WorldWideScience

Sample records for isotope effect study

  1. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  3. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  4. Culture Studies of Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects Associated with Nitrate Assimilation and Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, D. M.; Granger, J.; Lehmann, M. F.; Difiore, P. J.; Tortell, P. D.

    2007-12-01

    The isotope effects of nitrate-consuming reactions such as nitrate assimilation and denitrification are potential indicators of the physiological state of the organisms carrying out these reactions. Moreover, an understanding of these isotope effects is needed to use the stable isotopes to investigate the fluxes associated with these reactions in modern and ancient environments. We have used batch cultures to investigate the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope effects of (1) nitrate assimilation by eukaryotic and prokaryotic algae and by heterotrophic bacteria, and (2) nitrate reduction by denitrifying bacteria. We observe intra- and inter-specific variation in isotope effect amplitudes and, in the case of denitrifiers, indications of isotope effect decreases during individual nitrate drawdown experiments. However, the measured N and O isotope effect ratio is close to 1 for all studied organisms, with the exception of an unusual denitrifier (Rhodobacter sphaeroides) that possesses only periplasmic (non-respiratory) nitrate reductase. This observation and other findings are consistent with nitrate reductase being the predominant source of isotope fractionation and with most isotope effect amplitude variability arising from variable degrees to which nitrate imported into the cell is reduced versus effluxed back into the environment; the more efflux, the more complete the expression of the fractionation imparted by nitrate reduction. If this is the case, then isotope effect amplitudes in the field should be related to physiological conditions in the environment, a prediction that, we argue, is supported by recent studies of (1) nitrate assimilation in the polar ocean and (2) denitrification in sediment porewaters.

  5. Stable isotope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  6. The isotope altitude effect reflected in groundwater: a case study from Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezga, Kim; Urbanc, Janko; Cerar, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the stable isotope data of oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δ(2)H) in groundwater from 83 sampling locations in Slovenia and their interpretation. The isotopic composition of water was monitored over 3 years (2009-2011), and each location was sampled twice. New findings on the isotopic composition of sampled groundwater are presented, and the data are also compared to past studies regarding the isotopic composition of precipitation, surface water, and groundwater in Slovenia. This study comprises: (1) the general characteristics of the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater in Slovenia, (2) the spatial distribution of oxygen isotope composition (δ(18)O) and d-excess in groundwater, (3) the groundwater isotope altitude effect, (4) the correlation between groundwater d-excess and the recharge area altitude of the sampling location, (5) the relation between hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in groundwater in comparison to the global precipitation isotope data, (6) the groundwater isotope effect of distance from the sea, and (7) the estimated relation between the mean temperature of recharge area and δ(18)O in groundwater.

  7. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary...... isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  8. Copper isotope effect in serum of cancer patients. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Télouk, Philippe; Puisieux, Alain; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Clapisson, Gilles; Lamboux, Aline; Albarede, Francis

    2015-02-01

    The isotope effect describes mass-dependent variations of natural isotope abundances for a particular element. In this pilot study, we measured the (65)Cu/(63)Cu ratios in the serums of 20 breast and 8 colorectal cancer patients, which correspond to, respectively, 90 and 49 samples taken at different times with molecular biomarker documentation. Copper isotope compositions were determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). When compared with the literature data from a control group of 50 healthy blood donors, abundances of Cu isotopes predict mortality in the colorectal cancer group with a probability p = 0.018. For the breast cancer patients and the group of control women the probability goes down to p = 0.0006 and the AUC under the ROC curve is 0.75. Most patients considered in this preliminary study and with serum δ(65)Cu lower than the threshold value of -0.35‰ (per mil) did not survive. As a marker, a drop in δ(65)Cu precedes molecular biomarkers by several months. The observed decrease of δ(65)Cu in the serum of cancer patients is assigned to the extensive oxidative chelation of copper by cytosolic lactate. The potential of Cu isotope variability as a new diagnostic tool for breast and colorectal cancer seems strong. Shifts in Cu isotope compositions fingerprint cytosolic Cu chelation by lactate mono- and bidentates. This simple scheme provides a straightforward explanation for isotopically light Cu in the serum and isotopically heavy Cu in cancer cells: Cu(+) escaping chelation by lactate and excreted into the blood stream is isotopically light. Low δ(65)Cu values in serum therefore reveal the strength of lactate production by the Warburg effect.

  9. Brillouin scattering studies of isotopic effects in solid ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefte, H.; Penney, R.; Breckon, S. W.; Clouter, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of high resolution Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to determine the adiabatic elastic constants and the elasto-optic coupling (Pockels) coefficient ratios of oriented single crystals of (solid I) ND3 at temperatures near the gas-liquid-solid triple point. The values of the elastic constants at 196.0 K are C11=83.3, C12=44.0, and C44=49.6 (in units of kbar) with an estimated absolute uncertainty of ±2%. The values of the elasto-optic coefficient ratios are P12/P11=0.90 and P44/P11=0.16 for ND3 and 0.89 and 0.16 for NH3, respectively. Other than that expected from the mass ratio, no significant isotopic differences are evident.

  10. Comparisons of phosphorothioate with phosphate transfer reactions for a monoester, diester, and triester: isotope effect studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrina, Irina E; Hengge, Alvan C

    2003-06-25

    Phosphorothioate esters are sometimes used as surrogates for phosphate ester substrates in studies of enzymatic phosphoryl transfer reactions. To gain better understanding of the comparative inherent chemistry of the two types of esters, we have measured equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects for several phosphorothioate esters of p-nitrophenol (pNPPT) and compared the results with data from phosphate esters. The primary (18)O isotope effect at the phenolic group ((18)k(bridge)), the secondary nitrogen-15 isotope effect ((15)k) in the nitro group, and (for the monoester and diester) the secondary oxygen-18 isotope effect ((18)k(nonbridge)) in the phosphoryl oxygens were measured. The equilibrium isotope effect (EIE) (18)k(nonbridge) for the deprotonation of the monoanion of pNPPT is 1.015 +/- 0.002, very similar to values previously reported for phosphate monoesters. The EIEs for complexation of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) with the dianion pNPPT(2-) were both unity. The mechanism of the aqueous hydrolysis of the monoanion and dianion of pNPPT, the diester ethyl pNPPT, and the triester dimethyl pNPPT was probed using heavy atom kinetic isotope effects. The results were compared with the data reported for analogous phosphate monoester, diester, and triester reactions. The results suggest that leaving group bond fission in the transition state of reactions of the monoester pNPPT is more advanced than for its phosphate counterpart pNPP, while alkaline hydrolysis of the phosphorothioate diester and triester exhibits somewhat less advanced bond fission than that of their phosphate ester counterparts.

  11. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph; Jost, Rémy; Bhattacharya, S K; Johnson, Matthew S; Savarino, Joël

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. ["Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ((15)N, (17)O, and (18)O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ(15)N, δ(18)O, and Δ(17)O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of (15)ɛ = (-15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of (15)ɛ = (-47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from -40 to -74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of (14)NO3 (-) and (15)NO3 (-) in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying this model under the experimental temperature as well as considering the

  12. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph; Jost, Rémy; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Savarino, Joël

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. ["Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate (15N, 17O, and 18O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ15N, δ18O, and Δ17O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of 15ɛ = (-15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of 15ɛ = (-47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from -40 to -74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of 14NO3- and 15NO3- in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying this model under the experimental temperature as well as considering the shift in width and center well

  13. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  14. Isotope effect studies of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abell, L.M.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1988-08-09

    The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii shows a nitrogen isotope effect k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9770 +/- 0.0021, a carbon isotope effect k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0308 +/- 0.0006, and a carbon isotope effect for L-(..cap alpha..-/sup 2/H)histidine of 1.0333 +/- 0.0001 at pH 6.3, 37/sup 0/C. These results indicate that the overall decarboxylation rate is limited jointly by the rate of Schiff base interchange and by the rate of decarboxylation. Although the observed isotope effects are quite different from those for the analogous glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli, the intrinsic isotope effects for the two enzymes are essentially the same. The difference in observed isotope effects occurs because of a roughly twofold difference in the partitioning of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-substrate Schiff base between decarboxylation and Schiff base interchange. The observed nitrogen isotope effect requires that the imine nitrogen in this Schiff base is protonated. Comparison of carbon isotope effects for deuteriated and undeuteriated substrates reveals that the deuterium isotope effect on the decarboxylation step is about 1.20; thus, in the transition state for the decarboxylation step, the carbon-carbon bond is about two-thirds broken.

  15. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  16. Kinetic and metabolic isotope effects in coral skeletal carbon isotopes: A re-evaluation using experimental coral bleaching as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Levas, Stephen J.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.; McBride, Michael O.; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E.; Hughes, Adam D.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2014-12-01

    Coral skeletal δ13C can be a paleo-climate proxy for light levels (i.e., cloud cover and seasonality) and for photosynthesis to respiration (P/R) ratios. The usefulness of coral δ13C as a proxy depends on metabolic isotope effects (related to changes in photosynthesis) being the dominant influence on skeletal δ13C. However, it is also influenced by kinetic isotope effects (related to calcification rate) which can overpower metabolic isotope effects and thus compromise the use of coral skeletal δ13C as a proxy. Heikoop et al. (2000) proposed a simple data correction to remove kinetic isotope effects from coral skeletal δ13C, as well as an equation to calculate P/R ratios from coral isotopes. However, despite having been used by other researchers, the data correction has never been directly tested, and isotope-based P/R ratios have never been compared to P/R ratios measured using respirometry. Experimental coral bleaching represents a unique environmental scenario to test this because bleaching produces large physiological responses that influence both metabolic and kinetic isotope effects in corals. Here, we tested the δ13C correction and the P/R calculation using three Pacific and three Caribbean coral species from controlled temperature-induced bleaching experiments where both the stable isotopes and the physiological variables that cause isotopic fractionation (i.e., photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification) were simultaneously measured. We show for the first time that the data correction proposed by Heikoop et al. (2000) does not effectively remove kinetic effects in the coral species studied here, and did not improve the metabolic signal of bleached and non-bleached corals. In addition, isotope-based P/R ratios were in poor agreement with measured P/R ratios, even when the data correction was applied. This suggests that additional factors influence δ13C and δ18O, which are not accounted for by the data correction. We therefore recommend that the

  17. Observation of Selective Isotope Effect in the Ultraviolet excitation of N2: A Computational Study

    CERN Document Server

    Muskatel, B H; Thiemens, Mark H; Levine, R D

    2011-01-01

    Isotope effects associated with gas phase N2 photolysis are used to interpret Martian atmospheric evolution, icy satellite atmospheric chemistry and meteorite isotopic anomalies from nebular N2 photochemistry. To interpret observations at the highest level, fundamental understanding of the precise wavelength dependency of the process must be known. In this paper VUV isotopic photodissociation effects are calculated as a function of wavelength at different wavelength slices in the 12.5-15 eV range. A very strong wavelength dependence is observed, which is significant for experiments. An observable effect is possible for the width of the beam profile at the advanced light source, ALS that may produce sufficient photolysis product for high precision isotopic analysis. A significantly more pronounced effect is predicted for a beam narrower by a factor of four providing a potential experimental test of the model. The spectrum is computed ab initio. It manifests two physical mechanisms for the isotope effect and th...

  18. Laser Spectroscopic Study on Oxygen Isotope Effects in Ozone Surface Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, Marco; Boursier, Corinne; Elandaloussi, Hadj; Te, Yao; Jeseck, Pascal; Rouille, Christian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Janssen, Christof

    2016-04-01

    The isotope kinetics of ozone formation in the Chapman reaction [1] O + O2 + M → O3 + M (1) provides the primary example for a chemically induced oxygen isotope anomaly and is associated with large [2] and mass independent [3] oxygen isotope enrichments in the product molecule, linked to a symmetry selection in the ozone formation kinetics [4-5]. The isotopic composition of ozone and its transfer to other molecules is a powerful tracer in the atmospheric and biogeochemical sciences [6] and serves as a primary model for a possible explanation of the oxygen isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar system [7-8]. Recently, the isotope fractionation in the photolytic decomposition process O3 + hν → O2 + O (2) using visible light has been studied in detail [9-10]. Much less is currently known about the isotope fractionation in the dry deposition or in the gas phase thermal decomposition of ozone O3 + M → O2 + O +M. (3) Here we report on first spectroscopic studies of non-photolytic ozone decomposition using a cw-quantum cascade laser at 9.5 μm. The concentration of individual ozone isotopomers (16O3,16O16O17O, and 16O17O16O) in a teflon coated reaction cell is followed in real time at temperatures between 25 and 150 °C. Observed ozone decay rates depend on homogeneous (reaction (3)) processes in the gas phase and on heterogeneous reactions on the wall. A preliminary analysis reveals agreement with currently recommended ozone decay rates in the gas phase and the absence of a large symmetry selection in the surface decomposition process, indicating the absence of a mass independent fractionation effect. This result is in agreement with previous mass spectrometer (MS) studies on heterogeneous ozone formation on pyrex [11], but contradicts an earlier MS study [12] on ozone surface decomposition on pyrex and quartz. Implications for atmospheric chemistry will be discussed. [1] Morton, J., Barnes, J., Schueler, B. and Mauersberger, K. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 901 - 907 (1990

  19. Newtonian kinetic isotope effects. Observation, prediction, and origin of heavy-atom dynamic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kelmara K; Hirschi, Jennifer S; Singleton, Daniel A

    2009-06-24

    Intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects were determined for the dimerization of cyclopentadiene. Substantial isotope effects were observed in three positions, despite the C(2) symmetry of the cycloaddition transition state and the absence of dynamical bottlenecks after this transition state. The observed isotope effects were predicted well from trajectory studies by extrapolating the outcomes of trajectories incorporating superheavy isotopes of carbon, ranging from (20)C to (140)C. Trajectory studies suggest that the isotope effects are unrelated to zero-point energy or the geometrical and momentum properties of the transition state. However, steepest-descent paths in mass-weighted coordinates correctly predict the direction of the isotope effects, supporting a novel origin in Newton's second law of motion.

  20. Isotope Effects in ESR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  1. Study on the Effect of the Separating Unit Optimization on the Economy of Stable Isotope Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Kun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic criterion called as yearly net profit of single separating unit (YNPSSU was presented to evaluate the influence of structure optimization on the economy. Using YNPSSU as a criterion, economic analysis was carried out for the structure optimization of separating unit in the case of separating SiF4 to obtain the 28Si and 29Si isotope. YNPSSU was calculated and compared with that before optimization. The results showed that YNPSSU was increased by 12.3% by the structure optimization. Therefore, the structure optimization could increase the economy of the stable isotope separation effectively.

  2. Isotope effect in the formation of H2 from H2CO studied at the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Walter, S.; Bohn, B.; Wegener, R.; Spahn, H.; Brauers, T.; Tillmann, R.; Schlosser, E.; Koppmann, R.; Rohrer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Formaldehyde of known, near-natural isotopic composition was photolyzed in the SAPHIR atmosphere simulation chamber under ambient conditions. The isotopic composition of the product H2 was used to determine the isotope effects in formaldehyde photolysis. The experiments are sensitive to the molecula

  3. Hydrogen and carbon vapour pressure isotope effects in liquid fluoroform studied by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, Takao; Mitome, Ryota; Yanase, Satoshi [Sophia Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    2017-06-01

    H/D and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C vapour pressure isotope effects (VPIEs) in liquid fluoroform (CHF{sub 3}) were studied at the MPW1PW91/6-31 ++ G(d) level of theory. The CHF{sub 3} monomer and CHF{sub 3} molecules surrounded by other CHF{sub 3} molecules in every direction in CHF{sub 3} clusters were used as model molecules of vapour and liquid CHF{sub 3}. Although experimental results in which the vapour pressure of liquid {sup 12}CHF{sub 3} is higher than that of liquid {sup 12}CDF{sub 3} and the vapour pressure of liquid {sup 13}CHF{sub 3} is higher than that of liquid {sup 12}CHF{sub 3} between 125 and 212 K were qualitatively reproduced, the present calculations overestimated the H/D VPIE and underestimated the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C VPIE. Temperature-dependent intermolecular interactions between hydrogen and fluorine atoms of neighbouring molecules were required to explain the temperature dependences of both H/D and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C VPIEs.

  4. Mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase studied via thiamin diphosphate-bound intermediates and kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Nemeria, Natalia; Yep, Alejandra; McLeish, Michael J; Kenyon, George L; Jordan, Frank

    2008-03-25

    Direct spectroscopic observation of thiamin diphosphate-bound intermediates was achieved on the enzyme benzaldehyde lyase, which carries out reversible and highly enantiospecific conversion of ( R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde. The key enamine intermediate could be observed at lambda max 393 nm in the benzoin breakdown direction and in the decarboxylase reaction starting with benzoylformate. With benzaldehyde as substrate, no intermediates could be detected, only formation of benzoin at 314 nm. To probe the rate-limiting step in the direction of ( R)-benzoin synthesis, the (1)H/ (2)H kinetic isotope effect was determined for benzaldehyde labeled at the aldehyde position and found to be small (1.14 +/- 0.03), indicating that ionization of the C2alphaH from C2alpha-hydroxybenzylthiamin diphosphate is not rate limiting. Use of the alternate substrates benzoylformic and phenylpyruvic acids (motivated by the observation that while a carboligase, benzaldehyde lyase could also catalyze the slow decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids) enabled the observation of the substrate-thiamin covalent intermediate via the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomer, characteristic of all intermediates with a tetrahedral C2 substituent on ThDP. The reaction of benzaldehyde lyase with the chromophoric substrate analogue ( E)-2-oxo-4(pyridin-3-yl)-3-butenoic acid and its decarboxylated product ( E)-3-(pyridine-3-yl)acrylaldehyde enabled the detection of covalent adducts with both. Neither adduct underwent further reaction. An important finding of the studies is that all thiamin-related intermediates are in a chiral environment on benzaldehyde lyase as reflected by their circular dichroism signatures.

  5. Semiclassical wave packet study of anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-10-21

    We applied the semiclassical initial value representation method to calculate energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of scattering resonances in a two-dimensional potential for O+O2 collision. Such scattering states represent the metastable O3* species and play a central role in the process of ozone formation. Autocorrelation functions for scattering states were computed and then analyzed using the Prony method, which permits one to extract accurate energies and widths of the resonances. We found that the results of the semiclassical wave packet propagation agree well with fully quantum results. The focus was on the 16O16O18O isotopomer and the anomalous isotope effect associated with formation of this molecule, either through the 16O16O+18O or the 16O+16O18O channels. An interesting correlation between the local vibration mode character of the metastable states and their lifetimes was observed and explained. New insight is obtained into the mechanism by which the long-lived resonances in the delta zero-point energy part of spectrum produce the anomalously large isotope effect.

  6. Theoretical Study of H/D Isotope Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Shieldings Using an ab initio Multi-Component Molecular Orbital Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Tachikawa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have theoretically analyzed the nuclear quantum effect on the nuclear magnetic shieldings for the intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems of σ-hydroxy acyl aromatic species using the gauge-including atomic orbital technique combined with our multi-component density functional theory. The effect of H/D quantum nature for geometry and nuclear magnetic shielding changes are analyzed. Our study clearly demonstrated that the geometrical changes of hydrogen-bonds induced by H/D isotope effect (called geometrical isotope effect: GIE is the dominant factor of deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shift.

  7. Ab initio study of nitrogen and position-specific oxygen kinetic isotope effects in the NO + O3 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Wendell W.; Michalski, Greg

    2016-12-01

    Ab initio calculations have been carried out to investigate nitrogen (k15/k14) and position-specific oxygen (k17/k16O & k18/k16) kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the reaction between NO and O3 using CCSD(T)/6-31G(d) and CCSD(T)/6-311G(d) derived frequencies in the complete Bigeleisen equations. Isotopic enrichment factors are calculated to be -6.7‰, -1.3‰, -44.7‰, -14.1‰, and -0.3‰ at 298 K for the reactions involving the 15N16O, 14N18O, 18O16O16O, 16O18O16O, and 16O16O18O isotopologues relative to the 14N16O and 16O3 isotopologues, respectively (CCSD(T)/6-311G(d)). Using our oxygen position-specific KIEs, a kinetic model was constructed using Kintecus, which estimates the overall isotopic enrichment factors associated with unreacted O3 and the oxygen transferred to NO2 to be -19.6‰ and -22.8‰, respectively, (CCSD(T)/6-311G(d)) which tends to be in agreement with previously reported experimental data. While this result may be fortuitous, this agreement suggests that our model is capturing the most important features of the underlying physics of the KIE associated with this reaction (i.e., shifts in zero-point energies). The calculated KIEs will useful in future NOx isotopic modeling studies aimed at understanding the processes responsible for the observed tropospheric isotopic variations of NOx as well as for tropospheric nitrate.

  8. The isotopic effect and spectroscopic studies of boron orthophosphate (BPO 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, A.; Handke, M.

    2000-11-01

    Boron orthophosphate (BPO 4) belongs to the group of SiO 2-derivative structures. Its network is built up of boron and phosphorous tetrahedra, with boron and phosphorous atoms at almost the same positions as the silicon atoms in high-temperature cristobalite structure. In the present work, the interpretation of IR and Raman spectra of BPO 4 was carried out based on the model of PO 4 tetrahedron isolated by boron atoms. The factor group analysis enabled the separation of 12 bands due to the vibrations of PO 4 tetrahedron and three bands due to pseudo-lattice boron-oxygen bond vibrations. Substitution of boron atoms with 10B isotope caused shifts of the bands in the IR spectra, which made it possible to distinguish the bands due to boron-oxygen and phosphorus-oxygen bond vibrations. Based on the factor group analysis and isotopic effect, all bands in the IR and Raman spectra were assigned to the appropriate bond vibrations.

  9. Isotope effect in the formation of H2 from H2CO studied at the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Koppmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde of known, near-natural isotopic composition was photolyzed in the SAPHIR atmosphere simulation chamber under ambient conditions. The isotopic composition of the product H2 was used to determine the isotope effects in formaldehyde photolysis. The experiments are sensitive to the molecular photolysis channel, and the radical channel has only an indirect effect and cannot be effectively constrained. The molecular channel kinetic isotope effect KIEmol, the ratio of photolysis frequencies j(HCHO→CO+H2/j(HCDO→CO+HD at surface pressure, is determined to be KIEmol=1.63−0.046+0.038. This is similar to the kinetic isotope effect for the total removal of HCHO from a recent relative rate experiment (KIEtot=1.58±0.03, which indicates that the KIEs in the molecular and radical photolysis channels at surface pressure (≈100 kPa may not be as different as described previously in the literature.

  10. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...

  11. Quantum path-integral study of the phase diagram and isotope effects of neon

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez, R; 10.1063/1.3023036

    2011-01-01

    The phase diagram of natural neon has been calculated for temperatures in the range 17-50 K and pressures between 0.01 and 2000 bar. The phase coexistence between solid, liquid, and gas phases has been determined by the calculation of the separate free energy of each phase as a function of temperature. Thus, for a given pressure, the coexistence temperature was obtained by the condition of equal free energy of coexisting phases. The free energy was calculated by using non-equilibrium techniques such as adiabatic switching and reversible scaling. The phase diagram obtained by classical Monte Carlo simulations has been compared to that obtained by quantum path-integral simulations. Quantum effects related to the finite mass of neon cause that coexistence lines are shifted towards lower temperatures when compared to the classical limit. The shift found in the triple point amounts to 1.5 K, i.e., about 6 % of the triple-point temperature. The triple-point isotope effect has been determined for 20Ne, 21Ne, 22Ne, a...

  12. Isotopic Variations Within the Carbo Iron Meteorite: A Case Study of the Effects from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. L.; Hunt, A. C.; Ek, M. E.; Leya, I.; Schönbächler, M.

    2016-08-01

    Four aliquots of the Carbo (IID) iron meteorite were sampled representing different depths within the original meteoroid. These samples were used to investigate the effects of galactic cosmic rays on the isotopes of Pt, Pd, Fe, and Ni.

  13. Isotope Effects of Solid Hydrogenic Pellet Ablation in Fusion Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGLilin; DENGBaiquan; YANJiancheng; WANGXiaoyu

    2003-01-01

    The isotope effects of ablation processes in fusion plasma for five combinations of solid isotopic hydrogenic pellets H2, HD, D2,DT, T2 have been first time studied. The resuits show that the modifications caused by isotope effects for pellet erosion speeds range from 1 for hydrogen pellet down to 0. 487 for tritium pellet and are not negligible in ablation rate calculations. These effects lead to deeper mass deposition and improved core fueling efficiency.

  14. Forces in EDO-TTF: Theoretical study of isotope and charge effects on vibronic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Ken

    Isotope and charge effects on vibronic coupling constant (V) and energy gradient (g) of ethylenedioxy-tetrathiafulvalen (EDO-TTF) upon the electron injection into cation and electron removal from neutral molecule are investigated. It is found that normal modes which include C = C stretching motion generally have large V and g. For electron removal, three normal modes (v460, v470, and v480) have large Vi+ and gi+, and deuteration results in decrease of V46+ and increase of V47+. For electron injection, five normal modes (ν+42, ν+44, ν+45, ν+47, and ν+48) have large vi0 and gi0 deuteration results in increase of V045 and V048 and decrease of V047. From the analysis of vibronic coupling constants using vibronic coupling density (VCD), regional vibronic coupling constant (RVCC), and atomic vibronic coupling constant (AVCC), it is revealed that the change in normal mode vectors (d) due to the deuteration and electron removal (or injection) leads to the change in V.

  15. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku, Toyama (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  16. Isotopic studies in Pacific Panama mangrove estuaries reveal lack of effect of watershed deforestation on food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Inés G; Valiela, Ivan; Martinetto, Paulina; Monteiro Pierce, Rita; Fox, Sophia E

    2015-02-01

    Stable isotopic N, C, and S in food webs of 8 mangrove estuaries on the Pacific coast of Panama were measured to 1) determine whether the degree of deforestation of tropical forests on the contributing watersheds was detectable within the estuarine food web, and 2) define external sources of the food webs within the mangrove estuaries. Even though terrestrial rain forest cover on the contributing watersheds differed between 23 and 92%, the effect of deforestation was not detectable on stable isotopic values in food webs present at the mouth of the receiving estuaries. We used stable isotopic measures to identify producers or organic sources that supported the estuarine food web. N isotopic values of consumers spanned a broad range, from about 2.7 to 12.3‰. Mean δ(15)N of primary producers and organic matter varied from 3.3 for macroalgae to 4.7‰ for suspended particulate matter and large particulate matter. The δ(13)C consumer data varied between -26 and -9‰, but isotopic values of the major apparent producers or organic matter sampled could not account for this range variability. The structure of the food web was clarified when we added literature isotopic values of microphytobenthos and coralline algae, suggesting that these, or other producers with similar isotopic signature, may be part of the food webs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural and Kinetic Isotope Effect Studies of Nicotinamidase (Pnc1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Brian C.; Anderson, Mark A.; Hoadley, Kelly A.; Keck, James L.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Denu, John M. (UW)

    2012-05-08

    Nicotinamidases catalyze the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to nicotinic acid and ammonia. Nicotinamidases are absent in mammals but function in NAD{sup +} salvage in many bacteria, yeast, plants, protozoa, and metazoans. We have performed structural and kinetic investigations of the nicotinamidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Pnc1). Steady-state product inhibitor analysis revealed an irreversible reaction in which ammonia is the first product released, followed by nicotinic acid. A series of nicotinamide analogues acting as inhibitors or substrates were examined, revealing that the nicotinamide carbonyl oxygen and ring nitrogen are critical for binding and reactivity. X-ray structural analysis revealed a covalent adduct between nicotinaldehyde and Cys167 of Pnc1 and coordination of the nicotinamide ring nitrogen to the active-site zinc ion. Using this structure as a guide, the function of several residues was probed via mutagenesis and primary {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on V/K for amide bond hydrolysis. The KIE values of almost all variants were increased, indicating that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting; however, a decreased KIE for D51N was indicative of a stronger commitment to catalysis. In addition, KIE values using slower alternate substrates indicated that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting with nicotinamide to highly rate limiting with thionicotinamide. A detailed mechanism involving nucleophilic attack of Cys167, followed by elimination of ammonia and then hydrolysis to liberate nicotinic acid, is discussed. These results will aid in the design of mechanism-based inhibitors to target pathogens that rely on nicotinamidase activity.

  18. Studies on fractionation of ytterbium isotopes in Yb(III)-acetate/Yb-amalgam system. Even-odd effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, W.; Poninski, M.; Fiedler, R.

    1997-12-31

    The fractionation of ytterbium isotopes with the even and odd numbers of neutrons was investigated in a Yb(III)-acetate/Yb-amalgam exchange systems. The light isotope was preferentially fractionated to the amalgam phase. The values of the unit separation gain per mass difference,{epsilon}, were found to be -0.00054 for {sup 176/171}Yb and -0.00069 for {sup 176/174}Yb The difference which amounted to 0.00015 is an evidence for the occurrence of the so called `even-odd` effect. It was also found that the chemical isotope shift of ytterbium was monitored by optical isotope shift its atomic spectra. (author). 23 refs, 7 figs, 4 tabs.

  19. Isotopic effects in mechanistic studies of biotransformations of fluorine derivatives of L-alanine catalysed by L-alanine dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska-Majchrzak, Jolanta; Pałka, Katarzyna; Kańska, Marianna

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of 3-fluoro-[2-(2)H]-L-alanine (3-F-[(2)H]-L-Ala) in reductive amination of 3-fluoropyruvic acid catalysed by L-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was described. Fluorine derivative was used to study oxidative deamination catalysed by AlaDH applied kinetic (for 3-F-L-Ala in H2O - KIE's on Vmax: 1.1; on Vmax/KM: 1.2; for 3-F-L-Ala in (2)H2O - on Vmax: 1.4; on Vmax/KM: 2.1) and solvent isotope effect methods (for 3-F-L-Ala - SIE's on Vmax: 1.0; on Vmax/KM: 0.87; for 3-F-[2-(2)H]-L-Ala - on Vmax: 1.4; on Vmax/KM: 1.5). Studies explain some details of reaction mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    compositions. These particles typically also contain numerous {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots, occasional C isotopic anomalies, and abundant presolar silicate grains. In contrast, the other ''isotopically normal'' IDPs have normal bulk N isotopic compositions and, although some contain {sup 15}N-rich hotspots, none exhibit C isotopic anomalies and none contain presolar silicate or oxide grains. Thus, isotopically interesting IDPs can be identified and selected on the basis of their N isotopic compositions for further study. However, this distinction does not extend to H isotopic compositions. Although both H and N anomalies are frequently attributed to the survival of molecular cloud material in IDPs and, thus, should be more common in IDPs with anomalous bulk N compositions, D anomalies are as common in normal IDPs as they are in those characterized as isotopically primitive, based on their N isotopes. This may be due to different effects of secondary processing on the isotopic systems involved.

  1. Study on the Effect of the Separating Unit Optimization on the Economy of Stable Isotope Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Kun; MOU Hong

    2015-01-01

    An economic criterion called as yearly net profit of single separating unit (YNPSSU) was presented to evaluate the influence of structure optimization on the economy. Using YNPSSU as a criterion, economic analysis was carried out for the structure optimization of separating unit in the case of separating SiF4 to obtain the 28Si and 29Si isotope. YNPSSU was calculated and compared with that before optimization. The results showed that YNPSSU was increased by 12.3% by the structure optimization...

  2. Theoretical study of stereodynamics for the reaction O(aP) +D2 (v = 0, j = 0) → OD+D and isotope effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zeng-Hui; Zong Fu-Jian

    2011-01-01

    Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been performed to study the product polarization behaviours in the reaction O(3P) + D2 (v = 0, j = 0) → OD + D. By running trajectories on the 3A' and 3A" potential energy surfaces (PESs), vector correlations such as the distributions of the polarization-dependent differential cross sections (PDDCSs), the angular distributions of P(θr) and P(φr) are presented. Isotope effect is discussed in this work by a comprehensive comparison with the reaction O(3P) + H2 (v = 0, j = 0) → H + H. Common characteristics as well as differences are discussed in product alignment and orientation for the two reactions. The isotope mass effect differs on the two potential energy surfaces: the isotope mass effect has stronger influence on P(θr) and PDDCSs of the 3A' PES while the opposite on P(φr) of the 3A" potential energy surface.

  3. Theoretical Study of Isotopic Effect of Oxygen Atom on the Stereodynamics for the O(3P)+D2→ OD+D Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shi-Li; SHI Ying

    2010-01-01

    @@ Quasi-classical trajectory theory is used to study the isotope effect of oxygen atoms on the vector correlations in the O(3p)+D2 reaction at a collision energy of 25kcal/mol using accurate potential energy surface of the 3 A' triplet state.The distributions of p(θr)and the distribution of dihedral angel p(ψr)as well as p(θr,ψr)are calculated.Moreover,four polarization-dependent generalized differential cross sections(PDDCSs)of product are presented in the center-of-mass frame.The results indicate that the polarization of the product presents different characters for the isotope effect of oxygen atoms.Isotopic substitute can cause obviously different effects on the four PDDCSs.

  4. Stereochemical course, isotope effects, and enzyme inhibitor studies of glaucine metabolism in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The microbial transformation of the aporphine alkaloid glaucine by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030) proceeds with complete substrate stereoselectivity. The fungus F. solani metabolizes only S-(+)-glaucine (1) to dehydroglaucine (3), and A. flavipes metabolizes only R-(-)-glaucine (2) to dehydroglaucine. This facile microbiological reaction is useful in the destructive resolution of racemic mixtures of glaucine, and may provide a model for producing pure enantiomers (either R or S) of other aporphines from racemic mixtures. In order to extend the reaction to other aporphines and related alkaloids, the overall stereochemical course and enzyme(s) involved in the reaction, and the substrate requirements of the enzyme were investigated. The overall stereochemical course of the transformation was examined using C-7 methyl-blocked analogs of glaucine, cis- and trans-7-methylglaucine, as substrates for the fungi. Isolation and examination of residual substrates from semi-preparative scale incubations by MS, PMR, PMR with a chiral shift reagent, OR and ORD indicated that the transformation was enantioselective in the case of A. flavipes. However, only a 10% enrichment of 6aR,7R-cis-7-methylglaucine was observed in F. solani cultures. The oxidation of glaucine can be envisioned as proceeding through one of several mechanisms, each involving a different enzyme system. Deuterium isotope, induction and enzyme inhibitor experiments helped to distinguish between the three mechanisms.

  5. Effect of parent body evolution on equilibrium and kinetic isotope fractionation: a combined Ni and Fe isotope study of iron and stony-iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernonozhkin, Stepan M.; Goderis, Steven; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; Claeys, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Various iron and stony-iron meteorites have been characterized for their Ni and Fe isotopic compositions using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) after sample digestion and chromatographic separation of the target elements in an attempt to further constrain the planetary differentiation processes that shifted these isotope ratios and to shed light on the formational history and evolution of selected achondrite parent body asteroids. Emphasis was placed on spatially resolved isotopic analysis of iron meteorites, known to be inhomogeneous at the μm to mm scale, and on the isotopic characterization of adjacent metal and silicate phases in main group pallasites (PMG), mesosiderites, and the IIE and IAB complex silicate-bearing iron meteorites. In a 3-isotope plot of 60/58Ni versus62/58Ni, the slope of the best-fitting straight line through the laterally resolved Ni isotope ratio data for iron meteorites reveals kinetically controlled isotope fractionation (βexper = 1.981 ± 0.039, 1 SD), predominantly resulting from sub-solidus diffusion (with the fractionation exponent β connecting the isotope fractionation factors, as α62/58 =α60/58β). The observed relation between δ56/54Fe and Ir concentration in the metal fractions of PMGs and in IIIAB iron meteorites indicates a dependence of the bulk Fe isotopic composition on the fractional crystallization of an asteroidal metal core. No such fractional crystallization trends were found for the corresponding Ni isotope ratios or for other iron meteorite groups, such as the IIABs. In the case of the IIE and IAB silicate-bearing iron meteorites, the Fe and Ni isotopic signatures potentially reflect the influence of impact processes, as the degree of diffusion-controlled Ni isotope fractionation is closer to that of Fe compared to what is observed for magmatic iron meteorite types. Between the metal and olivine counterparts of pallasites, the Fe and Ni isotopic compositions show clearly

  6. Semiclassical study of quantum coherence and isotope effects in ultrafast electron transfer reactions coupled to a proton and a phonon bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Charulatha

    2011-11-28

    The linearized semiclassical initial value representation is employed to describe ultrafast electron transfer processes coupled to a phonon bath and weakly coupled to a proton mode. The goal of our theoretical investigation is to understand the influence of the proton on the electronic dynamics in various bath relaxation regimes. More specifically, we study the impact of the proton on coherences and analyze if the coupling to the proton is revealed in the form of an isotope effect. This will be important in distinguishing reactions in which the proton does not undergo significant rearrangement from those in which the electron transfer is accompanied by proton transfer. Unlike other methodologies widely employed to describe nonadiabatic electron transfer, this approach treats the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom consistently. However, due to the linearized approximation, quantum interference effects are not captured accurately. Our study shows that at small phonon bath reorganization energies, coherent oscillations and isotope effect are observed in both slow and fast bath regimes. The coherences are more substantially damped by deuterium in comparison to the proton. Further, in contrast to the dynamics of the spin-boson model, the coherences are not long-lived. At large bath reorganization energies, the decay is incoherent in the slow and fast bath regimes. In this case, the extent of the isotope effect depends on the relative relaxation timescales of the proton mode and the phonon bath. The isotope effect is magnified for baths that relax on picosecond timescales in contrast to baths that relax in femtoseconds.

  7. Study on the oxygen isotope effect in A-site ordered manganite $R$BaMn$_{2}$O$_{6}$ ($R$ = La, Pr, Nd, Sm)

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, G. Y.; Wong, K. H.; Wang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    A-site ordered manganites $R$BaMn$_{2}$O$_{6}$ ($R$ = La, Pr, Nd, Sm) were synthesized and the oxygen isotope effect in them was studied. It was found that the substitution of $^{16}$O by $^{18}$O has caused increases in both the Neel temperature ($T$$_{N}$) and the charge ordering temperature ($T$$_{CO}$) and an decrease in the Curie temperature ($T$$_{C}$). The isotope exponent is small on $T$$_{C}$ and $T$$_{CO}$ compared with that in A-site disordered manganites such as La$_{1-x}$Ca$_{x}$...

  8. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  9. The isotope effect: Prediction, discussion, and discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The precise position of a spectral line emitted by an atomic system depends on the mass of the atomic nucleus and is therefore different for isotopes belonging to the same element. The possible presence of an isotope effect followed from Bohr's atomic theory of 1913, but it took several years before it was confirmed experimentally. Its early history involves the childhood not only of the quantum atom, but also of the concept of isotopy. Bohr's prediction of the isotope effect was apparently at odds with early attempts to distinguish between isotopes by means of their optical spectra. However, in 1920 the effect was discovered in HCl molecules, which gave rise to a fruitful development in molecular spectroscopy. The first detection of an atomic isotope effect was no less important, as it was by this means that the heavy hydrogen isotope deuterium was discovered in 1932. The early development of isotope spectroscopy illustrates the complex relationship between theory and experiment, and is also instructive with...

  10. Carbon isotopic study of individual alcohol compounds in modern sediments from Nansha Islands sea area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段毅; 文启彬; 郑国东; 罗斌杰

    1997-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions of individual n-alkanols and sterols in modern sediments from the Nan-sha Islands sea area are measured after derivatization to trimethylsilyl ethers by the new isotopic analytical technique of GC/C/IRMS. The effects of the three added silyl carbon atoms in every alcohol molecule on these compound isotopic compositions and the characteristics of their carbon isotopic compositions are studied. Then their biological sources are discussed using their carbon isotopic compositions.

