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Sample records for isotope shifts suggest

  1. Hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift in drift wave turbulence (Dimits et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 969) is discussed using the theory of zonal flows, in which the nonlinear damping rate of zonal flows is taken into account. The up-shift of the critical linear growth rate of the drift waves, above which drift wave fluctuations develop, is investigated. The dependence on the mass number of the hydrogen isotope is discussed.

  2. Hitting the moving target: modelling ontogenetic shifts with stable isotopes reveals the importance of isotopic turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Eric; Trudel, Marc; El-Sabaawi, Rana; Tucker, Strahan; Dower, John F; Beacham, Terry D; Edwards, Andrew M; Mazumder, Asit

    2016-05-01

    Ontogenetic niche shifts are widely prevalent in nature and are important in shaping the structure and dynamics of ecosystems. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool to assess these shifts, with δ(15) N providing a measure of trophic level and δ(13) C a measure of energy source. Previous applications of stable isotopes to study ontogenetic niche shifts have not considered the appreciable time lag between diet and consumer tissue associated with isotopic turnover. These time lags introduce significant complexity into field studies of ontogenetic niche shifts. Juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from freshwater to marine ecosystems and shift their diet from feeding primarily on invertebrates to feeding primarily on fish. This dual ontogenetic habitat and diet shift, in addition to the long time lag associated with isotopic turnover, suggests that there is potential for a disconnect between the prey sources that juvenile salmon are consuming, and the inferred prey sources from stable isotopes. We developed a model that considered ontogenetic niche shifts and time lags associated with isotopic turnover, and compared this 'ontogeny' model to one that considered only isotopic turnover. We used a Bayesian framework to explicitly account for parameter uncertainty. Data showed overwhelming support for the ontogeny model relative to the isotopic turnover model. Estimated variables from best model fits indicate that the ontogeny model predicts a much greater reliance on fish prey than does the stomach content data. Overall, we found that this method of quantifying ontogenetic niche shifts effectively accounted for both isotopic turnover and ontogenetic diet shifts; a finding that could be widely applicable to a variety of systems.

  3. Probing New Physics with Isotope Shift Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Delaunay, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential to probe physics beyond the Standard Model with isotope shift measurements of optical atomic clock transitions. We first derive the reach for generic new physics above the GeV scale at the effective field theory level, as well as estimate the limits on possible new spin-independent forces mediated by sub-GeV states coupled to electrons and neutrons. We also study the weak force and show that isotope shifts could provide strong constraints on the $Z^0$ couplings to valence quarks, which complement precision observables at LEP and atomic parity violation experiments. Finally, motivated by recent experimental hints of a new 750 GeV resonance in diphotons, we also consider the potential to probe its parity-preserving couplings to electrons, quarks and gluons with this method. In particular, combining the diphoton signal with indirect constraints from $g_e-2$ and isotope shifts in Ytterbium allows to probe the resonance coupling to electrons with unprecedented precision.

  4. Multiconfiguration calculations of electronic isotope shift factors in Al I

    CERN Document Server

    Filippin, Livio; Ekman, Jörgen; Fritzsche, Stephan; Godefroid, Michel; Jönsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    The present work reports results from systematic multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations of electronic isotope shift factors for a set of transitions between low-lying states in neutral aluminium. These electronic quantities together with observed isotope shifts between different pairs of isotopes provide the changes in mean-square charge radii of the atomic nuclei. Two computational approaches are adopted for the estimation of the mass- and field shift factors. Within these approaches, different models for electron correlation are explored in a systematic way to determine a reliable computational strategy and estimate theoretical uncertainties of the isotope shift factors.

  5. ESTIMATING THE TIMING OF DIET SHIFTS USING STABLE ISOTOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotope analysis has become an important tool in studies of trophic food webs and animal feeding patterns. When animals undergo rapid dietary shifts due to migration, metamorphosis, or other reasons, the isotopic composition of their tissues begins changing to reflect tha...

  6. Frequency shift in high order harmonic generation from isotopic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    He, Lixin; Zhai, Chunyang; Wang, Feng; Shi, Wenjing; Zhang, Qingbin; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lu, Peixiang

    2016-01-01

    We report the first experimental observation of frequency shift in high order harmonic generation (HHG) from isotopic molecules H2 and D2 . It is found that harmonics generated from the isotopic molecules exhibit obvious spectral red shift with respect to those from Ar atom. The red shift is further demonstrated to arise from the laser-driven nuclear motion in isotopic molecules. By utilizing the red shift observed in experiment, we successfully retrieve the nuclear vibrations in H2 and D2, which agree well with the theoretical calculations from the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) with Non-Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the frequency shift can be manipulated by changing the laser chirp.

  7. Isotope shift of the ferromagnetic transition temperature in itinerant ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Hase, Izumi; Odagiri, Kosuke

    2017-02-01

    We present a theory of the isotope effect of the Curie temperature Tc in itinerant ferromagnets. The isotope effect in ferromagnets occurs via the electron-phonon vertex correction and the effective attractive interaction mediated by the electron-phonon interaction. The decrease of the Debye frequency increases the relative strength of the Coulomb interaction, which results in a positive isotope shift of Tc when the mass M of an atom increases. Following this picture, we evaluate the isotope effect of Tc by using the Stoner theory and a spin-fluctuation theory. When Tc is large enough as large as or more than 100 K, the isotope effect on Tc can be measurable. Recently, precise measurements on the oxygen isotope effect on Tc have been performed for itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO3 with Tc ∼ 160 K. A clear isotope effect has been observed with the positive shift of Tc ∼ 1 K by isotope substitution (16O →18O). This experimental result is consistent with our theory.

  8. Rising methane: post-2007 growth, geographic loci, timings and isotopic shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Euan G.; Manning, Martin R.; Dlugokencky, Ed; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Brownlow, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric methane is rising rapidly again, after a period of stability [1]. NOAA report a global growth rate from 2007-2013 of 5.7±1.2 ppb yr-1, followed by extreme growth of 12.6±0.5 ppb in 2014 and 10.0±0.7 ppb in 2015. Growth has been accompanied by a shift in δ13C(CH4) (a measure of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in methane) to significantly more negative values since 2007. This isotopic shift has been observed in independently calibrated NOAA, Royal Holloway and NIWA-New Zealand measurements: thus the negative trend is real, global, and not a calibration artifact. Fossil fuel methane emissions, which are mostly more positive than atmospheric values, are not driving the rise in methane. Instead, the geographic loci of post-2007 growth, and the timings of the methane rise and isotopic shift suggest growth was dominated by significant increases in biogenic methane emissions, particularly in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere: for example in years with heavy rainfall under the Inter-Tropical Convergence, from wetlands and increased agricultural sources such as ruminants and rice paddies. Changes in the removal rate of methane by the OH radical or other sinks may also have occurred but do not appear fully to explain short term variations in methane isotopes. All these drivers of rising methane - wetlands, ruminants, changing sinks - may reflect underlying decade-long trends in tropical climate: methane may thus be an important climate-change signal. 1. Nisbet, E.G. et al. (2016) Rising atmospheric methane: 2007-2014 growth and isotopic shift, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 30, doi:10.1002/ 2016GB005406.

  9. Probing new light force-mediators by isotope shift spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berengut, Julian C. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Budker, Dmitry [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Inst. Mainz; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Physics Dept.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Delaunay, Cedric [Savoie Mont Blanc Univ., Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique LAPTh; and others

    2017-04-15

    In this Letter we explore the potential of probing new light force-carriers, with spin-independent couplings to the electron and the neutron, using precision isotope shift spectroscopy. We develop a formalism to interpret linear King plots as bounds on new physics with minimal theory inputs. We focus only on bounding the new physics contributions that can be calculated independently of the Standard Model nuclear effects. We apply our method to existing Ca{sup +} data and project its sensitivity to possibly existing new bosons using narrow transitions in other atoms and ions (specifically, Sr and Yb). Future measurements are expected to improve the relative precision by five orders of magnitude, and can potentially lead to an unprecedented sensitivity for bosons within the 10 keV to 10 MeV mass range.

  10. Hyperfine Structure and Isotope Shifts in Dy II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan F. Del Papa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using fast-ion-beam laser-fluorescence spectroscopy (FIBLAS, we have measured the hyperfine structure (hfs of 14 levels and an additional four transitions in Dy II and the isotope shifts (IS of 12 transitions in the wavelength range of 422–460 nm. These are the first precision measurements of this kind in Dy II. Along with hfs and IS, new undocumented transitions were discovered within 3 GHz of the targeted transitions. These atomic data are essential for astrophysical studies of chemical abundances, allowing correction for saturation and the effects of blended lines. Lanthanide abundances are important in diffusion modeling of stellar interiors, and in the mechanisms and history of nucleosynthesis in the universe. Hfs and IS also play an important role in the classification of energy levels, and provide a benchmark for theoretical atomic structure calculations.

  11. RIS3: A program for relativistic isotope shift calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazé, C.; Gaidamauskas, E.; Gaigalas, G.; Godefroid, M.; Jönsson, P.

    2013-09-01

    An atomic spectral line is characteristic of the element producing the spectrum. The line also depends on the isotope. The program RIS3 (Relativistic Isotope Shift) calculates the electron density at the origin and the normal and specific mass shift parameters. Combining these electronic quantities with available nuclear data, isotope-dependent energy level shifts are determined. Program summaryProgram title:RIS3 Catalogue identifier: ADEK_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADEK_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5147 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 32869 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77. Computer: HP ProLiant BL465c G7 CTO. Operating system: Centos 5.5, which is a Linux distribution compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Advanced Server. Classification: 2.1. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADEK_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 100 (1997) 81 Subprograms used: Cat Id Title Reference ADZL_v1_1 GRASP2K VERSION 1_1 to be published. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Prediction of level and transition isotope shifts in atoms using four-component relativistic wave functions. Solution method: The nuclear motion and volume effects are treated in first order perturbation theory. Taking the zero-order wave function in terms of a configuration state expansion |Ψ>=∑μcμ|Φ(γμPJMj)>, where P, J and MJ are, respectively, the parity and angular quantum numbers, the electron density at the nucleus and the normal and specific mass shift parameters may generally be expressed as ∑cμcν where V is the relevant operator. The matrix elements, in turn, can be expressed as sums over radial integrals multiplied

  12. Chlorine isotope effects from isotope ratio mass spectrometry suggest intramolecular C-Cl bond competition in trichloroethene (TCE) reductive dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretnik, Stefan; Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Löffler, Frank; Elsner, Martin

    2014-05-20

    Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE) dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i) of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii) of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were -19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE) and -12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE) (95% confidence intervals). Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (-5.0‰ ± 0.1‰) and TCE (-3.6‰ ± 0.2‰). In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by -16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error)) than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of -2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of -6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals). A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect). These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition). This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I) or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  13. Chlorine Isotope Effects from Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Suggest Intramolecular C-Cl Bond Competition in Trichloroethene (TCE Reductive Dehalogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Cretnik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (biochemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i of tetrachloroethene (PCE to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were −19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE and −12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE (95% confidence intervals. Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (−5.0‰ ± 0.1‰ and TCE (−3.6‰ ± 0.2‰. In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by −16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of −2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of −6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals. A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect. These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition. This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  14. Detecting shifts in tropical moisture imbalances with satellite-derived isotope ratios in water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, A.; Blossey, P. N.; Noone, D.; Nusbaumer, J.; Wood, R.

    2017-06-01

    As global temperatures rise, regional differences in evaporation (E) and precipitation (P) are likely to become more disparate, causing the drier E-dominated regions of the tropics to become drier and the wetter P-dominated regions to become wetter. Models suggest that such intensification of the water cycle should already be taking place; however, quantitatively verifying these changes is complicated by inherent difficulties in measuring E and P with sufficient spatial coverage and resolution. This paper presents a new metric for tracking changes in regional moisture imbalances (e.g., E-P) by defining δDq—the isotope ratio normalized to a reference water vapor concentration of 4 mmol mol-1—and evaluates its efficacy using both remote sensing retrievals and climate model simulations in the tropics. By normalizing the isotope ratio with respect to water vapor concentration, δDq isolates the portion of isotopic variability most closely associated with shifts between E- and P-dominated regimes. Composite differences in δDq between cold and warm phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) verify that δDq effectively tracks changes in the hydrological cycle when large-scale convective reorganization takes place. Simulated δDq also demonstrates sensitivity to shorter-term variability in E-P at most tropical locations. Since the isotopic signal of E-P in free tropospheric water vapor transfers to the isotope ratios of precipitation, multidecadal observations of both water vapor and precipitation isotope ratios should provide key evidence of changes in regional moisture imbalances now and in the future.

  15. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    to be negative, indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition unusual long-range effects are seen. Structures, NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using DFT methods. Two-bond deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are correlated......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found...... with calculated OH stretching frequencies. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are calculated for systems with OH exchanged by OD. Hydrogen bond potentials are discussed. New and more soluble nitro derivatives are synthesized....

  16. High resolution isotope shifts and hyperfine structure measurements of tungsten by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jeongwon; Leanhardt, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of tungsten were studied in the near UV range. We have used laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy on a pulsed supersonic beam to probe the 5D0 -> 5F1 transition at 384.9 nm, 7S3 -> 7P4 transition at 400.9 nm, and 7S3 -> 7P3 transition at 407.4 nm. Three new magnetic hyperfine constants are reported for 7P3,7P4, and 5F1 states. The isotope shifts of the 384.9 nm transition are presented for the first time, and the isotope shifts of 400.9 nm and 407.4 nm transition are measured with an order of magnitude higher precision compared to the previous measurements. As a result, the nuclear parameters lambda and lambda_{rel} are extracted from the isotope shifts with an improved precision.

  17. Relativistic calculations of the isotope shifts in highly charged Li-like ions

    CERN Document Server

    Zubova, N A; Shabaev, V M; Tupitsyn, I I; Volotka, A V; Plunien, G; Brandau, C; Stöhlker, Th

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic calculations of the isotope shifts of energy levels in highly charged Li-like ions are performed. The nuclear recoil (mass shift) contributions are calculated by merging the perturbative and large-scale configuration-interaction Dirac-Fock-Sturm (CI-DFS) methods. The nuclear size (field shift) contributions are evaluated by the CI-DFS method including the electron-correlation, Breit, and QED corrections. The nuclear deformation and nuclear polarization corrections to the isotope shifts in Li-like neodymium, thorium, and uranium are also considered. The results of the calculations are compared with the theoretical values obtained with other methods.

  18. Core correlation effects in multiconfiguration calculations of isotope shifts in Mg I

    CERN Document Server

    Filippin, Livio; Ekman, Jörgen; Jönsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    The present work reports results from systematic multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations of isotope shifts for several well-known transitions in neutral magnesium. Relativistic normal and specific mass shift factors as well as the electronic probability density at the origin are calculated. Combining these electronic quantities with available nuclear data, energy and transition level shifts are determined for the $^{26}$Mg$-^{24}$Mg pair of isotopes. Different models for electron correlation are adopted. It is shown that although valence and core-valence models provide accurate values for the isotope shifts, the inclusion of core-core excitations in the computational strategy significantly improves the accuracy of the transition energies and normal mass shift factors.

  19. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes from Top Predator Amino Acids Reveal Rapidly Shifting Ocean Biochemistry in the Outer California Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I.; Koch, Paul L.; Fiedler, Paul C.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Climatic variation alters biochemical and ecological processes, but it is difficult both to quantify the magnitude of such changes, and to differentiate long-term shifts from inter-annual variability. Here, we simultaneously quantify decade-scale isotopic variability at the lowest and highest trophic positions in the offshore California Current System (CCS) by measuring δ15N and δ13C values of amino acids in a top predator, the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus). Using a time series of skin tissue samples as a biological archive, isotopic records from individual amino acids (AAs) can reveal the proximate factors driving a temporal decline we observed in bulk isotope values (a decline of ≥1 ‰) by decoupling changes in primary producer isotope values from those linked to the trophic position of this toothed whale. A continuous decline in baseline (i.e., primary producer) δ15N and δ13C values was observed from 1993 to 2005 (a decrease of ∼4‰ for δ15N source-AAs and 3‰ for δ13C essential-AAs), while the trophic position of whales was variable over time and it did not exhibit directional trends. The baseline δ15N and δ13C shifts suggest rapid ongoing changes in the carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in the offshore CCS, potentially occurring at faster rates than long-term shifts observed elsewhere in the Pacific. While the mechanisms forcing these biogeochemical shifts remain to be determined, our data suggest possible links to natural climate variability, and also corresponding shifts in surface nutrient availability. Our study demonstrates that isotopic analysis of individual amino acids from a top marine mammal predator can be a powerful new approach to reconstructing temporal variation in both biochemical cycling and trophic structure. PMID:25329915

  20. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary...... isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  1. Strontium isotopes provide clues for a process shift in base cation dynamics in young volcanic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, N.; Jackson, M. G.; Bookhagen, B.; Maher, K.; Chadwick, O.

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in soil development theory based on studies of old soils or over long timescales, little is known about soil thresholds (dramatic changes in soil properties associated with only small shifts in external forcing factors) that might be expressed in young soils (less than 10 kyr). Therefore, we seek to understand infant soil development in a tropical environment through the sourcing of plant available base cations by measuring the strontium (Sr) isotopic composition of the soil exchange complex. Our sampling strategy spans soils in three different precipitation ranges (950-1060 mm, 1180-1210 mm, and 1450-1500) and an array of soil ages from 500 to 7500 years in the Kona region on the island of Hawaii. In Hawaiian soils, 87Sr/86Sr values are determined by a mixture of three components: a mantle-derived component from the lava (0.7034), a rainfall component (0.7093) and a component from continental dust (0.720). Elevation-controlled leaching intensity in the wettest localities produces a decline in the concentration of base cations supplied by basalt and a dilute resupply by rainfall. In the driest sites, where leaching intensity is dramatically reduced, there is a buildup of rainfall-derived extractable Sr in the soil over time. Slow rock weathering rates produce a small rock-derived cation input to the soil. Thus, Sr isotope signatures reflect both the input of rainfall-derived cations and rock-derived cations with values that fall between rainfall and basaltic signatures. Soils in the intermediate precipitation range have Sr isotopic signatures consistent with both the wet and dry trends; suggesting that they lie close to the critical precipitation amount that marks a shift between these two processes. For the Kona region, this transition seems to occur at 1200 mm /yr. In contrast to the clear-cut differentiation in strontium isotopes with precipitation shifts observed in older soils, patterns on these young soils in Kona are complicated by low soil

  2. Oxygen Isotopes in Fresh Water Biogenic Opal: Northeastern US Alleroed-Younger Dryas Temperature Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Aldo; Peteet, Dorothy

    1997-01-01

    The first oxygen isotope analysis of biogenic opal from lake sediments, from the Allerod/Younger Dryas transition in a core from Linsley Pond, Connecticut, gives an average estimate of a 6 C drop in temperature during the Younger Dryas. This shift represents temperatures during the bloom season, and may be less than the winter temperature drop. The sharp transition itself, with a duration of about 200 years, suggests that the temperature decrease may have been as large as 12 C. Previous estimates of the Allerod/Younger Dryas temperature shifts are controversial, and range from 3-20 C, suggesting that further interdisciplinary research on the same samples is warranted. One way that global climate change manifests itself is by redistributing energy throughout the globe. The Northern Hemisphere latitudinal temperature gradient during the late-glacial is at present a controversial topic. The magnitude of air temperature shifts during the Allerod/Younger Dryas (YD) oscillation are estimated from mid-latitude pollen records surrounding the North Atlantic to be 3-5 C in Europe [Lowe et al., 19941 and 3-4 C in the eastern US [Peteet et al., 1993]. In contrast, lake temperatures estimates derived from aquatic midge larvae in the Canadian eastern maritimes and Maine range from 6-20 C, with larger shifts at more southern sites [Levesque et al., 1997]. The magnitude of YD cooling in Greenland ice cores ranges from at least 7 C from the Bolling warming [Dansgaard et al., 1989] to 15 C - a more recent estimate from borehole temperatures [Cuffey et al., 1995]. The ice core geochemical records reveal that massive frequent and short-term (decadal or less) changes in atmospheric composition occurred throughout this event, suggesting a very dynamic circulation [Mayewski et al., 1993).

  3. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static......” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative...

  4. Anharmonicity effects in impurity-vacancy centers in diamond revealed by isotopic shifts and optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekimov, E. A.; Krivobok, V. S.; Lyapin, S. G.; Sherin, P. S.; Gavva, V. A.; Kondrin, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    We studied isotopically enriched nano- and microdiamonds with optically active GeV- centers synthesized at high pressures and high temperatures in nonmetallic growth systems. The influence of isotopic composition on optical properties has been thoroughly investigated by photoluminescence-excitation (PLE) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to get insight into the nature and electronic structure of this color center. We have demonstrated that the large frequency defect (difference between oscillation frequencies in the ground and excited electronic states) does bring about large discrepancy between PLE and PL spectra and comparatively high isotopic shift of the zero phonon line. Both effects seem to be rather common to split-vacancy centers (for example SiV-), where the frequency defect reaches record high values. Isotopic substitution of carbon atoms in the diamond lattice results in even larger shifts, which are only partially accounted for by a redistribution of electron density caused by the volume change of the diamond lattice. It was shown that the vibronic frequency in this case does not depend on the mass of carbon atoms. The greatest part of this isotopic shift is due to anharmonicity effects, which constitute a substantial part of vibronic frequency observed in this center. The exact physical mechanism, which leads to significant enhancement of anharmonicity on substitution of 12C to 13C, is yet to be clarified.

  5. Isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of {sup 212-214}Ra{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, Gouri S.; Sahoo, Bijaya K.; Versolato, Oscar O.; Wansbeek, Lotje W.; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W.; Jungmann, Klaus; Timmermans, Rob G.E. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    The availability of short lived Ra isotopes at the TRI{mu}P facility of the KVI makes the study of atomic structure of these isotopes possible. {sup 212-214}Ra ions are trapped in a buffer-gas filled Paul trap. Isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of {sup 212-214}Ra{sup +} for several transitions were obtained by laser spectroscopy. Ra{sup +} is of particular interest for a most precise measurement of Atomic Parity Violation (APV), currently underway in our group. Such a measurement will provide a stringent test of the Standard Model of particle physics. However, the interpretation of APV measurements require the determination of the weak matrix elements to better than 1% accuracy in order to extract the weak charge (Weinberg angle). Currently, our calculations are accurate to some 3%. We therefore plan to exploit the fact that radium has a wide range of isotopes by looking at the ratio E1APV/ E1'APV for two -or more- isotopes, and thus canceling atomic uncertainties. Here, nuclear structure effects start to play a role. The extracted isotope shifts and hyperfine interactions provide indispensable information. In addition, the measured hyperfine structure of {sup 213}Ra{sup +} is of particular interest for the proposed Radium single ion clock.

  6. Identifying Stereoisomers by ab-initio Calculation of Secondary Isotope Shifts on NMR Chemical Shieldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Böhm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present ab-initio calculations of secondary isotope effects on NMR chemical shieldings. The change of the NMR chemical shift of a certain nucleus that is observed if another nucleus is replaced by a different isotope can be calculated by computing vibrational corrections on the NMR parameters using electronic structure methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the computational results is sufficient to even distinguish different conformers. For this purpose, benchmark calculations for fluoro(2-2Hethane in gauche and antiperiplanar conformation are carried out at the HF, MP2 and CCSD(T level of theory using basis sets ranging from double- to quadruple-zeta quality. The methodology is applied to the secondary isotope shifts for 2-fluoronorbornane in order to resolve an ambiguity in the literature on the assignment of endo- and exo-2-fluoronorbornanes with deuterium substituents in endo-3 and exo-3 positions, also yielding insight into mechanistic details of the corresponding synthesis.

  7. Isotope shift on the chlorine electron affinity revisited by an MCHF/CI approach

    CERN Document Server

    Carette, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Today, the electron affinity is experimentally well known for most of the elements and is a useful guideline for developing ab initio computational methods. However, the measurements of isotope shifts on the electron affinity are limited by both resolution and sensitivity. In this context, theory eventually contributes to the knowledge and understanding of atomic structures, even though correlation plays a dominant role in negative ions properties and, particularly, in the calculation of the specific mass shift contribution. The present study solves the longstanding discrepancy between calculated and measured specific mass shifts on the electron affinity of chlorine (Phys. Rev. A 51 (1995) 231)

  8. Widespread kelp-derived carbon in pelagic and benthic nearshore fishes suggested by stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Biela, Vanessa R.; Newsome, Seth D.; Bodkin, James L.; Kruse, Gordon H.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2016-11-01

    Kelp forests provide habitat for diverse and abundant fish assemblages, but the extent to which kelp provides a source of energy to fish and other predators is unclear. To examine the use of kelp-derived energy by fishes we estimated the contribution of kelp- and phytoplankton-derived carbon using carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes measured in muscle tissue. Benthic-foraging kelp greenling (Hexagrammos decagrammus) and pelagic-foraging black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) were collected at eight sites spanning ∼35 to 60°N from the California Current (upwelling) to Alaska Coastal Current (downwelling) in the northeast Pacific Ocean. Muscle δ13C values were expected to be higher for fish tissue primarily derived from kelp, a benthic macroalgae, and lower for tissue primarily derived from phytoplankton, pelagic microalgae. Muscle δ13C values were higher in benthic-feeding kelp greenling than in pelagic-feeding black rockfish at seven of eight sites, indicating more kelp-derived carbon in greenling as expected. Estimates of kelp carbon contributions ranged from 36 to 89% in kelp greenling and 32 to 65% in black rockfish using carbon isotope mixing models. Isotopic evidence suggests that these two nearshore fishes routinely derive energy from kelp and phytoplankton, across coastal upwelling and downwelling systems. Thus, the foraging mode of nearshore predators has a small influence on their ultimate energy source as energy produced by benthic macroalgae and pelagic microalgae were incorporated in fish tissue regardless of feeding mode and suggest strong and widespread benthic-pelagic coupling. Widespread kelp contributions to benthic- and pelagic-feeding fishes suggests that kelp energy provides a benefit to nearshore fishes and highlights the potential for kelp and fish production to be linked.

  9. The effect of realistic nuclear charge distributions on isotope shifts and towards the extraction of higher order nuclear radial moments

    CERN Document Server

    Papoulia, A; Ekman, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atomic spectral lines from different isotopes display a small shift in energy, commonly referred to as the line isotope shift. One of the components of the isotope shift is the field shift, which depends on the extent and the shape of the nuclear charge density distribution. Purpose: To investigate how sensitive field shifts are with respect to variations in the nuclear size and shape and what information of nuclear charge distributions that can be extracted from measured field shifts. Methods: Nuclear properties are obtained from nuclear density functional theory calculations based on the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach. These results are combined with multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock methods to obtain realistic field shifts. Results: Phenomena such as nuclear deformation and variations in the diffuseness of nuclear charge distributions give measurable contributions to the field shifts. Using a novel approach, we demonstrate the possibility to extract new information concerning the n...

  10. Isotope shifts of natural Sr+ measured by laser fluorescence in a sympathetically cooled Coulomb crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubost, B.; Dubessy, R.; Szymanski, B.; Guibal, S.; Likforman, J.-P.; Guidoni, L.

    2014-03-01

    We measured by laser spectroscopy the isotope shifts between naturally occurring even isotopes of strontium ions for both the 5s2S1/2→5p2P1/2 (violet) and the 4d2D3/2→5p2P1/2 (infrared) dipole-allowed optical transitions. Fluorescence spectra were taken by simultaneous measurements on a two-component Coulomb crystal in a linear Paul trap containing 103-104 laser-cooled Sr+ ions. The isotope shifts are extracted from the experimental spectra by fitting the data with the analytical solution of the optical Bloch equations describing a three-level atom interacting with two laser beams. This technique allowed us to increase the precision with respect to previously reported data obtained by optogalvanic spectroscopy or fast atomic-beam techniques. The results for the 5s2S1/2→5p2P1/2 transition are ν88-ν84=+378(4) MHz and ν88-ν86=+170(3) MHz, in agreement with previously reported measurements. In the case of the previously unexplored 4d2D3/2→5p2P1/2 transition we find ν88-ν84=-828(4) MHz and ν88-ν86=-402(2) MHz. These results provide more data for stringent tests of theoretical calculations of the isotope shifts of alkali-metal-like atoms. Moreover, they simplify the identification and the addressing of Sr+ isotopes for ion frequency standards or quantum-information-processing applications in the case of multi-isotope ion strings.

  11. Calculations of the vibrational frequency and isotopic shift of UF6 and U2F6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yun-Guang; Zha Xin-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Molecular structure,vibrational frequency and infrared intensity of UF6 are investigated by using the revised Perdew-Burke-Enzerhof function with the triple-zeta polarized basis set.The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental values and indicate the existence of a stable U2F6 molecule with a multiple bonded U2 unit.The calculation results also predict that the D3d symmetry of U2F6 is more stable than D3h.The optimized geometries,vibrational frequencies,and infrared intensities are also reported for U2F6 molecules in D3d symmetry.In addition,the isotopic shift of vibrational frequencies of the two molecules under isotopic substitution of uranium atom are also investigated with the same method.The U2F6 molecule is predicted to be better than UF6 for laser uranic isotope separation.

  12. Ab Initio Calculations of Deuterium Isotope Effects on Chemical Shifts of Salt-Bridged Lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Saif; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Williamson, Mike P.;

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation....... This method enables the determination of both the electronic and the protonic (deuteronic) wave functions simultaneously and can directly calculate the geometrical difference induced by H/D isotope effects. The calculations show that the one-bond deuterium isotope effects on 15N nuclear shielding, 1Δ15N......(D), in ammonium and amines decrease as a counterion or water molecule moves closer to the nitrogen. 1Δ15N(D) and 2Δ1H(D) of the NH3+ groups of lysine residues in the B1 domain of protein G have been calculated using truncated side chains and also determined experimentally by NMR. Comparisons show...

  13. Isotope shifts of 6s5d $^3$D-states in neutral Barium

    CERN Document Server

    Dammalapati, U; Jungmann, K; Willmann, L

    2008-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the low lying $^1$P and $^3$D states in atomic barium has been performed. This work contributes substantially to the development of an effective laser cooling and trapping for heavy alkaline earth elements and aims in particular for a better understanding of the atomic wave function of these systems. Isotope shifts and hyperfine structures are ideal probes for the wave functions at the position of the nucleus. This is essential input for a theoretical evaluation of the sensitivity to fundamental symmetry breaking properties like permanent electric dipole moments. We report the first isotope shift measurements of the $^3$D$_{1,2}$-$^1$P$_1$ transitions. A deviation of the King plot from its expected behavior has been observed. Further we have optically resolved the hyperfine structure of the $^3$D$_{1,2}$ states.

  14. Isotope shifts in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazé, C.; Verdebout, S. [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Rynkun, P.; Gaigalas, G. [Vilnius University, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Godefroid, M., E-mail: mrgodef@ulb.ac.be [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Jönsson, P. [Group for Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, 205-06 Malmö (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Energy levels, normal and specific mass shift parameters as well as electronic densities at the nucleus are reported for numerous states along the beryllium, boron, carbon, and nitrogen isoelectronic sequences. Combined with nuclear data, these electronic parameters can be used to determine values of level and transition isotope shifts. The calculation of the electronic parameters is done using first-order perturbation theory with relativistic configuration interaction wavefunctions that account for valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects as zero-order functions. Results are compared with experimental and other theoretical values, when available.

  15. Discordant phylogenies suggest repeated host shifts in the Fusarium-Euwallacea ambrosia beetle mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sink, Stacy; Libeskind-Hadas, Ran; Hulcr, Jiri; Kasson, Matthew T; Ploetz, Randy C; Konkol, Joshua L; Ploetz, Jill N; Carrillo, Daniel; Campbell, Alina; Duncan, Rita E; Liyanage, Pradeepa N H; Eskalen, Akif; Na, Francis; Geiser, David M; Bateman, Craig; Freeman, Stanley; Mendel, Zvi; Sharon, Michal; Aoki, Takayuki; Cossé, Allard A; Rooney, Alejandro P

    2015-09-01

    -Dade County, Florida shared an identical cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) allele with Euwallacea validus, suggesting introgressive hybridization between these species and/or pseudogenous nature of this marker. Results of the present study highlight the importance of understanding the potential for and frequency of host-switching between Euwallacea and members of the AFC, and that these shifts may bring together more aggressive and virulent combinations of these invasive mutualists. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Shifting sediment sources in the world's longest river: A strontium isotope record for the Holocene Nile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jamie; Macklin, Mark; Fielding, Laura; Millar, Ian; Spencer, Neal; Welsby, Derek; Williams, Martin

    2015-12-01

    We have reconstructed long-term shifts in catchment sediment sources by analysing, for the first time, the strontium (Sr) and neodymium (Nd) isotope composition of dated floodplain deposits in the Desert Nile. The sediment load of the Nile has been dominated by material from the Ethiopian Highlands for much of the Holocene, but tributary wadis and aeolian sediments in Sudan and Egypt have also made major contributions to valley floor sedimentation. The importance of these sources has shifted dramatically in response to global climate changes. During the African Humid Period, before c. 4.5 ka, when stronger boreal summer insolation produced much higher rainfall across North Africa, the Nile floodplain in northern Sudan shows a tributary wadi input of 40-50%. Thousands of tributary wadis were active at this time along the full length of the Saharan Nile in Egypt and Sudan. As the climate became drier after 4.5 ka, the valley floor shows an abrupt fall in wadi inputs and a stronger Blue Nile/Atbara contribution. In the arid New Kingdom and later periods, in palaeochannel fills on the margins of the valley floor, aeolian sediments replace wadi inputs as the most important secondary contributor to floodplain sedimentation. Our sediment source data do not show a measurable contribution from the White Nile to the floodplain deposits of northern Sudan over the last 8500 years. This can be explained by the distinctive hydrology and sediment delivery dynamics of the upper Nile basin. High strontium isotope ratios observed in delta and offshore records - that were previously ascribed to a stronger White Nile input during the African Humid Period - may have to be at least partly reassessed. Our floodplain Sr records also have major implications for bioarchaeologists who carry out Sr isotope-based investigations of ancient human remains in the Nile Valley because the isotopic signature of Nile floodplain deposits has shifted significantly over time.

  17. Stable Isotopic Shifts in Fish Bones from Multiple Archeological Coastal Middens in Penobscot Bay, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C.; Johnson, B.; Ambrose, W. G.; Bourque, B.; Dostie, P.; Crowley, E.

    2010-12-01

    The carbon and nitrogen stable isotope compositions of collagen extracted from well-preserved archeological fish bones has the potential to provide useful information on fish diets and food web dynamics over time. Previous work on the Turner Farm archaeological site in Penobscot Bay, Gulf of Maine, reveals significant shifts in fish diets have occurred since European colonization (post 1620’s). The objective of the present study was to analyze samples from other archaeological sites within Penobscot Bay to characterize the spatial extent of the isotopic shift measured at Turner Farm. Stratified cod, flounder, and sculpin bones were analyzed from eight coastal middens located approximately 50km apart from one another within Penobscot Bay. The bones were sampled from three time horizons (0kya, 0.5-1kya, and 2.2-2.4kya). All bone samples were demineralized in 0.2M HCl at 4°C for 2 to 7 days and then extracted in 0.25M NaOH at 4°C for 1 to 2 hours. After freeze-drying, the bulk isotopic composition of each sample was analyzed using the EA-IRMS. In all stratigraphic horizons analyzed, cod were more enriched in δ13C and δ15N than sculpin, and flounder were the most depleted in δ13C and δ15N . However, the isotopic offsets between the fish species decreased from 2.4kya to the present. The nitrogen isotope composition was relatively constant over time and space for all species, implying that trophic levels for the fishes analyzed have not changed significantly in Penobscot Bay for the last 2,400 years. The carbon isotope composition also appears to be constant spatially in Penobscot Bay, however, the modern signal was more depleted than the paleo signal in all three species. The difference between the modern and paleo δ13C is ~5‰ for cod and flounder, and ~9‰ for sculpin. These shifts may, in part, be explained by decreases in both primary producer and prey species diversity, as kelp forests replace eelgrass beds in the Gulf of Maine.

  18. Isotope shifts of natural Sr+ measured by laser fluorescence in a sympathetically cooled Coulomb crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Dubost, Brice; Szymanski, Benjamin; Guibal, Samuel; Likforman, Jean-Pierre; Guidoni, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We measured by laser spectroscopy the isotope shifts between naturally-occurring even-isotopes of strontium ions for both the $5s\\,\\,^2S_{1/2}\\to 5p\\,\\,^2P_{1/2}$ (violet) and the $4d\\,\\,^2D_{3/2}\\to 5p\\,\\,^2P_{1/2}$ (infrared) dipole-allowed optical transitions. Fluorescence spectra were taken by simultaneous measurements on a two-component Coulomb crystal in a linear Paul trap containing $10^3$--$10^4$ laser-cooled Sr$^+$ ions. The isotope shifts are extracted from the experimental spectra by fitting the data with the analytical solution of the optical Bloch equations describing a three-level atom in interaction with two laser beams. This technique allowed us to increase the precision with respect to previously reported data obtained by optogalvanic spectroscopy or fast atomic-beam techniques. The results for the $5s\\,\\,^2S_{1/2}\\to 5p\\,\\,^2P_{1/2}$ transition are $\

  19. Macroevolutionary data suggest a role for reinforcement in pollination system shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, van der T.; Johnson, S.D.; Linder, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    Reproductive isolation can evolve either as a by-product of divergent selection or through reinforcement. We used the Cape flora of South Africa, known for its high level of pollination specialization, as a model system to test the potential role of shifts in pollination system in the speciation

  20. Macroevolutionary data suggest a role for reinforcement in pollination system shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, van der T.; Johnson, S.D.; Linder, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    Reproductive isolation can evolve either as a by-product of divergent selection or through reinforcement. We used the Cape flora of South Africa, known for its high level of pollination specialization, as a model system to test the potential role of shifts in pollination system in the speciation pro

  1. Stable water isotopes suggest sub-canopy water recycling in a northern forested catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark B. Green; Bethany K. Laursen; John L. Campbell; Kevin J. McGuire; Eric P. Kelsey

    2015-01-01

    Stable water isotopes provide a means of tracing many hydrologic processes, including poorly understood dynamics like soil water interactions with the atmosphere. We present a four-year dataset of biweekly water isotope samples from eight fluxes and stores in a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA. We use Dansgaard's...

  2. Isotope shift calculations for D lines of stable and short-lived lithium nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Geng-Hua; Zhao, Peng-Yi; Xu, Bing-Ming; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Ling

    2016-11-01

    The isotope shifts (ISs) for the 2s2S1/2 to 2p2P J (J = 1/2, 3/2) transitions of the lithium nuclei including the stable and short-lived isotopes are calculated based on the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method and the relativistic configuration interaction approach. The results are in good agreement with the previous theoretical and experimental results within a deviation less than 0.05%. The methods used here could be applied to the IS calculations for other heavier Li-like ions and few-electron systems. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304093), the Fund of the Scientific Research Foundation of Sichuan Provincial Department of Education, China (Grant No. 15ZB0386), and the Fund of the 1315 Project of Chengdu University, China (Grant No. 2081915041).

  3. Carbon isotope ratios suggest no additional methane from boreal wetlands during the rapid Greenland Interstadial 21.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Peter; Schaefer, Hinrich; Mikaloff Fletcher, Sara; Guillevic, Myriam; Lassey, Keith; Sapart, Célia; Röckmann, Thomas; Blunier, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Samples from two Greenland ice cores (NEEM and NGRIP) have been measured for methane carbon isotope ratios (delta 13C-CH4) to investigate the CH4 mixing ratio anomaly during Greenland Interstadial (GI) 21.2 (85,000 years before present). This extraordinarily rapid event occurred within 150 years, comprising a CH4 mixing ratio pulse of 150 ppb (˜25%). Our new measurements disclose a concomitant shift in delta 13C-CH4 of 1‰ . Keeling plot analyses reveal the delta 13C of the additional CH4 source constituting the CH4 anomaly as -56.8 ± 2.8‰ , which we confirm by means of a previously published box model. We propose tropical wetlands as the most probable additional CH4 source during GI-21.2 and present independent evidence that suggests that tropical wetlands in South America and Asia have played a key role. We find no evidence that boreal CH4 sources, such as permafrost degradation, contributed significantly to the atmospheric CH4 increase, despite the pronounced warming in the Northern Hemisphere during GI-21.2.

  4. New lifetime measurements in the stable semimagic Sn isotopes using the Doppler-shift attenuation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungclaus, A.; Walker, J.; Leske, J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Stuchbery, A. E.; East, M.; Boutachkov, P.; Cederkäll, J.; Doornenbal, P.; Egido, J. L.; Ekström, A.; Gerl, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Maier-Komor, P.; Modamio, V.; Naqvi, F.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H.; Schwengner, R.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2011-09-01

    Precise measurements of lifetimes in the picosecond range of excited states in the stable even-A Sn isotopes 112,114,116,122Sn have been performed using the Doppler shift attenuation technique. For the first excited 2+ states in 112Sn, 114Sn and 116Sn the E2 transition strengths deduced from the measured lifetimes are in disagreement with the previously adopted values. They indicate a shallow minimum at N = 66 in contrast to the maximum at mid-shell predicted by modern shell model calculations.

  5. The Sagnac Phase Shift Suggested by the Aharonov-Bohm Effect for Relativistic Matter Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Guido; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2003-10-01

    The phase shift due to the Sagnac Effect, for relativistic matter beams counter-propagating in a rotating interferometer, is deduced on the bases of a formal analogy with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. A procedure outlined by Sakurai, in which non relativistic quantum mechanics and Newtonian physics appear together with some intrinsically relativistic elements, is generalized to a fully relativistic context, using the Cattaneo's splitting technique. This approach leads to an exact derivation, in a self-consistently relativistic way, of the Sagnac effect. Sakurai's result is recovered in the first order approximation.

  6. The Sagnac Phase Shift suggested by the Aharonov-Bohm effect for relativistic matter beams

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, G; Rizzi, Guido; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2003-01-01

    The phase shift due to the Sagnac Effect, for relativistic matter beams counter-propagating in a rotating interferometer, is deduced on the bases of a a formal analogy with the the Aharonov-Bohm effect. A procedure outlined by Sakurai, in which non relativistic quantum mechanics and newtonian physics appear together with some intrinsically relativistic elements, is generalized to a fully relativistic context, using the Cattaneo's splitting technique. This approach leads to an exact derivation, in a self-consistently relativistic way, of the Sagnac effect. Sakurai's result is recovered in the first order approximation.

  7. Stable isotopes reveal habitat-related diet shifts in facultative deposit-feeders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Baeta, Alexandra; Marques, João C.

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass patches interspersed in a sediment matrix may vary environmental conditions and affect feeding habits of consumers and food-web structure. This paper investigates diet shifts between bare sediments and a Zostera noltei (Hornemann, 1832) meadow for three facultative deposit-feeding macrofaunal consumers, notably the bivalve Scrobicularia plana (da Costa, 1778), the polychaete Hediste diversicolor (O.T. Müller, 1776), and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant, 1778). In July 2008, one eelgrass meadow and two bare sediment locations were chosen in the Mondego estuary (40° 08″ N, 8° 50‧ W, Portugal) and sampled for stable isotope signatures (δ13C and δ15N) of macrofauna consumers and some of their potential basal food sources, such as sedimentary organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos (MPB), seagrass shoots, leaves and seaweeds laying on the surface sediment. The δ15N of H. diversicolor was 3‰ higher in the eelgrass meadow than in bare sediment, indicating a change of trophic position, whereas the Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model showed that S. plana assimilated more macroalgal detritus than microphytobenthos in the eelgrass bed. Such habitat-related diet shifts have the potential to change structure and spatial dynamics of benthic food webs.

  8. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Tamim A., E-mail: tamim.darwish@ansto.gov.au [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J. [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); James, Michael [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual {sup 1}H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D{sub 2}O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary {sup 13}C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing {sup 13}C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve {sup 13}C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ({sup 1}H, {sup 2}H) resolves closely separated quaternary {sup 13}C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. - Graphical abstract: The relative intensities of quaternary {sup 13}C {"1H,"2H} resonances are equal despite the different relaxation delays, allowing the relative abundance of the different deuterated isotopologues to be calculated using NMR fast

  9. Iodine-to-calcium ratios in carbonates suggest a primary origin for the Precambrian Lomagundi and Shuram carbon isotope excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardisty, D. S.; Lu, Z.; Planavsky, N. J.; Osburn, M. R.; Bekker, A.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Systematic increases in iodine-to-calcium ratios (I/Ca) in carbonates from both the Precambrian Lomagundi and Shuram carbonate carbon isotope (δ13Ccarb) excursion intervals suggest primary origins for these events. Iodate (IO3-), the oxidized iodine species, is the exclusive species incorporated into carbonates. The high redox sensitivity of IO3- to deoxygenation requires highly oxidizing fluids for IO3- production, making I/Ca in platform carbonates a simple indicator of the presence of oxidizing fluids in the surface ocean. Similarly, redox sensitivity makes the proxy host susceptible to diagenetic iodine loss during carbonate recrystallization in reducing pore fluids. Recent work has shown carbonates to experience near-complete iodine loss during dolomitization in the Permian, and work from our group evaluating modern and recent carbonates demonstrate the potential for diagenetic iodine loss during carbonate recrystallization. In some cases, however, such as meteoric aragonite-to-calcite transitions, oxidizing pore fluids have the potential to buffer IO3- concentrations, causing negligible alteration to primary I/Ca despite negative shifts in δ13Ccarb. These results highlight that diagenetic alterations to I/Ca and δ13Ccarb need not always be coupled, but importantly, no observed scenario promotes post-depositional addition of iodine to carbonates. This means that, independent of δ13Ccarb, systematic, stratigraphic increases in I/Ca ratios observed in the carbonate record are most easily interpreted as resulting from depositional controls such as surface ocean redox or shifts in the total marine iodine reservoir. From this, increasing I/Ca ratios coincident with rising and falling δ13Ccarb trends for the Paleoproterozic Lomagundi and Neoproterozoic Shuram events, respectively, support suggestions of a primary origin for the δ13Ccarb excursions. Significant increase in I/Ca in dolomites deposited during the Lomagundi excursion, rising from blank values in

  10. Compound specific isotopic fractionation patterns suggest different carbon metabolisms among Chloroflexus-like bacteria in hot spring microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Meer, M.T.J. van der; Schouten, S.; Leeuw, J.W. de; Ward, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope fractionations between dissolved inorganic carbon and lipid biomarkers suggest photoautotrophy by Chloroflexus-like organisms in sulfidic and nonsulfidic Yellowstone hot springs. Where co-occurring, cyanobacteria appear to cross-feed Chloroflexus-like organisms supporting photo

  11. Further evidence for three-nucleon spin-orbit interaction in isotope shifts of $Z=\\mathrm{magic}$ nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nakada, H

    2015-01-01

    We pointed out [Phys. Rev. C \\textbf{91}, 021302(R)] that the isotope shifts of the Pb nuclei, the kink at $N=126$ in particular, can be well described by the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations if a density-dependent LS interaction derived from the $3N$ interaction is incorporated. Effects of the density-dependence in the LS channel on the isotope shifts are extensively investigated for the Ca, Ni and Sn isotopes, using the semi-realistic M3Y-P6 interaction and its LS modified variant M3Y-P6a, as in the Pb case. It is found that almost equal charge radii between $^{40}$Ca and $^{48}$Ca are reproduced, as well as the isotope shifts in a long chain of the Sn nuclei, owing to the density-dependence in the LS channel. A kink is predicted at $N=82$ for the isotope shifts of the Sn nuclei, in clear contrast to the interactions without the density-dependence.

  12. Isotope shifts of the 2$p_{3/2}$-2$p_{1/2}$ transition in B-like ions

    CERN Document Server

    Zubova, N A; Tupitsyn, I I; Shabaev, V M; Kozhedub, Y S; Plunien, G; Brandau, C; Stohlker, Th

    2016-01-01

    Isotope shifts of the 2$p_{3/2}$-2$p_{1/2}$ transition in B-like ions are evaluated for a wide range of the nuclear charge number: Z=8-92. The calculations of the relativistic nuclear recoil and nuclear size effects are performed using a large scale configuration-interaction Dirac-Fock-Sturm method. The corresponding QED corrections are also taken into account. The results of the calculations are compared with the theoretical values obtained with other methods. The accuracy of the isotope shifts of the 2$p_{3/2}$-2$p_{1/2}$ transition in B-like ions is significantly improved.

  13. Isotope shifts of the 2 p3 /2-2 p1 /2 transition in B-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubova, N. A.; Malyshev, A. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Shabaev, V. M.; Kozhedub, Y. S.; Plunien, G.; Brandau, C.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-05-01

    Isotope shifts of the 2 p3 /2-2 p1 /2 transition in B-like ions are evaluated for a wide range of the nuclear charge number: Z =8 -92 . The calculations of the relativistic nuclear recoil and nuclear size effects are performed using a large-scale configuration-interaction Dirac-Fock-Sturm method. The corresponding QED corrections are also taken into account. The results of the calculations are compared with the theoretical values obtained with other methods. The accuracy of the isotope shifts of the 2 p3 /2-2 p1 /2 transition in B-like ions is significantly improved.

  14. Line shift, line asymmetry, and the 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio determination

    CERN Document Server

    Cayrel, Roger; Chand, Hum; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Spite, Monique; Spite, François; Petitjean, Patrick; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta

    2007-01-01

    Context: Line asymmetries are generated by convective Doppler shifts in stellar atmospheres, especially in metal-poor stars, where convective motions penetrate to higher atmospheric levels. Such asymmetries are usually neglected in abundance analyses. The determination of the 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio is prone to suffering from such asymmetries, as the contribution of 6Li is a slight blending reinforcement of the red wing of each component of the corresponding 7Li line, with respect to its blue wing. Aims: The present paper studies the halo star HD 74000 and estimates the impact of convection-related asymmetries on the Li isotopic ratio determination. Method: Two methods are used to meet this aim. The first, which is purely empirical, consists in deriving a template profile from another element that can be assumed to originate in the same stellar atmospheric layers as Li I, producing absorption lines of approximately the same equivalent width as individual components of the 7Li I resonance line. The second metho...

  15. Stable isotopes suggest differences in diet between historic and reintroduced Przewalskís horses in the Gobi desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnik Šturm, Martina; Spasskaya, Natalia N.; Sablin, Mikhail V.; Voigt, Christian C.; Kaczensky, Petra

    2016-04-01

    In historic times, two wild equid species, the Przewalski᾽s horse (PH; Equus ferus przewalskii) and the Asiatic wild ass (khulan, KH; Equus hemionus), roamed the Eurasian steppes. By the end of the 1960s, PHs had been driven to extinction in the wild and the range of KHs became severely restricted to the least productive habitats. However, PHs survived in captivity and reintroductions since the 1990s have brought the species back to parts of its native range in Mongolia and northern China where they again overlap with KHs. Ecological research on PHs and KHs has increased in recent years, but very little information is available on the ecology of the original PHs prior to extinction in the wild. We applied stable isotope analysis (13C, 15N, and 2H) of segmentally cut tail hair of PHs and KHs, collected during expeditions in NW China and SW Mongolia in 1889-1899, to draw inferences about the species feeding ecology. We compared tail hair isotope patterns of historic individuals to those of their extant counterparts from the Mongolian Gobi. A previous study of isotopic tail hair signatures of extant PHs (N=6) and KHs (N=6) suggested species specific differences in diet, with PHs being year-round grazers, but KHs switching between being grazers in summer and mixed feeders in winter (Burnik Šturm et al., in prep.). The comparison of isotope patterns of extant with historic samples confirms diet seasonality in historic KHs (N=3), but detects the same seasonality in five out of six PHs, suggesting that historic PHs had a different isotopic dietary niche than extant PHs. While we are still unable to fully understand the underlying reasons for this change in PHs, our results clearly suggest that the isotopic dietary niche of PHs was wider in the past, suggesting a higher diet flexibility, and overlapped with that of KHs, suggesting a high competition potential over Gobi pastures between the two equid species in historic times. Reference: Burnik Šturm, M., Ganbaatar, O

  16. Tree demography suggests multiple directions and drivers for species range shifts in mountains of Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wason, Jay W; Dovciak, Martin

    2016-12-09

    Climate change is expected to lead to upslope shifts in tree species distributions, but the evidence is mixed partly due to land-use effects and individualistic species responses to climate. We examined how individual tree species demography varies along elevational climatic gradients across four states in the northeastern United States to determine whether species elevational distributions and their potential upslope (or downslope) shifts were controlled by climate, land-use legacies (past logging), or soils. We characterized tree demography, microclimate, land-use legacies, and soils at 83 sites stratified by elevation (~500 to ~1200 m above sea level) across 12 mountains containing the transition from northern hardwood to spruce-fir forests. We modeled elevational distributions of tree species saplings and adults using logistic regression to test whether sapling distributions suggest ongoing species range expansion upslope (or contraction downslope) relative to adults, and we used linear mixed models to determine the extent to which climate, land use, and soil variables explain these distributions. Tree demography varied with elevation by species, suggesting a potential upslope shift only for American beech, downslope shifts for red spruce (more so in cool regions) and sugar maple, and no change with elevation for balsam fir. While soils had relatively minor effects, climate was the dominant predictor for most species and more so for saplings than adults of red spruce, sugar maple, yellow birch, cordate birch, and striped maple. On the other hand, logging legacies were positively associated with American beech, sugar maple, and yellow birch, and negatively with red spruce and balsam fir - generally more so for adults than saplings. All species exhibited individualistic rather than synchronous demographic responses to climate and land use, and the return of red spruce to lower elevations where past logging originally benefited northern hardwood species indicates

  17. Isotopic ordering in eggshells reflects body temperatures and suggests differing thermophysiology in two Cretaceous dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Robert A.; Enriquez, Marcus; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Hu, David; Tütken, Thomas; Montanari, Shaena; Loyd, Sean J.; Ramirez, Pedro; Tripati, Aradhna K.; Kohn, Matthew J.; Cerling, Thure E.; Chiappe, Luis M.; Eiler, John M.

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary transitions leading to the modern endothermic state of birds and mammals is incomplete, partly because tools available to study the thermophysiology of extinct vertebrates are limited. Here we show that clumped isotope analysis of eggshells can be used to determine body temperatures of females during periods of ovulation. Late Cretaceous titanosaurid eggshells yield temperatures similar to large modern endotherms. In contrast, oviraptorid eggshells yield temperatures lower than most modern endotherms but ~6 °C higher than co-occurring abiogenic carbonates, implying that this taxon did not have thermoregulation comparable to modern birds, but was able to elevate its body temperature above environmental temperatures. Therefore, we observe no strong evidence for end-member ectothermy or endothermy in the species examined. Body temperatures for these two species indicate that variable thermoregulation likely existed among the non-avian dinosaurs and that not all dinosaurs had body temperatures in the range of that seen in modern birds.

  18. Changes in Sport Fish Mercury Concentrations from Food Web Shifts Suggest Partial Decoupling from Atmospheric Deposition in Two Colorado Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Brian A; Johnson, Brett M; Lepak, Jesse M

    2017-02-01

    Partial decoupling of mercury (Hg) loading and observed Hg concentrations ([Hg]) in biotic and abiotic samples has been documented in aquatic systems. We studied two Colorado reservoirs to test whether shifts in prey for sport fish would lead to changes in [Hg] independent of external atmospheric Hg deposition. We compared sport fish total mercury concentrations ([T-Hg]) and macroinvertebrate (chironomids and crayfish) methylmercury concentrations ([MeHg]) before and after food web shifts occurred in both reservoirs. We also monitored wet atmospheric Hg deposition and sediment [T-Hg] and [MeHg] at each reservoir. We found rapid shifts in Hg bioaccumulation in each reservoir's sport fish, and these changes could not be attributed to atmospheric Hg deposition. Our study shows that trends in atmospheric deposition, environmental samples (e.g., sediments), and samples of species at the low trophic levels (e.g., chironomids and crayfish) may not accurately reflect conditions that result in fish consumption advisories for high trophic level sport fish. We suggest that in the short-term, monitoring fish [Hg] is necessary to adequately protect human health because natural and anthropogenic perturbations to aquatic food-webs that affect [Hg] in sport fish will continue regardless of trends in atmospheric deposition.

  19. Precision isotope shift measurements in Ca$^+$ using highly sensitive detection schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Gebert, Florian; Wolf, Fabian; Angstmann, Christopher N; Berengut, Julian C; Schmidt, Piet O

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an efficient high-precision optical spectroscopy technique for single trapped ions with non-closed transitions. In a double-shelving technique, the absorption of a single photon is first amplified to several phonons of a normal motional mode shared with a co-trapped cooling ion of a different species, before being further amplified to thousands of fluorescence photons emitted by the cooling ion using the standard electron shelving technique. We employ this extension of the photon recoil spectroscopy technique to perform the first high precision absolute frequency measurement of the $^{2}$D$_{3/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{2}$P$_{1/2}$ transition in $^{40}$Ca$^{+}$, resulting in a transition frequency of $f=346\\, 000\\, 234\\, 867(96)$ kHz. Furthermore, we determine the isotope shift of this transition and the $^{2}$S$_{1/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{2}$P$_{1/2}$ transition for $^{42}$Ca$^{+}$, $^{44}$Ca$^{+}$ and $^{48}$Ca$^{+}$ ions relative to $^{40}$Ca$^{+}$ with an accuracy below 100 kHz. Improved field and ...

  20. Effect of realistic nuclear charge distributions on isotope shifts and progress towards the extraction of higher-order nuclear radial moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulia, A.; Carlsson, B. G.; Ekman, J.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic spectral lines from different isotopes display a small shift in energy, commonly referred to as the line isotope shift. One of the components of the isotope shift is the field shift, which depends on the extent and the shape of the nuclear charge density distribution. The purpose of this work is to investigate how sensitive field shifts are with respect to variations in the nuclear size and shape and what information of nuclear charge distributions can be extracted from measurements. Nuclear properties are obtained from nuclear density functional theory calculations based on the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach. These results are combined with multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock methods to obtain realistic field shifts and it is seen that phenomena such as nuclear deformation and variations in the diffuseness of nuclear charge distributions give measurable contributions to the isotope shifts. Using a different approach, we demonstrate the possibility to extract information concerning the nuclear charge densities from the observed field shifts. We deduce that combining methods used in atomic and nuclear structure theory gives an improved description of field shifts and that extracting additional nuclear information from measured isotope shifts is possible in the near future with improved experimental methods.

  1. Nuclear field shift effect as a possible cause of Te isotopic anomalies in the early solar system —An alternative explanation of Fehr et al. (2006 and 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, F.; Fujii, T.; Albarède, F.

    2009-12-01

    We explore the possibility that Te isotopic anomalies measured in Ca-Al-rich inclusions (Fehr et al. 2009) and in leachates of carbonaceous chondrites (Fehr et al. 2006) may be due to mass-independent effects controlled by nuclear field shift rather than to nucleosynthetic processes. Fehr et al.’s spectrum of mass-independent anomalies of Te isotopes shows a smooth correlation with mass number and nuclear charge distribution. Ratios of even to odd isotopes, as the 125Te/126Te ratio used by these authors for normalization are particularly prone to nuclear field shift effects. We show that the alternative normalization of isotopic ratios to 130Te/126Te strongly reduces the trend of isotopic fractionation with mass number, leaving only 125Te as truly anomalous. For both normalizations (125Te/126Te and 130Te/126Te), Fehr et al.’s results fit the theory of Bigeleisen (1996), which suggests that the nuclear field shift effect can potentially account for the observed Te isotope abundances, as an alternative to nucleosynthetic processes. We propose that these mass-independent effects may be acquired during accretion of sulfides from the solar nebula.

  2. Deuterium isotope shifts for backbone ¹H, ¹⁵N and ¹³C nuclei in intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in nature and characterization of their potential structural propensities remains a widely pursued but challenging task. Analysis of NMR secondary chemical shifts plays an important role in such studies, but the output of such analyses depends on the accuracy of reference random coil chemical shifts. Although uniform perdeuteration of IDPs can dramatically increase spectral resolution, a feature particularly important for the poorly dispersed IDP spectra, the impact of deuterium isotope shifts on random coil values has not yet been fully characterized. Very precise (2)H isotope shift measurements for (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (13)C', (15)N, and (1)H(N) have been obtained by using a mixed sample of protonated and uniformly perdeuterated α-synuclein, a protein with chemical shifts exceptionally close to random coil values. Decomposition of these isotope shifts into one-bond, two-bond and three-bond effects as well as intra- and sequential residue contributions shows that such an analysis, which ignores conformational dependence, is meaningful but does not fully describe the total isotope shift to within the precision of the measurements. Random coil (2)H isotope shifts provide an important starting point for analysis of such shifts in structural terms in folded proteins, where they are known to depend strongly on local geometry.

  3. Stable Isotopes Suggest Low Site Fidelity in Bar-headed Geese (Anser indicus) in Mongolia: Implications for Disease Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Eli S.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Xiao, Xiangming; Batbayar, Nyambayar; Natsagdorj, Tseveenmyadag; Hill, Nichola J.; Takekawa, John Y.; Hawkes, Lucy A.; Bishop, Charles M.; Butler, Patrick J.; Newman, Scott H.

