V5+ and V4+ in the melt. The magnitude of the fractionation factor systematically increases with increasing log{f_{{{O}2}}} relative to the Fayalite-Magnetite-Quartz buffer (FMQ), from Δ51Vmag-gl = - 0.63 ± 0.09‰ at FMQ - 1 to - 0.92 ± 0.11‰ (SD) at ≈ FMQ + 5, reflecting constant V3+/V4+ in magnetite but increasing V5+/V4+ in the melt with increasing log{f_{{{O}2}}}. These first mineral-melt measurements of V isotope fractionation factors underline the importance of both oxidation state and co-ordination environment in controlling isotopic fractionation. The fractionation factors determined experimentally are in excellent agreement with those needed to explain natural isotope variations in magmatic suites. Furthermore, these experiments provide a useful framework in which to interpret vanadium isotope variations in natural rocks and magnetites, and may be used as a potential fingerprint the redox state of the magma from which they crystallise.

  8. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Isotopes are generally distinguished by three analytical means. The first ofthem makes use of radioactive isotopes, such as tritium PH), 14C,. 32p etc. This is a highly sensitive technique, but special facilities are required to handle radioactive material. Mass spectroscopy can also be used to detect isotopes. This is also a.

  9. Chromium isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of a modern basaltic weathering profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Frei, Robert

    Chromium can be used as a tracer of redox sensitive environmental processes. In soils Cr (III) is inert, immobile and resides predominantly in minerals, clays and oxides. Cr (VI) is toxic, soluble and mobile and is usually lost from the soil to local run off. Chromium isotopes have been shown...

  10. Pressure dependent isotopic fractionation in the photolysis of formaldehyde-d2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, E.J.K.; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Johnson, Matthew Stanley

    2014-01-01

    earlier work with HDCO vs. H2CO. The UV lamps used for photolysis emit light at wavelengths that primarily dissociate formaldehyde into molecular products, CO and H2 or D2. The isotope effect k(H2CO)/k(D2CO) Combining double low line 3.16 ± 0.03 at 1000 mbar is in good agreement...

  11. Isotopic abundance measurements of K and Ca using a wide-dispersion multi-collector mass spectrometer and low-fractionation ionisation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, I. R.; Maggi, A. L.; Rosman, K. J. R.; McNaughton, N. J.

    1997-04-01

    Procedures have been established for routine high-precision isotopic analyses of all aspects of the K-Ca isotopic system, for virtually any natural sample, using a set of 40K + 43Ca + 46Ca spikes and a VG354 (Multi-II) mass spectrometer. Loading samples as KI and CaI2 on triple (or double) filament arrays results in reduced mass fractionation, approximately as expected from Rayleigh distillation theory. For K, this improves the fractionation (or 41K anomaly) detection limit to ~0.8[per mille sign]/amu for single analyses. For Ca, the reduced fractionation renders data insensitive to the choice of fractionation law used for internal corrections. The 2[sigma] reproducibility of normalised 40Ca/44Ca data (expressed as [epsilon]Ca) is ~4, approximately twice the theoretical limits, but for measurements of natural fractionation ([delta]44/42Ca) it is ~0.4[per mille sign], about five times theoretical. These measurement procedures yield an atomic weight for the Ca standard which is consistent with the IUPAC value, and provide strong support for a reduced uncertainty (by a factor of two). A value of 40.078 ± 0.002 would include all known isotopic fractionations in natural and commercial materials. Analyses of four Nerita marine mollusc samples from a wide geographic (and water temperature) range failed to detect any thermally controlled Ca isotope fractionation ([delta]44/42Ca) corresponding to the observed [delta]18O variations.