  11. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    The isotopic fractionation associated with photodissociation of N2O, OCS and CO2, at different altitudes in Earth’s atmosphere, is investigated theoretically using constructed quantum mechanical models of the dissociation processes (i.e. potential energy surfaces and relevant coupling elements...... or moderate, and overall sulfur fractionation in the stratosphere is very weak which does not exclude OCS from being an acceptable background the Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosol layer. (iii) CO2 photolysis in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere is highly fractionating in both isotopes, enriching...

  12. Effective crustal permeability controls fault evolution: An integrated structural, mineralogical and isotopic study in granitic gneiss, Monte Rosa, northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawther, Susan E. M.; Dempster, Tim J.; Shipton, Zoe K.; Boyce, Adrian J.

    2016-10-01

    Two dextral faults within granitic gneiss in the Monte Rosa nappe, northern Italy reveal key differences in their evolution controlled by evolving permeability and water/rock reactions. The comparison reveals that identical host rock lithologies develop radically different mineralogies within the fault zones, resulting in fundamentally different deformation histories. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses coupled to microstructural characterisation show that infiltration of meteoric water occurred into both fault zones. The smaller Virgin Fault shows evidence of periodic closed system behaviour, which promoted the growth of hydrothermal K-feldspar, whilst the more open system behaviour of the adjacent Ciao Ciao Fault generated a weaker muscovite-rich fault core, which promoted a step change in fault evolution. Effective crustal permeability is a vital control on fault evolution and, coupled to the temperature (i.e. depth) at which key mineral transformations occur, is probably a more significant factor than host rock strength in controlling fault development. The study suggests that whether a fault in granitic basement grows into a large structure may be largely controlled by the initial hydrological properties of the host rocks. Small faults exposed at the surface may therefore be evolutionary "dead-ends" that typically do not represent the early stages in the development of larger faults.

  13. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  14. Hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift in drift wave turbulence (Dimits et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 969) is discussed using the theory of zonal flows, in which the nonlinear damping rate of zonal flows is taken into account. The up-shift of the critical linear growth rate of the drift waves, above which drift wave fluctuations develop, is investigated. The dependence on the mass number of the hydrogen isotope is discussed.

  15. Systematic Study of Tensor Force Effect on Pseudospin Orbital Splittings in Sn Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yan-zhao; YU; Guo-liang; LI; Zhen-yu; GU; Jian-zhong

    2012-01-01

    <正>The tensor force is a noncentral and nonlocal spin-spin coupling term of the nucleon-nucleon interaction whose effect on the nuclear structure has been discussed in the framework of the self-consistent mean field approaches and the shell model in the past a few years. Based on the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, we systematically investigated the role of the tensor force on the

  16. H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, Nikolaos; Huijser, A.; Poulsen, Finn Willy

    2015-01-01

    The atomic mass ratio of ca. 2 between deuterium and hydrogen is the highest for any pair of stable isotopes and results in significant and measurable H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors containing these species. This paper discusses H/D isotope effects manifested in O......-H/O-D vibration frequencies, the mobility of H+/D+ carriers, the kinetics of the electrochemical oxidation of H2/D2, the solubilities of H2O/D2O and, finally, the spontaneous electromotive force that appears across H2/D2 cells with proton conducting electrolytes. Comparable work on tritium-exchanged materials...... is also discussed. The results highlight the usefulness of isotope effects in the study of high temperature proton conductors....

  17. Isotope and density profile effects on pedestal neoclassical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, S.; Pusztai, I.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-field neoclassical transport of heat, particles and momentum is studied in sharp density pedestals, with a focus on isotope and profile effects, using a radially global approach. Global effects—which tend to reduce the peak ion heat flux, and shift it outward—increase with isotope mass for fixed profiles. The heat flux reduction exhibits a saturation with a favorable isotopic trend. A significant part of the heat flux can be convective even in pure plasmas, unlike in the plasma core, and it is sensitive to how momentum sources are distributed between the various species. In particular, if only ion momentum sources are allowed, in global simulations of pure plasmas the ion particle flux remains close to its local value, while this may not be the case for simulations with isotope mixtures or electron momentum sources. The radial angular momentum transport that is a finite orbit width effect, is found to be strongly correlated with heat sources.

  18. Reduction of spectral interferences and noise effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry with partial least square regression - a computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianglei; Chan, George C.-Y.; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-08-01

    The fundamental analytical accuracies and precisions attainable by laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS), with emphasis on the impacts from spectral interferences and measurement noise, were investigated by means of computer simulation. The study focused on the analysis of a minor isotope at sub- to single-percentage abundance level. With a natural abundance about 1.1% for 13C, the C2 Swan band (d3Πg-a3Πu) with Δν = + 1 was selected as a representative system. The characteristics (e.g., noise amplitude and distribution, signal strength, and signal-to-background ratio) of the simulated spectra were experimentally characterized. Partial least square (PLS) regression was used to extract isotopic information from the simulated molecular spectra. In the absence of any spectral interference and with the use of a calibration set consisting of eleven isotopic standards, the theoretical accuracies and precisions with signal accumulation from 100 laser shots are about 0.002% and 0.001%, respectively, in absolute percentage abundance of 13C. The theoretical analytical accuracies slightly degrade, but are adequate for many applications, to 0.004% and 0.008% respectively, for calibrations involving only three and two isotopic standards. It was found that PLS regression is not only immune to both source-flicker and photon-shot noise, but is also effective in differentiating the spectral patterns from the analyte against those from spectral interferences. The influences of spectral interference from single or multiple atomic emission lines were simulated, and new ways to minimize their impacts were formulated and demonstrated. It was found that the wavelength range selected for the computation of the normalization factor should not contain any spectral-interfering peak, and a properly chosen wavelength range increases the tolerance of spectral interference by at least one order of magnitude. With matrix-matched calibration standards, the precisions (expressed

  19. Embryotoxicity of stable isotopes and use of stable isotopes in studies of teratogenetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, H.; Nau, H.

    1986-07-01

    Experiments on teratogenic effects of stable isotopes from our own and other laboratories are evaluated. In the first series of investigations, the enrichment of the stable isotope /sup 13/C derived from U-/sup 13/C-glucose was studied in mouse embryos at various stages of development, including limb buds in organ culture. Preimplantation mouse embryos incubated in vitro in /sup 13/C-enriched medium for 48 hours showed normal development during subsequent differentiation in vitro and also in vivo after embryo transfer to faster mothers. These embryos were 15% to 20% enriched in /sup 13/C. Administration of U-13-C-glucose to pregnant mice during organogenesis led to an increase of the absolute /sup 13/C content of the embryo for several days after the end of isotope administration, whereas the enrichment in maternal tissue decreased. No alterations of embryonic development were detected due to stable isotope enrichment. Development of cultured mouse limb buds was unaffected by incubation with 82 mol% U-/sup 13/C-glucose as judged from morphologic and biochemical criteria. The second part of the article describes the value of deuterium-labeled drugs as probes into the mechanism of activation of teratogenic metabolites. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics as well as the teratogenicity between cyclophosphamide and some specific deuterium-labeled analogues showed that the isotope effect observed can be related to a particular metabolic pathway crucial for teratogenic activation by this drug.

  20. Isotope effects of hafnium in solvent extraction using crown ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moriyama, Hirotake [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Hirata, Takafumi [Laboratory for Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishizawa, Kazushige [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Hafnium isotopes were fractionated in a liquid-liquid extraction system by using seven types of crown ethers, tributyl phosphate, or {omicron}-diethoxybenzene. The largest isotope effect was observed in the isotope pair of {sup 177}Hf-{sup 179}Hf with dibenzo-24-crown-8; the isotope enrichment factor was observed to be 0.0129{+-}0.0032. (author)

  1. Laboratory studies of carbon kinetic isotope effects on the production mechanism of particulate phenolic compounds formed by toluene photooxidation: a tool to constrain reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irei, Satoshi; Rudolph, Jochen; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2015-01-08

    In this study, we examined compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of isotope-label-free toluene. SOA generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 m(3) indoor smog chamber was collected on filters, which were extracted with acetonitrile for compound-specific analysis. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined using a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5-6‰ compared to the initial isotope ratio of toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4-nitrophenol remained identical to that of toluene. On the basis of the reaction mechanisms proposed in previous reports, stable carbon isotope ratios of these products were calculated. By comparing the observed isotope ratios with the predicted isotope ratios, we explored possible production pathways for the particulate phenolic compounds.

  2. Secondary. beta. -deuterium isotope effects in decarboxylation and elimination reactions of. cap alpha. -lactylthiamin: intrinsic isotope effects of pyruvate decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluger, R.; Brandl, M.

    1986-11-26

    The reactions of the adduct of pyruvate and thiamine, lactylthiamin (2-(lact-2-yl)thiamine), are accurate nonenzymic models for reactions of intermediates formed during catalysis by pyruvate decarboxylase. The enzymatic reaction generates lactylthiamin diphosphate from pyruvate and thiamine diphosphate. ..beta..-Deuterium isotope effects were determined for the nonenzymic reactions, and the results were related to isotope effects on the enzymic reaction. 2-(Lact-2-yl-..beta..-d/sub 3/) thiamine was prepared by condensation of methyl pyruvate-d/sub 3/ with thiamine followed by hydrolysis. The isotope effect for decarboxylation of lactylthiamin in acidic solution at 25/sup 0/C (k/sub H3//k/sub D3/) is 1.09 (standard deviation (SD) 0.015) in pH 3.8, 0.5 M sodium acetate: isotope effect = 1.095 (SD 0.014) in 0.001 M HCl. The reaction was also studied using 38% ethanolic aqueous sodium acetate (pH 3.8 before mixing with ethanol) since the enzymic sites are less polar than water and the reaction is significantly accelerated by the cosolvent. The isotope effect is within statistical range of that for the reaction in water, 1.105 (SD 0.016), indicating that acceleration by the solvent does not change the extent of hyperconjugative stabilization of the transition state relative to the ground state. The isotope effect for the base-catalyzed elimination of pyruvate from lactylthiamin was determined from kinetic studies by using multiwavelength analysis for reactions in pH 11 sodium carbonate solution. The isotope effect (k/sub H3//k/sub D3/) is 1.12 (SD 0.01), which is slightly higher than the effect on decarboxylation.

  3. Quasiclassical trajectory study of collisional energy transfer in toluene systems. I. Argon bath gas: Energy dependence and isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kieran F.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies of collisional energy transfer from highly vibrationally excited toluene to various bath gases have recently been reported [Toselli and Barker, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 1809 (1992), and references therein]. A quasiclassical trajectory investigation for toluene in argon bath gas at 300 K for initial internal energies E'=41 000, 30 000, and 15 000 cm-1 is reported here. Collisional energy transfer is almost linearly dependent on E'. Predictions of energy transfer quantities are very sensitive to the average well depth of the assumed individual pairwise potentials, but is less sensitive to the detailed shape. Qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment is obtained where the overall well depth is physically realistic. Isotope studies using 40Ar and pseudohelium (4Ar) bath gases indicate that energy transfer is independent of the mass of the bath-gas collider, but perdeuteration increases 1/2 by 13% over the undeuterated values.

  4. Temperature dependence of stable carbon kinetic isotope effect for the oxidation reaction of ethane by OH radicals: Experimental and theoretical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piansawan, T.; Saccon, M.; Vereecken, L.; Gensch, I.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2017-08-01

    The stable carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of ethane photooxidation by OH radicals was deduced by employing both laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. The investigations were designed to elucidate the temperature dependence of KIE within atmospherically relevant temperature range. The experimental KIE was derived from laboratory compound-specific isotope analyses of ethane with natural isotopic abundance exposed to OH at constant temperature, showing ɛ values of 7.16 ± 0.54‰ (303 K), 7.45 ± 0.48‰ (288 K), 7.36 ± 0.28‰ (273 K), 7.61 ± 0.28‰ (263 K), 8.89 ± 0.90‰ (253 K), and 9.42 ± 2.19‰ (243 K). Compared to previous studies, a significant improvement of the measurement precision was reached at the high end of the investigated temperature range. The KIE was theoretically determined as well, in the temperature range of 150 K to 400 K, by calculating the reaction rate coefficients of 12C and singly 13C substituted ethane isotopologues applying chemical quantum mechanics together with transition state theory. Tunneling effect and internal rotations were also considered. The agreement between experimental and theoretical results for rate coefficients and KIE in an atmospherically relevant temperature range is discussed. However, both laboratory observations and computational predictions show no significant temperature dependence of the KIE for the ethane oxidation by OH radicals.

  5. Study on hydrogen isotope permeation in the HTTR hydrogen production system. 2. Effectiveness of reducing the amount of permeated deuterium by oxidized film. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Tetsuaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Iwatsuki, Jin [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has performed a research and development (R and D) program on nuclear production of hydrogen as a study consigned by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. Permeation of hydrogen isotope through a high-temperature alloy as used a heat transfer pipe of an intermediate heat exchanger and a steam reformer is an important problem in the hydrogen production system connected to be the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). In order to obtain detailed data for safety review and development of analytical codes, a test of permeation of hydrogen isotope was carried out as one of essential tests. The objective of this study is to obtain a permeability of hydrogen isotope through Hastelloy XR and other high temperature alloys and to evaluate quantitatively an effect of oxidized film on reducing the amount of permeated hydrogen through the pipe. From the results obtained in this experiment, it is supposed that the oxidized film produced on the surface of the heat transfer pipe during an early stage of the reactor operation will reduce the amount of tritium permeated from the primary circuit of the HTTR to the utilization system. This report describes the amount of permeated hydrogen and deuterium through Hastelloy XR with oxidized film on the tube surface and state for production of oxidized film. (author)

  6. Isotopic modeling of the sub-cloud evaporation effect in precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamalikis, V., E-mail: vsalamalik@upatras.gr [Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics, University of Patras, GR 26500 Patras (Greece); Argiriou, A.A. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics, University of Patras, GR 26500 Patras (Greece); Dotsika, E. [Stable Isotope Unit, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Center of Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, 15310 Athens (Greece)

    2016-02-15

    In dry and warm environments sub-cloud evaporation influences the falling raindrops modifying their final stable isotopic content. During their descent from the cloud base towards the ground surface, through the unsaturated atmosphere, hydrometeors are subjected to evaporation whereas the kinetic fractionation results to less depleted or enriched isotopic signatures compared to the initial isotopic composition of the raindrops at cloud base. Nowadays the development of Generalized Climate Models (GCMs) that include isotopic content calculation modules are of great interest for the isotopic tracing of the global hydrological cycle. Therefore the accurate description of the underlying processes affecting stable isotopic content can improve the performance of iso-GCMs. The aim of this study is to model the sub-cloud evaporation effect using a) mixing and b) numerical isotope evaporation models. The isotope-mixing evaporation model simulates the isotopic enrichment (difference between the ground and the cloud base isotopic composition of raindrops) in terms of raindrop size, ambient temperature and relative humidity (RH) at ground level. The isotopic enrichment (Δδ) varies linearly with the evaporated raindrops mass fraction of the raindrop resulting to higher values at drier atmospheres and for smaller raindrops. The relationship between Δδ and RH is described by a ‘heat capacity’ model providing high correlation coefficients for both isotopes (R{sup 2} > 80%) indicating that RH is an ideal indicator of the sub-cloud evaporation effect. Vertical distribution of stable isotopes in falling raindrops is also investigated using a numerical isotope-evaporation model. Temperature and humidity dependence of the vertical isotopic variation is clearly described by the numerical isotopic model showing an increase in the isotopic values with increasing temperature and decreasing RH. At an almost saturated atmosphere (RH = 95%) sub-cloud evaporation is negligible and the

  7. The effects of α-cellulose extraction and blue-stain fungus on retrospective studies of carbon and oxygen isotope variation in live and dead trees†

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, N.B.; McDowell, N.G.; Allen, C.D.; Mora, C.

    2011-01-01

    Tree-ring carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from live and recently dead trees may reveal important mechanisms of tree mortality. However, wood decay in dead trees may alter the δ13C and δ18O values of whole wood obscuring the isotopic signal associated with factors leading up to and including physiological death. We examined whole sapwood and α-cellulose from live and dead specimens of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), one-seed juniper (Juniperous monosperma), piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and white fir (Abies concolor), including those with fungal growth and beetle frass in the wood, to determine if α-cellulose extraction is necessary for the accurate interpretation of isotopic compositions in the dead trees. We found that the offset between the δ13C or δ18O values of α-cellulose and whole wood was the same for both live and dead trees across a large range of inter-annual and regional climate differences. The method of α-cellulose extraction, whether Leavitt-Danzer or Standard Brendel modified for small samples, imparts significant differences in the δ13C (up to 0.4‰) and δ18O (up to 1.2‰) of α-cellulose, as reported by other studies. There was no effect of beetle frass or blue-stain fungus (Ophiostoma) on the δ13C and δ18O of whole wood or α-cellulose. The relationships between whole wood and α-cellulose δ13C for ponderosa, piñon and juniper yielded slopes of ~1, while the relationship between δ18O of whole wood and α-cellulose was less clear. We conclude that there are few analytical or sampling obstacles to retrospective studies of isotopic patterns of tree mortality in forests of the western United States.

  8. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K.E.

    1978-04-01

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, /sup 242/Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 ..mu..b in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, ..cap alpha..xn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z/sub 1/ + Z/sub 2/ = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of /sup 228/Pu, /sup 230/Pu, /sup 232/Cm, or /sup 238/Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes.

  9. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-01

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals.

  10. Identifying vital effects in Halimeda algae with Ca isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Blättler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical records of biogenic carbonates provide some of the most valuable records of the geological past, but are often difficult to interpret without a mechanistic understanding of growth processes. In this experimental study, Halimeda algae are used as a test organism to untangle some of the specific factors that influence their skeletal composition, in particular their Ca-isotope composition. Algae were stimulated to precipitate both calcite and aragonite by growth in artificial Cretaceous seawater, resulting in experimental samples with somewhat malformed skeletons. The Ca-isotope fractionation of the algal calcite (−0.6‰ appears to be much smaller than that for the algal aragonite (−1.4‰, similar to the behaviour observed in inorganic precipitates. However, the carbonate from Halimeda has higher Ca-isotope ratios than inorganic forms by approximately 0.25‰, likely because of Rayleigh distillation within the algal intercellular space. In identifying specific vital effects and the magnitude of their influence on Ca-isotope ratios, this study suggests that mineralogy has a first-order control on the marine Ca-isotope cycle.

  11. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  12. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-03-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive.

  13. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive. PMID:28262764

  14. Isotope effect in charge-transfer collisions of H with He{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loreau, J.; Dalgarno, A. [Institute for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Ryabchenko, S. [Northern (Arctic) Federal University, 17 Severnaya Dvina Emb., 163002 Arkhangelsk (Russian Federation); Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), CP160/09, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Vaeck, N. [Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), CP160/09, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2011-11-15

    We present a theoretical study of the isotope effect arising from the replacement of H by T in the charge-transfer collision H(n=2) + He{sup +}(1s) at low energy. Using a quasimolecular approach and a time-dependent wave-packet method, we compute the cross sections for the reaction including the effects of the nonadiabatic radial and rotational couplings. For H(2s) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions, we find a strong isotope effect at energies below 1 eV/amu for both singlet and triplet states. We find a much smaller isotopic dependence of the cross section for H(2p) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions in triplet states, and no isotope effect in singlet states. We explain the isotope effect on the basis of the potential energy curves and the nonadiabatic couplings, and we evaluate the importance of the isotope effect on the charge-transfer rate coefficients.

  15. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  16. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for δ 18O value, while the δD value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  17. Kinetic secondary deuterium isotope effects for substituted benzaldehyde cyanohydrin formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, V.; do Amaral, L.; Cordes, E.H.

    1976-07-07

    ..cap alpha.. secondary deuterium isotope effects have been measured for the observed rate constants for addition of cyanide ion to a series of substituted benzaldehydes in aqueous solution at 25/sup 0/C. Under the experimental conditions employed, these reactions did not proceed to completion, and the observed isotope effects were corrected to account for the influence of the reverse reaction employing measured equilibrium constants for cyanohydrin formation and previously determined secondary deuterium isotope effect for the equilibrium constant for 4-methoxybenzaldehyde cyanohydrin formation. In the four cases studied, values of k/sub D//k/sub H/ varied from 1.15 to 1.20, only slightly lower than the calculated maximal value for complete formation of the anionic tetrahedral species which is the immediate product of the rate-determining step, 1.21. A trend in isotope effect as a function of substrate reactivity could not be definitively established. The results suffice to establish that addition of cyanide to benzaldehydes proceeds via transition states in which rehybridization of carbonyl carbon to the tetrahedral geometry is nearly complete.

  18. Oxygen Isotope Study of the Suzhou Granite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王汝成; 沈渭洲; 等

    1998-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of the Suzhou granite have been made based on drill-hole samples.In the inner part,the δ18 O values are less variable either in the whole-rock,quartz or in feldspar.Oxygen isotopic compositions are in equilibrium between coexisting quartz and feldspar.Data points from the inner part are plotted in a small area in the δ18 OQ-δ18Of diagram,indicating that this part has not been affected by meteoric hydrothermal fluids.But the whole-rock δ18 O values of the marginal part vary greatly.Oxygen isotopic compositions are in extreme disequilibrium between quartz and feldspar.Data points from the marginal part are displayed with a nearly vertical slope in the δ18OQ-δ18 Of diagram,implying that rocks of this part are affected by the meteoric hydrothermal fluids.Extreme water-rock interactions lead to mineralizations of rare-elements(Nb,Ta,as well as Zr,Hf,Th)in the marginal part.Source materials of the Suzhou granite are also discussed in this paper.

  19. Isotope and multiband effects in layered superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Keller, Hugo

    2012-06-13

    In this review we consider three classes of superconductors, namely cuprate superconductors, MgB(2) and the new Fe based superconductors. All of these three systems are layered materials and multiband compounds. Their pairing mechanisms are under discussion with the exception of MgB(2), which is widely accepted to be a 'conventional' electron-phonon interaction mediated superconductor, but extending the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory to account for multiband effects. Cuprates and Fe based superconductors have higher superconducting transition temperatures and more complex structures. Superconductivity is doping dependent in these material classes unlike in MgB(2) which, as a pure compound, has the highest values of T(c) and a rapid suppression of superconductivity with doping takes place. In all three material classes isotope effects have been observed, including exotic ones in the cuprates, and controversial ones in the Fe based materials. Before the area of high-temperature superconductivity, isotope effects on T(c) were the signature for phonon mediated superconductivity-even when deviations from the BCS value to smaller values were observed. Since the discovery of high T(c) materials this is no longer evident since competing mechanisms might exist and other mediating pairing interactions are discussed which are of purely electronic origin. In this work we will compare the three different material classes and especially discuss the experimentally observed isotope effects of all three systems and present a rather general analysis of them. Furthermore, we will concentrate on multiband signatures which are not generally accepted in cuprates even though they are manifest in various experiments, the evidence for those in MgB(2), and indications for them in the Fe based compounds. Mostly we will consider experimental data, but when possible also discuss theoretical models which are suited to explain the data.

  20. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  1. Combinatorial effects on clumped isotopes and their significance in biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement of isotopes within a collection of molecules records their physical and chemical histories. Clumped-isotope analysis interrogates these arrangements, i.e., how often rare isotopes are bound together, which in many cases can be explained by equilibrium and/or kinetic isotope fractionation. However, purely combinatorial effects, rooted in the statistics of pairing atoms in a closed system, are also relevant, and not well understood. Here, I show that combinatorial isotope effects are most important when two identical atoms are neighbors on the same molecule (e.g., O2, N2, and D-D clumping in CH4). When the two halves of an atom pair are either assembled with different isotopic preferences or drawn from different reservoirs, combinatorial effects cause depletions in clumped-isotope abundance that are most likely between zero and -1‰, although they could potentially be -10‰ or larger for D-D pairs. These depletions are of similar magnitude, but of opposite sign, to low-temperature equilibrium clumped-isotope effects for many small molecules. Enzymatic isotope-pairing reactions, which can have site-specific isotopic fractionation factors and atom reservoirs, should express this class of combinatorial isotope effect, although it is not limited to biological reactions. Chemical-kinetic isotope effects, which are related to a bond-forming transition state, arise independently and express second-order combinatorial effects related to the abundance of the rare isotope. Heteronuclear moeties (e.g., Csbnd O and Csbnd H), are insensitive to direct combinatorial influences, but secondary combinatorial influences are evident. In general, both combinatorial and chemical-kinetic factors are important for calculating and interpreting clumped-isotope signatures of kinetically controlled reactions. I apply this analytical framework to isotope-pairing reactions relevant to geochemical oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen cycling that may be influenced by combinatorial

  2. Studies on Separation Process and Production Technology of Boron Isotope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jian-ping

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The boron isotopes separation test was performed by chemical exchange reaction in the benzene ether -three boron fluoride system, which resulted to the boron isotopic enrichment of -10 in the liquid phase, the boron isotopic enrichment of -11 in the gas phase. After then, boron isotope separation trial production has been finished. In this process, the exchange column and complex tower normal operating parameters and the complex tower technology have been obtained, the problems of material distillation purification is solved, boron isotopes feasibility with PTFE packing enrichment is verified in an exchange column. Also, effect of operating pressure, flow and other parameters on boron -10 isotopic enrichment experiments and the effect and properties of the PTFE packing have been investigated in the existing system. All the results are very useful for the industrialization of the boron isotopes separation system.

  3. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan A.; Wang, David T.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Ono, Shuhei

    2017-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH was produced from the reaction of O(1D) (from O3 photolysis) with H2O, and Cl was from photolysis of Cl2. Samples were taken from the reaction cell and analyzed for methane (12CH4, 12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D) isotopologue ratios using tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy. Measured kinetic isotope effects for singly substituted species were consistent with previous experimental studies. For doubly substituted methane, 13CH3D, the observed kinetic isotope effects closely follow the product of the kinetic isotope effects for the 13C and deuterium substituted species (i.e., 13,2KIE = 13KIE × 2KIE). The deviation from this relationship is 0.3‰ ± 1.2‰ and 3.5‰ ± 0.7‰ for OH and Cl oxidation, respectively. This is consistent with model calculations performed using quantum chemistry and transition state theory. The OH and Cl reactions enrich the residual methane in the clumped isotopologue in open system reactions. In a closed system, however, this effect is overtaken by the large D/H isotope effect, which causes the residual methane to become anti-clumped relative to the initial methane. Based on these results, we demonstrate that oxidation of methane by OH, the predominant oxidant for tropospheric methane, will only have a minor (∼0.3‰) impact on the clumped isotope signature (Δ13CH3D, measured as a deviation from a stochastic distribution of isotopes) of tropospheric methane. This paper shows that Δ13CH3D will provide constraints on methane source strengths, and predicts that Δ12CH2D2 can provide information on methane sink strengths.

  4. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardi, A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  5. On the isotope effects of ZrX2 (X = H, D and T): A First-principles study

    OpenAIRE

    Chattaraj, D.; Parida, S. C.; Dash, Smruti; Majumder, C.

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium hydride is an important material for storage of hydrogen isotopes. Here we report the structural, electronic, vibrational and thermodynamic properties of ZrH2, ZrD2 and ZrT2 using density functional theory (DFT). The structural optimization was carried out by the plane-wave based pseudo-potential method under the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) scheme. The electronic structure of the ZrH2 compound was illustrated in terms of the electronic density of states, charge density ...

  6. Anomalous isotopic effect on electron-directed reactivity by a 3-{\\mu}m midinfrared pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Kunlong; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically studied the effect of nuclear mass on electron localization in dissociating H_2^+ and its isotopes subjected to a few-cycle 3-{\\mu}m laser pulse. Compared to the isotopic trend in the near-infrared regime, our results reveal an inverse isotopic effect in which the degree of electron-directed reactivity is even higher for heavier isotopes. With the semi-classical analysis, we find, for the first time, the pronounced electron localization is established by the interferences through different channels of one- and, more importantly, higher-order photon coupling. Interestingly, due to the enhanced high-order above-threshold dissociation of heavier isotopes, the interference maxima gradually become in phase with growing mass and ultimately lead to the anomalous isotopic behavior of the electron localization. This indicates that the multi-photon coupling channels will play an important role in controlling the dissociation of larger molecules with midinfrared pulses.

  7. Isotopic Analysis of Fingernails as a USGS Open House Demonstration of the Use of Stable Isotopes in Foodweb Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Choy, D.

    2011-12-01

    The USGS Isotope Tracers Project uses stable isotopes and tritium to add a unique dimension of chemical information to a wide range of environmental investigations. The use and application of isotopes is usually an unfamiliar and even esoteric topic to the general public. Therefore during three USGS open house events, as a public outreach effort, we demonstrated the use of stable isotopes by analyzing nitrogen and carbon isotopes from very small fragments of fingernail from willing participants. We titled the exhibit "You Are What You Eat". The results from all participants were plotted on a graph indicating the general influence of different food groups on the composition of body tissues as represented by fingernails. All participants were assigned a number and no personal-identification information was collected. A subset of participants provided us with an estimate of the number of days a week various foods were eaten and if they were vegetarians, vegans or non-vegetarians. Volunteers from our research group were on hand to explain and discuss fundamental concepts such as how foods attain their isotopic composition, the difference between C3 and C4 plants, the effects of assimilation, trophic enrichment, and the various uses of stable isotopes in environmental studies. The results of the fingernail analyses showed the variation of the range of isotopic compositions among about 400 people at each event, the distinct influence of C4 plants (mainly corn and cane sugar) on our carbon isotopic composition, and the isotopic differences between vegetarians and non vegetarians among other details (http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/projects/fingernails/). A poll of visitors attending the open house event in 2006 indicated that "You Are What You Eat" was among the most popular exhibits. Following the first two open house events we were contacted by a group of researchers from Brazil who had completed a very similar study. Our collaboration resulted in a publication in

  8. Quantum and isotope effects in lithium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, Graeme J.; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Martinez-Canales, Miguel; Loa, Ingo; Zhang, Rong; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Cai, Weizhao; Deemyad, Shanti

    2017-06-01

    The crystal structure of elements at zero pressure and temperature is the most fundamental information in condensed matter physics. For decades it has been believed that lithium, the simplest metallic element, has a complicated ground-state crystal structure. Using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells and multiscale simulations with density functional theory and molecular dynamics, we show that the previously accepted martensitic ground state is metastable. The actual ground state is face-centered cubic (fcc). We find that isotopes of lithium, under similar thermal paths, exhibit a considerable difference in martensitic transition temperature. Lithium exhibits nuclear quantum mechanical effects, serving as a metallic intermediate between helium, with its quantum effect-dominated structures, and the higher-mass elements. By disentangling the quantum kinetic complexities, we prove that fcc lithium is the ground state, and we synthesize it by decompression.

  9. 2015 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on the fracture toughness of stainless steels. Fracture toughness variability was investigated for Type 21-6-9 stainless steel using the 7K0004 forging. Fracture toughness specimens were cut from the forging in two different geometric configurations: arc shape and disc shape. The fracture toughness properties were measured at ambient temperature before and after exposure to hydrogen gas and compared to prior studies. There are three main conclusions that can be drawn from the results. First, the fracture toughness properties of actual reservoir forgings and contemporary heats of steel are much higher than those measured in earlier studies that used heats of steel from the 1980s and 1990s and forward extruded forgings which were designed to simulate reservoir microstructures. This is true for as-forged heats as well as forged heats exposed to hydrogen gas. Secondly, the study confirms the well-known observation that cracks oriented parallel to the forging grain flow will propagate easier than those oriented perpendicular to the grain flow. However, what was not known, but is shown here, is that this effect is more pronounced, particularly after hydrogen exposures, when the forging is given a larger upset. In brick forgings, which have a relatively low amount of upset, the fracture toughness variation with specimen orientation is less than 5%; whereas, in cup forgings, the fracture toughness is about 20% lower than that forging to show how specimen geometry affects fracture toughness values. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) specifies minimum specimen section sizes for valid fracture toughness values. However, sub-size specimens have long been used to study tritium effects because of the physical limitation of diffusing hydrogen isotopes into stainless steel at mild temperatures so as to not disturb the underlying forged microstructure. This study shows

  10. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  11. Probing isotope effects in chemical reactions using single ions

    CERN Document Server

    Staanum, Peter F; Wester, Roland; Drewsen, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Isotope effects in reactions between Mg+ in the 3p 2P3/2 excited state and molecular hydrogen at thermal energies are studied through single reaction events. From only ~250 reactions with HD, the branching ratio between formation of MgD+ and MgH+ is found to be larger than 5. From additional 65 reactions with H2 and D2 we find that the overall decay probability of the intermediate MgH2+, MgHD+ or MgD2+ complexes is the same. Our study shows that few single ion reactions can provide quantitative information on ion-neutral reactions. Hence, the method is well-suited for reaction studies involving rare species, e.g., rare isotopes or short-lived unstable elements.

  12. Isotopic modeling of the sub-cloud evaporation effect in precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamalikis, V; Argiriou, A A; Dotsika, E

    2016-02-15

    In dry and warm environments sub-cloud evaporation influences the falling raindrops modifying their final stable isotopic content. During their descent from the cloud base towards the ground surface, through the unsaturated atmosphere, hydrometeors are subjected to evaporation whereas the kinetic fractionation results to less depleted or enriched isotopic signatures compared to the initial isotopic composition of the raindrops at cloud base. Nowadays the development of Generalized Climate Models (GCMs) that include isotopic content calculation modules are of great interest for the isotopic tracing of the global hydrological cycle. Therefore the accurate description of the underlying processes affecting stable isotopic content can improve the performance of iso-GCMs. The aim of this study is to model the sub-cloud evaporation effect using a) mixing and b) numerical isotope evaporation models. The isotope-mixing evaporation model simulates the isotopic enrichment (difference between the ground and the cloud base isotopic composition of raindrops) in terms of raindrop size, ambient temperature and relative humidity (RH) at ground level. The isotopic enrichment (Δδ) varies linearly with the evaporated raindrops mass fraction of the raindrop resulting to higher values at drier atmospheres and for smaller raindrops. The relationship between Δδ and RH is described by a 'heat capacity' model providing high correlation coefficients for both isotopes (R(2)>80%) indicating that RH is an ideal indicator of the sub-cloud evaporation effect. Vertical distribution of stable isotopes in falling raindrops is also investigated using a numerical isotope-evaporation model. Temperature and humidity dependence of the vertical isotopic variation is clearly described by the numerical isotopic model showing an increase in the isotopic values with increasing temperature and decreasing RH. At an almost saturated atmosphere (RH=95%) sub-cloud evaporation is negligible and the isotopic

  13. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile: Solvent isotope effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tuhin Pradhan; Piue Ghoshal; Ranjit Biswas

    2009-01-01

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other properties such as quantum yield and radiative rates have been found to be insensitive to the solvent isotope substitution in all these solvents. The origin of the solvent isotope insensitivity of the reaction is discussed and correlated with the observed slowing down of the solvation dynamics upon isotope substitution.

  14. Stable Chlorine Isotope Study: Application to Early Solar System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mala,ira. M/; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2010-01-01

    A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the Cl-37/Cl-35 ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For example, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each

  15. Computational Replication of the Primary Isotope Dependence of Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effects in Solution Hydride Transfer Reactions: Supporting the Isotopically Different Tunneling Ready State Conformations

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported a study of the steric effect on the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs for several hydride transfer reactions in solution (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 6653). The unusual 2° KIEs decrease as the 1° isotope changes from H to D, and more in the sterically hindered systems. These were explained in terms of a more crowded tunneling ready state (TRS) conformation in D-tunneling, which has a shorter donor-acceptor distance (DAD), than in H-tunneling. In order to examine the isoto...

  16. Understanding the effect of cobalt particle size on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: surface species and mechanistic studies by SSITKA and kinetic isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia; Tveten, Erik Z; Chen, De; Holmen, Anders

    2010-11-02

    Co/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalysts with particle sizes in the range of 4-15 nm were investigated by isothermal hydrogenation (IH), temperature programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA). Kinetic isotope effect experiments were used to probe possible mechanisms on Co/γ-Al(2)O(3) with different particle size. It was found that CO dissociated on Co/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalysts at 210 °C. The total amount of CO(2) formed following the dissociation depends on the cobalt crystal size. O-Co binding energy was found to be highly dependent on the Co metal particle size, whereas similar C-Co binding energy was found on catalysts with different Co particle size. Very strongly bonded carbon and oxygen surface species increased with decreasing particle size and acted as site blocking species in the methanation reaction. SSITKA experiments showed that the intrinsic activity (1/τ(CH(x))) remained constant as the particle size increased from 4 to 15 nm. The number of surface intermediates (N(CH(x))) increased with increasing particle size. The apparent activation energies were found similar for these catalysts, about 85 kJ/mol. D(2)-H(2) switches further confirmed that the particle size did not change the kinetically relevant steps in the reaction. The reactivity of the active sites on the 4 nm particles was the same as those on the 8, 11, and 15 nm particles, and only the number of total available surface active sites was less on the 4 nm particles than on the others.

  17. Anharmonic phonons and the isotope effect in superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, V.H.; Cohen, M.L. (Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (USA) Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (USA)); Penn, D.R. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Anharmonic interionic potentials are examined in an Einstein model to study the unusual isotope-effect exponents for the high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} oxides. The mass dependences of the electron-phonon coupling constant {lambda} and the average phonon frequency {radical}{l angle}{omega}{sup 2}{r angle} are computed from weighted sums over the oscillator levels. The isotope-effect exponent is depressed below 1/2 by either a double-well potential or a potential with positive quadratic and quartic parts. Numerical solutions of Schroedinger's equation for double-well potentials produce {lambda}'s in the range 1.5--4 for a material with a vanishing isotope-effect parameter {alpha}. However, low phonon frequencies limit {ital T}{sub {ital c}} to roughly 15 K. A negative quartic perturbation to a harmonic well can increase {alpha} above 1/2. In the extreme-strong-coupling limit, {alpha} is 1/2, regardless of anharmonicity.

  18. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  19. Investigation of Stable C and Cl Isotope Effects of Trichloroethene and Tetrachloroethylene during Evaporation at Different Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingting Yu; Yiqun Gan; Aiguo Zhou; Kai Yu; Yunde Liu

    2014-01-01

    There are variations of reported isotope enrichment factors of chlorinated organic contaminants in evaporation processes. Trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were chosen to study carbon and chlorine isotope effects during evaporation at different temperatures. Equilibrium vapor-liquid carbon and chlorine isotope effects experiments were also conducted. In the equilibrium liquid-vapor system, the 13C was enriched but 37Cl was depleted in the vapor phase, being consistent with previous results. For evaporation average carbon isotope enrichment factor εC were +0.28‰± 0.01‰ for TCE and +0.56‰±0.09‰ for PCE at temperature from 20 to 26 ºC. Meanwhile, average chlorine isotope enrichment factor εCl were -1.33‰±0.21‰ for TCE and -1.00‰±0.00‰ for PCE. The results indicate that during evaporation the equilibrium isotope effect attenuates the magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation whereas enhances the chlorine isotope effect. Isotope fractionation during evaporation is determined by both equilibrium and kinetic factors. Chlorine isotope fractionation is influenced by the evaporation rate which is linked to temperature. When using stable isotope to investigate the behavior of chlorinated organic contaminants in groundwater with slow biodegradation rate, the isotope fractionation resulted from evaporation should be taken into consideration. Furthermore, the environment conditions such as temperature are also factors to be considered.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effect for the Oxidation Reaction of Ethane by Hydroxyl Radicals Under Atmospherically Relevant Conditions: Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Piansawan, Tammarat

    2016-01-01

           Ethane is the second most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere, after methane, impacting on air quality, human health and climate. A quantification of its effects requires accurate knowledge of sources, processes along transport, and sinks. Carbon stable isotopic ratio investigations, complementarily to concentration measurements, were demonstrated to give more insight in source apportionment and atmospheric processing of organic compounds.        Yet, apportionment of atmospher...