    2016-01-01

    Population connectivity is an important consideration in studies of disease transmission and biological conservation, especially with regard to migratory species. Determining how and when different subpopulations intermingle during different phases of the annual cycle can help identify important geographical regions or features as targets for conservation efforts and can help inform our understanding of continental-scale disease transmission. In this study, stable isotopes of hydrogen and carbon in contour feathers were used to assess the degree of molt-site fidelity among Bar-headed Geese (Anser indicus) captured in north-central Mongolia. Samples were collected from actively molting Bar-headed Geese (n = 61), and some individual samples included both a newly grown feather (still in sheath) and an old, worn feather from the bird’s previous molt (n = 21). Although there was no difference in mean hydrogen isotope ratios for the old and new feathers, the isotopic variance in old feathers was approximately three times higher than that of the new feathers, which suggests that these birds use different and geographically distant molting locations from year to year. To further test this conclusion, online data and modeling tools from the isoMAP website were used to generate probability landscapes for the origin of each feather. Likely molting locations were much more widespread for old feathers than for new feathers, which supports the prospect of low molt-site fidelity. This finding indicates that population connectivity would be greater than expected based on data from a single annual cycle, and that disease spread can be rapid even in areas like Mongolia where Bar-headed Geese generally breed in small isolated groups. PMID:27695389

  4. Use of stable isotope analysis to determine of the timing of ontogenic habitat shifts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SAIP funding for stable isotope research was provided in FY11 and FY13; the FY11 funding was for loggerhead turtles (described below) as opposed to green turtles in...

  5. Carbon stable isotopic composition of soluble sugars in Tillandsia epiphytes varies in response to shifts in habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Laurel K; Erhardt, Erik B; Santiago, Louis S; Allen, Michael F

    2010-07-01

    We studied C stable isotopic composition (delta(13)C) of bulk leaf tissue and extracted sugars of four epiphytic Tillandsia species to investigate flexibility in the use of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and C(3) photosynthetic pathways. Plants growing in two seasonally dry tropical forest reserves in Mexico that differ in annual precipitation were measured during wet and dry seasons, and among secondary, mature, and wetland forest types within each site. Dry season sugars were more enriched in (13)C than wet season sugars, but there was no seasonal difference in bulk tissues. Bulk tissue delta(13)C differed by species and by forest type, with values from open-canopied wetlands more enriched in (13)C than mature or secondary forest types. The shifts within forest habitat were related to temporal and spatial changes in vapor pressure deficits (VPD). Modeling results estimate a possible 4% increase in the proportional contribution of the C(3) pathway during the wet season, emphasizing that any seasonal or habitat-mediated variation in photosynthetic pathway appears to be quite moderate and within the range of isotopic effects caused by variation in stomatal conductance during assimilation through the C(3) pathway and environmental variation in VPD. C isotopic analysis of sugars together with bulk leaf tissue offers a useful approach for incorporating short- and long-term measurements of C isotope discrimination during photosynthesis.

  6. Dietary shift after 3600 cal yr BP and its influencing factors in northwestern China: Evidence from stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Minmin; Dong, Guanghui; Jia, Xin; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yifu; Chen, Fahu

    2016-08-01

    Human diets rely on natural resource availability and can reflect social and cultural values. When environments, societies, and cultures change, diets may also shift. This study traced the extent of dietary change and the factors influencing such change. Through stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of late Neolithic and early Bronze Age human and animal bone collagen, we found that significant shifts in human diets were closely associated with intercontinental cultural exchanges in Eurasia and climate change in northwestern China. The isotopic evidence indicated that human diets mainly consisted of C4 foodstuffs (presumably millet and/or animals fed with C4 foods) around 4000 calibrated years before the present (cal yr BP), corresponding to the flourishing of millet agriculture in the context of the optimal climate conditions of the mid-Holocene. Subsequently, more C3 foods (probably wheat, barley, and animals fed with C3 foods) were added to human diets post-3600 cal yr BP when the climate became cooler and drier. Such dietary variation is also consistent with the increasing intensity of long-distance exchange after 4000 cal yr BP. While many factors can lead to human dietary shifts (e.g. climate change, population growth, cultural factors, and human migration), climate may have been a key factor in Gansu and Qinghai.

  7. Dietary shift after 3600 cal yr BP and its influencing factors in northwestern China: Evidence from stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Minmin; Dong, Guanghui; Jia, Xin; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yifu; Chen, Fahu

    2017-04-01

    :Human diets rely on natural resource availability and can reflect social and cultural values. When environments, societies, and cultures change, diets may also shift. This study traced the extent of dietary change and the factors influencing such change. Through stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of late Neolithic and early Bronze Age human and animal bone collagen, we found that significant shifts in human diets were closely associated with intercontinental cultural exchanges in Eurasia and climate change in northwestern China. The isotopic evidence indicated that human diets mainly consisted of C4 foodstuffs (presumably millet and/or animals fed with C4 foods) around 4000 calibrated years before the present (cal yr BP), corresponding to the flourishing of millet agriculture in the context of the optimal climate conditions of the mid-Holocene. Subsequently, more C3 foods (probably wheat, barley, and animals fed with C3 foods) were added to human diets post-3600 cal yr BP when the climate became cooler and drier. Such dietary variation is also consistent with the increasing intensity of long-distance exchange after 4000 cal yr BP. While many factors can lead to human dietary shifts (e.g. climate change, population growth, cultural factors, and human migration), climate may have been a key factor in Gansu and Qinghai.

  8. Dual stable isotopes of CH 4 from Yellowstone hot-springs suggest hydrothermal processes involving magmatic CO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, James J.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Jay, Zackary J.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Beam, Jacob P.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2017-07-01

    Volcanism and post-magmatism contribute both significant annual CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere (on par with other natural sources such as forest fire and wild animal emissions) and have been implicated in past climate-change events. The Yellowstone hot spot is one of the largest volcanic systems on Earth and is known to emit methane in addition to other greenhouse gases (e.g. carbon dioxide) but the ultimate source of this methane flux has not been elucidated. Here we use dual stable isotope analysis (δ2H and δ13C) of CH4(g) sampled from ten high-temperature geothermal pools in Yellowstone National Park to show that the predominant flux of CH4(g) is abiotic. The average δ13C and δ2H values of CH4(g) emitted from hot springs (-26.7 (±2.4) and -236.9 (±12.0) ‰, respectively) are not consistent with biotic (microbial or thermogenic) methane sources, but are within previously reported ranges for abiotic methane production. Correlation between δ13CCH4 and δ13C-dissolved inorganic C (DIC) also suggests that CO2 is a parent C source for the observed CH4(g). Moreover, CH4-CO2 isotopic geothermometry was used to estimate CH4(g) formation temperatures ranging from ~ 250 - 350°C, which is just below the temperature estimated for the hydrothermal reservoir and consistent with the hypothesis that subsurface, rock-water interactions are responsible for large methane fluxes from this volcanic system. An understanding of conditions leading to the abiotic production of methane and associated isotopic signatures are central to understanding the evolutionary history of deep carbon sources on Earth.

  9. Hyperfine structure and isotope shift of the D/sub 2/ line of /sup 118-145/Cs and some of their isomers

    CERN Document Server

    Thibault, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Duong, H T; Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pesnelle, A; Pillet, P; Pinard, J; Touchard, F; Vialle, J L

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution laser spectroscopy has been performed on /sup 118-145 /Cs and /sup 119m,121m,122m,130m,134m,135m,136m,138m/Cs. The Cs nuclei have been produced either by spallation of La or by fission of U by the 600 MeV proton beam, from the SC at CERN. The hyperfine structures, spins, and isotope shifts have been measured. The charge radii changes deduced from the isotope shifts exhibit shell effects at N=82, isomeric staggering for N=64,66,67 and a strong odd-even staggering for all isotopes with N<82. (24 refs).

  10. Ontogenetic shifts in the diet of plains hog-nosed snakes (Heterodon nasicus) revealed by stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Andrew M; Mullin, Stephen J

    2017-02-01

    Wild snake diets are difficult to study using traditional methods, but stable isotopes offer several advantages, including integrating dietary information over time, providing data from individuals that have not fed recently, and avoiding bias towards slowly-digesting prey items. We used stable isotope signatures of carbon and nitrogen from scale tissue, red blood cells, and blood plasma to assess the diet of wild plains hog-nosed snakes (Heterodon nasicus) in Illinois. We developed Bayesian mixing models which, taken together, predicted that H. nasicus shifted from a juvenile diet predominantly (31-63%) composed of six-lined racerunners (Aspidoscelis sexlineatus) and their eggs to an adult diet predominantly (44-56%) composed of eggs of the aquatic turtles Chrysemys picta and Chelydra serpentina, with a contribution from toads (Anaxyrus sp.; 6-27%) during their adolescent years. These results agreed with sparse data from gut contents. Combining traditional and isotopic techniques for studying the diets of wild snakes can increase the utility of both types of data.

  11. Stable Isotope and Signature Fatty Acid Analyses Suggest Reef Manta Rays Feed on Demersal Zooplankton: e77152

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lydie I E Couturier; Christoph A Rohner; Anthony J Richardson; Andrea D Marshall; Fabrice R A Jaine; Michael B Bennett; Kathy A Townsend; Scarla J Weeks; Peter D Nichols

    2013-01-01

    .... Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses of muscle tissue were used for the first time to examine assimilated diet of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, and were compared with different...

  12. Dietary back-calculation using stable isotopes: can activities of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism be used to improve estimates of trophic shifts in fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert; Abel, Hansjörg; Becker, Klaus

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess the effects of dietary protein content and feeding level on trophic shifts of C and N isotopes (Delta delta(13)C(tissue-diet) and Delta delta(15)N(tissue-diet)) and (2) to test whether the measurement of the activities of two enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids could improve the accuracy of estimation of the trophic shifts of C and N isotopes. For this, 36 Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were kept under controlled conditions for 8 weeks and fed at three different levels (2, 4 and 8 g kg(-0.8) d(-1)) with three diets differing in their protein content only (20, 29 and 39 %). For each fish, food to fish body trophic shifts of C and N isotopes were measured as well as the hepatic activities of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). The feeding level affected the activities of ASAT and GDH as well as the trophic shifts of C and N isotopes significantly but the dietary protein content had no significant effect except on the specific activity of ASAT. Fish fed at the lowest level had significantly higher trophic shifts of C and N isotopes than fish fed at higher levels. The trophic shifts were significantly lower in fish with a high protein utilisation. Values of the 'goodness-of-fit' for linear regressions between enzyme activities and trophic shifts were low. Thus, activities of ASAT and GDH are not suitable for predicting estimates of trophic shifts in situations where the amount of food consumed or the dietary protein content is not known. In further studies, activities of enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids combined with measurements of the activities of other enzymes should be used to try and improve the accuracy of estimates of trophic shifts.

  13. Integrating ontogenetic shift, growth and mortality to determine a species' ecological role from isotopic signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson F Fontoura

    Full Text Available Understanding species linkages and energy transfer is a basic goal underlying any attempt at ecosystem analysis. Although the first food-web studies were based on gut contents of captured specimens, the assessment of stable isotopes, mainly δ13C and δ15N, has become a standard methodology for wide-range analyses in the last 30 years. Stable isotopes provide information on the trophic level of species, food-web length, and origin of organic matter ingested by consumers. In this study, we analyzed the ontogenetic variability of δ13C and δ15N obtained from samples of three Neotropical fish species: silver sardine (Lycengraulis grossidens, n=46, white lambari (Cyanocharax alburnus, n= 26, and the red-tail lambari (Astyanax fasciatus, n=23 in Pinguela Lagoon, southern Brazil. We developed a new metric, called the Weighted Isotopic Signature (φ 15N or φ 13C, ‰, that incorporates ontogenetic variability, body growth, and natural mortality into a single number.

  14. Isotopic signatures suggest important contributions from recycled gasoline, road dust and non-exhaust traffic sources for copper, zinc and lead in PM10 in London, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuofei; Ochoa Gonzalez, Raquel; Harrison, Roy M.; Green, David; North, Robin; Fowler, Geoff; Weiss, Dominik

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of what controls the isotope composition of Cu, Zn and Pb in particulate matter (PM) in the urban environment and to develop these isotope systems as possible source tracers. To this end, isotope ratios (Cu, Zn and Pb) and trace element concentrations (Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Sb, Ba, Pb, Cr, Ni and V) were determined in PM10 collected at two road sites with contrasting traffic densities in central London, UK, during two weeks in summer 2010, and in potential sources, including non-combustion traffic emissions (tires and brakes), road furniture (road paint, manhole cover and road tarmac surface) and road dust. Iron, Ba and Sb were used as proxies for emissions derived from brake pads, and Ni, and V for emissions derived from fossil fuel oil. The isotopic composition of Pb (expressed using 206Pb/207Pb) ranged between 1.1137 and 1.1364. The isotope ratios of Cu and Zn expressed as δ65CuNIST976 and δ66ZnLyon ranged between -0.01‰ and +0.51‰ and between -0.21‰ and +0.33‰, respectively. We did not find significant differences in the isotope signatures in PM10 over the two weeks sampling period and between the two sites, suggesting similar sources for each metal at both sites despite their different traffic densities. The stable isotope composition of Pb suggests significant contribution from road dust resuspension and from recycled leaded gasoline. The Cu and Zn isotope signatures of tires, brakes and road dust overlap with those of PM10. The correlation between the enrichments of Sb, Cu, Ba and Fe in PM10 support the previously established hypothesis that Cu isotope ratios are controlled by non-exhaust traffic emission sources in urban environments (Ochoa Gonzalez et al., 2016). Analysis of the Zn isotope signatures in PM10 and possible sources at the two sites suggests significant contribution from tire wear. However, temporary additional sources, likely high temperature industrial emissions, need to be invoked

  15. Stable isotope and modelling evidence for CO2 as a driver of glacial–interglacial vegetation shifts in southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Bragg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 concentration is hypothesized to influence vegetation distribution via tree–grass competition, with higher CO2 concentrations favouring trees. The stable carbon isotope (δ13C signature of vegetation is influenced by the relative importance of C4 plants (including most tropical grasses and C3 plants (including nearly all trees, and the degree of stomatal closure – a response to aridity – in C3 plants. Compound-specific δ13C analyses of leaf-wax biomarkers in sediment cores of an offshore South Atlantic transect are used here as a record of vegetation changes in subequatorial Africa. These data suggest a large increase in C3 relative to C4 plant dominance after the Last Glacial Maximum. Using a process-based biogeography model that explicitly simulates 13C discrimination, it is shown that precipitation and temperature changes cannot explain the observed shift in δ13C values. The physiological effect of increasing CO2 concentration is decisive, altering the C3/C4 balance and bringing the simulated and observed δ13C values into line. It is concluded that CO2 concentration itself was a key agent of vegetation change in tropical southern Africa during the last glacial–interglacial transition. Two additional inferences follow. First, long-term variations in terrestrial δ13Cvalues are not simply a proxy for regional rainfall, as has sometimes been assumed. Although precipitation and temperature changes have had major effects on vegetation in many regions of the world during the period between the Last Glacial Maximum and recent times, CO2 effects must also be taken into account, especially when reconstructing changes in climate between glacial and interglacial states. Second, rising CO2 concentration today is likely to be influencing tree–grass competition in a similar way, and thus contributing to the "woody thickening" observed in savannas worldwide. This second inference points to the importance of experiments to

  16. Nitrogen isotopic evidence for a shift from nitrate- to diazotroph-fueled export production in VAHINE mesocosm experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Knapp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a shallow, coastal lagoon off the southwest coast of New Caledonia, large-volume (~ 50 m3 mesocosm experiments were undertaken to track the fate of newly fixed nitrogen (N. The mesocosms were intentionally fertilized with 0.8 μM dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP to stimulate diazotrophy. N isotopic evidence indicates that the dominant source of N fueling export production shifted from subsurface nitrate (NO3− assimilated prior to the start of the 23 day experiments to N2 fixation by the end of the experiments. While the δ15N of the sinking particulate N (PNsink flux changed during the experiments, the δ15N of the suspended PN (PNsusp and dissolved organic N (DON pools did not. This is consistent with previous observations that the δ15N of surface ocean N pools is less responsive than that of PNsink to changes in the dominant source of new N to surface waters. In spite of the absence of detectable NO3− in the mesocosms, the δ15N of PNsink indicated that NO3− continued to fuel a significant fraction of export production (20 to 60 % throughout the 23 day experiments, with N2 fixation dominating export after about two weeks. The low rates of primary productivity and export production during the first 14 days were primarily supported by NO3−, and phytoplankton abundance data suggest that export was driven by large diatoms sinking out of surface waters. Concurrent molecular and taxonomic studies indicate that the diazotroph community was dominated by diatom-diazotroph assemblages (DDAs at this time. However, these DDAs represented a minor fraction (2 fixation; they were thus not important for driving export production, either directly or indirectly. The unicellular cyanobacterial diazotroph, a Cyanothece-like UCYN-C, proliferated during the last phase of the experiments when N2 fixation, primary production, and the flux of PNsink increased significantly, and δ15N budgets reflected a predominantly diazotrophic source of N fueling

  17. Isotope shifts of the (3s3p) 3P0,1,2-(3s4s) 3S1 Mg I transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Therkildsen, Kasper T.; Jensen, Brian B.;

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the isotope shifts of the (3s3p)P30,1,2-(3s4s)S31 Mg I transitions for the stable isotopes M24g (I=0) , M25g (I=5/2) , and M26g (I=0) . Furthermore, the M25g S31 hyperfine coefficient A(S31)=(-321.6±1.5)MHz is extracted and found to be in excellent agreement with state...

  18. A role for prostaglandins in rapid cycling suggested by episode-specific gene expression shifts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurvich, Artem; Begemann, Martin; Dahm, Liane

    2014-01-01

    of prostaglandin synthesis-related genes in rapid cycling was first proposed. METHODS: Psychopathological follow-up of the reported case was performed under cessation of celecoxib treatment. In a prospective observational study, patients with bipolar disorder (n = 47; of these, four had rapid cycling......-gated ion channel 7 (P2RX7). RESULTS: The follow-up of our original case of a patient with rapid cycling who had shown impressive psychopathological improvement under celecoxib revealed complete loss of this effect upon discontinuation of the COX2 inhibitor. Episode-specific gene expression measurements...... with bipolar disorder and the 97 monopolar depressed patients, emphasizing the advantages of the rapid cycling condition with its rapid and frequent shifts for identification of gene expression changes. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports a role for prostaglandins in rapid cycling and advocates the cyclooxygenase...

  19. Toward a universal carbonate clumped isotope calibration: Diverse synthesis and preparatory methods suggest a single temperature relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelson, Julia R.; Huntington, Katharine W.; Schauer, Andrew J.; Saenger, Casey; Lechler, Alex R.

    2017-01-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope (Δ47) thermometry has been applied to a wide range of problems in earth, ocean and biological sciences over the last decade, but is still plagued by discrepancies among empirical calibrations that show a range of Δ47-temperature sensitivities. The most commonly suggested causes of these discrepancies are the method of mineral precipitation and analytical differences, including the temperature of phosphoric acid used to digest carbonates. However, these mechanisms have yet to be tested in a consistent analytical setting, which makes it difficult to isolate the cause(s) of discrepancies and to evaluate which synthetic calibration is most appropriate for natural samples. Here, we systematically explore the impact of synthetic carbonate precipitation by replicating precipitation experiments of previous workers under a constant analytical setting. We (1) precipitate 56 synthetic carbonates at temperatures of 4-85 °C using different procedures to degas CO2, with and without the use of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) to promote rapid dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) equilibration; (2) digest samples in phosphoric acid at both 90 °C and 25 °C; and (3) hold constant all analytical methods including acid preparation, CO2 purification, and mass spectrometry; and (4) reduce our data with 17O corrections that are appropriate for our samples. We find that the CO2 degassing method does not influence Δ47 values of these synthetic carbonates, and therefore probably only influences natural samples with very rapid degassing rates, like speleothems that precipitate out of drip solution with high pCO2. CA in solution does not influence Δ47 values in this work, suggesting that disequilibrium in the DIC pool is negligible. We also find the Δ47 values of samples reacted in 25 and 90 °C acid are within error of each other (once corrected with a constant acid fractionation factor). Taken together, our results show that the Δ47-temperature relationship

  20. The vibrational spectra of amides—II. The force field and isotopic shifts of N, N-dimethyl formamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, D.; Quatermain, A.

    The effects of 16O → 18O substitution on the vibrational frequencies of N, N-dimethylformamide have been studied. To understand these and the effects of previously measured shift data due to 13C, 2H and 15N ab initio calculations of frequencies and intensities have been carried out at the 3-21G level. Accord between theory and experiment is generally good. A surprising result is the prediction of a weak band near 2000 cm -1 in DMF due to in-plane interaction between the methyl umbrella modes and the anti-symmetric CN stretch. This abnormally high frequency is explained as arising due to the planar trigonal C 3N entity. Previous problems in reproducing isotope shifts are shown to be due to this mode being previously assigned near 1500 cm -1. The effects of suppressing reference to one of a set of internal valence angles involved in a redundancy are explored. It is shown that the principal effect is to add the diagonal quadratic constant for that coordinate to all other quadratic terms involving pairs of the angles involved in the redundancy. This results in large, almost equal, interaction constants amongst this set. Such effects are seen in the present work. The ab initio field is shown to be compatible with ab initio fields of mono N-methyl amides extant in the literature.

  1. Isotope shifts and transition frequencies for the S and P states of lithium: Bethe logarithms and second-order relativistic recoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. M.; Li, Chun; Yan, Z.-C.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2017-03-01

    Isotope shifts and total transition frequencies are calculated for the 2 2S-3 2S transition of the lithium isotopes 6Li, 7Li, 8Li, 9Li, and the halo nucleus 11Li. The accuracy is improved for previously calculated relativistic and quantum electrodynamic corrections, and in particular a disagreement for the Bethe logarithm is resolved for the ground 2S state. Our previous result is confirmed for the 2 2P state. We use the pseudostate expansion method to perform the sum over virtual intermediate states. Results for the second-order relativistic recoil term of order α2(μ/M ) 2 Ry are shown to make a significant contribution relative to the theoretical uncertainty, but because of accidental cancellations the final result for the isotope shift is nearly unchanged. However, the spin-orbit term makes an unexpectedly large contribution to the splitting isotope shift (SIS) for the 2 1/2 2P -2 3/2 2P fine structure, increasing the theoretical value for the 6Li-7Li isotopes to 0.556 31 (7 )±0.001 MHz. A comparison is made with high-precision measurements and other calculations for the SIS and for the total 2 2S-3 2S transition frequency.

  2. Measurement of the $^{20-22}$Ne $^3$P$_2$-$^3$D$_3$ transition isotope shift using a single, phase modulated laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Ohayon, Ben; Ron, Guy

    2016-01-01

    We develop a simple technique to accurately measure frequency differences between far lying resonances in a spectroscopy signal using a single laser. This technique was used to measure the isotope shift of the cooling transition of metastable neon for the result of $1626.264(79)$ MHz. The most accurate determination of this value to date.

  3. Laser spectroscopic measurement of isotope shifts of transitions 3d-4p in the ionic spectra of argon, chlorine and sulphur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, A.; Elbel, M.; Kamke, W.; Quad, R.; Bauche, J.

    1982-03-01

    By means of collinear laser spectroscopy at ion beams of Ar/sup +/, S/sup +/ and Cl/sup +/ the isotope shifts of a total of twelve lines could be measured. All the lines are of the type 3psup(n-1)3d..-->..3psup(n-1)4p (3psup(n) being the proper ground configuration of the ions). All the measured shifts are unusually large and prevailingly due to a strong specific mass effect or momentum correlation of the 3d electron with the inner p-shells. The measured shifts could be quantitatively reproduced by computation of the inherent Vinti integrals.

  4. Nitrogen isotopic evidence for a shift from nitrate- to diazotroph-fueled export production in the VAHINE mesocosm experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Angela N.; Fawcett, Sarah E.; Martínez-Garcia, Alfredo; Leblond, Nathalie; Moutin, Thierry; Bonnet, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    In a coastal lagoon with a shallow, 25 m water column off the southwest coast of New Caledonia, large-volume ( ˜ 50 m3) mesocosm experiments were undertaken to track the fate of newly fixed nitrogen (N). The mesocosms were intentionally fertilized with 0.8 µM dissolved inorganic phosphorus to stimulate diazotrophy. N isotopic evidence indicates that the dominant source of N fueling export production shifted from subsurface nitrate (NO3-) assimilated prior to the start of the 23-day experiments to N2 fixation by the end of the experiments. While the δ15N of the sinking particulate N (PNsink) flux changed during the experiments, the δ15N of the suspended PN (PNsusp) and dissolved organic N (DON) pools did not. This is consistent with previous observations that the δ15N of surface ocean N pools is less responsive than that of PNsink to changes in the dominant source of new N to surface waters. In spite of the absence of detectable NO3- in the mesocosms, the δ15N of PNsink indicated that NO3- continued to fuel a significant fraction of export production (20 to 60 %) throughout the 23-day experiments, with N2 fixation dominating export after about 2 weeks. The low rates of organic N export during the first 14 days were largely supported by NO3-, and phytoplankton abundance data suggest that sinking material primarily comprised large diatoms. Concurrent molecular and taxonomic studies indicate that the diazotroph community was dominated by diatom-diazotroph assemblages (DDAs) at this time. However, these DDAs represented a minor fraction (< 5 %) of the total diatom community and contributed very little new N via N2 fixation; they were thus not important for driving export production, either directly or indirectly. The unicellular cyanobacterial diazotroph, a Cyanothece-like UCYN-C, proliferated during the last phase of the experiments when N2 fixation, primary production, and the flux of PNsink increased significantly, and δ15N budgets reflected a predominantly

  5. Dual stable isotopes of CH4 from Yellowstone hot-springs suggest hydrothermal processes involving magmatic CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James J.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Jay, Zackary J.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Beam, Jacob P.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2017-07-01

    Volcanism and post-magmatism contribute significant annual methane (CH4) fluxes to the atmosphere (on par with other natural sources such as forest fire and wild animal emissions) and have been implicated in past climate-change events. The Yellowstone hot spot is one of the largest volcanic systems on Earth and is known to emit CH4 (as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gases), but the ultimate sources of this CH4 flux have not been elucidated. Here we use dual stable isotope analysis (δ2H and δ13C) of CH4 sampled from ten high-temperature geothermal pools in Yellowstone National Park along with other isotopic and gas analyses to evaluate potential sources of methane. The average δ13C and δ2H values of CH4 emitted from hot springs (26.7 (± 2.4) and - 236.9 (± 12.0) ‰, respectively) are inconsistent with microbial methanogenesis but do not allow distinction between thermogenic and abiotic sources. Correlation between δ13CCH4 and δ13C of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) is consistent with DIC as the parent C source for the observed CH4, or with equilibration of CH4 and DIC. Methane formation temperatures estimated by isotopic geothermometry based on δ13CCH4 and δ13CCO2 ranged from 250-350 °C, which is just below previous temperature estimates for the hydrothermal reservoir. Further, the δ2HH2O of the thermal springs and the measured δ2HCH4 values are consistent with equilibration between the source water and the CH4 at the formation temperatures. Though the ultimate origin of the CH4 could be attributed to either abiotic of themorgenic processes with subsequent isotopic equilibration, the C1/C2 + composition of the gases is more consistent with abiotic origins for most of the samples. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that subsurface rock-water interactions are responsible for at least a significant fraction of the CH4 flux from the Yellowstone National Park volcanic system.

  6. Isotope Shifts of the $6d\\,^2$D$_{3/2}\\,$ - $7p\\,^2$P$_{1/2}\\,$ Transition in Trapped Short-Lived $^{209-214}$Ra$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, G S; Berg, J E van den; Böll, O; Dammalapati, U; van der Hoek, D J; Jungmann, K; Kruithof, W L; Müller, S; Portela, M Nuñez; Onderwater, C J G; Santra, B; Timmermans, R G E; Wansbeek, L W; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2011-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of short-lived radium isotopes in a linear Paul trap has been performed. The isotope shifts of the $6d\\,^2$D$_{3/2}\\,$ - $7p\\,^2$P$_{1/2}\\,$ transition in $^{209-214}$Ra$^+$ were measured, which are sensitive to the short range part of the atomic wavefunctions. The results are essential experimental input for improving the precision of atomic structure calculation. This is indispensable for parity violation in Ra$^+$ aiming at the determination of the weak mixing angle.

  7. A 2000-year leaf wax-based hydrogen isotope record from Southeast Asia suggests low frequency ENSO-like teleconnections on a centennial timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamoah, Kweku A.; Chabangborn, Akkaneewut; Chawchai, Sakonvan; Schenk, Frederik; Wohlfarth, Barbara; Smittenberg, Rienk H.

    2016-09-01

    Limited understanding of the complex dynamics of the tropical monsoon exists, partly due to inadequate paleo (hydro)-climate proxy data from monsoonal regions. This study presents a 2000-year long record of hydrogen isotope values of leaf wax (δDwax) from a sedimentary sequence recovered from Lake Pa Kho, Northern Thailand. Evaluation of present day rainfall patterns and water isotope data indicates that δDwax reflects the amount of rainfall and is also influenced by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamics. Over the last 2000 years, wettest conditions occurred between ca. 700 AD and ca. 1000 AD, whereas the driest intervals lasted from ca. 50 BCE to ca. 700 AD and from ca. 1300 AD to ca. 1500 AD. Further investigations to establish the spatiotemporal variability of ENSO within the wider tropical Asian-Pacific realm over centennial timescales revealed a low-frequency-tripole pattern between mainland SE Asia (MSEA), the tropical West Pacific, and the central-eastern Pacific, with a wetter than normal MSEA during El Niño-like climate conditions. This pattern stands in contrast to the annual event where El Niño cause drier conditions in MSEA. We hypothesize that on centennial timescales the land-sea contrast, which drives monsoon intensity in MSEA, is modulated by the latitudinal shift of the Walker circulation and associated ENSO dynamics.

  8. Theoretical analysis of geometry and NMR isotope shift in hydrogen-bonding center of photoactive yellow protein by combination of multicomponent quantum mechanics and ONIOM scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori [Quantum Chemistry Division, Yokohama City University, Seto 22-2, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan)

    2014-11-14

    Multicomponent quantum mechanical (MC-QM) calculation has been extended with ONIOM (our own N-layered integrated molecular orbital + molecular mechanics) scheme [ONIOM(MC-QM:MM)] to take account of both the nuclear quantum effect and the surrounding environment effect. The authors have demonstrated the first implementation and application of ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) method for the analysis of the geometry and the isotope shift in hydrogen-bonding center of photoactive yellow protein. ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) calculation for a model with deprotonated Arg52 reproduced the elongation of O–H bond of Glu46 observed by neutron diffraction crystallography. Among the unique isotope shifts in different conditions, the model with protonated Arg52 with solvent effect reasonably provided the best agreement with the corresponding experimental values from liquid NMR measurement. Our results implied the availability of ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) to distinguish the local environment around hydrogen bonds in a biomolecule.

  9. Measurement of hyperfine structure and isotope shifts in the 580.56nm line of 142_145_146_148_150_Nd+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hong-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Istope shifts and hyperfine spectrum of singly ionized neodymium ion was measured by collinear fast-ion-beam laser spectroscopy. The hyperfine A constants and B constants are obtained for the (23230)o9/2 level and 4f45d6K9/2 level, respectively. The optical isotope shifts between seven isotopes in the 580.56 nm of 142-145;146;148;150hNd+ line are determined. The configuration admixtures for (23230)o9/2 level were quantitatively analysed to be 4f46p,4f35d2,and 4f35d6p with mixing coefficients of 67%, 5%,and 28%,respectively.

  10. Theoretical analysis of geometry and NMR isotope shift in hydrogen-bonding center of photoactive yellow protein by combination of multicomponent quantum mechanics and ONIOM scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2014-11-14

    Multicomponent quantum mechanical (MC_QM) calculation has been extended with ONIOM (our own N-layered integrated molecular orbital + molecular mechanics) scheme [ONIOM(MC_QM:MM)] to take account of both the nuclear quantum effect and the surrounding environment effect. The authors have demonstrated the first implementation and application of ONIOM(MC_QM:MM) method for the analysis of the geometry and the isotope shift in hydrogen-bonding center of photoactive yellow protein. ONIOM(MC_QM:MM) calculation for a model with deprotonated Arg52 reproduced the elongation of O-H bond of Glu46 observed by neutron diffraction crystallography. Among the unique isotope shifts in different conditions, the model with protonated Arg52 with solvent effect reasonably provided the best agreement with the corresponding experimental values from liquid NMR measurement. Our results implied the availability of ONIOM(MC_QM:MM) to distinguish the local environment around hydrogen bonds in a biomolecule.

  11. Electronic isotope shift factors for the Cu $4s \\; ^2S_{1/2} - 4p \\; ^2P^o_{3/2}$ line

    CERN Document Server

    Carette, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations have been performed to evaluate the electronic field and mass isotope shift factors of the Cu~I resonance line at $\\lambda = 324.8$~nm. A linear correlation between the mass factors and the transition energy is found for elaborate correlation models, allowing extrapolation to the observed frequency limit. The relativistic corrections to the recoil operator reduces the transition mass factor by 5~\\%.

  12. Suggested protocol for collecting, handling and preparing peat cores and peat samples for physical, chemical, mineralogical and isotopic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givelet, Nicolas; Le Roux, Gaël; Cheburkin, Andriy; Chen, Bin; Frank, Jutta; Goodsite, Michael E; Kempter, Heike; Krachler, Michael; Noernberg, Tommy; Rausch, Nicole; Rheinberger, Stefan; Roos-Barraclough, Fiona; Sapkota, Atindra; Scholz, Christian; Shotyk, William

    2004-05-01

    elements have led to the development of many analytical procedures which now permit the measurement of a wide range of elements in peat samples such as lead and lead isotope ratios, mercury, arsenic, antimony, silver, molybdenum, thorium, uranium, rare earth elements. Radiometric methods (the carbon bomb pulse of (14)C, (210)Pb and conventional (14)C dating) are combined to allow reliable age-depth models to be reconstructed for each peat profile.

  13. Nitrogen deposition to lakes in national parks of the western Great Lakes region: Isotopic signatures, watershed retention, and algal shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, William O.; Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska; Stottlemyer, Robert; Toczydlowski, David; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Edlund, Mark B.; Almendinger, James E.; Strock, Kristin E.; VanderMeulen, David; Elias, Joan E.; Saros, Jasmine E.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a primary source of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to undisturbed watersheds of the Great Lakes region of the U.S., raising concerns over whether enhanced delivery over recent decades has affected lake ecosystems. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) has been measuring Nr deposition in this region for over 35 years. Here we explore the relationships among NADP-measured Nr deposition, nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N) in lake sediments, and the response of algal communities in 28 lakes situated in national parks of the western Great Lakes region of the U.S. We find that 36% of the lakes preserve a sediment δ15N record that is statistically correlated with some form of Nr deposition (total dissolved inorganic N, nitrate, or ammonium). Furthermore, measured long-term (since 1982) nitrogen biogeochemistry and inferred critical nitrogen loads suggest that watershed nitrogen retention and climate strongly affect whether sediment δ15N is related to Nr deposition in lake sediment records. Measurements of algal change over the last ~ 150 years suggest that Nr deposition, in-lake nutrient cycling, and watershed inputs are important factors affecting diatom community composition, in addition to direct climatic effects on lake physical limnology. The findings suggest that bulk sediment δ15N does reflect Nr deposition in some instances. In addition, this study highlights the interactive effects of Nr deposition and climate variability.

  14. Novel shifts in memory research and their impact on the legal process: introduction to the special issue on memory formation and suggestibility in the legal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Sauerland, Melanie; Petrila, John P

    2013-01-01

    The functioning and frailties of memory are frequently at the centerpiece of much expert testimony about the reliability of eyewitness accounts. Although we have much knowledge about how false memories and suggestibility can affect testimonies, the contributions in this special issue show that when using a sound theoretical framework, novel directions in this field can surface. The papers in this issue can broadly be divided into contributions that are related to: (1) the exact determinants of false memory and suggestibility; (2) new paradigms in legal psychology; (3) positive consequences of memory illusions; and (4) developmental false memory research. Collectively, these contributions have the potential to provide novel shifts in memory research and push this field beyond its current boundaries.

  15. Fossil mice and rats show isotopic evidence of niche partitioning and change in dental ecomorphology related to dietary shift in Late Miocene of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuri; Jacobs, Louis L; Cerling, Thure E; Uno, Kevin T; Ferguson, Kurt M; Flynn, Lawrence J; Patnaik, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis in tooth enamel is a well-established approach to infer C3 and C4 dietary composition in fossil mammals. The bulk of past work has been conducted on large herbivorous mammals. One important finding is that their dietary habits of fossil large mammals track the late Miocene ecological shift from C3 forest and woodland to C4 savannah. However, few studies on carbon isotopes of fossil small mammals exist due to limitations imposed by the size of rodent teeth, and the isotopic ecological and dietary behaviors of small mammals to climate change remain unknown. Here we evaluate the impact of ecological change on small mammals by fine-scale comparisons of carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) with dental morphology of murine rodents, spanning 13.8 to ∼2.0 Ma, across the C3 to C4 vegetation shift in the Miocene Siwalik sequence of Pakistan. We applied in-situ laser ablation GC-IRMS to lower first molars and measured two grazing indices on upper first molars. Murine rodents yield a distinct, but related, record of past ecological conditions from large herbivorous mammals, reflecting available foods in their much smaller home ranges. In general, larger murine species show more positive δ(13)C values and have higher grazing indices than smaller species inhabiting the same area at any given age. Two clades of murine rodents experienced different rates of morphological change. In the faster-evolving clade, the timing and trend of morphological innovations are closely tied to consumption of C4 diet during the vegetation shift. This study provides quantitative evidence of linkages among diet, niche partitioning, and dental morphology at a more detailed level than previously possible.

  16. Fossil mice and rats show isotopic evidence of niche partitioning and change in dental ecomorphology related to dietary shift in Late Miocene of Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Kimura

    Full Text Available Stable carbon isotope analysis in tooth enamel is a well-established approach to infer C3 and C4 dietary composition in fossil mammals. The bulk of past work has been conducted on large herbivorous mammals. One important finding is that their dietary habits of fossil large mammals track the late Miocene ecological shift from C3 forest and woodland to C4 savannah. However, few studies on carbon isotopes of fossil small mammals exist due to limitations imposed by the size of rodent teeth, and the isotopic ecological and dietary behaviors of small mammals to climate change remain unknown. Here we evaluate the impact of ecological change on small mammals by fine-scale comparisons of carbon isotope ratios (δ(13C with dental morphology of murine rodents, spanning 13.8 to ∼2.0 Ma, across the C3 to C4 vegetation shift in the Miocene Siwalik sequence of Pakistan. We applied in-situ laser ablation GC-IRMS to lower first molars and measured two grazing indices on upper first molars. Murine rodents yield a distinct, but related, record of past ecological conditions from large herbivorous mammals, reflecting available foods in their much smaller home ranges. In general, larger murine species show more positive δ(13C values and have higher grazing indices than smaller species inhabiting the same area at any given age. Two clades of murine rodents experienced different rates of morphological change. In the faster-evolving clade, the timing and trend of morphological innovations are closely tied to consumption of C4 diet during the vegetation shift. This study provides quantitative evidence of linkages among diet, niche partitioning, and dental morphology at a more detailed level than previously possible.

  17. A Computational Drug Metabolite Detection Using the Stable Isotopic Mass-Shift Filtering with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry in Pioglitazone and Flurbiprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Miyamoto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of metabolites in drug discovery is important. At present, radioisotopes and mass spectrometry are both widely used. However, rapid and comprehensive identification is still laborious and difficult. In this study, we developed new analytical software and employed a stable isotope as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. A deuterium-labeled compound and non-labeled compound were both metabolized in human liver microsomes and analyzed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS. We computationally aligned two different MS data sets and filtered ions having a specific mass-shift equal to masses of labeled isotopes between those data using our own software. For pioglitazone and flurbiprofen, eight and four metabolites, respectively, were identified with calculations of mass and formulas and chemical structural fragmentation analysis. With high resolution MS, the approach became more accurate. The approach detected two unexpected metabolites in pioglitazone, i.e., the hydroxypropanamide form and the aldehyde hydrolysis form, which other approaches such as metabolite-biotransformation list matching and mass defect filtering could not detect. We demonstrated that the approach using computational alignment and stable isotopic mass-shift filtering has the ability to identify drug metabolites and is useful in drug discovery.

  18. Planktonic foraminiferal oxygen isotope analysis by ion microprobe technique suggests warm tropical sea surface temperatures during the Early Paleogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozdon, Reinhard; Kelly, D. Clay; Kita, Noriko T.; Fournelle, John H.; Valley, John W.

    2011-09-01

    Cool tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are reported for warm Paleogene greenhouse climates based on the δ18O of planktonic foraminiferal tests. These results are difficult to reconcile with models of greenhouse gas-forced climate. It has been suggested that this "cool tropics paradox" arises from postdepositional alteration of foraminiferal calcite, yielding erroneously high δ18O values. Recrystallization of foraminiferal tests is cryptic and difficult to quantify, and the compilation of robust δ18O records from moderately altered material remains challenging. Scanning electron microscopy of planktonic foraminiferal chamber-wall cross sections reveals that the basal area of muricae, pustular outgrowths on the chamber walls of species belonging to the genus Morozovella, contain no mural pores and may be less susceptible to postdepositional alteration. We analyzed the δ18O in muricae bases of morozovellids from the central Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Site 865) by ion microprobe using 10 μm pits with an analytical reproducibility of ±0.34‰ (2 standard deviations). In situ measurements of δ18O in these domains yield consistently lower values than those published for conventional multispecimen analyses. Assuming that the original δ18O is largely preserved in the basal areas of muricae, this new δ18O record indicates Early Paleogene (˜49-56 Ma) tropical SSTs in the central Pacific were 4°-8°C higher than inferred from the previously published δ18O record and that SSTs reached at least ˜33°C during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. This study demonstrates the utility of ion microprobe analysis for generating more reliable paleoclimate records from moderately altered foraminiferal tests preserved in deep-sea sediments.

  19. Carbon isotopic shift and its cause at the Wuchiapingian-Changhsingian boundary in the Upper Permian at the Zhaojiaba section, South China: Evidences from multiple geochemical proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengye; Yu, Hao; Wang, Jianguo; Qiu, Zhen; Xiang, Lei; Shi, Guo

    2015-06-01

    The Late Permian environmental change, connecting the Guadalupian-Lopingian (G-L) (Middle-Upper Permian) boundary mass extinction and the Permain-Triassic (P-Tr) boundary mass extinction, has attracted more and more attentions. A significant negative shift for carbon isotope had been found at the Wuchiapingian-Changhsingian (W-C) boundary in the Upper Permian recently. However, the cause(s) of this negative excursion is still unknown. To resolve this problem, we analyzed the bulk organic carbon isotope, total organic carbon (TOC) content, pyritic sulfur (Spy) content, major element concentrations, and molecular organic biomarkers in the Wujiaping and Dalong formations in the Upper Permian from the Zhaojiaba section in western Hubei province, South China. Our results show that (1) there was a significant negative excursion in organic carbon isotopes at the W-C boundary and again a negative excursion at the top of Changhsingian stage; (2) the significant negative excursion at the W-C boundary was probably a global signal and mainly caused by the low primary productivity; and (3) the negative carbon isotope excursion at the top of Changhsingian was probably caused by the Siberian Traps eruptions. A decline in oceanic primary productivity at the W-C boundary probably represents a disturbance of the marine food web, leading to a vulnerable ecosystem prior to the P-Tr boundary mass extinction.

  20. Chemical and isotopic fractionation of wet andesite in a temperature gradient: Experiments and models suggesting a new mechanism of magma differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Lundstrom, C. C.; Glessner, J.; Ianno, A.; Boudreau, A.; Li, J.; Ferré, E. C.; Marshak, S.; DeFrates, J.

    2009-02-01

    Piston-cylinder experiments were conducted to investigate the behavior of partially molten wet andesite held within an imposed temperature gradient at 0.5 GPa. In one experiment, homogenous andesite powder (USGS rock standard AGV-1) with 4 wt.% H 2O was sealed in a double capsule assembly for 66 days. The temperature at one end of this charge was held at 950 °C, and the temperature at the other end was kept at 350 °C. During the experiment, thermal migration (i.e., diffusion in a thermal gradient) took place, and the andesite underwent compositional and mineralogical differentiation. The run product can be broadly divided into three portions: (1) the top third, at the hot end, contained 100% melt; (2) the middle-third contained crystalline phases plus progressively less melt; and (3) the bottom third, at the cold end, consisted of a fine-grained, almost entirely crystalline solid of granitic composition. Bulk major- and trace-element compositions change down temperature gradient, reflecting the systematic change in modal mineralogy. These changes mimic differentiation trends produced by fractional crystallization. The change in composition throughout the run product indicates that a fully connected hydrous silicate melt existed throughout the charge, even in the crystalline, cold bottom region. Electron Backscatter Diffraction analysis of the run product indicates that no preferred crystallographic orientation of minerals developed in the run product. However, a significant anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was observed, suggesting that new crystals of magnetite were elongated in the direction of the thermal gradient. Further, petrographic observation reveals alignment of hornblende parallel to the thermal gradient. Finally, the upper half of the run product shows large systematic variations in Fe-Mg isotopic composition reflecting thermal diffusion, with the hot end systematically enriched in light isotopes. The overall δ 56Fe IRMM-14 and δ 26Mg DSM-3

  1. Laser spectroscopic studies along the Al isotopic chain and the isomer-shift of the self-conjugate $^{26}$Al nucleus

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure the isomer shift in the self-conjugate $^{26}$Al ($\\textit{N = Z}$ = 13) nucleus along with the isotope shifts of $^{24-33}$Al using bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy at the COLLAPS beam line at ISOLDE. These isomer and isotope shifts allow the extraction of precise mean-square charge radii, in particular the difference in charge radius between the $\\textit{I}$ = 5$^{+}$; $\\textit{T}$ = 0 ground state and $\\textit{I}$= 0$^{+}$;$\\textit{T}$= 1 isomer in $^{26}$Al. This charge radius difference, in comparison with the odd-even staggering in the Al-chain, is an excellent probe to study proton-neutron pairing correlations, as was previously illustrated for $^{38}_{19}$K$_{19}$. Furthermore, accurate knowledge of the mean-square charge radius in $^{26m}$Al is essential to reliably calculate its isospin-symmetry-breaking correction which is important to extract the CKM matrix element V$_{ud}$ from the 0$^{+}$ $\\rightarrow$ 0$^{+}$ super-allowed $\\beta$-decay data. Finally, the charge ...

  2. Coincident negative shifts in sulfur and carbon isotope compositions prior to the end-Permian mass extinction at Shangsi Section of Guangyuan, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengwei LI; Junhua HUANG; Min CHEN; Xiao BAI

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur isotope composition of carbonate-associated sulfate (δ3 434SCAS) and carbon isotope composition of carbonate (δ13Ccarb) were jointly investigated on the Late Permian rocks at Shangsi Section, Guanyuan, Northeast Sichuan, South China. Both δ3 4SCAS and δ13Ccarb show gradual decline trends in Late Permian strata, inferring the occurrence of the long-term variation of marine environmental conditions. Associated with the long-term variation are the two coincident negative shifts in δ3 4SCAS and δ13Ccarb, with one occurring at the boundary between Middle Permian Maokou Formation and Late Permian Wujiaping Formation and another at Middle Dalong Formation. Of significance is the second shift which clearly predates the regression and the biotic crisis at the end of Permian at Shangsi Section, providing evidence that a catastrophic event occurred prior to the biotic crisis. The frequent volcanisms indicated by the volcanic rocks or fragments, and the upwelling are proposed to cause the second negative excursion. An abrupt extreme negative δ3 4 SCAS (ca.-20‰) associated with a low relative concentration of CAS and total organic carbon without large change in δ13Ccarb is found at the end of the second shift, which might arise from the short-term oxygenation of bottom waters and sediments that resulted from the abrupt sea level drop.

  3. RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing Suggests Allobaculum spp. as Particularly Active Glucose Assimilators in a Complex Murine Microbiota Cultured In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Elena; Young, Wayne; Rosendale, Douglas; Reichert-Grimm, Verena; Conrad, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) and metabolic profiling were used to detect actively glucose-consuming bacteria in a complex microbial community obtained from a murine model system. A faeces-derived microbiota was incubated under anaerobic conditions for 0, 2, and 4 h with 40 mM [U13C]glucose. Isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation and fractionation of isolated RNA into labeled and unlabeled fractions followed by 16S rRNA sequencing showed a quick adaptation of the bacterial community in response to the added sugar, which was dominated by unclassified Lachnospiraceae species. Inspection of distinct fractions of isotope-labeled RNA revealed Allobaculum spp. as particularly active glucose utilizers in the system, as the corresponding RNA showed significantly higher proportions among the labeled RNA. With time, the labeled sugar was used by a wider spectrum of faecal bacteria. Metabolic profiling indicated rapid fermentation of [U13C]glucose, with lactate, acetate, and propionate being the principal 13C-labeled fermentation products, and suggested that “cross-feeding” occurred in the system. RNA-SIP combined with metabolic profiling of 13C-labeled products allowed insights into the microbial assimilation of a general model substrate, demonstrating the appropriateness of this technology to study assimilation processes of nutritionally more relevant substrates, for example, prebiotic carbohydrates, in the gut microbiota of mice as a model system. PMID:28299315

  4. Computation and comparison of Pd-based membrane reactor performances for water gas shift reaction and isotope swamping in view of highly tritiated water decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santucci, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.santucci@enea.it [Associazione ENEA-Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Rizzello, Claudio [Tesi Sas, Via Bolzano 28, Roma (Italy); Tosti, Silvano [Associazione ENEA-Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, RM (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A dedicated detritiation process for highly tritiated water (HTW) has to be identified. • Water gas shift and isotopic swamping via Pd–Ag membrane reactor are possible processes. • A parametric analysis through two simulation codes is performed. • A comparison in terms of the decontamination factor is provided. -- Abstract: In a D–T fusion machine, due to the possible reaction between tritium and oxygen, some potential sources of highly tritiated water (HTW) can be identified. Therefore, a dedicated detritiation process has to be assessed either for economic and safety reasons. In this view, the use of a Pd-based membrane reactor performing isotopic exchange reactions can be considered since hydrogen isotopes exclusively permeate the Pd–Ag membrane and their exchange over the catalyst realizes the water detritiation. In this activity, the treatment of highly tritiated water, generated by an ITER-like machine (i.e. 2 kg of stoichiometric HTO containing up to 300 g of tritium), via a Pd-membrane reactor is studied in terms of decontamination capability. Especially, a parametric analysis of two processes (water gas shift and isotopic swamping) performed in a Pd-based membrane reactor is carried out by using two mathematical models previously developed and experimentally verified. Particularly, the effect of the reactor temperature, the membrane thickness, the reaction pressure and the protium sweep flow-rate is investigated. Moreover, a comparison in terms of the decontamination factor and the number of reactors necessary to detritiate the HTW are provided. Generally, the results reveal a higher decontamination capability of the WGS reaction respect with the IS (maximum DF values of about 120 and 1.6 in the case of WGS and IS, respectively). However some drawbacks, mainly related with the formation of tritiated species, can occur by performing the WGS.

  5. Probing potential medium effects on phosphate ester bonds using 18O isotope shifts on 31P NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen-Stowell, Kerensa; Hengge, Alvan C

    2005-10-14

    Dipolar aprotic cosolvents, such as DMSO and acetonitrile, accelerate the rates of hydrolysis of phosphate monoester dianions. It has been speculated that the rate acceleration arises from the disruption of hydrogen bonding to the phosphoryl group. An aqueous solvation shell can stabilize the dianionic phosphoryl group by forming hydrogen bonds to the phosphoryl oxygens, whereas solvents such as DMSO are incapable of forming such bonds. It has been proposed that the loss of stabilization could result in a weakened P-OR ester bond, contributing to the observed faster rate of hydrolysis. Computational results support this notion. We have used the 18O-induced perturbation to the 31P chemical shift to ascertain whether solvent changes result in alterations to the P-O(R) bond. We have studied 16O18O-labeled methyl, ethyl, phenyl, p-nitrophenyl, diethyl p-nitrophenyl, triphenyl, and di-tert-butyl ethyl phosphate in the solvents water, methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, dioxane, and DMSO. The results suggest no significant solvent-induced weakening of the phosphate ester bonds in any of the solvents tested, and this is unlikely to be a significant source for the acceleration of hydrolysis in mixed solvents.

  6. An alternative model for within plate basalts generation suggested by their major elements, trace elements and Pb-Sr-Nd isotope compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashima, H.

    2003-12-01

    Based on geochemistry, the recent favor model for within-plate basalts (WPB) is plumes with eclogite originally formed by inversion of basaltic oceanic crust into eclogite in subduction zones (e.g. Hauri, 1996). Melting experiments of basalt/peridotie hybrids (Kogiso and Takahashi, 1998), however, have demonstrated that the hybrid source model could not explain major element features of WPB, such as FeO* enrichment and Al2O3 depletion compared with MORB. Melting experiments of peridotites and basalt/peridotite hybrids indicate that the sources of WPB are peridotites abnormally enriched in FeO*. Such Fe-rich sources could not be formed by extraction of basalt melt from typical peridotite or mixing of basalt and typical peridotite. A potential candidate for the abnormally Fe-rich source is Archean peridotitic komatiite (APK) which is enriched in FeO* compared with typical peridotite. Attractive features of the recycled APK melting model are as follows: 1) It explains why within-plate basalts are FeO*-rich and Al2O3-poor relative to MORB because of large proportion of cpx in APK. 2) Moderate partial melting of APK forms LREE-enriched partial melts because of selective fusion of cpx. 3) It explains near bulk earth Nd isotope compositions because of relatively flat REE patterns of APK. 4) Archean age of APK is consistent with Pb isotope ofWPB suggesting their sources have Archean age. 5) Compositional spectrum of Archean komatiite suites ranging from peridotitic komatiite to basalts explains that of WPB from silica-under saturated basalt to silica-oversaturated andesite.

  7. Measurement of hyperfine structure and isotope shift within the 7s1/2-7p1/2 transition in 203-Tl and 205-Tl

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjit, G; Vukasin, G D; Majumder, P K

    2013-01-01

    A two-step, two-color laser spectroscopy technique has been used to determine of the hyperfine splitting (HFS) of the 7p1/2 excited state in 203-Tl and 205-Tl, as well as the isotope shift within the 7s1/2 - 7p1/2 1301 nm transition. We find the hyperfine splittings in 203-Tl and 205-Tl to be 2152.2(7) MHz and 2173.3(8) MHz respectively. The 203-Tl - 205-Tl transition isotope shift is found to be 534.4(9) MHz. The HFS values each disagree by roughly 20 MHz from previously published values which quoted precision comparable to ours. In order to ensure accurate frequency-axis calibration in this new measurement, we employed both a Fabry-Perot cavity, as well as radio-frequency modulation to create sidebands in the absorption spectrum at well-defined frequency separation. In our experiment, one laser was locked to the ground-state 6p1/2 - 7s1/2 378 nm transition, while the second, spatially overlapping laser was scanned across the 7s1/2 (F=1) - 7p1/2 (F=0,1) hyperfine transitions.

  8. A new serial pooling method of shifted tree ring blocks to construct millennia long tree ring isotope chronologies with annual resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Tatjana; Friedrich, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The study presents a new serial pooling method of shifted tree ring blocks for the building of isotope chronologies. This method combines the advantages of traditional 'serial' and 'intertree' pooling, and can be recommended for the construction of sub-regional long isotope chronologies with sufficient replication, and on annual resolution, especially for the case of extremely narrow tree rings. For Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L., Khibiny Low Mountains, NW Russia) and Silver firs (Abies alba Mill., Franconia, Southern Germany), serial pooling of five consecutive tree rings seems appropriate because the species- and site-specific particularities lead to blurs of climate linkages in their tree rings for the period up to ca. five years back. An equivalent to a five-year running means that curve gained on the base annual data sets of single trees can be derived from the analysis of yearly shifted five-year blocks of consecutive tree rings, and therefore, with approximately 20% of the expense. Good coherence of delta(13)C- and delta(18)O-values between calculated means of annual total rings or late wood data and means of five-year blocks of consecutive total tree rings analysed experimentally on most similar material confirms this assumption.

  9. 15N Isotopic Crop Exchange Residue Studies Suggest that IPCC N Input Methodologies to Assess N2O-N Emissions Should be Reevaluated

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is difficult to quantify nitrogen (N) losses from agricultural systems to the environment, however we can use 15N isotopic techniques to conduct site specific studies to increase our knowledge about N management and fate. This manuscript synthesizes the review of two selected 15N isotopic studies...

  10. More rapid shift to a benthic niche in larger Gadus morhua juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsdóttir, G Á; Gunnarsson, G S; Karlsson, H

    2015-08-01

    Trophic use by Atlantic cod Gadus morhua juveniles was examined early and late in the shift from pelagic to benthic habitats. Changes in the proportion of pelagic copepods, estimates of benthic prey indicated by isotope mixing models and stable-isotope values between sample periods suggested a gradual shift towards a benthic niche. Values of the trophic proxies, however, changed most markedly in the largest juvenile group, suggesting a more rapid trophic niche shift, and in turn competitive advantage, of larger juveniles.

  11. Isotopic shift of atom-dimer Efimov resonances in K-Rb mixtures: Critical effect of multichannel Feshbach physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, K; Kobayashi, J; Julienne, P S; Inouye, S

    2016-01-01

    The multichannel Efimov physics is investigated in ultracold heteronuclear admixtures of K and Rb atoms. We observe a shift in the scattering length where the first atom-dimer resonance appears in the $^{41}$K-$^{87}$Rb system relative to the position of the previously observed atom-dimer resonance in the $^{40}$K-$^{87}$Rb system. This shift is well explained by our calculations with a three-body model including the van der Waals interactions, and, more importantly, the multichannel spinor physics. With only minor difference in the atomic masses of the admixtures, the shift in the atom-dimer resonance positions can be cleanly ascribed to the isolated and overlapping Feshbach resonances in the $^{40}$K-$^{87}$Rb and $^{41}$K-$^{87}$Rb systems, respectively. Our study demonstrates the role of the multichannel Feshbach physics in determining Efimov resonances in heteronuclear three-body systems.

  12. Isotope shift of $^{40,42,44,48}$Ca in the $4s\\,^2 \\rm{S}_{\\frac{1}{2}} \\rightarrow 4p\\,^2\\rm{P}_{\\frac{3}{2}}$ transition

    CERN Document Server

    Gorges, C; Frömmgen, N; Geppert, Ch; Hammen, M; Kaufmann, S; Krämer, J; Krieger, A; Neugart, R; Sanchez, R; Nörtershäuser, W

    2015-01-01

    We report on improved isotope shift measurements of the isotopes $^{40,42,44,48}$Ca in the $4s\\,^2 \\rm{S}_{\\frac{1}{2}} \\rightarrow 4p\\,^2\\rm{P}_{\\frac{3}{2}}$ (D2) transition using collinear laser spectroscopy. Accurately known isotope shifts in the $4s\\,^2 \\rm{S}_{\\frac{1}{2}} \\rightarrow 4p\\,^2\\rm{P}_{\\frac{1}{2}}$ (D1) transition were used to calibrate the ion beam energy with an uncertainty of $\\Delta U \\approx \\pm 0.25$ V. The accuracy in the D2 transition was improved by a factor of $5 - 10$. A King-plot analysis of the two transitions revealed that the field shift factor in the D2 line is about 1.8(13) % larger than in the D1 transition which is ascribed to relativistic contributions of the $4p_{1/2}$ wave function.

  13. Hyperfine structure constants and isotope shift of the levels of the configuration 4 f 6 5 d 6 s 2 in Eu I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elantkowska, M.; Bernard, A.; Dembczyński, J.; Ruczkowski, J.

    1993-06-01

    The hyperfine structure (hfs) and the isotope shift (IS) of transitions between metastable levels of the configuration 4 f 7 5 d 6 s and levels of the configuration 4 f 6 5 d 6 s 2 of151Eu and153Eu were studied by means of the high resolution laser-atomic-beam technique. New data for the hfs in151Eu and153Eu were obtained as well as new and more accurate for the IS between151Eu and153Eu. The measured hfs constants A and B of the 4 f 6 5 d 6 s 2 configuration allow to perform a parametric analysis using the Sandars and Beck theory. The value of the Sternheimer correction is also disscused.

  14. Shifts in bryophyte carbon isotope ratio across an elevation × soil age matrix on Mauna Loa, Hawaii: do bryophytes behave like vascular plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Mashuri; Sack, Lawren

    2011-05-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of vascular plant leaf tissue is determined by isotope discrimination, primarily mediated by stomatal and mesophyll diffusion resistances and by photosynthetic rate. These effects lead to predictable trends in leaf δ(13)C across natural gradients of elevation, irradiance and nutrient supply. Less is known about shifts in δ(13)C for bryophytes at landscape scale, as bryophytes lack stomata in the dominant gametophyte phase, and thus lack active control over CO(2) diffusion. Twelve bryophyte species were sampled across a matrix of elevation and soil ages on Mauna Loa, Hawaii Island. We tested hypotheses based on previous findings for vascular plants, which tend to have less negative δ(13)C at higher elevations or irradiances, and for leaves with higher leaf mass per area (LMA). Across the matrix, bryophytes spanned the range of δ(13)C values typical of C(3) vascular plants. Bryophytes were remarkably similar to vascular plants in exhibiting less negative δ(13)C with increasing elevation, and with lower overstory cover; additionally δ(13)C was related to bryophyte canopy projected mass per area, a trait analogous to LMA in vascular plants, also correlated negatively with overstory cover. The similarity of responses of δ(13)C in bryophytes and vascular plants to environmental factors, despite differing morphologies and diffusion pathways, points to a strong direct role of photosynthetic rate in determining δ(13)C variation at the landscape scale.