  12. Preparation and purification of organic samples for selenium isotope studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, Helena; Stelling, Monika; König, Stephan; Schoenberg, Ronny; Neumann, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an important micronutrient but also a strong toxin with a narrow tolerance range for many organisms. As such, a globally heterogeneous Se distribution in soils is responsible for various disease patterns (i.e. Se excess and deficiency) and environmental problems, whereby plants play a key role for the Se entrance into the biosphere. Selenium isotope variations were proved to be a powerful tracer for redox processes and are therefore promising for the exploration of the species dependent Se metabolism in plants and the Se cycling within the Critical Zone. Plant cultivation setups enable systematic controlled investigations, but samples derived from them-plant tissue and phytoagar-are particularly challenging and require specific preparation and purification steps to ensure precise and valid Se isotope analytics performed with HG-MC-ICP-MS. In this study, different methods for the entire process from solid tissue preparation to Se isotope measurements were tested, optimized and validated. A particular microwave digestion procedure for plant tissue and a vacuum filtration method for phytoagar led to full Se recoveries, whereby unfavorable organic residues were reduced to a minimum. Three purification methods predominantly described in the literature were systematically tested with pure Se solution, high concentrated multi-element standard solution as well as plant and phytoagar as target matrices. All these methods efficiently remove critical matrix elements, but differ in Se recovery and organic residues. Validation tests doping Se-free plant material and phytoagar with a reference material of known Se isotope composition revealed the high impact of organic residues on the accuracy of MC-ICP-MS measurements. Only the purification method with no detectable organic residues, hydride generation and trapping, results in valid mass bias correction for plant samples with an average deviation to true δ82/76Se values of 0.2 ‰ and a reproducibility (2 SD

  13. Minimal Influence of [NiFe] Hydrogenase on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in H2-Oxidizing Cupriavidus necator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Campbell

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids produced by H2-metabolizing bacteria are sometimes observed to be more D-depleted than those of photoautotrophic organisms, a trait that has been suggested as diagnostic for chemoautotrophic bacteria. The biochemical reasons for such a depletion are not known, but are often assumed to involve the strong D-depletion of H2. Here, we cultivated the bacterium Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha H16 under aerobic, H2-consuming, chemoautotrophic conditions and measured the isotopic compositions of its fatty acids. In parallel with the wild type, two mutants of this strain, each lacking one of two key hydrogenase enzymes, were also grown and measured. In all three strains, fractionations between fatty acids and water ranged from -173‰ to -235‰, and averaged -217‰, -196‰, and -226‰, respectively, for the wild type, SH- mutant, and MBH- mutant. There was a modest increase in δD as a result of loss of the soluble hydrogenase enzyme. Fractionation curves for all three strains were constructed by growing parallel cultures in waters with δDwater values of approximately -25‰, 520‰, and 1100‰. These curves indicate that at least 90% of the hydrogen in fatty acids is derived from water, not H2. Published details of the biochemistry of the soluble and membrane-bound hydrogenases confirm that these enzymes transfer electrons rather than intact hydride (H- ions, providing no direct mechanism to connect the isotopic composition of H2 to that of lipids. Multiple lines of evidence thus agree that in this organism, and presumably others like it, environmental H2 plays little or no direct role in controlling lipid δD values. The observed fractionations must instead result from isotope effects in the reduction of NAD(PH by reductases with flavin prosthetic groups, which transfer two electrons and acquire H+ (or D+ from solution. Parallels to NADPH reduction in photosynthesis may explain why D/H fractionations in C. necator

  14. Minimal Influence of [NiFe] Hydrogenase on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in H2-OxidizingCupriavidus necator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian J; Sessions, Alex L; Fox, Daniel N; Paul, Blair G; Qin, Qianhui; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Valentine, David L

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acids produced by H 2 -metabolizing bacteria are sometimes observed to be more D-depleted than those of photoautotrophic organisms, a trait that has been suggested as diagnostic for chemoautotrophic bacteria. The biochemical reasons for such a depletion are not known, but are often assumed to involve the strong D-depletion of H 2 . Here, we cultivated the bacterium Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha H16) under aerobic, H 2 -consuming, chemoautotrophic conditions and measured the isotopic compositions of its fatty acids. In parallel with the wild type, two mutants of this strain, each lacking one of two key hydrogenase enzymes, were also grown and measured. In all three strains, fractionations between fatty acids and water ranged from -173‰ to -235‰, and averaged -217‰, -196‰, and -226‰, respectively, for the wild type, SH - mutant, and MBH - mutant. There was a modest increase in δD as a result of loss of the soluble hydrogenase enzyme. Fractionation curves for all three strains were constructed by growing parallel cultures in waters with δD water values of approximately -25‰, 520‰, and 1100‰. These curves indicate that at least 90% of the hydrogen in fatty acids is derived from water, not H 2 . Published details of the biochemistry of the soluble and membrane-bound hydrogenases confirm that these enzymes transfer electrons rather than intact hydride (H - ) ions, providing no direct mechanism to connect the isotopic composition of H 2 to that of lipids. Multiple lines of evidence thus agree that in this organism, and presumably others like it, environmental H 2 plays little or no direct role in controlling lipid δD values. The observed fractionations must instead result from isotope effects in the reduction of NAD(P)H by reductases with flavin prosthetic groups, which transfer two electrons and acquire H + (or D + ) from solution. Parallels to NADPH reduction in photosynthesis may explain why D/H fractionations in C