  1. Stable isotope methods in biological and ecological studies of arthropods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hood-Nowotny, R.C.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    This is an eclectic review and analysis of contemporary and promising stable isotope methodologies to study the biology and ecology of arthropods. It is augmented with literature from other disciplines, indicative of the potential for knowledge transfer. It is demonstrated that stable isotopes can

  2. Effects of short range correlations on Ca isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Lalazissis, G A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of Short Range Correlations (SRC) on Ca isotopes is studied using a simple phenomenological model. Theoretical expressions for the charge (proton) form factors, densities and moments of Ca nuclei are derived. The role of SRC in reproducing the empirical data for the charge density differences is examined. Their influence on the depletion of the nuclear Fermi surface is studied and the fractional occupation probabilities of the shell model orbits of Ca nuclei are calculated. The variation of SRC as function of the mass number is also discussed.

  3. Boron isotope method for study of seawater intrusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖应凯; 尹德忠; 刘卫国; 王庆忠; 魏海珍

    2001-01-01

    A distinct difference in boron isotopes between seawater and terrestrial water is emphasized by δ11B values reported for seawater and groundwater, with an average of 38.8‰ and in the range of -8.9‰ to 9.8‰, respectively. The isotopic composition of boron in groundwater can be used to quantify seawater intrusion and identify intrusion types, e.g. seawater or brine intrusions with different chemical and isotopic characteristics, by using the relation of δ11B and chloride concentration. The feasibility of utilizing boron isotope in groundwater for studying seawater intrusion in Laizhou Bay Region, China, is reported in this study, which shows that boron isotope is a useful and excellent tool for the study of seawater intrusion.

  4. The effect of zero-point energy differences on the isotope dependence of the formation of ozone: a classical trajectory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Reinhard; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The effect of zero-point energy differences (DeltaZPE) between the possible fragmentation channels of highly excited O(3) complexes on the isotope dependence of the formation of ozone is investigated by means of classical trajectory calculations and a strong-collision model. DeltaZPE is incorporated in the calculations in a phenomenological way by adjusting the potential energy surface in the product channels so that the correct exothermicities and endothermicities are matched. The model contains two parameters, the frequency of stabilizing collisions omega and an energy dependent parameter Delta(damp), which favors the lower energies in the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. The stabilization frequency is used to adjust the pressure dependence of the absolute formation rate while Delta(damp) is utilized to control its isotope dependence. The calculations for several isotope combinations of oxygen atoms show a clear dependence of relative formation rates on DeltaZPE. The results are similar to those of Gao and Marcus [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 137 (2002)] obtained within a statistical model. In particular, like in the statistical approach an ad hoc parameter eta approximately 1.14, which effectively reduces the formation rates of the symmetric ABA ozone molecules, has to be introduced in order to obtain good agreement with the measured relative rates of Janssen et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 3, 4718 (2001)]. The temperature dependence of the recombination rate is also addressed.

  5. Medical applications of Cu, Zn, and S isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarede, Francis; Télouk, Philippe; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Albalat, Emmanuelle; Oger, Philippe; Bonaventura, Paola; Miossec, Pierre; Fujii, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    This review examines recent applications of stable copper, zinc and sulfur isotopes to medical cases and notably cancer. The distribution of the natural stable isotopes of a particular element among coexisting molecular species varies as a function of the bond strength, the ionic charge, and the coordination, and it also changes with kinetics. Ab initio calculations show that compounds in which a metal binds to oxygen- (sulfate, phosphate, lactate) and nitrogen-bearing moieties (histidine) favor heavy isotopes, whereas bonds with sulfur (cysteine, methionine) favor light isotopes. Oxidized cations (e.g., Cu(ii)) and low coordination numbers are expected to favor heavy isotopes relative to their reduced counterparts (Cu(i)) and high coordination numbers. Here we discuss the first observations of Cu, Zn, and S isotopic variations, three elements closely related along multiple biological pathways, with emphasis on serum samples of healthy volunteers and of cancer patients. It was found that heavy isotopes of Zn and to an even greater extent Cu are enriched in erythrocytes relative to serum, while the difference is small for sulfur. Isotopic variations related to age and sex are relatively small. The (65)Cu/(63)Cu ratio in the serum of patients with colon, breast, and liver cancer is conspicuously low relative to healthy subjects. The characteristic time over which Cu isotopes may change with disease progression (a few weeks) is consistent with both the turnover time of the element and albumin half-life. A parallel effect on sulfur isotopes is detected in a few un-medicated patients. Copper in liver tumor tissue is isotopically heavy. In contrast, Zn in breast cancer tumors is isotopically lighter than in healthy breast tissue. (66)Zn/(64)Zn is very similar in the serum of cancer patients and in controls. Possible reasons for Cu isotope variations may be related to the cytosolic storage of Cu lactate (Warburg effect), release of intracellular copper from cysteine

  6. Unified picture of the oxygen isotope effect in cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Wu, Zhigang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2007-03-06

    High-temperature superconductivity in cuprates was discovered almost exactly 20 years ago, but a satisfactory theoretical explanation for this phenomenon is still lacking. The isotope effect has played an important role in establishing electron-phonon interaction as the dominant interaction in conventional superconductors. Here we present a unified picture of the oxygen isotope effect in cuprate superconductors based on a phonon-mediated d-wave pairing model within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. We show that this model accounts for the magnitude of the isotope exponent as functions of the doping level as well as the variation between different cuprate superconductors. The isotope effect on the superconducting transition is also found to resemble the effect of pressure on the transition. These results indicate that the role of phonons should not be overlooked for explaining the superconductivity in cuprates.

  7. Role of effective distance in the fission mechanism study by the double-energy measurement for uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadashi; Takahashi, Naruto [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    Fission product kinetic energies were measured by the double-energy method for thermal-neutron fission of {sup 235,233}U and proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U at the 15.8-MeV excitation. From the obtained energy-mass correlation data, the kinetic-energy distribution was constructed from each mass bin to evaluate the first moment of the kinetic energy for a given fragment mass. The resulting kinetic energy was then converted to the effective distance between the charge centers at the moment of scission. The effective distances deduced for the proton-induced fission was concluded to be classified into two constant values, one for asymmetric and the other for symmetric mode, irrespective of the mass though an additional component was further extracted in the asymmetric mass region. This indicates that the fission takes place via two well-defined saddles, followed by the random neck rupture. On the contrary, the effective distances obtained for thermal-neutron induced fission turned out to lie along the contour line at the same level as the equilibrium deformation in the two-dimensional potential map. This strongly suggests that it is essentially a barrier-penetrating type of fission rather than the over-barrier fission. (author). 73 refs.

  8. Experimental protocols for and studies of the effects of surface passivation and water isotopes on the gliding speed of microtubules propelled by kinesin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Roger Andrew

    This dissertation explores how the kinesin-1 and microtubule system is affected by surface passivation and water isotopes. Surface passivation was found to affect the gliding speed that microtubules exhibit in the gliding motility assay and the lengths of microtubules supported by the passivation. It was also found that gliding speeds of microtubules are very sensitive to temperature changes. Studies changing the water isotope were a first attempt to investigate if changing the solvent changed the osmotic pressure of the solution kinesin and microtubules were in. No osmotic pressure changes were observed, however, the experiments using different isotopes of water did illuminate the possibility that kinesin may be sensitive to viscosity changes in the solvent. This experiment also suggests further experiments that can be specifically designed to probe osmotic pressure changes. This thesis was also the first thesis ever, to the best of the author's knowledge, to be done in a completely open format. All information and notebook entries that are related to it, as well as the thesis itself, can be found on the website OpenWetWare. The thesis can also be found there including all the different versions that went into its editing. The philosophy and process of making data open and accessible to every one is also discussed.

  9. H/D Isotope Effects in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Filarowski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (1H,2H on d (1H. This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  10. Modeling the isotope effect in Walden inversion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Israel

    1991-05-01

    A simple model to explain the isotope effect in the Walden exchange reaction is suggested. It is developed in the spirit of the line-of-centers models, and considers a hard-sphere collision that transfers energy from the relative translation to the desired vibrational mode, as well as geometrical properties and steric requirements. This model reproduces the recently measured cross sections for the reactions of hydrogen with isotopic silanes and older measurements of the substitution reactions of tritium atoms with isotopic methanes. Unlike previously given explanations, this model explains the effect of the attacking atom as well as of the other participating atoms. The model provides also qualitative explanation of the measured relative yields and thresholds of CH 3T and CH 2TF from the reaction T + CH 3F. Predictions for isotope effects and cross sections of some unmeasured reactions are given.

  11. Kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects in the oxidation of putrescine catalysed by enzyme diamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałka, Katarzyna; Szymańska, Jolanta; Kańska, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the kinetic isotope effects and solvent isotope effects in the reaction of the deamination of [(1R)-(2)H ] putrescine--catalysed by enzyme diamine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6)--were determined using a non-competitive spectroscopic method. Putrescine, stereospecifically labelled with deuterium, was obtained by enzymatic decarboxylation of l-ornithine that was carried out in a fully deuteriated incubation medium.

  12. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  13. Heat Capacity of PbS: Isotope Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona, M.; Kremer, R. K.; Lauck, R.; Siegle, G.; Serrano, J.; Romero, A. H.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the availability of highly pure stable isotopes has made possible the investigation of the dependence of the physical properties of crystals, in particular semiconductors, on their isotopic composition. Following the investigation of the specific heat ($C_p$, $C_v$) of monatomic crystals such as diamond, silicon, and germanium, similar investigations have been undertaken for the tetrahedral diatomic systems ZnO and GaN (wurtzite structure), for which the effect of the mass of...

  14. Stable isotope studies. Final report, March 1, 1972--February 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-10-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes: Effects of Chirality and Isotope Impurity

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Zhang; Li, Baowen

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality and isotope impurity by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also study the dependence of thermal conductivity on tube length for t...

  16. Stable isotopes in pharmacology studies: present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, T.R.

    1986-07-01

    Stable-isotope techniques offer advantages over older methods in safety, sensitivity, specificity, and reduction in numbers of subjects required and analytic determinations for some types of pharmacology studies. In addition to their use as internal standards in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analytic methods, stable isotopes have been successfully employed in studies of absorption, bioavailability, distribution, biotransformation, excretion, metabolite identification, time-dependent and dose-dependent pharmacokinetic changes, drug interactions, pharmacologic changes during pregnancy, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity. 32 references.

  17. Isotope effects on particle transport in the Compact Helical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.; Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Ida, K.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Osakabe, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Isobe, M.; Morita, S.; Matsuoka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrogen isotope effects of particle transport were studied in the hydrogen and deuterium dominant plasmas of the Compact Helical System (CHS). Longer decay time of electron density after the turning-off of the gas puffing was observed in the deuterium dominant plasma suggesting that the recycling was higher and/or the particle confinement was better in the deuterium dominant plasma. Density modulation experiments showed the quantitative difference of the particle transport coefficients. Density was scanned from 0.8  ×  1019 m-3 to 4  ×  1019 m-3 under the same magnetic field and almost the same heating power. In the low density regime (line averaged density  2.5  ×  1019 m-3) no clear difference was observed. This result indicates that the isotope effects of particle transport exist only in the low density regime. Comparison with neoclassical transport coefficients showed that the difference of particle transport is likely to be due to the difference of turbulence driven anomalous transport. Linear character of the ion scale turbulence was studied. The smaller linear growth rate qualitatively agreed with the reduced particle transport in the deuterium dominant plasma of the low density regime.

  18. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  19. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, Sergey S.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 18}O and Δ{sup 17}O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated {sup 13}CO/{sup 12}CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in {sup 13}C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH{sub 4}) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH{sub 4} to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in {sup 13}C, were found significant

  20. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step.

  1. Expanding the isotopic toolbox: Applications of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to food web studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah B Vander Zanden

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H and oxygen (δ18O isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applications using δ2H and, to a lesser extent, δ18O values have demonstrated potential for these elements to provide novel insights in modern food web studies. We explore the advantages and challenges associated with three applications of δ2H and δ18O values in food web studies. First, large δ2H differences between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem end members can permit the quantification of energy inputs and nutrient fluxes between these two sources, with potential applications for determining allochthonous vs. autochthonous nutrient sources in freshwater systems and relative aquatic habitat utilization by terrestrial organisms. Next, some studies have identified a relationship between δ2H values and trophic position, which suggests that this marker may serve as a trophic indicator, in addition to the more commonly used δ15N values. Finally, coupled measurements of δ2H and δ18O values are increasing as a result of reduced analytical challenges to measure both simultaneously and may provide additional ecological information over single element measurements. In some organisms, the isotopic ratios of these two elements are tightly coupled, whereas the isotopic disequilibrium in other organisms may offer insight into the diet and physiology of individuals. Although a coherent framework for interpreting δ2H and δ18O data in the context of food web studies is emerging, many fundamental uncertainties remain. We highlight directions for targeted research that

  2. Oxygen Isotope Studies of Epithermal Systems:A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊永良; 翟裕生

    1992-01-01

    Numerous stable isotope studies of whole rocks and mineral separates in epithermal systems indi-cate that even though meteoric waters are dominant components in epithermal systems ,fluids of other origins,such as sedimentary or meta-sedimentary fluids,magmatic waters and even evolved meteoric waters ,may also play a role in the formation of epithermal ore deposits.Usually the more depleted the wall rocks,the larger the size of ore deposits ,and the least depletion degrees in whole rocks for economic mineralization are by about 3.5‰.The depletion in δ18O in wall rocks,however,may be complicated by the superimposition of low temperature-hydration over high-temperature altera-tion or vice versa,the existence of primary low-18O and high-18O magmas ,and alteration by vol-canic gases.The depletion in δ18O in wall rocks is controlled by the composition and nature of flu-ids,the temperature of fluids,the elevation of rocks at the time of alteration ,lithology,boiling effects of fluids ,and alteration style,as well as by water/rock ratios.In addition ,the fluids re-sponsible for epithermal deposits have experienced positive δ18O shifts .It seems that when the above complications and controlling factors are well defined,oxygen isotope studies would be a promising and powerful exploration tool.

  3. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera: Implication for microhabitat preferences and interspecies correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Bhaumik; Shiv Kumar; Shilpi Ray; G K Vishwakarma; Anil K Gupta; Pushpendra Kumar; Kalachand Sain

    2017-07-01

    Stable isotopes of benthic foraminifera have widely been applied in micropalaeontological research to understand vital effects in foraminifera. Isotopic fractionations are mainly controlled by ontogeny, bottom/pore water chemistry, habitat preference, kinetic effect and respiration. Discontinuous abundance of a species for isotopic analysis has forced us to select multiple species from down-core samples. Thus standardisation factors are required to convert isotopic values of one species with respect to other species. The present study is pursued on isotopic values of different pairs of benthic foraminifera from the Krishna–Godavari basin and Peru offshore to understand habitat-wise isotopic variation and estimation of isotopic correction factors for the paired species (Cibicides wuellerstorfi–Bulimina marginata, Ammonia spp.–Loxostomum amygdalaeformis and Bolivina seminuda–Nonionella auris). Infaunal species (B. marginata, Ammonia spp. and N. auris) show a lighter carbon isotopic excursion with respect to the epifaunal to shallow infaunal forms (C. wuellerstorfi, L. amygdalaeformis and B. seminuda). These lighter δ13C values are related to utilisation of CO2 produced by anaerobic remineralisation of organic matter. However, enrichment of δ18O for the deeper microhabitat (bearing lower pH and decreased CO32−) is only recorded in case of B. marginata. It is reverse in case of N. auris and related to utilisation of respiratory CO2 and internal dissolve inorganic carbon pool. Estimation of interspecies isotopic correction factors for the species pairs (δ13C of C. wuellerstorfi–B. marginata, L. amygdalaeformis–Ammonia spp., N. auris–B. seminuda) and δ18O of C. wuellerstorfi–B. marginata are statistically reliable and may be used in palaeoecological studies.

  4. Multicomponent DFT study of geometrical H/D isotope effect on hydrogen-bonded organic conductor, κ-H3(Cat EDT-ST)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kaichi; Kanematsu, Yusuke; Nagashima, Umpei; Ueda, Akira; Mori, Hatsumi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2017-04-01

    We theoretically investigated a significant contraction of the hydrogen-bonding O⋯O distance upon H/D substitution in our recently developed purely organic crystals, κ-H3(Cat-EDT-ST)2 (H-ST) and its isotopologue κ-D3(Cat-EDT-ST)2 (D-ST), having π-electron systems coupled with hydrogen-bonding fluctuation. The origin of this geometrical H/D isotope effect was elucidated by using the multicomponent DFT method, which takes the H/D nuclear quantum effect into account. The optimized O⋯O distance in H-ST was found to be longer than that in D-ST due to the anharmonicity of the potential energy curve along the Osbnd H bond direction, which was in reasonable agreement with the experimental trend.

  5. Mass-independent isotope effects in planetary atmospheres and the early solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, M H

    1999-01-15

    A class of isotope effects that alters isotope ratios on a mass-independent basis provides a tool for studying a wide range of processes in atmospheres of Earth and other planets as well as early processes in the solar nebula. The mechanism for the effect remains uncertain. Mass-independent isotopic compositions have been observed in O3, CO2, N2O, and CO in Earth's atmosphere and in carbonate from a martian meteorite, which suggests a role for mass-independent processes in the atmosphere of Mars. Observed mass-independent meteoritic oxygen and sulfur isotopic compositions may derive from chemical processes in the presolar nebula, and their distributions could provide insight into early solar system evolution.

  6. Neutron-rich polonium isotopes studied with in-source laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dexters, Wim; Cocolios, T E

    This work studies the unknown region of neutron rich polonium isotopes. The polonium isotopes, with Z=84, lie above the magic lead nuclei (Z=82). The motivation for this research can mainly be found in these lead nuclei. When looking at the changes in the mean square charge radii beyond the N=126 shell gap, a kink is observed. This kink is also found in the radon (Z=86) and radium (Z=88) isotopes. The observed effect cannot be reproduced with our current models. The polonium isotopes yield more information on the kink and they are also able to link the known charge radii in lead isotopes to those in radon and radium. Additionally, the nuclear moments of the odd-neutron isotope $^{211}$Po are investigated. This nucleus has two protons and one neutron more than the doubly magic nucleus $^{208}$Pb. Nuclear moments of isotopes close to this doubly magic nucleus are good tests for the theoretic models. Besides pushing the models to their limits, the nuclear moments of $^{211}$Po also yield new information on the f...

  7. Unusual isotope effects of molybdenum in chemical exchange reaction using dicyclohexano-18-crown-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Nishizawa, Kazushige [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Inagawa, Jun

    1999-06-01

    Molybdenum isotopes were fractionated in a liquid-liquid extraction system using dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC18C6). The enrichment factors showed a breakdown of the conventional mass-dependent rule. Some unusual and larger isotope effects were observed in the even atomic mass isotopes, {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. The unusual features in the present study were not responsible for the field shift effect, which was regarded as a primary factor of the anomalous isotope effect in the recent theory, but were due to an anomaly on the vibrational levels. The largest isotope effect was observed in the isotope pair of {sup 94}Mo-{sup 96}Mo, it was {epsilon}{sub 96,94} = 0.0086 {+-} 0.0007, its initial aqueous phase was 0.91 M molybdenum chloride, and its organic phase was 0.2 M DC18C6 in chloroform: this was 0.0043 {+-} 0.0004 in terms of the enrichment factor for unit mass different. (author)

  8. Kinetic isotope effects in the OH and Cl reactions of the clumped methane species 13CH3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Magnus

    a heavy atom vibrates slower than a light atom, the substitution to heavier isotopes in a molecular bond leads to lower Zero-Point Energy (ZPE) and thus amore stable bond. Fromstatistical thermodynamics we know that the influence of ZPE is largest at low temperatures, therefore the clumping of isotopes....... In Papers I and II, isotopically-labeled methane was used and the reactions were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In Paper III; natural abundance methane was used and only the reaction yield was measured with FTIR spectroscopy. Meanwhile, the isotopic compositions were measured...... the clumping effect by a reaction, the apparent clumpiness is defined as the deviation of the Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE) of the reaction with the clumped isotope (13CH3D) from the combination of KIEs of reactions with the single substituted isotopologues (13CH4 and 12CH3D). If the KIE of the reaction with 13...

  9. An Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Kinetic Isotope Effect of C2H6 and C2D6 Reaction with OH

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2015-10-30

    We report experimental and theoretical results for the deuterated kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) of the reaction of OH with ethane (C2H6) and deuterated ethane (C2D6). The reactions were investigated behind reflected shock waves over 800–1350 K by monitoring OH radicals near 306.69 nm using laser absorption. In addition, high level CCSD(T)/cc-pV(T,Q)Z//MP2/cc-pVTZ quantum chemical and statistical rate theory calculations were performed which agreed very well with the experimental findings. The results reported herein provide the first experimental evidence that DKIE for alkanes asymptotes to a value of 1.4 at high temperatures.

  10. A study on the isotope effects in the reduction of carbon dioxide by zinc; Etude des effets isotopiques dans la reduction du gaz carbonique par le zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senegacnik, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-06-15

    We have determined the isotope effects which occur in the reduction of carbon dioxide by zinc. It has been shown that in the case of irreversible surface reactions, Bernstein's equation which permits the calculation of the fractionation factor is still valid. These experimental factors are in good agreement with those obtained by calculating the partition functions of the adsorbed activated complexes. In the reaction mechanism used, the model of the activated complex corresponds to the dissociation of one of the carbon oxygen bonds CO{sub 2} {yields} CO + O. Perturbations arising from the slight reversibility of the reaction Zn + CO{sub 2} {r_reversible} ZnO + CO on the isotope effects on the carbon and oxygen atoms have also been calculated. (author) [French] Nous avons etudie les effets isotopiques qui ont lieu dans la reduction du gaz carbonique par le zinc. La validite de l'equation de Bernstein qui permet de calculer le facteur de fractionnement a ete demontree pour le cas d'une reaction irreversible de surface. Ces facteurs de fractionnement experimentaux sont en bon accord avec ceux obtenus par le calcul des fonctions de partition isotopiques des complexes actives adsorbes. Dans le mecanisme de reaction utilise, le modele du complexe active correspond a la dissociation d'une des liaisons carbone oxygene CO{sub 2} {yields} CO + O. Les effets perturbateurs de la reversibilite de la reduction Zn + CO{sub 2} {r_reversible} ZnO + CO sur les effets isotopiques du carbone et ceux de l'oxygene ont ete egalement evalues. (auteur)

  11. Boron isotope effect in superconducting MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bud'ko, S L; Lapertot, G; Petrovic, C; Cunningham, C E; Anderson, N; Canfield, P C

    2001-02-26

    We report the preparation method of and boron isotope effect for MgB2, a new binary intermetallic superconductor with a remarkably high superconducting transition temperature T(c)(10B) = 40.2 K. Measurements of both temperature dependent magnetization and specific heat reveal a 1.0 K shift in T(c) between Mg11B2 and Mg10B2. Whereas such a high transition temperature might imply exotic coupling mechanisms, the boron isotope effect in MgB2 is consistent with the material being a phonon-mediated BCS superconductor.

  12. Microscale reservoir effects on microbial sulfur isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, Stilianos; Crowe, Sean A.

    2017-04-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction can impart strong sulfur isotope fractionation by preferentially using the lighter 32SO42- over the heavier 34SO42-. The magnitude of fractionation depends on a number of factors, including ambient concentrations of sulfate and electron donors. Sulfur isotope compositions in sedimentary rocks thus facilitate reconstruction of past environmental conditions, such as seawater sulfate concentrations, primary productivity, organic carbon burial, and sulfur fluxes into or out of the ocean. Knowing the processes that regulate the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation is necessary for the correct interpretation of the geological record, but so far theoretical work has focused mostly on internal cellular processes. In sulfate-limited environments, like low sulfate lakes and the Archean ocean, microbial sulfate reduction can lead to sulfate depletion in the water column and an enrichment in isotopically heavy sulfate. This reservoir effect in turn mutes the fractionation expressed in the water column and ultimately preserved in sediments relative to the biologically induced fractionation. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that similar reservoir effects can also appear at the microscale in close proximity to sulfate-reducing cells. These microscale reservoir effects have the potential to modulate sulfur isotope fractionation to a considerable degree, especially at low (micromolar) sulfate concentrations. As a result, background sulfate concentrations, sulfate reduction rates, and extracellular ion diffusion rates can influence the fractionation expressed even if the physiologically induced fractionation is constant. This has implications for the interpretation of biogenic sulfur isotope fractionations expressed in the geological record, because the correct estimation of the environmental conditions that would promote these fractionations requires consideration of microscale reservoir effects. We discuss these implications, and

  13. Isotopes through the looking glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson Pendrill, Ann Marie

    2000-08-01

    Nuclear distributions affect many aspects of atomic spectra. As an example, recent experimental results for the hyperfine anomaly in Fr isotopes are considered. These depend on nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. The variations in charge radii for these isotopes were studied earlier by measuring optical isotope shifts. The hyperfine anomalies for the odd-odd isotopes involve the neutron distributions, of interest for studies of parity nonconserving effects along a chain of isotopes.

  14. Equilibrium clumped-isotope effects in doubly substituted isotopologues of ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michael A.; Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Bowman, Joel M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    We combine path-integral Monte Carlo methods with a new intramolecular potential energy surface to quantify the equilibrium enrichment of doubly substituted ethane isotopologues due to clumped-isotope effects. Ethane represents the simplest molecule to simultaneously exhibit 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects, and the analysis of corresponding signatures may provide useful geochemical and biogeochemical proxies of formation temperatures or reaction pathways. Utilizing path-integral statistical mechanics, we predict equilibrium fractionation factors that fully incorporate nuclear quantum effects, such as anharmonicity and rotational-vibrational coupling which are typically neglected by the widely used Urey model. The magnitude of the calculated fractionation factors for the doubly substituted ethane isotopologues indicates that isotopic clumping can be observed if rare-isotope substitutions are separated by up to three chemical bonds, but the diminishing strength of these effects suggests that enrichment at further separations will be negligible. The Urey model systematically underestimates enrichment due to 13C-D and D-D clumped-isotope effects in ethane, leading to small relative errors in the apparent equilibrium temperature, ranging from 5 K at 273.15 K to 30 K at 873.15 K. We additionally note that the rotameric dependence of isotopologue enrichment must be carefully considered when using the Urey model, whereas the path-integral calculations automatically account for such effects due to configurational sampling. These findings are of direct relevance to future clumped-isotope studies of ethane, as well as studies of 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects in other hydrocarbons.

  15. Temperature effects on the fractionation of multiple sulfur isotopes by Thermodesulfobacterium and Desulfovibrio strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Sun, C.; Ono, S.; Lin, L.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction is one of the major mechanisms driving anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in global ocean. While sulfate-reducing prokaryotes are well known to fractionate sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction, unraveling the isotopic compositions of sulfur-bearing minerals preserved in sedimentary records could provide invaluable constraints on the evolution of seawater chemistry and metabolic pathways. Variations in the sulfur isotope fractionations are partly due to inherent differences among species and also affected by environmental conditions. The isotope fractionations caused by microbial sulfate reduction have been interpreted to be a sequence of enzyme-catalyzed isotope fractionation steps. Therefore, the fractionation factor depends on (1) the sulfate flux into and out of the cell, and (2) the flux of sulfur transformation between the internal pools. Whether the multiple sulfur isotope effect could be quantitatively predicted using such a metabolic flux model would provide insights into the cellular machinery catalyzing with sulfate reduction. This study examined the multiple sulfur isotope fractionation patterns associated with a thermophilic Thermodesulfobacterium-related strain and a mesophilic Desulfovibrio gigas over a wide temperature range. The Thermodesulfobacterium-related strain grew between 34 and 79°C with an optimal temperature at 72°C and the highest cell-specific sulfate reduction rate at 77°C. The 34ɛ values ranged between 8.2 and 31.6‰ with a maximum at 68°C. The D. gigas grew between 10 and 45 °C with an optimal temperature at 30°C and the highest cell-specific sulfate reduction rate at 41°C. The 34ɛ values ranged between 10.3 and 29.7‰ with higher magnitude at both lower and higher temperatures. The results of multiple sulfur isotope measurements expand the previously reported range and cannot be described by a solution field of the metabolic flux model, which calculates

  16. Studies of carbon--isotope fractionation. Annual progress report, December 1, 1974--November 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1975-12-01

    The vapor pressure isotope effect of /sup 13/C//sup 12/C-substitution in CClF/sub 3/ was measured at temperatures between 169/sup 0/ and 206/sup 0/K by means of cryogenic distillation. The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C-vapor pressure isotope effect in CHF/sub 3/ was also studied at temperatures between 161/sup 0/ and 205/sup 0/K by a similar method. The construction of a cryostat has progressed as scheduled. The investigation of carbon isotope exchange equilibria between carbon dioxide and various carbamates dissolved in various organic solvents has continued. The five-stage system of Taylor-Ghate design was improved to shorten the transient time. A single stage apparatus was designed, built, and tested. These systems are used to measure the equilibrium constants and various phase equilibria involved in the carbon dioxide--carbamate system. The investigation of the explicit method of total isotope effect has made progress. A satisfactory approximation was found for the classical partition function of a Morse oscillator. The method gives a reasonable result at rho identical with /sup 1///sub 2/..sqrt..(u/sub e//x/sub e/) greater than 1.5. The medium cluster approach was applied to isotopic methanes to investigate the effects of intermolecular distance and mutual orientations of molecules in the liquid upon vapor pressure isotope effect. It was found that all geometrical effects studied tend to vanish as the size of clusters is increased. Isotope effect in the zero-point energy shifts on condensation was calculated on the basis of London dispersion forces in liquid and a semi-empirical molecular orbital theory, and was favorably compared with experimental results. (auth)

  17. Isotope effects in the evaporation of water: a status report of the Craig-Gordon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Juske; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Cohen, Shabtai

    2008-03-01

    The Craig-Gordon model (C-G model) [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen 18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperatures, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] has been synonymous with the isotope effects associated with the evaporation of water from surface waters, soils, and vegetations, which in turn constitutes a critical component of the global water cycle. On the occasion of the four decades of its successful applications to isotope geochemistry and hydrology, an attempt is made to: (a) examine its physical background within the framework of modern evaporation models, (b) evaluate our current knowledge of the environmental parameters of the C-G model, and (c) comment on a general strategy for the use of these parameters in field applications. Despite its simplistic representation of evaporation processes at the water-air interface, the C-G model appears to be adequate to provide the isotopic composition of the evaporation flux. This is largely due to its nature for representing isotopic compositions (a ratio of two fluxes of different isotopic water molecules) under the same environmental conditions. Among many environmental parameters that are included in the C-G model, accurate description and calculations are still problematic of the kinetic isotope effects that occur in a diffusion-dominated thin layer of air next to the water-air interface. In field applications, it is of importance to accurately evaluate several environmental parameters, particularly the relative humidity and isotopic compositions of the 'free-atmosphere', for a system under investigation over a given time-scale of interest (e.g., hourly to daily to seasonally). With a growing interest in the studies of water cycles of different spatial and temporal scales, including paleoclimate and water resource studies, the importance and utility of the C-G model is also likely to

  18. Chemical Ligation and Isotope Labeling to Locate Dynamic Effects during Catalysis by Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Louis Y P; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Adesina, Aduragbemi S; Loveridge, E Joel; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vincent; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2015-07-27

    Chemical ligation has been used to alter motions in specific regions of dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli and to investigate the effects of localized motional changes on enzyme catalysis. Two isotopic hybrids were prepared; one with the mobile N-terminal segment containing heavy isotopes ((2) H, (13) C, (15) N) and the remainder of the protein with natural isotopic abundance, and the other one with only the C-terminal segment isotopically labeled. Kinetic investigations indicated that isotopic substitution of the N-terminal segment affected only a physical step of catalysis, whereas the enzyme chemistry was affected by protein motions from the C-terminal segment. QM/MM studies support the idea that dynamic effects on catalysis mostly originate from the C-terminal segment. The use of isotope hybrids provides insights into the microscopic mechanism of dynamic coupling, which is difficult to obtain with other studies, and helps define the dynamic networks of intramolecular interactions central to enzyme catalysis.

  19. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury is long known as a common environmental contaminant. In methylated form it is even more toxic and the methylation process is facilitated by microbial activities. Methyl mercury easily crosses cell membrane and accumulates in soft tissues of fishes and finally biomagnifies with increasing trophic levels. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of mercury have been reported and such variations have emphasized mass dependent fractionations, while theory and laboratory experiments indicate that mass-independent isotopic fractionation (MIF) effects are likely to be found as well. This study focuses on the MIF of mercury isotopes in the soft tissues of fishes. Samples include both fresh water and marine fish, from different continents and oceans. Approximately 1 gm of fish soft tissue was dissolved in 5 ml of conc. aqua regia for 24 hrs and filtered through a ¬¬¬100 μm filter paper and diluted with DI water. Hg is measured as a gaseous phase generated by reduction of the sample with SnCl2 in a continuous- flow cold-vapor generator connected to a Thermo-Finnigan Neptune MC-ICPMS. To minimize instrumental fractionation isotope ratios were measured by sample standard bracketing and reported as δ‰ relative to NIST SRM 3133 Hg standard where δAHg = [(A Hg/202Hg)sample/(A Hg/202Hg)NIST313] -1 ×1000‰. In this study we have measured the isotope ratios 198Hg/202Hg, 199Hg/202Hg, 200Hg/202Hg, 201Hg/202Hg and 204Hg/202Hg. In all the fish samples δ198Hg, δ200Hg, δ202Hg, δ204Hg define a mass- dependent fractionation sequence, where as the δ199Hg and δ201Hg depart from the mass- dependent fractionation line and indicate an excess of the odd-N isotopes. The magnitude of the deviation (ΔAHg where A=199 or 201) as obtained by difference between the measured δ199Hg and δ201Hg of the samples and the value obtained by linear scaling defined by the even-N isotopes ranges from approximately 0.2 ‰ to 3‰. The ratios of Δ199Hg /Δ201Hg range from 0.8 to 1

  20. Chlorine isotope effects from isotope ratio mass spectrometry suggest intramolecular C-Cl bond competition in trichloroethene (TCE) reductive dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretnik, Stefan; Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Löffler, Frank; Elsner, Martin

    2014-05-20

    Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE) dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i) of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii) of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were -19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE) and -12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE) (95% confidence intervals). Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (-5.0‰ ± 0.1‰) and TCE (-3.6‰ ± 0.2‰). In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by -16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error)) than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of -2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of -6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals). A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect). These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition). This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I) or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  1. Chlorine Isotope Effects from Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Suggest Intramolecular C-Cl Bond Competition in Trichloroethene (TCE Reductive Dehalogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Cretnik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (biochemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i of tetrachloroethene (PCE to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were −19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE and −12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE (95% confidence intervals. Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (−5.0‰ ± 0.1‰ and TCE (−3.6‰ ± 0.2‰. In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by −16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of −2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of −6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals. A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect. These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition. This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  2. Isotope effect in tunnelling ionization of neutral hydrogen molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Hu, B T; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates (O.I. Tolstikhin, H.J. Worner and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013) [1]). We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  3. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Hu, B. T.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2 . The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  4. Structural isotope effects in metal hydrides and deuterides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Valeska P; Henry, Paul F; Kohlmann, Holger; Wilson, Chick C; Weller, Mark T

    2010-03-07

    Historically the extraction of high-quality crystallographic information from inorganic samples having high hydrogen contents, such as metal hydrides, has involved preparing deuterated samples prior to study using neutron powder diffraction. We demonstrate, through direct comparison of the crystal structure refinements of the binary hydrides SrH(2) and BaH(2) with their deuteride analogues at 2 K and as a function of temperature, that precise and accurate structural information can be obtained from rapid data collections from samples containing in excess of 60 at.% hydrogen using modern high-flux, medium resolution, continuous wavelength neutron powder diffraction instruments. Furthermore, observed isotope-effects in the extracted lattice parameters and atomic positions illustrate the importance of investigating compounds in their natural hydrogenous form whenever possible.

  5. Impact of deep convection on the isotopic amount effect in tropical precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharammal, Thejna; Bala, Govindasamy; Noone, David

    2017-02-01

    The empirical "amount effect" observed in the distribution of stable water isotope ratios in tropical precipitation is used in several studies to reconstruct past precipitation. Recent observations suggest the importance of large-scale organized convection systems on amount effect. With a series of experiments with Community Atmospheric Model version 3.0 with water isotope tracers, we quantify the sensitivity of amount effect to changes in modeled deep convection. The magnitude of the regression slope between long-term monthly precipitation amount and isotope ratios in precipitation over tropical ocean reduces by more than 20% with a reduction in mean deep convective precipitation by about 60%, indicating a decline in fractionation efficiency. Reduced condensation in deep convective updrafts results in enrichment of lower level vapor with heavier isotope that causes enrichment in total precipitation. However, consequent increases in stratiform and shallow convective precipitation partially offset the reduction in the slope of amount effect. The net result is a reduced slope of amount effect in tropical regions except the tropical western Pacific, where the effects of enhanced large-scale ascent and increased stratiform precipitation prevail over the influence of reduced deep convection. We also find that the isotope ratios in precipitation are improved over certain regions in the tropics with reduced deep convection, showing that analyses of isotope ratios in precipitation and water vapor are powerful tools to improve precipitation processes in convective parameterization schemes in climate models. Further, our study suggests that the precipitation types over a region can alter the fractionation efficiency of isotopes with implications for the reconstructions of past precipitation.

  6. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  7. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  8. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE's) have been determined for the reaction of methyl iodide with a series of reducing agents. Reagents which transfer hydride ion in an SN2 reaction show small inverse or small normal KIE's. Reagents which transfer an electron to methyl iodide to produce...