  15. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  16. Carbon isotope (δ13C) excursions suggest times of major methane release during the last 14 ka in Fram Strait, the deep-water gateway to the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolaro, C.; Rasmussen, T. L.; Panieri, G.; Mienert, J.; Bünz, S.; Sztybor, K.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from a sediment core collected from a pockmark field on the Vestnesa Ridge (∼80° N) in the eastern Fram Strait. This is the only deep-water gateway to the Arctic, and one of the northernmost marine gas hydrate provinces in the world. Eight 14C AMS dating reveals a detailed chronology for the last 14 ka BP. The δ13C record measured on the benthic foraminiferal species Cassidulina neoteretis shows two distinct intervals with negative values, as low as -4.37‰ in the Bølling-Allerød interstadials and as low as -3.41‰ in the early Holocene. After cleaning procedure designed to remove all authigenic carbonate coatings on benthic foraminiferal tests, the 13C values are still negative (as low as -2.75‰). We have interpreted these negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) to record past methane release events, resulting from the incorporation of 13C-depleted carbon from methane emissions into the benthic foraminiferal shells. The CIEs during the Bølling-Allerød interstadials and the early Holocene relate to periods of ocean warming, sea level rise and increased concentrations of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. CIEs with similar timing have been reported from other areas in the North Atlantic suggesting a regional event. The trigger mechanisms for such regional events remain to be determined. We speculate that sea-level rise and seabed loading due to high sediment supply in combination with increased seismic activity as a result of rapid deglaciation may have triggered the escape of significant amounts of methane to the seafloor and the water column above.

  17. Isotope signals and anatomical features in tree rings suggest a role for hydraulic strategies in diffuse drought-induced die-back of Pinus nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucco, Laura; Nardini, Andrea; von Arx, Georg; Saurer, Matthias; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-03-17

    The 2003 and 2012 summer seasons were among the warmest and driest of the last 200 years over southeastern Europe, and in particular in the Karst region (northeastern Italy). Starting from winter-spring 2013, several black pines (Pinus nigra J.F. Arnold) suffered crown die-back. Declining trees occurred nearby individuals with no signs of die-back, raising hypotheses about the occurrence of individual-specific hydraulic strategies underlying different responses to extreme drought. We investigated possible processes driving black pine decline by dendrochronological and wood anatomical measurements, coupled with analysis of tree-ring carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopic composition in healthy trees (H) and trees suffering die-back (D). Die-back trees showed higher growth rates than H trees at the beginning of the last century, but suffered important growth reduction following the dry summers in 2003 and 2012. After the 2012 drought, D trees produced tracheids with larger diameter and greater vulnerability to implosion than H ones. Healthy trees had significantly higher wood δ13C than D trees, reflecting higher water-use efficiency for the surviving trees, i.e., less water transpired per unit carbon gain, which could be related to lower stomatal conductance and a more conservative use of water. Relatively high δ18O for D trees indicates that they were strongly dependent on shallow water sources, or that they sustained higher transpiration rates than H trees. Our results suggest that H trees adopted a more conservative water-use strategy under drought stress compared with D trees. We speculate that this diversity might have a genotypic basis, but other possible explanations, like different rooting depth, cannot be ruled out.

  18. Carbon isotope signatures of latest Permian marine successions of the Southern Alps suggest a continental runoff pulse enriched in land plant material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Kraus

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The latest Permian mass extinction, the most severe Phanerozoic biotic crisis, is marked by dramatic changes in palaeoenvironments. These changes significantly disrupted the global carbon cycle, reflected by a prominent and well known negative carbon isotope excursion recorded in marine and continental sediments. Carbon isotope trends of bulk carbonate and bulk organic matter in marine deposits of the European Southern Alps near the low-latitude marine event horizon deviate from each other. A positive excursion of several permil in δ13Corg starts earlier and is much more pronounced than the short-term positive 13Ccarb excursion; both excursions interrupt the general negative trend. Throughout the entire period investigated, 13Corg values become lighter with increasing distance from the palaeocoastline. Changing 13Corg values may be due to the influx of comparatively isotopically heavy land plant material. The stronger influence of land plant material on the 13Corg during the positive isotope excursion indicates a temporarily enhanced continental runoff that may either reflect increased precipitation, possibly triggered by aerosols originating from Siberian Trap volcanism, or indicate higher erosion rate in the face of reduced land vegetation cover. doi:10.1002/mmng.201300004

  19. Determination of the Tautomeric Equilibria of Pyridoyl Benzoyl -Diketones in the Liquid and Solid State through the use of Deuterium Isotope Effects on 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shifts and Spin Coupling Constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V.; Lindon, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on 1H and 13C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition, in th...

  20. Carbon isotopic composition of branched tetraether membrane lipids in soils suggest a rapid turnover and a heterotrophic life style of their source organism(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. H. Weijers

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Branched Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers (GDGTs are membrane spanning lipids synthesised by as yet unknown bacteria that thrive in soils and peat. In order to obtain more information on their ecological niche, the stable carbon isotopic composition of branched GDGT-derived alkanes, obtained upon ether bond cleavage, has been determined in a peat and various soils, i.e. forest, grassland and cropland, covered by various vegetation types, i.e., C3- vs. C4-plant type. These δ13C values are compared with those of bulk organic matter and higher plant derived n-alkanes from the same soils. With average δ13C values of −28‰, branched GDGTs in C3 soils are only slightly depleted (ca. 1‰ relative to bulk organic carbon and on average 8.5‰ enriched relative to plant wax-derived long-chain n-alkanes ( nC29nC33. In an Australian soil dominantly covered with C4 type vegetation, the branched GDGTs have a δ13C value of −18‰, clearly higher than observed in soils with C3 type vegetation. As with C3 vegetated soils, branched GDGT δ13C values are slightly depleted (1‰ relative to bulk organic carbon and enriched (ca. 5‰ relative to n-alkanes in this soil. The δ13C values of branched GDGT lipids being similar to bulk organic carbon and their co-variation with those of bulk organic carbon and plant waxes, suggest a heterotrophic life style and assimilation of relatively heavy and likely labile substrates for the as yet unknown soil bacteria that synthesise the branched GDGT lipids. However, a chemoautotrophic lifestyle, i.e. consuming respired CO2, could not be fully excluded based on these data alone. Based on a natural labelling experiment of a C3/C4 crop change introduced on one of the soils 23 years before sampling and based

  1. Intra-specific diet shift in manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) as revealed by carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and fatty acid biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Y.; Shin, K.

    2011-12-01

    Manila clams sampled in Seonjae Island, Korea with shell lengths (SL) below 19.76 mm in average showed a significantly depleted carbon and nitrogen isotope values (Pcultured in IFHRI. The result of fatty acid composition of manila clams in relation to size or growth rate suggests that fast growing clams would have rapid metabolism of fatty acids not required by the animals and an accumulation of the essential fatty acids (PUFA). In addition, their higher energy requirement and more active state of development would further diminish lipid reserve of the species.

  2. Bound-electron g-factor measurements for the determination of the electron mass and isotope shifts in highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Florian Thomas

    2015-07-22

    In the context of this thesis the electron mass has been determined in atomic mass units with a relative uncertainty of 2.8.10{sup -11}, which represents a 13-fold improvement of the 2010 CODATA value. The underlying measurement principle combines a high-precision measurement of the Larmor-to-cyclotron frequency ratio on a single hydrogenlike carbon ion {sup 12}C{sup 5+} with a very accurate g-factor calculation. Furthermore, this thesis contains the first isotope shift measurement of bound-electron g-factors of highly charged ions. Here, the g-factors of the valence electrons of the lithium-like calcium isotopes {sup 40}Ca{sup 17+} and {sup 48}Ca{sup 17+} have been measured with relative uncertainties of a few 10{sup -10}, constituting a so-far unrivaled level of precision for lithium-like ions. These calcium isotopes provide a unique system across the entire nuclear chart to test the pure relativistic nuclear recoil effect. The corresponding and successfully tested theoretical prediction is based on bound-state quantum electrodynamics but goes beyond the standard formalism, the so-called Furry picture, where the nucleus is considered as a classical source of the Coulomb field. The three Larmor-to-cyclotron frequency ratios of {sup 12}C{sup 5+}, {sup 40}Ca{sup 17+} and {sup 48}Ca{sup 17+} have been determined in sequence in a non-destructive manner on single trapped ions stored in a triple Penning trap setup. The cyclotron frequency is measured by a dedicated phase-sensitive detection technique while simultaneously probing the Larmor frequency. The spin-state of the bound valence electron is determined by the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect. In the very last part of this thesis, a new design of a highly compensated cylindrical Penning trap has been developed, which will be used in next generation's high-precision Penning trap experiments.

  3. Measurement of the Hyperfine Structure and Isotope Shifts of the 3s23p2 3P2 to 3s3p3 3Do3 Transition in Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Siu Au

    2010-01-01

    The hyperfine structure and isotope shifts of the 3s23p2 3P2 to 3s3p3 3Do3 transition in silicon have been measured. The transition at 221.7 nm was studied by laser induced fluorescence in an atomic Si beam. For 29Si, the hyperfine A constant for the 3s23p2 3P2 level was determined to be -160.1+-1.3 MHz (1 sigma error), and the A constant for the 3s3p3 3Do3 level is -532.9+-0.6 MHz. This is the first time that these constants were measured. The isotope shifts (relative to the abundant isotope 28Si) of the transition were determined to be 1753.3+-1.1 MHz for 29Si and 3359.9+-0.6 MHz for 30Si. This is an improvement by about two orders of magnitude over a previous measurement. From these results we are able to predict the hyperfine structure and isotope shift of the radioactive 31Si atom, which is of interest in building a scalable quantum computer.

  4. Isotope shifts of the 6d{sup 2} D{sub 3/2}-7 p{sup 2} P{sub 1/2} transition in trapped short-lived {sup 209-214}Ra{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, G. S.; Versolato, O. O.; Berg, J. E. van den; Boell, O.; Dammalapati, U.; Hoek, D. J. van der; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W. L.; Mueller, S.; Nunez Portela, M.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Santra, B.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W. [University of Groningen, Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Groningen NL-9747 AA (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Laser spectroscopy of short-lived radium isotopes in a linear Paul trap has been performed. The isotope shifts of the 6d{sup 2} D{sub 3/2} -7 p{sup 2} P{sub 1/2} transition in {sup 209-214}Ra{sup +}, which are sensitive to the short-range part of the atomic wave functions, were measured. The results are essential experimental input for improving the precision of atomic structure calculations. This is indispensable for parity violation in Ra{sup +} aiming at the determination of the weak mixing angle.

  5. submitter Metabolomic Profile of Low–Copy Number Carriers at the Salivary α-Amylase Gene Suggests a Metabolic Shift Toward Lipid-Based Energy Production

    CERN Document Server

    Arredouani, Abdelilah; Culeddu, Nicola; Moustafa, Julia El-Sayed; Tichet, Jean; Balkau, Beverley; Brousseau, Thierry; Manca, Marco; Falchi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Low serum salivary amylase levels have been associated with a range of metabolic abnormalities, including obesity and insulin resistance. We recently suggested that a low copy number at the AMY1 gene, associated with lower enzyme levels, also increases susceptibility to obesity. To advance our understanding of the effect of AMY1 copy number variation on metabolism, we compared the metabolomic signatures of high– and low–copy number carriers. We analyzed, using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sera of healthy normal-weight women carrying either low–AMY1 copies (LAs: four or fewer copies; n = 50) or high–AMY1 copies (HAs: eight or more copies; n = 50). Best-fitting multivariate models (empirical P < 1 × $10^{−3})$ of mass spectrometry and NMR data were concordant in showing differences in lipid metabolism between the two groups. In particular, LA carriers showed lower levels of long- and medium-chain fatty acids, and higher levels of dicarboxylic fatty acids and 2-hydrox...

  6. Temperature Shift Experiments Suggest That Metabolic Impairment and Enhanced Rates of Photorespiration Decrease Organic Acid Levels in Soybean Leaflets Exposed to Supra-Optimal Growth Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Sicher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated growth temperatures are known to affect foliar organic acid concentrations in various plant species. In the current study, citrate, malate, malonate, fumarate and succinate decreased 40 to 80% in soybean leaflets when plants were grown continuously in controlled environment chambers at 36/28 compared to 28/20 °C. Temperature effects on the above mentioned organic acids were partially reversed three days after plants were transferred among optimal and supra-optimal growth temperatures. In addition, CO2 enrichment increased foliar malate, malonate and fumarate concentrations in the supra-optimal temperature treatment, thereby mitigating effects of high temperature on respiratory metabolism. Glycerate, which functions in the photorespiratory pathway, decreased in response to CO2 enrichment at both growth temperatures. The above findings suggested that diminished levels of organic acids in soybean leaflets upon exposure to high growth temperatures were attributable to metabolic impairment and to changes of photorespiratory flux. Leaf development rates differed among temperature and CO2 treatments, which affected foliar organic acid levels. Additionally, we report that large decreases of foliar organic acids in response to elevated growth temperatures were observed in legume species.

  7. Temperature Shift Experiments Suggest That Metabolic Impairment and Enhanced Rates of Photorespiration Decrease Organic Acid Levels in Soybean Leaflets Exposed to Supra-Optimal Growth Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicher, Richard C

    2015-08-05

    Elevated growth temperatures are known to affect foliar organic acid concentrations in various plant species. In the current study, citrate, malate, malonate, fumarate and succinate decreased 40 to 80% in soybean leaflets when plants were grown continuously in controlled environment chambers at 36/28 compared to 28/20 °C. Temperature effects on the above mentioned organic acids were partially reversed three days after plants were transferred among optimal and supra-optimal growth temperatures. In addition, CO2 enrichment increased foliar malate, malonate and fumarate concentrations in the supra-optimal temperature treatment, thereby mitigating effects of high temperature on respiratory metabolism. Glycerate, which functions in the photorespiratory pathway, decreased in response to CO2 enrichment at both growth temperatures. The above findings suggested that diminished levels of organic acids in soybean leaflets upon exposure to high growth temperatures were attributable to metabolic impairment and to changes of photorespiratory flux. Leaf development rates differed among temperature and CO2 treatments, which affected foliar organic acid levels. Additionally, we report that large decreases of foliar organic acids in response to elevated growth temperatures were observed in legume species.

  8. Isotopic Fractionation of Selenium Oxyanions in Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. K.; Johnson, T. M.

    2004-05-01

    As oxic surface waters pass through aquatic macrophytes and over anoxic sediments in wetlands and lakes, the dissolved Se load often decreases; and, Se isotope ratio measurements can provide information about the mechanisms involved. Previous work on microbially induced isotopic fractionation of Se oxyanions under nearly natural conditions using wetland sediments shows consistent Se isotopic shifts during reduction of Se(VI) and Se(IV) to insoluble Se(0). However, previous isotopic studies of total dissolved selenium in wetlands found little to no isotopic shift as dissolved selenium concentrations decreased. This suggests that plant/algal uptake, followed by deposition and degradation, is the primary route of Se transfer into sediments. However, it is possible that the effective isotopic fractionation between Se in the surface water and Se deposited into sediments is somehow much less than the fractionation induced by the reduction reaction, or that cycling of organically bound Se is involved. In this study, we report Se isotope data for Se(VI), Se(IV) and total dissolved Se, Se(T), in surface waters from three wetland/lake sites: Sweitzer Lake, CO; 33-Mile Reservoir, WY; and, a small pond adjacent to Benton Lake, MT. We isolated Se(IV) via hydride generation, and Se(VI) via ion exchange. Se(T), including any organic components, was also analyzed. Isotope analysis was performed on an Isoprobe MC-ICPMS, using a method modified from that of Rouxel et al. (2002). We used the 82Se + 74Se double spike approach, and spiked samples before species separation. Our results for all three locations indicate similar trends in concentration changes and isotopic shifts between the inflow and outflow waters. Se(T) concentrations decrease by 45-70%, and Se(VI) concentrations decrease by 60-90%, whereas Se(IV) concentrations increase by 60-150%. Concomitant 80Se/76Se shifts are +0.5-0.8‰ for Se(T); -0.1-0.5‰ for Se(VI); and +0.4-6.5‰ for Se(IV). These data provide greater

  9. Synthesis, NMR spectroscopic characterization and structure of a divinyldisilazane-(triphenylphosphine)platinum(0) complex: observation of isotope-induced chemical shifts (1)Δ(12/13)C((195)Pt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrackmeyer, Bernd; Klimkina, Elena V; Schmalz, Thomas; Milius, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    Tetramethyldivinyldisilazane-(triphenylphosphine)platinum(0) was prepared, characterized in solid state by X-ray crystallography and in solution by multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N, (29)Si, (31)P and (195)Pt NMR). Numerous signs of spin-spin coupling constants were determined by two-dimensional heteronuclear shift correlations (HETCOR) and two-dimensional (1)H/(1)H COSY experiments. Isotope-induced chemical shifts (1)Δ(12/13)C((195)Pt) were measured from (195)Pt NMR spectra of the title compound as well as of other Pt(0), Pt(II) and Pt(IV) compounds for comparison. In contrast to other heavy nuclei such as (199)Hg or (207)Pb, the "normal" shifts of the heavy isotopomers to low frequencies are found, covering a range of >500 ppb.

  10. Invasive mussels alter the littoral food web of a large lake: stable isotopes reveal drastic shifts in sources and flow of energy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Ozersky

    Full Text Available We investigated how establishment of invasive dreissenid mussels impacted the structure and energy sources of the littoral benthic food web of a large temperate lake. We combined information about pre- and postdreissenid abundance, biomass, and secondary production of the littoral benthos with results of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of archival (predreissenid and recent (postdreissenid samples of all common benthic taxa. This approach enabled us to determine the importance of benthic and sestonic carbon to the littoral food web before, and more than a decade after dreissenid establishment. Long term dreissenid presence was associated with a 32-fold increase in abundance, 6-fold increase in biomass, and 14-fold increase in secondary production of the littoral benthos. Dreissenids comprised a large portion of the post-invasion benthos, making up 13, 38, and 56% of total abundance, biomass, and secondary production, respectively. The predreissenid food web was supported primarily by benthic primary production, while sestonic material was relatively more important to the postdreissenid food web. The absolute importance of both sestonic material and benthic primary production to the littoral benthos increased considerably following dreissenid establishment. Our results show drastic alterations to food web structure and suggest that dreissenid mussels redirect energy and material from the water column to the littoral benthos both through biodeposition of sestonic material as well as stimulation of benthic primary production.

  11. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    wavelength range 90-100 nm. The reaction proceeds by a predissociation mechanism, in which the excited electronic state lives long enough to have well-defined vibrational and rotational energy levels. As a consequence, the three isotopic species - C16O, C17O, and C18O - absorb at different wavelengths, corresponding to the isotope shift in vibrational frequencies. Because of their different number densities, the abundant C16O becomes optically thick in the outermost part of the cloud (nearest to the external source of UV radiation), while the rare C17O and C18O remain optically thin, and hence dissociate at a greater rate in the cloud interior. The differences in chemical reactivity between C16O molecules and 17O and 18O atoms may lead to isotopically selective reaction products. This scenario has been suggested to explain meteoritic isotope patterns, as discussed below (Yurimoto and Kuramoto, 2002).Stable isotope abundances in meteoritic material provide an opportunity to evaluate the thoroughness of mixing of isotopes of diverse stellar sources. Molybdenum presents a good test case: it has seven stable isotopes, derived from at least three types of stellar sources, corresponding to the r-process, s-process, and p-process. Presolar silicon carbide grains, extracted from primitive meteorites, contain molybdenum that has been subject to s-process neutron capture in red-giant stars, resulting in large enrichments of isotopes at masses 95, 96, 97, 98, and severe depletions (up to 100%) of isotopes at masses 92 and 94 (p-process) and 100 (r-process) (Nicolussi et al., 1998). Complementary patterns have been found in whole-rock samples of several meteorites, with >1,000-fold smaller amplitude, suggesting the preservation of a small fraction of the initial isotopic heterogeneity ( Yin et al., 2002; Dauphas et al., 2002). Oxygen is another element for which primordial isotopic heterogeneity might be preserved. This is discussed further below.It would be highly desirable to have

  12. Isotopes through the looking glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson Pendrill, Ann Marie

    2000-08-01

    Nuclear distributions affect many aspects of atomic spectra. As an example, recent experimental results for the hyperfine anomaly in Fr isotopes are considered. These depend on nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. The variations in charge radii for these isotopes were studied earlier by measuring optical isotope shifts. The hyperfine anomalies for the odd-odd isotopes involve the neutron distributions, of interest for studies of parity nonconserving effects along a chain of isotopes.

  13. Laser spectroscopy of gallium isotopes using the ISCOOL RFQ cooler

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Kowalska, M; Ware, T; Procter, T J

    2007-01-01

    We propose to study the radioisotopes of gallium (Z=31) by collinear laser spectroscopy using the ISCOOL RFQ ion cooler. The proposed measurements on $^{62-83}$Ga will span both neutron-deficient and neutron-rich isotopes. Of key interest is the suggested development of a proton-skin in the neutron-deficient isotopes. The isotope shifts measured by laser spectroscopy will be uniquely sensitive to this feature. The measurements will also provide a wealth of new information on the gallium nuclear spins, static moments and nuclear charge radii.

  14. Coupled Hf-Nd-Pb isotope co-variations of HIMU oceanic island basalts from Mangaia, Cook-Austral islands, suggest an Archean source component in the mantle transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Oliver; Arculus, Richard J.; van Westrenen, Wim; Woodhead, Jon D.; Jenner, Frances E.; Nebel-Jacobsen, Yona J.; Wille, Martin; Eggins, Stephen M.

    2013-07-01

    Although it is widely accepted that oceanic island basalts (OIB) sample geochemically distinct mantle reservoirs including recycled oceanic crust, the composition, age, and locus of these reservoirs remain uncertain. OIB with highly radiogenic Pb isotope signatures are grouped as HIMU (high-μ, with μ = 238U/204Pb), and exhibit unique Hf-Nd isotopic characteristics, defined as ΔɛHf, deviant from a terrestrial igneous rock array that includes all other OIB types. Here we combine new Hf isotope data with previous Nd-Pb isotope measurements to assess the coupled, time-integrated Hf-Nd-Pb isotope evolution of the most extreme HIMU location (Mangaia, French Polynesia). In comparison with global MORB and other OIB types, Mangaia samples define a unique trend in coupled Hf-Nd-Pb isotope co-variations (expressed in 207Pb/206Pb vs. ΔɛHf). In a model employing subducted, dehydrated oceanic crust, mixing between present-day depleted MORB mantle (DMM) and small proportions (˜5%) of a HIMU mantle endmember can re-produce the Hf-Nd-Pb isotope systematics of global HIMU basalts (sensu stricto; i.e., without EM-1/EM-2/FOZO components). An age range of 3.5 to affected by other enriched mantle endmembers (sensu lato). If correct, this requires isolation of parts of the mantle transition zone for >3 Gyr and implies that OIB chemistry can be used to test geodynamic models.

  15. Isotope shifts of the three lowest 1S states of the B+ ion calculated with a finite-nuclear-mass approach and with relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2010-03-01

    We present very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the three lowest S-states [1s22s2(S10), 1s22p2(S10), and 1s22s3s(S10)] of the two stable isotopes of the boron ion, B10+ and B11+. At the nonrelativistic level the calculations have been performed with the Hamiltonian that explicitly includes the finite mass of the nucleus as it was obtained by a rigorous separation of the center-of-mass motion from the laboratory frame Hamiltonian. The spatial part of the nonrelativistic wave function for each state was expanded in terms of 10 000 all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians were variationally optimized using a procedure involving the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to the nonlinear parameters. The nonrelativistic wave functions of the three states were subsequently used to calculate the leading α2 relativistic corrections (α is the fine structure constant; α =1/c, where c is the speed of light) and the α3 quantum electrodynamics (QED) correction. We also estimated the α4 QED correction by calculating its dominant component. A comparison of the experimental transition frequencies with the frequencies obtained based on the energies calculated in this work shows an excellent agreement. The discrepancy is smaller than 0.4 cm-1.

  16. Isotope shifts of the three lowest 1S states of the B+ ion calculated with a finite-nuclear-mass approach and with relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2010-03-21

    We present very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the three lowest S-states [1s(2)2s(2)((1)S(0)), 1s(2)2p(2)((1)S(0)), and 1s(2)2s3s((1)S(0))] of the two stable isotopes of the boron ion, (10)B(+) and (11)B(+). At the nonrelativistic level the calculations have been performed with the Hamiltonian that explicitly includes the finite mass of the nucleus as it was obtained by a rigorous separation of the center-of-mass motion from the laboratory frame Hamiltonian. The spatial part of the nonrelativistic wave function for each state was expanded in terms of 10,000 all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians were variationally optimized using a procedure involving the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to the nonlinear parameters. The nonrelativistic wave functions of the three states were subsequently used to calculate the leading alpha(2) relativistic corrections (alpha is the fine structure constant; alpha=1/c, where c is the speed of light) and the alpha(3) quantum electrodynamics (QED) correction. We also estimated the alpha(4) QED correction by calculating its dominant component. A comparison of the experimental transition frequencies with the frequencies obtained based on the energies calculated in this work shows an excellent agreement. The discrepancy is smaller than 0.4 cm(-1).

  17. Tooth enamel maturation reequilibrates oxygen isotope compositions and supports simple sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trayler, Robin B.; Kohn, Matthew J.

    2017-02-01

    Oxygen isotope and major element zoning patterns of several disparate ungulate teeth were collected to evaluate the timing and geometry of enamel formation, records of isotope zoning, and tooth enamel sampling strategies. Isotopic zoning in mammalian tooth enamel encodes a sub-annual time series of isotopic variation of an animal's body water composition, with a damping factor that depends on the specifics of how enamel mineralizes. Enamel formation comprises two stages: precipitation of appositional enamel with a high CO3:PO4 ratio, followed by precipitation of maturational enamel with a lower CO3:PO4. If appositional and maturational enamel both contribute to isotope compositions (but with different CO3:PO4), and if isotope compositions vary seasonally, paired δ18O values from CO3 and PO4 profiles should show a spatial separation. CO3 isotope patterns should be shifted earlier seasonally than PO4 isotope patterns. Such paired profiles for new and published data show no resolvable shifts, i.e. CO3 and PO4 δ18O profiles show coincident maxima and minima. This coincidence suggests that enamel maturation reequilibrates appositional isotope compositions. If enamel maturation establishes enamel isotope compositions, the geometry of maturation, not apposition, should be considered when devising sampling protocols. X-ray maps of Ca zoning show that the majority of enamel (inner and middle layers) mineralizes heavily at a high angle to the external tooth surface and the enamel-dentine junction over length scales of 2-4 mm, while the outer enamel surface mineralizes more slowly. These data suggest that isotopic sampling strategies should parallel maturational geometry and focus on interior enamel to improve data fidelity. The magnitude of isotopic damping is also smaller than implied in previous studies, so tooth enamel zoning more closely reflects original body water isotopic variations than previously assumed.

  18. Study on diet shift of Erythroulter mongolicus mongolicus with stable isotope technology%蒙古鲌食性转变的稳定性同位素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌; 王志坚; 金丽; 叶凤芬; 陈大庆; 张耀光

    2011-01-01

    During the process of maturity, a clear change occurred in using food resources with the development of fishes. There is usually an obvious niche shift in different ontogenetic stages, and the living environment and food groups would be converted with the increase of body size. Traditionally the method which is used for food shift is to analyze the contents in stomach and intestines, however, it could not completely show the location of fishes in food web as well as food source. In recent years stable isotopic way has been widely used to research food types of animals in different environments. The stable carbon isotope composition of consumers is able to show where the foods derive from, while the nitrogen isotope composition can show the position of trophic levels in food web. Mongolian culter( Erythroulter mongolicus mongolicus), which is one of the main economic fishes in Xiaojiang River after the Three-Gorges Reservoir accumulated water, plays an important role in aquatic ecosystem. The diet shift of Mongolian culter in various ontogenetic stages has a deep impact on the aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, based on the stable isotope analysis, combined with the identification of contents in stomach and intestines, we herein discussed the Mongolian culter food groups from Quma town and Huangshi town along the Xiaojiang River region so as to provide a theoretic basis for the management of Xiaojiang fishery resources and enhancement and releasing. Our results indicate that the 813C and δ15N values of small Mongolian culter whose length is less than 200 mm are( -24.50%o ± 1. 15%o) and (12. 17%o ±1. 54%o) respectively,diey are carnivorously omnivorous with 2.9 of trophic level; those big ones of more than 200 mm in length are( -23. 87%o ± 1. 12%o) and (13.54%o ± 1.12%o) respectively, their trophic level is 3. 3 and diet type is carnivorous. The fact that the 8MC and 8I5N values of large Mongolian culter are significantly higher than that of small ones(P <0

  19. Macrophysical climate models and Holocene hunter-gatherer subsistence shifts in Central Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, R. P.; Munoz, C.

    2013-12-01

    We use stable carbon isotopic values from bone collagen, as well as carbon values from carbonate extracted from bone apatite from 69 prehistoric human skeletal samples to investigate past resource use and climate relationships over the Middle and Late Holocene in Central Texas. Bone samples come from seven archaeological sites and samples date from 6,900 BP to the close of the prehistoric sequence at about 350 BP. Carbon isotopes from these samples suggest four broad dietary trends. From 6,900 through about 3,800 BP, carbon isotopes suggest a gradual increase in the consumption of resources that ultimately use a C3 photosynthetic pathway. A decline in δ13C in both collagen and carbonate values follows, suggesting a decrease in C3 resource use through roughly 2,900 BP. A variable, but once again increasing pattern on C3 resource use by prehistoric hunter-gatherers is indicated in bone isotopes through about 1,000 BP. After that date, a decrease in C3 resource dependence, with hints at greater subsistence diversity, is suggested through the close of the sequence at 350 BP. To assess the impact of climate shifts on this isotopic pattern, we developed a series of macrophysical climate models (MCM) for several locations in Central Texas focusing on fall, winter, and early spring precipitation. This fall-spring rainfall should closely determine C3 production. If subsistence shifts are responding to climate-induced changes in resource availability, then the measured hunter-gatherer carbon isotope trends summarized above should pattern with C3 production as monitored by the modeled fall-spring precipitation values. For the Middle Holocene portion of the sequence, the precipitation models suggest increasing C3 production, consistent with increasing C3 dependence shown in the isotopic data. A decline in C3 production between 3,900 and 3,000 BP in the models is also consistent with the isotopic decline at that point. After 3,000 BP, however, the coupling between fall

  20. Kinetic isotope effect studies on aspartate aminotransferase: Evidence for a concerted 1,3 prototropic shift mechanism for the cytoplasmic isozyme and L-aspartate and dichotomy in mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julin, D.A.; Kirsch, J.F. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1989-05-02

    The C alpha primary hydrogen kinetic isotope effects (C alpha-KIEs) for the reaction of the cytoplasmic isozyme of aspartate aminotransferase (cAATase) with (alpha-2H)-L-aspartate are small and only slightly affected by deuterium oxide solvent (DV = 1.43 +/- 0.03 and DV/KAsp = 1.36 +/- 0.04 in H{sub 2}O; DV = 1.44 +/- 0.01 and DV/KAsp = 1.61 +/- 0.06 in D{sub 2}O). The D{sub 2}O solvent KIEs (SKIEs) are somewhat larger and are essentially independent of deuterium at C alpha (D{sub 2}OV = 2.21 +/- 0.07 and D{sub 2}OV/KAsp = 1.70 +/- 0.03 with ({alpha}-1H)-L-aspartate; D{sub 2}OV = 2.34 +/- 0.12 and D{sub 2}OV/KAsp = 1.82 +/- 0.06 with ({alpha}-2H)-L- aspartate). The C alpha-KIEs on V and on V/KAsp are independent of pH from pH 5.0 to pH 10.0. These results support a rate-determining concerted 1,3 prototropic shift mechanism by the multiple KIE criteria. The large C alpha-KIEs for the reaction of mitochondrial AATase (mAATase) with L-glutamate (DV = 1.88 +/- 0.13 and DV/KGlu = 3.80 +/- 0.43 in H{sub 2}O; DV = 1.57 +/- 0.05 and DV/KGlu = 4.21 +/- 0.19 in D{sub 2}O) coupled with the relatively small SKIEs (D{sub 2}OV = 1.58 +/- 0.04 and D{sub 2}OV/KGlu = 1.25 +/- 0.05 with ({alpha}-1H)-L-glutamate; D{sub 2}OV = 1.46 +/- 0.06 and D{sub 2}OV/KGlu = 1.16 +/- 0.05 with (alpha-2H)-L-glutamate) are most consistent with a two-step mechanism for the 1,3 prototropic shift for this isozyme-substrate pair.

  1. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  2. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  3. Tough Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Robert S.; Verdezoto, Nervo; Holst, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    in a student dormitory and found that players did not shift their electricity use, because they were unwilling to change their schedules and found it easier to focus on reducing electricity use. Based on our findings, we discuss the implications for encouraging shifting, and also the challenges of integrating...

  4. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling.

  5. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  6. Late Permian-earliest Triassic high-resolution organic carbon isotope and palynofacies records from Kap Stosch (East Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson-Barrera, Anna; Hochuli, Peter A.; Bucher, Hugo; Schneebeli-Hermann, Elke; Weissert, Helmut; Adatte, Thierry; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2015-10-01

    During and after the end Permian mass extinction terrestrial and marine biota underwent major changes and reorganizations. The latest Permian and earliest Triassic is also characterized by major negative carbon isotope shifts reflecting fundamental changes in the carbon cycle. The present study documents a high-resolution bulk organic carbon isotope record and palynofacies analysis spanning the latest Permian-earliest Triassic of East Greenland. An almost 700 meter thick composite section from Kap Stosch allowed discriminating 6 chemostratigraphic intervals that provide the basis for the correlation with other coeval records across the world, and for the recognition of basin wide transgressive-regressive events documenting tectonic activity during the opening of the Greenland-Norway Basin. The identification of the main factors that influenced the organic carbon isotope signal during the earliest Triassic (Griesbachian to Dienerian) was possible due to the combination of bulk organic carbon isotope, palynofacies and Rock-Eval data. Two negative carbon isotopic shifts in the Kap Stosch record can be correlated with negative shifts recorded in coeval sections across the globe. A first negative shift precedes the base of the Triassic as defined by the first occurrence of the conodont Hindeodus parvus in the Meishan reference section, and the second one coincides with the suggested Griesbachian-Dienerian boundary. This new organic carbon isotope record from the extended Kap Stosch section from the Boreal Realm documents regional and global carbon cycle signals of the interval between the latest Palaeozoic and the onset of the Mesozoic.

  7. Power Shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ "We are entering a new era of world history: the end of Western domination and the arrival of the Asian century. The question is: will Washington wake up to this reality?" This is the central premise of Kishore Mahbubani's provocative new book The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Global Power to the East.

  8. Copper speciation and isotopic fractionation in plants: uptake and translocation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Brooke M; Kirby, Jason K; Degryse, Fien; Harris, Hugh; McLaughlin, Mike J; Scheiderich, Kathleen

    2013-07-01

    The fractionation of stable copper (Cu) isotopes during uptake into plant roots and translocation to shoots can provide information on Cu acquisition mechanisms. Isotope fractionation ((65) Cu/(63) Cu) and intact tissue speciation techniques (X-ray absorption spectroscopy, XAS) were used to examine the uptake, translocation and speciation of Cu in strategy I (tomato-Solanum lycopersicum) and strategy II (oat-Avena sativa) plant species. Plants were grown in controlled solution cultures, under varied iron (Fe) conditions, to test whether the stimulation of Fe-acquiring mechanisms can affect Cu uptake in plants. Isotopically light Cu was preferentially incorporated into tomatoes (Δ(65) Cu(whole plant-solution ) = c. -1‰), whereas oats showed minimal isotopic fractionation, with no effect of Fe supply in either species. The heavier isotope was preferentially translocated to shoots in tomato, whereas oat plants showed no significant fractionation during translocation. The majority of Cu in the roots and leaves of both species existed as sulfur-coordinated Cu(I) species resembling glutathione/cysteine-rich proteins. The presence of isotopically light Cu in tomatoes is attributed to a reductive uptake mechanism, and the isotopic shifts within various tissues are attributed to redox cycling during translocation. The lack of isotopic discrimination in oat plants suggests that Cu uptake and translocation are not redox selective.

  9. Hydrogen and oxygen in brine shrimp chitin reflect environmental water and dietary isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Kristine E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2010-03-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of the common structural biopolymer chitin are a potential recorder of ecological and environmental information, but our understanding of the mechanisms of incorporation of H and O from environmental substrates into chitin is limited. We report the results of a set of experiments in which the isotopic compositions of environmental water and diet were varied independently in order to assess the contribution of these variables to the H and O isotopic composition of Artemia franciscana chitin. Hydrogen isotope ratios of chitin were strongly linearly correlated with both food and water, with approximately 26% of the hydrogen signal reflecting food and approximately 38% reflecting water. Oxygen isotopes were also strongly correlated with the isotopic composition of water and food, but whereas 69% of oxygen in chitin exchanged with environmental water, only 10% was derived from food. We propose that these observations reflect the position-specific, partial exchange of H and O atoms with brine shrimp body water during the processes of digestion and chitin biosynthesis. Comparison of culture experiments with a set of natural samples collected from the Great Salt Lake, UT in 2006 shows that, with some exceptions, oxygen isotope compositions of chitin track those of water, whereas hydrogen isotopes vary inversely with those of lake water. The different behavior of the two isotopic systems can be explained in terms of a dietary shift from allochthonous particulate matter with relatively higher δ 2H values in the early spring to autochthonous particulate matter with significantly lower δ 2H values in the late summer to autumn. These results suggest oxygen in chitin may be a valuable proxy for the oxygen isotopic composition of environmental water, whereas hydrogen isotope values from the same molecule may reveal ecological and biogeochemical changes within lakes.

  10. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Liu, J.; Macias, B.; Martin, D. S.; Minkoff, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Sargsyan, A.; Smith, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  11. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products.

  12. Interpreting the Marine Calcium Isotope Record: Influence of Reef Builders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Farkas, J.; Kiessling, W.; Veizer, J.; Wallmann, K.

    2008-12-01

    The calcium isotopic composition of seawater as recorded in brachiopod shells varied substantially during the Paleozoic (Farkas et al. 2007, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 71, 5117-5134). The most prominent feature of the record is an excursion to higher 44Ca/40Ca values that started during the Early Carboniferous and lasted until the Permian. The shift occurred shortly after the transition from a calcite-sea to an aragonite-sea (Sandberg 1983, Nature 305, 19-22; Stanley and Hardie 1998, Pal3, 144, 3-19). It therefore has been interpreted to reflect a change in the average calcium isotope fractionation of carbonates produced in the oceans. Aragonite is depleted by about 0.6 permil in 44Ca/40Ca compared to calcite (Gussone et al. 2005, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 69, 4485-4494). Consequently a transient shift from calcite dominated to an aragonite dominated calcium carbonate sedimentation could have caused the observed 0.5 permil isotope shift. We compare the marine calcium isotope record with a new compilation of the Phanerozoic trends in the skeletal mineralogy of marine invertebrates (Kiessling et al. 2008, Nature Geoscience, 1, 527-530). The compilation is based on data collected in the PaleoReef database and the Paleobiology Database, which include information on Phanerozoic reef complexes and taxonomic collection data of Phanerozoic biota, respectively. We find a strong positive correlation between the calcium isotope ratios and the abundance of aragonitic reef builders from the Silurian until the Permian at a sample resolution of about 10 million years. The two records, however, diverge in the Triassic, when reefs were dominated by aragonite but the calcium isotope values remained at a relatively low level. We also find a good correlation between calcium isotopes and the proportion of aragonite in the general record of Phanerozoic biota. However, in this case the records start to diverge already in the latest Carboniferous. The observations suggest that the

  13. Recent results on neutron rich tin isotopes by laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roussière, B; Crawford, J E; Essabaa, S; Fedosseev, V; Geithner, W; Genevey, J; Girod, M; Huber, G; Horn, R; Kappertz, S; Lassen, J; Le Blanc, F; Lee, J K P; Le Scornet, G; Lettry, Jacques; Mishin, V I; Neugart, R; Obert, J; Oms, J; Ouchrif, A; Peru, S; Pinard, J; Ravn, H L; Sauvage, J; Verney, D

    2001-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy measurements have been performed on neutron rich tin isotopes using the COMPLIS experimental setup. The nuclear charge radii of the even-even isotopes from A=108 to 132 are compared to the results of macroscopic and microscopic calculations. The improvements and optimizations needed to perform the isotope shift measurement on $^{134}$Sn are presented.

  14. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  15. Quantitative microbial ecology through stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Bruce A; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Morrissey, Ember M; Price, Lance B

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in (18)O and (13)C composition after exposure to [(18)O]water or [(13)C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of (18)O into DNA from [(18)O]water. However, the increase in (18)O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing.

  16. Re-investigating the isotopic fractionation corrections in radiocarbon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrni, S.; Santos, G. M.; Xu, X.; Southon, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    By convention (Stuiver and Polach, 1977), 14C data has to be corrected for any isotopic fractionation occurring in nature, during the sample preparation or the measurement. The fractionation factor b = 2.0 used to correct the 14C/12C ratio for shifts in the 13C/12C ratio has been proposed in 1954 (Craig, 1954) and has been applied ever since. While theoretical considerations have suggested moderate deviations of b from 2.0, some measurements have suggested larger differences (e.g. Saliege and Fontes, 1984). With the increasing precision of radiocarbon measurements, potential deviations of b from 2.0 become more significant, since these could cause shifts of several decades in some radiocarbon dates (Southon, 2011). It is therefore of great interest for the radiocarbon community to re-evaluate the fractionation corrections. We present approaches for the experimental determination of b and discuss results and their effects on radiocarbon dating. Stuiver M., Polach H.A., 1977. Discussion: reporting of 14C data. Radiocarbon 19(3):355-63. Saliege J.F., Fontes J.C., 1984. Essai de détermination expérimentale du fractionnement des isotopes 13C et 14C du carbone au cours de processus naturels. International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes 35(1):55-62. Craig H., 1954. Carbon 13 in plants and the relationships between carbon 13 and carbon 14 in nature. Journal of Geology 62(2):115-49. Southon J., 2011. Are the Fractionation Corrections Correct: Are the Isotopic Shifts for 14C/12C Ratios in Physical Processes and Chemical Reactions Really Twice Those for 13C/12C? Radiocarbon 53(4):691-704.

  17. ZIRCONIUM—HAFNIUM ISOTOPE EVIDENCE FROM METEORITES FOR THE DECOUPLED SYNTHESIS OF LIGHT AND HEAVY NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, W.; Schönbächler, M. [School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sprung, P. [Institut für Planetologie, Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Vogel, N. [Institute for Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH, Clausiusstrasse 25, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-11-10

    Recent work based on analyses of meteorite and terrestrial whole-rock samples showed that the r- and s- process isotopes of Hf were homogeneously distributed throughout the inner solar system. We report new Hf isotope data for Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) of the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende, and novel high-precision Zr isotope data for these CAIs and three carbonaceous chondrites (CM, CO, CK). Our Zr data reveal enrichments in the neutron-rich isotope {sup 96}Zr (≤1ε in {sup 96}Zr/{sup 90}Zr) for bulk chondrites and CAIs (∼2ε). Potential isotope effects due to incomplete sample dissolution, galactic and cosmic ray spallation, and the nuclear field shift are assessed and excluded, leading to the conclusion that the {sup 96}Zr isotope variations are of nucleosynthetic origin. The {sup 96}Zr enrichments are coupled with {sup 50}Ti excesses suggesting that both nuclides were produced in the same astrophysical environment. The same CAIs also exhibit deficits in r-process Hf isotopes, which provides strong evidence for a decoupling between the nucleosynthetic processes that produce the light (A ≤ 130) and heavy (A > 130) neutron-rich isotopes. We propose that the light neutron-capture isotopes largely formed in Type II supernovae (SNeII) with higher mass progenitors than the supernovae that produced the heavy r-process isotopes. In the context of our model, the light isotopes (e.g. {sup 96}Zr) are predominantly synthesized via charged-particle reactions in a high entropy wind environment, in which Hf isotopes are not produced. Collectively, our data indicates that CAIs sampled an excess of materials produced in a normal mass (12-25 M{sub ☉}) SNII.

  18. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  19. Seasonal variation in kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotopes in southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, Tom H.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

    2012-09-01

    Serial sampling of tooth enamel growth increments for carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of Macropus (kangaroo) teeth was performed to assess the potential for reconstructing paleoseasonality. The carbon isotope composition of tooth enamel apatite carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C3 and C4 vegetation. The oxygen isotopic composition of enamel reflects that of ingested and metabolic water. Tooth enamel forms sequentially from the tip of the crown to the base, so dietary and environmental changes during the tooth's formation can be detected. δ13C and δ18O values were determined for a series of enamel samples drilled from the 3rd and 4th molars of kangaroos that were collected along a 900 km north-south transect in southern Australia. The serial sampling method did not yield pronounced seasonal isotopic variation patterns in Macropus enamel. The full extent of dietary isotopic variation may be obscured by attenuation of the isotopic signal during enamel mineralisation. Brachydont (low-crowned) Macropus teeth may be less sensitive to seasonal variation in isotopic composition due to time-averaging during mineralisation. However, geographic variations observed suggest that there may be potential for tracking latitudinal shifts in vegetation zones and seasonal environmental patterns in response to climate change.

  20. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate facies in the Vindhyan Supergroup, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Banerjee; S K Bhattacharya; S Sarkar

    2006-02-01

    The Vindhyan sedimentary succession in central India spans a wide time bracket from the Paleopro- terozoic to the Neoproterozoic period.Chronostratigraphic significance of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of the carbonate phase in Vindhyan sediments has been discussed in some recent studies.However,the subtle controls of facies variation,depositional setting and post-depositional diagenesis on stable isotope compositions are not yet clearly understood.The Vindhyan Super- group hosts four carbonate units,exhibiting a wide variability in depositional processes and paleogeography.A detailed facies-specific carbon and oxygen isotope study of the carbonate units was undertaken by us to investigate the effect of these processes and to identify the least altered isotope values.It is seen that both carbon and oxygen isotope compositions have been affected by early meteoric water diagenesis.The effect of diagenetic alteration is,however,more pronounced in case of oxygen isotopes than carbon isotopes.Stable isotope compositions remained insensitive to facies only when sediments accumulated in a shallow shelf setting without being exposed.Major alteration of original isotope ratios was observed in case of shallow marine carbonates,which became exposed to meteoric fluids during early diagenetic stage.Duration of exposure possibly determined the magnitude of alteration and shift from the original values.Moreover,dolomitization is found to be accompanied by appreciable alteration of isotope compositions in some of the carbonates.The present study suggests that variations in sediment depositional settings,in particular the possibility of subaerial exposure,need to be considered while extracting chronostratigraphic signi ficance from 13C data.

  1. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  2. Isotopic chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  3. Isotopic Paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, R.

    Paleotemperature scales were calculated by H. C. Urey and others in the 1950s to assess past temperatures, and later work using the stable isotopes of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon employed standards such as Peedee belemnite (PDB) and Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW). Subsequently, subjects as diverse as ice volume and paleotemperatures, oceanic ice and sediment cores, Pleistocene/Holocene climatic changes, and isotope chronostratigraphy extending back to the Precambrian were investigated.

  4. Protein Chemical Shift Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    The protein chemical shifts holds a large amount of information about the 3-dimensional structure of the protein. A number of chemical shift predictors based on the relationship between structures resolved with X-ray crystallography and the corresponding experimental chemical shifts have been developed. These empirical predictors are very accurate on X-ray structures but tends to be insensitive to small structural changes. To overcome this limitation it has been suggested to make chemical shift predictors based on quantum mechanical(QM) calculations. In this thesis the development of the QM derived chemical shift predictor Procs14 is presented. Procs14 is based on 2.35 million density functional theory(DFT) calculations on tripeptides and contains corrections for hydrogen bonding, ring current and the effect of the previous and following residue. Procs14 is capable at performing predictions for the 13CA, 13CB, 13CO, 15NH, 1HN and 1HA backbone atoms. In order to benchmark Procs14, a number of QM NMR calculatio...

  5. Beam shifts and distribution functions

    CERN Document Server

    Aiello, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    When a beam of light is reflected by a smooth surface its behavior deviates from geometrical optics predictions. Such deviations are quantified by the so-called spatial and angular Goos-Haenchen (GH) and Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shifts of the reflected beam. These shifts depend upon the shape of the incident beam, its polarization and on the material composition of the reflecting surface. In this article we suggest a novel approach that allows one to unambiguously isolate the beam-shape dependent aspects of GH and IF shifts. We show that this separation is possible as a result of some universal features of shifted distribution functions which are presented and discussed.

  6. Deformation of C isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kanada-Enyo, Y

    2004-01-01

    Systematic analysis of the deformations of proton and neutron densities in even-even C isotopes was done based on the method of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The $E2$ transition strength was discussed in relation to the deformation. We analyze the $B(E2;2^+_1\\to 0^+_1)$ in $^{16}$C, which has been recently measured to be abnormally small. The results suggest the difference of the deformations between proton and neutron densities in the neutron-rich C isotopes. It was found that stable proton structure in C isotopes plays an important role in the enhancement the neutron skin structure as well as in the systematics of $B(E2)$ in the neutron-rich C.

  7. Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

  8. Theories of Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W

    1928-02-01

    The word "suggestion" has been used in educational, scientific and medical literature in slightly different senses. In psychological medicine the use of suggestion has developed out of the earlier use of hypnotic influence.Charcot defined hypnosis as an artificial hysteria, Bernheim as an artificially increased suggestibility. The two definitions need to be combined to give an adequate account of hypnosis. Moreover, due allowance should be made for the factors of dissociation and of rapport in hypnotic phenomena.The relationships between dissociation, suggestibility, and hypnotizability.Theories of suggestion propounded by Pierre Janet, Freud, McDougall, Pawlow and others. Ernest Jones's theory of the nature of auto-suggestion. Janet explains suggestion in terms of ideo-motor action in which the suggested idea, because of the inactivity of competing ideas, produces its maximum effect. Freud explains rapport in terms of the sex instinct "inhibited in its aim" (transference) and brings in his distinction of "ego" and "ego-ideal" (or "super-ego") to supplement the theory. Jones explains auto-suggestion in terms of narcissism. McDougall explains hypnotic suggestion in terms of the instinct of self-abasement. But different instincts may supply the driving power to produce suggestion-effects in different circumstances. Such instincts as those of self-preservation (fear) and gregariousness may play their part. Auto-suggestion as a therapeutic factor is badly named. It supplements, but does not supplant the will, and makes complete volition possible.

  9. Abyssal peridotites reveal the near-chondritic Fe isotopic composition of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Paul R.; Warren, Jessica M.; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Terrestrial oceanic and continental basalts are enriched by approximately +0.1‰ in 56Fe/54Fe ratio relative to primitive, undifferentiated meteorites (chondrites). The δ56Fe values of terrestrial basalts are also distinct from those of basalts from Mars and asteroid Vesta, which have chondritic Fe isotopic compositions. The processes responsible for the isotopic enrichment of terrestrial basalts are debated, in part because the Fe isotopic composition of the mantle source of terrestrial basalts is unknown. Here we report Fe isotopic measurements of abyssal peridotites, which are the residues of limited melting at oceanic ridges and are thus the best proxies for the composition of the convective portion of the mantle. Our data show that abyssal peridotites have a mean δ56Fe value of +0.010±0.007‰ (relative to IRMM-014), which is indistinguishable from chondrites. After correcting this data for seafloor weathering and mantle melting, we estimate the average Fe isotopic composition of the terrestrial mantle to be δ56Fe=+0.025±0.025‰, which is also indistinguishable from chondrites, within current analytical precision. We determine that the maximum shift in δ56Fe for peridotite residues during partial mantle melting is 0.01‰. Our results argue against isotopic fractionation during core-mantle differentiation or iron vaporization during the Moon-forming giant impact, because both processes would yield a bulk mantle δ56Fe value that is non-chondritic. In addition, our results suggest that disproportionation of mantle Fe2+-Fe3+ in perovskite and Fe0 metal and segregation of metal to the core could not have been a driver for Fe isotopic fractionation in the silicate mantle. Instead, the different iron isotopic compositions of abyssal peridotites and MORBs support mounting evidence for iron isotopic fractionation of melts but not residues during the formation of oceanic and continental crust.

  10. Suggested safeguards an

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    ... COORDINATION. (FACILITATION OR CASE MANAGEMENT) IN SOUTH AFRICA ... SUGGESTED SAFEGUARDS AND LIMITATIONS FOR EFFECTIVE AND .... professional practice.27 They have to assess the situation; educate the parents.

  11. Isotopic insights into microbial sulfur cycling in oil reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Hubbard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs (biosouring is often associated with secondary oil production where seawater containing high sulfate concentrations (~28 mM is injected into a reservoir to maintain pressure and displace oil. The sulfide generated from biosouring can cause corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks, and higher production costs. Isotope monitoring is a promising approach for understanding microbial sulfur cycling in reservoirs, enabling early detection of biosouring, and understanding the impact of souring. Microbial sulfate reduction is known to result in large shifts in the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of the residual sulfate, which can be distinguished from other processes that may be occurring in oil reservoirs, such as precipitation of sulfate and sulfide minerals. Key to the success of this method is using the appropriate isotopic fractionation factors for the conditions and processes being monitored. For a set of batch incubation experiments using a mixed microbial culture with crude oil as the electron donor, we measured a sulfur fractionation factor for sulfate reduction of -30‰. We have incorporated this result into a simplified 1D reservoir reactive transport model to highlight how isotopes can help discriminate between biotic and abiotic processes affecting sulfate and sulfide concentrations. Modeling results suggest that monitoring sulfate isotopes can provide an early indication of souring for reservoirs with reactive iron minerals that can remove the produced sulfide, especially when sulfate reduction occurs in the mixing zone between formation waters containing elevated concentrations of volatile fatty acids and injection water containing elevated sulfate. In addition, we examine the role of reservoir thermal, geochemical, hydrological, operational and microbiological conditions in determining microbial souring dynamics and hence the anticipated isotopic signatures.

  12. Paleoclimate and Amerindians: evidence from stable isotopes and atmospheric circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovvorn, M B; Frison, G C; Tieszen, L L

    2001-02-27

    Two Amerindian demographic shifts are attributed to climate change in the northwest plains of North America: at approximately 11,000 calendar years before present (yr BP), Amerindian culture apparently split into foothills-mountains vs. plains biomes; and from 8,000-5,000 yr BP, scarce archaeological sites on the open plains suggest emigration during xeric "Altithermal" conditions. We reconstructed paleoclimates from stable isotopes in prehistoric bison bone and relations between weather and fractions of C(4) plants in forage. Further, we developed a climate-change model that synthesized stable isotope, existing qualitative evidence (e.g., palynological, erosional), and global climate mechanisms affecting this midlatitude region. Our isotope data indicate significant warming from approximately 12,400 to 11,900 yr BP, supporting climate-driven cultural separation. However, isotope evidence of apparently wet, warm conditions at 7,300 yr BP refutes emigration to avoid xeric conditions. Scarcity of archaeological sites is best explained by rapid climate fluctuations after catastrophic draining of the Laurentide Lakes, which disrupted North Atlantic Deep Water production and subsequently altered monsoonal inputs to the open plains.

  13. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkranz, S.

    2003-01-01

    Based on arguments of the `reference- dependent' theory of consumer choice we assume that a retailer's discount of a manufacturer's suggested retail price changes consumers' demand. We can show that the producer benefits from suggesting a retail price. If consumers are additionally sufficiently `los

  14. Coper Isotope Fractionation in Porphyry Copper Deposits: A Controlled Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J.; Mathur, R.; Uhrie, J. L.; Hiskey, B.

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that copper is fractionated in the environment. However, the mechanisms for isotope fractionation and the role of organic and inorganic processes in the fractionation are not well understood. Here we used the well controlled experiments used by Phelps Dodge Corporation aimed at leaching copper from their ore deposits to constrain the mechanism of copper isotope fractionation in natural systems. The isotope data were collected on a Micromass Isoprobe. High temperature copper sulfides from ore deposits in Chile and Arizona yield delta 65Cu near 0 permil. The reproducibility of the data is better that 0.1 permil. Controlled experiments consisting of large columns of rocks were fed solutions containing bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferroxidans and Leptospirrilium ferroxidan. Solutions fom the columns were sampled for sixty days and analyzed for copper concentrations, oxidation potential, ferrous/ferric ratios and pH. The results indicate that the bacterially aided dissolution of copper fractionated copper. Preliminary experiments of copper dissolution not using bacteria show no isotope fractionation The original rock in the experiment has a delta 65Cu of -2.1. The first solutions that were collected from the columns had a delta 65Cu of -5.0 per mil. The liquid changed its isotopic composition from -50 to -10 during the sixty days of sampling. The greatest shift in the isotope ratios occurred the first 30 days when the copper recovered was less than 40% and the ferrous/ferric ratios were somewhat constant. At approximately 35 days after the start of the experiments, the copper recovery increases the ferrousferric ratio decreased and the copper isotope ratio of the fluids remained fairly constant. The data suggest that the bacteria are required to effectively fractionate copper isotopes in natural systems and that the mechanisms of bacterial aided copper dissolution may include a direct dissolution of the sulfides by the bacteria. Experiments

  15. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zemin; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xi-Chang; Liu, Weiping; Yang, Fangxing

    2015-09-15

    To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days' incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to -29.14 ± 0.22‰ and -29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = -1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  16. Comparative isotope ecology of African great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelze, Vicky M; Fahy, Geraldine; Hohmann, Gottfried; Robbins, Martha M; Leinert, Vera; Lee, Kevin; Eshuis, Henk; Seiler, Nicole; Wessling, Erin G; Head, Josephine; Boesch, Christophe; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2016-12-01

    The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp.). First, we explore differences in isotope baselines across different habitats and whether isotopic signatures in apes can be related to feeding niches (faunivory and folivory). Secondly, we illustrate how stable isotopic variations within African ape populations compare to other extant and extinct primates and discuss possible implications for dietary flexibility. Using 701 carbon and nitrogen isotope data points resulting from 148 sectioned hair samples and an additional collection of 189 fruit samples, we compare six different great ape sites. We investigate the relationship between vegetation baselines and climatic variables, and subsequently correct great ape isotope data to a standardized plant baseline from the respective sites. We obtained temporal isotopic profiles of individual animals by sectioning hair along its growth trajectory. Isotopic signatures of great apes differed between sites, mainly as vegetation isotope baselines were correlated with site-specific climatic conditions. We show that controlling for plant isotopic characteristics at a given site is essential for faunal data interpretation. While accounting for plant baseline effects, we found distinct isotopic profiles for each great ape population. Based on evidence from habituated groups and sympatric great ape species, these differences could possibly be related to faunivory and folivory. Dietary flexibility in apes varied, but temporal variation was overall

  17. Research Suggestions for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John L.

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to perform accurate research. Also includes suggestions for specific research projects under such headings as: (1) types; (2) environments; (3) interactions; (4) classification; (5) hexagonal model; and (6) differentiation. (HMV)

  18. Open to Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Reading, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Contributors offer suggestions concerning parents as reading stimulators, book discussions, a test bank for the secondary school/college reading lab, standardized reading tests, television reading, plagiarism, vocabulary development, and book reports. (FL)

  19. Open To Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Reading, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Suggests class activities in three short articles including: (1) "Students Evaluate Reading," by Lenore Sandel; (2) "Solving Verbal Analogies," by Edward J. Dwyer; and (3) "Becoming Testwise," by Dean Schoen. (RS)

  20. Influence of sea ice on ocean water vapor isotopes and Greenland ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eric S.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2016-12-01

    A warming climate results in sea ice loss and impacts to the Arctic water cycle. The water isotope parameter deuterium excess, a moisture source proxy, can serve as a tracer to help understand hydrological changes due to sea ice loss. However, unlocking the sea ice change signal of isotopes from ice cores requires understanding how sea ice changes impact deuterium excess, which is unknown. Here we present the first isotope data linking a gradient of sea ice extents to oceanic water vapor deuterium excess values. Initial loss of sea ice extent leads to lower deuterium excess moisture sources, and then values progressively increase with further ice loss. Our new process-based interpretation suggests that past rapid (1-3 years) Greenland ice core changes in deuterium excess during warming might not be the result of abrupt atmospheric circulation shifts, but rather gradual loss of sea ice extent at northern latitude moisture sources.