  15. Study of groundwater recharge in Rechna Doab using isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, M.I.; Tasneem, M.A.; Ahmed, M.; Hussain, S.D.; Khan, I.H.; Akram, W.

    1992-04-01

    Isotopic studies were performed in the Rechna Doab area to understand the recharge mechanism, investigate the relative contributions from various sources such as rainfall, rivers and canal system and to estimate the turn over times and replenishment rate of groundwater. The isotopic data suggest that the groundwater in the project area can be divided into different zones each having its own characteristic isotopic composition. The enriched isotopic values show rain recharge and depleted isotopic values are associated with river/canal system while the intermediate isotopic values show a mixing of two or more sources of water. The major contribution, however, comes from canal system. The isotopic data suggest that there is no quick movement of groundwater in the area. 18 figs. (author)

  16. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during bacterial acetylene fermentation: Potential for life detection in hydrocarbon-rich volatiles of icy planet(oid)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence; Baesman, Shaun; Oremland, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We report the first study of stable carbon isotope fractionation during microbial fermentation of acetylene (C2H2) in sediments, sediment enrichments, and bacterial cultures. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) averaged 3.7 ± 0.5‰ for slurries prepared with sediment collected at an intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay and 2.7 ± 0.2‰ for a pure culture of Pelobacter sp. isolated from these sediments. A similar KIE of 1.8 ± 0.7‰ was obtained for methanogenic enrichments derived from sediment collected at freshwater Searsville Lake, California. However, C2H2 uptake by a highly enriched mixed culture (strain SV7) obtained from Searsville Lake sediments resulted in a larger KIE of 9.0 ± 0.7‰. These are modest KIEs when compared with fractionation observed during oxidation of C1 compounds such as methane and methyl halides but are comparable to results obtained with other C2compounds. These observations may be useful in distinguishing biologically active processes operating at distant locales in the Solar System where C2H2 is present. These locales include the surface of Saturn's largest moon Titan and the vaporous water- and hydrocarbon-rich jets emanating from Enceladus.

  17. Analytical modelling of stable isotope fractionation of volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, D.; Cornaton, F.; Höhener, P.; Hunkeler, D.

    2011-01-01

    Analytical models were developed that simulate stable isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near a point source contamination in the unsaturated zone. The models describe diffusive transport of VOCs, biodegradation and source ageing. The mass transport is governed by Fick's law for diffusion. The equation for reactive transport of VOCs in the soil gas phase was solved for different source geometries and for different boundary conditions. Model results were compared to experiment...

  18. Comparative study of void fraction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, R.C.; Freitas, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Some models for the calculation of void fraction in water in sub-cooled boiling and saturated vertical upward flow with forced convection have been selected and compared with experimental results in the pressure range of 1 to 150 bar. In order to know the void fraction axial distribution it is necessary to determine the net generation of vapour and the fluid temperature distribution in the slightly sub-cooled boiling region. It was verified that the net generation of vapour was well represented by the Saha-Zuber model. The selected models for the void fraction calculation present adequate results but with a tendency to super-estimate the experimental results, in particular the homogeneous models. The drift flux model is recommended, followed by the Armand and Smith models. (F.E.) [pt

  19. Chromium isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of the Antrim Basalts: An insight into the global Cr geochemical cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Frei, Robert

    in this area has focused on laterites, a unique soil type produced by intense tropical weathering. To evaluate if this phenomenon is unique to tropical regions we have measured the Cr isotope composition (d53/52Cr ‰) of soils and river water from the Antrim Plateau, Northern Ireland, a marine temperate climate...... Cr as immobile Cr (III). The Cr (VI) lost from the system is insufficient to effect the isotopic composition of the soils. This study together with Cr data from other basaltic river catchments has found that the d53/52Cr of river water is catchment specific [1] and is controlled by local soil forming...... factors such as protolith, climate and biota. Our continuing research into modern analogues help link the d53/52Cr value of river water and the d53/52Cr value of seawater and contribute to our ultimate aim of using Cr isotopes as a palaeoclimate indicator....