  9. Predictive Framework and Experimental Tests of the Kinetic Isotope Effect at Redox-Active Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavner, A.; John, S.; Black, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Electrochemical reactions provide a compelling framework to study kinetic isotope effects because redox-related processes are important for a wide variety of geological and environmental processes. In the laboratory, electrochemical reaction rates can be electronically controlled and measured in the laboratory using a potentiostat. This enables variation of redox reactions rates independent of changes in chemistry and, and the resulting isotope compositions of reactants and products can be separated and analyzed. In the past years, a series of experimental studies have demonstrated a large, light, and tunable kinetic isotope effect during electrodeposition of metal Fe, Zn, Li, Cu, and Mo from a variety of solutions (e.g. Black et al., 2009, 2010, 2011). A theoretical framework based on Marcus kinetic theory predicts a voltage-dependent kinetic isotope effect (Kavner et al., 2005, 2008), however while this framework was able to predict the tunable nature of the effect, it was not able to simultaneously predict absolute reaction rates and relative isotope rates. Here we present a more complete development of a statistical mechanical framework for simple interfacial redox reactions, which includes isotopic behavior. The framework is able to predict a kinetic isotope effect as a function of temperature and reaction rate, starting with three input parameters: a single reorganization energy which describes the overall kinetics of the electron transfer reaction, and the equilibrium reduced partition function ratios for heavy and light isotopes in the product and reactant phases. We show the framework, elucidate some of the predictions, and show direct comparisons against isotope fractionation data obtained during laboratory and natural environment redox processes. A. Kavner, A. Shahar, F. Bonet, J. Simon and E. Young (2005) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 69(12), 2971-2979. A. Kavner, S. G. John, S. Sass, and E. A. Boyle (2008), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, vol 72, pp. 1731

  10. Structure of potassium isotopes studied with collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082445

    By exploring the structure of different nuclei, one can learn about the interaction between the nucleons, their building blocks. In this field of research, there is a strong interplay between experiment and theory. In particular, theory has a crucial role in the interpretation of the experimental results, while new experimental results provide testing ground and directions for theorists. In the light- and mid-mass regions of the nuclear chart, the shell model is very successful and widely used for calculations of the ground- as well as excited- states properties. It is based on associated larger energy gaps between single particle energy levels for isotopes with certain proton (Z) and neutron (N) numbers, which are called "magic numbers". It was believed that these numbers (8, 20, 28, ...) are preserved for all nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. However, during the last decades studies of the isotopes with an unbalanced number of protons and neutrons revealed that in these isotopes the shell gaps could chan...

  11. Ageing and structural effects on the sorption characteristics of Cd2+ by clinoptilolite and Y-type zeolite studied using isotope exchange technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, I A M; Young, S D; Crout, N M J

    2010-12-15

    This research investigates the long-term kinetics of Cd(2+) sorption and desorption by calcium-exchanged clinoptilolite (CaCpt) and Y-type (CaY) zeolite using isotopic exchange with (109)Cd while maintaining pH at circumneutral values. The effects of Si/Al ratio and crystal structure of these zeolitic materials on intracrystalline transport of Cd are discussed. A first-order kinetic model was developed to describe the progressive transfer of Cd(2+) to a less reactive form within the zeolite structure, following initial sorption and subsequent desorption of Cd subject to different initial contact times. The kinetic model differentiates between two forms of sorbed Cd(2+) designated 'labile' and 'non-labile' in which the labile form is in immediate equilibrium with the free Cd(2+) ion activity in solution. A model combining diffusion and first-order kinetics for cation exchange was also employed to determine Cd(2+) diffusivity and intracrystalline exchange rates in CaY and CaCpt. The efficiency of Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) containing zeolitic materials in protecting water systems against lateral flow of metal-contaminated leachate was simulated for three contrasting zeolites. The slow transfer of Cd between labile and non-labile forms was particularly important in moderating high concentration pulses of Cd traversing the PRB. In addition, the reversibility of Cd fixation effectively restored the sorption capability of the zeolite through slow leakage to drainage water.

  12. Magnetic isotope effect on kinetic parameters and quantum beats of radical pairs in micellar solution studied by optically detected esr using pulsed microwave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahama, Yasutaka; Sakaguchi, Yoshio

    2008-01-17

    We investigated the quantum beats, the oscillation between singlet and triplet states of radical pairs induced by the microwave field resonant to one of the component radicals. They were observed as the alternation of the yields of the component radicals by a nanosecond time-resolved optical absorption with the X-band (9.15 GHz) resonant microwave pulse. This technique was applied to the photochemical reaction of benzophenone, benzophenone-d(10), and benzophenone-carbonyl-(13)C in a sodium dodecylsulfate micellar solution with a step-by-step increase of the resonant microwave pulse width. The yields of the component radicals showed alternation with an increase of the microwave pulse width. This indicates that the radical pair retains spin coherence in the micellar solution. The magnetic isotope effect on the amplitude of the quantum beat was observed. The MW effect on the quantum beat of BP-(13)C decreases from 80% to 60% of that of BP by irradiation of the pi-pulse MW due to spin-locking. The kinetic parameters were also determined using the X- or Ku-band (17.44 GHz) region. They are almost similar to each other except for the intersystem recombination rate in the system of BP-(13)C, which may be slightly higher than those in other systems.

  13. Isotope studies of fossil bones of Pleistocene Yakut horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Di Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-conserved carcasses of ancient large mammals can be found in permafrost of North-eastern Siberia. Mummified remains of ancient horses are rather rare ones. Complex stable isotope studies of 5 mummies and several horses’ bones from Northern Yakutia were carried out. Results obtained testify to possibility to use carbon isotope composition of hydroxylapatite carbonate from horses’ bones as palaeoclimatic indicator. It was determined relative (warmer or cooler, more dry or humid environmental conditions during our horses’ lives. Preliminary data allow us to suppose that in Late Pleistocene lived in similar landscapes as well in Yakutia as Western Europe.

  14. Mechanistic studies of sesquiterpene cyclases based on their carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenhua; Bartram, Stefan; Boland, Wilhelm

    2017-01-03

    During the process of terpene biosynthesis, C-C bond breaking and forming steps are subjected to kinetic carbon isotope effects, leading to distinct carbon isotopic signatures of the products. Accordingly, carbon isotopic signatures could be used to reveal the 'biosynthetic history' of the produced terpenoids. Five known sesquiterpene cyclases, regulating three different pathways, representing simple to complex biosynthetic sequences, were heterologously expressed and used for in vitro assays with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate. Compound specific isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements of the enzyme substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) and the products of all the five cyclases were performed. The calculated δ(13) C value for FDP, based on δ(13) C values and relative amounts of the products, was identical with its measured δ(13) C value, confirming the reliability of the approach and the precision of measurements. The different carbon isotope ratios of the products reflect the complexity of their structure and are correlated with the frequency of carbon-carbon bond forming and breaking steps on their individual biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the analysis of carbon isotopic signatures of terpenes at natural abundance can be used as a powerful tool in elucidation of associated biosynthetic mechanisms of terpene synthases and in future in vivo studies even without 'touching' the plant. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Paul J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trumbore, Susan [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Swanston, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Torn, Margaret [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jastrow, Julie [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Parton, William A [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Century Ecosystems, Inc. (United States); Post, Wilfred M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Froberg, Mats J [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hainsworth, Laura J [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kleber, Markus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kramer, Christiane [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Matamala-Paradeda, Roser [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Garten, Jr, Charles T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-02-05

    A unique, large release of radiocarbon occurred near the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, TN in July/August 1999. Measurements of 14C in tree ring cellulose throughout the ORR area demonstrate that the 1999 release was unprecedented in its uptake by vegetation. We are taking advantage of the whole-ecosystem isotopic label generated by this release to address five outstanding issues in the terrestrial carbon cycle: (1) partitioning of soil respiration between autotrophic and heterotrophic sources, and quantification of that partitioning seasonally and inter-annually, (2) partitioning of heterotrophic respiration sources between above-ground litter decomposition and below-ground root detritus decomposition, (3) identification of pathways leading from leaf and root detritus to long-term stabilization of soil organic matter, including the role of soil fauna, (4) the role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport in distributing carbon within the soil profile, and, (5) the longevity and turnover time of fine roots. The first four issues are being addressed through a reciprocal litter transplant experiment set up at four sites on the ORR encompassing two soil types and two levels of 14C exposure in 1999. The fifth issue, longevity and turnover of fine roots, is being addressed by tracing the radiocarbon label through the fine root pool over time. With a combination of incubation, soil surface chamber and soil CO2 profiles, and continuous measurements of soil temperature and moisture controls, we are tracking changes in soil respiration partitioning over several years. The nature and source of organic matter pools that reside in soils for years to decades are being tracked with differently labeled root and surface litter, and experiments to exclude soil fauna have been initiated to elucidate their role in vertical transport. Periodic sampling of soils and soil solutions and the use of inert tracers, allow us to investigate the chemical nature and form of DOC and

  16. Kinetic isotope effects for fast deuterium and proton exchange rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, Estel; Mammoli, Daniele; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-04-21

    By monitoring the effect of deuterium decoupling on the decay of transverse (15)N magnetization in D-(15)N spin pairs during multiple-refocusing echo sequences, we have determined fast D-D exchange rates kD and compared them with fast H-H exchange rates kH in tryptophan to determine the kinetic isotope effect as a function of pH and temperature.

  17. The influence of anharmonic phonons on the isotope effect in high-{Tc} oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, V.H.; Cohen, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Anharmonic phonons are examined to study the unusual isotope effect exponents for the high-{Tc} oxides. Within a simple model of anharmonicity, the mass dependences of the electron-phonon coupling constant {lambda} and the phonon frequency determine the isotope effect exponent {alpha} as a function of coupling strength. A model in which the outer wells of a multiple-well potential deepen as the orthorhombic/low temperature tetragonal phase transition in La{sub 2-x}M{sub x}CuO{sub 4} is approached is consistent with some experimentally observed variations in {Tc} and {alpha}. 10 refs.

  18. The influence of anharmonic phonons on the isotope effect in high- Tc oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, V.H.; Cohen, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Anharmonic phonons are examined to study the unusual isotope effect exponents for the high-{Tc} oxides. Within a simple model of anharmonicity, the mass dependences of the electron-phonon coupling constant {lambda} and the phonon frequency determine the isotope effect exponent {alpha} as a function of coupling strength. A model in which the outer wells of a multiple-well potential deepen as the orthorhombic/low temperature tetragonal phase transition in La{sub 2-x}M{sub x}CuO{sub 4} is approached is consistent with some experimentally observed variations in {Tc} and {alpha}. 10 refs.

  19. Ageing and structural effects on the sorption characteristics of Cd{sup 2+} by clinoptilolite and Y-type zeolite studied using isotope exchange technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, I.A.M., E-mail: i.ahmed@lancaster.ac.uk [School of Biosciences, Division of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Young, S.D.; Crout, N.M.J. [School of Biosciences, Division of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    This research investigates the long-term kinetics of Cd{sup 2+} sorption and desorption by calcium-exchanged clinoptilolite (CaCpt) and Y-type (CaY) zeolite using isotopic exchange with {sup 109}Cd while maintaining pH at circumneutral values. The effects of Si/Al ratio and crystal structure of these zeolitic materials on intracrystalline transport of Cd are discussed. A first-order kinetic model was developed to describe the progressive transfer of Cd{sup 2+} to a less reactive form within the zeolite structure, following initial sorption and subsequent desorption of Cd subject to different initial contact times. The kinetic model differentiates between two forms of sorbed Cd{sup 2+} designated 'labile' and 'non-labile' in which the labile form is in immediate equilibrium with the free Cd{sup 2+} ion activity in solution. A model combining diffusion and first-order kinetics for cation exchange was also employed to determine Cd{sup 2+} diffusivity and intracrystalline exchange rates in CaY and CaCpt. The efficiency of Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) containing zeolitic materials in protecting water systems against lateral flow of metal-contaminated leachate was simulated for three contrasting zeolites. The slow transfer of Cd between labile and non-labile forms was particularly important in moderating high concentration pulses of Cd traversing the PRB. In addition, the reversibility of Cd fixation effectively restored the sorption capability of the zeolite through slow leakage to drainage water.

  20. ISOTOPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    1 A New Therapeutic Agent for Radiation Synovectomy: Preparation of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA Bai Hongsheng Jin Xiaohai Du Jin Wang Fan Chen Daming Fan Hongqiang Cheng Zhen In order to treat the patient with inflammatory synovial disease, HA particle is labeled with 166Ho by EDTMP under the condition of pH6.0-8.0 and vibration time 15 min, its labeling efficiency is more than 98%, the size of particle is mainly in the range of 2-5 μm. The absorbed capacity is 5 mg Ho per 1g HA. Study on stability of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA in vitro shows that loss of 166Ho is less than 2% for166Ho-EDTMP-HA incubated 72 h in the 0.9% saline and 1% BSA solution at 37 ℃ .Biodistribution in vivo and extra articular leakage are investigated following injection of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA into knee of normal rabbits. The experimental results show that the extra leakage of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA is 0.32% at 48 h post-injection, most of 166Ho radioactivity leaked from the knee joint is excreted in the urine. 99% of 166Ho radioactivity is retained in the knee joint of rabbits. Thereby 166Ho-EDTMP-HA, as a new therapeutical agent of radiation synovectomy, had a value of further clinical study.

  1. VAPOR PRESSURE ISOTOPE EFFECTS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL TRITIUM SAMPLES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhne, W.

    2012-12-03

    Standard procedures for the measurement of tritium in water samples often require distillation of an appropriate sample aliquot. This distillation process may result in a fractionation of tritiated water and regular light water due to the vapor pressure isotope effect, introducing either a bias or an additional contribution to the total tritium measurement uncertainty. The magnitude of the vapor pressure isotope effect is characterized as functions of the amount of water distilled from the sample aliquot and the heat settings for the distillation process. The tritium concentration in the distillate is higher than the tritium concentration in the sample early in the distillation process, it then sharply decreases due to the vapor pressure isotope effect and becomes lower than the tritium concentration in the sample, until the high tritium concentration retained in the boiling flask is evaporated at the end of the process. At that time, the tritium concentration in the distillate again overestimates the sample tritium concentration. The vapor pressure isotope effect is more pronounced the slower the evaporation and distillation process is conducted; a lower heat setting during the evaporation of the sample results in a larger bias in the tritium measurement. The experimental setup used and the fact that the current study allowed for an investigation of the relative change in vapor pressure isotope effect in the course of the distillation process distinguish it from and extend previously published measurements. The separation factor as a quantitative measure of the vapor pressure isotope effect is found to assume values of 1.034 {+-} 0.033, 1.052 {+-} 0.025, and 1.066 {+-} 0.037, depending on the vigor of the boiling process during distillation of the sample. A lower heat setting in the experimental setup, and therefore a less vigorous boiling process, results in a larger value for the separation factor. For a tritium measurement in water samples, this implies that

  2. Dynamical barrier and isotope effects in the simplest substitution reaction via Walden inversion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhaojun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H

    2017-02-22

    Reactions occurring at a carbon atom through the Walden inversion mechanism are one of the most important and useful classes of reactions in chemistry. Here we report an accurate theoretical study of the simplest reaction of that type: the H+CH4 substitution reaction and its isotope analogues. It is found that the reaction threshold versus collision energy is considerably higher than the barrier height. The reaction exhibits a strong normal secondary isotope effect on the cross-sections measured above the reaction threshold, and a small but reverse secondary kinetic isotope effect at room temperature. Detailed analysis reveals that the reaction proceeds along a path with a higher barrier height instead of the minimum-energy path because the umbrella angle of the non-reacting methyl group cannot change synchronously with the other reaction coordinates during the reaction due to insufficient energy transfer from the translational motion to the umbrella mode.

  3. Improved energy confinement with nonlinear isotope effects in magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, J; Jenko, F

    2016-01-01

    The efficient production of electricity from nuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas relies on a good confinement of the thermal energy. For more than thirty years, the observation that such confinement depends on the mass of the plasma isotope and its interaction with apparently unrelated plasma conditions has remained largely unexplained and it has become one of the main unsolved issues. By means of numerical studies based on the gyrokinetic theory, we quantitatively show how the plasma microturbulence depends on the isotope mass through nonlinear multiscale microturbulence effects involving the interplay between zonal flows, electromagnetic effects and the torque applied. This finding has crucial consequences for the design of future reactors since, in spite of the fact that they will be composed by multiple ion species, their extrapolation from present day experiments heavily relies on the knowledge obtained from a long experimental tradition based in single isotope plasmas.

  4. Arrhenius curves of hydrogen transfers: tunnel effects, isotope effects and effects of pre-equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Miguel Lopez, Juan; Kohen, Amnon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the Arrhenius curves of selected hydrogen-transfer reactions for which kinetic data are available in a large temperature range are reviewed. The curves are discussed in terms of the one-dimensional Bell–Limbach tunnelling model. The main parameters of this model are the barrier heights of the isotopic reactions, barrier width of the H-reaction, tunnelling masses, pre-exponential factor and minimum energy for tunnelling to occur. The model allows one to compare different reactions in a simple way and prepare the kinetic data for more-dimensional treatments. The first type of reactions is concerned with reactions where the geometries of the reacting molecules are well established and the kinetic data of the isotopic reactions are available in a large temperature range. Here, it is possible to study the relation between kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and chemical structure. Examples are the tautomerism of porphyrin, the porphyrin anion and related compounds exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds of medium strength. We observe pre-exponential factors of the order of kT/h≅1013 s−1 corresponding to vanishing activation entropies in terms of transition state theory. This result is important for the second type of reactions discussed in this paper, referring mostly to liquid solutions. Here, the reacting molecular configurations may be involved in equilibria with non- or less-reactive forms. Several cases are discussed, where the less-reactive forms dominate at low or at high temperature, leading to unusual Arrhenius curves. These cases include examples from small molecule solution chemistry like the base-catalysed intramolecular H-transfer in diaryltriazene, 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole, 2-hydroxy-phenoxyl radicals, as well as in the case of an enzymatic system, thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case, temperature-dependent KIEs are interpreted in terms of a transition between two regimes with different temperature

  5. Isotope Effects in Low Energy Ion-Atom Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Seely, D. G. [Albion College; Thomas, J. D. [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Kvale, Thomas Jay [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH

    2009-01-01

    Isotope effects for charge transfer processes have recently received increased attention. The ion-atom merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to measure charge transfer for low energy collisions of multi-charged ions with H and D and is therefore well suited to investigate isotope effects. The apparatus has been relocated and upgraded to accept high velocity beams from the 250 kV High Voltage Platform at the Multi-Charged Ion Research Facility. The intense higher velocity multi-charged ion beams allow, for the first time, measurements with both H and D from keV/u down to meV/u collision energies in the center-of-mass frame. When charge transfer occurs at relatively large inter-nuclear distances (via radial couplings) the ion-induced dipole attraction can lead to trajectory effects, causing differences in the charge transfer cross sections for H and D. A strong isotope effect (nearly a factor of two) has been observed in the cross section for Si4+ + H(D) below 0.1 eV/u. However, little or no difference is observed for N2+ + H(D). Recently, strong effects have been predicted for the fundamental system He2+ + H(D,T) at collision energies below 200 eV/u where charge transfer occurs primarily through united-atom rotational coupling. We are currently exploring systems where rotational coupling is important and isotopic differences in the cross section can be observed.

  6. Determination of Kinetic Isotope Effects in Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Using Transition Path Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Matthew; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The experimental determination of kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic systems can be a difficult, time-consuming, and expensive process. In this study, we use the Chandler-Bolhius method for the determination of reaction rates within transition path sampling (rTPS) to determine the primary kinetic isotope effect in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). In this study, normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) was applied to the transferring hydride/deuteride in order to correctly incorporate quantum effects into the molecular simulations. Though previous studies have used rTPS to calculate reaction rate constants in various model and real systems, it has not been applied to a system as large as YADH. Due to the fact that particle transfer is not wholly indicative of the chemical step, this method cannot be used to determine reaction rate constants in YADH. However, it is possible to determine the transition rate constant of the particle transfer, and the kinetic isotope effect of that step. This method provides a set of tools to determine kinetic isotope effects with the atomistic detail of molecular simulations.

  7. Anharmonicity effects in impurity-vacancy centers in diamond revealed by isotopic shifts and optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekimov, E. A.; Krivobok, V. S.; Lyapin, S. G.; Sherin, P. S.; Gavva, V. A.; Kondrin, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    We studied isotopically enriched nano- and microdiamonds with optically active GeV- centers synthesized at high pressures and high temperatures in nonmetallic growth systems. The influence of isotopic composition on optical properties has been thoroughly investigated by photoluminescence-excitation (PLE) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to get insight into the nature and electronic structure of this color center. We have demonstrated that the large frequency defect (difference between oscillation frequencies in the ground and excited electronic states) does bring about large discrepancy between PLE and PL spectra and comparatively high isotopic shift of the zero phonon line. Both effects seem to be rather common to split-vacancy centers (for example SiV-), where the frequency defect reaches record high values. Isotopic substitution of carbon atoms in the diamond lattice results in even larger shifts, which are only partially accounted for by a redistribution of electron density caused by the volume change of the diamond lattice. It was shown that the vibronic frequency in this case does not depend on the mass of carbon atoms. The greatest part of this isotopic shift is due to anharmonicity effects, which constitute a substantial part of vibronic frequency observed in this center. The exact physical mechanism, which leads to significant enhancement of anharmonicity on substitution of 12C to 13C, is yet to be clarified.

  8. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O.; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    2001-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K-1 mol(-1...

  9. Isotope effects in a multicusp tandem ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, W.G. (Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (Northern Ireland))

    1992-10-05

    Measurements of plasma parameters, including electron density, electron energy distribution function (eedf), and negative ion density, have been made in the driver and extractor regions of a multicusp tandem ion source. Here results which focus on comparing operation in hydrogen and deuterium are presented. Several isotope effects are evident. In particular, for the same operating conditions, the electron density is found to be higher in deuterium than in hydrogen while the negative ion density is consistently lower.

  10. Large-scale shell-model study of the Sn isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osnes Eivind

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the results of an extensive study of the structure of the Sn isotopes using a large shell-model space and effective interactions evaluated from realistic two-nucleon potentials. For a fuller account, see ref. [1].

  11. Isotope Fractionation in Methane Reactions Studied by Gas Chromatography and Liquid Scintillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bertel Lohmann; Bidoglio, G.; Leip, A.

    1997-01-01

    Determination of C-14-marked methane by gas chromatography and liquid scintillation counting is shown to be useful in studies of isotope effects. Data on the specific activity is used to separate the contributions of (CH4)-C-14, and (CH4)-C-12 to the gas-chromatographic peak area. As an application...

  12. Mechanistic investigations of the hydrolysis of amides, oxoesters and thioesters via kinetic isotope effects and positional isotope exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lori I; Fogle, Emily J; Marlier, John F

    2015-11-01

    The hydrolysis of amides, oxoesters and thioesters is an important reaction in both organic chemistry and biochemistry. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are one of the most important physical organic methods for determining the most likely transition state structure and rate-determining step of these reaction mechanisms. This method induces a very small change in reaction rates, which, in turn, results in a minimum disturbance of the natural mechanism. KIE studies were carried out on both the non-enzymatic and the enzyme-catalyzed reactions in an effort to compare both types of mechanisms. In these studies the amides and esters of formic acid were chosen because this molecular structure allowed development of methodology to determine heavy-atom solvent (nucleophile) KIEs. This type of isotope effect is difficult to measure, but is rich in mechanistic information. Results of these investigations point to transition states with varying degrees of tetrahedral character that fit a classical stepwise mechanism. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of interband interaction on isotope effect exponent of MgB2 superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Udomsamuthirun; C Kumvongsa; A Burakorn; P Changkanarth

    2006-03-01

    The exact formula of c's equation and the isotope effect exponent of two-band s-wave superconductors in the weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of interband interaction. In each band, our model consists of two pairing interactions: the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction. We find that the isotope effect exponent of MgB2, = 0.3 with c ≈ 40 K can be found in the weak coupling regime and interband interaction of electron-phonon shows more effect on the isotope effect exponent than on the interband interaction of non-phonon.

  14. Isotopic effects in the neon fixed point: uncertainty of the calibration data correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steur, Peter P. M.; Pavese, Franco; Fellmuth, Bernd; Hermier, Yves; Hill, Kenneth D.; Seog Kim, Jin; Lipinski, Leszek; Nagao, Keisuke; Nakano, Tohru; Peruzzi, Andrea; Sparasci, Fernando; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, Anna; Tamura, Osamu; Tew, Weston L.; Valkiers, Staf; van Geel, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The neon triple point is one of the defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). Although recognizing that natural neon is a mixture of isotopes, the ITS-90 definition only states that the neon should be of ‘natural isotopic composition’, without any further requirements. A preliminary study in 2005 indicated that most of the observed variability in the realized neon triple point temperatures within a range of about 0.5 mK can be attributed to the variability in isotopic composition among different samples of ‘natural’ neon. Based on the results of an International Project (EUROMET Project No. 770), the Consultative Committee for Thermometry decided to improve the realization of the neon fixed point by assigning the ITS-90 temperature value 24.5561 K to neon with the isotopic composition recommended by IUPAC, accompanied by a quadratic equation to take the deviations from the reference composition into account. In this paper, the uncertainties of the equation are discussed and an uncertainty budget is presented. The resulting standard uncertainty due to the isotopic effect (k = 1) after correction of the calibration data is reduced to (4 to 40) μK when using neon of ‘natural’ isotopic composition or to 30 μK when using 20Ne. For comparison, an uncertainty component of 0.15 mK should be included in the uncertainty budget for the neon triple point if the isotopic composition is unknown, i.e. whenever the correction cannot be applied.

  15. A Distinct Magnetic Isotope Effect Measured in Atmospheric Mercury in Epiphytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    Due to the importance of Mercury as an environmental contaminant, mercury cycling in the atmosphere has been extensively studied. However, there still remain uncertainties in the relative amounts of natural and anthropogenic emissions, atmospheric deposition rates as well as the spatial variation of atmospheric mercury. Part of a study to determine the isotopic composition of mercury deposited from the atmosphere has involved the use of epiphytes as monitors. The greatest advantage of such natural monitors is that a widespread, high-density network is possible at low cost. One of the disadvantages at present is that these monitors likely contain different mercury species (for example both gaseous, elemental mercury trapped by adsorption and Hg (II) by wet deposition). The project began with the understanding that biochemical reactions involving metallothioneins within the epiphytes might have produced an isotopic effect. One such regional network was composed of samples of Tillandsia usenoides (common name: Spanish moss) collected along the eastern Coastal Plain of the U.S. from northern Florida to North Carolina. The isotopic composition of a sample is expressed as permil deviations from a standard. The deviations are defined as δAHg = \\left(\\frac{Rsample}{Rstd}-1 \\right)1000 ‰ , where A represents the atomic mass number. R=\\frac{AHg}{202Hg} were measured for the isotopes 198Hg, 199Hg, 200Hg, 201Hg, 202Hg and 204Hg relative to the mercury standard SRM NIST 3133, by a standard-sample bracketing technique. For all samples, the delta values of the even-N plotted against atomic mass numbers define a linear curve. For the odd-N isotopes, δ199Hg and δ201Hg deviate from this mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) relationship and indicate a mass-independent fractionation (MIF) effect and a negative anomaly, i.e. a depletion in 199Hg and 201Hg relative to the even-N isotopes. These deviations are expressed as Δ199Hg = δ199Hgtotal - δ199HgMDF. A Δ201Hg/Δ199Hg

  16. The effect of small scale variablity in isotopic composition of precipitation on hydrograph separation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Benjamin; van Meerveld, Ilja; Seibert, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Understanding runoff processes is important for predictions of streamflow quantity and quality. The two-component isotope hydrograph separation (IHS) method is a valuable tool to study how catchments transform rainfall into runoff. IHS allows the stormflow hydrograph to be separated into rainfall (event water) and water that was stored in the catchment before the event (pre-event water). To be able to perform an IHS, water samples of baseflow (pre-event water) and stormflow are collected at the stream outlet. Rainfall is usually collected at one location by hand as an event total or sampled sequentially during the event. It is usually assumed that the spatial variability in rainfall and the isotopic composition of rainfall are negligible for small (area of 0.15, 0.23, and 0.7 km2). The isotopic composition of rainfall and streamflow were sampled for 10 different rain events (P: 5 mm intervals, Q: 12 to 51 samples per events). This dataset was used to perform a two-component isotope hydrograph separation. The results show that for some events the spatial variability in total rainfall, mean and maximum rainfall intensity and stable isotope composition of rainfall was high. There was no relation between the stable isotope composition of rainfall and the rainfall sum, rainfall intensity or altitude. The spatial variability of the isotopic composition of rainfall was for 4 out of the 10 events as large as the temporal variability in the isotopic composition. Different rainfall weighing methods resulted in different minimum pre-event water fractions in streamflow. For small events with a small mean temporal range in stable isotope composition of rainfall, the different rainfall weighing methods had little effect on the calculated minimum pre-event water fractions. However with increasing temporal variability in stable isotope composition of rainfall, the range in the minimum pre-event water fractions increased and therefore the choice of the rainfall weighing method

  17. The Effect of Aerosol Formation on Stable Isotopes Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Thomas; Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua; Wold, Allison; Stern, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    The formation of large amounts of aerosol in Titan atmosphere induces a significant sink for carbon and nitrogen in the atmosphere. Due to the high complexity of the chemistry leading to aerosol formation, there may be isotopic fractionation along the formation pathways of the aerosol. So far several stable isotopes have been measured in Titan atmosphere including the 13C/12C, 15N/14N and D/H ratios for different gaseous species. However, the fractionation effect of the aerosol formation and its impact on atmospheric stable isotope ratios has yet to be fully understood. Two experimental studies were recently published on the stable carbon [1] and nitrogen [1,2] isotope fractionation during aerosol formation in N2-CH4 reactant mixture. To better constrain the fractionation effect of aerosol formation on the Titan atmosphere we have measured the isotopic fractionation induced in laboratory aerosol analogues produced exploring the space of parameters that are expected to have an effect on fractionation processes. Parameters studied include pressure and temperature of aerosol formation and the reactant gas phase composition, including the standard "Titan" mixture of CH4/N2 as well as other trace species such as benzene (C6H6).[1] Sebree, J.A., Stern, J.C., Mandt, K.E., Domagal-Goldman, S.D., and Trainer, M.G.: C and N Fractionation of CH /N Mixtures during Photochemical Aerosol Formation: Relevance to Titan, (2016) Icarus 270:421-428[2] Kuga, M., Carrasco, N., Marty, B., Marrochi, Y., Bernard, S., Rigaudier, T., Fleury, B., Tissandier, L.: Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles, (2014) EPSL 393:2-13

  18. Coulomb excitation of neutron-deficient polonium isotopes studied at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Neven, Michiel

    The polonium isotopes represent an interesting region of the nuclear chart having only two protons outside the Z = 82 closed shell. These isotopes have already been extensively studied theoretically and experimentally. The heavier isotopes (A > 200) seem to follow a "regular seniority-type regime" while for the lighter isotopes (A < 200) a more collective behavior is observed. Many questions remain regarding the transition between these two regimes and the configuration mixing between quantum states. Experiments in the lighter polonium isotopes point to the presence of shape coexistence, however the phenomenon is not fully understood. A Coulomb excitation study of the polonium isotopes whereby the dynamic properties are investigated can provide helpful insights in understanding the shape coexistence phenomena. In this thesis $^{202}$Po was studied via Coulomb excitation. The $^{202}$Po isotope was part of an experimental campaign in which the $^{196,198,200,206}$Po isotopes were studied as well via Coulomb...

  19. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (URUGUAY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  20. Isotopically modified nanoparticles for enhanced detection in bioaccumulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, S.K.; Dybowska, A.; Berhanu, D.; Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results on synthesis of isotopically enriched (99% 65Cu) copper oxide nanoparticles and its application in ecotoxicological studies. 65CuO nanoparticles were synthesized as spheres (7 nm) and rods (7 ?? 40 nm). Significant differences were observed between the reactivity and dissolution of spherical and rod shaped nanoparticles. The extreme sensitivity of the stable isotope tracing technique developed in this study allowed determining Cu uptake at exposure concentrations equivalent to background Cu concentrations in freshwater systems (0.2-30 ??g/L). Without a tracer, detection of newly accumulated Cu was impossible, even at exposure concentrations surpassing some of the most contaminated water systems (>1 mg/L). ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Isotopic Studies of O-O Bond Formation During Water Oxidation (SISGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Justine P. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-03-03

    Isotopic Studies of O-O Bond Formation During Water Oxidation (SISGR) Research during the project period focused primarily on mechanisms of water oxidation by structurally defined transition metal complexes. Competitive oxygen isotope fractionation of water, mediated by oxidized precursors or reduced catalysts together with ceric, Ce(IV), ammonium nitrate in aqueous media, afforded oxygen-18 kinetic isotope effects (O-18 KIEs). Measurement, calculation, and interpretation of O-18 KIEs, described in the accompanying report has important ramifications for the production of electricity and solar hydrogen (as fuel). The catalysis division of BES has acknowledged that understanding mechanisms of transition metal catalyzed water oxidation has major ramifications, potentially leading to transformation of the global economy and natural environment in years to come. Yet, because of program restructuring and decreased availability of funds, it was recommended that the Solar Photochemistry sub-division of BES would be a more appropriate parent program for support of continued research.

  2. Molybdenum Isotopic Composition of the Archean Mantle As Inferred from Studies of Komatiites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, N. D.; Puchtel, I. S.; Nagler, T. F.; Mezger, K.

    2014-12-01

    Molybdenum isotopic composition has been shown to be a powerful tool in studies of planetary processes, e.g. estimating core formation temperatures [1,2]. However, Mo isotope compositions of terrestrial reservoirs are not well constrained. In order to better constrain the Mo isotopic composition of the early Earth's mantle, komatiites from four locations were analyzed for their Mo concentrations and isotopic compositions. Komatiites are particularly appropriate for this type of study because they formed by high degrees of partial melting of the mantle leading to a complete base metal sulfide removal from the residual mantle and the production of sulfur-undersaturated melts and thus a quantitative removal of Mo from the source into the melt. All samples, except for two strongly altered specimens specifically chosen to study the effects of secondary alteration, are very fresh having preserved most of their primary mineralogy. The Mo concentrations in komatiites range from 10 to 120 ng/g. Fresh komatiites have lighter δ98Mo (NIST SRM 3134 = 0.25‰, [3]) than altered samples. The estimated primary Mo isotope compositions of the studied komatiite melts range from 0.02 ± 0.16‰ to 0.19 ± 0.14‰ and are therefore indistinguishable within analytical uncertainty (2SD) from published values for chondritic meteorites (0.09 ± 0.04 ‰; 2SD; [2]) and lighter than the proposed average for Earth's continental crust (0.3 to 0.4‰ [4]). All data combined, although overlapping in errors, show a consistent trend of lighter δ98Mo and lower Mo concentrations in more melt-depleted mantle sources, indicating incompatible behaviour of Mo and preferential mobilization of heavy Mo isotopes during mantle melting. [1] Hin et al. (2013) EPSL, 379 [2] Burkhardt et al. (2014) EPSL, 391 [3] Nägler, et al. (2014) GGR, 38. [4] Voegelin et al. (2014) Lithos, 190-191.

  3. A preliminary study of iron isotope fractionation in marine invertebrates (chitons, Mollusca) in near-shore environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, S.; Schuessler, J. A.; Vinther, J.; Matthews, A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2014-10-01

    Chitons (Mollusca) are marine invertebrates that produce radulae (teeth or rasping tongues) containing high concentrations of biomineralized magnetite and other iron-bearing minerals. As Fe isotope signatures are influenced by redox processes and biological fractionation, Fe isotopes in chiton radulae might be expected to provide an effective tracer of ambient oceanic conditions and biogeochemical cycling. Here, in a pilot study to measure Fe isotopes in marine invertebrates, we examine Fe isotopes in modern marine chiton radulae collected from different locations in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to assess the range of isotopic values, and to test whether or not the isotopic signatures reflect seawater values. Values of δ56Fe (relative to IRMM-014) in chiton teeth range from -1.90 to 0.00 ‰ (±0.05‰ (2σ) uncertainty in δ56Fe), probably reflecting a combination of geographical control and biological fractionation processes. Comparison with published local surface seawater Fe isotope data shows a consistent negative offset of chiton teeth Fe isotope compositions relative to seawater. Strikingly, two different species from the same locality in the North Pacific (Puget Sound, Washington, USA) have distinct isotopic signatures. Tonicella lineata, which feeds on red algae in the sublittoral zone, has a mean δ56Fe of -0.65 ± 0.26‰ (2σ, 3 specimens), while Mopalia muscosa, which feeds on both green and red algae in the eulittoral zone, shows lighter isotopic values with a mean δ56Fe of -1.47 ± 0.98‰ (2σ, 5 specimens). Three possible pathways are proposed to account for the different isotopic signatures: (i) physiologically controlled processes within the chitons that lead to species-dependent fractionation; (ii) diet-controlled variability due to different Fe isotope fractionation in the red and green algal food sources; and (iii) environmentally controlled fractionation that causes variation in the isotopic signatures of bioavailable Fe in the different

  4. Australis: AMS for ultra sensitive trace element and isotopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1993-12-31

    The accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) at the CSIRO HIAF laboratory is being upgraded to enable in-situ measurements of ultratraces and isotopic-ratios in mineralogical applications. The upgraded system will include a microbeam Cs ion source which is designed to produce better than 50 micrometre diameter Cs beam to enable analyses of monomineralic grains. The Cs primary beam will be mass analysed in order to minimize contamination of the sample. The detection system will be upgraded to enable analyses of elements up to U, at 2 MV terminal voltage for charge states 4 and 5. The system will be known as AUSTRALIS: A.M.S. for Ultra Sensitive TRAce eLement and Isotopic Studies. An overview of the system and the anticipated applications in minerals exploration and mining research are presented. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Effective boson number calculations in Mo and Cd isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cata, G.; Bucurescu, D.; Cutoiu, D.; Ivascu, M.; Zamfir, N.V. (Institutul Central de Fizica, Bucharest (Romania))

    1990-03-01

    The effects of the neutron-proton interaction on the low-lying levels of Mo and Cd isotopes have been considered in the frame of the IBA-1 model by taking into account an effective boson number (N{sub eff}). Both an empirical procedure based on previous IBA-2 mixing calculations and the N{sub p}N{sub n} scheme provide comparable N{sub eff} values. Level spectra and electromagnetic transitions are investigated. The results support the idea that IBA-1 calculations with a suitable N{sub eff} can largely simulate IBA-2 mixing calculations, taking advantage of simplicity and a smaller number of parameters. (orig.).

  6. Isotope effects in the non enzymic glycation of hemoglobin catalyzed by DPG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Herminia; Uzcategui, Jorge [Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela). Dept. de Quimica

    1993-12-31

    The paradigmatic reaction of glucose with hemoglobin (Hb A{sub o}) has been studied and is known to occur most rapidly at the N-terminal valine of the {beta}-subunit. An initial, rapid imine formation is succeeded by slower Amadori rearrangement. Non enzymic glycation of Hb A{sub o} was studied in vitro in buffer Tris 10 mM in H{sub 2} O and D{sub 2} O, pH 7.3, pD 7.8 at 37 deg C at a fixed concentration of 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (DPG). The reaction exhibits identical rates in protium and deuterium oxides. When D-glucose-2-h is compared with D-glucose-2-d, the kinetic isotope effect for the DPG-dependent rate is 2.1 {+-} 0.3, while the DPG-independent rate constant shows no isotope effect (1.1 {+-} 0.1). The absence of a rate in isotopic water solvents shows that proton donation for solvent, lyons or DPG does not limit the rate. The substrate isotope effect of around 2 for the DPG kinetic term indicates that the proton abstraction step of the Amadori rearrangement by DPG is wholly or partially rate-limiting for this reaction. (author) 23 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Target and PADC Track Detectors for Rare Isotope Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bermudez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A higher yield of rare isotope production methods, for example, isotope separation on-line (ISOL, is expected to be developed for the EURISOL facility. In this paper as a part of the ongoing project, high power-target assembly and passive detector inclusion are given. Theoretical calculations of several configurations were done using Monte Carlo code FLUKA aimed to produce 1015 fiss/s on LEU-Cx target. The proposed radioactive ion beam (RIB production relies on a high-power (4 MW multibody target; a complete target design is given. Additionally we explore the possibility to employ PADC passive detector as a complementary system for RIB characterization, since these already demonstrated their importance in nuclear interactions phenomenology. In fact, information and recording rare and complex reaction product or short-lived isotope detection is obtained in an integral form through latent track formation. Some technical details on track formation and PADC detector etching conditions complete this study.