  1. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  2. High sulfur isotope fractionation associated with anaerobic oxidation of methane in a low sulfate, iron rich environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Sophia Weber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur isotope signatures provide key information for the study of microbial activity in modern systems and the evolution of the Earth surface redox system. Microbial sulfate reducers shift sulfur isotope distributions by discriminating against heavier isotopes. This discrimination is strain-specific and often suppressed at sulfate concentrations in the lower micromolar range that are typical to freshwater systems and inferred for ancient oceans. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is a sulfate-reducing microbial process with a strong impact on global sulfur cycling in modern habitats and potentially in the geological past, but its impact on sulfur isotope signatures is poorly understood, especially in low sulfate environments. We investigated sulfur cycling and 34S fractionation in a low-sulfate freshwater sediment with biogeochemical conditions analogous to Early Earth environments. The zone of highest AOM activity was associated in situ with a zone of strong 34S depletions in the pool of reduced sulfur species, indicating a coupling of sulfate reduction and AOM at sulfate concentrations < 50 µmol L-1. In slurry incubations of AOM-active sediment, the addition of methane stimulated sulfate reduction and induced a bulk sulfur isotope effect of ~29 ‰. Our results imply that sulfur isotope signatures may be strongly impacted by AOM even at sulfate concentrations two orders of magnitude lower than at present oceanic levels. Therefore, we suggest that sulfur isotope fractionation during AOM must be considered when interpreting 34S signatures in modern and ancient environment.

  3. Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron Rich Bismuth Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS344 :\\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experiment is to measure the optical isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of bismuth isotopes across the N=126 shell closure in order to extract the change in mean square charge radii ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle$) and static moments. These include the first isotones of lead to be measured directly above the shell closure and will provide new information on the systematics of the kink ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle)$ seen in the lead isotopic chain. After two very successful runs the programme has been extended to include the neutron deficient isotopes below $^{201}$Bi to study the systematics across the $i_{13/2}$ neutron sub-shell closure at N=118.\\\\ \\\\ During the initial 2 runs (9 shifts) the isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of three new isotopes, $ ^{210,212,213}$Bi and the 9$^{-}$ isomer of $^{210}$Bi have been measured. The accuracy of the previous measurements of $^{205,206,208}$Bi have been greatly improved. The samples of $ ^{208,210,210^{m}}$Bi were prepared by c...

  4. Stable lead isotopic analyses of historic and contemporary lead contamination of San Francisco Bay estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritson, P.I.; Bouse, R.M.; Flegal, A.R.; Luoma, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    Variations in stable lead isotopic composition (240Pb, 206Pb, 207Pb, 208Pb) in three sediment cores from the San Francisco Bay estuary document temporal changes in sources of lead during the past two centuries. Sediment, with lead from natural geologic sources, and relatively homogeneous lead isotopic compositions are overlain by sediments whose isotopic compositions indicate change in the sources of lead associated with anthropogenic modification of the estuary. The first perturbations of lead isotopic composition in the cores occur in the late 1800s concordant with the beginning of industrialization around the estuary. Large isotopic shifts, toward lower 206Pb/207Pb, occur after the turn of the century in both Richardson and San Pablo Bays. A similar relationship among lead isotopic compositions and lead concentrations in both Bays suggest contamination from the same source (a lead smelter). The uppermost sediments (post 1980) of all cores also have a relatively homogenous lead isotopic composition distinct from pre-anthropogenic and recent aerosol signatures. Lead isotopic compositions of leachates from fourteen surface sediments and five marsh samples from the estuary were also analyzed. These analyses suggest that the lead isotopic signature identified in the upper horizons of the cores is spatially homogeneous among recently deposited sediments throughout the estuary. Current aerosol lead isotopic compositions [Smith, D.R., Niemeyer, S., Flegal, A.R., 1992. Lead sources to California sea otters: industrial inputs circumvent natural lead biodepletion mechanisms. Environmental Research 57, 163-175] are distinct from the isotopic compositions of the surface sediments, suggesting that the major source of lead is cycling of historically contaminated sediments back through the water column. Both the upper core sediments and surface sediments apparently derive their lead predominantly from sources internal to the estuary. These results support the idea that

  5. Attitudes to Suggestions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER; JOHNSON

    2007-01-01

    As an Australian expat teaching English in China for over four years, I often encourage my students to not only learn the English language but also try to understand Western culture. This includes the fact that Westerners frequently initiate proactive suggestions on any aspects of soci-

  6. Suggestions for Teaching Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Na-na

    2013-01-01

    Teacher development and teaching practice(TP) have caught the eyes of researchers at home and abroad for many years. Many western scholars hold that reflective teaching is an efficient way to promote teacher development, but traditional TP is prevailing in China. Based on the merits and demerits of traditional TP and reflective TP, the author hopes to provide some suggestions for the people involved to promote the development of teacher education.

  7. Isotopic disproportionation during hydrogen isotopic analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sreejesh; Geilmann, Heike; Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Gehre, Matthias; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Brand, Willi A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale High-precision hydrogen isotope ratio analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic materials using high-temperature conversion (HTC) techniques has proven troublesome in the past. Formation of reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) has been suspected as a possible cause of incomplete H2 yield and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Methods The classical HTC reactor setup and a modified version including elemental chromium, both operated at temperatures in excess of 1400 °C, have been compared using a selection of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds, including caffeine. A focus of the experiments was to avoid or suppress hydrogen cyanide (HCN) formation and to reach quantitative H2 yields. The technique also was optimized to provide acceptable sample throughput. Results The classical HTC reaction of a number of selected compounds exhibited H2 yields from 60 to 90 %. Yields close to 100 % were measured for the experiments with the chromium-enhanced reactor. The δ2H values also were substantially different between the two types of experiments. For the majority of the compounds studied, a highly significant relationship was observed between the amount of missing H2and the number of nitrogen atoms in the molecules, suggesting the pyrolytic formation of HCN as a byproduct. A similar linear relationship was found between the amount of missing H2 and the observed hydrogen isotopic result, reflecting isotopic fractionation. Conclusions The classical HTC technique to produce H2 from organic materials using high temperatures in the presence of glassy carbon is not suitable for nitrogen-bearing compounds. Adding chromium to the reaction zone improves the yield to 100 % in most cases. The initial formation of HCN is accompanied by a strong hydrogen isotope effect, with the observed hydrogen isotope results on H2 being substantially shifted to more negative δ2H values. The reaction can be understood as an initial disproportionation leading to H2 and HCN

  8. Catastrophic shifts in ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Marten; Carpenter, Steve; Foley, Jonathan A.; Folke, Carl; Walker, Brian

    2001-10-01

    All ecosystems are exposed to gradual changes in climate, nutrient loading, habitat fragmentation or biotic exploitation. Nature is usually assumed to respond to gradual change in a smooth way. However, studies on lakes, coral reefs, oceans, forests and arid lands have shown that smooth change can be interrupted by sudden drastic switches to a contrasting state. Although diverse events can trigger such shifts, recent studies show that a loss of resilience usually paves the way for a switch to an alternative state. This suggests that strategies for sustainable management of such ecosystems should focus on maintaining resilience.

  9. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Zhang, Xi-Chang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liu, Weiping [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Alpha-cypermethrin (α-CP) can be degraded by microorganisms in soil. • Biodegradation of α-CP resulted in carbon isotope fractionation. • A relationship was found between carbon isotope ratios and concentrations of α-CP. • An enrichment factor ϵ of α-CP was determined as −1.87‰. • CSIA is applicable to assess biodegradation of α-CP. - Abstract: To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days’ incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to −29.14 ± 0.22‰ and −29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = −1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  10. Evaluating reaction pathways of hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis at elevated temperatures and pressures using carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments were performed to better understand the role of environmental factors on reaction pathways and corresponding carbon isotope fractionations during abiotic hydrothermal synthesis of organic compounds using piston cylinder apparatus at 750 °C and 5.5 kbars. Chemical compositions of experimental products and corresponding carbon isotopic values were obtained by a Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS system. Alkanes (methane and ethane), straight-chain saturated alcohols (ethanol and n-butanol) and monocarboxylic acids (formic and acetic acids) were generated with ethanol being the only organic compound with higher δ13C than CO2. CO was not detected in experimental products owing to the favorable water-gas shift reaction under high water pressure conditions. The pattern of δ13C values of CO2, carboxylic acids and alkanes are consistent with their equilibrium isotope relationships: CO2 > carboxylic acids > alkanes, but the magnitude of the fractionation among them is higher than predicted isotope equilibrium values. In particular, the isotopic fractionation between CO2 and CH4 remained constant at ∼31‰, indicating a kinetic effect during CO2 reduction processes. No "isotope reversal" of δ13C values for alkanes or carboxylic acids was observed, which indicates a different reaction pathway than what is typically observed during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis under gas phase conditions. Under constraints imposed in experiments, the anomalous 13C isotope enrichment in ethanol suggests that hydroxymethylene is the organic intermediate, and that the generation of other organic compounds enriched in 12C were facilitated by subsequent Rayleigh fractionation of hydroxymethylene reacting with H2 and/or H2O. Carbon isotope fractionation data obtained in this study are instrumental in assessing the controlling factors on abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems. Knowledge on how environmental conditions affect reaction pathways of abiotic synthesis of organic

  11. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Maïa; Carrasco, Nathalie; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Bernard, Sylvain; Rigaudier, Thomas; Fleury, Benjamin; Tissandier, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    The formation of organic compounds is generally assumed to result from abiotic processes in the Solar System, with the exception of biogenic organics on Earth. Nitrogen-bearing organics are of particular interest, notably for prebiotic perspectives but also for overall comprehension of organic formation in the young Solar System and in planetary atmospheres. We have investigated abiotic synthesis of organics upon plasma discharge, with special attention to N isotope fractionation. Organic aerosols were synthesized from N2-CH4 and N2-CO gaseous mixtures using low-pressure plasma discharge experiments, aimed at simulating chemistry occurring in Titan's atmosphere and in the protosolar nebula, respectively. The nitrogen content, the N speciation and the N isotopic composition were analyzed in the resulting organic aerosols. Nitrogen is efficiently incorporated into the synthesized solids, independently of the oxidation degree, of the N2 content of the starting gas mixture, and of the nitrogen speciation in the aerosols. The aerosols are depleted in 15N by 15-25‰ relative to the initial N2 gas, whatever the experimental setup is. Such an isotopic fractionation is attributed to mass-dependent kinetic effect(s). Nitrogen isotope fractionation upon electric discharge cannot account for the large N isotope variations observed among Solar System objects and reservoirs. Extreme N isotope signatures in the Solar System are more likely the result of self-shielding during N2 photodissociation, exotic effect during photodissociation of N2 and/or low temperature ion-molecule isotope exchange. Kinetic N isotope fractionation may play a significant role in the Titan's atmosphere. On the Titan's night side, 15N-depletion resulting from electron driven reactions may counterbalance photo-induced 15N enrichments occurring on the day's side. We also suggest that the low δ15N values of Archaean organic matter (Beaumont and Robert, 1999) are partly the result of abiotic synthesis of

  12. Quantification of organic pollutant degradation in contaminated aquifers using compound specific stable isotope analysis – Review of recent developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thullner, M.; Centler, F.; Richnow, H.-H.; Fischer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) has been established as a viable tool for proving, characterizing and assessing degradation of organic pollutants within contaminated aquifers. The fractionation of stable isotopes during contaminant degradation leads to observable shifts in stable is

  13. The significance of an Early Jurassic (Toarcian) carbon-isotope excursion in Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands), British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruthers, Andrew H.; Gröcke, Darren R.; Smith, Paul L.

    2011-07-01

    During the Early Toarcian there was a significant disruption in the short-term active carbon reservoir as revealed by carbon-isotope records, which show a broad positive shift that is interrupted by a large 5-7‰ negative excursion (δ 13C org). Carbon-isotope excursion co-occurs with the deposition of organic-rich shales in many areas. This perturbation in carbon isotopes is thought to be indicative of severe climate change and marine anoxia. The two leading hypotheses as to the cause of this event invoke either global or regional controls. Here we present carbon-isotope data from Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada showing a significant perturbation within a temporally constrained Early Toarcian succession that was deposited in the northeastern paleo-Pacific Ocean. These data reinforce the concept that the short-term active carbon reservoir was affected globally, and assist with the correlation of ammonite zonal schemes between western North America and Europe. The δ 13C org data show a broad positive shift that is interrupted by a sharp and pronounced negative excursion of 7‰ (8.5‰ in δ 13C wood) in the Early Toarcian Kanense Zone. This negative excursion also coincides with increasing total organic carbon (TOC) from ~ 0.4% to ~ 1.2%. These data suggest that the Early Toarcian carbon-isotope perturbation was indeed global and imprinted itself on all active global reservoirs of the exchangeable carbon cycle (deep marine, shallow marine, atmospheric).

  14. Copper isotope signatures in modern marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan H.; Vance, Derek; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-09-01

    The development of metal stable isotopes as tools in paleoceanography requires a thorough understanding of their modern marine cycling. To date, no Cu isotope data has been published for modern sediments deposited under low oxygen conditions. We present data encompassing a broad spectrum of hydrographic and redox regimes, including continental margin and euxinic (sulphide-containing) settings. Taken together with previously published data from oxic settings, these data indicate that the modern oceanic sink for Cu has a surprisingly homogeneous isotopic composition of about +0.3‰ (δ65Cu, relative to NIST SRM976). We suggest that this signature reflects one of two specific water-column processes: (1) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between soluble, isotopically heavy, Cu complexed to strong organic ligands and an isotopically light pool sorbed to particles that deliver Cu to the sediment, or (2) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between the same isotopically heavy ligand-bound pool and the particle reactive free Cu2+ species, with the latter being scavenged by particulates and thereby delivered to the sediment. An output flux of about +0.3‰ into sediments is isotopically light relative to the known inputs to the ocean (at around +0.6‰) and the seawater value of +0.6 to +0.9‰, suggesting the presence of an as yet unidentified isotopically light source of Cu to the oceans. We hypothesize that this source may be hydrothermal, or may result from the partial dissolution of continentally derived particles.

  15. Copper isotope fractionation by desert shrubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarrete, Jesica U., E-mail: jnavarrete2@miners.utep.edu [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Geological Sciences, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Viveros, Marian; Ellzey, Joanne T. [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Biological Sciences, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Borrok, David M. [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Geological Sciences, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Copper has two naturally occurring stable isotopes of masses 63 and 65 which can undergo mass dependent fractionation during various biotic and abiotic chemical reactions. These interactions and their resulting Cu isotope fractionations can be used to determine the mechanisms involved in the cycling of Cu in natural systems. In this study, Cu isotope changes were investigated at the organismal level in the metal-accumulating desert plant, Prosopis pubescens. Initial results suggest that the lighter Cu isotope was preferentially incorporated into the leaves of the plant, which may suggest that Cu was actively transported via intracellular proteins. The roots and stems show a smaller degree of Cu isotope fractionation and the direction and magnitude of the fractionations was dependent upon the levels of Cu exposure. Based on this and previous work with bacteria and yeast, a trend is emerging that suggests the lighter Cu isotope is preferentially incorporated into biological components, while the heavier Cu isotope tends to become enriched in aqueous solutions. In bacteria, plants and animals, intracellular Cu concentrations are strictly regulated via dozens of enzymes that can bind, transport, and store Cu. Many of these enzymes reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I). These initial results seem to fit into a broader picture of Cu isotope cycling in natural systems where oxidation/reduction reactions are fundamental in controlling the distributions of Cu isotopes.

  16. Measurement of the isotope shift of the 2{{\\rm{p}}}^{4}{}^{3}{{P}}_{2} \\rightarrow 2{{\\rm{p}}}^{3}3{\\rm{p}}{}^{3}{{P}}_{2} two-photon transition of O I and a revision of the triplet energy levels of atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, D.; Booth, J.-P.; Drag, C.; Blondel, C.

    2017-03-01

    Two-photon induced fluorescence of atomic oxygen, which is routinely used for plasma and flame diagnostics, is implemented with two counterpropagating laser beams of sufficient monochromaticity to permit Doppler-free spectroscopy. A single-mode injection-seeded pulsed Ti:sapphire laser has been frequency-doubled twice to produce narrow-band pulsed radiation at wavelengths around 225.6 nm, suitable to excite the ground-state-to-2{{{p}}}33{{p}}{}3{P} two-photon resonance line of oxygen. Accurate measurement of the injection-seeding wavelength provides new data on the excitation energy of the 3{{p}}{}3{P} states. The experiment was done both sequentially and simultaneously on 16O and 18O, which makes it possible to test recent calculations of the isotope shift. Having an absolute measurement of the excitation wave-number from the ground level, which has been the case only twice in previous spectroscopic studies of O I, we can re-examine the energy levels of the subset of triplet states and present an updated set of optimised energy values.

  17. The shifting beverage landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Maureen

    2010-04-26

    STOREY, M.L. The shifting beverage landscape. PHYSIOL BEHAV, 2010. - Simultaneous lifestyle changes have occurred in the last few decades, creating an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure that has led to overweight and obesity. Trends in the food supply show that total daily calories available per capita increased 28% since 1970. Total energy intake among men and women has also increased dramatically since that time. Some have suggested that intake of beverages has had a disproportional impact on obesity. Data collected by the Beverage Marketing Corporation between 1988-2008 demonstrate that, in reality, fewer calories per ounce are being produced by the beverage industry. Moreover, data from the National Cancer Institute show that soft drink intake represents 5.5% of daily calories. Data from NHANES 1999-2003 vs. 2003-06 may demonstrate a shift in beverage consumption for age/gender groups, ages 6 to>60years. The beverages provided in schools have significantly changed since 2006 when the beverage industry implemented School Beverage Guidelines. This voluntary action has removed full-calorie soft drinks from participating schools across the country. This shift to lower-calorie and smaller-portion beverages in school has led to a significant decrease in total beverage calories in schools. These data support the concept that to prevent and treat obesity, public health efforts should focus on energy balance and that a narrow focus on sweetened beverages is unlikely to have any meaningful impact on this complex problem. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cr isotope fractionation factors for Cr(VI) reduction by a metabolically diverse group of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Johnson, Thomas M.; Sanford, Robert A.

    2014-10-01

    Reduction of Cr(VI) is an important process that determines the geochemical behavior, mobility and bioavailability of Cr in both terrestrial and marine environments. Many metabolically diverse microorganisms possess Cr(VI) reduction capacity. Cr(VI) reduction fractionates Cr isotopes and thus 53Cr/52Cr ratios can be used to monitor Cr(VI) reduction and redox conditions. The magnitude of isotopic fractionation (ε) for a variety of microbial reduction mechanisms must be known for accurate interpretation of observed shifts in 53Cr/52Cr ratios. We determined isotopic fractionation factors for Cr(VI) reduction by metal reducers Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella sp. strain NR, a denitrifying soil bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri DCP-Ps1, and a sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris. All bacteria investigated in this study produced significant Cr isotope fractionation. The fractionation (ε) for G. sulfurreducens, Shewanella sp. (NR), P. stutzeri DCP-Ps1, and D. vulgaris were -3.03‰ ± 0.12‰, -2.17‰ ± 0.22‰, -3.14‰ ± 0.13‰, and -3.01‰ ± 0.11‰, respectively. Despite differences in microbial strains in this study, the ε did not vary significantly except for Shewanella sp. (NR). Our results suggest that strong isotopic fractionation is induced during Cr(VI) reduction under electron donor poor (∼300 μM) conditions.

  19. Absence of fractionation of mercury isotopes during trophic transfer of methylmercury to freshwater fish in captivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D.; Carvan, Michael J.; Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica A.; Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.

    2012-01-01

    We performed two controlled experiments to determine the amount of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation (MDF and MIF) of methylmercury (MeHg) during trophic transfer into fish. In experiment 1, juvenile yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were raised in captivity on commercial food pellets and then their diet was either maintained on unamended food pellets (0.1 μg/g MeHg) or was switched to food pellets with 1.0 μg/g or 4.0 μg/g of added MeHg, for a period of 2 months. The difference in δ202Hg (MDF) and Δ199Hg (MIF) between fish tissues and food pellets with added MeHg was within the analytical uncertainty (δ202Hg, 0.07 ‰; Δ199Hg, 0.06 ‰), indicating no isotope fractionation. In experiment 2, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) were raised in captivity on food pellets and then shifted to a diet of bloater (Coregonus hoyi) for 6 months. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg of the lake trout equaled the isotopic composition of the bloater after 6 months, reflecting reequilibration of the Hg isotopic composition of the fish to new food sources and a lack of isotope fractionation during trophic transfer. We suggest that the stable Hg isotope ratios in fish can be used to trace environmental sources of Hg in aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Compressive Shift Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Eldar, Yonina C.; Yang, Allen Y.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2014-08-01

    The classical shift retrieval problem considers two signals in vector form that are related by a shift. The problem is of great importance in many applications and is typically solved by maximizing the cross-correlation between the two signals. Inspired by compressive sensing, in this paper, we seek to estimate the shift directly from compressed signals. We show that under certain conditions, the shift can be recovered using fewer samples and less computation compared to the classical setup. Of particular interest is shift estimation from Fourier coefficients. We show that under rather mild conditions only one Fourier coefficient suffices to recover the true shift.

  1. Calcium isotope constraints on the end-Permian mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jonathan L; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Paytan, Adina; Depaolo, Donald J; Lehrmann, Daniel J; Yu, Meiyi; Wei, Jiayong

    2010-05-11

    The end-Permian mass extinction horizon is marked by an abrupt shift in style of carbonate sedimentation and a negative excursion in the carbon isotope (delta(13)C) composition of carbonate minerals. Several extinction scenarios consistent with these observations have been put forward. Secular variation in the calcium isotope (delta(44/40)Ca) composition of marine sediments provides a tool for distinguishing among these possibilities and thereby constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here we report delta(44/40)Ca across the Permian-Triassic boundary from marine limestone in south China. The delta(44/40)Ca exhibits a transient negative excursion of approximately 0.3 per thousand over a few hundred thousand years or less, which we interpret to reflect a change in the global delta(44/40)Ca composition of seawater. CO(2)-driven ocean acidification best explains the coincidence of the delta(44/40)Ca excursion with negative excursions in the delta(13)C of carbonates and organic matter and the preferential extinction of heavily calcified marine animals. Calcium isotope constraints on carbon cycle calculations suggest that the average delta(13)C of CO(2) released was heavier than -28 per thousand and more likely near -15 per thousand; these values indicate a source containing substantial amounts of mantle- or carbonate-derived carbon. Collectively, the results point toward Siberian Trap volcanism as the trigger of mass extinction.

  2. Fluid flow in extensional detachments determined from stable isotope analyses: Application to Kettle dome detachment, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilichini, A.; Teyssier, C.; Mulch, A.; Nachlas, W.

    2009-04-01

    In detachment systems that border metamorphic core complexes fluids convect from the surface to the detachment along faults and fractures in the brittle crust that serve as zones of recharge and discharge. This buoyancy-driven fluid flow is controlled by a high heat flow at the base of the system, beneath the detachment, where heat is advected by crustal thinning and magma intrusions. This hydrothermal convective flow is focused in the detachment for the duration of activity of the detachment and at relatively high temperature (300-500°C), resulting in very significant fluid-rock interaction and isotopic exchange. Studies of detachments in the North American Cordilleran core complexes suggest that meteoric fluids permeate detachment zones, as recorded by the deuterium composition of hydrous phases such as white mica, biotite, and amphibole. Quantifying fluid flux in detachments is a challenge because permeability of ductilely deforming rocks is poorly understood. The approach we are using focuses on oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in quartzite (+ minor mica) sections of detachments, complemented by high-precision chemical analyses of mica to understand their growth history and recrystallization process. The initial fluid isotopic composition is approximated using the deuterium composition of mica at a particular temperature that is given by oxygen isotopes in quartz-mica pairs. The more fluid interact with the quartzite, the larger the expected shift in oxygen isotope value. The Eocene Kettle Dome detachment in the North American Cordillera provides a continuous section of ~200 m thick quartzite mylonite where this methodology is applied. High-resolution sampling (up to 5 m) complements the initial sampling that was performed every 10 m in this section (Mulch et al., 2006, Tectonics, TC4001). Based on mica deuterium values, the fluid that participated in mica crystallization was meteoric in origin (~110 per mil). Interaction of this fluid with the quartz mylonite

  3. Isotope engineering of carbon nanotube systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F; Kramberger, Ch; Pfeiffer, R; Kuzmany, H; Zólyomi, V; Kürti, J; Singer, P M; Alloul, H

    2005-07-01

    The synthesis of a unique isotope engineered system, double-wall carbon nanotubes with natural carbon outer and highly 13C enriched inner walls, is reported from isotope enriched fullerenes encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The material allows the observation of the D line of the highly defect-free inner tubes that can be related to a curvature induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling. Ab initio calculations explain the inhomogeneous broadening of inner tube Raman modes due to the distribution of different isotopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance shows a significant contrast of the isotope enriched inner SWCNTs compared to other carbon phases and provides a macroscopic measure of the inner tube mass content. The high curvature of the small diameter inner tubes manifests in an increased distribution of the chemical shift tensor components.

  4. Stable isotope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  5. Constraints on the vital effect in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite by oxygen isotopic modification of seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Michaël; Horner, Tristan J.; Minoletti, Fabrice; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we show that there are independent controls of 18O/16O and 13C/12C fractionation in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite due to the contrasting kinetics of each isotope system. We demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the oxygen isotope fractionation with respect to equilibrium is related to the balance between calcification rate and the replenishment of the internal pool of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). As such, in fast growing cells, such as those of Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica (forming the so-called “heavy group”), calcification of the internal carbon pool occurs faster than complete isotopic re-adjustment of the internal DIC pool with H2O molecules. Hence, coccoliths reflect the heavy oxygen isotope signature of the CO2 overprinting the whole DIC pool. Conversely, in large and slow growing cells, such as Coccolithus pelagicus ssp. braarudii, complete re-equilibration is achieved due to limited influx of CO2 leading to coccoliths that are precipitated in conditions close to isotopic equilibrium (“equilibrium group”). Species exhibiting the most negative oxygen isotope composition, such as Calcidiscus leptoporus (“light group”), precipitate coccolith under increased pH in the coccolith vesicle, as previously documented by the “carbonate ion effect”. We suggest that, for the carbon isotope system, any observed deviation from isotopic equilibrium is only “apparent”, as the carbon isotopic composition in coccolith calcite is controlled by a Rayleigh fractionation originating from preferential incorporation of 12C into organic matter. Therefore, species with low PIC/POC ratios as E. huxleyi and G. oceanica are shifted towards positive carbon isotope values as a result of predominant carbon fixation into the organic matter. By contrast, cells with higher PIC/POC as C. braarudii and C. leptoporus maintain, to some extent, the original negative isotopic composition of the CO2. The calcareous

  6. Manus Water Isotope Investigation Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Jessica L [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Cobb, Kim M [Georgia Institute of Technology; Noone, David [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to investigate climatic controls on the stable isotopic composition of water vapor, precipitation, and seawater in the western tropical Pacific. Simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation from April 28 to May 8, 2013, at the Manus Tropical Western Pacific Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site, provided several key insights into the nature of the climate signal archived in precipitation and vapor isotope ratios. We observed a large shift from lower to higher isotopic values in vapor and precipitation because of the passage of a mesoscale convective system west of the site and a transition from a regional stormy period into a more quiescent period. During the quiescent period, the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation indicated the predominance of oceanic evaporation in determining the isotopic composition of boundary-layer vapor and local precipitation. There was not a consistent relationship between intra-event precipitation amount at the site and the stable isotopic composition of precipitation, thus challenging simplified assumptions about the isotopic “amount effect” in the tropics on the time scale of individual storms. However, some storms did show an amount effect, and deuterium excess values in precipitation had a significant relationship with several meteorological variables, including precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and cloud base height across all measured storms. The direction of these relationships points to condensation controls on precipitation deuterium excess values on intra-event time scales. The relationship between simultaneous measurements of vapor and precipitation isotope ratios during precipitation events indicates the ratio of precipitation-to-vapor isotope ratios can diagnose precipitation originating from a vapor source unique from boundary-layer vapor and rain re-evaporation.

  7. Geochemistry, geochronology, mineralogy, and geology suggest sources of and controls on mineral systems in the southern Toquima Range, Nye County, Nevada; with geochemistry maps of gold, silver, mercury, arsenic, antimony, zinc, copper, lead, molybdenum, bismuth, iron, titanium, vanadium, cobalt, beryllium, boron, fluorine, and sulfur; and with a section on lead associations, mineralogy and paragenesis, and isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawe, Daniel R.; Hoffman, James D.; Doe, Bruce R.; Foord, Eugene E.; Stein, Holly J.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Geochemistry maps showing the distribution and abundance of 18 elements in about 1,400 rock samples, both mineralized and unmineralized, from the southern Toquima Range, Nev., indicate major structural and lithologic controls on mineralization, and suggest sources of the elements. Radiometric age data, lead mineralogy and paragenesis data, and lead-isotope data supplement the geochemical and geologic data, providing further insight into timing, sources, and controls on mineralization. Major zones of mineralization are centered on structural margins of calderas and principal northwest-striking fault zones, as at Round Mountain, Manhattan, and Jefferson mining districts, and on intersections of low-angle and steep structures, as at Belmont mining district. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, mostly limestones (at Manhattan, Jefferson, and Belmont districts), and porous Oligocene ash-flow tuffs (at Round Mountain district) host the major deposits, although all rock types have been mineralized as evidenced by numerous prospects throughout the area. Principal mineral systems are gold-silver at Round Mountain where about 7 million ounces of gold and more than 4 million ounces of silver has been produced; gold at Gold Hill in the west part of the Manhattan district where about a half million ounces of gold has been produced; gold-mercury-arsenic-antimony in the east (White Caps) part of the Manhattan district where a few hundred thousand ounces of gold has been produced; and silver-lead-antimony at Belmont where more than 150,000 ounces of silver has been produced. Lesser amounts of gold and silver have been produced from the Jefferson district and from scattered mines elsewhere in the southern Toquima Range. A small amount of tungsten was produced from mines in the granite of the Round Mountain pluton exposed east of Round Mountain, and small amounts of arsenic, antimony, and mercury have been produced elsewhere in the southern Toquima Range. All elements show unique

  8. Isotope Tales: Remaining Problems, Unsolvable Questions, and Gentle Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    fogel, marilyn; bradley, christina; newsome, seth; filipp, fabian

    2014-05-01

    Earth's biomes function and adapt today as climate changes and ecosystems and the organisms within them adapt. Stable isotope biogeochemistry has had a major influence in understanding climate perturbations and continues to be an active area of research on many fronts. Banking on the success of compound specific stable isotope analyses of amino acids, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen isotopes continue to reveal subtle shifts in oceanic food webs and metabolic changes in microbes, plants, and animals. A biochemical understanding of exactly how organisms process and partition stable isotopes during metabolism remains unsolved, but is required if this field is to move beyond description to quantitation. Although the patterns of carbon and nitrogen isotopes are fairly well established in the common amino acids, we need to consider specifics: How do shifting metabolic pathways (metabolomics) influence the outcome of stable isotope partitioning? What influence does the gut microflora in animals have on isotopic labeling? What are the intramolecular isotope patterns of common amino acids and what do they tell us? What can be learned with other isotope systems, such as hydrogen? Results and ideas of how to move forward in this field will be presented starting at the molecular level and ending with ecosystems.

  9. Decoupling of carbon isotope records between organic matter and carbonate prior to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Early Jurassic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Stephane; Kothe, Tim; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Suan, Guillaume; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Across the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary (P-To, Early Jurassic), ca. 1 Myr before the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE), an initial negative carbon isotope excursion has been documented in western Tethys sedimentary rocks. In carbonate, its amplitude (2-3 permil) is similar to the subsequent excursion recorded at the onset of the T-OAE. Being also associated with a rapid warming event, the significance of this first carbon isotope shift, in terms of paleoenvironmental interpretation and triggering mechanism, remains however elusive. Taking advantage of expanded and rather continuous sections in the High Atlas of Morocco, several high-resolution, paired organic-inorganic carbon isotope records have been obtained across the Upper Pliensbachian - Lower Toarcian interval. At the onset of the T-OAE, an abrupt 1-2 permil negative shift is recorded in both organic and inorganic phases, succeeded by a relatively longer term 1-2 permil negative trend and a final slow return to pre-excursion conditions. In accordance with previous interpretations, this pattern indicates a perturbation of the entire exogenic carbon isotope reservoir at the onset of the T-OAE by the sudden release of isotopically light carbon into the atmosphere. By contrast, there is no negative shift in carbon isotopes for the P-To event recorded in bulk organic matter of Morocco. Given the strong dominance of terrestrial particles in the bulk organic matter fraction, this absence indicates that massive input of 12C-rich carbon into the atmosphere is not likely to have happened during the P-To event. A pronounced (2 permil) and abrupt negative shift in carbon isotope is however recorded in the bulk carbonate phase. We suggest that this decoupling between organic and inorganic phase is due to changes in the nature of the bulk carbonate phase. Indeed, the negative shift occurs at the lithological transition between Pliensbachian-lowermost Toarcian limestone-marl alternations and the Lower Toarcian marl

  10. Tissue turnover rates and isotopic trophic discrimination factors in the endothermic teleost, pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Madigan

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis (SIA of highly migratory marine pelagic animals can improve understanding of their migratory patterns and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of isotopic analyses relies on knowledge of isotope turnover rates and tissue-diet isotope discrimination factors. Laboratory-derived turnover rates and discrimination factors have been difficult to obtain due to the challenges of maintaining these species in captivity. We conducted a study to determine tissue- (white muscle and liver and isotope- (nitrogen and carbon specific turnover rates and trophic discrimination factors (TDFs using archived tissues from captive Pacific bluefin tuna (PBFT, Thunnus orientalis, 1-2914 days after a diet shift in captivity. Half-life values for (15N turnover in white muscle and liver were 167 and 86 days, and for (13C were 255 and 162 days, respectively. TDFs for white muscle and liver were 1.9 and 1.1‰ for δ(15N and 1.8 and 1.2‰ for δ(13C, respectively. Our results demonstrate that turnover of (15N and (13C in bluefin tuna tissues is well described by a single compartment first-order kinetics model. We report variability in turnover rates between tissue types and their isotope dynamics, and hypothesize that metabolic processes play a large role in turnover of nitrogen and carbon in PBFT white muscle and liver tissues. (15N in white muscle tissue showed the most predictable change with diet over time, suggesting that white muscle δ(15N data may provide the most reliable inferences for diet and migration studies using stable isotopes in wild fish. These results allow more accurate interpretation of field data and dramatically improve our ability to use stable isotope data from wild tunas to better understand their migration patterns and trophic ecology.

  11. Mo isotopes in OAE 2 black shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Stephane; Vance, Derek; Cameron, Vyllinniskii; Archer, Corey; Robinson, Stuart A.

    2014-05-01

    the redox conditions, δ98Mo values show similar values and trends along the sections of La Contessa and Furlo, and ODP site 1276. At the onset of OAE 2, an increasing trend in δ98Mo is observed with values ranging from -0.6 to 0.6 ‰during the 2nd half of OAE 2, the δ98Mo curve shows a progressive shift towards more negative values. This pattern is contrasted with the Mo isotope record from DSDP site 367. Before the OAE 2 interval, the δ98Mo values fluctuate between 0.15 and 0.48‰during OAE 2, an increase in δ98Mo is observed, ranging from 0.15 to 1.15 ‰Then, the Mo isotopes show two rapid fluctuations towards lower values (~0.70 ) and increase again to relatively constant values, with values fluctuating around an average value of 1.10 o Both the western Tethys and the Northern Atlantic sites show redox variations, reaching anoxic/euxinic conditions. In the western Tethys, despite evidence of strongly reducing conditions, the relatively light δ98Mo values suggest that redox conditions may not have been fully euxinic. The light δ98Mo values may thus be related to non-quantitative removal of Mo from the water column. At site 367, the Mo isotope variations and the RSTE concentrations suggest fully euxinic conditions and the sediments deposited during OAE 2 may have recorded the seawater signature.

  12. Oxygen isotope evidence for orbital-scale glacio-eustasy during middle Paleozoic greenhouse climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiling, B. P.; Elrick, M.

    2011-12-01

    Orbital-scale cycles (or parasequences) are pervasive throughout Phanerozoic and Precambrian marine deposits. Cycles deposited under cool (icehouse) conditions are commonly attributed to orbitally-driven glacio-eustasy whereas cycles forming during warm (greenhouse) climates, which lack direct evidence for glacial ice, are not well understood because autogenic and tectonic processes can often be eliminated. This study utilizes δ18O of marine apatite to explore whether orbital-scale glacio-eustasy controlled cycle formation during Paleozoic greenhouse time intervals. Stacked orbital-scale carbonate cycles within the Upper Silurian Henryhouse Formation of central Oklahoma and the Upper Devonian Devil's Gate Formation of central Nevada were sampled for conodont apatite. Both successions accumulated in shallow epicontinental seas on the flooded North American craton in southern tropical paleolatitudes. Subtidal cycles (2-7 m thick) at both locations are generally composed of deeper subtidal skeletal mudstone-wackestone that coarsen upward into shallow subtidal skeletal wackestone-packstone at cycle tops which show no evidence of subaerial exposure. Conodont δ18O values from the Silurian range from 15.8-19.5% and the Devonian from 16.3-19.0%. The majority of sampled Silurian and Devonian cycles record low δ18O values in the deepest water facies (during sea-level rise and highstand) and higher δ18O values in the shallowest water facies (during sea-level fall and lowstand). The magnitude of isotopic shift across individual cycles ranges from 2.2-3.1% for Silurian and ≤1.6% for Devonian cycles. If the intracycle isotopic shifts were due only to seawater temperature changes, then subtropical surface seawater temperature (SST) fluctuated between ~6-14°C during individual cycle formation. This magnitude of shift is greater than that recorded in the tropics since the Last Glacial Maximum, suggesting that the Silurian and Devonian isotopic shifts were not just the result

  13. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  14. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  15. Separation of Isotopes via Dynamical Delocalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farhan Saif

    2008-01-01

    Based on the dynamical de-localization phenomenon we show that different isotopes of a material can be separated.We explain that the suggested scheme can be realized in the laboratory using presently available experimental facilities.

  16. 13C isotope effects on infrared bands of quenched carbonaceous composite (QCC)

    CERN Document Server

    Wada, S; Yamamura, I; Murata, Y; Tokunaga, A T

    2003-01-01

    We investigate carbon isotope effects on the infrared bands of a laboratory analogue of carbonaceous dust, the quenched carbonaceous composite (QCC), synthesized from a plasma gas of methane with various 12C/13C ratios. Peak shifts to longer wavelengths due to the substitution of 12C by 13C are clearly observed in several absorption bands. The shifts are almost linearly proportional to the 13C fraction. New features associated with 13C are not seen, indicating that the infrared bands in the QCC are not very localized vibration modes but come from vibrations associated with rather large carbon structures. An appreciable peak shift is detected in the 6.2 micron band, which is attributed to a carbon-carbon vibration. A peak shift in an out-of-plane bending mode of aromatic C--H at 11.4 micron is also observed, while only a small shift is detected in the 3.3 micron band, which arises from a C--H stretching mode. The present experiment suggests that peak shifts in the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands, particularl...

  17. Implementing OpenShift

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial-based approach to using OpenShift and deploying custom or pre-built web applications to the OpenShift Online cloud.This book is for software developers and DevOps alike who are interested in learning how to use the OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service for developing and deploying applications, how the environment works on the back end, and how to deploy their very own open source Platform-as-a-Service based on the upstream OpenShift Origin project.

  18. Quantized beam shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Dalvit, D A R

    2015-01-01

    We predict quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-H\\"anchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$, while the Goos- H\\"anchen ones in multiples of $\\alpha^2$. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  19. Stable N isotope values of black spruce ecosystem components integrate source N isotope values, soil fertility, and microbial biomass: a natural and experimental study from Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, J. R.; Schuur, T.; Mack, M. C.; Nettelton Hollingsworth, T.; Bååth, E.

    2009-12-01

    approach that of the source N isotope values. This suggested black spruce switched from fungal delivered N to direct uptake of fertilizer. This was corroborated by the observation that N fertilization alone also suppressed the biomass of standing and actively growing fungi in soils. Surprisingly, P fertilization stimulated resin exchangeable pools of soil NO3 and led to significant enrichment of the residual soil NO3-N isotope pool by 18‰ relative to the control. Fractionation against 15N during denitrification of the increased NO3 concentrations could account for the isotopic enrichment. Combined, our natural gradient and experimental approach illustrated that measuring numerous ecosystem components, including source N isotope values, are necessary to understand the isotopic variability in a landscape dominated by a single species of tree. It also illustrated how the biomass, and presumed activity, of ECM fungi fluctuates across the landscape in response to shifting soil fertility.

  20. Classical toy models for the monopole shift and the quadrupole shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Katrin; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2012-08-28

    The penetration of s- and p(1/2)-electrons into the atomic nucleus leads to a variety of observable effects. The presence of s-electrons inside the nucleus gives rise to the isotope shift in atomic spectroscopy, and to the isomer shift in Mössbauer spectroscopy. Both well-known phenomena are manifestations of the more general monopole shift. In a recent paper (Koch et al., Phys. Rev. A, 2010, 81, 032507), we discussed the existence of the formally analogous quadrupole shift: a tensor correction to the electric quadrupole interaction due to the penetration of relativistic p(1/2)-electrons into the nucleus. The quadrupole shift is predicted to be observable by high-accuracy molecular spectroscopy on a set of 4 molecules (the quadrupole anomaly). The simple physics behind all these related phenomena is easily obscured by an elaborate mathematical formalism that is required for their derivation: a multipole expansion in combination with perturbation theory, invoking quantum physics and ideally relativity. In the present paper, we take a totally different approach. We consider three classical 'toy models' that can be solved by elementary calculus, and that nevertheless contain all essential physics of the monopole and quadrupole shifts. We hope that this intuitive (yet exact) analysis will increase the understanding about multipole shift phenomena in a broader community.

  1. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzakh, A. E., E-mail: barzakh@mail.ru; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for {sup 189–198,} {sup 211}Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  2. Isotopic investigation of contemporary and historic changes in penguin trophic niches and carrying capacity of the southern Indian ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Audrey; Cherel, Yves

    2011-02-02

    A temperature-defined regime shift occurred in the 1970s in the southern Indian Ocean, with simultaneous severe decreases in many predator populations. We tested a possible biological link between the regime shift and predator declines by measuring historic and contemporary feather isotopic signatures of seven penguin species with contrasted foraging strategies and inhabiting a large latitudinal range. We first showed that contemporary penguin isotopic variations and chlorophyll a concentration were positively correlated, suggesting the usefulness of predator δ¹³C values to track temporal changes in the ecosystem carrying capacity and its associated coupling to consumers. Having controlled for the Suess effect and for increase CO₂ in seawater, δ¹³C values of Antarctic penguins and of king penguins did not change over time, while δ¹³C of other subantarctic and subtropical species were lower in the 1970s. The data therefore suggest a decrease in ecosystem carrying capacity of the southern Indian Ocean during the temperature regime-shift in subtropical and subantarctic waters but not in the vicinity of the Polar Front and in southward high-Antarctic waters. The resulting lower secondary productivity could be the main driving force explaining the decline of subtropical and subantarctic (but not Antarctic) penguins that occurred in the 1970s. Feather δ¹⁵N values did not show a consistent temporal trend among species, suggesting no major change in penguins' diet. This study highlights the usefulness of developing long-term tissue sampling and data bases on isotopic signature of key marine organisms to track potential changes in their isotopic niches and in the carrying capacity of the environment.

  3. Carbon and oxygen isotopic constraints on paleoclimate and paleoelevation of the southwestern Qaidam basin, northern Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Lin Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the growth of the northern Tibetan Plateau and associated climate change by applying oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions in Cenozoic strata in the southwestern Qaidam basin. The X-ray diffraction and isotopic studies reveal that the carbonate minerals are mainly authigenic and they do not preserve any evidence for detrital carbonate and diagenesis. The isotope data show large fluctuations in the δ18O and δ13C values in the middle–late Eocene, indicating relatively warm and seasonal dry climate. The positive correlation of the δ18O and δ13C values in the Oligocene and the positive shift of the δ13C values from the Eocene to Oligocene suggest that the climate changed to arid in the Oligocene. However, the δ18O values show negative shift, which is closely related to the global cooling event. During the Miocene, the δ13C values vary between –2‰ and –4‰, whereas the δ18O values show continuous negative shift. The mean δ18O values decrease from –8.5‰ in the early Miocene to –10.0‰ in the late Miocene. The stable isotope-based paleoaltimetry results suggest that the elevation of the southwestern Qaidam basin was approximately 1500 m in the middle–late Eocene and Oligocene. Subsequently, during Miocene the crustal uplift process started and the elevation reached approximately 2000 m in the early Miocene and 2500 m in the late Miocene, which suggests large-scale growth of the northern Tibet Plateau during the Miocene.

  4. Isotopic investigation of contemporary and historic changes in penguin trophic niches and carrying capacity of the southern Indian ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Jaeger

    Full Text Available A temperature-defined regime shift occurred in the 1970s in the southern Indian Ocean, with simultaneous severe decreases in many predator populations. We tested a possible biological link between the regime shift and predator declines by measuring historic and contemporary feather isotopic signatures of seven penguin species with contrasted foraging strategies and inhabiting a large latitudinal range. We first showed that contemporary penguin isotopic variations and chlorophyll a concentration were positively correlated, suggesting the usefulness of predator δ¹³C values to track temporal changes in the ecosystem carrying capacity and its associated coupling to consumers. Having controlled for the Suess effect and for increase CO₂ in seawater, δ¹³C values of Antarctic penguins and of king penguins did not change over time, while δ¹³C of other subantarctic and subtropical species were lower in the 1970s. The data therefore suggest a decrease in ecosystem carrying capacity of the southern Indian Ocean during the temperature regime-shift in subtropical and subantarctic waters but not in the vicinity of the Polar Front and in southward high-Antarctic waters. The resulting lower secondary productivity could be the main driving force explaining the decline of subtropical and subantarctic (but not Antarctic penguins that occurred in the 1970s. Feather δ¹⁵N values did not show a consistent temporal trend among species, suggesting no major change in penguins' diet. This study highlights the usefulness of developing long-term tissue sampling and data bases on isotopic signature of key marine organisms to track potential changes in their isotopic niches and in the carrying capacity of the environment.

  5. On the calculation of Mossbauer isomer shift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filatov, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A quantum chemical computational scheme for the calculation of isomer shift in Mossbauer spectroscopy is suggested. Within the described scheme, the isomer shift is treated as a derivative of the total electronic energy with respect to the radius of a finite nucleus. The explicit use of a finite nuc

  6. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku, Toyama (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  7. Newtonian kinetic isotope effects. Observation, prediction, and origin of heavy-atom dynamic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kelmara K; Hirschi, Jennifer S; Singleton, Daniel A

    2009-06-24

    Intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects were determined for the dimerization of cyclopentadiene. Substantial isotope effects were observed in three positions, despite the C(2) symmetry of the cycloaddition transition state and the absence of dynamical bottlenecks after this transition state. The observed isotope effects were predicted well from trajectory studies by extrapolating the outcomes of trajectories incorporating superheavy isotopes of carbon, ranging from (20)C to (140)C. Trajectory studies suggest that the isotope effects are unrelated to zero-point energy or the geometrical and momentum properties of the transition state. However, steepest-descent paths in mass-weighted coordinates correctly predict the direction of the isotope effects, supporting a novel origin in Newton's second law of motion.

  8. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  9. Deglacial shift in subsurface watermass source in the subtropcal South Pacific North of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiraldi, B.; Sikes, E. L.; Elmore, A. C.; Cook, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    depletion jump suggests a sudden increase in either preformed nutrients or respired CO2 accumulating along the flow path from the source region to the site of our core. The combined isotopic reconstruction with a coeval shift in δ13C are echoed in the isotopic signal of Globorotalia inflata strongly suggesting that there was a change in the sources of subsurface mode waters to the Southwest Pacific at the start of the deglaciation. δ18Oseawater indicates Southern Ocean/ high latitude fresher source waters dominated during the glaciation with a late glacial peak in saltiness or more mid latitude source. The 19kyr depletion shift in the δ13C record combined with a lasting shift to a salty/lower latitude signal in the δ18Oseawater indicates increased input of more equatorial Pacific-sourced tropical mode waters with longer flow paths allowing for the accumulation of depleted δ13C from respired CO2. We suggest a shift in the position of significant fronts such as the ITCZ, STF and southern westerlies with the onset of the deglaciation instigated a fundamental change in source location and composition of mode waters in the mid latitude Southwest Pacific. During the earlier portion of the last glaciation the Southern Ocean is the primary source of subsurface mode waters in the subtropical Pacific.

  10. Silicon isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2011-10-01

    The Si isotopic composition of Earth's mantle is thought to be homogeneous (δ 30Si = -0.29 ± 0.08‰, 2 s.d.) and not greatly affected by partial melting and recycling. Previous analyses of evolved igneous material indicate that such rocks are isotopically heavy relative to the mantle. To understand this variation, it is necessary to investigate the degree of Si isotopic fractionation that takes place during magmatic differentiation. Here we report Si isotopic compositions of lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland, which has formed in a region devoid of old, geochemically diverse crust. We show that Si isotopic composition varies linearly as a function of silica content, with more differentiated rocks possessing heavier isotopic compositions. Data for samples from the Afar Rift Zone, as well as various igneous USGS standards are collinear with the Hekla trend, providing evidence of a fundamental relationship between magmatic differentiation and Si isotopes. The effect of fractionation has been tested by studying cumulates from the Skaergaard Complex, which show that olivine and pyroxene are isotopically light, and plagioclase heavy, relative to the Si isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle. Therefore, Si isotopes can be utilised to model the competing effects of mafic and felsic mineral fractionation in evolving silicate liquids and cumulates. At an average SiO 2 content of ˜60 wt.%, the predicted δ 30Si value of the continental crust that should result from magmatic fractionation alone is -0.23 ± 0.05‰ (2 s.e.), barely heavier than the mantle. This is, at most, a maximum estimate, as this does not take into account weathered material whose formation drives the products toward lighter δ 30Si values. Mass balance calculations suggest that removal of continental crust of this composition from the upper mantle will not affect the Si isotopic composition of the mantle.

  11. OpenShift cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gulati, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web application developer who wants to use the OpenShift platform to host your next big idea but are looking for guidance on how to achieve this, then this book is the first step you need to take. This is a very accessible cookbook where no previous knowledge of OpenShift is needed.

  12. Shifting employment revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan; Gramuglia, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The CLR-network examined in 2006 the phenomenon of undeclared labour, with specific regard to the construction sector. The resulting study, Shifting Employment: undeclared labour in construction (Shifting-study hereafter), gave evidence that this is an area particularly affected by undeclared activi

  13. Making Shifts toward Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGatha, Maggie B.; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The Leading for Mathematical Proficiency (LMP) Framework (Bay-Williams et al.) has three components: (1) The Standards for Mathematical Practice; (2) Shifts in classroom practice; and (3) Teaching skills. This article briefly describes each component of the LMP framework and then focuses more in depth on the second component, the shifts in…

  14. Shifted Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2007-01-01

    Delayed mixing is a problem of theoretical interest and practical importance, e.g., in speech processing, bio-medical signal analysis and financial data modelling. Most previous analyses have been based on models with integer shifts, i.e., shifts by a number of samples, and have often been carrie...

  15. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Jackson, Matthew G. [Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 (United States); Barrat, Jean-Alix, E-mail: eapringle@wustl.edu, E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: pringle@ipgp.fr, E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr, E-mail: jackson@geol.ucsb.edu, E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr [Université Européenne de Bretagne, Université de Brest, CNRS UMR 6538 (Domaines Océaniques), I.U.E.M., Place Nicolas Copernic, F-29280 Plouzané Cedex (France)

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  16. Stable isotope evidence for trophic niche partitioning in a South African savanna rodent community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacqueline CODRON; Kevin J DUFFY; Nico L AVENANT; Matt SPONHEIMER; Jennifer LEICHLITER; Oliver PAINE; Paul SANDBERG; Daryl CODRON

    2015-01-01

    Species’ partitioning of resources remains one of the most integral components for understanding community assem-bly. Analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in animal tissues has the potential to help resolve patterns of partitioning be-cause these proxies represent the individual’s diet and trophic niche, respectively. Using free-ranging rodents in a southern Afri-can savanna as a model community, we find that syntopic species within habitats occupy distinct isotope niches. Moreover, spe-cies with strongly overlapping isotope niches did not overlap in their spatial distribution patterns, suggesting an underlying effect of competitive exclusion. Niche conservatism appears to characterize the behaviour of most species in our sample – with little or no observed changes across habitats – with the exception of one species,Mastomys coucha. This species displayed a generalist distribution, being found in similar abundances across a variety of habitats. This spatial pattern was coupled with a generalist isotope niche that shifted across habitats, likely in response to changes in species composition over the same spatial gradient. The case forM. coucha supports contentions that past competition effects played a significant evolutionary role in shaping community structures of today, including the absence of strong interspecific niche overlaps within particular habitats. Our study highlights the value of stable isotope approaches to help resolve key questions in community ecology, and moreover introduces novel ana-lytical approaches to quantifying isotope niche breadths and niche overlaps that are easily comparable with traditional metrices [Current Zoology 61 (3): 397–441, 2015].

  17. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a m

  18. Pneumatic, PLC Controlled, Automotive Gear Shifting Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntaser Momani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a gear shifting mechanism was designed and applied to make the shifting process faster and less destructible for the driver. The new device must be reliable, has a small dimensions, low construction and maintenance cost. This paper aims to improve gear shifting process using devices as: a manual four speed gear box, four pneumatic double acting cylinders, four pneumatic two position five ways directional control valves, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC LOGO unit, an electrical motor, an electrical clutch, a belt, two pulleys, limit switches, push buttons, bulbs, a table (holder and power supply. According to suggested gear_ shifting method the driver can select the transmission gear ratio without moving his hands from the steering wheel by putting the gear shifting push buttons on the steering wheel. Using this method leaves to the driver the excitement of choosing the shifting moment.

  19. Predicting equilibrium uranium isotope fractionation in crystals and solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the rapidly growing interest in using 238U/235U measurements as a proxy for changes in oxygen abundance in surface and near-surface environments, the present theoretical understanding of uranium isotope fractionation is limited to a few simple gas-phase molecules and analogues of dissolved species (e.g., 1,2,3). Understanding uranium isotope fractionation behavior in more complicated species, such as crystals and adsorption complexes, will help in the design and interpretation of experiments and field studies, and may suggest other uses for 38U/235U measurements. In this study, a recently developed first-principles method for estimating the nuclear volume component of field shift fractionation in crystals and complex molecular species (4) is combined with mass-dependent fractionation theory to predict equilibrium 38U/235U fractionations in aqueous and crystalline uranium compounds, including uraninite (UO2). The nuclear field shift effect, caused by the interaction of electrons with the finite volume of the positive charge distribution in uranium nuclei, is estimated using Density Functional Theory and the Projector Augmented Wave method (DFT-PAW). Tests against relativistic electronic structure calculations and Mössbauer isomer shift data indicate that the DFT-PAW method is reasonably accurate, while being much better suited to models of complex and crystalline species. Initial results confirm previous predictions that the nuclear volume effect overwhelms mass depdendent fractionation in U(VI)-U(IV) exchange reactions, leading to higher 238U/235U in U(IV) species (i.e., for UO2 xtal vs. UO22+aq, ln αNV ≈ +1.8‰ , ln αMD ≈ -0.8‰, ln αTotal ≈ +1.0‰ at 25ºC). UO2 and U(H2O)94+, are within ~0.4‰ of each other, while U(VI) species appear to be more variable. This suggests that speciation is likely to significantly affect natural uranium isotope fractionations, in addition to oxidation state. Tentatively, it appears that uranyl-type (UO22

  20. High sulfur isotope fractionation associated with anaerobic oxidation of methane in a low sulfate, iron rich environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Hannah; Thamdrup, Bo; Habicht, Kirsten

    2016-06-01

    Sulfur isotope signatures provide key information for the study of microbial activity in modern systems and the evolution of the Earth surface redox system. Microbial sulfate reducers shift sulfur isotope distributions by discriminating against heavier isotopes. This discrimination is strain-specific and often suppressed at sulfate concentrations in the lower micromolar range that are typical to freshwater systems and inferred for ancient oceans. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a sulfate-reducing microbial process with a strong impact on global sulfur cycling in modern habitats and potentially in the geological past, but its impact on sulfur isotope signatures is poorly understood, especially in low sulfate environments. We investigated sulfur cycling and 34S fractionation in a low-sulfate freshwater sediment with biogeochemical conditions analogous to Early Earth environments. The zone of highest AOM activity was associated in situ with a zone of strong 34S depletions in the pool of reduced sulfur species, indicating a coupling of sulfate reduction and AOM at sulfate concentrations oceanic levels. Therefore, we suggest that sulfur isotope fractionation during AOM must be considered when interpreting 34S signatures in modern and ancient environment.

  1. Translocation of isotopically distinct macroalgae: A route to low-cost biomonitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröcke, Darren R; Racionero-Gómez, Blanca; Marschalek, James W; Greenwell, H Chris

    2017-10-01

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(15)N) in macroalgae are often used to identify sources of nitrogenous pollution in fluvial and estuarine settings. This approach assumes that the macroalgal δ(15)N is representative of the sources of the pollution averaged over a timespan in the order of days to weeks. The preferential uptake of a particular nitrogen compound or potential for fractionation in the water column or during uptake and assimilation by the macroalgae could make this assumption invalid. Laboratory studies were therefore performed to investigate the uptake and assimilation of both nitrate and ammonium at a variety of concentrations using the vegetative (non-fertile) tips of the brown macroalgae, Fucus vesiculosus. Nitrate appeared to fractionate at high concentrations, and was found to be taken up more rapidly than ammonia; within 13 days, the macroalgae tips were in isotopic equilibrium with the nitrate solution at 500 μM. These experiments were complemented by an investigation involving the translocation of macroalgae collected from a site enriched in (15)N relative to natural levels (Staithes, UK), to the River Tees, Middlesbrough (UK), a site depleted in (15)N relative to natural levels. The nitrogen isotope signature shifted by ∼50% within 7 days, with samples deployed nearer the surface subject to greater change. These findings suggest that the translocation of macroalgae with isotopically distinct signatures can be used as a rapid, cost-efficient method for nitrogen biomonitoring in estuarine environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Iron isotope fractionation during microbial reduction of iron: The importance of adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icopini, G. A.; Anbar, A. D.; Ruebush, S. S.; Tien, M.; Brantley, S. L.

    2004-03-01

    In experiments investigating the causes of Fe isotope fractionation, the δ56/54Fe value of Fe(II) remaining in solution (Fe(II)(aq)) after reduction of Fe(III) (goethite) by Shewanella putrefaciens is ˜-1.2‰ relative to the goethite, in agreement with previous research. The addition of an electron shuttle did not affect fractionation, suggesting that Fe isotope fractionation may not be related to the kinetics of the electron transfer. Furthermore, in abiotic, anaerobic FeCl2(aq) experiments in which approximately one-third of Fe(II)(aq) is lost from solution due to adsorption of Fe(II) onto goethite, the δ56/54Fe value of Fe(II)(aq) remaining in solution is shifted by -0.8‰ relative to FeCl2. This finding demonstrates that anaerobic nonbiological interaction between Fe(II) and goethite can generate significant Fe isotope fractionation. Acid extraction of sorbed Fe(II) from goethite in experiments reveals that heavy Fe preferentially sorbs to goethite. Simple mass-balance modeling indicates that the isotopic composition of the sorbed Fe(II) pool is ˜+1.5‰ to +2.5‰ heavier than Fe in the goethite [˜2.7‰ 3.7‰ heavier than aqueous Fe(II)]. Mass balance is also consistent with a pool of heavy Fe that is not released to solution during acid extraction.

  3. Exploring the Potential of Laser Ablation Carbon Isotope Analysis for Examining Ecology during the Ontogeny of Middle Pleistocene Hominins from Sima de los Huesos (Northern Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Garcia

    Full Text Available Laser ablation of tooth enamel was used to analyze stable carbon isotope compositions of teeth of hominins, red deer, and bears from middle Pleistocene sites in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain, to investigate the possibility that this technique could be used as an additional tool to identify periods of physiological change that are not detectable as changes in tooth morphology. Most of the specimens were found to have minimal intra-tooth variation in carbon isotopes (< 2.3‰, suggesting isotopically uniform diets through time and revealing no obvious periods of physiological change. However, one of the two sampled hominin teeth displayed a temporal carbon isotope shift (3.2‰ that was significantly greater than observed for co-occurring specimens. The δ13C value of this individual averaged about -16‰ early in life, and -13‰ later in life. This isotopic change occurred on the canine crown about 4.2 mm from the root, which corresponds to an approximate age of two to four years old in modern humans. Our dataset is perforce small owing to the precious nature of hominid teeth, but it demonstrates the potential utility of the intra-tooth isotope profile method for extracting ontogenetic histories of human ancestors.