  20. Linking Low-Level Stable Isotope Fractionation to Expression of the Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase-Encoding ethB Gene for Elucidation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Biodegradation in Aerated Treatment Pond Systems▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jechalke, Sven; Rosell, Mònica; Martínez-Lavanchy, Paula M.; Pérez-Leiva, Paola; Rohwerder, Thore; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H.

    2011-01-01

    Multidimensional compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) was applied in combination with RNA-based molecular tools to characterize methyl tertiary (tert-) butyl ether (MTBE) degradation mechanisms occurring in biofilms in an aerated treatment pond used for remediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater. The main pathway for MTBE oxidation was elucidated by linking the low-level stable isotope fractionation (mean carbon isotopic enrichment factor [ɛC] of −0.37‰ ± 0.05‰ and no significant hydrogen isotopic enrichment factor [ɛH]) observed in microcosm experiments to expression of the ethB gene encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase able to catalyze the oxidation of MTBE in biofilm samples both from the microcosms and directly from the ponds. 16S rRNA-specific primers revealed the presence of a sequence 100% identical to that of Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1, a well-characterized MTBE degrader. However, neither expression of the mdpA genes encoding the alkane hydroxylase-like enzyme responsible for MTBE oxidation in this strain nor the related MTBE isotope fractionation pattern produced by PM1 could be detected, suggesting that this enzyme was not active in this system. Additionally, observed low inverse fractionation of carbon (ɛC of +0.11‰ ± 0.03‰) and low fractionation of hydrogen (ɛH of −5‰ ± 1‰) in laboratory experiments simulating MTBE stripping from an open surface water body suggest that the application of CSIA in field investigations to detect biodegradation may lead to false-negative results when volatilization effects coincide with the activity of low-fractionating enzymes. As shown in this study, complementary examination of expression of specific catabolic genes can be used as additional direct evidence for microbial degradation activity and may overcome this problem. PMID:21148686

  1. Element for separating gaseous isotopes into at least two fractions and with a separating basket consisting of several separating elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossstuck, W.; Schafer, R.

    1985-01-01

    A separating element for gaseous isotopes into two fractions, and consisting of several elongated separating chips with a row of entry openings for the process gas at one side of the chips and a row of exit openings for the heavy fraction at the other side of the chips, with exit openings for the light fraction at the edges of the chips, and of two tubes holding the chips and having at least one chamber, with said tubes being connected by means of connecting elements, and equipped with entry and exit openings on their contact surfaces, with said entry and exit openings arranged in rows in a longitudinal direction of the chips, and for simplifying of installation and construction, this invention provides that the chips are arranged in a longitudinal direction to the tubes, with their sides abutting directly against the smooth contact surfaces of the tubes, and whereby the connecting elements are positioned in one row in the center of the two tubes

  2. Some isotope hydrological studies in Southern Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhagen, B.Th.

    2001-01-01

    Four case studies involving the use of the environmental isotopes 14 C and 3 H, in the and to semi-arid Kalahari region of Southern Africa are described and general conclusions regarding the qualitative aspects of recharge and discharge characteristics of the systems are based on these measurements. In each of the studies, diffuse, local recharge was found to be the dominant recharge mechanism. Recharge via river beds was found to be limited at the regional scale. The balancing discharge mechanism for groundwater was found to be via evapotranspiration. Groundwater salinity and mineralisation as well as the regional hydrogeology are controlled by geological structure rather than lithologies or residence times and the absence of hypersaline groundwaters indicates that the aquifers are periodically flushed during pluvial periods, thus pointing to long-term hydroclimatic controls over the observed present-day hydrology. (author)