  8. Using stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes to reveal monsoonal and related hydrological effects on meteoric water in the Western Pacific monsoon region: A case study of the Ilan region, northeastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tsung-Ren; Huang, Chun-Chun; Chen, Chi-Tsun; Chen, Jui-Er; Liang, Wen-Jui

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzes the isotopic compositions (δ2H and δ18O) of meteoric waters, including precipitation and stream water, to reveal what major hydrological processes affect the hydrological regime of the Ilan region, northeastern Taiwan. The isotopic results indicate monsoonal flows as the fundamental factors affecting studied precipitation and stream water. Summer precipitation sourced from southerly air mass exhibits lower δ and deuterium-excess (dE) values than winter precipitation sourced from northerly air masses. The δ18O and dE values are respectively -7.7‰ and 8‰ for summer precipitation and -3.3‰ and 24‰ for winter precipitation. Furthermore, semi-quantitative estimations using dE evidence indicate that summertime southerly air masses generally contribute more to stream water than wintertime northerly air-mass flows (approximately 54% vs. 46%). However, the contribution fractions are controlled by the orientation of catchments to the windward side of respective monsoonal flows. Northern catchments, located on the windward side of southerly air masses, receive about 60% of their water from precipitation condensed from the southerly air masses, and 40% from the northerly air masses. By comparison, southern catchments, located on the windward side of northerly air masses, receive about 59% of their water from northerly air masses and 41% from southerly air masses. Additionally, catchment effect, induced from δ value, is notable in stream basins with high elevations but this is not related to catchment sizes. Besides this, altitude effect, which is determined in terms of δ18O values, was derived using data from four precipitation stations of northern Taiwan. It ranges from -2.5 to -3.0‰ per 100 m depending on the season; moreover, based on the dE evidence, secondary evaporation effects are apparent with moisture recycling influencing inland summer precipitation and raindrop evaporation influencing inland winter precipitation.

  9. Applications of stable isotopes to study plant-animal relationships in terrestrial ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianzhu; LIN Guanghui; HUANG Jianhui; HAN Xingguo

    2004-01-01

    As natural tracers, stable isotopes have been extensively used in plant physiological, ecological and environmental research. Recently, animal physiological ecologists have also applied stable isotope techniques to study plant- animal relationships. The isotopic compositions of animal body generally reflect and integrate their diets over a time period ranging from hours to years to the lifetime of an individual. When animal living habitat changes or animals move to a new environment, the animal isotopic compositions will shift accordingly. Thus, stable isotope signatures of an animal can truly reflect its food sources, habitat, distribution and movement patterns during a given time period. Moreover, by analyzing animal-tissue isotopic compositions at different temporal scales, we can improve our understanding of animal adaptation to environmental changes. Stable isotope technique also provides an ideal tool to study animal foodweb relationship and community structure because of isotopic fractionation during the processes of nutrient assimilation by animals. Stable isotope technique can continuously measure animal trophic position in a foodweb, which can eventually reveal the predator-prey relationship and its role in determining matter balance and energy flow in the entire ecosystem. Stable isotope technique has been one of the most important and efficient tools in studying plant-animal relationship. In this paper, we first review recent advances in the application of stable isotope techniques to plant-animal relationship research then evaluate their advantages and disadvantages, and finally discuss some future directions associated with stable isotope applications to plant-animal relationship research.

  10. ISOTOPIC REGIME OF SUBGLACIAL LAKE VOSTOK ON EVIDENCE FROM DEEP ICE CORE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ekaykin

    2012-01-01

    variability is observed here, which is attributed to the pulsations of the flux and/or isotope content of the melt glacier waters coming from the northern part of the lake. In turn, this means not complete mixing of the lake source waters with the resident water of the lake and, thus, that the water layer just beneath the glacier in the Vostok station area is not representative in terms of the conditions in the main lake body. We suggest that the future direct lake studies must include water sampling at different depths from the lake-water interface to the bottom. Meanwhile, in the nearest future this study will be developed by the completing of the measurements of the whole 5G-2 core (to the depth of3769 m, as well as the analysis of the short-term (1 cm variations in the bottom part of the ice core, where the isotopic signal must be fully preserved without being erased by the molecular diffusion. Also, the measurement of the first lake water sample recovered from the drill after the penetration will allow the comparison with the lake ice isotope content in order to experimentally define the effective isotope fractionation coefficient and thus constrain the possible mechanism of the lake ice formation.

  11. Experimental study on the relationship between average isotopic fractionation factor and evaporation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao WANG

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic fractionation is the foundation of tracing water cycle using hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Isotopic fractionation factors in evaporation from free water body are mainly affected by temperature and relative humidity, and greatly vary with these atmospheric factors in a day. Evaporation rate can properly reveal the effects of atmospheric factors. Therefore, there should be a certain function relationship existing in isotopic fractionation factors and evaporation rate. An average isotopic fractionation factor was defined to describe isotopic differences between vapor and liquid phases in evaporation with time interval of hours or days. The relationship of average isotopic fractionation factor and evaporation based on isotopic mass balance was investigated through an evaporation pan experiment with no inflow. The experimental results showed that the isotopic compositions of residual water became more enrichment with time; the average isotopic fractionation factor was affected by air temperature, relative humidity and other atmospheric factors, and had a good functional relation with evaporation rate. The values of average isotopic fractionation factor could be easily calculated with the known of evaporation rate, the initial volume of water in pan and isotopic compositions of residual water.

  12. Deformation effects in the alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of even-even 244-260Cf isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Krishnan, Sreejith

    2016-04-01

    Within the unified ternary fission model (UTFM), the alpha accompanied ternary fission of even-even 244-260Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. For the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the 244Cf isotope, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination 108Ru + 4He + 132Te, which contains the near doubly magic nucleus 132Te ( N = 80, Z = 52). In the case of 246Cf and 248Cf isotopes, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combinations with the near doubly magic nucleus 134Te ( N = 82, Z = 52) as the heaviest fragment. The highest yield obtained for 250Cf, 252Cf, 254Cf, 256Cf, 258Cf and 260Cf isotopes is for the fragment combination with the doubly magic nucleus 132Sn ( N = 82), Z = 50 as the heaviest fragment. We have included the effect of deformation and orientation of fragments and this has revealed that in addition to the closed shell effect, ground-state deformation also plays an important role in the calculation of the relative yield of favorable fragment combinations. The computed isotopic yields for the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the 252Cf isotope are found to be in agreement with the experimental data. The emission probability and kinetic energy of the long-range alpha particle is calculated for the various isotopes of Cf and are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Shape coexistence in the lightest Tl isotopes studied by laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Herfurth, F; Antalic, S; Darby, I G; Venhart, M; Flanagan, K; Veselsky, M; Blaum, K; Radulov, D P; Beck, D; Kowalska, M; Schwarz, S; Chapman, R; Diriken, J V J; Lane, J; Rosenbusch, M

    This proposal aims at atomic spectroscopy studies of the very neutron-deficient isotopes $^{178-187}$Tl, at and far beyond the region of the neutron mid-shell at N=104, in which shape coexistence phenomena were investigated so far by particle and $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy methods only. Our motivation for this proposal is as follows : \\\\\\\\ -These studies will provide direct data on magnetic dipole moment, spin, charge radii and deformations of these isotopes. The results will form a stringent test for our current understanding of the shape coexistence phenomena in the vicinity of the neutron mid-shell at N=104, where the relevant effects are expected to be the strongest (cf.shape staggering in the isotopes $^{181,183,185}$Hg). \\\\-The knowledge of the structure (configuration, spin, deformation) and whether one or two $\\beta$-decaying isomers are present in the parent isotopes $^{178,180,182}$Tl are crucial for understanding of the results of our recent studies of $\\beta$-delayed fission in the lightest thalli...

  14. The oxygen isotope effect on critical temperature in superconducting copper oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Mourachkine, A.

    2003-01-01

    The isotope effect provided a crucial key to the development of the BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) microscopic theory of superconductivity for conventional superconductors. In superconducting cooper oxides (cuprates) showing an unconventional type of superconductivity, the oxygen isotope effect is very peculiar: the exponential coefficient strongly depends on doping level. No consensus has been reached so far on the origin of the isotope effect in the cuprates. Here we show that the oxygen i...

  15. Soil Drying Effects on the Carbon Isotope Composition of Soil Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. L.; Nickerson, N.; Risk, D.; Kayler, Z. E.; Rugh, W.; Mix, A. C.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opportunity to distinguish fast- responding plant C from slower-responding soil C pools, which under steady-state conditions may be too similar isotopically to partition. Monitoring the isotopic composition of soil respiration over a period of changing moisture conditions is potentially a useful approach for characterizing plant contributions to soil respiration. But this partitioning hinges on the assumption that any change in the isotopic signature of soil respiration is solely due to recent photosynthetic discrimination, and that post-photosynthetic processes, such as microbial respiration, do not discriminate as moisture decreases. The purpose of the present study is to test the assumption that δ13CO2 from microbial respiration remains static as soil dries. We conducted a series of greenhouse experiments employing different techniques to isolate microbial respiration from root respiration. The first involves removing roots from soil, and showed that when roots are present, respiration from dry soil is enriched in 13C relative to moist soil, but when roots are absent, respiration is isotopically similar from moist and dry soils. This indicates that rhizospheric respiration changes isotopically with moisture whereas soil microbial respiration does not. In contrast, a second experiment in which soil columns without plants were monitored as they dried, showed respiration from very dry soil to be enriched by 8‰ relative to moist soil. However, simulations with an isotopologue-based soil gas diffusion model demonstrate that at least a portion of the apparent enrichment is due to non-steady state gas transport processes. Careful sampling methodologies which prevent or account for non

  16. Environmental effects on the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... Key words: Oxygen isotopes, carbon isotopes, Porites coral, density bands, skeletal .... isotopic ratio of CO2 gas derived from the Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) ... water samples, a 2.0 ml of the sample was taken into a syringe and.

  17. Estimating niche width using stable isotopes in the face of habitat variability: a modelling case study in the marine environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O Cummings

    Full Text Available Distributions of stable isotopes have been used to infer an organism's trophic niche width, the 'isotopic niche', and examine resource partitioning. Spatial variation in the isotopic composition of prey may however confound the interpretation of isotopic signatures especially when foragers exploit resources across numerous locations. In this study the isotopic compositions from marine assemblages are modelled to determine the role of variation in the signature of prey items and the effect of dietary breadth and foraging strategies on predator signatures. Outputs from the models reveal that isotopic niche widths can be greater for populations of dietary specialists rather than for generalists, which contravenes what is generally accepted in the literature. When a range of different mixing models are applied to determine if the conversion from δ to p-space can be used to improve model accuracy, predator signature variation is increased rather than model precision. Furthermore the mixing models applied failed to correctly identify dietary specialists and/or to accurately estimate diet contributions that may identify resource partitioning. The results presented illustrate the need to collect sufficiently large sample sizes, in excess of what is collected under most current studies, across the complete distribution of a species and its prey, before attempts to use stable isotopes to make inferences about niche width can be made.

  18. Estimating niche width using stable isotopes in the face of habitat variability: a modelling case study in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, David O; Buhl, Jerome; Lee, Raymond W; Simpson, Stephen J; Holmes, Sebastian P

    2012-01-01

    Distributions of stable isotopes have been used to infer an organism's trophic niche width, the 'isotopic niche', and examine resource partitioning. Spatial variation in the isotopic composition of prey may however confound the interpretation of isotopic signatures especially when foragers exploit resources across numerous locations. In this study the isotopic compositions from marine assemblages are modelled to determine the role of variation in the signature of prey items and the effect of dietary breadth and foraging strategies on predator signatures. Outputs from the models reveal that isotopic niche widths can be greater for populations of dietary specialists rather than for generalists, which contravenes what is generally accepted in the literature. When a range of different mixing models are applied to determine if the conversion from δ to p-space can be used to improve model accuracy, predator signature variation is increased rather than model precision. Furthermore the mixing models applied failed to correctly identify dietary specialists and/or to accurately estimate diet contributions that may identify resource partitioning. The results presented illustrate the need to collect sufficiently large sample sizes, in excess of what is collected under most current studies, across the complete distribution of a species and its prey, before attempts to use stable isotopes to make inferences about niche width can be made.

  19. Is there a stable isotope evidence for the CO2 fertiliser effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Krishnamurthy; M Machavaram

    2000-03-01

    It has been suggested that part of the so-called ``missing sink" of carbon dioxide introduced into the atmosphere by anthropogenic activities, that is the imbalance between estimated anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions and oceanic uptake, may be stored in the vegetation in midlatitudes. Precise mecha- nisms of abstraction of additional carbon dioxide by vegetation, also known as the ``fertilization effect", are poorly understood. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose extracted from annual growth rings (covering the time period 1980-1993) in an oak tree from Kalamazoo, SW Michigan provide a basis to investigate at a physiological level how the fertilization effect may operate. The carbon isotope ratios show that the intercellular concentration of carbon dioxide increased due to an increase in stomatal opening. Although increased intercellular concentration of carbon dioxide translated to increased Water Use Efficiency and assimilation rates, it also resulted in increased transpiration rate as shown by higher D/H of the fixed carbon. The two-fold significance of the isotope data are: first, they provide the first field evidence based on isotope studies for excess CO2 induced biomass production and second, they suggest that this mechanism is likely to operate only in limited environments. Vegetation in regions where mois- ture availability is not restricted so that there can be a gain in water use efficiency despite increased leaf evaporation are best suited to sequester excess carbon from the atmosphere.

  20. Isotopic decoupling during porous melt flow: A case-study in the Lherz peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, V.; Bodinier, J.-L.; Alard, O.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Griffin, W. L.

    2009-03-01

    Most peridotite massifs and mantle xenoliths show a wide range of isotopic variations, often involving significant decoupling between Hf, Nd and Sr isotopes. These variations are generally ascribed either to mingling of individual components of contrasted isotopic compositions or to time integration of parent-element enrichment by percolating melts/fluids, superimposed onto previous depletion event(s). However, strong isotopic decoupling may also arise during porous flow as a result of daughter-elements fractionation during solid-liquid interaction. Although porous flow is recognized as an important process in mantle rocks, its effects on mantle isotopic variability have been barely investigated so far. The peridotites of the Lherz massif (French Pyrenees) display a frozen melt percolation front separating highly refractory harzburgites from refertilized lherzolites. Isotopic signatures observed at the melt percolation front show a strong decoupling of Hf from Nd and Sr isotopes that cannot be accounted for by simple mixing involving the harzburgite protolith and the percolating melt. Using one dimensional percolation-diffusion and percolation-reaction modeling, we show that these signatures represent transient isotopic compositions generated by porous flow. These signatures are governed by a few critical parameters such as daughter element concentrations in melt and peridotite, element diffusivity, and efficiency of isotopic homogenization rather than by the chromatographic effect of melt transport and the refertilization reaction. Subtle variations in these parameters may generate significant inter-isotopic decoupling and wide isotopic variations in mantle rocks.

  1. Isotope exchange reactions on ceramic breeder materials and their effect on tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, M.; Baba, A. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawamura, Y.; Nishi, M.

    1998-03-01

    Though lithium ceramic materials such as Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are considered as breeding materials in the blanket of a D-T fusion reactor, the release behavior of the bred tritium in these solid breeder materials has not been fully understood. The isotope exchange reaction rate between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of breeding materials have not been quantified yet, although helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas in the recent blanket designs. The mass transfer coefficient representing the isotope exchange reaction between H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}O or that between D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the ceramic breeding materials bed is experimentally obtained in this study. Effects of isotope exchange reactions on the tritium inventory in the bleeding blanket is discussed based on data obtained in this study where effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions are considered. The way to estimate the tritium inventory in a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} blanket used in this study shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in-situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-5, 6 and TRINE experiments. (author)

  2. Stable isotopes and Digital Elevation Models to study nutrient inputs in high-Arctic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calizza, Edoardo; Rossi, David; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Careddu, Giulio; Rossi, Loreto

    2016-04-01

    Ice cover, run-off from the watershed, aquatic and terrestrial primary productivity, guano deposition from birds are key factors controlling nutrient and organic matter inputs in high-Arctic lakes. All these factors are expected to be significantly affected by climate change. Quantifying these controls is a key baseline step to understand what combination of factors subtends the biological productivity in Arctic lakes and will drive their ecological response to environmental change. Basing on Digital Elevation Models, drainage maps, and C and N elemental content and stable isotope analysis in sediments, aquatic vegetation and a dominant macroinvertebrate species (Lepidurus arcticus Pallas 1973) belonging to Tvillingvatnet, Storvatnet and Kolhamna, three lakes located in North Spitsbergen (Svalbard), we propose an integrated approach for the analysis of (i) nutrient and organic matter inputs in lakes; (ii) the role of catchment hydro-geomorphology in determining inter-lake differences in the isotopic composition of sediments; (iii) effects of diverse nutrient inputs on the isotopic niche of Lepidurus arcticus. Given its high run-off and large catchment, organic deposits in Tvillingvatnet where dominated by terrestrial inputs, whereas inputs were mainly of aquatic origin in Storvatnet, a lowland lake with low potential run-off. In Kolhamna, organic deposits seem to be dominated by inputs from birds, which actually colonise the area. Isotopic signatures were similar between samples within each lake, representing precise tracers for studies on the effect of climate change on biogeochemical cycles in lakes. The isotopic niche of L. aricticus reflected differences in sediments between lakes, suggesting a bottom-up effect of hydro-geomorphology characterizing each lake on nutrients assimilated by this species. The presented approach proven to be an effective research pathway for the identification of factors subtending to nutrient and organic matter inputs and transfer

  3. A large solvent isotope effect on protein association thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eginton, Christopher; Beckett, Dorothy

    2013-09-24

    Solvent reorganization can contribute significantly to the energetics of protein-protein interactions. However, our knowledge of the magnitude of the energetic contribution is limited, in part, by a dearth of quantitative experimental measurements. The biotin repressor forms a homodimer as a prerequisite to DNA binding to repress transcription initiation. At 20 °C, the dimerization reaction, which is thermodynamically coupled to binding of a small ligand, bio-5'-AMP, is characterized by a Gibbs free energy of -7 kcal/mol. This modest net dimerization free energy reflects underlying, very large opposing enthalpic and entropic driving forces of 41 ± 3 and -48 ± 3 kcal/mol, respectively. The thermodynamics have been interpreted as indicating coupling of solvent release to dimerization. In this work, this interpretation has been investigated by measuring the effect of replacing H2O with D2O on the dimerization thermodynamics. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements performed at 20 °C reveal a solvent isotope effect of -1.5 kcal/mol on the Gibbs free energy of dimerization. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the reaction in D2O indicates enthalpic and entropic contributions of 28 and -37 kcal/mol, respectively, considerably smaller than the values measured in H2O. These large solvent isotope perturbations to the thermodynamics are consistent with a significant contribution of solvent release to the dimerization reaction.

  4. Spatial variability in the isotopic composition of rainfall in a small headwater catchment and its effect on hydrograph separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Benjamin M. C.; van Meerveld, H. J. (Ilja); Seibert, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Isotope hydrograph separation (IHS) is a valuable tool to study runoff generation processes. To perform an IHS, samples of baseflow (pre-event water) and streamflow are taken at the catchment outlet. For rainfall (event water) either a bulk sample is collected or it is sampled sequentially during the event. For small headwater catchment studies, event water samples are usually taken at only one sampling location in or near the catchment because the spatial variability in the isotopic composition of rainfall is assumed to be small. However, few studies have tested this assumption. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal variability in the isotopic composition of rainfall and its effects on IHS results using detailed measurements from a small pre-alpine headwater catchment in Switzerland. Rainfall was sampled sequentially at eight locations across the 4.3 km2 Zwäckentobel catchment and stream water was collected in three subcatchments (0.15, 0.23, and 0.70 km2) during ten events. The spatial variability in rainfall amount, average and maximum rainfall intensity and the isotopic composition of rainfall was different for each event. There was no significant relation between the isotopic composition of rainfall and total rainfall amount, rainfall intensity or elevation. For eight of the ten studied events the temporal variability in the isotopic composition of rainfall was larger than the spatial variability in the rainfall isotopic composition. The isotope hydrograph separation results, using only one rain sampler, varied considerably depending on which rain sampler was used to represent the isotopic composition of event water. The calculated minimum pre-event water contributions differed up to 60%. The differences were particularly large for events with a large spatial variability in the isotopic composition of rainfall and a small difference between the event and pre-event water isotopic composition. Our results demonstrate that even in small catchments

  5. A study of interaction between surface water and groundwater using environmental isotope in Huaisha River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xianfang; LIU Xiangchao; XIA Jun; YU Jingjie; TANG Changyuan

    2006-01-01

    The surface water and groundwater are important components of water cycle,and the interaction between surface water and groundwater is the important part in water cycle research.As the effective tracers in water cycle research,environmental isotope and hydrochemistry can reveal the interrelationships between surface water and groundwater effectively.The study area is the Huaisha River basin,which is located in Huairou district,Beijing.The field surveying and sampling for spring,river and well water were finished in 2002 and 2003.The hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and water quality were measured at the laboratory.The spatial characteristics in isotope and evolution of water quality along river lines at the different area were analyzed.The altitude effect of oxygen isotope in springs was revealed,and then using this equation,theory foundation for deducing recharge source of spring was estimated.By applying the mass balance method,the annual mean groundwater recharge rate at the catchment was estimated.Based on the groundwater recharge analysis,combining the hydrogeological condition analysis,and comparing the rainfall-runoff coefficients from the 1960s to 1990s in the Huaisha River basin and those in the Chaobai River basin,part of the runoff in the Huaisha River basin is recharged outside of this basin,in other words,this basin is an un-enclosed basin.On the basis of synthetically analyses,combining the compositions of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and hydrochemistry,geomorphology,geology,and watershed systems characteristics,the relative contributions between surface water and groundwater flow at the different areas at the catchments were evaluated,and the interaction between surface water and groundwater was revealed lastly.

  6. A study of interaction between surface water and groundwater using environmental isotope in Huaisha River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Xianfang; LIU; Xiangchao; XIA; Jun; YU; Jingjie; TANG; Changyuan

    2006-01-01

    The surface water and groundwater are important components of water cycle,and the interaction between surface water and groundwater is the important part in water cycle research.As the effective tracers in water cycle research,environmental isotope and hydrochemistry can reveal the interrelationships between surface water and groundwater effectively.The study area is the Huaisha River basin,which is located in Huairou district,Beijing.The field surveying and sampling for spring,river and well water were finished in 2002 and 2003.The hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and water quality were measured at the laboratory.The spatial characteristics in isotope and evolution of water quality along river lines at the different area were analyzed.The altitude effect of oxygen isotope in springs was revealed,and then using this equation,theory foundation for deducing recharge source of spring was estimated.By applying the mass balance method,the annual mean groundwater recharge rate at the catchment was estimated.Based on the groundwater recharge analysis,combining the hydrogeological condition analysis,and comparing the rainfall-runoff coefficients from the 1960s to 1990s in the Huaisha River basin and those in the Chaobai River basin,part of the runoff in the Huaisha River basin is recharged outside of this basin,in other words,this basin is an un-enclosed basin.On the basis of synthetically analyses,combining the compositions of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and hydrochemistry,geomorphology,geology,and watershed systems characteristics,the relative contributions between surface water and groundwater flow at the different areas at the catchments were evaluated,and the interaction between surface water and groundwater was revealed lastly.

  7. Temperature dependence of isotopic quantum effects in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R T; Benmore, C J; Neuefeind, J; Kohara, S; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2005-02-04

    The technique of high energy x-ray diffraction has been used to measure the temperature variation of hydrogen versus deuterium isotopic quantum effects on the structure of water. The magnitude of the effect is found to be inversely proportional to the temperature, varying by a factor of 2.5 over the range 6 to 45 degrees C. In addition, the H216O versus H218O effect has been measured at 26 degrees C and the structural difference shown to be restricted to the nearest neighbor molecular interactions. The results are compared to recent simulations and previously measured isochoric temperature differentials; additionally, implications for H/D substitution experiments are considered.

  8. Cooper pair breaking and isotope effect coefficient variation in high-T{sub c} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Pandey, R.K.; Singh, P. [G.B. Pant Univ. Pantanagar, Nainital (India)

    1996-06-01

    The effect of pair breaking on the isotope effect coefficient a = {minus}d ln T{sub c}/d ln M in La{sub 2{minus}x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and Pr-, Ca-, and Zn-doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} and EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} is studied using the generalized Abrikosov-Gorkov theory recently employed by Singh and Kishore for superconductivity. It is argued that the isotope effect coefficient a can be further enhanced, in agreement with experimental observation, by considering the dependence of the characteristic scattering time {tau}{sub s} for Cooper pairs on the concentration n of impurities (both magnetic and nonmagnetic) and the disorder ignored by them.

  9. The physical chemistry of mass-independent isotope effects and their observation in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, Mark H; Chakraborty, Subrata; Dominguez, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the physical chemistry of isotope effects and precise measurements in samples from nature have provided information on processes that could not have been obtained otherwise. With the discovery of a mass-independent isotopic fractionation during the formation of ozone, a new physical chemical basis for isotope effects required development. Combined theoretical and experimental developments have broadened this understanding and extended the range of chemical systems where these unique effects occur. Simultaneously, the application of mass-independent isotopic measurements to an extensive range of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial systems has furthered the understanding of events such as solar system origin and evolution and planetary atmospheric chemistry, present and past.

  10. Microscopic study of neutron-rich dysprosium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Carlos E. [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa (Mexico); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 70-542, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, Victor [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 70-542, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Lerma, Sergio [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa (Mexico)

    2013-01-15

    Microscopic studies in heavy nuclei are very scarce due to large valence spaces involved. This computational problem can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry-based models. Ground-state, {gamma} and {beta} bands, and their B(E2) transition strengths in {sup 160-168}Dy isotopes, are studied in the framework of the pseudo-SU(3) model which includes the preserving symmetry Q . Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized. Additionally, three rotor-like terms are considered, whose free parameters, fixed for all members of the chain, are used to fine tune the moment of inertia of rotational bands and the band head of {gamma} and {beta} bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus {sup 170}Dy. The results presented show that it is possible to study a full chain of isotopes or isotones in the region with the present model. (orig.)

  11. Microscopic study of neutron-rich Dysprosium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Vargas, Carlos E; Lerma, Sergio; 10.1140/epja/i2013-13004-1

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic studies in heavy nuclei are very scarce due to large valence spaces involved. This computational problem can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry based models. Ground-state, gamma and beta-bands, and their B(E2) transition strengths in 160-168Dy isotopes, are studied in the framework of the pseudo-SU(3) model which includes the preserving symmetry Q.Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized. Additionally, three rotor-like terms are considered whose free parameters, fixed for all members of the chain are used to fine tune the moment of inertia of rotational bands and the band-head of gamma and beta-bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus 170Dy. The results presented show that it is possible to study full chain of isotopes or isotones in the region with the present model.

  12. Effects of preservatives on stable isotope analyses of four marine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabel, Sirka; Verísimo, Patricia; Freire, Juan

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to quantify the effect of formalin-ethanol preservation on the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures of four taxonomical groups of marine species ( Himanthalia elongata, Anemonia sulcata, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Patella vulgata). To examine temporal changes in the effects of preservation and to determine if preservation induced predictable shifts in δ13C and δ15N signatures, repeated analyses were carried out after 6, 12 and 24 months of preservation. Data from our study showed highly variable effects of the formalin-ethanol preservation on carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures between species. The use of a general correction factor was not possible, or else it should be species-specific. Differences in nitrogen isotopic values between preserved and unpreserved samples were minor compared to the assumed enrichment between trophic levels. The combined use of data from preserved and unpreserved samples could lead to biases in the estimation of the trophic level of organisms. Changes that preservatives caused in carbon values were variable between species and not always small enough to be ignored. So the use of data from preserved samples could change the interpretation of the mixing models used to determine the importance of multiple sources of carbon. In order to elucidate the effects that preservatives have in other species, further studies will be necessary.

  13. Study of Urban environmental quality through Isotopes δ13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Becerril-Piña, R.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Usually, trees with similar pH values on their bark develop epiphytes of similar species, the acidity to be a factor for growth. The aim of the study was evaluate the air quality through isotope δ13C in order to define the levels of environmental quality in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. In this work were collected at least 4 epiphytes positioned in trees of the species Prosopis Laevigata at 25 sites of Queretaro City. The samples were analyzed for trace elements with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The collecting took place during dry period, in May and early rain June 2011 period, and on four sectors to identify the spatial distribution of pollution, using isotopic analysis of concentration of δ 13C. According with the results there are significant differences among the species in each of the sampled areas. The 5 February Avenue presented greater diversity and richness of δ13C, followed by those who were surveyed in the proximity of the UAQ and finally in the middle-east area. An average value of δ13C-17.92%, followed by those surveyed in the vicinity of the UAQ that correspond to sector I and II with an concentration of δ13C-17.55% and δ13C-17.22%, and finally the samples collected in trees scattered in the East-Sector II and IV with a value of δ13C-17.02% and δ13C-15.62%, respectively. Also were observed differences between the dry and wet period. It is likely that these results of δ 13C in moist period reflect the drag of the isotopes due to rain events that could mark a trend in the dilution of this element, however there is a trend in terms of abundance and composition of finding more impact in those species sampled in dry period, in May and early June 2011.

  14. Microscopic Study of the Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance in Cd, Sn and Pb Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Li-Gang; Colo, G

    2012-01-01

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) in Cd, Sn and Pb isotopes has been studied within the self-consistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock+BCS and quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA). Three Skyrme parameter sets are used in the calculations, i.e., SLy5, SkM* and SkP, since they are characterized by different values of the compression modulus in symmetric nuclear matter, namely K=230, 217, and 202 MeV, respectively. We also investigate the effect of different types of pairing forces on the ISGMR in Cd, Sn and Pb isotopes. The calculated peak energies and the strength distributions of ISGMR are compared with available experimental data. We find that SkP fails completely to describe the ISGMR strength distribution for all isotopes due to its low value of the nuclear matter incompressibility, namely K=202 MeV. On the other hand, the SLy5 parameter set, supplemented by an appropriate pairing interaction, gives a reasonable description of the ISGMR in Cd and Pb isotopes. A better description of ISGMR in ...

  15. Experimental study on stable isotopic fractionation of evaporating water under varying temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-ying HU; Wei-min BAO; Tao WANG; Si-min QU

    2009-01-01

    The variation of stable isotope ratios in natural waters provides valuable information that can be used to trace water movement. Evaporation plays a crucial role in determining the variation of stable isotopes. In this paper, several evaporation experiments were conducted in order to study the stable isotopic fractionation mechanism of water and analyze the influence of different temperatures on evaporation fractionation. Three group experiments of water evaporation under different temperatures and initial isotopic values were carried out. The results show that fractionation factors of hydrogen and oxygen may increase with temperature, and the average enrichment degree of hydrogen isotope D is 3.432 times that of oxygen isotope 18O. The results also show that the isotopic composition of the initial water has little influence on water evaporation fractionation, which is mainly affected by the state variables in the evaporation process, such as temperature. This research provides experimental data for further understanding the evaporation fractionation mechanism.

  16. Utilizing Stable Isotopes and Isotopic Anomalies to Study Early Solar System Formation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites contain a diversity of particle components, i.e., chondrules and calcium-, aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs), that have survived since the formation of the Solar System. The chemical and isotopic compositions of these materials provide a record of the conditions present in the protoplanetary disk where they formed and can aid our understanding of the processes and reservoirs in which solids formed in the solar nebula, an important step leading to the accretion of planetesimals. Isotopic anomalies associated with nucleosynthetic processes are observed in these discrete materials, and can be compared to astronomical observations and astrophysical formation models of stars and more recently proplyds. The existence and size of these isotopic anomalies are typically thought to reflect a significant state of isotopic heterogeneity in the earliest Solar System, likely left over from molecular cloud heterogeneities on the grain scale, but some could also be due to late stellar injection. The homogenization of these isotopic anomalies towards planetary values can be used to track the efficiency and timescales of disk wide mixing,

  17. Microstructural study of irradiated isotopically tailored F82H steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, E. E-mail: wakai@realab01.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Miwa, Y.; Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Shiba, K.; Abiko, K.; Furuno, S.; Jitsukawa, S

    2002-12-01

    The synergistic effect of displacement damage and hydrogen or helium atoms on microstructures in F82H steel irradiated at 250-400 deg. C to 2.8-51 dpa in HFIR has been examined using isotopes of {sup 54}Fe or {sup 10}B. Hydrogen atoms increased slightly the formation of dislocation loops and changed the Burgers vector for some parts of dislocation loops, and they also affected on the formation of cavity at 250 deg. C to 2.8 dpa. Helium atoms also influenced them at around 300 deg. C, and the effect of helium atoms was enhanced at 400 deg. C. Furthermore, the relations between microstructures and radiation-hardening or ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift in F82H steel were discussed. The cause of the shift increase of DBTT is thought to be due to the hardening of dislocation loops and the formation of {alpha}{sup '}-precipitates on dislocation loops.

  18. The effect of paleoecology and paleobiogeography on stable isotopes of Quaternary mammals from South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Laura; Prado, José Luis; Alberdi, María Teresa

    2012-11-01

    The modern South American mammalian assemblage was determined by the closure of the Panama isthmus (˜2.7-3.1 Ma) and later on, by profound climatic and environmental fluctuations occurred during the Quaternary as well as by the appearance of humans in the continent. In the present study, stable isotope analyses (δ13C, δO and δO) have been carried out on Pleistocene-Holocene northern inmigrant and endemic taxa from a broad latitudinal and altitudinal distribution in South America with the purpose of characterizing their paleoecology and the effects of the paleobiogeographic distribution on stable isotope results. Equids and gomphotheres show a wide range of δ13C values going from woodlands to pure C4 grasslands. In the case of equids, Hippidion shows lower δ13C values than Equus in the Late Pleistocene, whereas, in the case of gomphotheres, Cuvieronius and Stegomastodon differ in their δ18O values on account on differences in their paleobiogeography with the former found in the Andean corridor and the latter dispersing through an eastern route. Isotope data of the rest of taxa (immigrant and endemic) are in general in good agreement with other previous isotopic and non-isotopic studies. The latitude threshold between mixed C3-C4 and pure C3 conditions have been pinpointed at ˜33°S in the Middle and the Late Pleistocene. Mammalian δ18O values are intimately related to latitudinal and altitudinal distribution, with the latter exerting an overriding influence independently of latitude. Calculated altitudinal gradients (between -0.23‰/100 m and -0.40‰/100 m) are within the range of modern gradients.

  19. Modeling study of vibrational photochemical isotope enrichment. [HBr + Cl/sub 2/; HCl + Br/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badcock, C.C.; Hwang, W.C.; Kalsch, J.F.

    1978-09-29

    Chemical kinetic modeling studies of vibrational-photochemical isotope enrichment have been performed on two systems: Model (I), H/sup 79/Br(H/sup 81/Br) + Cl/sub 2/ and, Model (II), H/sup 37/Cl(H/sup 35/Cl) + Br. Pulsed laser excitation was modeled to the first excited vibrational level of H/sup 79/Br in Model I and the first and second excited vibrational levels of both HCl isotopes in Model II. These are prototype systems of exoergic (Model I) and endoergic (Model II) reactions. The effects on enrichment of varying the external parameters (pressure, laser intensity) and the internal parameters (rate constants for V-V exchange and excited-state reactions) were examined. Studies of these prototype systems indicate that a favorable reaction for enrichment, with isotopically-specific excitation and a significantly accelerated vibrationally-excited-state reaction should have the following properties: the reaction from v = 0 should be only moderately exoergic, and the most favorable coreactant should be a polyatomic species, such as alkyl radical. Direct excitation of the reacting vibrational level is at least an order of magnitude more favorable for enrichment than is population by energy transfer. Enrichment of the minor isotope by these processes is more effective than is major isotope enrichment. Within limits, increased laser intensity is beneficial. However, for sequential excitation of a second vibrational level, major isotope enrichment can be diminished by high populations of the first vibrational level.

  20. Stable isotopes in soil and water studies; Isotopes stables dans l`eau et le sol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G.B. [Division of Water Resources, Adelaide Laboratory, PMB2, South (Australia)

    1998-12-31

    The composition of oxygen-18 and deuterium in soil waters varies mainly as a result of changes in the isotopic composition of rainfall and the processes of evaporation. This paper gives examples of how the isotope profiles which develop in the unsaturated zone can give information about recharge fluxes and mechanisms, evaporation from groundwater systems in arid areas and the zones in soil profiles from which plants use water. J. Ch. Fontes and his colleagues have been leaders in the application of these techniques to the measurement of evaporation from deep water tables in arid areas. (author) 29 refs.

  1. Ruthenium endemic isotope effects in chondrites and differentiated meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the abundances of Ru isotopes in (1) iron meteorites, (2) stony-iron meteorites (pallasites), (3) ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites, and (4) in refractory inclusions from the carbonaceous meteorite Allende. We have developed improved Multiple-Collector, Negative-ion Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric (MC-NTIMS) techniques for Ru, with high ionization efficiency of 4% and with chemical separation techniques for Ru, which reduce mass interferences to the ppm level, so that no mass interference corrections needed to be applied. Our data were normalized to 99Ru/ 101Ru to correct for mass-dependent fractionation. We find no Ru isotopic effects in the ordinary chondrites and group IAB iron meteorites we have measured. There are significant effects (deficits) in the pure s-process nuclide 100Ru, in the Allende whole-rock and in refractory inclusions of up to 1.7 parts in 10,000 (ɛu). There are also endemic deficits in 100Ru in iron meteorites and in pallasites of up to 1.1 ɛu. The Ru data suggest a wide spread and large scale heterogeneity in p-, s-, and r-process components resulting in a deficit in s-process nuclides or enhancements in both p- and r-process nuclides, in refractory siderophiles condensing in the early solar nebula. In contrast, the data on bulk Murchison suggest an excess in 100Ru and in 104Ru, which are distinct from the rest of the measured patterns. Our results establish the presence of significant isotopic heterogeneity for Ru in the early solar nebula. The observation of endemic Ru effects in planetary differentiates, such as iron meteorites and pallasites, must reflect the siderophile nature of Ru and the preservation in condensing FeNi metal of refractory metal condensate grains formed in the early solar nebula. Once incorporated in the metal phase, the refractory siderophiles remained in the metal phase through the melting and differentiation of planetesimals to form FeNi cores and silicate mantles and crusts.

  2. Delayed Particle Study of Neutron Rich Lithium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Marechal, F; Perrot, F

    2002-01-01

    We propose to make a systematic complete coincidence study of $\\beta$-delayed particles from the decay of neutron-rich lithium isotopes. The lithium isotopes with A=9,10,11 have proven to contain a vast information on nuclear structure and especially on the formation of halo nuclei. A mapping of the $\\beta$-strength at high energies in the daughter nucleus will make possible a detailed test of our understanding of their structure. An essential step is the comparison of $\\beta$-strength patterns in $^{11}$Li and the core nucleus $^{9}$Li, another is the full characterization of the break-up processes following the $\\beta$-decay. To enable such a measurement of the full decay process we will use a highly segmented detection system where energy and emission angles of both charged and neutral particles are detected in coincidence and with high efficiency and accuracy. We ask for a total of 30 shifts (21 shifts for $^{11}$Li, 9 shifts $^{9}$Li adding 5 shifts for setting up with stable beam) using a Ta-foil target...