  4. Exploring the Potential of Laser Ablation Carbon Isotope Analysis for Examining Ecology during the Ontogeny of Middle Pleistocene Hominins from Sima de los Huesos (Northern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nuria; Feranec, Robert S; Passey, Benjamin H; Cerling, Thure E; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Laser ablation of tooth enamel was used to analyze stable carbon isotope compositions of teeth of hominins, red deer, and bears from middle Pleistocene sites in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain, to investigate the possibility that this technique could be used as an additional tool to identify periods of physiological change that are not detectable as changes in tooth morphology. Most of the specimens were found to have minimal intra-tooth variation in carbon isotopes (< 2.3‰), suggesting isotopically uniform diets through time and revealing no obvious periods of physiological change. However, one of the two sampled hominin teeth displayed a temporal carbon isotope shift (3.2‰) that was significantly greater than observed for co-occurring specimens. The δ13C value of this individual averaged about -16‰ early in life, and -13‰ later in life. This isotopic change occurred on the canine crown about 4.2 mm from the root, which corresponds to an approximate age of two to four years old in modern humans. Our dataset is perforce small owing to the precious nature of hominid teeth, but it demonstrates the potential utility of the intra-tooth isotope profile method for extracting ontogenetic histories of human ancestors.

  5. Exploring the Potential of Laser Ablation Carbon Isotope Analysis for Examining Ecology during the Ontogeny of Middle Pleistocene Hominins from Sima de los Huesos (Northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nuria; Feranec, Robert S.; Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Laser ablation of tooth enamel was used to analyze stable carbon isotope compositions of teeth of hominins, red deer, and bears from middle Pleistocene sites in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain, to investigate the possibility that this technique could be used as an additional tool to identify periods of physiological change that are not detectable as changes in tooth morphology. Most of the specimens were found to have minimal intra-tooth variation in carbon isotopes (< 2.3‰), suggesting isotopically uniform diets through time and revealing no obvious periods of physiological change. However, one of the two sampled hominin teeth displayed a temporal carbon isotope shift (3.2‰) that was significantly greater than observed for co-occurring specimens. The δ13C value of this individual averaged about -16‰ early in life, and -13‰ later in life. This isotopic change occurred on the canine crown about 4.2 mm from the root, which corresponds to an approximate age of two to four years old in modern humans. Our dataset is perforce small owing to the precious nature of hominid teeth, but it demonstrates the potential utility of the intra-tooth isotope profile method for extracting ontogenetic histories of human ancestors. PMID:26673156

  6. Generation of Radixenon Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Pitts, W. K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Reeder, Paul L.; Thomas, Charles W.

    2003-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed an automated system for separating Xe from air and can detect the following radioxenon isotopes, 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. This report details the techniques used to generate the various radioxenon isotopes that are used for the calibration of the detector as well as other isotopes that have the potential to interfere with the fission produced radioxenon isotopes. Fission production is covered first using highly enriched uranium followed by a description and results from an experiment to produce radioxenon isotopes from neutron activation of ambient xenon.

  7. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  8. Oxygen-isotope trends and seawater temperature changes across the Late Cambrian Steptoean positive carbon-isotope excursion (SPICE event)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrick, M.; Rieboldt, S.; Saltzman, M.; McKay, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The globally recognized Late Cambrian Steptoean positive C-isotope excursion (SPICE) is characterized by a 3???-5??? positive ??13C shift spanning SPICE represents a widespread ocean anoxic event leading to enhanced burial/preservation of organic matter (Corg) and pyrite. We analyzed ??18O values of apatitic inarticulate brachiopods from three Upper Cambrian successions across Laurentia to evaluate paleotemperatures during the SPICE. ??18O values range from ~12.5??? to 16.5???. Estimated seawater temperatures associated with the SPICE are unreasonably warm, suggesting that the brachiopod ??18O values were altered during early diagenesis. Despite this, all three localities show similar trends with respect to the SPICE ??13C curve, suggesting that the brachiopod apatite preserves a record of relative ??18O and temperature changes. The trends include relatively high ??18O values at the onset of the SPICE, decreasing and lowest values during the main event, and an increase in values at the end of the event. The higher ??18O values during the global extinction at the onset of the SPICE suggests seawater cooling and supports earlier hypotheses of upwelling of cool waters onto the shallow shelf. Decreasing and low ??18O values coincident with the rising limb of the SPICE support the hypothesis that seawater warming and associated reduced thermohaline circulation rates contributed to decreased dissolved O2 concentrations, which enhanced the preservation/burial of Corg causing the positive ??13C shift. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  9. Bethe logarithm and QED shift for lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zong-Chao; Drake, G W F

    2003-09-12

    A novel finite basis set method is used to calculate the Bethe logarithm for the ground 2 (2)S(1/2) and excited 3 (2)S(1/2) states of lithium. The basis sets are constructed to span a huge range of distance scales within a single calculation, leading to well-converged values for the Bethe logarithm. The results are used to calculate an accurate value for the complete quantum electrodynamic energy shift up to order alpha(3) Ry. The calculated 3 (2)S(1/2)-2 (2)S(1/2) transition frequency for 7Li is 27 206.092 6(9) cm(-1), and the ionization potential for the 2 (2)S(1/2) state is 43 487.158 3(6) cm(-1). The 7Li-6Li isotope shift is also considered, and all the results compared with experiment.

  10. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic δ13C and δ15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes—resident and transient—collected across ~25° of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in δ15N values of ~2.5‰ through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable δ15N and δ13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas δ15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ~1.5‰, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean δ13C and δ15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean

  11. Stable isotopic characterisation of francolite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J. M.; Benmore, R. A.; Coleman, M. L.; Soldi, C.; Yeh, H.-W.; O'Brien, G. W.

    1986-02-01

    Stable isotopic data are presented for 112 samples of francolite from 18 separate phosphate deposits. Values of δ 13C and δ 34S in most offshore deposits suggest formation within oxic or suboxic environments either by carbonate replacement or direct precipitation of francolite from water of normal marine compositions. The exceptions are concretionary francolite from Namibia, which has an isotopic composition in keeping with its formation within organic-rich sediments, and that from offshore Morocco, which has an isotopic signature of the anoxic/suboxic interface. Onshore deposits from Jordan, Mexico, South Africa and, possibly, the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the western U.S.A., are substantially depleted in 18O: they appear to be too altered for deductions to be made about their environments of formation. In other onshore deposits which are unaltered, or minimally altered, the isotopic composition suggests that some formed within sulphate-reducing sediments (Sedhura, Morocco) whilst francolite from the Georgina Basin of Australia formed at the oxic/anoxic boundary, where oxidation of biogenic H 2S decreases the δ 34S of pore water. In general, pelletal samples show non-oxic isotopic signatures, whilst non-pelletal samples show oxic isotopic signatures, but samples from Namibia, Peru (Ica Plateau) and the Californian and Moroccan margins are exceptions to this rule. Morphology may therefore be a misleading indicator of francolite genesis as no definitive relation exists between phosphorite type and isotopic signature.

  12. Fluid heterogeneity during granulite facies metamorphism in the Adirondacks: stable isotope evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, J.W.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The preservation of premetamorphic, whole-rock oxygen isotope ratios in Adirondack metasediments shows that neither these rocks nor adjacent anorthosites and gneisses have been penetrated by large amounts of externally derived, hot CO2-H2O fluids during granulite facies metamorphism. This conclusion is supported by calculations of the effect of fluid volatilization and exchange and is also independently supported by petrologic and phase equilibria considerations. The data suggest that these rocks were not an open system during metamorphism; that fluid/rock ratios were in many instances between 0.0 and 0.1; that externally derived fluids, as well as fluids derived by metamorphic volatilization, rose along localized channels and were not pervasive; and thus that no single generalization can be applied to metamorphic fluid conditions in the Adirondacks. Analyses of 3 to 4 coexisting minerals from Adirondack marbles show that isotopic equilibrium was attained at the peak of granulite and upper amphibolite facies metamorphism. Thus the isotopic compositions of metamorphic fluids can be inferred from analyses of carbonates and fluid budgets can be constructed. Carbonates from the granulite facies are on average, isotopically similar to those from lower grade or unmetamorphosed limestones of the same age showing that no large isotopic shifts accompanied high grade metamorphism. Equilibrium calculations indicate that small decreases in ??18O, averaging 1 permil, result from volatilization reactions for Adirondack rock compositions. Additional small differences between amphibolite and granulite facies marbles are due to systematic lithologie differences. The range of Adirondack carbonate ??18O values (12.3 to 27.2) can be explained by the highly variable isotopic compositions of unmetamorphosed limestones in conjunction with minor 18O and 13C depletions caused by metamorphic volatilization suggesting that many (and possibly most) marbles have closely preserved their

  13. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Five main types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed-source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results, and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  14. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LightWater Reactors (CASL). Fivemain types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  15. Competition from Isotopic Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Fabre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During later MOIS3, in Europe two populations were present, autochthonous Neanderthals and modern humans. Ecological competition between these two populations has often been evoked but never demonstrated. Our aim is to establish whether resource competition occurred. In this paper, in order to examine the possibility of ecological competition between these two populations, 599 isotopic data were subjected to rigorous statistical treatment and analysis through mixing models. The aim of this paper was to compare dietary strategies of Neanderthals and modern humans over time. Our conclusions suggest that Neanderthals and modern humans shared dietary habits in the particular environmental context of MOIS3 characterised in Europe by climatic deterioration. In this environmental context, the resource competition between Neanderthals and modern humans may have accelerated the disappearance of the Neanderthal population.

  16. Proliferation-resistant stable isotope separation based on optical pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol-Jung; Park, Hyunmin; Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Lim, Gwon; Kim, Taek-Soo; Rho, Sipyo; Cha, Yong-Ho; Han, Jamin; Jeong, Do-Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of). Quantum Optics Division

    2008-07-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the laser stable isotope separation based on optical pumping which can be applied to isotopes with small isotopic shift, provides high enrichment, is economical owing to high efficiency, and is proliferation-resistant. KAERI's laser isotope separation is based on isotope-selective optical pumping by very narrow bandwidth continuous wave laser followed by efficient infrared photo-ionization. KAERI demonstrated the pilot production of Tl-203 enriching over 97 % and separating 100 mg/hr. KAERI also demonstrated the separation of Yb-168 over 30 % and Yb- 176 over 97 % with tens of mg/hr. KAERI plans to scale up the production of Tl-203 up to 500 mg/hr and apply it to separation of Zn-67, Zn-70, Ba-130 and Ca-48 which are very important in medical industry and basic sciences. (author)

  17. Isotopic Constraints on the Origin and Evolution of Geothermal Fluids, Long Valley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. T.; Kennedy, B. M.; Depaolo, D. J.; Evans, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    Successful management of geothermal resources requires hydrologic models that define and predict fluid flow in fracture-dominated systems. Such models are necessary to assess the resource potential, the impact of fluid production on the reservoir and the impact that new wells will have on existing production. We present new data on variations in O, D, and Sr isotopes in thermal waters of the Long Valley (California, USA) geothermal system and use them to assess fluid flow and water-rock interaction in the system. Geothermal well water samples collected June 2005 to June 2007 have temperatures of 41-190°C, δ18O from -16.5 to -13.5‰, and δD from -123 to -111‰. The low values suggest recharge from the west and north rims of the caldera, consistent with a general west-to-east decrease in temperature. Both δ18O and δD are displaced from the local meteoric water line and are positively correlated with Cl- concentrations for all thermal water samples hotter than 50°C. The Sr isotope ratios in the currently producing part of the field are clustered near 0.708, with a small west-to-east gradient of decreasing values from 0.7080 to 0.7078 over a distance of a few kilometers. These values are higher than those of the primary reservoir rocks (0.7060-0.7065), so the Sr isotopic ratio of the hot fluids must be set in another rock type. Granites from the northern and western rims of the caldera have 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7078-0.7100 and are possible sources of hot (200°C+) water entering the Long Valley geothermal system. The O isotope values of the fluids are also far out of isotopic equilibrium with host rocks. The small gradient in Sr isotope ratios, associated with minimal shift in O isotopes in this part of the system, probably reflects water-rock reaction, and indicates that flowing waters are contained in widely spaced (10m or more) fractures. Observed variations in O and D isotopes outside of the producing part of the field are inconsistent with a water rock reaction

  18. The Marine Biogeochemistry of Zinc Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    dust (Niger) Sapropel (Mediterranean) 4* Deep-Sea Sediments * • Lobster Liver Mussel tissue Plankton Zooplankton Zinc ores * * * Sediment trap material...of natural plankton over large changes in nutrient concentrations in the Peru Upwelling Region. This suggests either that the isotope effect for Zn...hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, natural plankton , and seawater. By measuring Zn isotopes in a diverse array of

  19. Stable isotopes and turnover of nitrate in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähnke, K.; Johannsen, A.; Emeis, K.

    2009-04-01

    The German Bight is a hot-spot of river-induced eutrophication of the North Sea due to nitrate loads discharged into this semi-isolated embayment by several large rivers. We analysed stable isotope signatures of water column nitrate in the area on a grid of stations in winter and early spring 2007. Overall spatial patterns of δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- image the predominant influence of the rivers Rhine and Elbe on the German Bight. On a smaller scale, however, and in offshore stations, nitrate assimilation of an incipient phytoplankton bloom is indicated by parallel enrichment of δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-. Intriguingly, the enrichment ratio in ɛ18: ɛ15 is 1.5:1, differing from the ratio of 1:1 associated with uptake by marine phytoplankton. These data suggest that the shift in nitrate isotopes is not solely due to beginning phytoplankton assimilation, but that, despite low temperatures, nitrate in the outer regions of the German Bight derives to a considerable extent from nitrification. These novel data mark remineralization in sediments as an important source of DIN and underscore the role of sediments in recharging water column nutrient inventories.

  20. Tracking Eukaryotic Production and Burial Through Time with Zinc Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, T. Y. S.; Planavsky, N.; Owens, J. D.; Love, G. D.; Lyons, T.; Peterson, L. C.; Knoll, A. H.; Dupont, C. L.; Reinhard, C.; Zumberge, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zinc is an important, often co-limiting nutrient for eukaryotes in the oceans today. Given the importance of Zn in the modern oceans, we developed a Zn isotope approach to track the extent of Zn limitation and eukaryotic production through Earth's history. Specifically, we use the isotopic systematics of the pyrite (δ66Znpyr), rock extracts (bitumen) and kerogen pyrolysate (δ66Znorg) within euxinic black shales. We show that δ66Znpyr of euxinic core-top muds from the Cariaco basin capture the global deep seawater signature, validating its use as a seawater proxy. Additionally, we propose that Δ66Znpyr-org can be used to track surface water zinc bioavailability. Detailed studies of short-lived oceanic anoxic events such as Cretaceous OAE2, which punctuate an otherwise dominantly oxic Phanerozoic world, exhibit dramatic shifts in seawater δ66Zn and organic bound zinc. Such perturbations are consistent with the demise of eukaryotes under a nitrogen stressed regime, in which cyanobacteria carry the competitive advantage. Contradictory to previous models, however, our data suggest that zinc remained largely bioavailable throughout these anoxic intervals despite significant drawdown of the global reservoir. The framework developed from studies of the modern, Cenozoic, and Mesozoic can be used to track the Precambrian evolution of the marine Zn cycle and the rise of eukaryotic algae to ecological dominance.

  1. Variations of the glacio-marine air mass front in West Greenland through water vapor isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    While the isotopic distribution of precipitation has been widely used for research in hydrology, paleoclimatology, and ecology for decades, intensive isotopic studies of atmospheric water vapor has only recently been made possible by spectral-based technology. New instrumentation based on this technology opens up many opportunities to investigate short-term atmospheric dynamics involving the water cycle and moisture transport. We deployed a Los Gatos Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) at Kangerlussuaq, Greenland from July 21 to August 15, and measured the water vapor concentration and its isotopic ratios continuously at 10s intervals. A Danish Meteorological Institute site is located about 1 km from the site of the deployment, and meteorological data is collected at 30 min intervals. During the observation period, the vapor concentration of the ambient air ranges from 5608.4 to 11189.4 ppm; dD and d18O range from -254.5 to -177.7 ‰ and -34.2 to -23.2 ‰, respectively. The vapor content (dew point) and the isotopic ratios are both strongly controlled by the wind direction. The easterly winds are associated with dry, isotopically depleted air masses formed over the glacier, while westerly winds are associated with moist and isotopically enriched air masses from the marine/fjord surface. This region typically experiences katabatic winds off of the ice sheet to the east. However, during some afternoons, the wind shifts 180 degrees, blowing off the fjord to the west. This wind switch marks the onset of a sea breeze, and significant isotopic enrichment results. Enrichment in deuterium is up to 60 ‰ with a mean of 15‰, and oxygen-18 is enriched by 3‰ on average and up to 8 ‰. Other afternoons have no change in wind, and only small changes in humidity and vapor isotopic ratios. The humidity and isotopic variations suggest the local atmosphere circulation is dominated by relatively high-pressure systems above the cold glaciers and cool sea surface, and diurnal

  2. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Kyle C.; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-03-01

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity.

  3. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Kyle C; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-03-08

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity.

  4. Ca, Sr, O and D isotope approach to defining the chemical evolution of hydrothermal fluids: Example from Long Valley, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shaun T.; Kennedy, B. Mack; DePaolo, Donald J.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William C.

    2013-12-01

    We present chemical and isotopic data for fluids, minerals and rocks from the Long Valley meteoric-hydrothermal system. The samples encompass the presumed hydrothermal upwelling zone in the west moat of the caldera, the Casa Diablo geothermal field, and a series of wells defining a nearly linear, ∼16 km long, west-to-east trend along the likely fluid flow path. Fluid samples were analyzed for the isotopes of water, Sr, and Ca, the concentrations of major cations and anions, alkalinity, and total CO2. Water isotope data conform to trends documented in earlier studies, interpreted as indicating a single hydrothermal fluid mixing with local groundwater. Sr isotopes show subtle changes along the flow path, which requires rapid fluid flow and minimal reaction between the channelized fluids and the wallrocks. Sr and O isotopes are used to calculate fracture spacing using a dual porosity model. Calculated fracture spacing and temperature data for hydrothermal fluids indicate the system is (approximately) at steady-state. Correlated variations among total CO2, and the concentration and isotopic composition of Ca suggest progressive fluid degassing (loss of CO2), which drives calcite precipitation as the fluid flows west-to-east and cools. The shifts in Ca isotopes require that calcite precipitated at temperatures of 150-180 °C is fractionated by ca. -0.3‰ to -0.5‰ relative to aqueous species. Our data are the first evidence that Ca isotopes undergo kinetic fractionation at high temperatures (>100 °C) and can be used to trace calcite precipitation along hydrothermal fluid flow paths.

  5. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana G Popa-Lisseanu

    Full Text Available The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers.

  6. Coupled Iron and Sulfur Isotope Constraints on the Archean and Paleoproterozoic Ocean Redox State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O. J.; Bekker, A.

    2009-05-01

    The rise of atmospheric oxygen level by ca. 2.3 Ga have led to dramatic shifts in the iron and sulfur oceanic cycles. Past studies of non-mass dependent and mass dependent sulfur isotope record in sedimentary sulfides over geological time have placed important constraints on biogeochemical cycle of sulfur and evolution of Precambrian ocean chemistry. Recently, we applied a similar time-record approach to explore potential changes in Fe isotope composition of pyrite in black shales. Although the underlying mechanisms for Fe isotope fractionation in organic-rich sediments are debated, we identified direct link between the rise of atmospheric oxygen and changes in the Fe ocean cycle suggesting that Fe isotopes are useful proxies to the past ocean redox state. Since biogeochemical cycles of Fe and S are closely coupled in marine systems, Fe-limitation and S-limitation for pyrite formation in black shales should leave imprint on the isotopic record of both elements. Coupled Fe and S isotope systematics of Devonian pyrite display a range of 50‰ in δ34S values whereas δ56Fe values vary between - 1.0 and +0.1‰ consistent with Fe isotope variations in modern marine sediments. Similarly, pyrite in the 1.88 Ga Gunflint Formation has δ34S values ranging from - 32‰ to +10‰ and displays a range of δ56Fe values between 0 to - 0.4‰. In contrast, Archean black shales (e.g. Manjeri Fm., Belingwe Belt and Jeerinah Fm., Hamersley Basin) display a smaller range of δ34S values between together with ubiquitous non-mass dependent S-isotope fractionation but a larger range of δ56Fe values from - 3.5 to +0.2‰. A transitional period between ca. 2.3 and ca. 1.8 Ga is marked by a larger spread of δ34S values from - 34 to +28‰, disappearance of MIF and a larger range of δ56Fe values from - 1.7 to +1.1‰. These results confirm that after the rise of atmospheric oxygen by ca. 2.3 Ga, Paleoproterozoic ocean became stratified and gradually affected by an increase of seawater

  7. A global Ge isotope budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronas, J. Jotautas; Hammond, Douglas E.; McManus, James; Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Siebert, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of Ge isotope composition and ancillary data for samples of river water, low- and high-temperature hydrothermal fluids, and seawater. The dissolved δ74Ge composition of analyzed rivers ranges from 2.0 to 5.6‰, which is significantly heavier than previously determined values for silicate rocks (δ74Ge = 0.4-0.7‰, Escoube et al., Geostand. Geoanal. Res., 36(2), 2012) from which dissolved Ge is primarily derived. An observed negative correlation between riverine Ge/Si and δ74Ge signatures suggests that the primary δ74Ge fractionation mechanism during rock weathering is the preferential incorporation of light isotopes into secondary weathering products. High temperature (>150 °C) hydrothermal fluids analyzed in this study have δ74Ge of 0.7-1.6‰, most likely fractionated during fluid equilibration with quartz in the reaction zone. Low temperature (25-63 °C) hydrothermal fluids are heavier (δ74Ge between 2.9‰ and 4.1‰) and most likely fractionated during Ge precipitation with hydrothermal clays. Seawater from the open ocean has a δ74Gesw value of 3.2 ± 0.4‰, and is indistinguishable among the different ocean basins at the current level of precision. This value should be regulated over time by the isotopic balance of Ge sources and sinks, and a new compilation of these fluxes is presented, along with their estimated isotopic compositions. Assuming steady-state, non-opal Ge sequestration during sediment authigenesis likely involves isotopic fractionation Δ74Gesolid-solution that is -0.6 ± 1.8‰.

  8. In-line phase shift tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammonds, Jeffrey C.; Price, Ronald R.; Pickens, David R.; Donnelly, Edwin F. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to (1) demonstrate laboratory measurements of phase shift images derived from in-line phase-contrast radiographs using the attenuation-partition based algorithm (APBA) of Yan et al.[Opt. Express 18(15), 16074–16089 (2010)], (2) verify that the APBA reconstructed images obey the linearity principle, and (3) reconstruct tomosynthesis phase shift images from a collection of angularly sampled planar phase shift images.Methods: An unmodified, commercially available cabinet x-ray system (Faxitron LX-60) was used in this experiment. This system contains a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a nominal focal spot size of 10 μm. The digital detector uses CsI/CMOS with a pixel size of 50 × 50 μm. The phantoms used consisted of one acrylic plate, two polystyrene plates, and a habanero pepper. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed from 51 images acquired over a ±25° arc. All phase shift images were reconstructed using the APBA.Results: Image contrast derived from the planar phase shift image of an acrylic plate of uniform thickness exceeded the contrast of the traditional attenuation image by an approximate factor of two. Comparison of the planar phase shift images from a single, uniform thickness polystyrene plate with two polystyrene plates demonstrated an approximate linearity of the estimated phase shift with plate thickness (−1600 rad vs −2970 rad). Tomographic phase shift images of the habanero pepper exhibited acceptable spatial resolution and contrast comparable to the corresponding attenuation image.Conclusions: This work demonstrated the feasibility of laboratory-based phase shift tomosynthesis and suggests that phase shift imaging could potentially provide a new imaging biomarker. Further investigation will be needed to determine if phase shift contrast will be able to provide new tissue contrast information or improved clinical performance.

  9. Cu isotopes in marine black shales record the Great Oxidation Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Rodríguez, Nathalie P; Partin, Camille A; Lalonde, Stefan V; Andersson, Per; Weiss, Dominik J; El Albani, Abderrazak; Rodushkin, Ilia; Konhauser, Kurt O

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenation of the atmosphere ∼2.45-2.32 billion years ago (Ga) is one of the most significant geological events to have affected Earth's redox history. Our understanding of the timing and processes surrounding this key transition is largely dependent on the development of redox-sensitive proxies, many of which remain unexplored. Here we report a shift from negative to positive copper isotopic compositions (δ(65)CuERM-AE633) in organic carbon-rich shales spanning the period 2.66-2.08 Ga. We suggest that, before 2.3 Ga, a muted oxidative supply of weathering-derived copper enriched in (65)Cu, along with the preferential removal of (65)Cu by iron oxides, left seawater and marine biomass depleted in (65)Cu but enriched in (63)Cu. As banded iron formation deposition waned and continentally sourced Cu became more important, biomass sampled a dissolved Cu reservoir that was progressively less fractionated relative to the continental pool. This evolution toward heavy δ(65)Cu values coincides with a shift to negative sedimentary δ(56)Fe values and increased marine sulfate after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), and is traceable through Phanerozoic shales to modern marine settings, where marine dissolved and sedimentary δ(65)Cu values are universally positive. Our finding of an important shift in sedimentary Cu isotope compositions across the GOE provides new insights into the Precambrian marine cycling of this critical micronutrient, and demonstrates the proxy potential for sedimentary Cu isotope compositions in the study of biogeochemical cycles and oceanic redox balance in the past.

  10. Cu isotopes in marine black shales record the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fru, Ernest Chi; Rodríguez, Nathalie P.; Partin, Camille A.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Andersson, Per; Weiss, Dominik J.; El Albani, Abderrazak; Rodushkin, Ilia

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenation of the atmosphere ˜2.45-2.32 billion years ago (Ga) is one of the most significant geological events to have affected Earth's redox history. Our understanding of the timing and processes surrounding this key transition is largely dependent on the development of redox-sensitive proxies, many of which remain unexplored. Here we report a shift from negative to positive copper isotopic compositions (δ65CuERM-AE633) in organic carbon-rich shales spanning the period 2.66-2.08 Ga. We suggest that, before 2.3 Ga, a muted oxidative supply of weathering-derived copper enriched in 65Cu, along with the preferential removal of 65Cu by iron oxides, left seawater and marine biomass depleted in 65Cu but enriched in 63Cu. As banded iron formation deposition waned and continentally sourced Cu became more important, biomass sampled a dissolved Cu reservoir that was progressively less fractionated relative to the continental pool. This evolution toward heavy δ65Cu values coincides with a shift to negative sedimentary δ56Fe values and increased marine sulfate after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), and is traceable through Phanerozoic shales to modern marine settings, where marine dissolved and sedimentary δ65Cu values are universally positive. Our finding of an important shift in sedimentary Cu isotope compositions across the GOE provides new insights into the Precambrian marine cycling of this critical micronutrient, and demonstrates the proxy potential for sedimentary Cu isotope compositions in the study of biogeochemical cycles and oceanic redox balance in the past.

  11. Interpreting bryophyte stable carbon isotope composition: Plants as temporal and spatial climate recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royles, Jessica; Horwath, Aline B.; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-04-01

    are unable to control tissue water content although physiological adaptations allow growth in a wide range of habitats. Carbon isotope signals in two mosses (Syntrichia ruralis and Chorisodontium aciphyllum) and two liverworts (Conocephalum conicum and Marchantia polymorpha), whether instantaneous (real time, Δ13C), or organic matter (as δ13COM), provide an assimilation-weighted summary of bryophyte environmental adaptations. In mosses, δ13COM is within the measured range of Δ13C values, which suggests that other proxies, such as compound-specific organic signals, will be representative of historical photosynthetic and growth conditions. The liverworts were photosynthetically active over a wider range of relative water contents (RWC) than the mosses. There was a consistent 5‰ offset between Δ13C values in C. conicum and M. polymorpha, suggestive of greater diffusion limitation in the latter. Analysis of a C. aciphyllum moss-peat core showed the isotopic composition over the past 200 years reflects recent anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Once corrected for source-CO2 inputs, the seasonally integrated Δ13COM between 1350 and 2000 A.D. varied by 1.5‰ compared with potential range of the 12‰ measured experimentally, demonstrating the relatively narrow range of conditions under which the majority of net assimilation takes place. Carbon isotope discrimination also varies spatially, with a 4‰ shift in epiphytic bryophyte organic matter found between lowland Amazonia and upper montane tropical cloud forest in the Peruvian Andes, associated with increased diffusion limitation.

  12. Hafnium isotope evidence for a transition in the dynamics of continental growth 3.2 Gyr ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næraa, T; Scherstén, A; Rosing, M T; Kemp, A I S; Hoffmann, J E; Kokfelt, T F; Whitehouse, M J

    2012-05-30

    Earth's lithosphere probably experienced an evolution towards the modern plate tectonic regime, owing to secular changes in mantle temperature. Radiogenic isotope variations are interpreted as evidence for the declining rates of continental crustal growth over time, with some estimates suggesting that over 70% of the present continental crustal reservoir was extracted by the end of the Archaean eon. Patterns of crustal growth and reworking in rocks younger than three billion years (Gyr) are thought to reflect the assembly and break-up of supercontinents by Wilson cycle processes and mark an important change in lithosphere dynamics. In southern West Greenland numerous studies have, however, argued for subduction settings and crust growth by arc accretion back to 3.8 Gyr ago, suggesting that modern-day tectonic regimes operated during the formation of the earliest crustal rock record. Here we report in situ uranium-lead, hafnium and oxygen isotope data from zircons of basement rocks in southern West Greenland across the critical time period during which modern-like tectonic regimes could have initiated. Our data show pronounced differences in the hafnium isotope-time patterns across this interval, requiring changes in the characteristics of the magmatic protolith. The observations suggest that 3.9-3.5-Gyr-old rocks differentiated from a >3.9-Gyr-old source reservoir with a chondritic to slightly depleted hafnium isotope composition. In contrast, rocks formed after 3.2 Gyr ago register the first additions of juvenile depleted material (that is, new mantle-derived crust) since 3.9 Gyr ago, and are characterized by striking shifts in hafnium isotope ratios similar to those shown by Phanerozoic subduction-related orogens. These data suggest a transitional period 3.5-3.2 Gyr ago from an ancient (3.9-3.5 Gyr old) crustal evolutionary regime unlike that of modern plate tectonics to a geodynamic setting after 3.2 Gyr ago that involved juvenile crust generation by plate

  13. Characteristics of Menstrual Cycle in Shift Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Darkhi, Hamidreza; Kashanian, Maryam; khodarahmian, Mahshad; Dolati, Mandana; Ghaffari, Mostafa; Mirzamohammadi, Elham; Mohammadi, Saber

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study, the characteristics of menstrual cycle in shift workers employed in the pharmaceutical industry are investigated. Method: This study was conducted in a pharmaceutical industrial complex in Tehran in 2012. 406 female workers in packaging units were studied on the menstrual cycle characteristics. The studied workers were divided into two groups of shift workers and non-shift workers and were compared in terms of the frequency of menstrual disorder (short-term cycle, long-term cycle, irregular cycle and bleeding during menstrual cycle) as well as hormonal values (FSH, LH, TSH, and Prolactin). Results: The odds ratio (OR) for menstrual disorder in the shift workers was 5.54 (95% CI=2.78-11.02) compared to the non-shift workers. The mean difference of hormonal values (except prolactin) between shift workers and non-shift workers was not significant (P> 0.05). Conclusion: This study suggests that shift work may disrupt the menstrual cycle. PMID:23618486

  14. Set Shifting Among Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Darcy, Alison; Colborn, Danielle; Gudorf, Caroline; Lock, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective Set shifting difficulties are documented for adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, AN typically onsets in adolescents and it is unclear if set-shifting difficulties are a result of chronic AN or present earlier in its course. This study examined whether adolescents with short duration AN demonstrated set shifting difficulties compared to healthy controls (HC). Method Data on set shifting collected from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning System (DKEFS) and Wisconsin Card Sort Task (WCST) as well as eating psychopathology were collected from 32 adolescent inpatients with AN and compared to those from 22 HCs. Results There were no differences in set-shifting in adolescents with AN compared to HCs on most measures. Conclusion The findings suggest that set-shifting difficulties in AN may be a consequence of AN. Future studies should explore set-shifting difficulties in a larger sample of adolescents with the AN to determine if there is sub-set of adolescents with these difficulties and determine any relationship of set-shifting to the development of a chronic from of AN. PMID:22692985

  15. Deepening Sleep by Hypnotic Suggestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordi, Maren J.; Schlarb, Angelika A.; Rasch, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a critical role in body restoration and promotes brain plasticity; however, it markedly declines across the lifespan. Despite its importance, effective tools to increase SWS are rare. Here we tested whether a hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” extends the amount of SWS. Design: Within-subject, placebo-controlled crossover design. Setting: Sleep laboratory at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Participants: Seventy healthy females 23.27 ± 3.17 y. Intervention: Participants listened to an auditory text with hypnotic suggestions or a control tape before napping for 90 min while high-density electroencephalography was recorded. Measurements and Results: After participants listened to the hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” subsequent SWS was increased by 81% and time spent awake was reduced by 67% (with the amount of SWS or wake in the control condition set to 100%). Other sleep stages remained unaffected. Additionally, slow wave activity was significantly enhanced after hypnotic suggestions. During the hypnotic tape, parietal theta power increases predicted the hypnosis-induced extension of SWS. Additional experiments confirmed that the beneficial effect of hypnotic suggestions on SWS was specific to the hypnotic suggestion and did not occur in low suggestible participants. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of hypnotic suggestions to specifically increase the amount and duration of slow wave sleep (SWS) in a midday nap using objective measures of sleep in young, healthy, suggestible females. Hypnotic suggestions might be a successful tool with a lower risk of adverse side effects than pharmacological treatments to extend SWS also in clinical and elderly populations. Citation: Cordi MJ, Schlarb AA, Rasch B. Deepening sleep by hypnotic suggestion. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1143-1152. PMID:24882909

  16. Systematic of Nuclear Ground State Properties in Sr Isotope by Covariant Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; Yuan

    2012-01-01

    <正>The hyperfine structure and isotope shifts of Sr-isotopes, both even-even and odd-even nuclei, are studied in the covariant density functional theory (DFT) with the new parameter set DD-PC1. Pairing correlation is treated by using the Bogoliubov with a separable form of the pairing interaction. Spin-parity,

  17. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T.; Thoennessen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  18. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic

  20. Holocene paleotemperature signals based on polar firn water isotope diffusion studies from two Greenland ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinis, Vasileios; Terkelsen Holme, Christian; Møllesøe Vinther, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Polar ice cores provide a wealth of paleoclimatic information that is characterised by high temporal resolution and continuity, with water isotopic ratios of polar precipitation (δ18O, δD) being one of the most prominent proxies for past temperatures. In particular, ice cores from Greenland, record the series of abrupt stadial - interstadial transitions during the last Glacial, pinpointing in time, abrupt temperature transitions adjoined by similar accumulation trends. While the signal to noise ratio of the isotopic signal clearly allows the observation of sizable climate changes during the Glacial, the situation differs considerably when one looks into the Holocene. With the exception of the 8.2ky event, the signal to noise ratio of δ18O over the Holocene is extremely low, suggesting negligible temperature changes during this period. This is contrary to signals obtained by other proxies from marine and terrestrial records from high latitudes. In this study we bypass the discussion that deals with the various processes that can negatively affect paleotemperature reconstructions based on the δ18O proxy from ice cores. Based on two ultra-high resolution and high precision isotopic records covering the last 20,000 years from the NorthGRIP and NEEM ice cores we make use of the available spectral information to infer polar firn paleotemperatures using a coupled densification - firn water isotope diffusion model. The processes involved in the densification of firn and the diffusion of water isotopes that takes place after deposition and until the pore close-off are temperature-dependent and do not present the limitations of the normal δ18O thermometer. We show here how this approach reveals significant temperature changes over the Holocene. We compare the signals of the two records and pay particular attention to the indications of a mid-Holocene climatic shift towards colder temperatures that is apparent in both temperature reconstructions.

  1. Changes in stable isotopes, lignin-derived phenols, and fossil pigments in sediments of Lake Biwa, Japan: implications for anthropogenic effects over the last 100 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Fujio; Tsugeki, Narumi; Azuma, Jun-Ichi; Urabe, Jotaro; Nakanishi, Masami; Wada, Eitaro

    2008-09-15

    We measured stable nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) isotope ratios, lignin-derived phenols, and fossil pigments in sediments of known ages to elucidate the historical changes in the ecosystem status of Lake Biwa, Japan, over the last 100 years. Stable N isotope ratios and algal pigments in the sediments increased rapidly from the early 1960s to the 1980s, and then remained relatively constant, indicating that eutrophication occurred in the early 1960s but ceased in the 1980s. Stable C isotope ratios of the sediment increased from the 1960s, but decreased after the 1980s to the present. This decrease in stable C isotope ratios after the 1980s could not be explained by annual changes in either terrestrial input or algal production. However, when the C isotope ratios were corrected for the Suess effect, the shift to more negative isotopic value in atmospheric CO(2) by fossil fuel burning, the isotopic value showed a trend, which is consistent with the other biomarkers and the monitoring data. The trend was also mirrored by the relative abundance of lignin-derived phenols, a unique organic tracer of material that originated from terrestrial plants, which decreased in the early 1960s and recovered to some degree in the 1980s. We detected no notable difference in the composition of lignin phenols, suggesting that the terrestrial plant composition did not change markedly. However, we found that lignin accumulation rate increased around the 1980s. These results suggest that although eutrophication has stabilized since the 1980s, allochthonous organic matter input has changed in Lake Biwa over the past 25 years.

  2. Microbially Mediated Kinetic Sulfur Isotope Fractionation: Reactive Transport Modeling Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Amos, R. T.; Steefel, C. I.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction is a ubiquitous process in many subsurface systems. Isotopic fractionation is characteristic of this anaerobic process, since sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) favor the reduction of the lighter sulfate isotopologue (S32O42-) over the heavier isotopologue (S34O42-). Detection of isotopic shifts have been utilized as a proxy for the onset of sulfate reduction in subsurface systems such as oil reservoirs and aquifers undergoing uranium bioremediation. Reactive transport modeling (RTM) of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation has been applied to field and laboratory studies. These RTM approaches employ different mathematical formulations in the representation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation. In order to test the various formulations, we propose a benchmark problem set for the simulation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation during microbially mediated sulfate reduction. The benchmark problem set is comprised of four problem levels and is based on a recent laboratory column experimental study of sulfur isotope fractionation. Pertinent processes impacting sulfur isotopic composition such as microbial sulfate reduction and dispersion are included in the problem set. To date, participating RTM codes are: CRUNCHTOPE, TOUGHREACT, MIN3P and THE GEOCHEMIST'S WORKBENCH. Preliminary results from various codes show reasonable agreement for the problem levels simulating sulfur isotope fractionation in 1D.

  3. Using stable isotopes to investigate individual diet specialization in California sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, S.D.; Tinker, M.T.; Monson, D.H.; Oftedal, O.T.; Ralls, K.; Staedler, M.M.; Fogel, M.L.; Estes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Differences in diet composition among conspecifics (dietary specialization) have been documented across a broad range of taxonomic groups and habitats, and such variation at the individual level is increasingly recognized as an important component of diversity in trophic interactions. Accurate identification of individual dietary specialization, however, requires longitudinal dietary records that are labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive to obtain for many species. Here we explore the use of stable isotopes (??13C and ??15N) as a promising technique for detecting and quantifying patterns of individual dietary specialization. Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) offer a unique opportunity for testing this approach because (1) they consume a wide variety of prey that span multiple trophic levels, habitats, and ecologically defined functional groups: and (2) individual diet specialization can be validated with existing observational data. We analyzed the isotopic composition of sea otter vibrissae (n = 31) in order to characterize inter- and intra-individual variation in sea otter diets at Monterey Bay, California, USA. At the population level, sea otters showed substantial variation in both ??13C and ??15N values, occupying nearly all of the "isotopic space" created by the diversity of isotopic signatures of potential prey taxa. Most of the variation in sea otter vibrissae was accounted for by differences between individuals, with much less contributed by within-individual variation. A majority of sea otters (???80%) showed relatively little temporal variability in isotopic composition, suggesting that the proportional composition of most individuals' diets is relatively constant over time; a few individuals (???20%) exhibited a high degree of intra-vibrissa isotopic variability, suggesting seasonal shifts in diet composition. These results and our interpretation of them were supported by long-term observational data on the diets of radio-tagged sea otters from

  4. Modern and Cenozoic records of magnesium behaviour from foraminiferal Mg isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. E. Pogge von Strandmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is an element critically involved in the carbon cycle, because weathering of Ca–Mg silicates removes atmospheric CO2 into rivers, and formation of Ca–Mg carbonates in the oceans removes carbon from the ocean–atmosphere system. Hence the Mg cycle holds the potential to provide valuable insights into Cenozoic climate-system history, and the shift during this time from a greenhouse to icehouse state. We present Mg isotope ratios for the past 40 Myr using planktic foraminifers as an archive. Modern foraminifera, which discriminate against elemental and isotopically heavy Mg during calcification, show no correlation between the Mg isotope composition (δ26Mg and temperature, Mg / Ca or other parameters such as carbonate saturation (Δ CO3. However, inter-species isotopic differences imply that only well-calibrated single species should be used for reconstruction of past seawater. Seawater δ26Mg inferred from the foraminiferal record decreased from ~ 0‰ at 15 Ma, to −0.83‰ at the present day, which coincides with increases in seawater lithium and oxygen isotope ratios. It strongly suggests that neither Mg concentrations nor isotope ratios are at steady-state in modern oceans, given its ~ 10 Myr residence time. From these data, we have developed a dynamic box model to understand and constrain changes in Mg sources to the oceans (rivers and Mg sinks (dolomitisation and hydrothermal alteration. Our estimates of seawater Mg concentrations through time are similar to those independently determined by pore waters and fluid inclusions. Modelling suggests that dolomite formation and the riverine Mg flux are the primary controls on the δ26Mg of seawater, while hydrothermal Mg removal and the δ26Mg of rivers are more minor controls. Using riverine flux and isotope ratios inferred from the 87Sr / 86Sr record, the modelled Mg removal by dolomite formation shows minima in the Oligocene and at the present day (with decreasing trends from 15

  5. Modern and Cenozoic records of seawater magnesium from foraminiferal Mg isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogge von Strandmann, P. A. E.; Forshaw, J.; Schmidt, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    Magnesium is an element critically involved in the carbon cycle, because weathering of Ca-Mg silicates removes atmospheric CO2 into rivers, and formation of Ca-Mg carbonates in the oceans removes carbon from the ocean-atmosphere system. Hence the Mg cycle holds the potential to provide valuable insights into Cenozoic climate-system history, and the shift during this time from a greenhouse to icehouse state. We present Mg isotope ratios for the past 40 Myr using planktic foraminifers as an archive. Modern foraminifera, which discriminate against elemental and isotopically heavy Mg during calcification, show no correlation between the Mg isotope composition (δ26Mg, relative to DSM-3) and temperature, Mg / Ca or other parameters such as carbonate saturation (ΔCO3). However, inter-species isotopic differences imply that only well-calibrated single species should be used for reconstruction of past seawater. Seawater δ26Mg inferred from the foraminiferal record decreased from ~0‰ at 15 Ma, to -0.83‰ at the present day, which coincides with increases in seawater lithium and oxygen isotope ratios. It strongly suggests that neither Mg concentrations nor isotope ratios are at steady state in modern oceans, given its ~10 Myr residence time. From these data, we have developed a dynamic box model to understand and constrain changes in Mg sources to the oceans (rivers) and Mg sinks (dolomitisation and hydrothermal alteration). Our estimates of seawater Mg concentrations through time are similar to those independently determined by pore waters and fluid inclusions. Modelling suggests that dolomite formation and the riverine Mg flux are the primary controls on the δ26Mg of seawater, while hydrothermal Mg removal and the δ26Mg of rivers are more minor controls. Using Mg riverine flux and isotope ratios inferred from the 87Sr / 86Sr record, the modelled Mg removal by dolomite formation shows minima in the Oligocene and at the present day (with decreasing trends from 15 Ma

  6. A Shift of Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Administrative reforms are shifting prefecture government powers to the county level in an effort to boost local economies on July 8, the government of China’s southernmost Hainan Province announced that it was to hand over 177 of its administrative powers to county-level governments. The move practically dismantled the powers of the

  7. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riechelmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we explore the potential of magnesium (δ26Mg isotope time-series data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco, the warm-temperate (Germany, the equatorial-humid (Peru and the cold-humid (Austria climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are compared against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and disequilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rainwater or snow as well as soil and host rock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: −4.26 ± 0.07‰ and HK3: −4.17 ± 0.15‰, and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value of all stalagmites (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: −3.96 ± 0.04‰ but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is consistent with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: −4.01 ± 0.07‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: −4.20 ± 0.10‰ suggest changes in outside air temperature was the principal driver rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: −3.00 ± 0.73‰; SPA 59: −3.70 ± 0.43‰ are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature

  8. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  9. Millennial-scale isotope records from a wide-ranging predator show evidence of recent human impact to oceanic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Anne E; Ostrom, Peggy H; Welch, Andreanna J; Fleischer, Robert C; Gandhi, Hasand; Southon, John R; Stafford, Thomas W; Penniman, Jay F; Hu, Darcy; Duvall, Fern P; James, Helen F

    2013-05-28

    Human exploitation of marine ecosystems is more recent in oceanic than near shore regions, yet our understanding of human impacts on oceanic food webs is comparatively poor. Few records of species that live beyond the continental shelves date back more than 60 y, and the sheer size of oceanic regions makes their food webs difficult to study, even in modern times. Here, we use stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to study the foraging history of a generalist, oceanic predator, the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), which ranges broadly in the Pacific from the equator to near the Aleutian Islands. Our isotope records from modern and ancient, radiocarbon-dated bones provide evidence of over 3,000 y of dietary stasis followed by a decline of ca. 1.8‰ in δ(15)N over the past 100 y. Fishery-induced trophic decline is the most likely explanation for this sudden shift, which occurs in genetically distinct populations with disparate foraging locations. Our isotope records also show that coincident with the apparent decline in trophic level, foraging segregation among petrel populations decreased markedly. Because variation in the diet of generalist predators can reflect changing availability of their prey, a foraging shift in wide-ranging Hawaiian petrel populations suggests a relatively rapid change in the composition of oceanic food webs in the Northeast Pacific. Understanding and mitigating widespread shifts in prey availability may be a critical step in the conservation of endangered marine predators such as the Hawaiian petrel.

  10. Ambiguity Produces Attention Shifts in Category Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Miguel A.; Orgaz, Cristina; Luque, David; Nelson, James Byron

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that people and nonhuman animals protect their knowledge from interference by shifting attention toward the context when presented with information that contradicts their previous beliefs. Despite that suggestion, no studies have directly measured changes in attention while participants are exposed to an interference…

  11. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface...... deposited during the Early Ordovician — a time of known redox instability in ancient oceans – exhibit a significant positive Cr isotope excursion of +0.5‰. This excursion is interpreted as the reductive drawn down of dissolved Cr in seawater in response to the development of a proximal anoxic sink......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify...

  12. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    Greenland ice cores offer a unique opportunity to investigate the climate system behaviour. The objective of this PhD project is to investigate isotope modelling of present- day conditions and conduct model-data comparison using Greenland ice cores. Thus this thesis investigates how the integration...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  13. A carbon isotopic and sedimentological record of the latest Devonian (Famennian) from the Western U.S. and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrow, P.M.; Strauss, J.V.; Creveling, J.R.; Sicard, K.R.; Ripperdan, R.; Sandberg, C.A.; Hartenfels, S.

    2011-01-01

    New carbon isotopic data from upper Famennian deposits in the western United States reveal two previously unrecognized major positive isotopic excursions. The first is an abrupt ~. 3??? positive excursion, herein referred to as ALFIE (A Late Famennian Isotopic Excursion), recorded in two sections of the Pinyon Peak Limestone of north-central Utah. Integration of detailed chemostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data suggests that ALFIE is the Laurentian record of the Dasberg Event, which has been linked to transgression in Europe and Morocco. Sedimentological data from the Chaffee Group of western Colorado also record transgression at a similar biostratigraphic position, with a shift from restricted to open-marine lithofacies. ALFIE is not evident in chemostratigraphic data from age-equivalent strata in Germany studied herein and in southern Europe, either because it is a uniquely North American phenomenon, or because the German sections are too condensed relative to those in Laurentia. A second positive carbon isotopic excursion from the upper Chaffee Group of Colorado is recorded in transgressive strata deposited directly above a previously unrecognized paleokarst interval. The age of this excursion, and the duration of the associated paleokarst hiatus, are not well constrained, although the events occurred sometime after the Late Famennian Middle expansa Zone. The high positive values recorded in this excursion are consistent with those associated with the youngest Famennian Middle to Late praesulcata Hangenberg Isotopic Excursion in Europe, the isotopic expression of the Hangenberg Event, which included mass extinction, widespread black shale deposition, and a glacio-eustatic fall and rise. If correct, this would considerably revise the age of the Upper Chaffee Group strata of western Colorado. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Reordering Ranganathan: Shifting User Behaviors, Shifting Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaway, Lynn Silipigni; Faniel, Ixchel M.

    2014-01-01

    This report suggests that Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan's "Five Laws of Library Science" can be reordered and reinterpreted to reflect today's library resources and services, as well as the behaviors that people demonstrate when engaging with them. Although authors Senior Research Scientist Lynn Silipigni Connaway and Associate Research…

  15. Growth dynamics of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles undergoing an ontogenetic habitat shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Matthew D; Avens, Larisa; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Goshe, Lisa R; Heppell, Selina S

    2017-04-01

    Ontogenetic niche theory predicts that individuals may undergo one or more changes in habitat or diet throughout their lifetime to maintain optimal growth rates, or to optimize trade-offs between mortality risk and growth. We combine skeletochronological and stable nitrogen isotope (δ(15)N) analyses of sea turtle humeri (n = 61) to characterize the growth dynamics of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) during an oceanic-to-neritic ontogenetic shift. The primary objective of this study was to determine how ontogenetic niche theory extends to sea turtles, and to individuals with different patterns of resource use (discrete shifters, n = 23; facultative shifters n = 14; non-shifters, n = 24). Mean growth rates peaked at the start of the ontogenetic shift (based on change in δ(15)N values), but returned to pre-shift levels within 2 years. Turtles generally only experienced 1 year of relatively high growth, but the timing of peak growth relative to the start of an ontogenetic shift varied among individuals (before, n = 14; during, n = 12; after, n = 8). Furthermore, no reduction in growth preceded the transition, as is predicted by ontogenetic niche theory. Annual growth rates were similar between non-transitioning turtles resident in oceanic and neritic habitats and turtles displaying alternative patterns of resource use. These results suggest that factors other than maximization of size-specific growth may more strongly influence the timing of ontogenetic shifts in loggerhead sea turtles, and that alternative patterns of resource use may have limited influence on somatic growth and age at maturation in this species.

  16. Titan's Isotopic Menagerie: The Cassini CIRS Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bezard, B.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; de Kok, R.; Flasar, F. M.; Hewagama, T.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Jolly, A.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Vinatier, S.; CIRS Team

    2008-09-01

    Saturn's long-mysterious moon Titan is gradually yielding up its secrets under the intense scrutiny of the Cassini spacecraft, which has just completed a 4-year prime mission including 45 close flybys of the giant satellite. We here focus on the isotopic composition of the stratosphere, which since Voyager 1 in 1980 has been known to comprise a surprisingly rich mixture of hydrocarbons, nitriles and several oxygen species. These molecules are now understood to originate in the upper atmosphere by chemical processes initiated by the dissociation of the most abundant native species - methane and nitrogen - with some oxygen added from externally-supplied water. Measurements of isotopic ratios in these compounds are important and can provide valuable information on the formation and evolution of Titan's atmosphere. E.g. Chemical processes can cause isotopic fractionation via the 'kinetic isotope effect' (KIE). Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), which is sensitive to thermal infrared radiation from 10-1500 cm-1 (7-1000 micron), is an ideal tool for measuring molecular concentrations and can distinguish between isotopologues due to the shifts in the molecular bands. CIRS has now identified at least eleven isotopologue species in our spectra, with multiple new detections in the past year (13CO2, CO18O, HC13CCCN). CIRS has measured the ratios 12C/13C in a total of seven species, D/H in two species, and 14N/15N and 16O/18O each in one species - the best measurement so far of the important ratio 16O/18O on Titan (346±110). In this presentation we will summarize all our results to date on isotopic ratios, including comparison with Huygens GCMS and other determinations, a discussion of possible isotopic separation in hydrocarbon chains, and formation/evolution implications of these measurements for Titan.

  17. Applications of stable isotopes to study plant-animal relationships in terrestrial ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianzhu; LIN Guanghui; HUANG Jianhui; HAN Xingguo

    2004-01-01

    As natural tracers, stable isotopes have been extensively used in plant physiological, ecological and environmental research. Recently, animal physiological ecologists have also applied stable isotope techniques to study plant- animal relationships. The isotopic compositions of animal body generally reflect and integrate their diets over a time period ranging from hours to years to the lifetime of an individual. When animal living habitat changes or animals move to a new environment, the animal isotopic compositions will shift accordingly. Thus, stable isotope signatures of an animal can truly reflect its food sources, habitat, distribution and movement patterns during a given time period. Moreover, by analyzing animal-tissue isotopic compositions at different temporal scales, we can improve our understanding of animal adaptation to environmental changes. Stable isotope technique also provides an ideal tool to study animal foodweb relationship and community structure because of isotopic fractionation during the processes of nutrient assimilation by animals. Stable isotope technique can continuously measure animal trophic position in a foodweb, which can eventually reveal the predator-prey relationship and its role in determining matter balance and energy flow in the entire ecosystem. Stable isotope technique has been one of the most important and efficient tools in studying plant-animal relationship. In this paper, we first review recent advances in the application of stable isotope techniques to plant-animal relationship research then evaluate their advantages and disadvantages, and finally discuss some future directions associated with stable isotope applications to plant-animal relationship research.

  18. Alkaline magmatism of the Vitim province, West Transbaikalia, Russia: Age, mineralogical, geochemical and isotope (О, C, D, Sr and Nd) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshkevich, Anna G.; Ripp, German S.; Izbrodin, Ivan A.; Savatenkov, Valery M.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we study the geochronology, mineral chemistry, and whole-rock elemental, stable (O, C, D) and Sr-Nd isotopic data for alkaline ultrabasic-basic massifs of the Vitim alkaline province (Sayzhenski complex) in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, near the boundary with the Siberian craton, to evaluate their petrogenesis and geodynamic significance. U-Pb zircon dating results in Early Paleozoic (520-486 Ma) and Late Paleozoic (306-294 Ma) stages of alkaline rock formation. The mineralogy and geochemistry exhibit a wide range of SiO2 (38-73 wt.%), enrichment in Sr, Ba, LREE and Ta and, most significantly, in Na and Al. The rocks crystallized from a parental CO2- and H2O-rich silica-undersaturated melt. Isotopically, the rocks are highly variable, with (87Sr/86Sr)i - 0.705595-0.707729 and (143Nd/144Nd)i - 0.512237-0.512643. The geochemical and isotope data suggest that the rocks were derived from a source composed of three distinct components: PREMA, EM II and marine carbonate. Additionally, stable (O, C, D) isotope data display the shifting influence of assimilated organic sediments in the source of melts and a partial secondary isotope exchange between the late-magmatic fluids and minerals.

  19. Lake-groundwater relationships and fluid-rock interaction in the East African Rift Valley: isotopic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, W. George; Gizaw, Berhanu; Arusei, Musa K.

    1996-05-01

    The assessment of water resources in the Rift Valley environment is important for population, agriculture and energy-related issues and depends on a good understanding of the relationship between freshwater lakes and regional groundwater. This can be hampered by the amount of fluid-rock interaction which occurs throughout the rift, obscuring original hydrochemical signatures. However, O and H stable isotope ratios can be used as tracers of infiltration over sometimes considerable distances, while showing that the volcanic edifices of the rift floor have varying effects on groundwater flow patterns. Specific cases from Kenya and Ethiopia are considered, including Lakes Naivasha, Baringo, Awasa and Zwai. In addition to their physical tracing role, stable isotopes can reveal information about processes of fluid-rock interaction. The general lack of O isotope shifting in rift hydrothermal systems suggests a high water:rock ratio, with the implication that these systems are mature. Carbon isotope studies on the predominantly bicarbonate waters of the rift show how they evolve from dilute meteoric recharge to highly alkaline waters, via the widespread silicate hydrolysis promoted by the flux of mantle carbon dioxide which occurs in most parts of the rift. There appears to be only minor differences in the C cycle between Kenya and Ethiopia.

  20. [Suggestion and hypnosis in hysteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, P

    1995-12-15

    Suggestive influences allow to resolve ambiguities. Normally they are only accepted if they correspond with the knowledge and believes of the subject. Under hypnosis or under the impact of serious psychic perturbations one may take up reality constructions which are not in conformity with these criteria. The restriction of consciousness and the ignoring of certain functions permitting this are the common basis of hypnosis and hysteria. But suggestions do not cause the later; they may only shape the symptomatology. Hypnosis can create a terrain facilitating the resolution of the problems underlying hysteria but it does not represent the treatment of hysteria.

  1. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, Deb P; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Stout, Lisa M; Varga, Tamas; Blake, Ruth E

    2011-08-01

    A key question to address in the development of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate (δ(18)O(p)) as a tracer of biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in ancient and modern environments is the nature of isotopic signatures associated with uptake and cycling of mineral-bound phosphate by microorganisms. Here, we present experimental results aimed at understanding the biotic and abiotic pathways of P cycling during biological uptake of phosphate sorbed to ferrihydrite and the selective uptake of sedimentary phosphate phases by Escherichia coli and Marinobacter aquaeolei. Results indicate that a significant fraction of ferrihydrite-bound phosphate is biologically available. The fraction of phosphate taken up by E. coli attained an equilibrium isotopic composition in a short time (isotope exchange (between O in PO(4) and O in water; that is, actual breaking and reforming of P-O bonds) (biotic pathway). The difference in isotopic composition between newly equilibrated aqueous and residual sorbed phosphate groups promoted the ion exchange (analogous to isotopic mixing) of intact phosphate ions (abiotic pathway) so that this difference gradually became negligible. In sediment containing different P phases, E. coli extracted loosely sorbed phosphate first, whereas M. aquaeolei preferred Fe-oxide-bound phosphate. The presence of bacteria always imprinted a biotic isotopic signature on the P phase that was taken up and cycled. For example, the δ(18)O(p) value of loosely sorbed phosphate shifted gradually toward equilibrium isotopic composition. The δ(18)O(p) value of Fe-oxide-bound phosphate, however, showed only slight changes initially but, when new Fe-oxides were formed, coprecipitated/occluded phosphate retained δ(18)O values of the aqueous phosphate at the time of formation of new Fe oxides. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of authigenic and detrital phosphates did not change, suggesting that these phosphate phases were not utilized by bacteria. These findings

  2. On the Lamb shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroel, D. [Av. Tobalaba 3696, Puente Alto, Santiago, Metropolitana (Chile)

    2008-02-15

    The Lamb shift is calculated, in an approximate way, considering the hydrogen atom as an isolated physical system; the quantized radiation field does not play any role in the present approach. Our formalism is based on the generalization of the Dirac wave equation that incorporates the effects of the electron self-fields directly into it. Both the physical picture as well as the mathematical formalism have their roots in the classical theory of the electron. (author)

  3. Uniform Silicon Isotope Ratios Across the Milky Way Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Nathaniel N.; Morris, Mark R.; Young, Edward D.

    2017-04-01

    We report the relative abundances of the three stable isotopes of silicon, 28Si, 29Si, and 30Si, across the Galaxy using the v=0,J=1\\to 0 transition of silicon monoxide. The chosen sources represent a range in Galactocentric radii ({R}{GC}) from 0 to 9.8 kpc. The high spectral resolution and sensitivity afforded by the Green Bank Telescope permit isotope ratios to be corrected for optical depths. The optical-depth-corrected data indicate that the secondary-to-primary silicon isotope ratios {}29{Si}{/}28{Si} and {}30{Si}{/}28{Si} vary much less than predicted on the basis of other stable isotope ratio gradients across the Galaxy. Indeed, there is no detectable variation in Si isotope ratios with {R}{GC}. This lack of an isotope ratio gradient stands in stark contrast to the monotonically decreasing trend with {R}{GC} exhibited by published secondary-to-primary oxygen isotope ratios. These results, when considered in the context of the expectations for chemical evolution, suggest that the reported oxygen isotope ratio trends, and perhaps those for carbon as well, require further investigation. The methods developed in this study for SiO isotopologue ratio measurements are equally applicable to Galactic oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen isotope ratio measurements, and should prove useful for future observations of these isotope systems.

  4. Regime shifts in models of dryland vegetation

    CERN Document Server

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Yizhaq, Hezi; Bel, Golan; Meron, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Drylands are pattern-forming systems showing self-organized vegetation patchiness, multiplicity of stable states and fronts separating domains of alternative stable states. Pattern dynamics, induced by droughts or disturbances, can result in desertification shifts from patterned vegetation to bare soil. Pattern-formation theory suggests various scenarios for such dynamics; an abrupt global shift involving a fast collapse to bare soil, a gradual global shift involving the expansion and coalescence of bare-soil domains, and an incipient shift to a hybrid state consisting of stationary bare-soil domains in an otherwise periodic pattern. Using models of dryland vegetation we address the question which of these scenarios can be realized. We found that the models can be split into two groups: models that exhibit multiplicity of periodic-pattern and bare-soil states, and models that exhibit, in addition, multiplicity of hybrid states. Furthermore, in all models we could not identify parameter regimes in which bare-s...