  3. Isotopes in soil-plant nutrition studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    Radioisotopes have greatly facilitated investigating the characteristics of plant nutrients in the soil, in measuring soil moisture, in studying the uptake of nutrients by plants and in devising efficient methods of fertilizer application, and are now being widely used in soil-plant nutrition research. A recent international symposium on the use of radioisotopes in soil-plant nutrition studies showed the varied ways in which isotopes can contribute to agricultural production by helping to investigate soil characteristics and soil-plant relationships. The symposium, jointly sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, was held in Bombay from 26 February to 2 March 1962, at the invitation of the Government of India

  4. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  5. Progresses in the stable isotope studies of microbial processes associated with wetland methane production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qing; Lin Guanghui

    2013-01-01

    Methane emissions from wetlands play a key role in regulating global atmospheric methane concentration, so better understanding of microbial processes for the methane emission in wetlands is critical for developing process models and reducing uncertainty in global methane emission inventory. In this review, we describe basic microbial processes for wetland methane production and then demonstrate how stable isotope fractionation and stable isotope probing can be used to investigate the mechanisms underlying different methanogenic pathways and to quantify microbial species involved in wetland methane production. When applying stable isotope technique to calculate contributions of different pathways to the total methane production in various wetlands, the technical challenge is how to determine isotopic fractionation factors for the acetate derived methane production and carbon dioxide derived methane production. Although the application of stable isotope probing techniques to study the actual functions of different microbial organisms to methane production process is significantly superior to the traditional molecular biology method, the combination of these two technologies will be crucial for direct linking of the microbial community and functional structure with the corresponding metabolic functions, and provide new ideas for future studies. (authors)

  6. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Anja A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  7. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    would help us optimize reaction conditions to effect higher yields, minimize reaction times, etc. The transformation ... effect of the isotope on the reaction rate. In the following. Uday Maitra and. J Chandrasekhar .... to the reaction, the rate of isotope exchange was unaltered, but the rate of racemization (of the reactant) became ...

  8. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  9. Environmental Forensics : Compound Specific Isotope Analysis Of PAHs. Study Of A Former Coal Tar Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assal, A.; Doherty, R.; Dickson, K.; Kalin, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fingerprints of PAHs obtained by GC-IRMS have often been used in source apportionment studies. The use of PAHs in environmental forensics relies on the assumption that carbon isotopic fractionation caused by microbial degradation is less significant for these heavy molecular weight compounds than for lighter molecules such as chlorinated solvents or BTEX. Carbon isotopic fractionation of PAHs during degradation is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of CSIA of PAHs for environmental forensics applications at a complex (hydrogeology affected by tidal fluxes) former coal tar plant. In this work, soil samples from a tar works site were analyzed. The tar works operated on the site over a period of sixty years. A source apportionment study was first carried out based on 90 target PAHs quantified by GC-MS. These results were then compared to carbon isotope fingerprints. The separation of compounds of interest from co-extracted interfering peaks is a crucial prerequisite of CSIA by GC-IRMS. Hence, a sample preparation method which allowed the determination of precise carbon isotope signatures for up to 35 compounds per soil extract was developed, validated and applied to the samples previously analyzed by GC- MS. Although most soil samples were shown to be related to the point source tar contamination, PAHs ratios and principal component analysis of abundances highlighted some samples with unusual patterns, suggesting the input of a second source of contaminants. However, no statistically significant variation of the isotopic fingerprints of heavy molecular weight PAHs of these samples was observed. This was inconsistent with the first diagnosis. Since evidence was provided that most samples were only affected by a single source of contaminants, carbon isotopic fractionation was investigated in-situ. Importantly, naphthalene and 2- and 1- methylnaphthalenes isotopic fractionation was observed in a vertical

  10. The use of stable isotopes in drug metabolism studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, F P

    2001-06-01

    Although there is a long history of stable isotopes use in drug metabolism research, it is appropriate to evaluate them in pregnancy drug studies in which safety takes highest priority. It is well established through a number of human and animal experiments that stable isotopes themselves rarely generate additional toxicities beyond the molecules to which they are attached. For the analysis of stable isotopes involved in metabolism studies, mass spectrometry plays the predominant role. Several mass spectrometry-based techniques now exist that enable the selective quantitative detection of stable isotopes with better sensitivity and better retention of chromatographic resolution than do in-line radioactivity monitors for 14C. Even mass balance studies can be performed by using stable isotopes, a type of experiment that still predominantly uses radioisotopes. Some of the newest developments in the use of stable isotopes involve biopolymers, in which fully isotope-labeled species can be generated from cells grown in isotopically labeled growth media. Having shown safety, sensitivity, specificity, and versatility, stable isotopes should play an important role in drug metabolism studies in pregnancy.