  3. Hydrogen isotope effect on storage behavior of U2Ti and UZr2.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Ram Avtar; Sawant, S. G.; Rajan, M. B.; Dhanuskar, J. R.; Kaity, Santu; Parida, S. C.

    2013-11-01

    U2Ti and UZr2.3 alloys were prepared by arc melting method, vacuum annealed and characterized by XRD, SEM and EDX methods. Hydrogen isotope effect on the storage behavior of these alloys were studied by measuring the hydrogen/deuterium desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) profiles in the temperature range of 573-678 K using a Sievert's type volumetric apparatus. It was observed that, in the temperature and pressure range of investigation, all the isotherms show a single desorption plateau. The PCT data reveals that both U2Ti and UZr2.3 alloys had normal isotope effects on hydrogen/deuterium desorption at all experimental temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters for dehydrogenation and dedeuteration reactions of the corresponding hydrides and deuterides of the above alloys were deduced from the PCT data.

  4. Tritium isotope effect in high-performance liquid chromatography of eicosanoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, U.H.; Lo, S.-L.; Iles, J.; Rosenberger, T.; Tam, P.; Hong, Y.; Ahern, D. [DuPont, NEN Products, Boston (United States). Lipids Group

    1994-07-01

    A significant difference in retention time between unlabeled and the corresponding multi-tritium-labeled eicosanoid has been observed in the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of 11 eicosanoids. Variations in retention time range from 3-7%, depending on the separation conditions as well as the number and position of the tritium substitution. Multi-tritium-labeled eicosanoids were eluted earlier than the corresponding unlabeled eicosanoid in reversed phase HPLC, whereas no isotope effect was seen with {sup 14}C- and {sup 3}H{sub 2}-eicosanoids. Considerations must be given to this tritium isotope effect whenever both multi-tritium-labeled and unlabeled eicosanoids are used for HPLC cochromatography or recovery studies. (author).

  5. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Zhang, J; Chi, Q;

    2001-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K(-1) mol(-1...... dependence of E(0') is also different, yielding entropy changes of -57 J K(-1) mol(-1) in water and -84 J K(-1) mol(-1) in deuterium oxide. The driving force difference of 10 mV is in keeping with the kinetic isotope effect, but the contribution to DeltaS from the temperature dependence of E(0') is positive...

  6. Projected shell model study of quasiparticle structure of arsenic isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Preeti; Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Suram [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu, 180006 (India); Bharti, Arun, E-mail: arunbharti_2003@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu, 180006 (India); Khosa, S.K. [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu, 180006 (India); Bhat, G.H. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar, 190006 (India); Sheikh, J.A. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar, 190006 (India); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    Odd-mass isotopic chain of {sup 67–79}As has been studied within the context of the projected shell model. Deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential are used to calculate various nuclear structure properties like yrast spectra, rotational frequencies and reduced transition probabilities. The study of band structures of these As nuclei based on the band diagrams indicates the presence of multi-quasiparticle structure in the high spin realm of these nuclei. Rotational alignment phenomenon has also been studied in terms of band crossing which is understood to occur due to the rotational alignment of g{sub 9/2} neutron pair. We also have compared the results of the present calculations with the available experimental as well as the other theoretical data and an overall good agreement has been achieved between the two.

  7. Systematic Study on Triaxial Superdeformed Bands of Hf Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-Li; DING Bin-Gang

    2009-01-01

    Properties of the triaxial superdeformed (TSD) bands of Hf isotopes are investigated systematically within the supersymmetry scheme including many-body interactions and a perturbation possessing the SO(5) (or SU(5)) symmetry on the rotational symmetry. Quantitatively good results of the γ-ray energies, the dynamical moments of inertia,and the spin of the TSD bands in Hf isotopes are obtained. It shows that this approach is quite powerful in describing the properties of the triaxial superdeformation in Hf isotopes.

  8. Electrochemical H-D isotope effect at metal-perovskite proton conductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kek, D.; Bonanos, N.

    1999-01-01

    The H-D isotope effect on the electrode kinetics of a metal-proton conductor interface has been investigated. The current-voltage behaviour depends on the nature of the electrode (Ni, Ag), the atmosphere (H(2), D(2)), the partial pressures of the gases, and the temperature. The isotope effect...

  9. Isotopic Effects on Stereodynamics of the C+ + H2 → CH+ + H Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Yang, Yun-Fan; Fan, Xiao-Xing; Ma, Feng-Cai; Li, Yong-Qing

    2017-05-01

    The effects of isotope substitution on stereodynamic properties for the reactions {C}++{H}2/{H D}/{H T}\\to {{C H}}++H/D/T have been studied applying a quasi classical trajectory method occurring on the new ground state {{C H}}2+ potential energy surface [J. Chem. Phys. 142 (2015) 124302]. In the center of mass coordinates applying the quasi classical trajectory method to investigate the orientation and the alignment of the product molecule. Differential cross section and three angle distribution functions P(θr), P(ϕr), P( {θ }r,{φ }r ) on the potential energy surface that fixed the collision energy with a value is 40 kcal/mol have been studied. The isotope effect becomes more and more important with the reagent molecules H 2 changing into HD and HT. P({θ }r,{φ }r) as the joint probability density function of both polar angles θ r and ϕ r , which can illustrate more detailed dynamics information. The isotope effect is obvious influence on the properties of stereodynamics in the reactions of {C}++{H}2/{H D}/{H T}\\to {{C H}}++H/D/T. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11474141, 11274149, 11544015, the Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University under Grant No. LJQ2015040, and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry (2014-1685)

  10. Temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect in β-pinene ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensch, Iulia; Laumer, Werner; Stein, Olaf; Kammer, Beatrix; Hohaus, Thorsten; Saathoff, Harald; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2011-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of β-pinene ozonolysis was investigated experimentally at 258, 273 and 303 K in the AIDA atmospheric simulation chamber. Compound specific carbon isotopic analysis of gas phase samples was performed off-line with a Thermo Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS) system. From the temporal behavior of the δ13C of β-pinene a KIE of 1.00358 ± 0.00013 was derived at 303 K, in agreement with literature data. Furthermore, KIE values of 1.00380 ± 0.00014 at 273 K and 1.00539 ± 0.00012 at 258 K were determined, showing an increasing KIE with decreasing temperature. A parameterization of the observed KIE temperature dependence was deduced and used in a sensitivity study carried out with the global chemistry transport model MOZART-3. Two scenarios were compared, the first neglecting, the second implementing the KIE temperature dependence in the simulations. β-Pinene stable carbon isotope ratio and concentration were computed, with emphasis on boreal zones. For early spring it is shown that when neglecting the temperature dependence of KIE, the calculated average age of β-pinene in the atmosphere can be up to two times over- or underestimated. The evolution of the isotopic composition of the major β-pinene oxidation product, nopinone, was examined using Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) simulations. The tested hypothesis that formation of nopinone and its associated KIE are the determining factors for the observed δ13C values of nopinone is supported at high β-pinene conversion levels.

  11. Controlling for anthropogenically induced atmospheric variation in stable carbon isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, E.S.; Sweitzer, R.A.; Diefenbach, D.R.; Ben-David, M.

    2005-01-01

    Increased use of stable isotope analysis to examine food-web dynamics, migration, transfer of nutrients, and behavior will likely result in expansion of stable isotope studies investigating human-induced global changes. Recent elevation of atmospheric CO2 concentration, related primarily to fossil fuel combustion, has reduced atmospheric CO2 ??13C (13C/12C), and this change in isotopic baseline has, in turn, reduced plant and animal tissue ??13C of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Such depletion in CO2 ??13C and its effects on tissue ??13C may introduce bias into ??13C investigations, and if this variation is not controlled, may confound interpretation of results obtained from tissue samples collected over a temporal span. To control for this source of variation, we used a high-precision record of atmospheric CO2 ??13C from ice cores and direct atmospheric measurements to model modern change in CO2 ??13C. From this model, we estimated a correction factor that controls for atmospheric change; this correction reduces bias associated with changes in atmospheric isotopic baseline and facilitates comparison of tissue ??13C collected over multiple years. To exemplify the importance of accounting for atmospheric CO2 ??13C depletion, we applied the correction to a dataset of collagen ??13C obtained from mountain lion (Puma concolor) bone samples collected in California between 1893 and 1995. Before correction, in three of four ecoregions collagen ??13C decreased significantly concurrent with depletion of atmospheric CO2 ??13C (n ??? 32, P ??? 0.01). Application of the correction to collagen ??13C data removed trends from regions demonstrating significant declines, and measurement error associated with the correction did not add substantial variation to adjusted estimates. Controlling for long-term atmospheric variation and correcting tissue samples for changes in isotopic baseline facilitate analysis of samples that span a large temporal range. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  12. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Saritha; M Durga Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we had suggested that the motion along the promoter mode in the first part of the IRC of proton transfer reaction enhances the delocalization of electrons on the acceptor atom into the * orbital of the donor-hydrogen covalent bond, and as a consequence weakens it. This leads to a reduction of the barrier to the proton transfer as well as the stretching frequency of donor-hydrogen bond. An extension of this to the concerted multiple proton transfer reactions implies that the kinetic isotope effect in such reaction depends exponentially on the number of protons that are being transferred. Computational evidence on three systems, (HF)3, formic acid dimer, and (H2O) clusters is provided to support this assertion.

  13. Isotope quantum effects in water around the freezing point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R T; Mei, Q; Benmore, C J; Neuefeind, J C; Turner, J F C; Dolgos, M; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2006-04-07

    We have measured the difference in electronic structure factors between liquid H(2)O and D(2)O at temperatures of 268 and 273 K with high energy x-ray diffraction. These are compared to our previously published data measured from 279 to 318 K. We find that the total structural isotope effect increases by a factor of 3.5 over the entire range, as the temperature is decreased. Structural isochoric temperature differential and isothermal density differential functions have been used to compare these data to a thermodynamic model based upon a simple offset in the state function. The model works well in describing the magnitude of the structural differences above approximately 310 K, but fails at lower temperatures. The experimental results are discussed in light of several quantum molecular dynamics simulations and are in good qualitative agreement with recent temperature dependent, rotationally quantized rigid molecule simulations.

  14. [The isotope effect in the glycine dehydrogenase reaction is the cause of the intramolecular isotope inhomogeneity of glucose carbon of starch synthesized during photorespiration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, A A

    2005-01-01

    The isotope distribution of glucose-6-phosphate in the main pathways of its biosynthesis (in the processes of CO2 assimilation and photorespiration in the Calvin cycle and during resynthesis from the degradation products of lipids and proteins) was analyzed. For reconstructing the isotope distribution of glucoso-6-phosphate synthesized in the Calvin cycle during photorespiration, the functioning of the cycle with regard to its coupling with the glycolate chain, which together constitute the photorespiration chain, was considered. In the glycine dehydrogenase reaction of the glycolate cycle, there arises an isotope effect, which determines the distribution of isotopes in the glucose-6-phosphate and other photorespiration products. The isotope effect of the glycine dehydrogenase reaction increases at the expense of the exhaustion of glucose resources feeding the photorespiration chain. As a result, atoms C-3 and C-4 of glucose become enriched with the heavy isotope, and subsequent mixing of atoms and the specificity of interactions in the photorespiration chain lead to an isotope weighting of the other atoms and an uneven distribution of carbon isotopes in glucose-6-phosphate and other photorespiration products. A comparison of the glucose-6-phosphate isotope patterns in different pathways of the synthesis with the experimental data on the distribution of carbon isotopes in starch glucose of storing plant organs led to the conclusion that the starch resources are predominantly formed at the expense of glucose-6-phosphate of photorespiration. This is consistent with the earlier observed enhancement of photorespiration at the stage of plant maturation.

  15. Hydrodynamic influence on reservoir sustainability in semi-arid climate: A physicochemical and environmental isotopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Rawaa; Kazpard, Véronique; El Samrani, Antoine G; Amacha, Nabil; Saad, Zeinab; Chou, Lei

    2017-07-15

    Water scarcity and increasing water demand require the development of water management plans such as establishing artificial lakes and dams. Plans to meet water needs are faced by uprising challenges to improve water quality and to ensure the sustainability of hydro-projects. Environmental isotopes coupled to water physicochemical characteristics were investigated over a biennial cycle to assess both geomorphological and environmental impacts on the water quality of a reservoir situated in an intensively used agricultural watershed under a Mediterranean semi-arid climate. The particularity of the semi-arid climate and the diverse topography generate a continental and orographic rain effect on the isotopic composition of precipitation and the water recharged sources. The studied reservoir responds quickly to land-use activities and climatic changes as reflected by temporal and spatial variations of water chemistry and isotopic composition. Increasing changes in precipitation rate and dry periods significantly modified the water isotopic composition in the reservoir. During the first year, hydrogen (δD) and oxygen (δ(18)O) isotopes are depleted by 6 and 2‰ between dry and wet season, respectively. While a shift of -2‰ for δD and -1‰ for δ(18)O was detected during the second annual cycle. Environmental isotopic compositions demonstrate for the first time the occurrence of groundwater inflow to the central (Cz) and dam (Dz) zones of the Qaraaoun reservoir. The Cz and Dz can be considered as open water bodies subjected to dilution by groundwater inflow, which induces vertical mixing and reverse isotopic stratification of the water column. In the contrary, the river mouth zone acts as a closed system without groundwater intrusion, where heavy water accumulates and may act as a sink for contaminants during dry season. Groundwater influx acts as a dilution factor that renews the hypolimnion, and minimizes the perturbations induced by both internal

  16. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Said Ahmad, Ward; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-09-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰). Experiments involving sparingly soluble CaSO4 show that during the second catalytic phase of TSR the rate of sulfate reduction exceeds that of sulfate dissolution. In this case, there is no apparent isotopic fractionation between source sulfate and generated H2S, as all of the available sulfate is effectively reduced at all reaction times. When CaSO4 is replaced with fully soluble Na2SO4, sulfate dissolution is no longer rate limiting and significant S-isotopic fractionation is observed. This supports the notion that CaSO4 dissolution can lead to the apparent lack of fractionation between H2S and sulfate produced by TSR in nature. The S-isotopic composition of individual OSCs record information related to geochemical reactions that cannot be discerned from the δ34S values obtained from bulk phases such as H2S, oil, and sulfate minerals, and

  17. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  18. Insight on RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus strains using 13C and 15N kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Anat; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2013-01-02

    The explosive Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is known to be degraded aerobically by various isolates of the Rhodococcus species, with denitration being the key step, mediated by Cytochrome P450. Our study aimed at gaining insight into the RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus species and comparing isotope effects associated with RDX degradation by distinct Rhodococcus strains. For these purposes, enrichment in (13)C and (15)N isotopes throughout RDX denitration was studied for three distinct Rhodococcus strains, isolated from soil and groundwater in an RDX-contaminated site. The observable (15)N enrichment throughout the reaction, together with minor (13)C enrichment, suggests that N-N bond cleavage is likely to be the key rate-limiting step in the reaction. The similarity in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect between the three tested strains suggests that either isotope-masking effects are negligible, or are of a similar extent for all tested strains. The lack of variability in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect allows the interpretation of environmental studies with greater confidence.

  19. Clumped Isotope Composition of Cold-Water Corals: A Role for Vital Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, P.; Guo, W.; Robinson, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements on a set of cold-water corals (mainly Desmophyllum dianthus) have suggested that their clumped isotope composition could serve as a promising proxy for reconstructing paleocean temperatures. Such measurements have also offered support for certain isotope models of coral calcification. However, there are differences in the clumped isotope compositions between warm-water and cold-water corals, suggesting that different kinds of corals could have differences in their biocalcification processes. In order to understand the systematics of clumped isotope variations in cold-water corals more fully, we present clumped isotope data from a range of cold-water coral species from the tropical Atlantic and the Southern Ocean.Our samples were either collected live or recently dead (14C ages biocalcification may not apply equally well to all corals. Clumped isotope vital effects may be present in certain cold-water corals as they are in warm-water corals, complicating the use of this paleoclimate proxy.

  20. Simulation of cloud microphysical effects on water isotope fractionation in a frontal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. P.; Tsai, I. C.; Chen, W. Y.; Liang, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The stable water isotopic composition changes due to fractionation during phase changes. This information is useful for understanding the water cycle, such as the water vapor source, transport and cloud microphysical processes. In conventional atmospheric models, the isotope exchange between liquid and gas phase is usually assumed to be in an equilibrium state, which is not sufficient to describe the highly kinetic phase transformation processes in clouds. In this study, a two-moment microphysical scheme incorporated into the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is modified to simulate the isotope fractionations. Experimentally determined stable water isotope thermal equilibrium data are converted into isotope saturation vapor pressure, which is then put into the two-stream Maxwellian kinetic equation to calculate the fractionation during vapor condensation/evaporation or deposition/sublimation. Isotope mass transfer between liquid- and ice-phase hydrometeors during freezing/melting are also considered explicitly. The simulation results were compared with rainwater isotope measurements and showed fairly good agreement. Sensitivity tests were also conducted to quantify the contribution of rainwater isotopic due to water vapor source and transport, condensation environment conditions, and cloud microphysical processes. The results show that isotopic water vapor source dominates the stable isotope concentration in rainwater but the cloud microphysical processes including the ice-phase processes are also quite important. The results also showed that the two-stream Maxwellian kinetic method would cause significantly more deuterium to be transported into higher altitudes during convection than the thermal equilibrium method.

  1. Isotope Fractionation Studies in Prestellar Cores: The Case of Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - N and N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments. Charnley and Rodgers showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles (HCN and HNC) was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: L1521E, L1498, L1544, and L1521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards LI544 were obtained with N2H+ and NIH3, yielding ratios of 446 and >700, respectively. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  2. The power of integrating kinetic isotope effects into the formalism of the Michaelis-Menten equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinman, Judith P

    2014-01-01

    The final arbiter of enzyme mechanism is the ability to establish and test a kinetic mechanism. Isotope effects play a major role in expanding the scope and insight derived from the Michaelis-Menten equation. The integration of isotope effects into the formalism of the Michaelis-Menten equation began in the 1970s and has continued until the present. This review discusses a family of eukaryotic copper proteins, including dopamine β-monooxygenase, tyramine β-monooxygenase and peptidylglycine α-amidating enzyme, which are responsible for the synthesis of neuroactive compounds, norepinephrine, octopamine and C-terminally carboxamidated peptides, respectively. The review highlights the results of studies showing how combining kinetic isotope effects with initial rate parameters permits the evaluation of: (a) the order of substrate binding to multisubstrate enzymes; (b) the magnitude of individual rate constants in complex, multistep reactions; (c) the identification of chemical intermediates; and (d) the role of nonclassical (tunnelling) behaviour in C-H activation. © 2013 FEBS.

  3. USE OF STABLE ISOTOPES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FORENSIC GEOCHEMISTRY STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes have been used for many decades in the petroleum industry, but the development of combined gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCIRMS) has led to a virtual explosion in application of this technique not only in petroleum explora...

  4. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ18O and amount effects in the south of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, Roel J W; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    [1] Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ18Otr). Interannual variation in δ18Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ13C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ18Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly 18O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ18Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ18Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ18O and that interannual variation in δ18Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ18O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in disentangling the processes

  5. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ(18)O and amount effects in the south of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, Roel J W; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    [1] Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ(18)Otr). Interannual variation in δ(18)Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ(13)C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ(18)Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly (18)O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ(18)Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ(18)Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ(18)O and that interannual variation in δ(18)Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ(18)O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in

  6. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ18O and amount effects in the south of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, Roel J. W.; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ18Otr). Interannual variation in δ18Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ13C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ18Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly 18O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ18Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ18Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ18O and that interannual variation in δ18Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ18O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in disentangling the processes

  7. Pb Isotope Study of Some Nonferrous Metallic Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on Pb-Pb isochron data of more than 40 Precambrian polymetallic deposits, the authors consider that there are four mineralization periods for the Precambrian copper deposits in China, and the major copper deposits were formed at about 1800 Ma; there are three mineralization periods for gold deposits formed from Archaean to Proterozoic. By studying hundreds of lead isotope data from some Mesozoic continental subvolcanic Cu and Ag polymetallic deposits and fine-disseminated gold deposits, the authors found that the calculation based on the lead single-stage evolution model or two-stage evolution model cannot give the true ore-forming ages but can provide more information about mineralization and material sources of the deposits.

  8. Isotopic effects on non-linearity, molecular radius and intermolecular free length

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjan Dey; Arvind K Singh; N K Soni; B S Bisht; J D Pandey

    2006-08-01

    Computation of non-linearity parameter (/), molecular radius (rm) and intermolecular free length (f) for H2O, C6H6, C6H12, CH3OH, C2H5OH and their deuterium-substituted compounds have been carried out at four different temperatures, viz., 293.15, 303.15, 313.15 and 323.15 K. The aim of the investigation is an attempt to study the isotopic effects on the non-linearity parameter and the physicochemical properties of the liquids, which in turn has been used to study their effect on the intermolecular interactions produced thereof.

  9. An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Kamyshny, Alexey; Halevy, Itay

    2014-05-01

    An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies Natella Mirzoyan1, Alexey Kamyshny Jr.2, Itay Halevy1 1Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel 2Geological and Environmental Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel Pyrite is one of the most abundant and widespread of the sulfide minerals with a central role in biogeochemical cycles of iron and sulfur. Due to its diverse roles in the natural and anthropogenic sulfur cycle, pyrite has been extensively studied in various experimental investigations of the kinetics of its dissolution and oxidation, the isotopic fractionations associated with these reactions, and the microbiological processes involved. Pretreatment of pyrite for removal of oxidation impurities to prevent experimental artifacts and inaccuracies is often practiced. While numerous pyrite-cleaning methods have been used in experiments, a common pyrite pretreatment method, often used to investigate pyrite chemistry by the isotopic fractionations associated with it, includes several rinses by HCl, acetone and deionized water. Elemental sulfur (S0) is a common product of incomplete pyrite oxidation. Removal of S0 is desirable to avoid experimental biases associated with its participation in pyrite transformations, but is more complicated than the removal of sulfate. Although rinsing with an organic solvent is in part aimed at removing S0, to the best of our knowledge, the extraction efficiency of S0 in existing protocols has not been assessed. We have developed and tested a new protocol for elemental sulfur removal from the surface of pyrite by ultrasonication with warm acetone. Our data demonstrate the presence of large fractions of S0 on untreated pyrite particle surfaces, of which only approximately 60% was removed by the commonly used pretreatment method. The new protocol described here was found to be more efficient at S0 removal than the commonly used method

  10. Silver diffusion and isotope effect in silver rubidium iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzigian, James Simon [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1980-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of silver in (RbAg 4I 5) was measured in both superionic phases using radiotracer Ag-110m and serial sectioning with a low temperature sectioning apparatus. The activation energies for diffusion in alpha-RbAg4I5 and beta-RbAg4I5, respectively, are 0.11 ± 0.01 eV and 0.20 ± 0.04 eV. An isotope effect for diffusion was also measured in both superionic phases. Ag-105 and Ag-110m radioisotopes were used with gamma spectroscopy and energy discrimination. The effect is small, with no significant temperature variation, with the value at 333 K being 0.12 ± 0.01. The second-order phase transition at 208 K has a small effect, if any, on the magnitude of the effect. The data suggest that a highly cooperative transport mechanism is responsible for the unusually high values of both the conductivity and diffusion coefficient. Although it is not possible to deduce the particular mechanism involved, theories involving ionic polarons, or cooperative motion, such as crowdions or solitons, seem consistent with the observed results.

  11. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bruce S. [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Lollar, Barbara Sherwood [Earth Sciences Department, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B1 (Canada); Passeport, Elodie [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Department, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E5 (Canada); Sleep, Brent E., E-mail: sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining “observable” DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C{sub 0}), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (D{sub mech}/D{sub eff}). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C{sub 0}/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C{sub 0}/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1 m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (< 100 years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with “typical” well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where D{sub mech}/D{sub eff} is

  12. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  13. Stable isotope biogeochemistry of seabird guano fertilization: results from growth chamber studies with maize (Zea mays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Szpak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stable isotope analysis is being utilized with increasing regularity to examine a wide range of issues (diet, habitat use, migration in ecology, geology, archaeology, and related disciplines. A crucial component to these studies is a thorough understanding of the range and causes of baseline isotopic variation, which is relatively poorly understood for nitrogen (δ(15N. Animal excrement is known to impact plant δ(15N values, but the effects of seabird guano have not been systematically studied from an agricultural or horticultural standpoint. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This paper presents isotopic (δ(13C and δ(15N and vital data for maize (Zea mays fertilized with Peruvian seabird guano under controlled conditions. The level of (15N enrichment in fertilized plants is very large, with δ(15N values ranging between 25.5 and 44.7‰ depending on the tissue and amount of fertilizer applied; comparatively, control plant δ(15N values ranged between -0.3 and 5.7‰. Intraplant and temporal variability in δ(15N values were large, particularly for the guano-fertilized plants, which can be attributed to changes in the availability of guano-derived N over time, and the reliance of stored vs. absorbed N. Plant δ(13C values were not significantly impacted by guano fertilization. High concentrations of seabird guano inhibited maize germination and maize growth. Moreover, high levels of seabird guano greatly impacted the N metabolism of the plants, resulting in significantly higher tissue N content, particularly in the stalk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results presented in this study demonstrate the very large impact of seabird guano on maize δ(15N values. The use of seabird guano as a fertilizer can thus be traced using stable isotope analysis in food chemistry applications (certification of organic inputs. Furthermore, the fertilization of maize with seabird guano creates an isotopic signature very similar to a high-trophic level

  14. Photon strength functions in Gd isotopes studied from radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroll J.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimental spectra of γ rays following radiative neutron capture on isolated resonances of stable 152,154–158Gd targets were measured by the DANCE calorimeter installed at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center in New Mexico, USA. These spectra were analyzed within the extreme statistical model to get new information on the photon strength functions. Special emphasis was put on study of the scissors vibrational mode present in these isotopes. Our data show that the scissors-mode resonances are built not only on the ground states but also on the excited levels of all studied Gd isotopes. The scissors mode strength observed in 157,159Gd products is significantly higher than in neighboring even-even nuclei 156,158Gd. Such a difference indicates the existence of an odd-even effect in the scissors mode strength. Moreover, there exists no universal parameter-free model of the electric dipole photon strength function describing the experimental data in all of the Gd isotopes studied. The results for the scissors mode are compared with the (γ, γ′ data for the ground-state transitions and with the results from 3He-induced reactions.

  15. Mg isotopes in biocarbonates: new insight into vital effects associated to echinoderms and bivalves calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, F.; Hermans, J.; Borremans, C.; Dubois, P.; Poulain, C.; Paulet, Y.; Andre, L.

    2007-12-01

    Mg isotopes can be helpful tracers to reveal the fundamental pathways of Mg incorporation during biomineralisation. We report in this study a detailed characterisation of the Mg isotopic signatures of different biominerals: high magnesium calcitic skeletons of selected echinoderms (sea urchins and starfish) and low magnesium aragonitic shells of a bivalve species (clam). State of the art analytical procedures were applied including sample purification step followed by high precision measurements using MC-ICP-MS (Nu instrument) in dry plasma conditions. 26Mg/24Mg and 25Mg/24Mg are expressed as per mil deviations from the DSM3 (Dead Sea Metal 3) reference standard in delta notation (d26Mg and d25Mg). For echinoderms, we considered: (a) adult specimens of six starfish species (Asteria r., Marthasterias g., Anseropoda p., Asterina g., Echinaster s. and Henricia o.), sampled in Brittany (France); (b) a sea urchin species (Paracentrotus lividus) with field samples (Mediterranean Sea, Marseille, France) and culture specimen under T and S controlled conditions. In vivo endoskeletons display negative, but different d26Mg values of -3.06 for starfish (with uniform interspecies signatures) and -2.65 for sea urchin. Relative to seawater signature (-0.82), all echinoderms favour the incorporation of light isotopes during biocalcification. The d26Mg depletion is lower than theoretically expected from a inorganic calcite precipitation from seawater (at -3.5). These differences suggest that on its route from seawater to the shell, Mg isotopes are partly biologically fractionationated through "vital effects" leaving heavier Mg isotopic signatures. Taken into account that calcification in echinoderms is an intra- cellular process involving transient amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase, the observed bio-fractionation factors can be related to: (1) changes in the isotopic composition of the precipitating intracellular fluids due to active pumping in and out of the cell; (2) a

  16. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  17. Isotope effect on gyro-fluid edge turbulence and zonal flows

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Ole Hauke Heinz

    2016-01-01

    The role of ion polarisation and finite Larmor radius on the isotope effect on turbulent tokamak edge transport and flows is investigated by means of local electromagnetic multi-species gyro-fluid computations. Transport is found to be reduced with the effective plasma mass for protium, deuterium and tritium mixtures. This isotope effect is found for both cold and warm ion models, but significant influence of finite Larmor radius and polarisation effects are identified. Sheared flow reduction of transport through self generated turbulent zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes in the present model (not including neoclassical flows) is found to play only a minor role on regulating isotopically improved confinement.

  18. A first isotopic dietary study of the Greenlandic Thule Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, D.E.; Lynnerup, Niels; Arneborg, J.

    2012-01-01

    The isotopic dietary method has been applied to samples of some 65 Thule Culture individuals from existing archaeological collections of Greenlandic human skeletal material. The aim was to use the Greenlandic Thule Culture as a test of the isotopic method, in that we know they were heavily...... was used as the basis for analysis. As expected, the results indicate that these people were almost entirely dependent on the marine biosphere for their protein. An exception is those from Northeast Greenland, whose isotopic signatures show evidence for consumption of terrestrial protein as well...

  19. Ion beam production and study of radioactive isotopes with the laser ion source at ISOLDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosseev, Valentin; Chrysalidis, Katerina; Day Goodacre, Thomas; Marsh, Bruce; Rothe, Sebastian; Seiffert, Christoph; Wendt, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    At ISOLDE the majority of radioactive ion beams are produced using the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS). This ion source is based on resonant excitation of atomic transitions by wavelength tunable laser radiation. Since its installation at the ISOLDE facility in 1994, the RILIS laser setup has been developed into a versatile remotely operated laser system comprising state-of-the-art solid state and dye lasers capable of generating multiple high quality laser beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. A continuous programme of atomic ionization scheme development at CERN and at other laboratories has gradually increased the number of RILIS-ionized elements. At present, isotopes of 40 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized by the ISOLDE RILIS. Studies related to the optimization of the laser-atom interaction environment have yielded new laser ion source types: the laser ion source and trap and the versatile arc discharge and laser ion source. Depending on the specific experimental requirements for beam purity or versatility to switch between different ionization mechanisms, these may offer a favourable alternative to the standard hot metal cavity configuration. In addition to its main purpose of ion beam production, the RILIS is used for laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes. In an ongoing experimental campaign the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of long isotopic chains have been measured by the extremely sensitive in-source laser spectroscopy method. The studies performed in the lead region were focused on nuclear deformation and shape coexistence effects around the closed proton shell Z = 82. The paper describes the functional principles of the RILIS, the current status of the laser system and demonstrated capabilities for the production of different ion beams including the high-resolution studies of short-lived isotopes and other applications of RILIS lasers for ISOLDE experiments. This article belongs to the Focus on

  20. Triple Isotope Water Analyzer for Extraplanetary Studies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a miniature, high-resolution, low power, triple-isotope water...

  1. Triple Isotope Water Analyzer for Extraplanetary Studies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to employ Off-Axis ICOS to develop triple-isotope water analyzers for lunar and other extraplanetary exploration. This instrument...

  2. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  3. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-06-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

  4. Dynamic isotope effects on relaxation of quadrupolar nuclei in 12 simple organic molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛希安; andM.Holz

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic isotope effects on relaxation rate of quadrupolar nuclei are preliminarily reported. The relaxation rates of 17O and 14N in 12 simple organic molecules and their 18 corresponding deuterated species have been systematically measured. The principal components of the molecular inertia tensors have been calculated. The results show that there is an intrinsic correlation between the dynamic isotope effects of the relaxation rate and the static isotope effects of the molecular inertia. The concepts of molecular collision frequency and translation-rotation coupling have been introduced into the NMR relaxation theory. Therefore, a reasonable explanation of the experimental results has been given.

  5. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    to be negative, indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition unusual long-range effects are seen. Structures, NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using DFT methods. Two-bond deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are correlated......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found...... with calculated OH stretching frequencies. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are calculated for systems with OH exchanged by OD. Hydrogen bond potentials are discussed. New and more soluble nitro derivatives are synthesized....

  6. H/D isotope effect of {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra and {sup 79}Br NQR frequencies of piperidinium p-bromobenzoate and pyrrolidinium p-bromobenzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Hisashi, E-mail: hhonda@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Nanobioscience (Japan); Kyo, Shinshin [Yokohama City University, Faculty of Sciences (Japan); Akaho, Yousuke [Yokohama City University, Faculty of International College of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Takamizawa, Satoshi [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Nanobioscience (Japan); Terao, Hiromitsu [Tokushima University, Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    H/D isotope effects onto {sup 79}Br NQR frequencies of piperidinium p-bromobenzoate were studied by deuterium substitution of hydrogen atoms which form two kinds of N-H Midline-Horizontal-Ellipsis O type hydrogen bonds, and the isotope shift of ca. 100 kHz were detected for a whole observed temperature range. In addition, {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra measurements of piperidinium and pyrrolidinium p-bromobenzoate were carried out and little isotope changes of NMR line shape were detected. In order to reveal effects of molecular arrangements into the obtained isotope shift of NQR frequencies, single-crystal X-ray measurement of piperidinium p-bromobenzoate-d2 and density-functional-theory calculation were carried out. Our estimation showed the dihedral-angle change between piperidine and benzene ring contributes to isotope shift rather than those of N-H lengths by deuterium substitution.

  7. Characterizing the Effect of Shock on Isotopic Ages I: Ferroan Anorthosite Major Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, J.; Cohen, B. A.; Spilde, M. N.

    2009-01-01

    A study underway at Marshall Space Flight Center is further characterizing the effects of shock on isotopic ages. The study was inspired by the work of L. Nyquist et al. [1, 2], but goes beyond their work by investigating the spatial distribution of elements in lunar ferroan anorthosites (FANs) and magnesium-suite (Mg-suite) rocks in order to understand the processes that may influence the radioisotope ages obtained on early lunar samples. This paper discusses the first data set (major elements) obtained on FANs 62236 and 67075.

  8. Thermal effects on rare earth element and strontium isotope chemistry in single conodont elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, H. A.; Pearson, D. G.; Griselin, M.

    2001-02-01

    A low-blank, high sensitivity isotope dilution, ICP-MS analytical technique has been used to obtain REE abundance data from single conodont elements weighing as little as 5 μg. Sr isotopes can also be measured from the column eluants enabling Sr isotope ratios and REE abundance to be determined from the same dissolution. Results are comparable to published analyses comprising tens to hundreds of elements. To study the effects of thermal metamorphism on REE and strontium mobility in conodonts, samples were selected from a single bed adjacent to a basaltic dyke and from the internationally used colour alteration index (CAI) "standard set." Our analyses span the range of CAI 1 to 8. Homogeneous REE patterns, "bell-shaped" shale-normalised REE patterns are observed across the range of CAI 1 to 6 in both sample sets. This pattern is interpreted as the result of adsorption during early diagenesis and could reflect original seawater chemistry. Above CAI 6 REE patterns become less predictable and perturbations from the typical REE pattern are likely to be due to the onset of apatite recrystallisation. Samples outside the contact aureole of the dyke have a mean 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.708165, within the broad range of published mid-Carboniferous seawater values. Our analysis indicates conodonts up to CAI 6 record primary geochemical signals that may be a proxy for ancient seawater.

  9. Covariance of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition in plant water: Species effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1989-12-01

    Leaf water becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen during evapotranspiration. The magnitude of the enrichment has been shown to be influenced by temperature and humidity, but the effects of species-specific factors on leaf water enrichment of D and {sup 18}O have not been studied for different plants growing together. To learn whether leaf water enrichment patterns and processes for D and {sup 18}O are different for individual species growing under the same environmental conditions the authors tested the proposal that leaf waters in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) show high sloped (m in the leaf water equation {delta}D = m {delta}{sup 18}O + b) than in C{sub 3} plants. They determined the relationships between the stable hydrogen ({delta}D) and oxygen ({delta}{sup 18}O) isotope ratios of leaf waters collected during the diurnal cycle of evapotranspiration for Yucca schidigera, Ephedra aspera, Agave deserti, Prunus ilicifolia, Yucca whipplei, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Dyckia fosteriana, Simmondsia chinensis, and Encelia farinosa growing at two sites in southern California. The findings indicate that m in the aforementioned equation is related to the overall residence time for water in the leaf and proportions of water subjected to repeated evapotranspiration enrichments of heavy isotopes.

  10. Deformation effects in the alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of even-even {sup 244-260}Cf isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P.; Krishnan, Sreejith [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur, Kerala (India)

    2016-04-15

    Within the unified ternary fission model (UTFM), the alpha accompanied ternary fission of even-even {sup 244-260}Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. For the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the {sup 244}Cf isotope, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination {sup 108}Ru + {sup 4}He + {sup 132}Te, which contains the near doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Te (N = 80, Z = 52). In the case of {sup 246}Cf and {sup 248}Cf isotopes, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combinations with the near doubly magic nucleus {sup 134}Te (N = 82, Z = 52) as the heaviest fragment. The highest yield obtained for {sup 250}Cf, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 254}Cf, {sup 256}Cf, {sup 258}Cf and {sup 260}Cf isotopes is for the fragment combination with the doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn (N = 82), Z = 50 as the heaviest fragment. We have included the effect of deformation and orientation of fragments and this has revealed that in addition to the closed shell effect, ground-state deformation also plays an important role in the calculation of the relative yield of favorable fragment combinations. The computed isotopic yields for the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the {sup 252}Cf isotope are found to be in agreement with the experimental data. The emission probability and kinetic energy of the long-range alpha particle is calculated for the various isotopes of Cf and are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  11. Geometric isotope effects on small chloride ion water clusters with path integral molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi [Department of Chemistry, Tsukuba University, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, Kimichi [Research Institute for Nanosystem, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Chuo-2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nagashima, Umpei, E-mail: u.nagashima@aist.go.jp [Department of Chemistry, Tsukuba University, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Research Institute for Nanosystem, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Chuo-2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Tachikawa, Masanori [Quantum Chemistry Division, Graduate School of Science, Yokohama-City University, Seto 22-2, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Yan, Shiwei [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: • PIMD simulations with PM6-DH+ potential are carried out for Cl{sup −}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters. • The geometric isotope effects on the rearrangement of single and multi shell structures are presented. • The competition of intramolecular and intermolecular nuclear quantum effects on the cluster structures is shown. • The correlations between r(Cl…O) and other vibration motions are discussed. - Abstract: The geometric isotope effects on the structures of hydrated chloride ionic hydrogen bonded clusters are explored by carrying out path integral molecular dynamics simulations. First, an outer shell coordinate is selected to display the rearrangement of single and multi hydration shell cluster structures. Next, to show the competition of intramolecular and intermolecular nuclear quantum effects, the intramolecular OH{sup ∗} stretching and intermolecular ion–water wagging motions are studied for single and multi shell structures, respectively. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects stabilize the ionic hydrogen bonds in single shell structures, while they are destabilized through the competition with intramolecular nuclear quantum effects in multi shell structures. In addition, the correlations between ion–water stretching motion and other cluster vibrational coordinates are discussed. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects on the cluster structures are strongly related to the cooperation of the water–water hydrogen bond interactions.