  5. Investigation of reduced transition-strengths in neutron-rich chromium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunroth, Thomas; Dewald, Alfred; Fransen, Christoph; Litzinger, Julia [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany); Iwasaki, Hironori [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, MSU (United States); Lemasson, Antoine [GANIL, Laboratoire Commun DSM/CEA (France); Lenzi, Silvia [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    Neutron-rich nuclei close to N=40 are known for their rapid changes in nuclear structure. While {sup 68}Ni exhibits signatures of a shell closure, experimental data - e.g. excitation energies of the 2{sup +}{sub 1}-state and B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 1} → 0{sup +}{sub 1})-values - along the isotopic chains in even more exotic Fe and Cr-isotopes suggest a sudden rise in collective behaviour for N → 40. Lifetimes of low-lying yrast states in {sup 58,60,62}Cr were measured with the Recoil Distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) technique at NSCL, MSU (USA) to deduce model independent B(E2)-values. After fragmentation of a primary {sup 82}Se beam (E=140 AMeV) on a {sup 9}Be target and subsequent filtering with the A1900 fragment separator, high purity {sup 59,61,63}Mn-beams (E ∝ 95 AMeV) impinged on the {sup 9}Be plunger target, where excited states in the above mentioned Cr-isotopes were then populated in one proton knockout reactions. The S800 spectrograph allowed a clear recoil identification, which then lead to clean γ-spectra as measured by the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA). Final results of this experiment will be shown and discussed in the context of state-of-the-art shell-model calculations.

  6. Historical variations of mercury stable isotope ratios in Arctic glacier firn and ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, C. M.; Krümmel, E. M.; Poulain, A. J.; Yumvihoze, E.; Chen, J.; Å trok, M.; Scheer, M.; Hintelmann, H.

    2016-09-01

    The concentration and isotopic composition of mercury (Hg) were determined in glacier core samples from Canadian Arctic ice caps dating from preindustrial to recent time (early 21st century). Mean Hg levels increased from ≤ 0.2 ng L-1 in preindustrial time to ~0.8-1.2 ng L-1 in the modern industrial era (last ~200 years). Hg accumulated on Arctic ice caps has Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg that are higher (~ -1 to 2.9‰) than previously reported for Arctic snow impacted by atmospheric Hg depletion events (mostly < -1‰), suggesting that these events contribute little to Hg accumulation on ice caps. The range of δ202Hg, Δ199Hg, and Δ201Hg in glacier cores overlaps with that of Arctic Hg0(g) and of seawater in Baffin Bay and also with that of midlatitude precipitation and industrial Hg sources, including coal and Hg ores. A core from Agassiz ice cap (80.7°N) shows a ~ +1‰ shift in δ202Hg over the nineteenth to twentieth centuries that could reflect changes in the isotopic composition of the atmospheric Hg pool in the High Arctic in response to growing industrial emissions at lower latitudes. This study is the first ever to report on historical variations of Hg stable isotope ratios in Arctic ice cores. Results could help constrain future modeling efforts of the global Hg biogeochemical cycle and the atmosphere's response to changing Hg emissions, past and future.

  7. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi, J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Benmore, C J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Neuefeind, J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tomberli, B [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Tulk, C A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Guthrie, M [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Egelstaff, P A [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Klug, D D [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, K0A 0R6 (Canada)

    2003-06-11

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully 'annealed' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is {approx} 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 A{sup -1}. This compares to a maximum effect of {approx} 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 A{sup -1} in the isotopic difference function is not reproduced in the temperature difference and suggests that additional longer-range correlations are present in the more ordered deuterated form.

  8. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi, J.; Benmore, C. J.; Neuefeind, J.; Tomberli, B.; Tulk, C. A.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Klug, D.D.; CHM; IPNS; APS-USR

    2003-06-11

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully ''annealed'' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is {approx} 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 {angstrom}{sup -1}. This compares to a maximum effect of {approx} 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 {angstrom}{sup -1} in the isotopic difference function is not reproduced in the temperature difference and suggests that additional longer-range correlations are present in the more ordered deuterated form.

  9. Isotopic evidence for multiple contributions to felsic magma chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Wiebe, R.A.; Krogstad, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    by contemporaneous mafic magmas; the transition between the two now preserved as a zone of chilled mafic sheets and pillows in granite. Mafic components have highly variably isotopic compositions as a result of contamination either at depth or following injection into the magma chamber. Intermediate dikes...... with identical isotopic compositions to more mafic dikes suggest that closed system fractionation may be occurring in deeper level chambers prior to injection to shallower levels. The granitic portion of the pluton has the highest Nd isotopic composition (eNd=+3.0) of plutons in the region whereas the mafic...... lithologies have Nd isotopic compositions (eNd=+3.5) that are the lowest in the region and similar to the granite and suggestive of prolonged interactions and homogenization of the two components. Sr and Nd isotopic data for felsic enclaves are inconsistent with previously suggested models of diffusional...

  10. Isotopic Resonance Hypothesis: Experimental Verification by Escherichia coli Growth Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xueshu

    2014-01-01

    Isotopic composition of reactants affects the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. As a rule, enrichment of heavy stable isotopes leads to slower reactions. But the recent isotopic resonance hypothesis suggests that the dependence of the reaction rate upon the enrichment degree is not monotonous; instead, at some resonance isotopic compositions, the kinetics increases, while at off resonance compositions the same reactions progress slower. To test the predictions of this hypothesis for the elements C, H, N and O, we designed a precise (standard error plus or minus 0.05%) experiment to measure the bacterial growth parameters in minimal media with varying isotopic compositions. A number of predicted resonance conditions were tested, which kinetic enhancements as strong as plus 3% discovered at these conditions. The combined evidence extremely strongly supports the existence of isotopic resonances. This phenomenon has numerous implications for the origin of life and astrobiology, and possible application...

  11. Ubiquitous isotopic anomalies in Ti from normal Allende inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, S.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    A novel technique for the high-precision isotopic analysis of titanium was applied to three terrestrial rocks and coarse- and fine-grained Allende inclusions. Repeated analyses of the three terrestrial rocks gave excellent agreement with a Ti metal standard. All seven Allende inclusions were previously determined to contain isotopically normal Nd and/or Sm, indicating that none belongs to a small group of peculiar intrusions. The discovery of widespread Ti isotopic anomalies in normal Allende inclusions establishes Ti as the first non-noble gas element studied since oxygen to show such isotopic heterogeneity. A survey of nucleosynthetic origins of Ti isotopes suggests that the dominant Ti-50 excesses in these inclusions are due to the relative enrichment of isotopes synthesized during hydrostatic burning in, or near, the core of a massive star.

  12. Isotope and density profile effects on pedestal neoclassical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, S.; Pusztai, I.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-field neoclassical transport of heat, particles and momentum is studied in sharp density pedestals, with a focus on isotope and profile effects, using a radially global approach. Global effects—which tend to reduce the peak ion heat flux, and shift it outward—increase with isotope mass for fixed profiles. The heat flux reduction exhibits a saturation with a favorable isotopic trend. A significant part of the heat flux can be convective even in pure plasmas, unlike in the plasma core, and it is sensitive to how momentum sources are distributed between the various species. In particular, if only ion momentum sources are allowed, in global simulations of pure plasmas the ion particle flux remains close to its local value, while this may not be the case for simulations with isotope mixtures or electron momentum sources. The radial angular momentum transport that is a finite orbit width effect, is found to be strongly correlated with heat sources.

  13. Hydrogen isotopes as a tracer of the Precambrian hydrosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Bird, Dennis K.

    Oceanic serpentinites and hydrous silicate minerals that are formed in subduction-related volcanic and hydrothermal environments obtain their hydrogen isotope composition (δD) from seawater-derived fluids, and thus may be used to calculate secular variation in δDSEAWATER. Hydrogen isotope...... is constrained by the hydrogen isotope composition of the minerals at Isua. We developed a first-order mass balance model of δDSEAWATER evolution delimited by δD of Isua serpentine and fuchsite and that of modern seawater. The ca. 25‰ change in δDSEAWATER can be accounted for by the development of the modern...... account for the remainder of the observed isotopic shift in seawater. This estimate is consistent with independent approximations of atmospheric methane concentrations in the early Archean, and is within an order of magnitude of the amount of hydrogen escape required to oxidize the continents before...

  14. Iron isotope biogeochemistry of Neoproterozoic marine shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Marcus; Gibson, Timothy M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Bui, Thi Hao; Carozza, David A.; Sperling, Erik A.; Poirier, André; Cox, Grant M.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2017-07-01

    significantly heavier than bulk crust and hydrothermal iron imply partial oxidation of a ferrous seawater iron reservoir. In contrast, mean δ 56Fe values closer to that of hydrothermal iron in post-Sturtian shales reflects oxidation of a larger proportion of the ferrous seawater iron reservoir, and by inference, higher environmental oxygen levels. Nevertheless, significant iron isotopic variation in post-Sturtian shales suggest redox heterogeneity and possibly a dominantly anoxic deep ocean, consistent with results from recent studies using iron speciation and redox sensitive trace metals. However, the interpretation of generally increasing environmental oxygen levels after the Sturtian glaciation highlights the need to better understand the sensitivity of different redox proxies to incremental changes in oxygen levels to enable us to reconcile results from different paleoredox proxies.

  15. Iron isotope fractionation in marine invertebrates in near shore environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, S.; Schuessler, J. A.; Vinther, J.; Matthews, A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2014-04-01

    Chitons (Mollusca) are marine invertebrates that produce radula (teeth or rasping tongue) containing high concentrations of biomineralized magnetite and other iron bearing minerals. As Fe isotope signatures are influenced by redox processes and biological fractionation, Fe isotopes in chiton radula might be expected to provide an effective tracer of ambient oceanic conditions and biogeochemical cycling. Here, in a pilot study to measure Fe isotopes in marine invertebrates, we examine Fe isotopes in modern marine chiton radula collected from different locations in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to assess the range of isotopic values, and to test whether or not the isotopic signatures reflect seawater values. Furthermore, by comparing two species that have very different feeding habits but collected from the same location, we infer a possible link between diet and Fe isotopic signatures. Values of δ56Fe (relative to IRMM-014) in chiton teeth range from -1.90 to 0.00‰ (±0.05‰ (2σ) uncertainty in δ56Fe), probably reflecting a combination of geographical control and biological fractionation processes. Comparison with published local surface seawater Fe isotope data shows a consistent negative offset of chiton teeth Fe isotope compositions relative to seawater. Strikingly, two different species from the same locality in the North Pacific (Puget Sound, Washington, USA) have distinct isotopic signatures. Tonicella lineata, which feeds on red algae, has a mean δ56Fe of -0.65 ± 0.26‰ (2σ, 3 specimens), while Mopalia muscosa, which feeds primarily on green algae, shows lighter isotopic values with a mean δ56Fe of -1.47 ± 0.98‰ (2σ, 5 specimens). Although chitons are not simple recorders of the ambient seawater Fe isotopic signature, these preliminary results suggest that Fe isotopes provide information concerning Fe biogeochemical cycling in near shore environments, and might be used to probe sources of Fe in the diets of different organisms.

  16. Changes in nuclear structure along the Mn isotopic chain studied via charge radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylen, H.; Babcock, C.; Beerwerth, R.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Bonnard, J.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Day Goodacre, T.; Fedorov, D.; Fritzsche, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Geithner, W.; Geppert, Ch.; Gins, W.; Grob, L. K.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Lenzi, S. M.; Moore, I. D.; Maass, B.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Marsh, B.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Otsuka, T.; Papuga, J.; Rossel, R.; Rothe, S.; Sánchez, R.; Tsunoda, Y.; Wraith, C.; Xie, L.; Yang, X. F.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The hyperfine spectra of 51,53 -64Mn were measured in two experimental runs using collinear laser spectroscopy at ISOLDE, CERN. Laser spectroscopy was performed on the atomic 3 d54 s25/2 6S →3 d54 s 4 p 3/2 6P and ionic 3 d54 s 5S2→3 d54 p 5P3 transitions, yielding two sets of isotope shifts. The mass and field shift factors for both transitions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock framework and were combined with a King plot analysis in order to obtain a consistent set of mean-square charge radii which, together with earlier work on neutron-deficient Mn, allow the study of nuclear structure changes from N =25 across N =28 up to N =39 . A clear development of deformation is observed towards N =40 , confirming the conclusions of the nuclear moments studies. From a Monte Carlo shell-model study of the shape in the Mn isotopic chain, it is suggested that the observed development of deformation is not only due to an increase in static prolate deformation but also due to shape fluctuations and triaxiality. The changes in mean-square charge radii are well reproduced using the Duflo-Zuker formula except in the case of large deformation.

  17. Changes in nuclear structure along the Mn isotopic chain studied via charge radii

    CERN Document Server

    Heylen, H; Beerwerth, R; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Blaum, K; Bonnard, J; Campbell, P; Cheal, B; Goodacre, T Day; Fedorov, D; Fritzsche, S; Ruiz, R F Garcia; Geithner, W; Geppert, Ch; Gins, W; Grob, L K; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Lenzi, S M; Moore, I D; Maass, B; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S; Marsh, B; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nortershauser, W; Otsuka, T; Papuga, J; Rossel, R; Rothe, S; Sanchez, R; Tsunoda, Y; Wraith, C; Xie, L; Yang, X F; Yordanov, D T

    2016-01-01

    The hyperfine spectra of $^{51,53-64}$Mn were measured in two experimental runs using collinear laser spectroscopy at ISOLDE, CERN. Laser spectroscopy was performed on the atomic $3d^5\\ 4s^2\\ ^{6}\\text{S}_{5/2}\\rightarrow 3d^5\\ 4s4p\\ ^{6}\\text{P}_{3/2}$ and ionic $3d^5\\ 4s\\ ^{5}\\text{S}_2 \\rightarrow 3d^5\\ 4p\\ ^{5}\\text{P}_3$ transitions, yielding two sets of isotope shifts. The mass and field shift factors for both transitions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock framework and were combined with a King plot analysis in order to obtain a consistent set of mean-square charge radii which, together with earlier work on neutron-deficient Mn, allow the study of nuclear structure changes from $N=25$ across $N=28$ up to $N=39$. A clear development of deformation is observed towards $N=40$, confirming the conclusions of the nuclear moments studies. From a Monte Carlo Shell Model study of the shape in the Mn isotopic chain, it is suggested that the observed development of deformation is not only d...

  18. Magnesium isotope fractionation during carbonatite magmatism at Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wang-Ye; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Halama, Ralf; Keller, Jörg; Klaudius, Jurgis

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the behaviour of Mg isotopes during carbonatite magmatism, we analyzed Mg isotopic compositions of natrocarbonatites and peralkaline silicate rocks from Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania. The olivine melilitites from the vicinity of Oldoinyo Lengai have homogeneous and mantle-like Mg isotopic compositions (δ26Mg of -0.30 to -0.26‰), indicating limited Mg isotope fractionation during mantle melting. The highly evolved peralkaline silicate rocks not related to silicate-carbonatite liquid immiscibility, including phonolites from the unit Lengai I, combeite-wollastonite nephelinites (CWNs) from the unit Lengai II A and carbonated combeite-wollastonite-melilite nephelinites (carbCWMNs), have δ26Mg values (from -0.25 to -0.10‰) clustered around the mantle value. By contrast, the CWNs from the unit Lengai II B, which evolved from the silicate melts that were presumably generated by silicate-carbonatite liquid immiscibility, have heavier Mg isotopes (δ26Mg of -0.06 to +0.09‰). Such a difference suggests Mg isotope fractionation during liquid immiscibility and implies, based on mass-balance calculations, that the original carbonatite melts at Lengai were isotopically light. The variable and positive δ26Mg values of natrocarbonatites (from +0.13 to +0.37‰) hence require a change of their Mg isotopic compositions subsequent to liquid immiscibility. The negative correlations between δ26Mg values and contents of alkali and alkaline earth metals of natrocarbonatites suggest Mg isotope fractionation during fractional crystallization of carbonatite melts, with heavy Mg isotopes enriched in the residual melts relative to fractionated carbonate minerals. Collectively, significant Mg isotope fractionation may occur during both silicate-carbonatite liquid immiscibility and fractional crystallization of carbonatite melts, making Mg isotopes a potentially useful tracer of these processes relevant to carbonatite petrogenesis.

  19. Isotopic evolution of Mauna Loa volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, M.D.; Kammer, D.P. (Chemistry Dept., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA))

    1991-04-01

    In an effort to understand the temporal helium isotopic variations in Mauna Loa volcano, we have measured helium, strontium and lead isotopes in a suite of Mauna Loa lavas that span most of the subaerial eruptive history of the volcano. The lavas range in age from historical flows to Ninole basalt which are thought to be several hundred thousand years old. Most of the samples younger than 30 ka in age (Kau Basalt) are radiocarbon-dated flows, while the samples older than 30 ka are stratigraphically controlled (Kahuku and Ninole Basalt). The data reveal a striking change in the geochemistry of the lavas approximately 10 ka before present. The lavas older than 10 ka are characterized by high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ({approx equal} 16-20 times atmospheric), higher {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ({approx equal} 18.2), and lower {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr({approx equal} 0.70365) ratios than the younger Kau samples (having He, Pb and Sr ratios of approximately 8.5 x atmospheric, 18.1 and 0.70390, respectively). The historical lavas are distinct in having intermediate Sr and Pb isotopic compositions with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios similar to the other young Kau basalt ({approx equal} 8.5 x atmospheric). The isotopic variations are on a shorter time scale (100 to 10,000 years) than has previously been observed for Hawaiian volcanoes, and demonstrate the importance of geochronology and stratigraphy to geochemical studies. The data show consistency between all three isotope systems, which suggests that the variations are not related to magma chamber degassing processes, and that helium is not decoupled from the other isotopes. However, the complex temporal evolution suggests that three distinct mantle sources are required to explain the isotopic data. Most of the Mauna Loa isotopic variations could be explained by mixing between a plume type source, similar to Loihi, and an asthenospheric source with helium isotopic composition close to MORB and elevated Sr isotopic values. (orig./WL).

  20. Suggestions on photons and fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Alvargonzalez, R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we suggest a configuration of photons consistent with a spin $\\hbar$, and a configuration of the fermions coherent with a spin $\\hbar/2$. These suggested configurations open the way to further analyses which lead to the following conclusions: - There cannot exist elementary particles of spin $\\hbar/2$ with a mass inferior to $1m_e$ or with a radius greater than $1l_e$. - The electrostatic force derives from the centrifugal forces inherent to the spin and are propagated by photons. - The derivation of the electrostatic force explains the existence of positive and negative charges and Coulomb's law. - The enormous differences between the centrifugal forces and the centripetal forces at the surface of the protons give rise to quantic fluctuations of space which generate the energy flows necessary for equilibrium. These energy flows can explain gravitation and the strong force. - The mass of the proton, $m_p$, and the mass of the neutron, $m_n$, must each have a concrete value required for the cohes...

  1. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    the Arctic Ocean. A comprehensive database is created based on ice core and weather station data from Greenland within the period 1890-2014. Present day annual and seasonal mean values are computed for 326 locations in Greenland. Parameterization of the spatial distribution of temperature and δ18O are used...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  2. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  3. Isotope Production Facility (IPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive isotopes for medicine and research since the mid 1970s, when targets were first irradiated using the 800...

  4. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  5. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  6. Methods of isotopic geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhov, I. M.; Levchenkov, O. A.

    Papers are presented on such topics as the age of the chemical elements; the age of meteorites, the moon, and the earth; isotopic ages of the most ancient terrestrial formations; and the Archean evolution of Enderby Land in the Antarctic as evidenced by isotopic dating. Consideration is also given to a uranium-lead geochronology technique for investigating Precambrian ore deposits, a Pb-Pb technique of zircon dating, and the potentials and limitations of Sm-Nd geochronology.

  7. Cortisol shifts financial risk preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Narayanan; Hardy, Ben; Page, Lionel; Schaffner, Markus; Graggaber, Johann; Powlson, Andrew S.; Fletcher, Paul C.; Gurnell, Mark; Coates, John

    2014-01-01

    Risk taking is central to human activity. Consequently, it lies at the focal point of behavioral sciences such as neuroscience, economics, and finance. Many influential models from these sciences assume that financial risk preferences form a stable trait. Is this assumption justified and, if not, what causes the appetite for risk to fluctuate? We have previously found that traders experience a sustained increase in the stress hormone cortisol when the amount of uncertainty, in the form of market volatility, increases. Here we ask whether these elevated cortisol levels shift risk preferences. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over protocol we raised cortisol levels in volunteers over 8 d to the same extent previously observed in traders. We then tested for the utility and probability weighting functions underlying their risk taking and found that participants became more risk-averse. We also observed that the weighting of probabilities became more distorted among men relative to women. These results suggest that risk preferences are highly dynamic. Specifically, the stress response calibrates risk taking to our circumstances, reducing it in times of prolonged uncertainty, such as a financial crisis. Physiology-induced shifts in risk preferences may thus be an underappreciated cause of market instability. PMID:24550472

  8. Identifying Controls on the Stable Water Isotope Composition of Precipitation in the Southwestern Yukon Using GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, R.; Moore, K.

    2007-12-01

    The goal of our work is to better understand what controls the stable water isotope (SWI) composition of precipitation in the southwestern Yukon, and in particular, to better-interpret the SWI signal from the Mount Logan ice core. To this end, we are conducting experiments with the GISS ModelE general circulation model, which is equipped with SWI diagnostics. One feature of interest in the Mt. Logan ice core record is a significant drop in d18O in the 1850's towards more depleted values. The current explanation for this shift is a transition in the North Pacific circulation towards a deeper Aleutian Low, with the stronger meridional flow bringing moisture from more southerly sources. Because of their greater arrival times, these air masses would have undergone a greater isotopic depletion than moisture from closer, colder sources under a more zonal flow regime. Although physically plausible, it is possible that the d18O drop caused by this proposed shift in circulation might be offset by warmer source evaporation conditions and integrated air mass trajectories, both of which would be associated with less depleted precipitation. To test the physical plausibility of the meridional hypothesis, we conducted numerical experiments with the NASA GISS ModelE isotopically-equipped general circulation model. In the Yukon, SWI variability is influenced, via the regional temperature, by the Pacific North America pattern and ENSO. We found that positive d18O anomalies in the SW Yukon region were in fact associated with a deeper Aleutian Low; it would appear that the effect of a longer transit time is offset by a warmer moisture transport pathway, in disagreement with the current moisture shift explanation. Our results are in agreement, however, with recent tree-ring reconstructions of the North Pacific Index, which suggest an 1850's shift towards a weaker Aleutian Low. We also found that the degree of Pacific control on the SW Yukon isotope signal is highly dependant on

  9. Shift Work, Chronotype, and Melatonin Patterns among Female Hospital Employees on Day and Night Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael; Tranmer, Joan; Hung, Eleanor; Korsiak, Jill; Day, Andrew G; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    Shift work-related carcinogenesis is hypothesized to be mediated by melatonin; however, few studies have considered the potential effect modification of this underlying pathway by chronotype or specific aspects of shift work such as the number of consecutive nights in a rotation. In this study, we examined melatonin patterns in relation to shift status, stratified by chronotype and number of consecutive night shifts, and cumulative lifetime exposure to shift work. Melatonin patterns of 261 female personnel (147 fixed-day and 114 on rotations, including nights) at Kingston General Hospital were analyzed using cosinor analysis. Urine samples were collected from all voids over a 48-hour specimen collection period for measurement of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin concentrations using the Buhlmann ELISA Kit. Chronotypes were assessed using mid-sleep time (MSF) derived from the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ). Sociodemographic, health, and occupational information were collected by questionnaire. Rotational shift nurses working nights had a lower mesor and an earlier time of peak melatonin production compared to day-only workers. More pronounced differences in mesor and acrophase were seen among later chronotypes, and shift workers working ≥3 consecutive nights. Among nurses, cumulative shift work was associated with a reduction in mesor. These results suggest that evening-types and/or shift workers working ≥3 consecutive nights are more susceptible to adverse light-at-night effects, whereas long-term shift work may also chronically reduce melatonin levels. Cumulative and current exposure to shift work, including nights, affects level and timing of melatonin production, which may be related to carcinogenesis and cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(5); 830-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  11. Climatic signals in multiple highly resolved stable isotope records from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Bo Møllesøe; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann

    2010-01-01

    are found to correspond better with winter stable isotope data than with summer or annual average stable isotope data it is suggested that a strong local Greenland temperature signal can be extracted from the winter stable isotope data even on centennial to millennial time scales. Udgivelsesdato: Feb....

  12. Dispositional factors and work mastery among shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldal, Vegard; Langvik, Eva; Saksvik-Lehouillier, Ingvild

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how broad personality dimensions and dispositional resistance to change are associated with mastery of work among shift workers. A total of 285 shift workers employed in rotating shifts with morning, evening and night work and night shift schedules in a municipality in Norway completed electronic questionnaires. The findings suggest that the broad personality dimensions neuroticism and conscientiousness were significant predictors of perceived work mastery among shift workers in this sample, whereas the narrow trait dispositional resistance to change was not.

  13. Chromium isotopes in siliciclastic sediments and sedimentary rocks as a proxy for Earth surface redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N. J.; Wang, X.; Owens, J. D.; Johnson, T. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) isotopes are an emerging and potentially promising proxy for tracking redox processes at Earth's surface. However, recent efforts to reconstruct the Cr isotope record through time have primarily focused on sporadically deposited iron-rich chemical sediments, with large temporal gaps and limited capacity to explore the Cr isotope record relative to modern and recent marine processes. However, the basic inorganic chemistry of Cr suggests that anoxic marine basins factor prominently in the global Cr cycle, and that likewise sediments deposited within anoxic basins may offer an unexplored Cr isotope archive throughout Earth's history. We present authigenic δ53Cr data from sediments of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela--a ';type' environment on the modern Earth for large, perennially anoxic basins with relatively strong hydrological connections to the global ocean. Combined with currently available constraints on the δ53Cr composition of modern Atlantic seawater, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that anoxic marine basins can serve as a chemical archive of the first-order features of seawater δ53Cr variation. We employ a simple quantitative model to explore the implications of this hypothesis for global Cr isotope mass balance and the possible utility of authigenic δ53Cr in anoxically deposited siliciclastic sediments and sedimentary rocks as a global paleoredox proxy. Our focus is a basic analysis of the primary controls on seawater δ53Cr as related to both the marine redox landscape and the processes involved in the weathering and aqueous-particulate transport of Cr at Earth's surface. As a case study, we provide analysis of new bulk δ53Cr data through a Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE-2), which shows a well-defined ~1.0‰ negative excursion during the event coupled with evidence for a drawdown of the marine Cr reservoir. We present a conceptual model to explain these observations, and interpret this shift to suggest a shutdown of

  14. Modelling of mercury isotope separation in CP stellar atmospheres: results and problems

    CERN Document Server

    Sapar, A; Sapar, L; Poolamäe, R; 10.1016/j.newar.2009.08.010

    2009-01-01

    Formation of anomalous isotope abundances in the atmospheres of chemically peculiar (CP) stars can be explained by light-induced drift (LID). This effect is additional to the radiative acceleration and appears due to systematic asymmetry of radiative flux in partly overlapping isotopic spectral line profiles. LID causes levitation of an isotope with a red-shifted spectral line and sinking of an isotope with a blue-shifted line, generating thus diffusive separation of isotopes. We have studied diffusion of mercury as a typical well-studied isotope-rich heavy metal. Our model computations show that in mercury-rich quiescent atmospheres of CP stars LID causes levitation of the heavier mercury isotopes and sinking of the lighter ones. Precise quantitative modelling of the process of isotope separation demands very high-resolution computations and the high-precision input data, including data on hyperfine and isotopic splitting of spectral lines, adequate line profiles and impact cross-sections. Presence of microt...

  15. A 1000-Year Carbon Isotope Rainfall Proxy Record from South African Baobab Trees (Adansonia digitata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodborne, Stephan; Hall, Grant; Robertson, Iain; Patrut, Adrian; Rouault, Mathieu; Loader, Neil J; Hofmeyr, Michele

    2015-01-01

    A proxy rainfall record for northeastern South Africa based on carbon isotope analysis of four baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) trees shows centennial and decadal scale variability over the last 1,000 years. The record is in good agreement with a 200-year tree ring record from Zimbabwe, and it indicates the existence of a rainfall dipole between the summer and winter rainfall areas of South Africa. The wettest period was c. AD 1075 in the Medieval Warm Period, and the driest periods were c. AD 1635, c. AD 1695 and c. AD1805 during the Little Ice Age. Decadal-scale variability suggests that the rainfall forcing mechanisms are a complex interaction between proximal and distal factors. Periods of higher rainfall are significantly associated with lower sea-surface temperatures in the Agulhas Current core region and a negative Dipole Moment Index in the Indian Ocean. The correlation between rainfall and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation Index is non-static. Wetter conditions are associated with predominantly El Niño conditions over most of the record, but since about AD 1970 this relationship inverted and wet conditions are currently associated with la Nina conditions. The effect of both proximal and distal oceanic influences are insufficient to explain the rainfall regime shift between the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age, and the evidence suggests that this was the result of a northward shift of the subtropical westerlies rather than a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  16. Holocene peatland shifts in vegetation, carbon, and climate at Imnavait, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Nichols, J. E.; Ouni, S.; Pavia, F.; Pearl, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Imnavait Creek basin (68 40'N, 149 20'W; elevation 875-945 m) in the foothills of the Brooks Range, AK has been well studied in terms of modern vegetational communities, hydrology, and soils. But paleoclimate and paleovegetation reconstructions are limited. We retrieved a 2-m peatland core to examine the macrofossil/biomarker/carbon sequestration history throughout the Holocene and late-glacial. AMS 14C dates of the macrofossil remains will allow us to calculate carbon sequestration rates. The Holocene history (the top meter) records marked shifts in vascular plant as well as bryophyte history. A tri-partite sequence is apparent, with Andromeda/Sphagnum remains abundant in the early Holocene. The absence of bryophytes and the presence of Eriophorum and Carex achenes characterize the mid-Holocene. Andromeda and Betula nana with Sphagnum remains are abundant in the upper 30 cm of the core. Hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax alkanes record higher effective moisture in the early and late Holocene, suggesting more evaporative loss in the mid-Holocene which is characterized by Eriophorum. We compare our results with previously observed palynological shifts from lakes in the region and place this Arctic paleorecord in a larger perspective of peatland histories in a N-S transect covering nearly 10 degrees of latitude across Alaska. This tripartite pattern of effective moisture appears to be the same throughout the Alaskan transect, suggesting strong climatic control.

  17. Isotopic evidence for the past climates and vegetation of southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Vogel

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon can potentially provide evidence of past climates. The most detailed information has been obtained from variations in the oxygen-18 content of foraminifera from ocean floor cores, the analysis of which has produced a record of ocean temperature changes through the Quaternary and beyond. The use of isotope analysis of continental materials to reveal climatic change is more limited, but some advances have been made in recent years. One approach has been to utilize the variations in the isotopic composition of precipitation as recorded in ancient groundwater. Thus groundwater samples from a confined aquifer on the southern Cape coast show a marked rise in temperature since the Last Glacial maximum. The temperature changes during the Upper Pleistocene and Holocene are also reflected in the oxygen-18 content of stalagmites from the Cango caves in the same region. The widespread occurrence of C4 grasses in the warmer summer rainfall areas of southern Africa provides a novel possibility of observing temporal shifts of climatic boundaries. The distinctly high carbon-13 content of C4 plants is clearly reflected in the skeletons of grazers so that faunal material from suitably situated archaeological sites can be used to observe changes in the composition of the local grass-cover. The evidence thus far accumulated suggests only minor changes since the Upper Pleistocene. The combined evidence to date indicates that temperatures and also precipitation in southern Africa have changed since the Last Glacial maximum, about 18 000 years ago, but that shifts in the boundaries of the various veld-types were probably not very extensive.

  18. The behaviour of copper isotopes during igneous processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P. S.; Moynier, F.; Harvey, J.; Burton, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Application of Cu isotopes to high temperature systems has recently gained momentum and has the potential for probing sulphide fractionation during planetary differentiation [1]. This requires robust estimates for planetary reservoirs, and a fundamental understanding of how igneous processes affect Cu isotopes; this study aims to tackle the latter. Cogenetic suites affected by both fractionation crystallisation and cumulate formation were analysed to study such effects on Cu isotopes. In S-undersatured systems, Cu behaves incompatibly during melt evolution and the Cu isotope composition of such melt is invariant over the differentiation sequence. In contrast, S-saturated systems show resolvable Cu isotope variations relative to primitive melt. Such variations are minor but imply a slightly heavy Cu isotope composition for continental crust compared to BSE, consistent with granite data [2]. Although olivine accumulation does not affect Cu isotopes, spinel-hosted Cu is isotopically light relative to the bulk. Analysis of variably melt-depleted cratonic peridotites shows that partial melting can affect Cu isotope composition in restite, with the depleted samples isotopically light compared to BSE. This could be due to residual spinel and/or incongruent melting of sulphides - individual sulphides picked from a single xenolith reveal a range of Cu isotope compositions, dependent on composition. Although partial melting may fractionate Cu isotopes, models suggest most mantle-derived melt will have δ65Cu ≈ BSE, as most source Cu will be transferred to the melt. Small degree melts such as ocean island basalts are predicted to be isotopically heavier than MORB, if derived from a primitive mantle source. OIBs have a range of Cu isotope compositions: some are heavier than MORB as predicted; however, some have much lighter compositions. Since Cu isotopes can be significantly fractionated in the surface environment [e.g. 3] OIB Cu isotopic variations may be linked to

  19. Isotopic signatures, foraging habitats and trophic relationships between fish and seasnakes on the coral reefs of New Caledonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brischoux, F.; Bonnet, X.; Cherel, Y.; Shine, R.

    2011-03-01

    A predator's species, sex and body size can influence the types of prey that it consumes, but why? Do such dietary divergences result from differences in foraging habitats, or reflect differential ability to locate, capture or ingest different types of prey? That question is difficult to answer if foraging occurs in places that preclude direct observation. In New Caledonia, amphibious sea kraits ( Laticauda laticaudata and L. saintgironsi) mostly eat eels—but the species consumed differ between snake species and vary with snake body size and sex. Because the snakes capture eels within crevices on the sea floor, it is not possible to observe snake foraging on any quantitative basis. We used stable isotopes to investigate habitat-divergence and ontogenetic shifts in feeding habits of sympatric species of sea kraits. Similarities in δ15 N (~10.5‰) values suggest that the two snake species occupy similar trophic levels in the coral-reef foodweb. However, δ13C values differed among the eight eel species consumed by snakes, as well as between the two snake species, and were linked to habitat types. Specifically, δ13C differed between soft- vs. hard-substrate eel species, and consistently differed between the soft-bottom forager L. laticaudata (~ -14.7‰) and the hard-bottom forager L. saintgironsi (~ -12.5‰). Differences in isotopic signatures within and between the two sea krait species and their prey were consistent with the hypothesis of habitat-based dietary divergence. Isotopic composition varied with body size within each of the snake species and varied with body size within some eel species, reflecting ontogenetic shifts in feeding habits of both the sea kraits and their prey. Our results support the findings of previous studies based on snake stomach contents, indicating that further studies could usefully expand these isotopic analyses to a broader range of trophic levels, fish species and spatial scales.

  20. Anomalous H/D isotope effect on {sup 35}Cl NQR frequencies in piperidinium p-chlorobenzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Ryo; Honda, Hisashi, E-mail: hhonda@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Integrated Science (Japan); Kimura, Taiki [Yokohama City University, Faculty of Science (Japan); Nakata, Eiichi; Takamizawa, Satoshi; Noro, Sumiko [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Integrated Science (Japan); Ishimaru, Shin' ichi [Tokyo Denki University, Department of Green and Sustainable Chemistry (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Anomalous isotope effects were detected in the {sup 35}Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency of piperidinium p-chlrobenzoate (C{sub 5}H{sub 10}NH. ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COOH) by deuteration of hydrogen atoms. The atoms were determined to form two kinds of N-H...O type H-bonds in the crystal structure. Large frequency shifts of the {sup 35}Cl resonance lines reaching 288 kHz at 77 K and 278 kHz at room temperature were caused upon deuteration, in spite of the fact that the Cl atoms in the molecule do not form hydrogen bonds in the crystal. Results of single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements and density-functional-theorem calculations suggest that a dihedral-angle change of 1.8{sup o} between benzene and the piperidine ring contributes to {sup 35}Cl NQR anomalous frequency shifts.

  1. Evidence for Patterns of Selective Urban Migration in the Greater Indus Valley (2600-1900 BC: A Lead and Strontium Isotope Mortuary Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Valentine

    Full Text Available Just as modern nation-states struggle to manage the cultural and economic impacts of migration, ancient civilizations dealt with similar external pressures and set policies to regulate people's movements. In one of the earliest urban societies, the Indus Civilization, mechanisms linking city populations to hinterland groups remain enigmatic in the absence of written documents. However, isotopic data from human tooth enamel associated with Harappa Phase (2600-1900 BC cemetery burials at Harappa (Pakistan and Farmana (India provide individual biogeochemical life histories of migration. Strontium and lead isotope ratios allow us to reinterpret the Indus tradition of cemetery inhumation as part of a specific and highly regulated institution of migration. Intra-individual isotopic shifts are consistent with immigration from resource-rich hinterlands during childhood. Furthermore, mortuary populations formed over hundreds of years and composed almost entirely of first-generation immigrants suggest that inhumation was the final step in a process linking certain urban Indus communities to diverse hinterland groups. Additional multi disciplinary analyses are warranted to confirm inferred patterns of Indus mobility, but the available isotopic data suggest that efforts to classify and regulate human movement in the ancient Indus region likely helped structure socioeconomic integration across an ethnically diverse landscape.

  2. Evidence for Patterns of Selective Urban Migration in the Greater Indus Valley (2600-1900 BC): A Lead and Strontium Isotope Mortuary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Benjamin; Kamenov, George D.; Kenoyer, Jonathan Mark; Shinde, Vasant; Mushrif-Tripathy, Veena; Otarola-Castillo, Erik; Krigbaum, John

    2015-01-01

    Just as modern nation-states struggle to manage the cultural and economic impacts of migration, ancient civilizations dealt with similar external pressures and set policies to regulate people’s movements. In one of the earliest urban societies, the Indus Civilization, mechanisms linking city populations to hinterland groups remain enigmatic in the absence of written documents. However, isotopic data from human tooth enamel associated with Harappa Phase (2600-1900 BC) cemetery burials at Harappa (Pakistan) and Farmana (India) provide individual biogeochemical life histories of migration. Strontium and lead isotope ratios allow us to reinterpret the Indus tradition of cemetery inhumation as part of a specific and highly regulated institution of migration. Intra-individual isotopic shifts are consistent with immigration from resource-rich hinterlands during childhood. Furthermore, mortuary populations formed over hundreds of years and composed almost entirely of first-generation immigrants suggest that inhumation was the final step in a process linking certain urban Indus communities to diverse hinterland groups. Additional multi disciplinary analyses are warranted to confirm inferred patterns of Indus mobility, but the available isotopic data suggest that efforts to classify and regulate human movement in the ancient Indus region likely helped structure socioeconomic integration across an ethnically diverse landscape. PMID:25923705

  3. Seasonal Variations in the Biochemical Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Spartina alterniflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, A. L.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (D/H) of lipids are being intensively explored as a paleoenvironmental proxy, particularly for continental regimes where organic preservation in lakes is generally high. Several studies have already shown good correlations between δD values of lake water and sedimentary (core-top) lipids, but the fractionations indicated by those correlations do not agree well between studies. Moreover, the data cannot be adequately described by a single biochemical fractionation. These difficulties suggest that the relationship between environmental water and plant lipid δD is controlled by multiple environmental and biochemical factors. Understanding these factors will lead to a more robust interpretation of D/H as a paleoclimate proxy. Here we examine seasonal changes in biochemical H-isotopic fractionation by the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora. Because S. alterniflora grows partially submerged in a tidal estuary, it has an unlimited and isotopically unvarying source of water for growth. Thus environmental influences on fractionation should be negligible, allowing us to examine seasonal changes in biochemical fractionations. C27 and C29 n-alkanes, β-sitosterol, phytol, and C16 and C18 fatty acids were extracted and analyzed from 35 samples of S. alterniflora harvested from the same location over a period of 18 months. All lipids except β-sitosterol exhibit statistically significant depletions of D during summer months relative to the rest of the year. The magnitude of the isotopic shift is up to 36‰ in the fatty acids (δD values from -130 to -166‰), 31‰ in n-alkanes (-161 to -192‰), and 24‰ in phytol (-252 to -276‰). The shift in D/H ratio is in the opposite direction from that expected due to increased evapotranspiration during the summer months. The largest D-depletions coincide with periods of maximal growth. The observed pattern is interpreted as resulting from increased use of stored carbohydrates as substrates for lipid

  4. Possible Evidence for Enhanced Seasonality During the Little Ice Age Indicated by Multiple Isotopes from Kepler Lake, South-Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyo, A.; Yu, Z.; Bebout, G.

    2008-12-01

    We present multiple-proxy data from two short cores (85 cm and 101 cm) from Kepler Lake, an evaporation- insensitive, groundwater-fed marl lake in South-Central Alaska to reconstruct climate and environmental changes in the recent centuries. The proxies used include calcite C and O isotopes, organic matter (OM) C and N isotopes, and loss on ignition (LOI) analysis. Two cores can be visually correlated based upon LOI results. A 600 year chronology was established based on 3 calibrated AMS 14C dates of terrestrial macrofossils and 210Pb analysis. δ18OVPDB values of inorganic calcite range from - 17.0‰ to -15.7‰, with the highest values between 1470 and 1840 AD during the Little Ice Age (LIA). The relatively high δ18O values during the cold LIA contrast with the conventional temperature interpretation of O isotopes. Therefore, the isotopic shifts around the LIA were likely caused by a shift in atmospheric circulation. A weakening of the wintertime Aleutian Low pressure system residing over the Gulf of Alaska would result in enriched 18O in precipitation as well as a colder winter climate in SC Alaska. During the LIA period CaCO3 contents were elevated by ~15% to >80%. Calcite precipitation in freshwater lakes is primarily a function of summer temperature; we propose that the LIA in SC Alaska represents a period of colder winters and warmer summers. This interpretation is also supported by C isotopes, reflecting aquatic productivity. Both δ13C OM and δ13Ccalcite (relative to VPDB) exhibit relatively high values at 1600 to 1840 AD, after which δ13COM remains constant throughout the rest of the record and δ13Ccalcite declines after the LIA. The delayed increase in δ13C of OM and calcites at 1600 AD may reflect the differential responses of calcite precipitation and aquatic productivity. The negative shift of ~1‰ in δ18O in the 1840s has also been documented in ice cores from Mt. Logan and in marl lake sediments from the southern Yukon, suggesting a broad

  5. Niche convergence suggests functionality of the nocturnal fovea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Gillian L; Melin, Amanda D; Tuh Yit Yu, Fred; Bernard, Henry; Ong, Perry S; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-01

    The fovea is a declivity of the retinal surface associated with maximum visual acuity. Foveae are widespread across vertebrates, but among mammals they are restricted to haplorhine primates (tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans), which are primarily diurnal. Thus primates have long contributed to the view that foveae are functional adaptations to diurnality. The foveae of tarsiers, which are nocturnal, are widely interpreted as vestigial traits and therefore evidence of a diurnal ancestry. This enduring premise is central to adaptive hypotheses on the origins of anthropoid primates; however, the question of whether tarsier foveae are functionless anachronisms or nocturnal adaptations remains open. To explore this question, we compared the diets of tarsiers (Tarsius) and scops owls (Otus), taxa united by numerous anatomical homoplasies, including foveate vision. A functional interpretation of these homoplasies predicts dietary convergence. We tested this prediction by analyzing stable isotope ratios that integrate dietary information. In Borneo and the Philippines, the stable carbon isotope compositions of Tarsius and Otus were indistinguishable, whereas the stable nitrogen isotope composition of Otus was marginally higher than that of Tarsius. Our results indicate that species in both genera consumed mainly ground-dwelling prey. Taken together, our findings support a functional interpretation of the many homoplasies shared by tarsiers and scops owls, including a retinal fovea. We suggest that the fovea might function similarly in tarsiers and scops owls by calibrating the auditory localization pathway. The integration of auditory localization and visual fixation during prey detection and acquisition might be critical at low light levels.

  6. Rare earth element and neodymium isotope tracing of element input and past ocean circulation. Study from north and south pacific seawater and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froellje, Henning

    2016-08-09

    incorporation of NADW contribute to the changes in the Nd isotope signature of CDW. The absence of such early deglacial Nd isotope changes in the northernmost core were attributed to the isolation of this core from bottom waters by South Pacific bathymetry with potential contribution from shifts in the Southern Ocean's frontal system and potential influence of increased deglacial NPDW convection. Overall the results highlight the important role of glacial deep stratification in sustaining a deep glacial carbon reservoir in the Southern Ocean and the importance of Southern Hemisphere climate to the breakdown of deep stratification and the release of sequestered CO{sub 2} through upwelling. A 140,000 year long Nd isotope record from the Southeast Pacific covering the last glacial-interglacial cycle demonstrates comparable deep water mass mixing in the South Pacific during the last two glacial maxima, but higher NADW contributions during the glacial Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 4 (chapter 4). Likewise, the penultimate interglacial (MIS 5) was characterised by similar amounts of NADW and NPDW in CDW as the Holocene and the modern Southeast Pacific. Comparison of the last two glacial terminations thus shows high consistency and suggests similar mechanisms that controlled the deglacial change in water mass structure in the deep South Pacific, including a Southern Ocean contribution to early deglacial Nd isotope shifts. The results show weaker absolute glacial-interglacial Nd isotope changes compared to the South Atlantic due to the lack of direct NADW and slightly higher NPDW influence in the Southeast Pacific. Further, the Nd isotope record confirms the glacial-interglacial variability in NADW and NPDW mixture in CDW obtained previously from carbon isotope records.

  7. Comparison of bulk and n-alkane PETM carbon isotope trends from the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczynski, A. A.; McInerney, F. A.; Kraus, M. J.; Wing, S.

    2010-12-01

    al. suggest a prolonged and sustained core of the CIE (113 ka) followed by a more rapid initial recovery (33 ka) to near pre-PETM δ13C values. Improving the PETM age model and refining the allocation of time within the event has important implications for understanding the carbon cycle. Carbon isotope values of individual odd-carbon-numbered, long-chain (n-C21-n-C35) n-alkanes extracted from PETM sediments tend to become more negative with increasing chain length within a particular sample. In addition, the magnitude of the negative CIE also tends to increase with increasing n-alkane chain length. Using the empirical observation that δ13C values tend to increase with increasing chain length in conifers while δ13C values decrease with increasing chain length in angiosperms, Smith et al. (2007) has suggested that plant community composition shifted from 50% conifer to an exclusively angiosperm flora at the PETM. The additional n-alkane carbon isotope data presented here is similar to previously published data and supports the plant community change hypothesis suggested by Smith et al. (2007).

  8. Ru isotope heterogeneity in the solar protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Burkhardt, Christoph; Kruijer, Thomas S.; Kleine, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Nucleosynthetic isotope anomalies in bulk chondrites and differentiated meteorites reflect variable proportions of isotopically diverse presolar components in bulk planetary bodies, but the origin of these heterogeneities is not well understood. Here, the Ru isotope composition of a comprehensive suite of iron meteorites and bulk samples of ordinary, enstatite and carbonaceous chondrites, as well as acid leachates and an insoluble residue of the Allende chondrite are examined using newly developed multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. Except for IAB iron meteorites and enstatite chondrites, all investigated meteorites show well-resolved Ru isotope anomalies. Of these, within-group Ru isotopic variations observed for samples from a given chemical group of iron meteorites reflect secondary neutron capture induced Ru isotope shifts during prolonged cosmic ray-exposure. After correction of these cosmogenic effects using Pt isotopes as a neutron-dose monitor, the remaining Ru isotope anomalies are nucleosynthetic in nature and are consistent with a deficit in s-process Ru in iron meteorite parent bodies. Similarly, Ru isotope anomalies in bulk ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites also reflect a deficiency in s-process Ru. The sequential dissolution of Allende reveals the presence of an HF-soluble s-process carrier, which is either an unidentified presolar phase or a component that incorporated s-process Ru liberated from SiC grains during nebular or parent body processes. We show that varying proportions of the s-process carrier identified in Allende resulted in the correlated Ru isotope anomalies observed for bulk meteorites, and that all meteorites (except possibly IAB irons and enstatite chondrites) are depleted in this s-process component relative to Ru from the Earth's mantle. Bulk meteorites exhibit correlated Ru and Mo isotope anomalies, reflecting variable deficits of a common s-process component, but some iron meteorites and

  9. Heavy snow: IR spectroscopy of isotope mixed crystalline water ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andy; Shi, Liang; Auchettl, Rebecca; McNaughton, Don; Appadoo, Dominique R T; Robertson, Evan G

    2016-02-14

    Mid-infrared spectra have been measured for crystalline water ice aerosols of widely varied H/D isotopic composition. Particles with diameters ranging from 10-200 nm were generated via rapid collisional cooling with a cold buffer gas over a range of temperatures from 7-200 K. In near isotopically pure ices, the νL band position is slightly red-shifted with increasing temperature whilst in the ν2 region apparently anomalous shifts in peak maxima are explained by the contribution of a broad 2νL band of H2O and a 3νL band of D2O together with ν2 intensity that is particularly weak in low temperature crystalline ice. The hydrogen bonded OH (or OD) oscillator bands of near pure H2O (or D2O) ices are blue-shifted with temperature, with a gradient very similar to that of the corresponding band in isotope diluted samples, HOD in D2O (or H2O). It implies that this observed temperature trend is predominantly due to the intrinsic change in local hydride stretch potential energy, rather than to changes in intermolecular coupling. However, it is also observed that the narrow hydride stretch bands of an isotope diluted sample rapidly develop sub-band structure as the oscillator concentration increases, evidence of strong intermolecular coupling and a high degree of delocalisation. Anomalous blue-shifts in the OD stretch profile as D2O concentration grows is attributable to Fermi resonance with 2ν2 of D2O, in much closer proximity than the corresponding H2O levels. Theoretical results from a mixed quantum/classical approach are used to validate these findings in the hydride stretching region. Theory qualitatively reproduces the experimental trends as a function of temperature and isotopic variance.

  10. Accelerator Production of Isotopes for Medical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2014-03-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging and therapy has led to the development of novel routes of isotope production. For example, the production and purification of longer-lived position emitting radiometals has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller medical cyclotrons at dedicated facilities. Recently, isotope harvesting from heavy ion accelerator facilities has also been suggested. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a new national user facility for nuclear science to be completed in 2020. Radioisotopes could be produced by dedicated runs by primary users or may be collected synergistically from the water in cooling-loops for the primary beam dump that cycle the water at flow rates in excess of hundreds of gallons per minute. A liquid water target system for harvesting radioisotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) was designed and constructed as the initial step in proof-of-principle experiments to harvest useful radioisotopes in this manner. This talk will provide an overview of isotope production using both dedicated machines and harvesting from larger accelerators typically used for nuclear physics. Funding from Department of Energy under DESC0007352 and DESC0006862.

  11. Lamb shift of Unruh detector levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbrecht, Bjoern [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Prokopec, Tomislav [Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITF) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-06-07

    We argue that the energy levels of an Unruh detector experience an effect similar to the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics. As a consequence, the spectrum of energy levels in a curved background is different from that in flat space. As examples, we consider a detector in an expanding universe and in Rindler space, and for the latter case we suggest a new expression for the local virtual energy density seen by an accelerated observer. In the ultraviolet domain, that is when the space between the energy levels is larger than the Hubble rate or the acceleration of the detector, the Lamb shift quantitatively dominates over the thermal response rate.

  12. Lamb Shift of Unruh Detector Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Garbrecht, B; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2006-01-01

    We argue that the energy levels of an Unruh detector experience an effect similar to the Lamb shift in Quantum Electrodynamics. As a consequence, the spectrum of energy levels in a curved background is different from that in flat space. As examples, we consider a detector in an expanding Universe and in Rindler space, and for the latter case we suggest a new expression for the local virtual energy density seen by an accelerated observer. In the ultraviolet domain, that is when the space between the energy levels is larger than the Hubble rate or the acceleration of the detector, the Lamb shift quantitatively dominates over the thermal response rate.

  13. Zinc Isotope Variability in Three Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Predictive Model for Determining Isotopic Fractionation during Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Gonzalez, R; Weiss, D

    2015-10-20

    The zinc (Zn) isotope compositions of feed materials and combustion byproducts were investigated in three different coal-fired power plants, and the results were used to develop a generalized model that can account for Zn isotopic fractionation during coal combustion. The isotope signatures in the coal (δ(66)ZnIRMM) ranged between +0.73 and +1.18‰, values that fall well within those previously determined for peat (+0.6 ±2.0‰). We therefore propose that the speciation of Zn in peat determines the isotope fingerprint in coal. All of the bottom ashes collected in these power plants were isotopically depleted in the heavy isotopes relative to the coals, with δ(66)ZnIRMM values ranging between +0.26‰ and +0.64‰. This suggests that the heavy isotopes, possibly associated with the organic matter of the coal, may be preferentially released into the vapor phase. The fly ash in all of these power plants was, in contrast, enriched in the heavy isotopes relative to coal. The signatures in the fly ash can be accounted for using a simple unidirectional fractionation model with isotope fractionation factors (αsolid-vapor) ranging between 1.0003 and 1.0007, and we suggest that condensation is the controlling process. The model proposed allows, once the isotope composition of the feed coal is known, the constraining of the Zn signatures in the byproducts. This will now enable the integration of Zn isotopes as a quantitative tool for the source apportionment of this metal from coal combustion in the atmosphere.

  14. Boron isotope effect in superconducting MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bud'ko, S L; Lapertot, G; Petrovic, C; Cunningham, C E; Anderson, N; Canfield, P C

    2001-02-26

    We report the preparation method of and boron isotope effect for MgB2, a new binary intermetallic superconductor with a remarkably high superconducting transition temperature T(c)(10B) = 40.2 K. Measurements of both temperature dependent magnetization and specific heat reveal a 1.0 K shift in T(c) between Mg11B2 and Mg10B2. Whereas such a high transition temperature might imply exotic coupling mechanisms, the boron isotope effect in MgB2 is consistent with the material being a phonon-mediated BCS superconductor.

  15. Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, K T; Ruiz, R F Garcia; Budincevic, I; Procter, T J; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Cocolios, T E; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Strashnov, I; Stroke, H H; Rossel, R E; Heylen, H; Billowes, J; Rothe, S; Bissell, M L; Wendt, K D A; de Groote, R P; De Schepper, S

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic moments and isotope shifts of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-205 were measured at ISOLDE-CERN with use of collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. A production-to-detection efficiency of 1\\% was measured for Fr-202. The background from nonresonant and collisional ionization was maintained below one ion in 10(5) beam particles. Through a comparison of the measured charge radii with predictions from the spherical droplet model, it is concluded that the ground-state wave function remains spherical down to Fr-205, with a departure observed in Fr-203 (N = 116).

  16. Ab initio study of nitrogen and position-specific oxygen kinetic isotope effects in the NO + O3 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Wendell W.; Michalski, Greg

    2016-12-01

    Ab initio calculations have been carried out to investigate nitrogen (k15/k14) and position-specific oxygen (k17/k16O & k18/k16) kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the reaction between NO and O3 using CCSD(T)/6-31G(d) and CCSD(T)/6-311G(d) derived frequencies in the complete Bigeleisen equations. Isotopic enrichment factors are calculated to be -6.7‰, -1.3‰, -44.7‰, -14.1‰, and -0.3‰ at 298 K for the reactions involving the 15N16O, 14N18O, 18O16O16O, 16O18O16O, and 16O16O18O isotopologues relative to the 14N16O and 16O3 isotopologues, respectively (CCSD(T)/6-311G(d)). Using our oxygen position-specific KIEs, a kinetic model was constructed using Kintecus, which estimates the overall isotopic enrichment factors associated with unreacted O3 and the oxygen transferred to NO2 to be -19.6‰ and -22.8‰, respectively, (CCSD(T)/6-311G(d)) which tends to be in agreement with previously reported experimental data. While this result may be fortuitous, this agreement suggests that our model is capturing the most important features of the underlying physics of the KIE associated with this reaction (i.e., shifts in zero-point energies). The calculated KIEs will useful in future NOx isotopic modeling studies aimed at understanding the processes responsible for the observed tropospheric isotopic variations of NOx as well as for tropospheric nitrate.

  17. Stable isotopes. Applications and production; Les isotopes stables. Applications - production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, S.; Louvet, P.; Soulie, E. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This conference presents 46 communications concerning stable isotope production, utilization and application, grouped in 6 sessions and posters. The various themes are: biological applications (pharmacology, medical diagnosis, metabolism and protein studies, toxicity and response studies, labelled compounds), analysis procedures (NMR analysis for macromolecules, tracer studies), nuclear applications (utilization of stable isotopes in nuclear reactors), biological, physical and chemical applications (mass transfer, mobility, crystallography, isotopic exchange), stable isotope production (ion chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, cryogenic distillation).

  18. Iron isotopes in an Archean ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busigny, Vincent; Planavsky, Noah J.; Jézéquel, Didier; Crowe, Sean; Louvat, Pascale; Moureau, Julien; Viollier, Eric; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-05-01

    Iron isotopes have been extensively used to trace the history of microbial metabolisms and the redox evolution of the oceans. Archean sedimentary rocks display greater variability in iron isotope ratios and more markedly negative values than those deposited in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. This increased variability has been linked to changes in either water column iron cycling or the extent of benthic microbial iron reduction through time. We tested these contrasting scenarios through a detailed study of anoxic and ferruginous Lac Pavin (France), which can serve as a modern analogue of the Archean ocean. A depth-profile in the water column of Lac Pavin shows a remarkable increase in dissolved Fe concentration (0.1-1200 μM) and δ56Fe values (-2.14‰ to +0.31‰) across the oxic-anoxic boundary to the lake bottom. The largest Fe isotope variability is found at the redox boundary and is related to partial oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron, leaving the residual Fe enriched in light isotopes. The analysis of four sediment cores collected along a lateral profile (one in the oxic layer, one at the redox boundary, one in the anoxic zone, and one at the bottom of the lake) indicates that bulk sediments, porewaters, and reactive Fe mostly have δ56Fe values near 0.0 ± 0.2‰, similar to detrital iron. In contrast, pyrite δ56Fe values in sub-chemocline cores (60, 65, and 92 m) are highly variable and show significant deviations from the detrital iron isotope composition (δ56Fepyrite between -1.51‰ and +0.09‰; average -0.93‰). Importantly, the pyrite δ56Fe values mirror the δ56Fe of dissolved iron at the redox boundary—where near quantitative sulfate and sulfide drawdown occurs—suggesting limited iron isotope fractionation during iron sulfide formation. This finding has important implications for the Archean environment. Specifically, this work suggests that in a ferruginous system, most of the Fe isotope variability observed in sedimentary pyrites can

  19. Deciphering Carbon Isotope Excursions in Separated Biogenic and Diagenetic Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, M.; Minoletti, F.; Hesselbo, S.; Jenkyns, H.; Rickaby, R.; Diester-Haass, L.; Delsate, D.