  11. Application of the stable-isotope system to the study of sources and fate of Hg in the environment: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Runsheng; Feng Xinbin; Shi Wenfang

    2010-01-01

    With the improvement of analytical methods and the development of multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP/MS), research on non-traditional stable isotope (Cu, Zn, Fe, Se, Mo, Cr, Hg) in geochemistry has made tremendous progress in the past decade. Recent studies have demonstrated that both organic and inorganic reactions may cause Hg isotope fractionation, and variations of Hg isotopic composition in the environment have been successfully employed to explain Hg pollution history, Hg sources and tracking Hg pathways in nature. Furthermore, Hg isotopic fractionation studies can be a powerful tool in the calibration of global Hg cycling models. Stable isotope geochemistry of Hg is therefore becoming a new frontier subject in earth sciences. Based on summarizing previous research, this paper outlines the main advances in the study of Hg stable isotopes with particular emphasis placed on a brief explanation of Hg isotope analytical techniques, possible Hg isotope fractionation mechanisms observed in both natural and experimental processes, Hg isotope composition variations in different environmental matrices, and the application prospects of the Hg stable isotopes in environmental geosciences.

  12. Studies of enzyme mechanism using isotopic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The isotope partitioning studies of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction were examined with five transitory complexes including E:NAD, E:NAD:Mg, E:malate, E:Mg:malate, and E:NAD:malate. Three productive complexes, E:NAD, E:NAD:Mg, and E:Mg:malate, were obtained, suggesting a steady-state random mechanism. Data for trapping with E:/sup 14/C-NAD indicate a rapid equilibrium addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ prior to the addition of malate. Trapping with /sup 14/C-malate could only be obtained from the E:Mg/sup 2 +/:/sup 14/C-malate complex, while no trapping from E:/sup 14/C-malate was obtained under feasible experimental conditions. The equations for the isotope partitioning studies varying two substrates in the chase solution in an ordered terreactant reaction were derived, allowing a determination of the relative rates of substrate dissociation to the catalytic reaction for each of the productive transitory complexes. NAD and malate are released from the central complex at an identical rate, equal to the catalytic rate. The release of NAD from E:NAD and E:NAD:Mg complexes is 2- to 4-fold and 5- to 9-fold V/sub max//E/sub t/, respectively. The release of malate from the E:Mg:malate complex is 0.1- to 0.3-fold of V/sub max//E/sub t/. The individual rate constants for association and dissociation of the substrates, NAD and malate have been estimated.

  13. Studies of enzyme mechanism using isotopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The isotope partitioning studies of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction were examined with five transitory complexes including E:NAD, E:NAD:Mg, E:malate, E:Mg:malate, and E:NAD:malate. Three productive complexes, E:NAD, E:NAD:Mg, and E:Mg:malate, were obtained, suggesting a steady-state random mechanism. Data for trapping with E: 14 C-NAD indicate a rapid equilibrium addition of Mg 2+ prior to the addition of malate. Trapping with 14 C-malate could only be obtained from the E:Mg 2+ : 14 C-malate complex, while no trapping from E: 14 C-malate was obtained under feasible experimental conditions. The equations for the isotope partitioning studies varying two substrates in the chase solution in an ordered terreactant reaction were derived, allowing a determination of the relative rates of substrate dissociation to the catalytic reaction for each of the productive transitory complexes. NAD and malate are released from the central complex at an identical rate, equal to the catalytic rate. The release of NAD from E:NAD and E:NAD:Mg complexes is 2- to 4-fold and 5- to 9-fold V/sub max//E/sub t/, respectively. The release of malate from the E:Mg:malate complex is 0.1- to 0.3-fold of V/sub max//E/sub t/. The individual rate constants for association and dissociation of the substrates, NAD and malate have been estimated