  12. Effects of carbonate leaching on foraminifer stable isotopes ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrochta, S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Sakai, S.; Ishimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were measured on 125 individual epifaunal and infaunal benthic foraminifers from two discrete Holocene intervals in a shallow-water sediment core (~ 450 m) from the Timor Sea. Methane seeps are common in the area, resulting in significant precipitation of secondary calcite that is confirmed by SEM photomicrographs and has likely resulted in inconsistent downcore results. To assess the degree of removal of contaminants, individual Uvigerina peregrina were subjected to varying degrees of pretreatment prior to analysis. All foraminifers received standard cleaning with ethanol and brief sonication. A subset were further cleaned and sonicated in a dilute HCl solution (~ 0.003 M). Foraminifer tests were photographed using both reflected light and scanning electron microscopes during the course of treatment to monitor the changing degree of contaminant removal as increasingly aggressive cleaning methods were employed. Visible contamination remained on individuals not subjected to HCl treatment. The leached individuals exhibit a lower overall relative standard deviation and consistent results within morphotype groups. Based on these results, a 2% value is expected to be typical of the Holocene, though further downcore analyses are pending restoration of equipment adversely effected by the Eastern Japan 3/11 earthquake.

  13. Effects of permeability fields on fluid, heat, and oxygen isotope transport in extensional detachment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardi, RaphaëL.; Kao, Po-Hao; Saar, Martin O.; Teyssier, Christian

    2013-05-01

    Field studies of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes indicate that meteoric fluids permeated the upper crust down to the detachment shear zone and interacted with highly deformed and recrystallized (mylonitic) rocks. The presence of fluids in the brittle/ductile transition zone is recorded in the oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope compositions of the mylonites and may play an important role in the thermomechanical evolution of the detachment shear zone. Geochemical data show that fluid flow in the brittle upper crust is primarily controlled by the large-scale fault-zone architecture. We conduct continuum-scale (i.e., large-scale, partial bounce-back) lattice-Boltzman fluid, heat, and oxygen isotope transport simulations of an idealized cross section of a metamorphic core complex. The simulations investigate the effects of crust and fault permeability fields as well as buoyancy-driven flow on two-way coupled fluid and heat transfer and resultant exchange of oxygen isotopes between meteoric fluid and rock. Results show that fluid migration to middle to lower crustal levels is fault controlled and depends primarily on the permeability contrast between the fault zone and the crustal rocks. High fault/crust permeability ratios lead to channelized flow in the fault and shear zones, while lower ratios allow leakage of the fluids from the fault into the crust. Buoyancy affects mainly flow patterns (more upward directed) and, to a lesser extent, temperature distributions (disturbance of the geothermal field by ~25°C). Channelized fluid flow in the shear zone leads to strong vertical and horizontal thermal gradients, comparable to field observations. The oxygen isotope results show δ18O depletion concentrated along the fault and shear zones, similar to field data.

  14. Effect of Calcium Oxide Microstructure on the Diffusion of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes Ramos, João Pedro; Stora, T

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxide (CaO) powder targets have been successfully used at CERN-ISOLDE to produce neutron deficient exotic argon and carbon isotopes under proton irradiation at high temperatures (>1000°C). These targets outperform the other related targets for the production of the same beams. However, they presented either slow release rates (yields) from the beginning or a rapid decrease over time. This problem was believed to come from the target microstructure degradation, justifying the material investigation. In order to do so, the synthesis, reactivity in ambient air and sintering kinetics of CaO were studied, through surface area determination by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction for crystalline phase identification and crystallite size determination, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure. The synthesis studies revealed that a nanometric material is obtained from the decarbonation of CaCO3 in vacuum at temperatures higher than 550°C, which is very reactive in air....

  15. A study of hydrogen-bond dynamics in carboxylic acids by NMR T1 measurements: isotope effects and hydrogen-bond length dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaki, T.; Imashiro, F.; Terao, T.; Hirota, N.; Hayashi, S.

    1987-08-01

    Proton (deuteron) transfer of hydrogen bonds in benzoic, glutaric and p-formylbenzoic acids was studied by proton (deuteron) T1 measurements. Deuteration of carboxylic protons was found to increase the barriers to classical proton jumping as well as quantum-mechanical tunneling. The former barriers increase as the hydrogen-bond distance increases.

  16. The Evaporation Effect on the Isotopes in the Yellow River Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xiaosi; LIN Xueyu; LIAO Zisheng; WANG Jinsheng

    2001-01-01

    Based on the isotope analysis result of water samples in the 18 sections of the Yellow River, the variation of δ18Oand δD have been analyzed. From near the source to the entrance to the sea, the Yellow River has a general trend that the ratios of the stable isotope increase progressively; The main factors affecting the isotopes in the river water are mixing of external water bodies, evaporation and others; In the river segment between Lanzhou and Baotou and in lower reaches, the extent of the evaporation effect on the isotope fractionation from the river water surface is limited but the evaporation from the irrigated river water and the return flow is one of the main factors affecting the isotopes in river water.

  17. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and paleohydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3} precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth (due mainly to increased importance of respired CO{sub 2}), decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude (partially due to relatively more C-3 vegetation), and reduced {sup 13}C during spring (due again to higher rates of respiration, and reduced gas permeability of wet soils). These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  18. Isotope effect in the carbonyl sulfide reaction with O(3P)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Mahler, Denise W.;

    2012-01-01

    The sulfur kinetic isotope effect (KIE) in the reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) with O((3)P) was studied in relative rate experiments at 298 ± 2 K and 955 ± 10 mbar. The reaction was carried out in a photochemical reactor using long path FTIR detection, and data were analyzed using a nonlinear ...

  19. Contribution of stable isotopes to the study of pharmacokinetics of magnesium salts; Apport des isotopes stables a l'etude de la pharmacocinetique de sels de magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benech, H

    1999-05-28

    The use of stable isotopes as labels is becoming an attractive tool for the study of magnesium behavior in humans. It has been used two stable isotopes of magnesium, {sup 25}Mg and {sup 26}Mg, to measure the absolute bioavailability of a pharmaceutical form of magnesium. (N.C.)

  20. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Regulatory Assessment Dept.] [and others

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  1. Follow the Carbon: Isotopic Labeling Studies of Early Earth Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Raea K; Day, Douglas A; Jimenez, Jose L; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the faint young Sun, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in mixing ratios higher than those found on Earth today. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing these trace gases could lead to the formation of organic aerosol haze due to UV photochemistry. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain haze formation rely on CH4 as the source of carbon and treat CO2 as a source of oxygen only, but this has not previously been verified experimentally. In the present work, we use isotopically labeled precursor gases and unit-mass resolution (UMR) and high-resolution (HR) aerosol mass spectrometry to examine the sources of carbon and oxygen to photochemical aerosol formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. UMR results suggest that CH4 contributes 70-100% of carbon in the aerosol, while HR results constrain the value from 94% to 100%. We also confirm that CO2 contributes approximately 10% of the total mass to the aerosol as oxygen. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archean rocks on Earth and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres. Key Words: Atmosphere-Early Earth-Planetary atmospheres-Carbon dioxide-Methane. Astrobiology 16, 822-830.

  2. Kinetic and geometric isotope effects originating from different adsorption potential energy surfaces: cyclohexane on Rh(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitaya, Takanori; Shimizu, Sumera; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2012-06-07

    Novel isotope effects were observed in desorption kinetics and adsorption geometry of cyclohexane on Rh(111) by the use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, photoelectron spectroscopy, and spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction. The desorption energy of deuterated cyclohexane (C(6)D(12)) is lower than that of C(6)H(12). In addition, the work function change by adsorbed C(6)D(12) is smaller than that by adsorbed C(6)H(12). These results indicate that C(6)D(12) has a shallower adsorption potential than C(6)H(12) (vertical geometric isotope effect). The lateral geometric isotope effect was also observed in the two-dimensional cyclohexane superstructures as a result of the different repulsive interaction between interfacial dipoles. The observed isotope effects should be ascribed to the quantum nature of hydrogen involved in the C-H···metal interaction.

  3. Deformation effects on cluster decays of radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soylu, A., E-mail: asimsoylu@gmail.com; Evlice, S.

    2015-04-15

    We systematically investigate the influence of nuclear deformations of the cluster and daughter nuclei on the half-lives of {sup 4}He, {sup 8,10}Be, {sup 12,14,16}C and {sup 16,18,20,22}O cluster decays from {sup 210–226}Ra. The Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) method and Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization condition with the deformed squared Woods–Saxon and Cosh potentials are used phenomenologically in order to compute the half-lives. The calculations are performed for the spherical cluster and deformed daughter, deformed cluster and spherical daughter and deformed cluster and daughter cases. The half-lives for different orientation angles as well as over all angles are calculated, in order to show the deformation effects on the systems. In cases where the deformation of both cluster and daughter effect the result, it is found that the deformation of the cluster is more important than the deformation of the daughter. Furthermore, it is also found that taking into account the orientation angles of the daughter and cluster also improves the results when compared to experiment. However, the results for a Cosh potential with certain parameters without any deformation are found to be more compatible with both the results obtained by the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) and the universal formula for cluster decay (UNIV), as well as the experimental values for {sup 4}He and {sup 14}C decays. The results provide a useful method for estimating the unknown experimental half-lives of possible exotic decays from Ra isotopes.

  4. Deformation effects on cluster decays of radium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, A.; Evlice, S.

    2015-04-01

    We systematically investigate the influence of nuclear deformations of the cluster and daughter nuclei on the half-lives of 4He, 8,10Be, 12,14,16C and 16,18,20,22O cluster decays from 210-226Ra. The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method and Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition with the deformed squared Woods-Saxon and Cosh potentials are used phenomenologically in order to compute the half-lives. The calculations are performed for the spherical cluster and deformed daughter, deformed cluster and spherical daughter and deformed cluster and daughter cases. The half-lives for different orientation angles as well as over all angles are calculated, in order to show the deformation effects on the systems. In cases where the deformation of both cluster and daughter effect the result, it is found that the deformation of the cluster is more important than the deformation of the daughter. Furthermore, it is also found that taking into account the orientation angles of the daughter and cluster also improves the results when compared to experiment. However, the results for a Cosh potential with certain parameters without any deformation are found to be more compatible with both the results obtained by the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) and the universal formula for cluster decay (UNIV), as well as the experimental values for 4He and 14C decays. The results provide a useful method for estimating the unknown experimental half-lives of possible exotic decays from Ra isotopes.

  5. Determination and application of the equilibrium oxygen isotope effect between water and sulfite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, Scott D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Eldridge, Daniel L.; Johnston, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The information encoded by the two stable isotope systems in sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4) has been widely applied to aid reconstructions of both modern and ancient environments. Interpretation of δ18OSO4 records has been complicated by rapid oxygen isotope equilibration between sulfoxyanions and water. Specifically, the apparent relationship that develops between δ18OSO4 and δ18Owater during microbial sulfate reduction is thought to result from rapid oxygen isotope equilibrium between intracellular water and aqueous sulfite - a reactive intermediate of the sulfate reduction network that can back-react to produce sulfate. Here, we describe the oxygen equilibrium isotope effect between water and sulfite (referring to all the sum of all S(IV)-oxyanions including sulfite and both isomers and the dimer of bisulfite). Based on experiments conducted over a range of pH (4.5-9.8) and temperature (2-95 °C), where ε = 1000 * (α - 1), we find εSO3-H2O=13.61-0.299∗pH-0.081∗T °C. Thus, at a pH (7.0) and temperature (25 °C) typifying commonly used experimental conditions for sulfate reducing bacterial cultures, sulfite is enriched in 18O by 9.5‰ (±0.8‰) relative to ambient water. We examine the implication of these results in a sulfate reduction network that has been revised to reflect our understanding of the reactions involving oxygen. By evaluating previously published data within this new architecture, our results are consistent with previous suggestions of high reversibility of the sulfate reduction biochemical network. We also demonstrate that intracellular exchange rates between SO32- and water must be on average 1-3 orders of magnitude more rapid than intracellular fluxes of sulfate reduction intermediates and that kinetic isotope effects upstream of SO32- are required to explain previous laboratory and environmental studies of δ18OSO4 resulting as a consequence of sulfate reduction.

  6. Stable Isotope Studies of Crop Carbon and Water Relations: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cong-zhi; ZHANG Jia-bao; ZHAO Bing-zi; ZHANG Hui; HUANG Ping

    2009-01-01

    Crop carbon and water relations research is important in the studies of water saving agriculture,breeding program,and energy and material cycles in soil plant atmosphere continuum (SPAC).The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of knowledge on stable isotopes of carbon,oxygen,and hydrogen in the research of crop carbon and water relations,such as carbon isotope discrimination (△13C) during carbon fixation process by photosynthesis,application of △13C in crop water use efficiency (WUE) and breeding programs,oxygen isotope enrichment during leaf water transpiration,CO2 fixation by photosynthesis and release by respiration,application of hydrogen isotope composition (δD) and oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) for determination of water source used by a crop,stable isotope coupling Keeling plot for investigating the carbon and water flux in ecosystem,energy and material cycle in SPAC and correlative integrative models on stable isotope.These aspects contain most of the stable isotope researches on crop carbon and water relations which have been widely explored internationally while less referred in China.Based on the reviewed literatures,some needs for future research are suggested.

  7. Ruthenium tetraoxide oxidations of alkanes: DFT calculations of barrier heights and kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, Markus; Strassner, Thomas

    2006-03-03

    The oxidation of C-H and C-C bonds by metal-oxo compounds is of general interest. We studied the RuO4-mediated catalytic oxidation of several cycloalkanes such as adamantane and cis- and trans-decalin as well as methane. B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculations on the experimentally proposed (3+2) mechanism are in good agreement with known experimental results. Comparison of experimental and theoretical kinetic isotope effects confirms the proposed mechanism. Besides RuO4, we also looked at RuO4(OH)- as a potential active species to account for ruthenium tetraoxide oxidations under strong basic conditions.

  8. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  9. Stable isotope analysis as an early monitoring tool for community-scale effects of rat eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Katherine M.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Wegmann, Alex; Miller-ter Kuile, Ana; Fisher, Robert N.; Young, Hillary S.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive rats have colonized most of the islands of the world, resulting in strong negative impacts on native biodiversity and on ecosystem functions. As prolific omnivores, invasive rats can cause local extirpation of a wide range of native species, with cascading consequences that can reshape communities and ecosystems. Eradication of rats on islands is now becoming a widespread approach to restore ecosystems, and many native island species show strong numerical responses to rat eradication. However, the effect of rat eradication on other consumers can extend beyond direct numerical effects, to changes in behavior, dietary composition, and other ecological parameters. These behavioral and trophic effects may have strong cascading impacts on the ecology of restored ecosystems, but they have rarely been examined. In this study, we explore how rat eradication has affected the trophic ecology of native land crab communities. Using stable isotope analysis of rats and crabs, we demonstrate that the diet or trophic position of most crabs changed subsequent to rat eradication. Combined with the numerical recovery of two carnivorous land crab species (Geograpsus spp.), this led to a dramatic widening of the crab trophic niche following rat eradication. Given the established importance of land crabs in structuring island communities, particularly plants, this suggests an unappreciated mechanism by which rat eradication may alter island ecology. This study also demonstrates the potential for stable isotope analysis as a complementary monitoring tool to traditional techniques, with the potential to provide more nuanced assessments of the community- and ecosystem-wide effects of restoration.

  10. Phytoplankton-bacteria coupling under elevated CO2 levels: a stable isotope labelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Middelburg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential impact of rising carbon dioxide (CO2 on carbon transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria was investigated during the 2005 PeECE III mesocosm study in Bergen, Norway. Sets of mesocosms, in which a phytoplankton bloom was induced by nutrient addition, were incubated under 1× (~350 μatm, 2× (~700 μatm, and 3× present day CO2 (~1050 μatm initial seawater and sustained atmospheric CO2 levels for 3 weeks. 13C labelled bicarbonate was added to all mesocosms to follow the transfer of carbon from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC into phytoplankton and subsequently heterotrophic bacteria, and settling particles. Isotope ratios of polar-lipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA were used to infer the biomass and production of phytoplankton and bacteria. Phytoplankton PLFA were enriched within one day after label addition, whilst it took another 3 days before bacteria showed substantial enrichment. Group-specific primary production measurements revealed that coccolithophores showed higher primary production than green algae and diatoms. Elevated CO2 had a significant positive effect on post-bloom biomass of green algae, diatoms, and bacteria. A simple model based on measured isotope ratios of phytoplankton and bacteria revealed that CO2 had no significant effect on the carbon transfer efficiency from phytoplankton to bacteria during the bloom. There was no indication of CO2 effects on enhanced settling based on isotope mixing models during the phytoplankton bloom, but this could not be determined in the post-bloom phase. Our results suggest that CO2 effects are most pronounced in the post-bloom phase, under nutrient limitation.

  11. Priming effects of biochar elucidated using stable isotope techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-Nowotny, R.; Vanlauwe, B.

    2012-04-01

    Organic residues are routinely used in tropical agricultural systems; as mulches to reduce water losses and for their fertiliser value. The addition of high N content organic residues to soils has been promoted in tropical countries as a means to achieve sustainable intensification of tropical farming systems and increasing soil organic matter status on infertile low income farms. Improving the nutrient release from these materials could have positive feedback effects in terms of improved food security and increased organic matter return to the soil through improved crop yields. Unfortunately the fertiliser value of most organic residues is such that only 10 -20% of the available nitrogen in the residue is mineralised to plant available nitrogen and taken up by the plant in the first cropping year, dropping to less than 2% in the subsequent years; thus having marginal overall impact on crop yields. Improving the fertiliser benefit of residues by combining them with the biochar addition could lead to significant increases in crop yields, an immediately tangible benefit for farmers. The addition of charcoal in boreal forest systems has been shown to increase the rate of soil organic matter decomposition, suggesting there is a priming effect of a biochar analogue on organic matter decomposition. The priming effect is the increase in soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition rate after the addition of fresh organic matter or other compounds to soil. The implication is that is biochar if addition leads to the loss of native SOM it negates the carbon benefit of adding biochar to soil. However there could also be potential benefits of priming effects of biochar under specific circumstances, for example if biochar addition leads to the priming of freshly added organic matter breakdown it may in turn improve nutrient synchronisation and overall nutrient use efficiency. We conducted a series of experiments conducted in Kenya and Austria using stable isotope tools to look at

  12. The isotope effect in H3S superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczęśniak, R.; Durajski, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    The experimental value of H3S a isotope coefficient decreases from 2.37 to 0.31 in the pressure range from 130 GPa to 200 GPa. We have shown that the value of 0.31 is correctly reproduced in the framework of the classical Eliashberg approach in the harmonic approximation. On the other hand, the anomalously large value of the isotope coefficient (2.37) may be associated with the strong renormalization of the normal state by the electron density of states.

  13. Calcium Isotope Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S.; Richter, S.

    2010-12-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. This presentation discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. Additionally, the availability of Ca isotope reference materials will be discussed.

  14. The Effect of Phytase on the Oxygen Isotope Composition of Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Sperber, C.; Tamburini, F.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2013-12-01

    Plants and microorganisms under phosphorus (P) stress release extracellular phosphatases as a strategy to acquire inorganic phosphate (Pi) (1-2). These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoesters leading to a release of Pi. The enzymatic hydrolysis leads, via a nucleophilic attack, to the incorporation of one oxygen atom from the water into the newly formed Pi molecule. During the incorporation, an isotopic fractionation occurs, which might be used to identify the origin of Pi in the environment (3-6). While the effect of phosphomonoesterases and phosphodiesterases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate has been examined, there are, so far, no studies dealing with the effect of phytases (4-6). Phytases catalyze the hydrolysis of myo-inositol-hexakis-phosphate (IP6), which is an important component of organic P in many ecosystems (7). Enzymatic assays with phytase from wheat germ and Aspergillus niger were prepared under sterile and temperature controlled conditions in order to determine the effect of phytases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate, which has been liberated from IP6 via enzymatic hydrolysis. Assays with phytase from wheat germ lead to a turnover of the substrate close to 100%, while assays with phytase from Aspergillus niger lead to a turnover of the substrate close to 80%. In the case of the assays with phytase from wheat germ, our results indicate that one sixth of the total 24 oxygen which are associated to the phosphates in IP6 are exchanged with oxygen from water. From this we conclude that the incorporation of one oxygen atom from water occurs only at four phosphate molecules of IP6, while two phosphate molecules do not experience an incorporation of oxygen. This suggests that during the enzymatic hydrolysis, four P-O bonds and two C-O bonds are broken. Provided that, the isotopic fractionation can be calculated with an isotopic mass balance resulting in -8.4‰ (×3.6 SD). This is a value very similar to those reported

  15. Mechanism of the flame ionization detector. II. Isotope effects and heteroatom effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1997-01-01

    The relative molar flame ionization detecton (FID) response (RMR) for a hydrocarbon does not change when deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. The exception is methane for which an inverse deuterium effect of 3..5% is observed for tetradeuteriomethane. [13C]Methane shows an inverse isotope effect...... of 2%. The reason for the small or non-existent isotope effects is that H/2H exchange takes place in the pre-combustion hydrogenolysis in the flame. This was shown by taking samples from the lower part of the flame by means of a fused silica capillary probe. By the same technique the hydrogenolytic...... reactions in the hydrogen flame of compounds added to the hydrogen gas in low concentrations were followed. Alcohols, ethers, ketones, and esters all produced methane and carbon monoxide, while amines produced methane and hydrogen cyanide, halogen compounds methane and hydrogen halide, etc. The FID response...

  16. The separation of stable isotopes of carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oziashvili, E. D.; Egiazarov, A. S.

    1989-04-01

    The present state of work on the separation of carbon isotopes by diffusion, fractional distillation, chemical isotopic exchange, and the selective excitation and dissociation of molecules in electrical discharges or in the field of laser radiation has been examined. The characteristics of new laboratory and industrial assemblies for separating carbon isotopes have been described. Promising directions of study aimed at developing effective technological processes for separating carbon isotopes have been noted. The bibliography contains 148 references.

  17. A Combined Molecular and Isotopic Study of Anoxygenic Photosynthesis in Meromictic Lakes of the Northwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. H., IV; Gilhooly, W., III; Crane, E. J., III; Steinman, B.; Shelton, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionations within the chemocline can be an indication of green and purple sulfur photosynthetic activity. This isotopic signal is, however, small and variable, on the order of +2-6‰ (Zerkle et al. 2009). It is therefore advantageous to investigate the environmental and ecological effects on this signal so that these influences can be taken into account when estimating the contribution of anoxygenic phototrophs to the sulfur cycle in aquatic environments. This project aims to investigate the ways in which anoxygenic phototroph community structure and lake water geochemistry impact the sulfur isotope fractionation expressed during anoxygenic photosynthesis in meromictic lakes. During the summer of 2013, water column profile analysis of six lakes in the Pacific Northwest (located in eastern Washington and western Montana) were conducted to assess photosynthetically available radiation, salinity, pH, temperature, dissolved solids, and specific conductivity. Water column samples were obtained to determine the sulfur isotopic composition of dissolved sulfate and sulfide, major ion and sulfide concentrations. Microbial samples were also collected for genetic sequencing. Initial results found green (e.g., Chlorobiaceae sp.) and purple (e.g., Lamprocystis purpurea) bacteria at the same depth in one of the study lakes. These data, in addition to the same suite of samples collected in the summer of 2014, provide insight into relationships between the isotopic composition of sulfur (in H2S, S0, and SO4), lake water chemistry, and the presence or absence of green and purple sulfur bacteria.

  18. Geometric isotope effects on small chloride ion water clusters with path integral molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Suzuki, Kimichi; Nagashima, Umpei; Tachikawa, Masanori; Yan, Shiwei

    2013-11-01

    The geometric isotope effects on the structures of hydrated chloride ionic hydrogen bonded clusters are explored by carrying out path integral molecular dynamics simulations. First, an outer shell coordinate is selected to display the rearrangement of single and multi hydration shell cluster structures. Next, to show the competition of intramolecular and intermolecular nuclear quantum effects, the intramolecular OH∗ stretching and intermolecular ion-water wagging motions are studied for single and multi shell structures, respectively. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects stabilize the ionic hydrogen bonds in single shell structures, while they are destabilized through the competition with intramolecular nuclear quantum effects in multi shell structures. In addition, the correlations between ion-water stretching motion and other cluster vibrational coordinates are discussed. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects on the cluster structures are strongly related to the cooperation of the water-water hydrogen bond interactions.

  19. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  20. Ionic liquids as novel stationary phases in gas liquid chromatography: inverse or normal isotope effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmarr, Hans-Georg; Slabizki, Petra; Müntnich, Sabrina; Metzger, Carmen; Gracia-Moreno, Elisa

    2012-12-28

    The separation of deuterated and non-deuterated compounds in gas liquid partitioning chromatography (GLC) on silicone type stationary phase usually results in the inverse isotope effect. With ionic liquids (ILs) as stationary phase, however, this may show a totally different nature. The inverse isotope effect, in which heavier (deuterated) isotopic compounds (isotopologues) elute earlier, is to be expected when van der Waals (London) dispersion forces play a dominant role in the solute-stationary phase interaction. Such (apolar) interactions seem to play only a minor role when ILs are the stationary phases, leading to only a marginal inverse isotope effect, e.g. for the separation of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole and its [(2)H(5)]-isotopologue on 1,12-di(tripropylphosphonium) dodecane bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl) amide (commercialized as SLB-IL59, Supelco). Indeed, with the most polar stationary phase available (commercialized as SLB-IL111; Supelco), this separation showed a normal isotope effect. Further examples are presented and the nature of the isotope effect observed is discussed.

  1. The nitrogen isotope effect of benthic remineralization-nitrification-denitrification coupling in an estuarine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, M.; Lehmann, M. F.; Del Giorgio, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    The nitrogen (N) stable isotopic composition of pore water nitrate and total dissolved N (TDN) was measured in sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in organic matter reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. Benthic N isotope exchange, as well as the nitrate and TDN isotope effects of benthic nitrification-denitrification coupling on the water column, ϵapp and ϵsed, respectively, were investigated. The sediments were a major sink for nitrate and a source of reduced dissolved N (RDN = DON + NH4+). We observed that both the pore water nitrate and RDN pools were enriched in 15N relative to the water column, with increasing δ15N downcore in the sediments. As in other marine environments, the biological nitrate isotope fractionation of net nitrate elimination was barely expressed at the scale of sediment-water-exchange, with ϵapp values water oxygen concentrations and the organic matter reactivity can modulate ϵapp. For the first time, actual measurements of δ15N of pore water RDN were included in the calculations of ϵsed. We argue that large fractions of the sea-floor-derived DON are reactive and, hence, involved in the development of the δ15N of dissolved inorganic N (DIN) in the water column. In the St. Lawrence sediments, the combined benthic N transformations yield a flux of 15N-enriched RDN that can significantly enhance ϵsed. Calculated ϵsed values were within the range of 4.6 ± 2‰, and were related to organic matter reactivity and oxygen penetration depth in the sediments. ϵsed reflects the δ15N of the N2 lost from marine sediments and thus best describes the isotopic impact of N elimination on the oceanic fixed N pool. Our mean value for ϵsed is larger than assumed by earlier work, questioning current ideas with regards to the state of

  2. Dynamics of the Q2Π1u(1 ) state studied from the isotope effect on the cross sections for the formation of the 2 p atom pair in the photoexcitation of H2 and D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Kouichi; Shiino, Kennichi; Nakanishi, Yuko; Odagiri, Takeshi; Kitajima, Masashi; Kouchi, Noriyuki

    2016-06-01

    The absolute values of the cross section for formation of a 2 p atom pair in the photoexcitation of H2 and D2 are measured against the incident photon energy in the range of doubly excited states by means of the coincidence detection of two Lyman-α photons. The cross-section curves are explained only by the contribution of the doubly excited Q2Π1u(1 ) state. The isotope effect on the oscillator strengths of 2 p +2 p pair formation for H2 and D2 from the Q2Π1u(1 ) state is almost the same as that on the oscillator strengths of 2 s +2 p pair formation from the Q2Π1u(1 ) state obtained by our group [T. Odagiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 84, 053401 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.053401]. This channel independence indicates that both isotope effects are dominated by the early dynamics of the Q2Π1u(1 ) state, before reaching the branching point into 2 p +2 p pair formation and 2 s +2 p pair formation.

  3. Study of the stability of the gallium isotopes beyond the N = 50 neutron shell closure

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the stability of the nuclear structure beyond N = 50 and Z = 28 with beams of neutron-rich gallium isotopes at the CRIS experiment at ISOLDE. The study of their hyperne structure and isotope shift will provide spins, magnetic dipole moments, electric quadrupole moments and changes in the mean-square charge radii. The $\\beta$-decay of $^{80}$Ga will be unambiguously measured using the technique of Laser Assisted Nuclear Decay Spectroscopy (LANDS). The half-lives of the very neutron-rich isotopes with N > 54 will be measured for their impact on the astrophysical ${r}$-process.

  4. Quasi-harmonic calculations of the isotope effect in diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, J.H.

    1986-11-10

    It is shown how the kinetic energy factor for isotope diffusion may be calculated within the quasi-harmonic approximation using methods devised to calculate the vibrational contribution to defect entropies. The results are compared with experiment in the cases of CoO and NiO and good agreement found.

  5. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Stallings

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus. We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt, against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ13C and δ15N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ15N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ13C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes

  6. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James A.; Rozar, Katherine L.; Adams, Charles S.; Wall, Kara R.; Switzer, Theodore S.; Winner, Brent L.; Hollander, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus). We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt), against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ13C and δ15N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ15N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ13C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes and corresponding

  7. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ (13)C and δ (15)N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Christopher D; Nelson, James A; Rozar, Katherine L; Adams, Charles S; Wall, Kara R; Switzer, Theodore S; Winner, Brent L; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus). We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt), against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ (13)C and δ (15)N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ (15)N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ (13)C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes and

  8. Pb isotopic geochemical study on the crustal structure of Tongbaishan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Pb isotopic composition of the Tongbai complex, distributed in the Tongbaishan to the west of the Dabieshan, ranges between the Dabie core complex and the Dabie ultral-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic complex, the latter having more radiogenic Pb isotopic composition than the former. Granites from the Jigongshan pluton, which intruded mainly into the Tongbai complex, are distinct from the Tongbai complex but similar to the Dabie core complex in Pb isotopic composition, showing that the magma of the Jigongshan granites was derived from the partial melting of the Dabie core complex. According to Pb isotopic compositional variation model in the vertical crustal section and magma source from the Jigongshan pluton, it is suggested that the Tongbai complex was an upper rock serial of the Dabie core complex, which is beneath the Dabie UHP metamorphic complex in the crustal structure of the Tongbai-Dabie orogenic belt. The Tongbai complex was not well preserved in the Dabie area due to the high exhumed crustal section. However, the crustal section in the Tongbai area was exhumed less than that in the Dabie area, and the deep crust in the Tongbai area still contains the basement composition similar to the Dabie core complex. Therefore, the crustal basements from the Dabie to Tongbai areas are united. The present distribution of the basement blocks in different locations of the Tongbai-Dabie orogenic belt reflects different exposure of the crustal section.

  9. Temperature effect on leaf water deuterium enrichment and isotopic fractionation during leaf lipid biosynthesis: results from controlled growth of C3 and C4 land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youping; Grice, Kliti; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Farquhar, Graham D; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen isotopic ratios ((2)H/(1)H) of land plant leaf water and the carbon-bound hydrogen of leaf wax lipids are valuable indicators for climatic, physiological, metabolic and geochemical studies. Temperature will exert a profound effect on the stable isotopic composition of leaf water and leaf lipids as it directly influences the isotopic equilibrium (IE) during leaf water evaporation and cellular water dissociation. It is also expected to affect the kinetics of enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, and therefore the balance of hydrogen inputs along different biochemical routes. We conducted a controlled growth experiment to examine the effect of temperature on the stable hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water and the biological and biochemical isotopic fractionations during lipid biosynthesis. We find that leaf water (2)H enrichment at 20°C is lower than that at 30°C. This is contrary to the expectation that at lower temperatures leaf water should be more enriched in (2)H due to a larger equilibrium isotope effect associated with evapotranspiration from the leaf if all other variables are held constant. A hypothesis is presented to explain the apparent discrepancy whereby lower temperature-induced down-regulation of available aquaporin water channels and/or partial closure of transmembrane water channel forces water flow to "detour" to a more convoluted apoplastic pathway, effectively increasing the length over which diffusion acts against advection as described by the Péclet effect (Farquhar and Lloyd, 1993) and decreasing the average leaf water enrichment. The impact of temperature on leaf water enrichment is not reflected in the biological isotopic fractionation or the biochemical isotopic fractionation during lipid biosynthesis. Neither the biological nor biochemical fractionations at 20°C are significantly different from that at 30°C, implying that temperature has a negligible effect on the isotopic fractionation during lipid biosynthesis.

  10. Sedimentary nitrate reduction and its effect on the N-isotopic composition of oceanic nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Sigman, D. M.; McCorkle, D. C.

    2005-12-01

    A prerequisite for assessing denitrification fluxes in a specific environment using water column nitrate N isotope ratios is the knowledge of the expressed N isotope effects of water column and/or benthic denitrification in this environment. Here, we aim at assessing the effects of benthic nitrogen cycling on the N isotopic composition of the oceanic nitrate pool in deep-sea sediments, which are believed to harbour a large portion of the global benthic denitrification. We report 15N/14N ratios of pore water nitrate in pelagic sediments from the deep Bering Sea, where benthic nitrate reduction has previously been identified as a significant sink of fixed nitrogen. Porewater profiles from multicores indicate strong 15N enrichment in porewater nitrate at all stations, as one goes deeper in the sediments and nitrate concentrations decrease (δ15N generally reached 25-35‰). Our data are consistent with variable biological isotope effect (ɛ) for dissimilatory nitrate reduction ranging between 13 to 30 ‰. A one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model including organic matter degradation, nitrification, and denitrification indicates that, although denitrification leads to a pore water nitrate pool that is enriched in 15N, N isotope fractionation is poorly expressed at the scale of sediment-water nitrate exchange, independent of whether sediments are a net sink or a net source of nitrate. The apparent nitrate isotope effect of sedimentary denitrification on nitrate in overlying waters is generally below 2‰, as a result of diffusive transport limitation into, and within, the sediments and/or the production of light nitrate during nitrification. Thus, our data suggest that the low expressed isotope effect of benthic denitrification observed previously in reactive shelf sediments also applies to deep-sea sediments. However, where ammonium fluxes out of the sediments, it is enriched in 15-N, and may ultimately lead to an N-isotopic enrichment of the water-column nitrate

  11. High flux isotope reactor cold source preconceptual design study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.L.; Bucholz, J.A.; Burnette, S.E. [and others

    1995-12-01

    In February 1995, the deputy director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. The anticipated cold source will consist of a cryogenic LH{sub 2} moderator plug, a cryogenic pump system, a refrigerator that uses helium gas as a refrigerant, a heat exchanger to interface the refrigerant with the hydrogen loop, liquid hydrogen transfer lines, a gas handling system that includes vacuum lines, and an instrumentation and control system to provide constant system status monitoring and to maintain system stability. The scope of this project includes the development, design, safety analysis, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube. This project will also include those activities necessary to transport the cold neutron beam to the front face of the present HFIR beam room. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and research and development (R and D), (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the preconceptual phase and establishes the concept feasibility. The information presented includes the project scope, the preliminary design requirements, the preliminary cost and schedule, the preliminary performance data, and an outline of the various plans for completing the project.

  12. Sulfur isotope effects associated with protonation of HS- and volatilization of H2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The isotope effects associated with: (1) formation of H2S from HS- by protonation in aqueous solution; and (2) volatilization of H2S have been experimentally determined. Both isotopic distributions in closed systems at equilibrium and differential rates of volatilization of isotopic species in open systems were measured at 22 +/- 1 degrees C. It was found that, at equilibrium aqueous H2S is enriched in 34S by 2.0 - 2.7% relative to HS- and that H2S volatilized from solution is depleted in 34S by 0.5% relative to dissolved H2S. A small kinetic isotope effect accompanying volatilization of H2S was observed in the open-system experiments.

  13. Carbon Isotopes of Alkanes in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperatures and Pressures: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques [1-4]. With more evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history [5-7], abiotic formation by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis during serpentization reactions may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars [8, 9]. While the experimental studies performed to date leave little doubt that chemical reactions exist for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds by mineral surface-catalyzed reactions [10-12], little is known about the reaction pathways by which CO2 and/or CO are reduced under hydrothermal conditions. Carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements of alkanes have been used as an effective tool to constrain the origin and reaction pathways of hydrocarbon formation. Alkanes generated by thermal breakdown of high molecular weight organic compounds have carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures completely distinct from those formed abiotically [13-15]. Recent experimental studies, however, showed that different abiogenic hydrocarbon formation processes (e.g., polymerization vs. depolymerization) may have different carbon and hydrogen isotopic patterns [16]. Results from previous experiments studying decomposition of higher molecular weight organic compounds (lignite) also suggested that pressure could be a crucial factor affecting fractionation of carbon isotopes [17]. Under high pressure conditions, no experimental data are available describing fractionation of carbon isotope during mineral catalyzed FTT synthesis. Thus, hydrothermal experiments present an excellent opportunity to provide the requisite carbon isotope data. Such data can also be used to identify reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis under experimental conditions.

  14. Delayed neutron studies of separated isotopes of Br, Rb, I, and Cs

    CERN Document Server

    Reeder, R L; Wright, J F

    1976-01-01

    Discusses delayed neutron studies of separated isotopes of Br, Rb, I, and Cs are currently in progress at the Spectrometer for On-Line Analysis of Radionuclides (SOLAR) facility operated by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. (2 refs).

  15. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  16. Application of stable isotope analysis to study temporal changes in foraging ecology in a highly endangered amphibian.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Hayley Gillespie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding dietary trends for endangered species may be essential to assessing the effects of ecological disturbances such as habitat modification, species introductions or global climate change. Documenting temporal variation in prey selection may also be crucial for understanding population dynamics. However, the rarity, secretive behaviours and obscure microhabitats of some endangered species can make direct foraging observations difficult or impossible. Furthermore, the lethality or invasiveness of some traditional methods of dietary analysis (e.g. gut contents analysis, gastric lavage makes them inappropriate for such species. Stable isotope analysis facilitates non-lethal, indirect analysis of animal diet that has unrealized potential in the conservation of endangered organisms, particularly amphibians. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: I determined proportional contributions of aquatic macroinvertebrate prey to the diet of an endangered aquatic salamander Eurycea sosorum over a two-year period using stable isotope analysis of (13/12C and (15/14N and the Bayesian stable isotope mixing model SIAR. I calculated Strauss' dietary electivity indices by comparing these proportions with changing relative abundance of potential prey species through time. Stable isotope analyses revealed that a previously unknown prey item (soft-bodied planarian flatworms in the genus Dugesia made up the majority of E. sosorum diet. Results also demonstrate that E. sosorum is an opportunistic forager capable of diet switching to include a greater proportion of alternative prey when Dugesia populations decline. There is also evidence of intra-population dietary variation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Effective application of stable isotope analysis can help circumvent two key limitations commonly experienced by researchers of endangered species: the inability to directly observe these species in nature and the invasiveness or lethality of traditional methods of

  17. Matrix effects of calcium on high-precision sulfur isotope measurement by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenhui; Bian, Xiao-Peng; Yang, Tao; Lin, An-Jun; Jiang, Shao-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) has been successfully applied in the rapid and high-precision measurement for sulfur isotope ratios in recent years. During the measurement, the presence of matrix elements would affect the instrumental mass bias for sulfur and these matrix-induced effects have aroused a lot of researchers' interest. However, these studies have placed more weight on highlighting the necessity for their proposed correction protocols (e.g., chemical purification and matrix-matching) while less attention on the key property of the matrix element gives rise to the matrix effects. In this study, four groups of sulfate solutions, which have different concentrations of sulfur (0.05-0.60mM) but a constant sequence of atomic calcium/sulfur ratios (0.1-50), are investigated under wet (solution) and dry (desolvation) plasma conditions to make a detailed evaluation on the matrix effects from calcium on sulfur isotope measurement. Based on a series of comparative analyses, we indicated that, the matrix effects of calcium on both measured sulfur isotope ratios and detected (32)S signal intensities are dependent mainly on the absolute calcium concentration rather than its relative concentration ratio to sulfur (i.e., atomic calcium/sulfur ratio). Also, for the same group of samples, the matrix effects of calcium under dry plasma condition are much more significant than that of wet plasma. This research affords the opportunity to realize direct and relatively precise sulfur isotope measurement for evaporite gypsum, and further provides some suggestions with regard to sulfur isotope analytical protocols for sedimentary pore water.