    2008-12-01

    The long-term evolution of the carbon-isotope ratio in the sedimentary archive is classically linked with changes in primary productivity and organic matter burial. There have been sudden and pronounced shifts, so-called Carbon Isotope Excursions (CIEs) in the long-term trends as evidenced by synchronous shifts from various basins. These geochemical perturbations may have various explanations such as changes of the efficiency of the carbon sink; sudden infusion of isotopically-light carbon into the Ocean-Atmosphere system; or advection of 12C-rich source from bottom water in a stratified water column. Beside the record of primary changes in seawater chemistry, a possible diagenetic overprint may also mime such CIEs in the sedimentary record. The aim of this contribution is to illustrate through three critical intervals (the Early Toarcian, the K-P boundary and the Mid-Miocene Montery Event) how the various micron-sized sedimentary particles specifically record these CIEs, which are respectively associated with major paleoceanographical events. New techniques for getting monotaxic calcareous nannofossil assemblages from the sediment (Minoletti et al., accepted) enable the isotopic measurement at various depths within the surface water and from bottom water by analyzing early diagenetic precipitations (rhombs and micarbs). The integration of these high-resolution isotopic signals in terms of amplitudes affords to recognize diagenetic artifacts in some sections displaying coeval decrease in the carbonate content. For both Early Toarcian and K-P events, corroborative records of CIE records in both primary calcite and bottom water carbonate indicate a global C-isotope perturbation of the water column. For the Monterey event, the evolution of calcareous nannoplankton and the foraminifera isotopic records are in overall agreement, but in detail, the coccolith-discoaster and foraminifer ratio in the sediment, related to environmental changes, is likely to produce isotopic

  20. Non-Rayleigh control of upper-ocean Cd isotope fractionation in the western South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ruifang C.; Galer, Stephen J. G.; Abouchami, Wafa; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.; De Jong, Jeroen; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-08-01

    We present seawater Cd isotopic compositions in five depth profiles and a continuous surface water transect, from 50°S to the Equator, in the western South Atlantic, sampled during GEOTRACES cruise 74JC057 (GA02 section, Leg 3), and investigate the mechanisms governing Cd isotope cycling in the upper and deep ocean. The depth profiles generally display high ε 112 / 110Cd at the surface and decrease with increasing depth toward values typical of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). However, at stations north of the Subantarctic Front, the decrease in ε 112 / 110Cd is interrupted by a shift to values intermediate between those of surface and bottom waters, which occurs at depths occupied by North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). This pattern is associated with variations in Cd concentration from low surface values to a maximum at mid-depths and is attributed to preferential utilization of light Cd by phytoplankton in the surface ocean. Our new results show that in this region Cd-deficient waters do not display the extreme, highly fractionated ε 112 / 110Cd reported in some earlier studies from other oceanic regions. Instead, in the surface and subsurface southwest (SW) Atlantic, when [Cd] drops below 0.1 nmol kg-1, ε 112 / 110Cd are relatively homogeneous and cluster around a value of +3.7, in agreement with the mean value of 3.8 ± 3.3 (2SD, n = 164) obtained from a statistical evaluation of the global ocean Cd isotope dataset. We suggest that Cd-deficient surface waters may acquire their Cd isotope signature via sorption of Cd onto organic ligands, colloids or bacterial/picoplankton extracellular functional groups. Alternatively, we show that an open system, steady-state model is in good accord with the observed Cd isotope systematics in the upper ocean north of the Southern Ocean. The distribution of ε 112 / 110Cd in intermediate and deep waters is consistent with the water mass distribution, with the north-south variations reflecting changes in the mixing proportion

  1. Oxygen isotopes as a tool to quantify reservoir-scale CO2 pore-space saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serno, Sascha; Flude, Stephanie; Johnson, Gareth; Mayer, Bernard; Boyce, Adrian; Karolyte, Ruta; Haszeldine, Stuart; Gilfillan, Stuart

    2017-04-01

    Structural and residual trapping of carbon dioxide (CO2) are two key mechanisms of secure CO2 storage, an essential component of Carbon Capture and Storage technology [1]. Estimating the amount of CO2 that is trapped by these two mechanisms is a vital requirement for accurately assessing the secure CO2 storage capacity of a formation, but remains a key challenge. Recent field [2,3] and laboratory experiment studies [4] have shown that simple and relatively inexpensive measurements of oxygen isotope ratios in both the injected CO2 and produced water can provide an assessment of the amount of CO2 that is stored by these processes. These oxygen isotope assessments on samples obtained from observation wells provide results which are comparable to other geophysical techniques. In this presentation, based on the first comprehensive review of oxygen isotope ratios measured in reservoir waters and CO2 from global CO2 injection projects, we will outline the advantages and potential limitations of using oxygen isotopes to quantify CO2 pore-space saturation. We will further summarise the currently available information on the oxygen isotope composition of captured CO2. Finally, we identify the potential issues in the use of the oxygen isotope shifts in the reservoir water from baseline conditions to estimate accurate saturations of the pore space with CO2, and suggest how these issues can be reduced or avoided to provide reliable CO2 pore-space saturations on a reservoir scale in future field experiments. References [1] Scott et al., (2013) Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, 105-111 doi:10.1038/nclimate1695 [2] Johnson et al., (2011) Chemical Geology, Vol. 283, 185-193 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.06.019 [3] Serno et al., (2016) IJGGC, Vol. 52, 73-83 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.06.019 [4] Johnson et al., (2011) Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 26 (7) 1184-1191 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2011.04.007

  2. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  3. Continuation of Atomic Spectroscopy on Alkali Isotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Laser optical measurements on Rb, Cs and Fr have already been performed at ISOLDE in 1978-79. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of |7|6|-|9|8Rb, |1|1|8|-|1|4|5Cs, |2|0|8|-|2|1|3Fr and 14 of their isomers have been studied. Among the wealth of information which has been obtained, the most important are the first observation of an optical transition of the element Fr, the evidence of the onset of nuclear deformation at N~=~60 for Rb isotopes and the shape isomerism isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ From both the atomic and nuclear physics point of view, new studies seem very promising: \\item - the search for new optical transitions in Fr; the shell effect in the rms charge radius at N~=~126 for Fr isotopes \\item - the study of a possible onset of deformation for Cs isotopes beyond |1|4|5Cs \\item - the study of a region of static deformation in neutron-deficient Rb isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ \\end{enumerate} A new apparatus has been built. The principle remains the same as used in our earlier experiments. The improvements concern ess...

  4. Isotopes in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a concise introduction to the newly created sub-discipline of solid state physics isotopetronics. The role of isotopes in materials and their properties are describe  in this book. The problem of the enigma of the atomic mass in microphysics is briefly discussed.  The range of the applications of isotopes is wide: from biochemical process in living organisms to modern technical applications in quantum information. Isotopetronics promises to improve nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. With numerous illustrations this book is useful to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  5. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  6. Geospatial modeling of plant stable isotope ratios - the development of isoscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. B.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Hurley, J. M.; Cerling, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Large-scale spatial variation in stable isotope ratios can yield critical insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical cycles, animal movements, and shifts in climate, as well as anthropogenic activities such as commerce, resource utilization, and forensic investigation. Interpreting these signals requires that we understand and model the variation. We report progress in our development of plant stable isotope ratio landscapes (isoscapes). Our approach utilizes a GIS, gridded datasets, a range of modeling approaches, and spatially distributed observations. We synthesize findings from four studies to illustrate the general utility of the approach, its ability to represent observed spatio-temporal variability in plant stable isotope ratios, and also outline some specific areas of uncertainty. We also address two basic, but critical questions central to our ability to model plant stable isotope ratios using this approach: 1. Do the continuous precipitation isotope ratio grids represent reasonable proxies for plant source water?, and 2. Do continuous climate grids (as is or modified) represent a reasonable proxy for the climate experienced by plants? Plant components modeled include leaf water, grape water (extracted from wine), bulk leaf material ( Cannabis sativa; marijuana), and seed oil ( Ricinus communis; castor bean). Our approaches to modeling the isotope ratios of these components varied from highly sophisticated process models to simple one-step fractionation models to regression approaches. The leaf water isosocapes were produced using steady-state models of enrichment and continuous grids of annual average precipitation isotope ratios and climate. These were compared to other modeling efforts, as well as a relatively sparse, but geographically distributed dataset from the literature. The latitudinal distributions and global averages compared favorably to other modeling efforts and the observational data compared well to model predictions

  7. Stable isotopes in Lithuanian bioarcheological material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipityte, Raminta; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of bioarcheological material of ancient human populations allows us to understand the subsistence behavior associated with various adaptations to the environment. Feeding habits are essential to the survival and growth of ancient populations. Stable isotope analysis is accepted tool in paleodiet (Schutkowski et al, 1999) and paleoenvironmental (Zernitskaya et al, 2014) studies. However, stable isotopes can be useful not only in investigating human feeding habits but also in describing social and cultural structure of the past populations (Le Huray and Schutkowski, 2005). Only few stable isotope investigations have been performed before in Lithuanian region suggesting a quite uniform diet between males and females and protein intake from freshwater fish and animal protein. Previously, stable isotope analysis has only been used to study a Stone Age population however, more recently studies have been conducted on Iron Age and Late medieval samples (Jacobs et al, 2009). Anyway, there was a need for more precise examination. Stable isotope analysis were performed on human bone collagen and apatite samples in this study. Data represented various ages (from 5-7th cent. to 18th cent.). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on medieval populations indicated that individuals in studied sites in Lithuania were almost exclusively consuming C3 plants, C3 fed terrestrial animals, and some freshwater resources. Current investigation demonstrated social differences between elites and country people and is promising in paleodietary and daily life reconstruction. Acknowledgement I thank prof. dr. G. Grupe, Director of the Anthropological and Palaeoanatomical State Collection in Munich for providing the opportunity to work in her laboratory. The part of this work was funded by DAAD. Antanaitis-Jacobs, Indre, et al. "Diet in early Lithuanian prehistory and the new stable isotope evidence." Archaeologia Baltica 12 (2009): 12-30. Le Huray, Jonathan D., and Holger

  8. Online spectroscopy of trapped radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, Oscar O.; Giri, Gouri S.; Berg, Joost van den; Hoek, Duurt Johan van der; Kruithof, Wilbert; Santra, Bodhaditya; Shidling, Praveen; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W.; Jungmann, Klaus [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    Radium ions are of particular interest for a most precise measurement of Atomic Parity Violation. From a single cold and trapped ion one expects a significantly improved measurement of the weak mixing (Weinberg) angle through a determination of the light shift in the forbidden 7{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-6{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} transition. In preparation of such precision measurements the transitions relevant for this (7S-7P, 6D-7P) were observed and measured in the isotopes {sup 212}Ra, {sup 213}Ra and {sup 214}Ra. The isotopes were produced at the TRI{mu}P facility of KVI, when a {sup 208}Pb beam hit a solid {sup 12}C target. The Ra isotopes were stopped and re-ionized to Ra{sup +} in a Thermal Ionizer, mass separated in a Wien Filter and cooled in a gas filled Radio Frequency Quadrupole. The ions were stored as a cloud in a Paul trap, where they also interacted with laser light. All necessary wavelengths were obtained by semiconductor lasers. The setup and the measurements will be discussed.

  9. Quantifying mercury isotope dynamics in captive Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Yun Kwon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analyses of mercury (Hg isotope ratios in fish tissues are used increasingly to infer sources and biogeochemical processes of Hg in natural aquatic ecosystems. Controlled experiments that can couple internal Hg isotope behavior with traditional isotope tracers (δ13C, δ15N can improve the applicability of Hg isotopes as natural ecological tracers. In this study, we investigated changes in Hg isotope ratios (δ202Hg, Δ199Hg during bioaccumulation of natural diets in the pelagic Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis; PBFT. Juvenile PBFT were fed a mixture of natural prey and a dietary supplement (60% Loligo opalescens, 31% Sardinops sagax, 9% gel supplement in captivity for 2914 days, and white muscle tissues were analyzed for Hg isotope ratios and compared to time in captivity and internal turnover of δ13C and δ15N. PBFT muscle tissues equilibrated to Hg isotope ratios of the dietary mixture within ∼700 days, after which we observed a cessation in further shifts in Δ199Hg, and small but significant negative δ202Hg shifts from the dietary mixture. The internal behavior of Δ199Hg is consistent with previous fish studies, which showed an absence of Δ199Hg fractionation during Hg bioaccumulation. The negative δ202Hg shifts can be attributed to either preferential excretion of Hg with higher δ202Hg values or individual variability in captive PBFT feeding preferences and/or consumption rates. The overall internal behavior of Hg isotopes is similar to that described for δ13C and δ15N, though observed Hg turnover was slower compared to carbon and nitrogen. This improved understanding of internal dynamics of Hg isotopes in relation to δ13C and δ15N enhances the applicability of Hg isotope ratios in fish tissues for tracing Hg sources in natural ecosystems.

  10. Understanding and diagnosing shift work disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpy, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A significant proportion of the workforce in industrialized countries (16%) are employed as shift workers. These workers may be susceptible to shift work disorder (SWD), a circadian rhythm sleep disorder, particularly those who work at night or on early-morning shifts. Shift work disorder remains an underdiagnosed and undertreated problem among this population. Patients with SWD have difficulty initiating sleep and waking up. Often, these patients have excessive sleepiness during their work shift. Shift work disorder has been associated with decreased productivity, impaired safety, diminished quality of life, and adverse effects on health. Several tools have been validated to assess excessive daytime sleepiness and are often used to assess excessive nighttime sleepiness, such as that experienced in patients with SWD, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. The criteria for diagnosing SWD as established by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and published in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-Second Edition (ICSD-2) were most recently updated in 2005 and thus do not contain newer agents approved for use in patients with SWD. The symptoms of SWD can be treated using behavioral, prescription, and nonprescription therapies. Current treatment guidelines suggest nonpharmacologic interventions, such as exercise and exposure to light. In addition, medications that contain melatonin or caffeine may have clinical benefits in some patients with SWD. However, modafinil and armodafinil are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to improve wakefulness in patients with excessive sleepiness associated with SWD, and recent data suggest a clinical benefit. The use of these therapies can significantly improve sleep, performance, and quality of life for patients with SWD.

  11. What is the evidence for less shift work tolerance in older workers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, M.M.; Looze, M.P.de

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the suggestion that older people would be less tolerant to shift work. Field studies on age-shift work interaction effects on sleep, fatigue, performance, accidents and health were reviewed. Studies on age-shift (morning, afternoon, night) and age-shift system (roster) interactio

  12. Mass-dependent fractionation of nickel isotopes in meteoritic metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David L.; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Clayton, Robert N.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Janney, Philip E.; Davis, Andrew M.

    We measured nickel isotopes via multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) in the bulk metal from 36 meteorites, including chondrites, pallasites, and irons (magmatic and non-magmatic). The Ni isotopes in these meteorites are mass fractionated; the fractionation spans an overall range of ≈0.4‰ amu-1. The ranges of Ni isotopic compositions (relative to the SRM 986 Ni isotopic standard) in metal from iron meteorites (≈0.0 to ≈0.3‰ amu-1) and chondrites (≈0.0 to ≈0.2‰ amu-1) are similar, whereas the range in pallasite metal (≈-0.1 to 0.0‰ amu-1) appears distinct. The fractionation of Ni isotopes within a suite of fourteen IIIAB irons (≈0.0 to ≈0.3‰ amu-1) spans the entire range measured in all magmatic irons. However, the degree of Ni isotopic fractionation in these samples does not correlate with their Ni content, suggesting that core crystallization did not fractionate Ni isotopes in a systematic way. We also measured the Ni and Fe isotopes in adjacent kamacite and taenite from the Toluca IAB iron meteorite. Nickel isotopes show clearly resolvable fractionation between these two phases; kamacite is heavier relative to taenite by ≈0.4‰ amu-1. In contrast, the Fe isotopes do not show a resolvable fractionation between kamacite and taenite. The observed isotopic compositions of kamacite and taenite can be understood in terms of kinetic fractionation due to diffusion of Ni during cooling of the Fe-Ni alloy and the development of the Widmanstätten pattern.

  13. Iron isotope composition of some Archean and Proterozoic iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Little, Crispin T. S.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2012-03-01

    Fe isotopes can provide new insight into redox-dependent biogeochemical processes. Precambrian iron formations (IF) are deserving targets for Fe isotope studies because they are composed predominantly of authigenic Fe phases and record a period of unprecedented iron deposition in Earth's history. We present Fe isotope data for bulk samples from 24 Archean and Proterozoic IF and eight Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich deposits. These data reveal that many Archean and early Paleoproterozoic iron formations were a sink for isotopically heavy Fe, in contrast to later Proterozoic and Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich rocks. The positive δ56Fe values in IF are best explained by delivery of particulate ferric oxides formed in the water column to the sediment-water interface. Because IF are a net sink for isotopically heavy Fe, there must be a corresponding pool of isotopically light Fe in the sedimentary record. Earlier work suggested that Archean pyritic black shales were an important part of this light sink before 2.35 billion years ago (Ga). It is therefore likely that the persistently and anomalously low δ56Fe values in shales are linked with the deposition of isotopically heavy Fe in IF in the deeper parts of basins. IF deposition produced a residual isotopically light dissolved Fe pool that was captured by pyritic Fe in shales. Local dissimilatory Fe reduction in porewater and associated diagenetic reactions resulting in pyrite and carbonate precipitation may have further enhanced Fe isotope heterogeneity in marine sediments, and an 'iron shuttle' may have transported isotopically light Fe from shelf sediments to the basin. Nevertheless, water-column processing of hydrothermally delivered Fe likely had the strongest influence on the bulk iron isotope composition of Archean and Paleoproterozoic iron formations and other marine sediments.

  14. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  15. Isotopic Studies of the Guerrero Composite Terrane, West-Central Mexico: Implications for Provenance of Crustal Rocks and Ore Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potra, A.; Macfarlane, A. W.; Salters, V. J.; Sachi-Kocher, A.

    2010-12-01

    New Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope analyses of various crustal units and ores from the Guerrero terrane are presented in order to gain insight into their provenance. Mesozoic basement rocks from the Arteaga Complex and Tejupilco metamorphic suite contain radiogenic Pb relative to bulk earth models (206Pb/204Pb between 18.701 and 19.256, 207Pb/204Pb between 15.623 and 15.693, and 208Pb/204Pb between 38.694 and 39.216), plotting to the right of the average Pb crust evolution curve of Stacey and Kramers (1975). The isotopic compositions of Pb in these rocks are substantially more radiogenic than published data on high-grade metamorphic rocks from the Grenvillian-age Oaxaca terrane, but are similar to Paleozoic basement rocks of the Mixteca terrane. Sr and Nd isotope data suggest that the basement rocks of the Guerrero terrane partly originated from ocean-floor rocks which were overlain by sediments derived from a cratonic terrane, possibly represented by the metamorphic complexes of the Oaxaca or Mixteca terranes. Lead isotope ratios of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Zihuatanejo and Huetamo Sequences define two different clusters, with the Zihuatanejo Sequence units shifted to more radiogenic values (206Pb/204 between 18.763 and 19.437, 207Pb/204Pb between 15.580 and 15.643, and 208Pb/204Pb between 38.510 and 38.892). Samples from the Huetamo Sequence are less radiogenic than the metamorphic basement, with Pb isotope ratios between 18.630 and 18.998 for 206Pb/204, 15.563 and 15.641 for 207Pb/204Pb, and 38.369 and 38.610 for 208Pb/204Pb. They plot close to the radiogenic end of the MORB field, suggesting a possible mixing line between the basement rocks and the MORB component. Lead isotope ratios of Tertiary intrusive rocks from La Verde, El Malacate, and La Esmeralda resemble the orogene reservoir in the plumbotectonics model of Zartman and Doe (1981). Plutonic rocks from La Verde show the most radiogenic Pb compositions, suggesting a significant influence of old

  16. Salinity dependent hydrogen isotope fractionation in alkenones produced by coastal and open ocean haptophyte algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'boule, Daniela; Chivall, David; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogen isotope fractionation in alkenones produced by haptophyte algae is a promising new proxy for paleosalinity reconstructions. To constrain and further develop this proxy the coastal haptophyte Isochrysis galbana and the open ocean haptophyte alga Emiliania huxleyi were cultured at different salinities. The fractionation factor, αalkenones-water, ranged between 0.853 and 0.902 for I. galbana and 0.789 and 0.822 for E. huxleyi. The results show a strong linear correlation between the fractionation factor α and salinity for E. huxleyi, in agreement with earlier studies, but also for I. galbana. Both haptophytes show the same response to changes in salinity, represented by the slopes of the α-salinity relationship (˜0.002 per salinity unit). This suggests that the same process, in both coastal as well as open ocean haptophytes, is responsible for reducing fractionation with increasing salinity. However, there is a significant difference in absolute isotope fractionation between E. huxleyi and I. galbana, i.e. E. huxleyi produces alkenones which are 90‰ more depleted in D under the same culturing conditions than I. galbana. Our data suggest that the δD of alkenones can be used to reconstruct relative shifts in paleosalinity in coastal as well as open ocean environments with careful consideration of species composition and other complicating factors especially in coastal regions.

  17. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  18. GEOCHRONOMETRY ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20040631 Chen Jiangfeng (School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui) ; Xie Zhi Relationships Between Rb-Sr, Ar - Ar Geochronometers and Oxygen Isotopic Equilibrium of Intrusions from Eastern Anhui Province, China (Geological Journal of China Universities, ISSN 1006 - 7493, CN 32 -

  19. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090432 Zhou Shuqing (School of Energy Resources, China University of Geosciences Beijing 100083, China); Huang Haiping Stable Isotopic Records vs. Important Events in Life Evolution and the Concurrent Environment (Geological Review, ISSN0371-5736, CN11-1952, 54(2), 2008, p.225-231, 3 illus., 1 table, 77 refs.)

  20. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20141014Wang Hairan(State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics,Department of Geology,Northwest University,Xi’an710069,China);Zhao Hongge Theory and Application of Zircon U-Pb Isotope Dating Technique(Geology and Resources,ISSN1671-1947,CN21-1458/P,22(3),2013,p.229

  1. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072750 Huang Sijing(State Key Laboratory of Oil/Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Pei Changrong Age Calibration for the Boundary between Lower and Middle Triassic by Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy in Eastern Sichuan Province

  2. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070454 Bao Zengkuan (Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049, China); Yuan Wanming Apatite (U-Th)/He Dating and Its Application (Acta Petrologica et Mineralogica, ISSN1000-6524, CN11-1966/P, 24(2), 2005, p.126-132, 2 illus., 25 refs.) Key words: isotopic geochronology

  3. Isotopic Implicit Surface Meshing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boissonnat, Jean-Daniel; Cohen-Steiner, David; Vegter, Gert

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of piecewise linear approximation of implicit surfaces. We first give a criterion ensuring that the zero-set of a smooth function and the one of a piecewise linear approximation of it are isotopic. Then, we deduce from this criterion an implicit surface meshing algor

  4. Isotope hydrograph separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum, Centre of Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Leipzig (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Storm-runoff thus reflects the complex hydraulic behaviour of drainage basins and water-links of such systems. Water of different origin may participate in the events and in this lecture, the application of isotope techniques to separate storm hydrographs into different components will be presented.

  5. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  6. Sources of Holocene variability of oxygen isotopes in paleoclimate archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. LeGrande

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Variability in water isotopes has been captured in numerous archives and used to infer past climate changes. Here we examine water isotope variability over the course of the Holocene using the water-isotope enabled, coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model, GISS ModelE-R. Eight Holocene time slices, ~1000 years apart are simulated and driven by estimated changes in orbital configuration, greenhouse gases, and ice sheet extent. We find that simulated water isotope archives match well with those seen in ice cores, ocean sediment cores, and speleothems. The climate changes associated with the water isotope changes, however, are more complex than simple modern spatial slope interpretations might suggest. In particular, water isotope variability in Asian speleothems is linked to alterations in landward water vapor transport, not local precipitation, and ice sheet changes over North America lead to the masking of temperature signals in Summit, Greenland. Salinity-seawater isotope variability is complicated by inter-ocean basin exchanges of water vapor. Water isotopes do reflect variability in the hydrology, but are better interpreted in terms of regional hydrological cycle changes rather than as indicators of local climate.

  7. Variability in carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with bacterial hydrolysis of atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A.; Penning, H.; Elsner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Even after legislative prohibition in 1991 by the European Union, the pesticide atrazine and its metabolites are still detected in surface and ground water frequently exceeding the permitted drinking water concentration limit of 0,1 g/L. Despite much recent research on atrazine, its risk assessment in the environment is still a major challenge because of the difficulty of establishing mass balances in the subsurface. To obtain a better insight into the fate of atrazine, we developed compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for atrazine. CSIA has proven valuable for assessing organic contaminants in subsurface environments, on the one hand for source identification and on the other hand to trace (bio)chemical degradation reactions through isotope fractionation in the compounds. Such assessment is based on the Rayleigh equation and therein on the isotope enrichment factor ɛ, which must be determined experimentally beforehand. In ongoing work, we therefore measured carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with biotic hydrolsis of atrazine. C and N isotope enrichment factors were determined in resting cell experiments for Pseudomonas sp. ADP, Chelatobacter heintzii and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1, strains that hydrolyse atrazine in the initial transformation reaction. Carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment factors were distinctly different between the bacterial strains. However, when plotting shifts in carbon isotope ratios versus shifts in nitrogen isotope ratios the slopes of the different degradation experiments coincided well. These results give evidence that all bacterial strains were carrying out the same initial biochemical degradation reaction, but that the associated isotope fractionation, as represented by the enrichment factors, was masked to a different extent owing to different rate determining steps prior to the isotopically sensitive bond cleavage (commitment to catalysis). Our study therefore illustrates the benefit of multi

  8. Investigating controls on boron isotope ratios in shallow marine carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Henehan, Michael J.; Hull, Pincelli M.; Reid, R. Pamela; Hardisty, Dalton S.; Hood, Ashleigh v. S.; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2017-01-01

    The boron isotope-pH proxy has been widely used to reconstruct past ocean pH values. In both planktic foraminifera and corals, species-specific calibrations are required in order to reconstruct absolute values of pH, due to the prevalence of so-called vital effects - physiological modification of the primary environmental signals by the calcifying organisms. Shallow marine abiotic carbonate (e.g. ooids and cements) could conceivably avoid any such calibration requirement, and therefore provide a potentially useful archive for reconstructions in deep (pre-Cenozoic) time. However, shallow marine abiotic carbonates could also be affected by local shifts in pH caused by microbial photosynthesis and respiration, something that has up to now not been fully tested. In this study, we present boron isotope measurements from shallow modern marine carbonates, from the Bahama Bank and Belize to investigate the potential of using shallow water carbonates as pH archives, and to explore the role of microbial processes in driving nominally 'abiogenic' carbonate deposition. For Bahama bank samples, our boron-based pH estimates derived from a range of carbonate types (i.e. ooids, peloids, hardground cements, carbonate mud, stromatolitic micrite and calcified filament micrite) are higher than the estimated modern mean-annual seawater pH values for this region. Furthermore, the majority (73%) of our marine carbonate-based pH estimates fall out of the range of the estimated pre-industrial seawater pH values for this region. In shallow sediment cores, we did not observe a correlation between measured pore water pH and boron-derived pH estimates, suggesting boron isotope variability is a depositional rather than early diagenetic signal. For Belize reef cements, conversely, the pH estimates are lower than likely in situ seawater pH at the time of cement formation. This study indicates the potential for complications when using shallow marine non-skeletal carbonates as marine pH archives

  9. Nuclear charge radius measurements of radioactive beryllium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the nuclear charge radii of the beryllium isotopes $^{7,9,10}$Be and the one-neutron halo isotope $^{11}$Be using laser spectroscopy of trapped ions. Ions produced at ISOLDE and ionized with the laser ion source will be cooled and bunched in the radio-frequency buncher of the ISOLTRAP experiment and then transferred into a specially designed Paul trap. Here, they will be cooled to temperatures in the mK range employing sympathetic and direct laser cooling. Precision laser spectroscopy of the isotope shift on the cooled ensemble in combination with accurate atomic structure calculations will provide nuclear charge radii with a precision of better than 3%. This will be the first model-independent determination of a one-neutron halo nuclear charge radius.

  10. Anthropogenic influences on Pb/Al and lead isotope signature in annually layered Holocene Maar lake sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schettler, G.; Romer, R.L. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Telegrafenberg, D-14473 Potsdam (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    Annually laminated sediments from two Maar lakes in the West Eifel volcanic field (Germany) show anomalously high Pb within sections deposited during the first centuries A.D. exceeding the local geological background 8.5-fold in Lake Meerfelder Maar (MFM) and 4-fold in Lake Schalkenmehrener Maar (SMM). These Pb anomalies are associated with a distinct shift in the Pb isotope signature to less radiogenic compositions. The excess Pb causing the anomaly has the same isotopic composition as galena deposits 60 km to the NW of the Maar lakes. It is suggested that this component was transported airborne into the Maar lakes and originates from regional Roman Pb refinement and cupellation of argentiferous Pb. Varve chronostratigraphy of correlated cores indicates that significant Roman Pb input lasted for about 230 a. SMM does not get fluviatile input. Its sedimentary record is more sensitive to variations in airborne input than that of MFM, which had an inflow. SMM sediment sections deposited during periods of low soil erosion (early Holocene, Dark Ages) with comparably high Pb/Al values also show little radiogenic Pb. This is caused by airborne minerogenic matter from a geochemically and isotopically distinct remote source that becomes apparent only in sedimentation periods of very restricted local allochthonous input. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Stable isotope ratios in Cape gannets around the southern coasts of Africa reveal penetration of biogeographic patterns in oceanic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquemet, Sébastien; McQuaid, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    The southern coasts of Africa are influenced by two major oceanic currents, leading to biogeographic patterns in inshore and offshore species assemblages, and in the stable isotope signatures of suspended particulate matter and filter-feeding mussels. We used the stable isotope ratios of carbon ( 13C/ 12C) and nitrogen ( 15N/ 14N) from the blood and feathers of adult and chick Cape gannets ( Morus capensis) to investigate whether the geographic differences observed at the lower levels in the marine communities are deep penetrating effects that reach top predators. Additionally, we evaluated whether trophic segregation occurs between adult and reared chick gannets, and whether a shift to wintering habitat occurs in adults. The study was conducted during the 2006 breeding season on Bird Island in the Agulhas system, and on Malgas and Ichaboe Islands, in the south and north Benguela respectively. Our results showed significant differences in the isotope ratios of members of different colonies, but no intra-colony differences between tissues or age groups. These results indicate that there is neither age-related nor temporal segregation in the diet of members of the same colony. Feather isotopic values suggest that adults remain all year round in the same habitats, and do not undertake long migration after reproduction. Since all gannets tend to target similar prey, we attributed among-colony differences in isotope signatures mostly to the oceanic conditions experienced by the main prey of birds rather than substantial differences in diet composition. Overall, isotopic signatures segregate the two current systems, with depleted carbon values in the Agulhas and enriched nitrogen values in the upwelled waters of the Benguela. Within the Benguela birds from Ichaboe in the north had higher δ 15N values than those from Malgas in the south, which we attributed to differences in the functioning of the upwelling cells in the vicinity of the two colonies. Finally, slight

  12. Water isotopes in desiccating lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Máguas, Cristina; Lakatos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of water is routinely used as a tracer to study water exchange processes in vascular plants and ecosystems. To date, no study has focussed on isotope processes in non-vascular, poikilohydric organisms such as lichens and bryophytes. To understand basic isotope exchange processes of non-vascular plants, thallus water isotopic composition was studied in various green-algal lichens exposed to desiccation. The study indicates that lichens equilibrate with the isotopic composition of surrounding water vapour. A model was developed as a proof of concept that accounts for the specific water relations of these poikilohydric organisms. The approach incorporates first their variable thallus water potential and second a compartmentation of the thallus water into two isotopically distinct but connected water pools. Moreover, the results represent first steps towards the development of poikilohydric organisms as a recorder of ambient vapour isotopic composition. PMID:19888598

  13. In situ SIMS oxygen isotope analysis of olivine in the Tibetan mantle xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhidan; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Liu, Dong; Mo, Xuanxue

    2016-04-01

    around 90, but also as low as Fo of 70; (4) In olivine crystals in mantle xenolith, the oxygen isotopes in rim (δ18O=6.96-7.98‰ Fo#=78-82) significantly shift to high δ18O values that similar to their neighboring lava olivine phenocrysts (δ18O=8.03‰ Fo# =80). These data suggest that the oxygen isotopes in mantle xenolith olivines are more stable during the processes of metasomatism. The mantle xenolith may have been metasomatized by the host lava, in addition to other enriched reservoir in the sub-arc mantle. [Financially supported by the NSF of China, grants 41273044, 41225006, 41230209, 41130314]. References: [1] Zhao Z, et al., 2008a. Acta Petrologica Sinica, 24 (2): 193-202 [2] Zhao Z, et al., 2008b. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 72, 12 (Supp.): A1095 [3] Zhao Z, et al., 2009. Lithos, 113: 190-212 [4] Liu C-Z, et al., 2011, Geology, 39, 923-926 [5] Liu C-Z, et al., 2014, Geology, Scientific Report, 4, 4232; DOI:10.1038/srep04232

  14. Chemical and Isotopic Constraints on the Origin of Cenozoic Pacific Northwest Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Hart, W. K.; Grove, T. L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Barr, J. A.; Till, C. B.

    2009-12-01

    Though there is little debate about the connection of Cascade volcanism to subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate, the cause of extensive Neogene volcanism east of the Cascades is not as well understood. Volumetrically, the most significant component of this volcanism, the flood basalts of the Columbia Plateau and Steens Mountain, are dominated by lavas that have suffered extensive crystal fractionation in crustal magma chambers. The evolved, crustally contaminated, nature of most of these basalts makes identification of the primary magma difficult, confounding interpretation of the background cause of the volcanism. Some Steens lavas are relatively undifferentiated (Johnson et al., USGS Open File report 98-0482). These Steens basalts have compositions that are distinguished from younger primitive basalts on the High Lava Plains (HLP) by distinctly lower Al and higher FeO, Ti, Zr and Nb concentrations, but also Mg#s that are too low to be in equilibrium with mantle that has Fo90 olivine. If these are primary magmatic characteristics, they suggest either a more fertile, FeO-rich source, or lower, not higher, degrees of melting at greater depth during the flood basalt era as opposed to the much smaller-volume younger HLP volcanism. Experimental results on primitive Quaternary HLP and Newberry Volcano lavas suggest last equilibration at pressures corresponding to just below the Moho (30-40 km) with water contents that range from substantial (up to 4 wt %) at Newberry to low (Columbia River basalts and most Snake River Plain basalts have Pb isotope compositions strongly displaced from values seen in oceanic basalts plotting instead along a circa 2.5 Ga trend. The shift in Pb (and Sr, Nd, and Hf) isotope composition occurs precisely at the boundary between young accreted terranes to the west and Precambrian North America to the east, suggesting that ancient continental lithospheric mantle is an important source component of Snake River basaltic volcanism. At precisely the

  15. Shifts in the trophic base of intermittent stream food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekar, Matthew P.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; Huxel, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal variation in the trophic base of stream food webs is critical for predicting population and community stability, and ecosystem function. We used stable isotope ratios (13C/12C, and 15N/14N) to characterize the trophic base of two streams in the Ozark Mountains of northwest Arkansas, U.S.A. We predicted that autochthonous resources would be more important during the spring and summer and allochthonous resources would be more important in the winter due to increased detritus inputs from the riparian zone during autumn leaf drop. We predicted that stream communities would demonstrate increased reliance on autochthonous resources at sites with larger watersheds and greater canopy openness. The study was conducted at three low-order sites in the Mulberry River Drainage (watershed area range: 81-232 km2) seasonally in 2006 and 2007. We used circular statistics to examine community-wide shifts in isotope space among fish and invertebrate consumers in relation to basal resources, including detritus and periphyton. Mixing models were used to quantify the relative contribution of autochthonous and allochthonous energy sources to individual invertebrate consumers. Significant isotopic shifts occurred but results varied by season and site indicating substantial variation in the trophic base of stream food webs. In terms of temporal variation, consumers shifted toward periphyton in the summer during periods of low discharge, but results varied during the interval between summer and winter. Our results did not demonstrate increased reliance on periphyton with increasing watershed area or canopy openness, and detritus was important at all the sites. In our study, riffle-pool geomorphology likely disrupted the expected spatial pattern and stream drying likely impacted the availability and distribution of basal resources.

  16. Regime shifts in resource management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Resource management has to take account of the possibility of tipping points and regime shifts in ecological systems that provide the resources. This article focuses on the typical model of regime shifts in the ecological literature and analyzes optimal management and common-property issues when tra

  17. Work shifts in Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Recupero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency Medicine is known as a high stress specialty. The adverse effect of constantly rotating shifts is the single most important reason given for premature attrition from the field. In this work problems tied with night shift work will be taken into account and some solutions to reduce the impact of night work on the emergency physicians will be proposed.

  18. Isotope hydrology of El Chichón volcano-hydrothermal system; a coupled system of crater lake and hot springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, L.; Taran, Y.; Rouwet, D.

    2010-12-01

    The catastrophic 1982 eruption of El Chichón (>1.5 km3 of erupted material) opened the upper hundred meters of the existing volcano-hydrothermal system. In the new formed 200m-deep crater a large shallow crater lake and numerous hot springs were formed. The lake existence and its salinity depend on the precipitation (~4000 mm/y) as well as a group of geyser-like neutral saline springs (source of Cl and SO4) and hydrothermal steam vents discharging into the lake (source of SO4). The chemistry of these “Soap Pool” (SP) springs evolved from >13,000 ppm of Cl in 1995 to ~2000-3000 ppm of Cl in 2006. Since 2006, this Cl-concentration in SP waters is constant. Similar concentrations of Cl are observed in most flank hot springs located at altitudes of ~ 600 m asl, 2-3 km from the crater. Therefore, it can be suggested that the flank springs, crater lake and crater hot springs are manifestations of the upper, relatively shallow volcano-hydrothermal system developed beneath the crater in the volcano edifice. Water isotopic composition of all types of thermal and fresh waters including fumarolic steam condensates (>100 samples collected in 1995-2010) allow to classify and distinguish different processes of shallow mixing, boiling, evaporation and water-rock isotope exchange. All spring waters from the upper system have meteoric origin, with the isotopic composition plotting close to the meteoric water line. Crater waters are strongly evolved due to shallow boiling and loss of steam. Isotopic composition of water from the lower, deep hydrothermal system is characterized by a significant positive oxygen isotopic shift and a strong Cl-d18O linear correlation. Waters from numerous cold springs that drain pyroclastic deposits demonstrate a clear negative oxygen shift. Some problems related to water isotopic composition are still remain unresolved: (1) we cannot find any traces of the infiltrated isotopically heavy lake waters, i.e., the seepage from the lake at the volcano

  19. Tracing source pollution in soils using cadmium and lead isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloquet, C; Carignan, J; Libourel, G; Sterckeman, T; Perdrix, E

    2006-04-15

    Tracing the source of heavy metals in the environment is of key importance for our understanding of their pollution and natural cycles in the surface Earth reservoirs. Up to now, most exclusively Pb isotopes were used to effectively trace metal pollution sources in the environment. Here we report systematic variations of Cd isotope ratios measured in polluted topsoils surrounding a Pb-Zn refinery plant in northern France. Fractionated Cd was measured in soil samples surrounding the refinery, and this fractionation can be attributed to the refining processes. Despite the Cd isotopic ratios being precisely measured, the obtained uncertainties are still large compared to the total isotopic variation. Nevertheless, for the first time, Cd isotopically fractionated by industrial processes may be traced in the environment. On the same samples, Pb isotope systematics suggested that materials actually used by the refinery were not the major source of Pb in soils, probably because refined ore origins changed over the 100 years of operation. On the other hand, Cd isotopes and concentrations measured in topsoils allowed identification of three main origins (industrial dust and slag and agriculture), assuming that all Cd ores are not fractionated, as suggested by terrestrial rocks so far analyzed, and calculation of their relative contributions for each sampling point. Understanding that this refinery context was an ideal situation for such a study, our results lead to the possibility of tracing sources of anthropogenic Cd and better constrain mixing processes, fluxes, transport, and phasing out of industrial input in nature.

  20. Metabolic impact of shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Fernandes Junior, Silvio A; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, shift work represents a considerable contingent workforce. Recently, studies have shown that overweight and obesity are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. In addition, shift work has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of many metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dislipidemias and metabolic syndrome. Recent data have pointed that decrease of the sleep time, desynchronization of circadian rhythm and alteration of environmental aspects are the main factors related to such problems. Shortened or disturbed sleep is among the most common health-related effects of shift work. The plausible physiological and biological mechanisms are related to the activation of the autonomic nervous system, inflammation, changes in lipid and glucose metabolism, and related changes in the risk for atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes. The present review will discuss the impact of shift work on obesity and metabolic disorders and how disruption of sleep and circadian misalignment may contribute to these metabolic dysfunctions.

  1. Changes in the mean-square charge radii and magnetic moments of neutron-deficient Tl isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Mezilev, K. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2013-08-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron-deficient thallium isotopes at the 276.9-nm atomic transition have been carried out at the Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. New data on isotope shifts and the hyperfine structure for 183-207Tl isotopes and isomers are presented. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and magnetic-moment values are deduced. It is shown that nuclear properties of Tl isotopes and isomers smoothly change at the neutron midshell and beyond without development of strong deformation in contrast to the adjacent Hg nuclei. A rather great isomer shift between I = 1/2 and I = 9/2 states for odd Tl isotopes is preserved for both sides of the previously investigated mass range. For the first time, a similar isomer shift is found for the odd-odd isotope 186Tl. The close resemblance of the charge radii isotopic behavior for the Tl and Pb ground states is demonstrated.

  2. Nuclear charge radii of potassium isotopes beyond N=28

    CERN Document Server

    Kreim, K.; Papuga, J.; Blaum, K.; De Rydt, M.; Ruiz, R.F.Garcia; Goriely, S.; Heylen, H.; Kowalska, M.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nortershauser, W.; Rajabali, M.M.; Sanchez Alarcon, R.; Stroke, H.H.; Yordanov, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the measurement of optical isotope shifts for $^{38,39,42,44,46\\text{-}51}$K relative to $^{47}$K from which changes in the nuclear mean square charge radii across the N=28 shell closure are deduced. The investigation was carried out by bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy at the CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion-beam facility. Mean square charge radii are now known from $^{37}$K to $^{51}$K, covering all $\

  3. Oxygen isotope fractionation in phosphates: the role of dissolved complex anions in isotope exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation factors for phosphates were calculated by means of the increment method. The results suggest that Ag3PO4 and BiPO4 are enriched in (18)O relative to AgPO4, and the three phosphates are consistently depleted in (18)O relative to Ba3[PO4]2; fluorapatite and chlorapatite exhibit a similar behaviour of oxygen isotope fractionation with consistent enrichment of (18)O relative to hydroxyapatite. The valence, radii and coordination of metal cations play a quantitative role in dictating the (18)O/(16)O partitioning in these phosphates of different compositions. The calculated fractionation factors for the Ag3PO4-H2O system are in agreement with experimental determinations derived from enzyme-catalysed isotope exchange between dissolved inorganic phosphate and water at the longest reaction durations at low temperatures. This demonstrates that the precipitated Ag3PO4 has completely captured the oxygen isotope fractionation in the dissolved inorganic phosphate. The calculated fractionation factors for the F/Cl-apatite-water systems are in agreement with the enzyme-catalysed experimental fractionations for the dissolved phosphate-water system at the longest reaction durations but larger than fractionations derived from bacteria-facilitated exchange and inorganic precipitation experiments as well as natural observations. For the experimental calibrations of oxygen isotope fractionation involving the precipitation of dissolved phosphate species from aqueous solutions, the fractionation between precipitate and water is primarily dictated by the isotope equilibration between the dissolved complex anions and water prior to the precipitation. Therefore, the present results provide a quantitative means to interpret the temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionation in inorganic and biogenic phosphates.

  4. Empirical isotropic chemical shift surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czinki, Eszter; Csaszar, Attila G. [Eoetvoes University, Laboratory of Molecular Spectroscopy, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary)], E-mail: csaszar@chem.elte.hu

    2007-08-15

    A list of proteins is given for which spatial structures, with a resolution better than 2.5 A, are known from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and isotropic chemical shift (ICS) values are known from the RefDB database related to the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) database. The structures chosen provide, with unknown uncertainties, dihedral angles {phi} and {psi} characterizing the backbone structure of the residues. The joint use of experimental ICSs of the same residues within the proteins, again with mostly unknown uncertainties, and ab initio ICS({phi},{psi}) surfaces obtained for the model peptides For-(l-Ala){sub n}-NH{sub 2}, with n = 1, 3, and 5, resulted in so-called empirical ICS({phi},{psi}) surfaces for all major nuclei of the 20 naturally occurring {alpha}-amino acids. Out of the many empirical surfaces determined, it is the 13C{sup {alpha}} ICS({phi},{psi}) surface which seems to be most promising for identifying major secondary structure types, {alpha}-helix, {beta}-strand, left-handed helix ({alpha}{sub D}), and polyproline-II. Detailed tests suggest that Ala is a good model for many naturally occurring {alpha}-amino acids. Two-dimensional empirical 13C{sup {alpha}}-{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} ICS({phi},{psi}) correlation plots, obtained so far only from computations on small peptide models, suggest the utility of the experimental information contained therein and thus they should provide useful constraints for structure determinations of proteins.

  5. Lithium Isotopic Fractionation in Subduction Zones: Clues From Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. B.; Hervig, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    Lithium isotope ratios show such large variations in nature (>30 per mil), that many areas of geosciences are exploring the usefulness of this system in explaining the evolution of particular rocks. Here we show how the lithium isotope ratios change during the transformation of smectite clay minerals to illite during burial metamorphism. Such a transition may be a common feature in the shallow regions of subduction zones and may ultimately affect the Li isotope compositions of fluids contributing to arc magmatism. Lithium is a ubiquitous trace element in natural formation waters that, like B, shows large isotopic fractionation especially during interactions with clay minerals. Lithium is adsorbed in the interlayer region of expandable clay minerals but is easily exchanged. Lithium is also incorporated into the octahedral sites. The substitutions of Li in two crystallographic sites of clay minerals may complicate interpretations of bulk Li-isotope ratios. We suggest that the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of Li between fluid and clay is different in the interlayer sites of clay minerals than in the octahedral sites of clay minerals. Examination of Li contents and isotope variations in experimental reactions of smectite to illite (300C, 100MPa) shows changes with structural re-arrangement of the clay layers. The Li-isotope trend declines (from ~+6 to -13 per mil, expressed as ratios of 7/6) throughout R1-ordering of the mixed-layered illite smectite (I/S). However, the equilibrium end products of the reaction have R3-ordering and show a heavier isotope ratio (~0 per mil). This observation is very similar to the trends we observed for B-isotopes, where the interlayer B initially overprinted the tetrahedral-layer B isotope composition, but as the interlayer sites were collapsed during illitization, the equilibrium isotope composition was approached. The significant Li and B isotopic changes that occur during ordering of I/S coincides with the temperatures

  6. Medical applications of Cu, Zn, and S isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarede, Francis; Télouk, Philippe; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Albalat, Emmanuelle; Oger, Philippe; Bonaventura, Paola; Miossec, Pierre; Fujii, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    clusters (metallothionein), or the hepatocellular and biosynthetic dysfunction of the liver. We suggest that Cu isotope metallomics will help evaluate the homeostasis of this element during patient treatment, notably by chelates and blockers of Cu trafficking, and understand the many biochemical pathways in which this element is essential.

  7. Niche convergence suggests functionality of the nocturnal fovea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian L. Moritz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The fovea is a declivity of the retinal surface associated with maximum visual acuity. Foveae are widespread across vertebrates, but among mammals they are restricted to haplorhine primates (tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans, which are primarily diurnal. Thus primates have long contributed to the prevailing view that the fovea is a functional adaptation to diurnal color vision. The foveae of nocturnal taxa, such as tarsiers, are widely interpreted as vestigial traits and therefore evidence of a diurnal ancestry. This enduring premise has been central to adaptive hypotheses on the origins of anthropoid primates; however, the question of whether the fovea of tarsiers is a functionless anachronism or a nocturnal adaptation remains open. To address this question, we focused on the diets of tarsiers (Tarsius and scops owls (Otus, two taxa united by numerous anatomical homoplasies, including foveate vision. A functional interpretation of these homoplasies predicts dietary convergence and competition. This prediction can be tested with an analysis of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in tissues, which integrate dietary information. As predicted, the isotopic niches of Tarsius and Otus overlapped. In both Borneo and the Philippines, the δ13C values were indistinguishable, whereas the δ15N values of Otus were marginally higher than those of Tarsius. Our results indicate that both diets consisted mainly of ground-dwelling prey and raise the possibility of some resource partitioning. Taken together, our isotopic analysis supports a functional interpretation of the many homoplasies shared by tarsiers and scops owls, including a retinal fovea. We suggest that the fovea might function similarly in tarsiers and scops owls by calibrating the auditory localization pathway. The integration of auditory localization and visual fixation during prey detection and acquisition might be critical at low light levels.

  8. Stable isotopic signature of Australian monsoon controlled by regional convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, C.; Munksgaard, N. C.; Kurita, N.; Bird, M. I.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the main meteorological drivers of rainfall isotopic variation in north Australia in order to improve the interpretation of isotopic proxy records in this region. An intense monitoring program was conducted during two monsoonal events that showed significant and systematic isotopic change over time. The results showed a close link between isotopic variation in precipitation and variability in monsoon conditions, associated with the presence of large convective envelopes propagating through the study site. The largest negative amplitudes in the isotopic signal were observed when eastward and westward moving precipitation systems within the convective envelope merged over the measurement site. This suggests that the amplitude of the isotopic signal is related to the size and activity of the convective envelope. The strong correlation between rainfall isotopic variation, regional outgoing longwave radiation and regional rainfall amount supports this conclusion. This is further strengthened by the strong relationship between isotopic variation and the integrated rainfall history of air masses prior to arriving at the measurement locations. A local amount effect was not significant and these findings support the interpretation of δ18O as proxy for regional climatic conditions rather than local rainfall amount. Meteorological parameters that characterize intra-seasonal variability of monsoon conditions were also found to be strongly linked to inter-seasonal variability of the monthly based δ18O values in the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) database. This leads to the conclusion that information about the Australian monsoon variability can likely be inferred from the isotopic proxy record in North Australia on short (intra seasonal) and long (inter seasonal or longer) timescales.

  9. Response of an ombrotrophic peat to a regional climatic event revealed by macrofossil, molecular, and isotopic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Pancost, R.D.; Baas, B.; Geel, B. van

    2003-01-01

    We examined the variations in vegetation, organic carbon isotopic compositions and biomarker distributions spanning a well-constrained climatic shift in a Sub-Boreal Dutch raised bog. The macrofossils record a vegetation shift from a predominance of degraded Ericaceae rootlets to a predominance of w

  10. Isotopic compositions of cometary matter returned by Stardust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeegan, Kevin D; Aléon, Jerome; Bradley, John; Brownlee, Donald; Busemann, Henner; Butterworth, Anna; Chaussidon, Marc; Fallon, Stewart; Floss, Christine; Gilmour, Jamie; Gounelle, Matthieu; Graham, Giles; Guan, Yunbin; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hutcheon, Ian D; Huth, Joachim; Ishii, Hope; Ito, Motoo; Jacobsen, Stein B; Kearsley, Anton; Leshin, Laurie A; Liu, Ming-Chang; Lyon, Ian; Marhas, Kuljeet; Marty, Bernard; Matrajt, Graciela; Meibom, Anders; Messenger, Scott; Mostefaoui, Smail; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Nittler, Larry; Palma, Russ; Pepin, Robert O; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A; Robert, François; Schlutter, Dennis; Snead, Christopher J; Stadermann, Frank J; Stroud, Rhonda; Tsou, Peter; Westphal, Andrew; Young, Edward D; Ziegler, Karen; Zimmermann, Laurent; Zinner, Ernst

    2006-12-15

    Hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotopic compositions are heterogeneous among comet 81P/Wild 2 particle fragments; however, extreme isotopic anomalies are rare, indicating that the comet is not a pristine aggregate of presolar materials. Nonterrestrial nitrogen and neon isotope ratios suggest that indigenous organic matter and highly volatile materials were successfully collected. Except for a single (17)O-enriched circumstellar stardust grain, silicate and oxide minerals have oxygen isotopic compositions consistent with solar system origin. One refractory grain is (16)O-enriched, like refractory inclusions in meteorites, suggesting that Wild 2 contains material formed at high temperature in the inner solar system and transported to the Kuiper belt before comet accretion.

  11. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface...... deposited during the Early Ordovician — a time of known redox instability in ancient oceans – exhibit a significant positive Cr isotope excursion of +0.5‰. This excursion is interpreted as the reductive drawn down of dissolved Cr in seawater in response to the development of a proximal anoxic sink...... of ancient marine sediments can be a useful tool for understanding the cycling of redox sensitive elements on a local scale....

  12. Discrepancy and Disliking Do Not Induce Negative Opinion Shifts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takács, Károly; Flache, Andreas; Mäs, Michael

    2016-01-01

    .... Results confirm that similarities induce attraction, but results do not support that discrepancy or disliking entails negative influence. Instead, our findings suggest a robust positive linear relationship between opinion distance and opinion shifts.

  13. Enhancement of ferromagnetism by oxygen isotope substitution in strontium ruthenate SrRuO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Aiura, Yoshihiro; Hasebe, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Makoto; Masui, Takahiko; Nishihara, Yoshikazu; Yanagisawa, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen isotope effect of the ferromagnetic transition in itinerant ferromagnet strontium ruthenate SrRuO3 with a Curie temperature Tc of 160 K is studied. We observed for the first time a shift of ∆Tc ~ 1 K by oxygen isotope substitution of 16O → 18O in SrRuO3 by precise measurements of DC and AC magnetizations. The results surprisingly lead to the noteworthy inverse isotope effect with negative coefficient α = -∂ lnTc/∂ lnM. The Raman spectra indicate that the main vibration frequency of 16O at 363 cm-1 shifts to 341 cm-1 following oxygen isotope substitution 18O. This shift is remarkably consistent with the Debye frequency being proportional to ∝ 1√M where M is the mass of an oxygen atom. The positive isotope shift of ∆Tc can be understood by taking account of the electron-phonon interaction.

  14. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>20050934 Chen Zhihong (Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China); Lu Songnian Age of the Fushui Intermediate-Mafic Intrusive Complex in the Qinling Orogen, New Zircon U - Pb and Whole -Rock Sm and Nd Isotope Chronological Evidence (Geological Bulletin of China, ISSN 1671-2552, CN11-4648/P, 23(4), 2004, p. 322-328, 3 illus. , 3 tables, 10 refs. )

  15. GEOCHRONOMETRY &ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131727 Huang Xiaowen(State Key Laboratory of Ore Deposit Geochemistry,Institute of Geochemistry,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Guiyang 550002,China);Qi Liang Preliminary Study on Sample-Preparation for Re-Os Isotopic Dating of Pyrite(Geochimica,ISSN0379-1726,CN44-1398/P,41(4),2012,p.380-386,3illus.,2tables,25refs)Key words:pyrite,Re-Os dating

  16. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20132601 Cui Yurong(Tianjin Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources,China Geological Survey,Tianjin 300170,China);Zhou Hongying In Situ LA-MC-ICP-MS U-Pb Isotopic Dating of Monazite(Acta Geoscientica Sinica,ISSN0375-5444,CN11-1856/P,33(6),2012,p.865-876,6illus.,4tables,41refs.)Key words:monazite,U-Pb dating

  17. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  18. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  19. Study of the stability of the gallium isotopes beyond the N = 50 neutron shell closure

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the stability of the nuclear structure beyond N = 50 and Z = 28 with beams of neutron-rich gallium isotopes at the CRIS experiment at ISOLDE. The study of their hyperne structure and isotope shift will provide spins, magnetic dipole moments, electric quadrupole moments and changes in the mean-square charge radii. The $\\beta$-decay of $^{80}$Ga will be unambiguously measured using the technique of Laser Assisted Nuclear Decay Spectroscopy (LANDS). The half-lives of the very neutron-rich isotopes with N > 54 will be measured for their impact on the astrophysical ${r}$-process.

  20. Ground state properties of La isotopes in reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The ground state properties of La isotopes are investigated with the reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field(RAS-RMF) model.The calculation results of binding energies and the quadrupole moments are in good agreements with the experiment.The calculation results indicate the change of the quadrupole deformation with the nuclear mass number.The "kink" on the isotope shifts is observed at A = 139 where the neutron number is the magic number N = 82.It is also found that the octupole deformations may exist in the La isotopes with mass number A ~ 145-155.

  1. Ground state properties of La isotopes in reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Nan; GUO Lu

    2009-01-01

    The ground state properties of La isotopes are investigated with the reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field (RAS-RMF) model.The calculation results of binding energies and the quadrupole moments are in good agreements with the experiment.The calculation results indicate the change of the quadrupole deformation with the nuclear mass number.The "kink" on the isotope shifts is observed at A=139 where the neutron number is the magic number N=82.It is also found that the octupole deformations may exist in the La isotopes with mass number A~ 145-155.

  2. Variations in expression of carbon isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethenes during biologically enhanced PCE dissolution close to a source zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, P L; Sleep, B E; Seepersad, D J; McMaster, M L; Hood, E D; LeBron, C; Major, D W; Edwards, E A; Lollar, B Sherwood

    2009-11-03

    The stable carbon isotope values of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its degradation products were monitored during studies of biologically enhanced dissolution of PCE dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to determine the effect of PCE dissolution on observed isotope values. The degradation of PCE was monitored in a 2-dimensional model aquifer and in a pilot test cell (PTC) at Dover Air Force Base, both with emplaced PCE DNAPL sources. Within the plume down gradient from the source, the isotopic fractionation of dissolved PCE and its degradation products were consistent with those observed in biodegradation laboratory studies. However, close to the source zone significant shifts in the isotope values of dissolved PCE were not observed in either the model aquifer or PTC due to the constant input of newly dissolved, non fractionated PCE, and the small isotopic fractionation associated with PCE reductive dechlorination by the mixed microbial culture used. Therefore the identification of reductive dechlorination in the presence of PCE DNAPL was based upon the appearance of daughter products and the isotope values of those daughter products. An isotope model was developed to simulate isotope values of PCE during the dissolution and degradation of PCE adjacent to a DNAPL source zone. With the exception of very high degradation rate constants (>1/day) stable carbon isotope values of PCE estimated by the model remained within error of the isotope value of the PCE DNAPL, consistent with measured isotope values in the model aquifer and in the PTC.

  3. Application of non-traditional stable isotopes in analytical ecogeochemistry assessed by MC ICP-MS--A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ecogeochemistry is an evolving scientific field dedicated to the development of analytical methods and tools and their application to ecological questions. Traditional stable isotopic systems have been widely explored and have undergone continuous development during the last century. The variations of the isotopic composition of light elements (H, O, N, C, and S) have provided the foundation of stable isotope analysis followed by the analysis of traditional geochemical isotope tracers (e.g., Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf). Questions in a considerable diversity of scientific fields have been addressed, many of which can be assigned to the field of ecogeochemistry. Over the past 15 years, other stable isotopes (e.g., Li, Zn, Cu, Cl) have emerged gradually as novel tools for the investigation of scientific topics that arise in ecosystem research and have enabled novel discoveries and explorations. These systems are often referred to as non-traditional isotopes. The small isotopic differences of interest that are increasingly being addressed for a growing number of isotopic systems represent a challenge to the analytical scientist and push the limits of today's instruments constantly. This underlines the importance of a metrologically sound concept of analytical protocols and procedures and a solid foundation of data processing strategies and uncertainty considerations before these small isotopic variations can be interpreted in the context of applied ecosystem research. This review focuses on the development of isotope research in ecogeochemistry, the requirements for successful detection of small isotopic shifts, and highlights the most recent and innovative applications in the field.

  4. Influence of isotopic re-equilibration on speleothem and fluid inclusion isotope ratios after primary calcite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Tobias; Haderlein, Astrid; Weißbach, Therese

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios in speleothems (notably stalagmites) have been used since decades to successfully infer paleotemperatures and deduce paleo-environmental information. In addition, recent technical developments allow to increasingly use fluid inclusions as an archive for drip-water and together with the surrounding calcite as paleothermometer. A basic requirement for isotope data interpretation is the complete knowledge of the fractionation between calcite and fluid. Most laboratory and in-situ cave experiments focus on calcite growth and the isotope fractionation between calcite and feed solution. Potential isotope exchange and re-equilibration processes after the initial deposition have mostly been neglected. However, experiments of Oelkers et al. (2015) showed that the isotope exchange between minerals and fluid can proceed rapidly (within days), even at chemical equilibrium. In hydrous Mg carbonates a similar process of continuous isotope exchange between carbonate and fluid was observed after the carbonate precipitation was completed (Mavromatis et al., 2015). These observations suggest that the isotope ratios of speleothem calcite may be affected by this continuous exchange, likely driving the isotope composition continuously towards equilibrium at the respective cave conditions. In addition, fluid inclusions are suspected to be sensitive to an isotope exchange with the surrounding carbonate highlighting the need to precisely understand and quantify this effect. We assessed the oxygen isotope exchange between calcite and solution at chemical equilibrium conditions with theoretical estimates and laboratory experiments over an intermediate time scale (hours-weeks). A large isotope gradient (~20 ‰)) between solution and calcite was prepared in the experiment to investigate the dynamics of this re-equilibration process. We used a theoretical model based on a Rayleigh fractionation approach and the direct comparison with the experiment to determine

  5. Retracing diagenetic processes in marine porewaters using Ca isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockert, C.; Teichert, B. M.; Kaufhold, S.; Gussone, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) isotope ratios of marine organic and inorganic mineral precipitates are used to monitor changes in the oceanic Ca-budget and in paleo-temperature, and serve as a proxy for the trophic level of organisms in the food chain (c.f. Skulan et al., 1997; Zhu et al., 1998). However, during interaction between sediments and porewater, the Ca isotopic composition of marine porewaters might be shifted, bearing the potential to alter the Ca isotope proxy records. While processes, such as partial dissolution of calcareous shells and carbonate recrystallization have been studied (Fantle and DePaolo, 2007; Turchyn and DePaolo 2011), other diagenetic processes such as ion exchange with clay minerals have not been taken into account while studying Ca isotope profiles of porewaters. Nevertheless, first experiments and the investigation of natural porewaters indicate that this process has a significant effect on the Ca isotope composition in marine porewaters. Laboratory experiments aimed to determine if Ca isotope fractionation occurs during Ca adsorption and exchange with ammonium on clay minerals. The results show that Ca adsorption in a seawater environment is associated with fractionation, where light Ca is preferably adorbed. The addition of ammonium to the experimental set up caused partial release of Ca accompanied by isotope fractionation. Based on the results of the experiments, model calculations tested the impact of varying clay mineral type, content and sediment porosity, revealing that ion exchange processes with clay minerals predominantly shift the porewater signal to lighter values. This is in agreement with observations by Teichert et al. (2009), who found a correlation of ammonium-concentration and δ44/40Ca ratios in the porewater of drill core samples from the Cascadia accretionary margin (ODP Leg 204). Calcium isotope ratios of natural marine porewaters of three sites in the North Atlantic (IODP Expedition 303) show that the correlation between

  6. Zn isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle: A melting control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Luc S.; Mattielli, Nadine; Ionov, Dmitri A.; Debouge, Wendy; Golovin, Alexander V.