  14. Cyanoacetylene and its 13C species: Evidence against relative isotope fractionation and improved 12C/13C abundance ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannier, P.G.; Linke, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    We use the J=9→8 transitions of HCCCN and its 13 C substituted species to obtain several results in Sgr B2 and Ori A. In Sgr B2 we test for relative isotope fractionation among the three carbon sites in HCCCN and find none to a level of +- 5%. We verify that HCCCN has low opacity in both sources and derive 12 C/ 13 C isotope ratios of 50 (Ori A) and 22 (Sgr B2), an indication of galactic evolution of this important ratio. That the Orion ''plateau'' feature is especially prominent in HCCCN indicates a surprisingly large polyatomic molecule abundance for this energetic source. Our spectra also yield information about other chemical species, including a new transition of NH 2 CN, an improved frequency of U81505, and a new unidentified line U79220. In addition, sensitive upper limits for NH 2 CN, CH 2 CO, and HNO in the Orion ''spike'' source imply that this cloud is relatively deficient in these species

  15. Dynamic changes of carbon isotope apparent fractionation factor to describe transition to syntrophic acetate oxidation during cellulose and acetate methanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V

    2017-05-01

    To identify predominant metabolic pathway for cellulose methanization new equations that take into account dynamics of 13C are added to the basic model of cellulose methanization. The correct stoichiometry of hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis and methanogenesis steps including biomass is considered. Using experimental data by Laukenmann et al. [Identification of methanogenic pathway in anaerobic digesters using stable carbon isotopes. Eng. Life Sci. 2010;10:1-6], who reported about the importance of ace`tate oxidation during mesophilic cellulose methanization, the model confirmed that, at high biomass concentration of acetate oxidizers, the carbon isotope fractionation factor amounts to about 1.085. The same model, suggested firstly for cellulose degradation, was used to describe, secondly, changes in, and in methane and carbon dioxide during mesophylic acetate methanization measured by Grossin-Debattista [Fractionnements isotopiques (13C/12C) engendres par la methanogenese: apports pour la comprehension des processus de biodegradation lors de la digestion anaerobie [doctoral thesis]. 2011. Bordeaux: Universite Bordeaux-1;2011. Available from: http://ori-oai.u-bordeaux1.fr/pdf/2011/GROSSIN-DEBATTISTA_JULIEN_2011.pdf . French].The model showed that under various ammonium concentrations, at dominating acetoclastic methanogenesis, the value decreases over time to a low level (1.016), while at dominating syntrophic acetate oxidation, coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, slightly increases, reaching 1.060 at the end of incubation.

  16. Stable isotope studies. Annual progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1981-01-01

    Our studies during the year consisted of cryogenic measurements of vapor pressure isotope effects (VPIE) in CHF 3 , CH 2 F 2 , CH 3 F, and ammonia, interpretations of the results of the VPIE studies of CHF 3 and CH 3 F by means of ab initio molecular orbital calculations and vibrational analyses, studies of nitrogen isotope fractionation by an exchange between nitric oxide and the liquid phase consisting of N 2 O 3 and N 2 O 4 under elevated pressures, an exploration of the concept of closed refluxer system for the Nitrox process for separating 15 N using a Fe(II)/Fe(III) system as reducing agent for nitric acid and the electrolysis for regeneration of Fe(II), and a theoretical study of approximation of the zero-point energy and its isotopic differences developed on the basis of Lanczos' tau-method

  17. Accurate and precise measurement of oxygen isotopic fractions and diffusion profiles by selective attenuation of secondary ions (SASI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez, Helena; Druce, John; Hong, Jong-Eun; Ishihara, Tatsumi; Kilner, John A

    2015-03-03

    The accuracy and precision of isotopic analysis in Time-of-Flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) relies on the appropriate reduction of the dead-time and detector saturation effects, especially when analyzing species with high ion yields or present in high concentrations. Conventional approaches to avoid these problems are based on Poisson dead-time correction and/or an overall decrease of the total secondary ion intensity by reducing the target current. This ultimately leads to poor detection limits for the minor isotopes and high uncertainties of the measured isotopic ratios. An alternative strategy consists of the attenuation of those specific secondary ions that saturate the detector, providing an effective extension of the linear dynamic range. In this work, the selective attenuation