    2016-10-01

    We present new Zn elemental and isotope data on seventeen fertile and refractory mantle peridotite xenoliths. Eleven fertile peridotites are garnet and spinel lherzolites from Vitim and Tariat (Siberia and Mongolia) and represent some of the most pristine fertile peridotites available. Six refractory peridotites are spinel harzburgites from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberian craton) that are nearly pristine residues of high-degree polybaric melting at high pressure (7-4 GPa). Geochemical data suggest that Zn isotopic compositions in the peridotites have not been affected by post-melting processes such as metasomatism, contamination by the host-magmas or alteration. The fertile peridotites have uniform Zn concentrations (59 ± 2 ppm) and Zn isotopic compositions with δ66Zn (relative to JMC-Lyon-03-0749l) = +0.30 ± 0.03‰ consistent with the Bulk Silicate Earth estimates of δ66Zn = +0.28 ± 0.05‰ (Chen et al., 2013). The refractory peridotites have Zn concentrations ranging from 30 to 48 ppm and δ66Zn from + 0.10 ± 0.01 ‰ to + 0.18 ± 0.01 ‰ with an average of + 0.14 ± 0.03 ‰. Our data suggest that the lithospheric mantle has a heterogeneous Zn isotopic composition. Modeling of Zn isotope partitioning during partial melting of fertile mantle suggests that high degrees of melt extraction (>30%) may significantly fractionate Zn isotopes (up to 0.16‰) and that during mantle melting, Zn concentrations and isotopic compositions are mainly controlled by the stability of clinopyroxene and garnet within the melting residue. Because the stability of clinopyroxene and garnet is mainly pressure dependent we suggest that both the depth and the degrees of melt extraction may control Zn isotope fractionation during mantle melting.

  7. Explaining (Missing) Regulator Paradigm Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    of competition regulation is heaving into sight. It sets out to explain this from the vantage point of a critical political economy perspective, which identifies the circumstances under which a crisis can result in a regulatory paradigm shift. Contrasting the current situation with the shift in EC/EU competition...... capitalism; the social power configuration underpinning the neoliberal order remains unaltered; no clear counter-project has surfaced; the European Commission has been (and remains) in a position to oppose radical changes; and finally, there are no signs of a wider paradigm shift in the EU's regulatory...

  8. Nuclear physics and stable isotopes; Physique nucleaire et isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutte, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to show that fundamental research in nuclear physics requires utilization of stable isotopes; stable isotopes are essential as target material since a large quantity of nucleus have to be studied in order to appreciate all the complexity of the nuclear structure, but also as a tool, such as beams, for the same purpose. Examples are given with samarium, tin and germanium isotopes. 7 figs.

  9. Isotope Effect on Electron-Phonon Coupling in Multiband Superconductor MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Daixiang; Taufour, Valentin; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Bud'Ko, Serguei; Canfield, Paul; Kaminski, Adam

    We systematically investigate the isotope effect of electron-phonon coupling in multi-band superconductor MgB2 by laser based Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV on two σ bands, which is caused by electron coupling to E2 g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy in Mg10B2 than that in Mg11B2. The measured shifting energy of 3.5 meV is consistent with theoretical calculation based on harmonic phonon in MgB2. Our temperature dependent measurement also indicates the isotope effect of kink structure is not dependent on superconducting transition.

  10. Isotope effect on electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Daixiang; Manni, Soham; Taufour, Valentin; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the effect of isotope substitution on the electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2 using tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV in the σ band, which is caused by electron coupling to the E2 g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy by ˜3.5 meV in Mg 10B2 and the shift is not affected by superconducting transition. These results serve as the benchmark for investigations of isotope effects in known, unconventional superconductors and newly discovered superconductors where the origin of pairing is unknown.

  11. H/D isotope effect of {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra and {sup 79}Br NQR frequencies of piperidinium p-bromobenzoate and pyrrolidinium p-bromobenzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Hisashi, E-mail: hhonda@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Nanobioscience (Japan); Kyo, Shinshin [Yokohama City University, Faculty of Sciences (Japan); Akaho, Yousuke [Yokohama City University, Faculty of International College of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Takamizawa, Satoshi [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Nanobioscience (Japan); Terao, Hiromitsu [Tokushima University, Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    H/D isotope effects onto {sup 79}Br NQR frequencies of piperidinium p-bromobenzoate were studied by deuterium substitution of hydrogen atoms which form two kinds of N-H Midline-Horizontal-Ellipsis O type hydrogen bonds, and the isotope shift of ca. 100 kHz were detected for a whole observed temperature range. In addition, {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra measurements of piperidinium and pyrrolidinium p-bromobenzoate were carried out and little isotope changes of NMR line shape were detected. In order to reveal effects of molecular arrangements into the obtained isotope shift of NQR frequencies, single-crystal X-ray measurement of piperidinium p-bromobenzoate-d2 and density-functional-theory calculation were carried out. Our estimation showed the dihedral-angle change between piperidine and benzene ring contributes to isotope shift rather than those of N-H lengths by deuterium substitution.

  12. Impact of hydrogen isotope species on microinstabilities in helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Motoki; Nunami, Masanori; Sugama, Hideo; Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko

    2016-07-01

    The impact of isotope ion mass on ion-scale and electron-scale microinstabilities such as ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode, trapped electron mode (TEM), and electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode in helical plasmas are investigated by using gyrokinetic Vlasov simulations with a hydrogen isotope and real-mass kinetic electrons. Comprehensive scans for the equilibrium parameters and magnetic configurations clarify the transition from ITG mode to TEM instability, where a significant TEM enhancement is revealed in the case of inward-shifted plasma compared to that in the standard configuration. It is elucidated that the ion-mass dependence on the ratio of the electron-ion collision frequency to the ion transit one, i.e. {ν\\text{ei}}/{ω\\text{ti}}\\propto {{≤ft({{m}\\text{i}}/{{m}\\text{e}}\\right)}1/2} , leads to a stabilization of the TEM for heavier isotope ions. The ITG growth rate indicates a gyro-Bohm-like ion-mass dependence, where the mixing-length estimate of diffusivity yields γ /k\\bot2\\propto m\\text{i}1/2 . On the other hand, a weak isotope dependence of the ETG growth rate is identified. A collisionality scan also reveals that the TEM stabilization by the isotope ions becomes more significant for relatively higher collisionality in a banana regime.

  13. Observation of Large Enhancement of Charge Exchange Cross Sections with Neutron-Rich Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Tanihata, I; Kanungo, R; Ameil, F; Atkinson, J; Ayyad, Y; Cortina-Gil, D; Dillmann, I; Estradé, A; Evdokimov, A; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Guastalla, G; Janik, R; Knoebel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinov, Yu A; Marta, M; Mostazo, M; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Ong, H J; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Scheidenberger, C; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Takechi, M; Tanaka, J; Toki, H; Vargas, J; Winfield, J S; Weick, H

    2015-01-01

    Production cross sections of nitrogen isotopes from high-energy carbon isotopes on hydrogen and carbon targets have been measured for the first time for a wide range of isotopes. The fragment separator FRS at GSI was used to deliver C isotope beams. The cross sections of the production of N isotopes were determined by charge measurements of forward going fragments. The cross sections show a rapid increase with the number of neutrons in the projectile. Since the production of nitrogen is mostly due to charge exchange reactions below the proton separation energies, the present data suggests a concentration of Gamow-Teller and Fermi transition strength at low excitation energies for neutron-rich isotopes. It was also observed that the cross sections were enhanced much more strongly for neutron rich isotopes in the C-target data.

  14. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  15. Chemical and Isotopic Composition of Waters and Dissolved Gases in Some Thermal Springs of Sicily and Adjacent Volcanic Islands, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassa, Fausto; Capasso, Giorgio; Favara, Rocco; Inguaggiato, Salvatore

    2006-04-01

    Hydrochemical (major and some minor constituents), stable isotope ([InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.], δ13CTDIC total dissolved inorganic carbon) and dissolved gas composition have been determined on 33 thermal discharges located throughout Sicily (Italy) and its adjacent islands. On the basis of major ion contents, four main water types have been distinguished: (1) a Na-Cl type; (2) a Ca-Mg > Na-SO4-Cl type; (3) a Ca-Mg-HCO3 type and (4) a Na-HCO3 type water. Most waters are meteoric in origin or resulting from mixing between meteoric water and heavy-isotope end members. In some samples, δ 18O values reflect the effects of equilibrium processes between thermal waters and rocks (positive 18O-shift) or thermal waters and CO2 (negative 18O-shift). Dissolved gas composition indicates the occurrence of gas/water interaction processes in thermal aquifers. N2/O2 ratios higher than air-saturated water (ASW), suggest the presence of geochemical processes responsible for dissolved oxygen consumption. High CO2 contents (more than 3000 cc/litre STP) dissolved in the thermal waters indicate the presence of an external source of carbon dioxide-rich gas. TDIC content and δ 13C TDIC show very large ranges from 4.6 to 145.3 mmol/Kg and from 10.0‰ and 2.8‰, respectively. Calculated values indicate the significant contribution from a deep source of carbon dioxide inorganic in origin. Interaction with Mediterranean magmatic CO2 characterized by heavier carbon isotope ratios ([InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] value from -3 to 0‰ vs V-PDB (CAPASSO et al., 1997, GIAMMANCO et al., 1998; INGUAGGIATO et al., 2000) with respect to MORB value and/or input of CO2-derived from thermal decomposition of marine carbonates have been inferred.

  16. Isotopic incorporation rates and discrimination factors in mantis shrimp crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deVries, Maya S; Del Rio, Carlos Martínez; Tunstall, Tate S; Dawson, Todd E

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has provided insights into the trophic ecology of a wide diversity of animals. Knowledge about isotopic incorporation rates and isotopic discrimination between the consumer and its diet for different tissue types is essential for interpreting stable isotope data, but these parameters remain understudied in many animal taxa and particularly in aquatic invertebrates. We performed a 292-day diet shift experiment on 92 individuals of the predatory mantis shrimp, Neogonodactylus bredini, to quantify carbon and nitrogen incorporation rates and isotope discrimination factors in muscle and hemolymph tissues. Average isotopic discrimination factors between mantis shrimp muscle and the new diet were 3.0 ± 0.6 ‰ and 0.9 ± 0.3 ‰ for carbon and nitrogen, respectively, which is contrary to what is seen in many other animals (e.g. C and N discrimination is generally 0-1 ‰ and 3-4 ‰, respectively). Surprisingly, the average residence time of nitrogen in hemolymph (28.9 ± 8.3 days) was over 8 times longer than that of carbon (3.4 ± 1.4 days). In muscle, the average residence times of carbon and nitrogen were of the same magnitude (89.3 ± 44.4 and 72.8 ± 18.8 days, respectively). We compared the mantis shrimps' incorporation rates, along with rates from four other invertebrate taxa from the literature, to those predicted by an allometric equation relating carbon incorporation rate to body mass that was developed for teleost fishes and sharks. The rate of carbon incorporation into muscle was consistent with rates predicted by this equation. Our findings provide new insight into isotopic discrimination factors and incorporation rates in invertebrates with the former showing a different trend than what is commonly observed in other animals.

  17. Isotopic incorporation rates and discrimination factors in mantis shrimp crustaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya S deVries

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis has provided insights into the trophic ecology of a wide diversity of animals. Knowledge about isotopic incorporation rates and isotopic discrimination between the consumer and its diet for different tissue types is essential for interpreting stable isotope data, but these parameters remain understudied in many animal taxa and particularly in aquatic invertebrates. We performed a 292-day diet shift experiment on 92 individuals of the predatory mantis shrimp, Neogonodactylus bredini, to quantify carbon and nitrogen incorporation rates and isotope discrimination factors in muscle and hemolymph tissues. Average isotopic discrimination factors between mantis shrimp muscle and the new diet were 3.0 ± 0.6 ‰ and 0.9 ± 0.3 ‰ for carbon and nitrogen, respectively, which is contrary to what is seen in many other animals (e.g. C and N discrimination is generally 0-1 ‰ and 3-4 ‰, respectively. Surprisingly, the average residence time of nitrogen in hemolymph (28.9 ± 8.3 days was over 8 times longer than that of carbon (3.4 ± 1.4 days. In muscle, the average residence times of carbon and nitrogen were of the same magnitude (89.3 ± 44.4 and 72.8 ± 18.8 days, respectively. We compared the mantis shrimps' incorporation rates, along with rates from four other invertebrate taxa from the literature, to those predicted by an allometric equation relating carbon incorporation rate to body mass that was developed for teleost fishes and sharks. The rate of carbon incorporation into muscle was consistent with rates predicted by this equation. Our findings provide new insight into isotopic discrimination factors and incorporation rates in invertebrates with the former showing a different trend than what is commonly observed in other animals.

  18. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here, we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon-cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the LOSCAR model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6oC.

  19. Mechanisms controlling the carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton in karst reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoli Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to systematically understand the mechanisms controlling the carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton (δ13CPHYin freshwater ecosystems, seasonal changes in δ13CPHY and related environmental factors were determined in karst reservoirs from the Wujiang river basin, China. Substantial and systematic differences within seasons and reservoirs were observed for δ13CPHY, which ranged from -39.2‰ to -15.1‰. An increase in water temperature triggered fast growth of phytoplankton which assimilated more dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, resulting in the increase of δ13CPHY, δ13CDIC and pH. When the concentration of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2 was less than 10 mmol L–1, phytoplankton shifted to using HCO3– as a carbon source. This resulted in the sharp increase of δ13CPHY. The carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton tended to decrease with the increase of Bacillariophyta, which dominated in January and April, but tended to increase with the increase of Chlorophyta and Dinophyta, which dominated in July. Multiple regression equations suggested that the influence of biological factors such as taxonomic difference on δ13CPHY could be equal or more important than that of physical and chemical factors. Thus, the effect of taxonomic differences on δ13CPHY must be considered when explaining the δ13C of organic matter in lacustrine ecosystem.

  20. Retrospective stable isotope analysis reveals ecosystem responses to river regulation over the last century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Thomas F; Krabbenhoft, Trevor I; Collyer, Michael L; Krabbenhoft, Corey A; Edwards, Melanie S; Sharp, Zachary D

    2015-12-01

    Disruption of natural flow regimes, nutrient pollution, and other consequences of human population growth and development have impacted most major rivers of the world. Alarming losses of aquatic biodiversity coincide with human-caused river alteration, but effects of biotic homogenization on aquatic ecosystem processes are not as well documented. This is because unaltered systems for comparison are scarce, and some ecosystem-wide effects may take decades to manifest. We evaluated aquatic ecosystem responses to extensive river- floodplain engineering and nutrient addition in the Rio Grande of southwestern North America as revealed by changes in trophic structure of, and resource availability to, the fish community. Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA) was conducted on museum-preserved fishes collected over a 70-year period of intensive river management and exponential human population growth. Trophic complexity and resource heterogeneity for fish consumers (measured as "isotopic niche breadth") decreased following sediment deprivation and channelization, and these effects persist into the present. Increased nutrient inputs led to δ15N enrichment in the entire fish community at all affected sites, and a shift to autochthonous sources of carbon at the most proximal site downstream of wastewater release, probably via bottom-up transfer. Overall, retrospective SIA of apex consumers suggests radical change and functional impairment of a floodplain river ecosystem already marked by significant biodiversity loss.

  1. Ambiguity produces attention shifts in category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Orgaz, Cristina; Luque, David; Nelson, James Byron

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that people and nonhuman animals protect their knowledge from interference by shifting attention toward the context when presented with information that contradicts their previous beliefs. Despite that suggestion, no studies have directly measured changes in attention while participants are exposed to an interference treatment. In the present experiments, we adapted a dot-probe task to track participants' attention to cues and contexts while they were completing a simple category learning task. The results support the hypothesis that interference produces a change in the allocation of attention to cues and contexts.

  2. VP Anaphors and Object Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsnes, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the placement of the VP anaphor det ‘it’ as a complement of verbs selecting VP complements in Danish. With verbs that only allow a VP complement, the VP anaphor must be in SpecCP regardless of its information structure properties. If SpecCP is occupied by an operator, the an...... be in situ. The article argues that a shifted pronominal in Danish must be categorially licensed by the verb and extends this analysis to shifting locatives. An Optimality Theory analysis is proposed that accounts for the observed facts......., the anaphor can be in situ, but it cannot shift. With verbs that allow its VP complement to alternate with an NP complement, the VP anaphor can be in SpecCP, shifted or in situ according to the information structural properties of the anaphor. Only if SpecCP is occupied by an operator, must a topical anaphor...

  3. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleeping during the day. Do you have any sleep tips for shift workers? Answers from Timothy Morgenthaler, ... to be awake during the day and to sleep at night. Good daytime sleep is possible, though, ...

  4. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  5. Reconstructed ancestral enzymes suggest long-term cooling of Earth's photic zone since the Archean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Amanda K.; Schopf, J. William; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2017-05-01

    Paleotemperatures inferred from the isotopic compositions (δ18O and δ30Si) of marine cherts suggest that Earth’s oceans cooled from 70 ± 15 °C in the Archean to the present ˜15 °C. This interpretation, however, has been subject to question due to uncertainties regarding oceanic isotopic compositions, diagenetic or metamorphic resetting of the isotopic record, and depositional environments. Analyses of the thermostability of reconstructed ancestral enzymes provide an independent method by which to assess the temperature history inferred from the isotopic evidence. Although previous studies have demonstrated extreme thermostability in reconstructed archaeal and bacterial proteins compatible with a hot early Earth, taxa investigated may have inhabited local thermal environments that differed significantly from average surface conditions. We here present thermostability measurements of reconstructed ancestral enzymatically active nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs) derived from light-requiring prokaryotic and eukaryotic phototrophs having widely separated fossil-based divergence ages. The ancestral environmental temperatures thereby determined for these photic-zone organisms--shown in modern taxa to correlate strongly with NDK thermostability--are inferred to reflect ancient surface-environment paleotemperatures. Our results suggest that Earth's surface temperature decreased over geological time from ˜65-80 °C in the Archean, a finding consistent both with previous isotope-based and protein reconstruction-based interpretations. Interdisciplinary studies such as those reported here integrating genomic, geologic, and paleontologic data hold promise for providing new insight into the coevolution of life and environment over Earth history.

  6. Nutrient variations and isotopic evidences of particulate organic matter provenance in fringing reefs, South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Di; Cao, Wenzhi, E-mail: wzcao@xmu.edu.cn; Liang, Ying; Huang, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is considered to be one of the causes of coral decline. Increase in traditional fishing in the Xuwen National Coral Reefs Reserve tract (XW) and tourism around the Sanya National Coral Reefs Reserve tract (SY) are causing this coral decline. This study reviews the current state of knowledge of the nutrient status of coastal fringing reefs in South China and evaluates the primary sources of nutrients using stable isotope method. Surveys of seawater nutrients showed that the seawater remained clean in both the XW and SY coastal coral reef areas. Based on the isotopic differences between anthropogenic sewage and naturally occurring aquatic nutrients, the isotopic values of particulate organic matter (POM) and the C/N ratios were successfully used to identify the presence of anthropogenic nutrients in aquatic environments. The δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N and C/N compositions of POM from XW and SY (− 21.18 ± 2.11‰, 10.30 ± 5.54‰, and 5.35 ± 0.69 and − 20.80 ± 1.34‰, 7.06 ± 3.95‰, and 5.77 ± 2.15, respectively) showed statistically significant variations with the season. The δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values of POM suggest marine and terrestrial-derived nutrient sources. Organic carbon is a mixture of marine phytoplankton, marine benthic algae and terrestrial-derived plants. The δ{sup 15}N values suggest terrestrial-derived sewage and upwelling-dominated nitrogen sources. In the presence of natural upwelling and coastal currents, coastal coral reef areas are more vulnerable to the increasing anthropogenic nutrient inputs. Anthropogenic activities might lead to large increases in the nutrient concentrations and could trigger the shift from coral- to macroalgae-dominated ecosystems, which would ultimately result in the degradation of the coastal coral reef ecosystem. These results provide some understanding of the declining coral reef ecosystem and the importance of conservation areas and coastal coral reef resource management

  7. Strontium isotope characterization of wines from Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, Victor; Stevenson, Ross; Pedneault, Karine; Poirier, André; Hélie, Jean-François; Widory, David

    2016-11-01

    The (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios were measured on grape, wine and soil samples collected in 13 commercial vineyards located in three major wine producing areas of Quebec (Canada). The soils yield Sr isotope ratios that are intimately related to the local geology and unambiguously discriminate the different producing areas. A strong relationship exists between the (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios of the wine and the grapes. This suggests that the vinification process does not alter the overall Sr budget. Although the Sr isotope ratios of the grapes do not show a strong correlation with the bulk Sr isotope composition of the soil, they do correlate strongly with the Sr isotope composition contained in the labile fraction of the soil. This indicates that the labile fraction of the soil represents the Sr reservoir available to the plant during its growth. This study demonstrates that the Sr isotope approach can be used as a viable tool in forensic science for investigating the provenance of commercial wines.

  8. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  9. Goos-Hänchen shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A W; Love, J D

    1976-01-01

    An extremely simple derivation of the Goos-Hänchen shift is presented for total internal reflection at a plane interface between two semiinfinite dielectric media, as well as for optical waveguides of plane arid circular cross section. The derivation is based on energy considerations, requires knowledge of Fresnel's equation only, and shows explicitly that the shift is due to the flow of energy across the dielectric boundary.

  10. Unbiased isotope equilibrium factors from partial isotope exchange experiments in 3-exchange site systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrinier, Pierre; Javoy, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Two methods are available in order to evaluate the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors between exchange sites or phases from partial isotope exchange experiments. The first one developed by Northrop and Clayton (1966) is designed for isotope exchanges between two exchange sites (hereafter, the N&C method), the second one from Zheng et al. (1994) is a refinement of the first one to account for a third isotope exchanging site (hereafter, the Z method). In this paper, we use a simple model of isotope kinetic exchange for a 3-exchange site system (such as hydroxysilicates where oxygen occurs as OH and non-OH groups like in muscovite, chlorite, serpentine, or water or calcite) to explore the behavior of the N&C and Z methods. We show that these two methods lead to significant biases that cannot be detected with the usual graphical tests proposed by the authors. Our model shows that biases originate because isotopes are fractionated between all these exchanging sites. Actually, we point out that the variable mobility (or exchangeability) of isotopes in and between the exchange sites only controls the amplitude of the bias, but is not essential to the production of this bias as previously suggested. Setting a priori two of the three exchange sites at isotopic equilibrium remove the bias and thus is required for future partial exchange experiments to produce accurate and unbiased extrapolated equilibrium fractionation factors. Our modeling applied to published partial oxygen isotope exchange experiments for 3-exchange site systems (the muscovite-calcite (Chacko et al., 1996), the chlorite-water (Cole and Ripley, 1998) and the serpentine-water (Saccocia et al., 2009)) shows that the extrapolated equilibrium fractionation factors (reported as 1000 ln(α)) using either the N&C or the Z methods lead to bias that may reach several δ per mil in a few cases. These problematic cases, may be because experiments were conducted at low temperature and did not reach high

  11. Lithium isotope separation by laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisawa, T.; Maruyama, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Shiba, K.

    1982-01-01

    A lithium isotope separation was performed using a laser isotope separation method. It was found that the lithium atoms with a natural isotopic abundance enhanced its /sup 6/Li concentration up to over 90% by tuning the laser wavelength to the /sup 2/Psub(1/2) of /sup 6/Li. Too high power, however, leads to a loss of enrichment due to the power broadening effect which was analysed by the equation of motion of density matrices.

  12. An episode of widespread ocean anoxia during the latest Ediacaran Period revealed by light U isotope compositions in carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of ocean redox chemistry during the Ediacaran Period is important for understanding the causal relationship between environmental oxygen levels and early metazoan evolution. Geochemical data (e.g., high Mo and U concentrations and/or heavy Mo and U isotope compositions from sedimentary rocks) provide evidence of extensive ocean oxygenation shortly after the Marinoan glaciation at ca. 632 Ma [1], during the late Ediacaran Period at ca. 560-551 Ma [2], and multiple times during the early Cambrian Period [3, 4]. These episodes of oxygenation may have been separated by intervals of less oxygenated conditions [1, 2]. However, the global redox state of the ocean during the terminal Ediacaran period (ca. 551-541 Ma) is poorly constrained. We address this knowledge gap by measuring carbonate U isotope compositions (δ238U) - a novel global ocean redox proxy - of the Gaojiashan Member of the late Ediacaran Dengying Formation (ca. 551-541 Ma) in South China. An abrupt negative shift in δ238U from values scattering around -0.45‰ to values averaging -0.95‰ (±0.20‰, 2sd) was observed in the middle Gaojiashan Member, suggesting a globally widespread expansion of ocean anoxia during the terminal Ediacaran Period. The negative δ238U shift coincides with the onset of a pronounced positive carbon isotope excursion (from 0‰ to +6‰), suggesting that ocean anoxia is the major driving force behind enhanced organic carbon burial that led to the carbon isotope excursion. The widespread anoxia recorded by the Gaojiashan Member is bracketed by known intervals of extensive ocean oxygenation, thus indicating that the Precambrian-Phanerozoic transition was characterized by oscillating ocean redox conditions. The Ediacara biota (ca. 541 Ma) [5] disappeared shortly after the widespread ocean anoxia, suggesting that an expansion of ocean anoxia may have triggerred the onset of a mass extinction in the latest Ediacaran time. References: [1] Sahoo, et al. (2012), Nature

  13. Bashful Ballerina: Southward shifted Heliospheric Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursula, K.; Hiltula, T.

    It is known since long (Rosenberg and Coleman, 1969) that one of the two sectors of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed at the Earth's orbit dominates at high heliographic latitudes during solar minimum times, reflecting the poloidal structure of the global solar magnetic field at these times. Here we find that while this latitudinal variation of the dominant IMF sector around the solar equator is valid for both solar hemispheres during the last four solar minima covered by direct observations, it is systematically more strongly developed in the northern heliographic hemisphere. This implies that the average heliospheric current sheet is shifted or coned southward during solar minimum times, suggesting that the temporary southward shift of the heliosheet found earlier by Ulysses observations in 1995 is a persistent pattern. This also implies that the open solar magnetic field is north-south asymmetric at these times, suggesting that the solar dynamo has an asymmetric component. Accordingly, the Sun with the heliosheet is like a bashful ballerina who is repeatedly trying to push her excessively high flaring skirt downward. However, the effective shift at 1 AU is only a few degrees, allowing the Rosenberg-Coleman rule to be valid, on an average, in both hemispheres during solar minima.

  14. Light element isotopic compositions of cometary matter returned by the STARDUST mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeegan, K D; Aleon, J; Bradley, J; Brownlee, D; Busemann, H; Butterworth, A; Chaussidon, M; Fallon, S; Floss, C; Gilmour, J; Gounelle, M; Graham, G; Guan, Y; Heck, P R; Hoppe, P; Hutcheon, I D; Huth, J; Ishii, H; Ito, M; Jacobsen, S B; Kearsley, A; Leshin, L A; Liu, M; Lyon, I; Marhas, K; Marty, B; Matrajt, G; Meibom, A; Messenger, S; Mostefaoui, S; Nakamura-Messenger, K; Nittler, L; Palma, R; Pepin, R O; Papanastassiou, D A; Robert, F; Schlutter, D; Snead, C J; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R; Tsou, P; Westphal, A; Young, E D; Ziegler, K; Zimmermann, L; Zinner, E

    2006-10-10

    Hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotopic compositions are heterogeneous among comet 81P/Wild2 particle fragments, however extreme isotopic anomalies are rare, indicating that the comet is not a pristine aggregate of presolar materials. Non-terrestrial nitrogen and neon isotope ratios suggest that indigenous organic matter and highly volatile materials were successfully collected. Except for a single circumstellar stardust grain, silicate and oxide minerals have oxygen isotopic compositions consistent with solar system origin. One refractory grain is {sup 16}O-enriched like refractory inclusions in meteorites, suggesting formation in the hot inner solar nebula and large-scale radial transport prior to comet accretion in the outer solar system.

  15. Salinity changes in the Agulhas leakage area recorded by stable hydrogen isotopes of C37 alkenones during Termination I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, S.; van der Meer, M. T. J.; Mets, A.; Zahn, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2014-02-01

    At the southern tip of Africa, the Agulhas Current reflects back into the Indian Ocean causing so-called "Agulhas rings" to spin off and release relatively warm and saline water into the South Atlantic Ocean. Previous reconstructions of the dynamics of the Agulhas Current, based on paleo-sea surface temperature and sea surface salinity proxies, inferred that Agulhas leakage from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic was reduced during glacial stages as a consequence of shifted wind fields and a northwards migration of the subtropical front. Subsequently, this might have led to a buildup of warm saline water in the southern Indian Ocean. To investigate this latter hypothesis, we reconstructed sea surface salinity changes using alkenone δD, and paleo-sea surface temperature using TEXH86 and UK'37, from two sediment cores (MD02-2594, MD96-2080) located in the Agulhas leakage area during Termination I and II. Both UK'37 and TEXH86 temperature reconstructions indicate an abrupt warming during the glacial terminations, while a shift to more negative δDalkenone values of approximately 14‰ during glacial Termination I and II is also observed. Approximately half of the isotopic shift can be attributed to the change in global ice volume, while the residual isotopic shift is attributed to changes in salinity, suggesting relatively high salinities at the core sites during glacials, with subsequent freshening during glacial terminations. Approximate estimations suggest that δDalkenone represents a salinity change of ca. 1.7-1.9 during Termination I and Termination II. These estimations are in good agreement with the proposed changes in salinity derived from previously reported combined planktonic Foraminifera δ18O values and Mg/Ca-based temperature reconstructions. Our results confirm that the δD of alkenones is a potentially suitable tool to reconstruct salinity changes independent of planktonic Foraminifera δ18O.

  16. Argon isotope fractionation induced by stepwise heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieloff, Mario; Falter, Martina; Buikin, Alexei I.; Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Altherr, Rainer

    2005-03-01

    Noble gas isotopes are widely used to elucidate the history of the rocks in which they have been trapped, either from distinct reservoirs or by accumulation following radioactive decay. To extract noble gases from their host rocks, stepwise heating is the most commonly used technique to deconvolve isotopically different components, e.g., atmospheric, in situ radiogenic, or excess radiogenic from mantle or crustal reservoirs. The accurate determination of the isotopic composition of these different components is of crucial importance, e.g., for ages obtained by 40Ar- 39Ar stepheating plateaus. However, diffusion theory-based model calculations predict that the stepwise thermal extraction process from mineral phases induces isotope fractionation and, hence, adulterates the original composition. Such effects are largely unconsidered, as they are small and a compelling experimental observation is lacking. We report the first unequivocal evidence for significant mass fractionation of argon isotopes during thermal extraction, observed on shungite, a carbon-rich Precambrian sedimentary rock. The degree of fractionation, as monitored by 38Ar/ 36Ar and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, very well agrees with theoretical predictions assuming an inverse square root dependence of diffusion coefficient and atomic mass, resulting in easier extraction of lighter isotopes. Hence, subatmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained for argon extracted at low temperatures may not represent paleoatmospheric argon. Shungite argon resembles modern atmospheric composition, but constraints on the timing of trapping appear difficult to obtain, as shungites are multicomponent systems. In 40Ar- 39Ar stepwise heating, the isotope fractionation effect could cause systematic underestimations of plateau ages, between 0.15 and 0.4% depending on age, or considerably higher if samples contain appreciable atmospheric Ar. The magnitude of this effect is similar to the presently achieved uncertainties of this increasingly

  17. Isotopic and Chemical Analysis of Nitrate Source and Cycling in the San Joaquin River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Bemis, B.; Bergamaschi, B.; Kratzer, C.; Dileanis, P.; Erickson, D.; Avery, E.; Paxton, K.

    2001-12-01

    The sources and cycling of nitrate was investigated during a pilot study at four sites along the San Joaquin River using carbon and nitrogen isotopes of total dissolved and particulate organic matter along with hydrological measurements and various concentration data including chlorophyll-a. The nitrate source, its relationship to phytoplankton, and the effect of the nitrate source and cycling on the isotopic composition of dissolved and particulate organic matter were the primary concerns of the study. Samples were collected between July and October 2000 at (1) Crow's Landing, (2) Laird Park, (3) Vernalis, and (4) upstream of the Merced River. Particulate organic matter samples (POM) were collected on pre-combusted glass fiber filters. Combined dissolved organic and inorganic samples were prepared by roto-evaporating filtered waters (RV samples). Both the RV and the POM samples were acidified to eliminate inorganic carbon. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes and C:N ratios of POM in addition to chlorophyll-a concentrations were consistent with POM derived primarily from plankton at all sites and sampling times except in late October during a dam release event. The late October samples showed a shift toward isotopically heavier carbon and lighter nitrogen isotopes and higher C:N ratios reflecting a significant input from non-planktonic (probably terrestrial) sources. About 90 percent of the nitrogen in the RV samples was inorganic, 97 percent of which was in the form of nitrate. Assuming that the nitrogen isotopic composition of the minor organic fraction fell within the range of common organic samples (0 to 25 per mil), the delta 15N value of the RV samples was a close representation of the nitrogen isotopic composition of the nitrate. The POM and RV samples therefore appear to be reasonable proxies for the nitrogen isotopic compositions of plankton and nitrate, respectively. By comparison with other dissolved species, most of the variation in nitrate

  18. Atmospheric pCO2 control on speleothem stable carbon isotope compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, Daniel O.

    2017-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope compositions of C3 plants are controlled by the carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 (δ13Ca) and by the stomatal response to water stress. These relationships permit the reconstruction of ancient environments and assessment of the water use efficiency of forests. It is currently debated whether the δ13C values of C3 plants are also controlled by atmospheric pCO2. Here I show that globally-averaged speleothem δ13C values closely track atmospheric pCO2 over the past 90 kyr. After accounting for other possible effects, this coupling is best explained by a C3 plant δ13C sensitivity of - 1.6 ± 0.3 ‰ / 100 ppmV CO2 during the Quaternary. This is consistent with 20th century European forest tree ring δ13C records, providing confidence in the result and suggesting that the modest pCO2-driven increase in water use efficiency determined for those ecosystems and simulated by land surface models accurately approximates the global average response. The δ13C signal from C3 plants is transferred to speleothems relatively rapidly. Thus, the effect of atmospheric pCO2 should be subtracted from new and existing speleothem δ13C records so that residual δ13C shifts can be interpreted in light of the other factors known to control spleleothem δ13C values. Furthermore, global average speleothem δ13C shifts may be used to develop a continuous radiometric chronology for Pleistocene atmospheric pCO2 fluctuations and, by correlation, ice core climate records.

  19. Delayed Particle Study of Neutron Rich Lithium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Marechal, F; Perrot, F

    2002-01-01

    We propose to make a systematic complete coincidence study of $\\beta$-delayed particles from the decay of neutron-rich lithium isotopes. The lithium isotopes with A=9,10,11 have proven to contain a vast information on nuclear structure and especially on the formation of halo nuclei. A mapping of the $\\beta$-strength at high energies in the daughter nucleus will make possible a detailed test of our understanding of their structure. An essential step is the comparison of $\\beta$-strength patterns in $^{11}$Li and the core nucleus $^{9}$Li, another is the full characterization of the break-up processes following the $\\beta$-decay. To enable such a measurement of the full decay process we will use a highly segmented detection system where energy and emission angles of both charged and neutral particles are detected in coincidence and with high efficiency and accuracy. We ask for a total of 30 shifts (21 shifts for $^{11}$Li, 9 shifts $^{9}$Li adding 5 shifts for setting up with stable beam) using a Ta-foil target...

  20. Phanerozoic and Neoproterozoic Negative Carbon Isotope Excursions, Diagenesis and Terrestrialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, K.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Comprehensive data sets of Phanerozoic and late Precambrian carbon isotope data derived from carbonate rocks show a similar positive relation when cross-plotted with oxygen isotope values. The range and slope between the time periods is identical and the processes responsible for the relation have been well documented in Quaternary sediments. These processes include the stabilization of isotope values to ambient meteoric water values during shallow burial and flushing of carbonate sediments. Both data sets show strongly depleted carbon (-9 per mil PDB) and oxygen isotope values that retain seemingly systematic stratigraphic patterns with the Quaternary and Phanerozoic examples that demonstrably record meteroric water values. Similar values and patterns in the Precambrian are interpreted as primary marine in origin with significant implications for an ocean carbon mass balance not possible in the Phanerozoic carbon cycle. A similar compilation of carbonates older than one billion years do not show a relation between carbon and oxygen isotopes, lacking the negative carbon values evident in the younger record. We hypothesize that this difference records the onset of significant organic carbon on the land surface and the alteration of meteoric waters toward Phanerozoic values. We demonstrate the meteoric affinities of Neoproterozoic carbonates containing prominent negative isotope excursions recorded in the Shuram and Wonoka Formations of Oman and South Australia commonly attributed to whole ocean isotope variation. The conspicuous absence of negative carbon isotope values with normal marine oxygenisotope values in the Phanerozoic and Neoproterozic identifies a consistent relation between these time intervals and suggests that, as well accepted in the Phanerozoic, negative carbon isotope excursions less than -3 per mil are not a record of marine processes, but rather the later terrestrial biotic influence on meteoric water values.

  1. Isotopes in North American Rocky Mountain snowpack 1993–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lesleigh; Max Berkelhammer,; Mast, M. Alisa

    2015-01-01

    We present ∼1300 new isotopic measurements (δ18O and δ2H) from a network of snowpack sites in the Rocky Mountains that have been sampled since 1993. The network includes 177 locations where depth-integrated snow samples are collected each spring near peak accumulation. At 57 of these locations snowpack samples were obtained for 10–21 years and their isotopic measurements provide unprecedented spatial and temporal documentation of snowpack isotope values at mid-latitudes. For environments where snowfall accounts for the majority of annual precipitation, snowmelt is likely to have the strongest influence on isotope values retained in proxy archives. In this first presentation of the dataset we (1) describe the basic features of the isotope values in relation to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL), (2) evaluate space for time substitutions traditionally used to establish δ18O-temperature relations, (3) evaluate site-to-site similarities across the network and identify those that are the most regionally representative, (4) examine atmospheric circulation patterns for several years with spatially coherent isotope patterns, and (5) provide examples of the implications this new dataset has for interpreting paleoclimate records (Bison Lake, Colorado and Minnetonka Cave, Idaho). Results indicate that snowpack δ18O is rarely a simple proxy of temperature. Instead, it exhibits a high degree of spatial heterogeneity and temporal variance that reflect additional processes such as vapor transport and post-depositional modification. Despite these complexities we identify consistent climate-isotope patterns and regionally representative locations that serve to better define Holocene hydroclimate estimates and their uncertainty. Climate change has and will affect western U.S. snowpack and we suggest these changes can be better understood and anticipated by oxygen and hydrogen isotope-based reconstructions of Holocene hydroclimate using a process-based understanding of the

  2. Photolytic separation of isotopes in cryogenic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Battie, W.H.

    Separation of carbon isotopes by photolysis of CS/sub 2/ in cryogenic solutions of nitrogen, krypton and argon with 206 nm light from an iodine resonance lamp is reported. The spectral distributionn of the ultraviolet absorption depends on solvent. Thus, in liquid nitrogen the photolytic decomposition rate of /sup 13/CS/sub 2/ is greater than that of /sup 12/CS/sub 2/ (because the absorption of 206 nm radiation is greater for /sup 13/CS/sub 2/), whereas in liquid krypton and liquid argon the reverse is true. The shift in ultraviolet spectrum is a general phenomenon readily characterized as a function of solvent polarizability, and exhibits behavior similar to that for vibrational transitions occurring in the infrared.

  3. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  4. Clumped Isotope Composition of Cold-Water Corals: A Role for Vital Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, P.; Guo, W.; Robinson, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements on a set of cold-water corals (mainly Desmophyllum dianthus) have suggested that their clumped isotope composition could serve as a promising proxy for reconstructing paleocean temperatures. Such measurements have also offered support for certain isotope models of coral calcification. However, there are differences in the clumped isotope compositions between warm-water and cold-water corals, suggesting that different kinds of corals could have differences in their biocalcification processes. In order to understand the systematics of clumped isotope variations in cold-water corals more fully, we present clumped isotope data from a range of cold-water coral species from the tropical Atlantic and the Southern Ocean.Our samples were either collected live or recently dead (14C ages biocalcification may not apply equally well to all corals. Clumped isotope vital effects may be present in certain cold-water corals as they are in warm-water corals, complicating the use of this paleoclimate proxy.

  5. Iron isotope systematics in planetary reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; Nebel, Oliver; Foden, John

    2016-10-01

    = 0.10 ± 0.01 ‰ (2SE) after correction to primary magmas, and can be produced from single stage melt extraction. Conversely, iron isotopes in arc basalts are more varied (- 0.2 partial melting. Their iron isotope compositions are significantly lighter, suggesting they form from mantle re-enriched in light Fe and/or more depleted than Depleted MORB Mantle (DMM). If arc sources are more oxidised, an agent other than iron is required. Magmatic differentiation drives enrichment in heavy isotopes by partial melting of crustal rocks, fluid exsolution and crystallisation. Iron isotope trajectories in evolving magmas depend on their initial fO2 and whether the system is closed or open to oxygen and/or mass exchange. Granite end-members carry signatures diagnostic of their tectonic setting, where reduced, anorogenic A-type granites (δ57 Fe = + 0.4 ‰) are heavier than more oxidised I-types (δ57 Fe = + 0.2 ‰).

  6. Silicon isotope evidence against an enstatite chondrite Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoussi, Caroline; Bourdon, Bernard

    2012-03-23

    The compositions of Earth materials are strikingly similar to those of enstatite chondrite meteorites in many isotope systems. Although this suggests that Earth largely accreted from enstatite chondrites, definitive proof of this model has been lacking. By comparing the silicon (Si) isotope signatures of several extraterrestrial materials with terrestrial samples, we show that they cannot be explained by core-formation scenarios involving a bulk Earth of enstatite chondrite composition. Si isotope similarities between the bulk silicate Earth and the Moon preclude the existence of a hidden reservoir in the lower mantle, a necessary condition of the enstatite chondrite model, and require an equilibrium process after the Moon-forming impact. A three-end-member chondritic mixing model for Earth reconciles the Si isotope similarities between enstatite chondrites and Earth.

  7. Modeling the isotope effect in Walden inversion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Israel

    1991-05-01

    A simple model to explain the isotope effect in the Walden exchange reaction is suggested. It is developed in the spirit of the line-of-centers models, and considers a hard-sphere collision that transfers energy from the relative translation to the desired vibrational mode, as well as geometrical properties and steric requirements. This model reproduces the recently measured cross sections for the reactions of hydrogen with isotopic silanes and older measurements of the substitution reactions of tritium atoms with isotopic methanes. Unlike previously given explanations, this model explains the effect of the attacking atom as well as of the other participating atoms. The model provides also qualitative explanation of the measured relative yields and thresholds of CH 3T and CH 2TF from the reaction T + CH 3F. Predictions for isotope effects and cross sections of some unmeasured reactions are given.

  8. Helium and neon isotopes in deep Pacific Ocean sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    Helium and neon concentration measurements, along with isotope ratio determinations, have been made for particles collected in the deep Pacific with a magnetic sled, and they are believed to be of extraterrestrial origin. Analyses were made for samples consisting of composites of many extremely fine particles and for several individual particles large enough to contain sufficient gas for analysis but small enough to escape melting in their passage through the atmosphere. Step-heating was employed to extract the gas. Cosmic-ray spallation products or solar-wind helium and neon, if present, were not abundant enough to account for the isotopic compositions measured. In the case of the samples of magnetic fines, the low temperature extractions provided elemental and isotopic ratios in the general range found for the primordial gas in carbonaceous chondrites and gas-rich meteorites. The isotopic ratios found in the high temperature extractions suggest the presence of solar-flare helium and neon.

  9. Stable Isotopes and Oral Tori in Greenlandic Norse and Inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, M.; Lynnerup, N.; Scott, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    that estimated stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions for a Greenlandic Norse sample makes it possible to compare directly PT and MT expression with the relative degree of marine protein intake. For comparative purposes, parallel observations were made on a Greenlandic Inuit sample. Some researchers...... suggest the intake of marine resources could impact bone development, including torus expression, but our analysis found no significant correlation between PT or MT expression and δ13C and δ15N values in the Norse. In the Inuit, PT expression also showed no relationship to stable isotope compositions. MT...... size in the Inuit did, however, show a significant inverse relationship with δ13C and δ15N values. As MT size goes up, stable isotope compositions go down. Compared with contemporary European populations, the Greenlandic Norse show very positive isotope compositions, but the Inuit, with their high...

  10. Possible shift in macaque trophic level following a century of biodiversity loss in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Luke

    2011-07-01

    Biodiversity loss in tropical forests is a major problem in conservation biology, and nowhere is this more dire than in Southeast Asia. Deforestation and the associated loss of species may trigger shifts in habitat and feeding preferences of persisting species. In this study, I compared the habitat use and diet of long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) populations in Singapore from two time periods: museum specimens originally collected between 1893 and 1944, and living macaques sampled in 2009. I collected hair and used stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis to identify temporal changes in dietary source and trophic position, respectively. δ(13)C ratios were virtually identical, suggesting that macaques foraged in similar habitats during both time periods. However, δ(15)N ratios decreased considerably over time, suggesting that macaques today feed at a lower trophic level than previously. This decline in trophic level may be because of the disappearance or decline of other species that compete with macaques for fruit. This study highlights the effect of biodiversity loss on persisting species in degraded habitats of Southeast Asia, and improves our understanding of how species will adapt to further human-driven changes in tropical forest habitats.

  11. Diet shift of lentic dragonfly larvae in response to reduced terrestrial prey subsidies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Johanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Inputs of terrestrial plant detritus and nutrients play an important role in aquatic food webs, but the importance of terrestrial prey inputs in determining aquatic predator distribution and abundance has been appreciated only recently. I examined the numerical, biomass, and diet responses of a common predator, dragonfly larvae, to experimental reduction of terrestrial arthropod input into ponds. I distributed paired enclosures (n  =  7), one with a screen between the land and water (reduced subsidy) and one without a screen (ambient subsidy), near the shoreline of 2 small fishless ponds and sampled each month during the growing season in the southern Appalachian Mountains, Virginia (USA). Screens between water and land reduced the number of terrestrial arthropods that fell into screened enclosures relative to the number that fell into unscreened enclosures and open reference plots by 36%. The δ13C isotopic signatures of dragonfly larvae shifted towards those of aquatic prey in reduced-subsidy enclosures, a result suggesting that dragonflies consumed fewer terrestrial prey when fewer were available (ambient subsidy: 30%, reduced subsidy: 19% of diet). Overall abundance and biomass of dragonfly larvae did not change in response to reduced terrestrial arthropod inputs, despite the fact that enclosures permitted immigration/emigration. These results suggest that terrestrial arthropods can provide resources to aquatic predators in lentic systems, but that their effects on abundance and distribution might be subtle and confounded by in situ factors.

  12. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Nowak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To quantify the contribution of autotrophic microorganisms to organic matter formation (OM in soils, we investigated natural CO2 vents (mofettes situated in a wetland in NW Bohemia (Czech Republic. Mofette soils had higher SOM concentrations than reference soils due to restricted decomposition under high CO2 levels. We used radiocarbon (Δ14C and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C to characterize SOM and its sources in two moffetes and compared it with respective reference soils, which were not influenced by geogenic CO2. The geogenic CO2 emitted at these sites is free of radiocarbon and enriched in δ13C compared to atmospheric CO2. Together, these isotopic signals allow us to distinguish C fixed by plants from C fixed by autotrophic microorganisms using their differences in δ13C discrimination. We can then estimate that up to 27 % of soil organic matter in the 0–10 cm layer of these soils was derived from microbially assimilated CO2. Isotope values of bulk SOM were shifted towards more positive δ13C and more negative Δ14C values in mofettes compared to reference soils, suggesting that geogenic CO2 emitted from the soil atmosphere is incorporated into SOM. To distinguish whether geogenic CO2 was fixed by plants or by CO2 assimilating microorganisms, we first used the proportional differences in radiocarbon and δ13C values to indicate the magnitude of discrimination of the stable isotopes in living plants. Deviation from this relationship was taken to indicate the presence of microbial CO2 fixation, as microbial discrimination should differ from that of plants. 13CO2-labelling experiments confirmed high activity of CO2 assimilating microbes in the top 10 cm, where δ13C values of SOM were shifted up to 2 ‰ towards more negative values. Uptake rates of microbial CO2 fixation ranged up to 1.59 ± 0.16 μg gdw−1 d−1. We inferred that the negative δ13C shift was caused by the activity of chemo-lithoautotrophic microorganisms, as

  13. The 13C-excess: a new dual-element stable isotopic approach for detrending the effects of evaporation on lake carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, T. W.; Oze, C.

    2012-12-01

    Stable isotope-based proxy methods enhance our ability to interpret paleohydrology, paleoelevation, climate change, and biogeochemical cycles. In ancient carbonate lakes, these methods often require that the unmodified isotopic composition of meteoric water, or local carbon reservoirs, or both, are recorded by authigenic minerals. Surprisingly, these critical assumptions have not been tested across wide-ranging environmental contexts. Here, we show that globally distributed Quaternary lake carbonate oxygen isotope compositions are not strongly, nor significantly, correlated with local meteoric-derived water compositions due to the modification of in-flow waters following entry into the lake environment. These modifications are largely caused by surface water evaporation, and can result in dubious reconstructions of ancient hydrological conditions and water source effects such as the strength of prevailing air-mass trajectory, >3km errors in paleoelevation estimates, unrealistic shifts in lake water temperature, and misleading interpretations of local carbon cycle conditions if not accounted for. However, our analysis suggests that positive shifts in surface water δ18O are accompanied by similar magnitude shifts in δ13C-DIC during lake residence. This positive co-variation in δ18O and δ13C may be used to detrend lake carbonate compositions for the effects of surface water evaporation using a parameter we define here as the '13C-excess'. This approach uses the isotopic covariant trend between in-flow waters and lake waters, rather than lacustrine covariation alone, to better constrain ancient meteoric-derived water compositions. To demonstrate the potential strength of the 13C-excess approach over single element methods, we compare the paleoelevation estimates derived from lake carbonate compositions using both approaches. When Tibetan lakes are excluded from the dataset, 13C-excess values are significantly correlated with mean up-slope hypsometric altitude with

  14. Remarkable vertical shift in residence depth links pelagic larval and demersal adult jellynose fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Sui, Tsung-Da; Chang, Ni-Na; Chang, Chih-Wei

    2017-03-01

    Deep-sea fish show diverse migratory behaviors across depths at different life stages. The historical residence depths of jellynose fish Ateleopus japonicus and Ijimaia dofleini (Ateleopodidae) were reconstructed from otolith microstructures and isotopic compositions. δ18O values in the otolith core areas ranged from -0.5 to -1.3‰ among individuals, suggesting that larval and post-larval stages lived in the mixed layer (50-200 m). Otolith growth increment widths surged for 10-30 rings around 300-600 μm from the core, indicating a fast-growth phase during the early post-larval stage. Fish then migrated downward to 350-800 m depth at about 2 months of age, possibly during the post-larval metamorphosis to the juvenile. Otolith growth increments became narrower and otolith δ13C values increased from -5 to -1‰, suggesting a lower growth and metabolic rate when the fish experienced colder water during the downward migration. After arrival at the deepest waters, the fish then migrated upward to the continental margin or upper slopes where the adults persistently resided. A translucent otolith zone was formed after the residence depth shift from the deepest waters to shallower depths, indicating a transition from pelagic to bathydemersal life on the continental shelf or break. The down-and-up shift in residence depth of jellynose fish represents an indirect settlement process to the adult residence depth, which might be associated with a unique post-larval stage moving offshore before the downward migration. The results filled the gap of vertical distributions of jellynose fish from pelagic larvae near the sea surface to the bathydemersal adult dwelling on the continental shelf break.

  15. Regime shifts and resilience in China's coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke

    2016-02-01

    Regime shift often results in large, abrupt, and persistent changes in the provision of ecosystem services and can therefore have significant impacts on human wellbeing. Understanding regime shifts has profound implications for ecosystem recovery and management. China's coastal ecosystems have experienced substantial deterioration within the past decades, at a scale and speed the world has never seen before. Yet, information about this coastal ecosystem change from a dynamics perspective is quite limited. In this review, I synthesize existing information on coastal ecosystem regime shifts in China and discuss their interactions and cascading effects. The accumulation of regime shifts in China's coastal ecosystems suggests that the desired system resilience has been profoundly eroded, increasing the potential of abrupt shifts to undesirable states at a larger scale, especially given multiple escalating pressures. Policy and management strategies need to incorporate resilience approaches in order to cope with future challenges and avoid major losses in China's coastal ecosystem services.

  16. Development of the Separation System of {sup 203}Tl Stable Isotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Do Young; Ko, Kwang Hoon; Lim, Gwon; Kim, Tak Soo; Park, Hyun Min; Rho, Si Pyo; Kim, Cheol Jung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Thallium has two naturally occurring isotopes, {sup 203}Tl and {sup 205}Tl, with abundances of 30% and 70%, respectively. {sup 203}Tl is an indispensable raw material for the production of {sup 201}Tl radioisotopes by a proton bombardment in a cyclotron. {sup 201}TlCl is a radiopharmaceutical used widely to diagnose a heart disease. Development of the isotope-selective photoionization technique of Tl has been attractive, but an isotope selective ionization of thallium has never been achieved so far because of its small isotope shift as well as the lack of an available autoionization state. We have proposed a new method to separate the thallium isotopes, which is based-on an isotope-selective optical pumping followed by infrared photoionization. Many photoionization methods are available, such as the two photon excitation followed by the direct ionization in a high electric field. But, other ionization methods do not have the sufficient selectivity for a single stage. Two or three stages have to be applied for obtaining the sufficient selectivity. Moreover, they need strict experimental conditions and are expected that the efficiency decreases in the ionization step. However, our method is expected to overcome these drawbacks. With this background, we developed the laser isotope separation system to have high isotopic abundance of {sup 203}Tl. The system configuration and characteristics are represented in this paper.

  17. Boundary processes traced by neodymium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeandel, C.; Lacan, F.

    2003-04-01

    Continental margins have been identified as preferential sites for removing of reactive elements from the ocean, on the base of U-series measurements (more specifically 231Pa/230Th). This process is called boundary scavenging (Bacon, 1988). Five years of neodymium isotopes data in water masses along the ocean margins (Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Greenland-Scotland ridge and Labrador Sea) suggests that Nd is transferred from the sediments to the ocean but the reverse also occurs via the so-called boundary scavenging. These processes are only detectable by isotopic ratio measurements because they affect the isotopic signature of the water mass coming in contact with the margin, without changing its concentration. They can involve much higher fluxes than net input processes: for example, the modification of the AAIW signature along the Papua New Guinea slope involves exchange processes only (Lacan and Jeandel, 2001). Since we suspect that such processes not only affect the Nd oceanic chemistry but also the chemical fate of other reactive elements in the ocean, we suggest that the concept of boundary scavenging should be extended to "boundary exchange".

  18. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, C H; Schopf, J W; McKeegan, K D; Coath, C D; Harrison, T M; Stetter, K O

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  19. Stable isotope record of coexisting apatite and dolomite in Early Cambrian phosphorites, Meishucun section, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwerth, Antje; Struck, Ulrich; Segl, Monika; Vennemann, Torsten W.; Gehlken, Peer-L.; Heubeck, Christoph; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2010-05-01

    The Precambrian-Cambrian transition forms one of the most dramatic time periods in Earth's history, as global changes in tectonics, climate and chemistry in the atmosphere and oceans favoured the worldwide Cambrian Radiation and a concomitant ecosphere revolution. This time interval is paralleled by the first appearance of the widespread giant phosphorites. The well-known Meishucun section (South China), a former candidate section for the Pc-C boundary, documents phosphorite genesis amongst a rapid biodiversification, immediately following the end of the Precambrian in a low-latitude, shallow-water carbonate shelf. This contribution aims to elucidate the relation between simultaneous phosphorite deposition and global environmental conditions at the Pc-C boundary by using stable carbon and oxygen isotope analyses. Accurate determinations of d13C and d18O values may allow conclusions about ancient ocean circulation, paleo-productivity, paleo-temperatures, and most prominently diagenetic processes. The investigated samples from the Meishucun section basically consist of apatite, dolomite, and quartz that may be further devided into a lower and upper phosphorite as well as an overlying dolostone intervall. Additionally, calcite and siderite occur as minor compounds in some samples. Bulk d13C values of the carbonate fraction correlate with dolomite abundance throughout the section ranging from -4 to 1 per mil. Furthermore, several horizons suggest a relation between d13C values and apatite content, implying lower d13C values in apatites compared to coexisting dolomite. A slight negative d13C excursion at the top of the lower phosphorite coincides with the first appearance of small shelly fossils. Corresponding bulk d18O values generally show a stratigraphic-upward trend towards lower values throughout the record with slightly higher values in dolomite-rich sections. This may either indicate a warming trend during deposition, an isotopic shift in sea water composition

  20. The evolving structure of the Cd isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett P.E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The even-even Cd isotopes have long been cited as one of the prime examples of vibrational behaviour, identified soon after the Bohr model was developed in the early 1950’s. By the late 1970’s, the presence of intruder states and shape coexistence were identified, but the underlying vibrational nature remained intact. More recently, the robustness of the multiphonon states was questioned, prompting detailed spectroscopic investigations at a number of facilities, including the use of the (n, n'γ reaction and β-decay studies with modern γ-ray spectrometers. Combining results from these studies, a re-examination of the structure of the mid-shell Cd isotopes suggests that they may represent deformed γ-soft rotors rather than spherical vibrators.

  1. Hydrogen Isotopes as a Tracer of the Precambrian Hydrosphere (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, E. C.; Rosing, M. T.; Bird, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    Oceanic serpentinites and hydrous silicate minerals that are formed in subduction-related volcanic and hydrothermal environments obtain their hydrogen isotope composition (δD) from seawater-derived fluids, and thus may be used to calculate secular variation in δDSEAWATER. Hydrogen isotope compositions of serpentine and fuchsite from the ca. 3.8 Ga Isua supracrustal belt in West Greenland range from -99 to -53‰, and -115 to -61‰, respectively. The highest values indicate that Eoarchean seawater had a δD that was at most 25 × 5‰ lower than modern oceans. Deuterium-poor water is potentially sequestered from oceans over geologic time by continental growth, large-scale glaciation events, biologically mediated hydrogen escape to space, and subduction of water that is chemically bound in alteration minerals of the ocean crust. The extent to which any of these fluxes have occurred since the Eoarchean is constrained by the hydrogen isotope composition of the minerals at Isua. We developed a first-order mass balance model of δDSEAWATER evolution delimited by δD of Isua serpentine and fuchsite and that of modern seawater. The ca. 25‰ change in δDSEAWATER can be accounted for by the development of the modern cryosphere (9‰), continental growth (as much as 10‰ if continents grew continuously from 0% to 100% of their modern volume since 3.8 Ga) and hydrogen escape to space before the rise of an oxygen-rich atmosphere. ~1.0 × 0.8 x 1022 mol of elemental hydrogen released to space via biogenic methanogenesis would account for the remainder of the observed isotopic shift in seawater. This estimate is consistent with independent approximations of atmospheric methane concentrations in the early Archean, and is within an order of magnitude of the amount of hydrogen escape required to oxidize the continents before the rise of atmospheric oxygen. Volatile ingassing to the mantle at subduction zones and outgassing in arcs and mid-ocean ridges are apparently equivocal

  2. The groundwater nitrate isotope quandary: Is the dual isotopic composition of groundwater nitrate a recorder of interactions between N and Fe in the subsurface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, S. D.; Hansel, C. M.; Tang, Y.; Johnston, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    18ɛ:15ɛ typically observed in studies of groundwater NO3- under reducing conditions. We also conducted flow-through sediment incubations to examine the co-reduction of nitrate and various iron oxide minerals. Effluent NO3- exhibited values of 18ɛ:15ɛ that shifted over time, suggesting multiple mechanisms that may vary in proportion as the system (and microbial community) evolved. Isotope modeling results help to constrain a number of possible mechanisms, including microbially induced abiotic NO3- reduction by mineral associated Fe(II), and anaerobic or microaerophilic NO3- production by NO2- oxidizing and/or anammox bacteria. Considering the abundance of Fe-bearing minerals in the Earth's crust, the coupling of Fe cycling with transformations of inorganic nitrogen species may represent an unrecognized, yet important, link among global N, C and Fe cycles.

  3. The ruthenium isotopic composition of the oceanic mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, K. R.; Walker, R. J.

    2017-09-01

    The approximately chondritic relative, and comparatively high absolute mantle abundances of the highly siderophile elements (HSE), suggest that their concentrations in the bulk silicate Earth were primarily established during a final ∼0.5 to 1% of ;late accretion; to the mantle, following the cessation of core segregation. Consequently, the isotopic composition of the HSE Ru in the mantle reflects an am