  18. Pressure dependence of the deuterium isotope effect in the photolysis of formaldehyde by ultraviolet light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. K. Nilsson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The pressure dependence of the relative photolysis rate of HCHO vs. HCDO has been investigated for the first time, using a photochemical reactor at the University of Copenhagen. The dissociation of HCHO vs. HCDO using a UVA lamp was measured at total bath gas pressures of 50, 200, 400, 600 and 1030 mbar. The products of formaldehyde photodissociation are either H2 + CO (molecular channel or HCO + H (radical channel, and a photolysis lamp was chosen to emit light at wavelengths that greatly favor the molecular channel. The isotope effect in the dissociation, kHCHO/kHCDO, was found to depend strongly on pressure, varying from 1.1 + 0.15/−0.1 at 50 mbar to 1.75±0.10 at 1030 mbar. The results can be corrected for radical channel contribution to yield the kinetic isotope effect for the molecular channel; i.e. the KIE in the production of molecular hydrogen. This is done and the results at 1030 mbar are discussed in relation to previous studies at ambient pressure. In the atmosphere the relative importance of the two product channels changes with altitude as a result of changes in pressure and actinic flux. The study demonstrates that the δD of photochemical hydrogen produced from formaldehyde will increase substantially as pressure decreases.

  19. Lead isotope ratios as a tracer for lead contamination sources: A lake Andong case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Y. H

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate stable Pb isotope signatures as a tracer for Pb contamination in Lake Andong. For Pb isotope analysis, we collected water and sediment from Lake Andong, particles in the air, soils, and stream water, mine tailings, sludge and wastewater from zinc smelting around lake Andong watershed. The results showed that Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb for zinc concentrate were 18.809 ± 0.322, 15.650 ± 0.062, and 38.728 ± 0.421, respectively. In wastewater, isotopic ratio values (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb were 17.363 ± 0.133, 15.550 ± 0.025, and 37.217 ± 0.092, respectively. Additionally, isotopic ratio values (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb for sludge were 17.515 ± 0.155, 15.537 ± 0.018, and 37.357 ± 0.173, respectively. These values were similar to those in zinc and lead concentrate originated from Canada and South America. In contrast, Pb isotope ratios of soil, tailings and sediment from Lake Andong were similar to those of Korean ore. Atmospheric particles showed different patterns of Pb isotope ratios from sediments, soils, and zinc smelting and this needs further investigation in order to identify atmospheric Pb sources.

  20. Study of polonium isotopes ground state properties by simultaneous atomic- and nuclear-spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Koester, U H; Kalaninova, Z; Imai, N

    2007-01-01

    We propose to systematically study the ground state properties of neutron deficient $^{192-200}$Po isotopes by means of in-source laser spectroscopy using the ISOLDE laser ion source coupled with nuclear spectroscopy at the detection setup as successfully done before by this collaboration with neutron deficient lead isotopes. The study of the change in mean square charge radii along the polonium isotope chain will give an insight into shape coexistence above the mid-shell N = 104 and above the closed shell Z = 82. The hyperfine structure of the odd isotopes will also allow determination of the nuclear spin and the magnetic moment of the ground state and of any identifiable isomer state. For this study, a standard UC$_{x}$ target with the ISOLDE RILIS is required for 38 shifts.

  1. How Trees Interact with Their Hydrologic Environment: a Stable Isotope Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierke, C.; Newton, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Sacramento Mountains of southeast New Mexico serve as the primary recharge area to adjacent regional aquifers, including the Roswell Artesian Basin, the Tularosa Basin and the Salt Basin. Under pressures of population growth and climate change, land and water managers are interested in identifying land management and forest restoration methods that may increase local and regional groundwater recharge in the high mountains. The Sacramento Mountain Watershed Study is designed to assess the effects of tree thinning in mountain watersheds as an effective method of increasing groundwater recharge. The project employs a soil water balance to quantify the partitioning of local precipitation before and after tree thinning. This study was designed to determine the role that trees play in the hydrologic cycle by using the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to identify tree water sources. The study is being conducted in a 1st order watershed with no perennial outflow stream where vegetation is dominated by Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii). Ridges are capped with San Andres Limestone while lower slopes and the valley bottom are underlain by the Yeso Formation which is composed of sandstones, mudstones and interbedded carbonate layers. The area has thin soils covering shallow fractured bedrock or epikarst features. Some of the fractures within the epikarst zone provide direct conduits to the larger groundwater system while others are isolated rendering the reservoir inactive. From March 2011 to February 2012, we collected soil and twig samples from which water was extracted by cryogenic vacuum distillation. Soil water was also sampled with passive capillary samplers (PCAPS). The isotopic composition of bulk soil water appears to be controlled by evaporation of snowmelt stored within the soil matrix. The isotopic composition of soil water sampled by wick samplers reflects mixing of non-evaporated rainfall with evaporated bulk soil water. As the monsoon season

  2. Coherent phonon decay and the boron isotope effect for MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarco, Jose A; Talbot, Peter C; Mackinnon, Ian D R

    2014-12-14

    Ab initio DFT calculations for the phonon dispersion (PD) and the phonon density of states (PDOS) of the two isotopic forms ((10)B and (11)B) of MgB2 demonstrate that use of a reduced symmetry super-lattice provides an improved approximation to the dynamical, phonon-distorted P6/mmm crystal structure. Construction of phonon frequency plots using calculated values for these isotopic forms gives linear trends with integer multiples of a base frequency that change in slope in a manner consistent with the isotope effect (IE). Spectral parameters inferred from this method are similar to that determined experimentally for the pure isotopic forms of MgB2. Comparison with AlB2 demonstrates that a coherent phonon decay down to acoustic modes is not possible for this metal. Coherent acoustic phonon decay may be an important contributor to superconductivity for MgB2.

  3. Stable isotope studies of nephrite deposits from Fengtien, Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yui, Tzenfu; Yeh, Hsuehwen (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA)); Lee, Chihming Wang (National Taiwan Univ. Taipei (Taiwan))

    1988-03-01

    Metasomatic nephrite deposits (i.e., rodingites) occur between serpentinites and muscovite-quartz schist in the Fengtien area, eastern Taiwan. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of nephrite range from +4.5 to +5.3{per thousand} and the {delta}D values, from {minus}33 to {minus}68{per thousand}. The narrow range in the {delta}{sup 18}O values and wide variation in the {delta}D values indicate low water/rock ratios and multiple origins of the ambient H{sub 2}O during nephrite formation. The ultimate sources of the ambient H{sub 2}O are largely sea water for the early nephrite and meteoric water for the late nephrite. The temperature of nephrite formation is 320-420{degree}C: the estimated O-isotopic fractionation between nephrite (tremolite) and serpentine (antigorite) is 1.0 {plus minus} 0.2{per thousand} in this temperature range. Diopsidefels and epidotite are two other kinds of rodingite in the deposits. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of diopside from diopsidefels range from +3.7 to +4.5{per thousand}, the {delta}D values of clinozoisite from epidotite range from {minus}31 to {minus}34{per thousand} and the {delta}{sup 18}O value of one clinozoisite analyzed is +3.9{per thousand}. These data suggest that most diopsidefels formed in isotopic equilibrium with nephrite and that clinozoisite was not in isotopic equilibrium with either nephrite of diopsidefels. O-isotope compositions of both nephrite and diopsidefels cannot give conclusive evidence of their parental rocks. Circumstantial evidence, however, implies that the nephrite is derived from serpentinite whereas diopsidefels formed from unaltered ultramafic rocks.

  4. Stable isotope studies of nephrite deposits from Fengtien, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Tzen-Fu; Yeh, Hsueh-Wen; Lee, Chihming Wang

    1988-03-01

    Metasomatic nephrite deposits ( i.e., rodingites) occur between serpentinites and muscovite-quartz schist in the Fengtien area, eastern Taiwan. The δ 18O values of nephrite range from +4.5 to +5.3%. and the δD values, from -33 to -68%. The narrow range in the δ 18O values and wide variation in the δD values indicate low water/rock ratios and multiple origins of the ambient H 2O during nephrite formation. The ultimate sources of the ambient H 2O are largely sea water for the early nephrite and meteoric water for the late nephrite. The temperature of nephrite formation is 320-420°C: the estimated O-isotopic fractionation between nephrite (tremolite) and serpentine (antigorite) is 1.0 ± 0.2%. in this temperature range. Diopsidefels and epidotite are two other kinds of rodingite in the deposits. The δ 18O values of diopside from diopsidefels range from +3.7 to +4.5%., theδD values of clinozoisite from epidotite range from -31 to -34%. and the δ 18O value of one clinozoisite analyzed is +3.9%. These data suggest that most diopsidefels formed in isotopic equilibrium with nephrite and that clinozoisite was not in isotopic equilibrium with either nephrite or diopsidefels. O-isotope compositions of both nephrite and diopsidefels cannot give conclusive evidence of their parental rocks. Circumstantial evidence, however, implies that the nephrite is derived from serpentinite whereas diopsidefels formed from unaltered ultramafic rocks.

  5. Constraints on the vital effect in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite by oxygen isotopic modification of seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Michaël; Horner, Tristan J.; Minoletti, Fabrice; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we show that there are independent controls of 18O/16O and 13C/12C fractionation in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite due to the contrasting kinetics of each isotope system. We demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the oxygen isotope fractionation with respect to equilibrium is related to the balance between calcification rate and the replenishment of the internal pool of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). As such, in fast growing cells, such as those of Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica (forming the so-called “heavy group”), calcification of the internal carbon pool occurs faster than complete isotopic re-adjustment of the internal DIC pool with H2O molecules. Hence, coccoliths reflect the heavy oxygen isotope signature of the CO2 overprinting the whole DIC pool. Conversely, in large and slow growing cells, such as Coccolithus pelagicus ssp. braarudii, complete re-equilibration is achieved due to limited influx of CO2 leading to coccoliths that are precipitated in conditions close to isotopic equilibrium (“equilibrium group”). Species exhibiting the most negative oxygen isotope composition, such as Calcidiscus leptoporus (“light group”), precipitate coccolith under increased pH in the coccolith vesicle, as previously documented by the “carbonate ion effect”. We suggest that, for the carbon isotope system, any observed deviation from isotopic equilibrium is only “apparent”, as the carbon isotopic composition in coccolith calcite is controlled by a Rayleigh fractionation originating from preferential incorporation of 12C into organic matter. Therefore, species with low PIC/POC ratios as E. huxleyi and G. oceanica are shifted towards positive carbon isotope values as a result of predominant carbon fixation into the organic matter. By contrast, cells with higher PIC/POC as C. braarudii and C. leptoporus maintain, to some extent, the original negative isotopic composition of the CO2. The calcareous

  6. Isotopic quantum effects in water structure measured with high energy photon diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberli, B.; Benmore, C. J.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Neuefeind, J.; Honkimäki, V.

    2000-03-01

    High energy electromagnetic radiation scattering techniques have been used to measure the structural differences between light and heavy water: we have studied both intra- and intermolecular effects. These methods and our data analysis are described in detail. We have observed a maximum isotopic effect of 1.6% relative to the magnitude of the x-ray structure factor. Our uncertainties are an order of magnitude smaller than those of previous icons/Journals/Common/gamma" ALT="gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/> -ray measurements (Root J H, Egelstaff P A and Hime A 1986 Chem. Phys. 109 5164) and this has permitted us to test accurately the available quantum simulation results on water. The SPC and TIP4P potentials reproduce the measured results in r -space moderately well for intermolecular effects at distances greater than 2.5 Å. These results show that H2 O is a slightly more disordered liquid than D2 O at the same temperature.

  7. Solvent isotope effects on alkane formation by cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase and their mechanistic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Matthew W; Marsh, E Neil G

    2014-09-02

    The reaction catalyzed by cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase is of interest both because of its potential application to the production of biofuels and because of the highly unusual nature of the deformylation reaction it catalyzes. Whereas the proton in the product alkane derives ultimately from the solvent, the identity of the proton donor in the active site remains unclear. To investigate the proton transfer step, solvent isotope effect (SIE) studies were undertaken. The rate of alkane formation was found to be maximal at pH 6.8 and to be the same in D2O or H2O within experimental error, implying that proton transfer is not a kinetically significant step. However, when the ratio of protium to deuterium in the product alkane was measured as a function of the mole fraction of D2O, a (D2O)SIEobs of 2.19 ± 0.02 was observed. The SIE was invariant with the mole fraction of D2O, indicating the involvement of a single protic site in the reaction. We interpret this SIE as most likely arising from a reactant state equilibrium isotope effect on a proton donor with an inverse fractionation factor, for which Φ = 0.45. These observations are consistent with an iron-bound water molecule being the proton donor to the alkane in the reaction.

  8. Isotopic Soret effect in ternary mixtures: Theoretical predictions and molecular simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artola, Pierre-Arnaud, E-mail: pierre-arnaud.artola@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, Université de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Rousseau, Bernard [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, CNRS Université de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    2015-11-07

    In this paper, we study the Soret effect in ternary fluid mixtures of isotopic argon like atoms. Soret coefficients have been computed using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and a theoretical approach based on our extended Prigogine model (with mass effect) and generalized to mixtures with any number of components. As is well known for binary mixture studies, the heaviest component always accumulates on the cold side whereas the lightest species accumulate on the hot side. An interesting behavior is observed for the species with the intermediate mass: it can accumulate on both sides, depending on composition and mass ratios. A simple picture can be given to understand this change of sign: the intermediate mass species can be seen as evolving in an equivalent fluid whose species mass varies with composition. An excellent prediction of all simulated data has been obtained using our model including the change of sign of the Soret coefficient for species with intermediate mass.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes Revisited: Effects of Chirality, Isotope Impurity, Tube Length, and Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2004-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality, isotope impurity, tube length and temperature by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also found that the tube length dependence o...

  10. Ab initio calculations of the Fe(II) and Fe(III) isotopic effects in citrates, nicotianamine, and phytosiderophore, and new Fe isotopic measurements in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Wang, Kun; Foriel, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant transition metal in higher plants and variations in its isotopic compositions can be used to trace its utilization. In order to better understand the effect of plant-induced isotopic fractionation on the global Fe cycling, we have estimated by quantum chemical calculations the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation between different Fe species relevant to the transport and storage of Fe in higher plants: Fe(II)-citrate, Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(II)-nicotianamine, and Fe(III)-phytosiderophore. The ab initio calculations show firstly, that Fe(II)-nicotianamine is ˜3‰ (56Fe/54Fe) isotopically lighter than Fe(III)-phytosiderophore; secondly, even in the absence of redox changes of Fe, change in the speciation alone can create up to ˜1.5‰ isotopic fractionation. For example, Fe(III)-phytosiderophore is up to 1.5‰ heavier than Fe(III)-citrate2 and Fe(II)-nicotianamine is up to 1‰ heavier than Fe(II)-citrate. In addition, in order to better understand the Fe isotopic fractionation between different plant components, we have analyzed the iron isotopic composition of different organs (roots, seeds, germinated seeds, leaves and stems) from six species of higher plants: the dicot lentil (Lens culinaris), and the graminaceous monocots Virginia wild rye (Elymus virginicus), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), river oat (Uniola latifolia), and Indian goosegrass (Eleusine indica). The calculations may explain that the roots of strategy-II plants (Fe(III)-phytosiderophore) are isotopically heavier (by about 1‰ for the δ56Fe) than the upper parts of the plants (Fe transported as Fe(III)-citrate in the xylem or Fe(II)-nicotianamine in the phloem). In addition, we suggest that the isotopic variations observed between younger and older leaves could be explained by mixing of Fe received from the xylem and the phloem.

  11. Quantifying MTBE biodegradation in the Vandenberg Air Force Base ethanol release study using stable carbon isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R; Mackay, Douglas M; de Sieyes, Nicholas R; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2007-12-07

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) was used to assess biodegradation of MTBE and TBA during an ethanol release study at Vandenberg Air Force Base. Two continuous side-by-side field releases were conducted within a preexisting MTBE plume to form two lanes. The first involved the continuous injection of site groundwater amended with benzene, toluene and o-xylene ("No ethanol lane"), while the other involved the continuous injection of site groundwater amended with benzene, toluene and o-xylene and ethanol ("With ethanol lane"). The delta(13)C of MTBE for all wells in the "No ethanol lane" remained constant during the experiment with a mean value of -31.3 +/- 0.5 per thousand (n=40), suggesting the absence of any substantial MTBE biodegradation in this lane. In contrast, substantial enrichment in (13)C of MTBE by 40.6 per thousand, was measured in the "With ethanol lane", consistent with the effects of biodegradation. A substantial amount of TBA (up to 1200 microg/L) was produced by the biodegradation of MTBE in the "With ethanol lane". The mean value of delta(13)C for TBA in groundwater samples in the "With ethanol lane" was -26.0 +/- 1.0 per thousand (n=32). Uniform delta(13)C TBA values through space and time in this lane suggest that substantial anaerobic biodegradation of TBA did not occur during the experiment. Using the reported range in isotopic enrichment factors for MTBE of -9.2 per thousand to -15.6 per thousand, and values of delta(13)C of MTBE in groundwater samples, MTBE first-order biodegradation rates in the "With ethanol lane" were 12.0 to 20.3 year(-1) (n=18). The isotope-derived rate constants are in good agreement with the previously published rate constant of 16.8 year(-1) calculated using contaminant mass-discharge for the "With ethanol lane".

  12. Deformation effects in the alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of even-even $^{244-260}$Cf isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P

    2016-01-01

    Within the Unified ternary fission model (UTFM), the alpha accompanied ternary fission of even-even $^{244-260}$Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. For the alpha accompanied ternary fission of 244^Cf isotope, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination 108^Ru+4^He+132^Te, which contain near doubly magic nuclei 132^Te (N=80, Z=52). In the case of 246^Cf and 248^Cf isotopes, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combinations with near doubly magic nuclei 134^Te (N=82, Z=52) as the heavier fragment. The highest yield obtained for 250^Cf, 252^Cf, 254^Cf, 256^Cf, 258^Cf and 260^Cf isotopes is for the fragment combination with doubly magic nuclei 132^Sn (N=82, Z=50) as the heavier fragment. We have included the effect of deformation and orientation of fragments and this has revealed that in addition to closed shell effect, ground state deformation also plays an important role in the calculation of relative yield of fav...

  13. The stable isotope amount effect: New insights from NEXRAD echo tops, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schol, M.A.; Shanley, J.B.; Zegarra, J.P.; Coplen, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    The stable isotope amount effect has often been invoked to explain patterns of isotopic composition of rainfall in the tropics. This paper describes a new approach, correlating the isotopic composition of precipitation with cloud height and atmospheric temperature using NEXRAD radar echo tops, which are a measure of the maximum altitude of rainfall within the clouds. The seasonal differences in echo top altitudes and their corresponding temperatures are correlated with the isotopic composition of rainfall. These results offer another factor to consider in interpretation of the seasonal variation in isotopic composition of tropical rainfall, which has previously been linked to amount or rainout effects and not to temperature effects. Rain and cloud water isotope collectors in the Luquillo Mountains in northeastern Puerto Rico were sampled monthly for three years and precipitation was analyzed for ??18O and ??2H. Precipitation enriched in , 18O and 2H occurred during the winter dry season (approximately December-May) and was associated with a weather pattern of trade wind showers and frontal systems. During the summer rainy season (approximately June-November), precipitation was depleted in 18O and 2H and originated in low pressure systems and convection associated with waves embedded in the prevailing easterly airflow. Rain substantially depleted in 18O and 2H compared to the aforementioned weather patterns occurred during large low pressure systems. Weather analysis showed that 29% of rain input to the Luquillo Mountains was trade wind orographic rainfall, and 30% of rainfall could be attributed to easterly waves and low pressure systems. Isotopic signatures associated with these major climate patterns can be used to determine their influence on streamflow and groundwater recharge and to monitor possible effects of climate change on regional water resources.

  14. Fish fins as non-lethal surrogates for muscle tissues in freshwater food web studies using stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hette Tronquart, Nicolas; Mazeas, Laurent; Reuilly-Manenti, Liana; Zahm, Amandine; Belliard, Jérôme

    2012-07-30

    Dorsal white muscle is the standard tissue analysed in fish trophic studies using stable isotope analyses. However, sampling white muscle often implies the sacrifice of fish. Thus, we examined whether the non-lethal sampling of fin tissue can substitute muscle sampling in food web studies. Analysing muscle and fin δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of 466 European freshwater fish (14 species) with an elemental analyser coupled with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, we compared the isotope values of the two tissues. Correlations between fin and muscle isotope ratios were examined for all fish together and specifically for 12 species. We further proposed four methods of assessing muscle from fin isotope ratios and estimated the errors made using these muscle surrogates. Despite significant differences between isotope values of the two tissues, fin and muscle isotopic signals are strongly correlated. Muscle values, estimated with raw fin isotope ratios (1st method), induce an error of ca. 1‰ for both isotopes. In comparison, specific (2nd method) or general (3rd method) correlations provide meaningful corrections of fin isotope ratios (errors muscle estimates (errors >0.8‰). There is little chance that a global model can be created. However, the 2nd and 3rd methods of estimating muscle values from fin isotope ratios should provide an acceptable level of error for the studies of European freshwater food web. We thus recommend that future studies use fin tissue as a non-lethal surrogate for muscle. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Variation in oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis: intramolecular and biosynthetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Leonel; Pinzon, Maria Camila; Anderson, William T; Jahren, A Hope

    2006-10-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of plant cellulose is commonly used for the interpretations of climate, ecophysiology and dendrochronology in both modern and palaeoenvironments. Further applications of this analytical tool depends on our in-depth knowledge of the isotopic fractionations associated with the biochemical pathways leading to cellulose. Here, we test two important assumptions regarding isotopic effects resulting from the location of oxygen in the carbohydrate moiety and the biosynthetic pathway towards cellulose synthesis. We show that the oxygen isotopic fractionation of the oxygen attached to carbon 2 of the glucose moieties differs from the average fractionation of the oxygens attached to carbons 3-6 from cellulose by at least 9%, for cellulose synthesized within seedlings of two different species (Triticum aestivum L. and Ricinus communis L.). The fractionation for a given oxygen in cellulose synthesized by the Triticum seedlings, which have starch as their primary carbon source, is different than the corresponding fractionation in Ricinus seedlings, within which lipids are the primary carbon source. This observation shows that the biosynthetic pathway towards cellulose affects oxygen isotope partitioning, a fact heretofore undemonstrated. Our findings may explain the species-dependent variability in the overall oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis, and may provide much-needed insight for palaeoclimate reconstruction using fossil cellulose.

  16. Isotope Fractionation of chlorine in Aqueous System: One Study on Anion-Exchange Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musashi, M.; Oi, T.; Eggenkamp, H.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2001-05-01

    Stable chlorine isotopes such as 37Cl and 35Cl have been paid attention as useful tool identifying the source, and monitoring the transport process and natural fate of chlorinated organic pollutants in air and groundwater. However, it is not established yet whether any isotope effects accompany biodegradation or reductive dehalogenation of the pollutants (Clark and Fritz, 1997). Here we first present an experimental determination of isotope fractionation factor of chlorine in aqueous system by using anion-exchange chromatographic technique. Into the Cl-free anion exchange resin (Muromac, OH- form) packed in a 30 cm long pyrex glass column and controlled temperature at 25 oC, hydrochloric solution was fed with controlling the flow rate constant. Effluent from the column was recovered by an automatic fraction collector and prepared for Cl isotope analysis. The Cl isotope ratio (δ 37Cl vs. SMOC) was measured by IR-MS at the Utrecht University with precision of 0.06 per-mil. Magnitude of the factor obtained was 1.00035 at 25 oC. The result indicates that the lighter isotope (35Cl) was preferably fractionated into the resin phase, while the heavier one (37Cl) was enriched into the aqueous phase. This trend suggests that molecular structure of hydrolysis with Cl in aqueous phase may be more stable than that of Cl ionically bonding with the resin. This result may offer physico-chemical insights into behavior and fate of the pollutants.

  17. Ab Initio Calculations of Deuterium Isotope Effects on Chemical Shifts of Salt-Bridged Lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Saif; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Williamson, Mike P.;

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation....... This method enables the determination of both the electronic and the protonic (deuteronic) wave functions simultaneously and can directly calculate the geometrical difference induced by H/D isotope effects. The calculations show that the one-bond deuterium isotope effects on 15N nuclear shielding, 1Δ15N......(D), in ammonium and amines decrease as a counterion or water molecule moves closer to the nitrogen. 1Δ15N(D) and 2Δ1H(D) of the NH3+ groups of lysine residues in the B1 domain of protein G have been calculated using truncated side chains and also determined experimentally by NMR. Comparisons show...

  18. Application of Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Cell Metabolism Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le You

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The applications of stable isotopes in metabolomics have facilitated the study of cell metabolisms. Stable isotope-assisted metabolomics requires: (1 properly designed tracer experiments; (2 stringent sampling and quenching protocols to minimize isotopic alternations; (3 efficient metabolite separations; (4 high resolution mass spectrometry to resolve overlapping peaks and background noises; and (5 data analysis methods and databases to decipher isotopic clusters over a broad m/z range (mass-to-charge ratio. This paper overviews mass spectrometry based techniques for precise determination of metabolites and their isotopologues. It also discusses applications of isotopic approaches to track substrate utilization, identify unknown metabolites and their chemical formulas, measure metabolite concentrations, determine putative metabolic pathways, and investigate microbial community populations and their carbon assimilation patterns. In addition, 13C-metabolite fingerprinting and metabolic models can be integrated to quantify carbon fluxes (enzyme reaction rates. The fluxome, in combination with other “omics” analyses, may give systems-level insights into regulatory mechanisms underlying gene functions. More importantly, 13C-tracer experiments significantly improve the potential of low-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS for broad-scope metabolism studies. We foresee the isotope-assisted metabolomics to be an indispensable tool in industrial biotechnology, environmental microbiology, and medical research.

  19. Application of Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Cell Metabolism Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Le; Zhang, Baichen; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2014-01-01

    The applications of stable isotopes in metabolomics have facilitated the study of cell metabolisms. Stable isotope-assisted metabolomics requires: (1) properly designed tracer experiments; (2) stringent sampling and quenching protocols to minimize isotopic alternations; (3) efficient metabolite separations; (4) high resolution mass spectrometry to resolve overlapping peaks and background noises; and (5) data analysis methods and databases to decipher isotopic clusters over a broad m/z range (mass-to-charge ratio). This paper overviews mass spectrometry based techniques for precise determination of metabolites and their isotopologues. It also discusses applications of isotopic approaches to track substrate utilization, identify unknown metabolites and their chemical formulas, measure metabolite concentrations, determine putative metabolic pathways, and investigate microbial community populations and their carbon assimilation patterns. In addition, 13C-metabolite fingerprinting and metabolic models can be integrated to quantify carbon fluxes (enzyme reaction rates). The fluxome, in combination with other “omics” analyses, may give systems-level insights into regulatory mechanisms underlying gene functions. More importantly, 13C-tracer experiments significantly improve the potential of low-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for broad-scope metabolism studies. We foresee the isotope-assisted metabolomics to be an indispensable tool in industrial biotechnology, environmental microbiology, and medical research. PMID:24957020

  20. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unidentified nuclear effects (FUN CAIs): II. Heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the early Solar System inferred from in situ high-precision magnesium-isotope measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changkun; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Davis, Andrew M.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with isotopic mass fractionation effects and unidentified nuclear isotopic anomalies (FUN CAIs) have been studied for more than 40 years, but their origins remain enigmatic. Here we report in situ high precision measurements of aluminum-magnesium isotope systematics of FUN CAIs by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual minerals were analyzed in six FUN CAIs from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrites Axtell (compact Type A CAI Axtell 2271) and Allende (Type B CAIs C1 and EK1-4-1, and forsterite-bearing Type B CAIs BG82DH8, CG-14, and TE). Most of these CAIs show evidence for excess 26Mg due to the decay of 26Al. The inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] and the initial magnesium isotopic compositions (δ26Mg0) calculated using an exponential law with an exponent β of 0.5128 are (3.1 ± 1.6) × 10-6 and 0.60 ± 0.10‰ (Axtell 2271), (3.7 ± 1.5) × 10-6 and -0.20 ± 0.05‰ (BG82DH8), (2.2 ± 1.1) × 10-6 and -0.18 ± 0.05‰ (C1), (2.3 ± 2.4) × 10-5 and -2.23 ± 0.37‰ (EK1-4-1), (1.5 ± 1.1) × 10-5 and -0.42 ± 0.08‰ (CG-14), and (5.3 ± 0.9) × 10-5 and -0.05 ± 0.08‰ (TE) with 2σ uncertainties. We infer that FUN CAIs recorded heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the CAI-forming region(s). Comparison of 26Al-26Mg systematics, stable isotope (oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium) and trace element studies of FUN and non-FUN igneous CAIs indicates that there is a continuum among these CAI types. Based on these observations and evaporation experiments on CAI-like melts, we propose a generic scenario for the origin of igneous (FUN and non-FUN) CAIs: (i) condensation of isotopically normal solids in an 16O-rich gas of approximately solar composition; (ii) formation of CAI precursors by aggregation of these solids together with variable abundances of isotopically anomalous grains-possible carriers of unidentified nuclear (UN) effects; and (iii) melt evaporation of these precursors

  1. Isotopic quantum effects in the structure of liquid methanol: I. Experiments with high-energy photon diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberli, B.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Benmore, C. J.; Neuefeind, J.

    2001-12-01

    High-energy electromagnetic radiation scattering techniques have been used to measure the structural differences between four isotopic samples of methanol (CH3OH, CD3OD, CH3OD and CD3OH). The first series of experiments employed room temperature and ambient pressure. The carbon-oxygen intramolecular bond length was measured and found to depend more strongly on the isotopic substitution at the hydroxyl site than at the methyl sites. The oscillations in the isotopic difference of the x-ray structure factor, ΔSX(Q), are shown at room temperature to be about 2% as large as the oscillations in the total structure factor. Our uncertainties are an order of magnitude smaller than those of previous gamma ray measurements (Benmore C J and Egelstaff P A 1996 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 8 9429-32). A second series of experiments was carried out at -80 °C at its vapour pressure in order to study the significant temperature dependence of these effects. The ΔSX(Q) difference at -80 °C is shown to be up to three times larger than the room temperature difference. These studies showed that isotopic structural differences in methanol may be represented as temperature shifts that vary as a function of thermodynamic state and substitution site.

  2. Fe isotope fractionation between chalcopyrite and dissolved Fe during hydrothermal recrystallization: An experimental study at 350 °C and 500 bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syverson, Drew D.; Luhmann, Andrew J.; Tan, Chunyang; Borrok, David M.; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E.

    2017-03-01

    Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between chalcopyrite and dissolved Fe was determined in acidic chloride-bearing fluid at 350 °C and 500 bars. The study utilized deformable gold-cell technology, which allowed time-series sampling of solution during chalcopyrite recrystallization and isotope exchange. A key element of the experimental design involved the addition of anomalous dissolved 57Fe to an on-going experiment as a means of determining the degree and rate of isotope exchange. Taking explicit account of imposed chemical and isotopic mass balance constraints of Fe in fluid and mineral (chalcopyrite) reservoirs, these data indicate that no more than 1000 h is required for the isotopically anomalous dissolved Fe reservoir to exchange completely with the coexisting chalcopyrite. The experimental calibration of the rate of Fe isotope exchange for the δ57Fe-spiked experiment provides critical insight for the time necessary to achieve Fe isotope exchange in two non-spiked, but otherwise identical experiments. The Fe isotope data indicate that the equilibrium fractionation between chalcopyrite and dissolved Fe, Δ56FeCpy-Fe (aq), at 350 °C is small, 0.09 ± 0.17‰ (2σ), and is in good agreement with recent theoretical equilibrium predictions. Owing to the apparent rate of Fe isotope exchange at 350 °C, it is likely that chalcopyrite formed at high temperature deep-sea vents (black smoker systems) achieves isotopic equilibrium, and effectively records the Fe isotopic composition of the coexisting end-member hydrothermal fluid. Comparison of the experimental mineral-fluid equilibrium fractionation factors with conjugate chalcopyrite and dissolved Fe pairs sampled from high temperature hydrothermal vent systems at Axial Caldera and Main Endeavour Field (Juan de Fuca Ridge) are in agreement with this inference. The experimental data were further used to determine the mineral-mineral equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between pyrite-chalcopyrite, Δ56Fe

  3. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static......” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative...

  4. Influence of Isotope on Shell Effects of Pre-scission Particle Evaporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Wei; CHEN Na

    2005-01-01

    The shell effects on the particle evaporation prior to fission for three Pb isotopes, 204pb, 20sPb, and 212pb,as well as three Sn isotopes, 128Sn, 132Sn, and 136Sn, are explored by a diffusion model. Calculations show that the magnitude of shell effects in the emission of particles changes with the neutron-to-proton ratio N/Z of these fissioning nuclei, and this change is affected significantly by the spin and excitation energy of the system. It is shown that high angular momentum enhances the dependence of shell effects on the N/Z while high excitation energy weakens such a dependence.

  5. Insights into iron sources and pathways in the Amazon River provided by isotopic and spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Daniel Santos; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo Resende; Allard, Thierry; Vieira, Lucieth Cruz; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Mancini, Luiz; Seyler, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the weathering and transport mechanisms of Fe in the Amazon River. A particular emphasis was placed on Fe partitioning, speciation, and isotopic fractionation in the contrasting waters of the Solimões and Negro rivers and their mixing zone at the beginning of the Amazon River. Samples collected in the end-member rivers and thirteen sites distributed throughout the mixing zone were processed through frontal vacuum filtration and tangential-flow ultrafiltration to separate the different suspended solid fractions, i.e., particulate (P > 0.45 μm and P > 0.22 μm), colloidal (0.22 μm > C > 5 kDa) and truly dissolved elements (TD 0.22 μm and -0.104‰ for P > 0.45 μm fractions). The mineral particulate-rich waters of the Solimões River had dissolved and colloidal fractions with light isotopic composition (-0.532‰ and -0.176‰, respectively), whereas the particulate fractions yielded δ57Fe values close to those of the continental crust (i.e., -0.029‰ for P > 0.22 μm and 0.028‰ for P > 0.45 μm). Ten kilometers downstream from the Negro and Solimões junction, the concentrations of colloidal and dissolved Fe species deviate markedly from conservative mixing. A maximum Fe loss of 43 μg/L (i.e., 50% of the dissolved and colloidal Fe) is observed 110 km downstream from the rivers junction. The contrasting Negro and Solimões Rivers isotopic compositions along the pore-sized water fractions is attributable to the biogeochemical processes involving different types of upland soils and parental materials. For instance, the isotopic composition of colloidal and dissolved Fe from the Negro River are consistent with Fe oxidation and complexation mechanisms at the interface between waterlogged podzols and river networks, as supported by strong organo-Fe complexes signals observed by EPR. Conversely, the particulate and colloidal fractions from the Solimões River have δ57Fe consistent with strong mechanical erosion in the Andean

  6. Laser Spectroscopy Study on the Neutron-Rich and Neutron-Deficient Te Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to perform laser spectroscopy measurements on the Te isotopes. This will give access to fundamental properties of the ground and rather long-lived isomeric states such as the change in the mean square charge radius ($\\delta\\langle$r$^2_c\\rangle$) and the nuclear moments. For these medium-mass isotopes, at this moment the optical resolution obtained with RILIS is not high enough to perform isotope shift measurements. Thus we will use the COMPLIS experimental setup which allows Resonant Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) on laser desorbed atoms. The 5p$^{4}$ $^{3}$P$_{2} \\rightarrow$ 5p$^{3}$ 6s $^{3}$S$_{1}$ and 5p$^{4}$ $^{3}$P$_{2} \\rightarrow$ 5p$^{3}$ 6s $^{5}$S$_{2}$ optical transitions have been used to perform, on the stable Te isotopes, the tests required by the INTC committee. For this purpose stable-ion sources have been built and Te isotopes have been delivered as stable beams by the injector coupled to the COMPLIS setup. ISOLDE offers the opportunity for studying the Te isotope series over a ...

  7. Hydrogen isotope variability in prairie wetland systems: implications for studies of migratory connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Lauren E; Clark, Robert G; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes (delta2H) are often used to infer the origins of migratory animals based on the strong correlation between deuterium content of tissues and long-term patterns of precipitation. However, the extreme flood and drought dynamics of surface waters in prairie wetland systems could mask these expected correlations. We investigated H isotopic variability in an aquatic food web associated with Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) that rely heavily on wetland-derived aerial insects for food. We evaluated isotopic turnover and incorporation of environmental water into tissue, processes that could affect H isotopic composition. Wetland water and aquatic invertebrates showed intra- and interannual H isotopic variation mainly related to evaporation and the amount and timing of precipitation. Snails showed rapid turnover of tissue deuterium and a large contribution of environmental water to their tissues. Swallow feather deuterium (delta2Hf) was variable but did not clearly follow changes in any of the food web compartments measured. Instead, isotopic variability may have been driven by shifts in the type or relative amounts of grey consumed and types of wetlands used. Nevertheless, despite relatively high variance in delta2Hf, the majority of birds fell within the predicted range of delta2Hf for the study area, revealing that significant trophic averaging occurred. However, both (presumed) diet shifts and variable hydrological conditions have the potential to greatly increase variance that must be considered when assigning origins of migratory animals based on delta2H.

  8. Study of Neutron-Deficient $^{202-205}$Fr Isotopes with Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    De Schepper, Stijn; Cocolios, Thomas; Budincevic, Ivan

    The scope of this master’s thesis is the study of neutron-deficient $^{202−205}$Fr isotopes. These isotopes are inside the neutron-deficient lead region, a region that has shown evidence of shape coexistence. For this thesis, this discussion is limited to the phenomenon where a low lying excited state has a different shape than the ground state. Shape coexistence is caused by intruder states. These are single-particle Shell Model states that are perturbed in energy due to the interaction with a deformed core. In the neutron-deficient lead region the main proton intruder orbit is the 3s$_{1/2}$orbit. When going towards more neutron-deficient isotopes, deformation increases. The $\\pi3s_{1/2}$orbit will rise in energy and will eventually become the ground state in odd- A bismuth (Z=83) isotopes. It is also observed in odd-A astatine (Z=85) isotopes, already in less neutron-deficient nuclei. The same phenomenon is expected to be present francium (Z=87) isotopes already at $^{199}$Fr. Although it is currently ...

  9. Carbon isotopic studies of individual lipids in organisms from the Nansha sea area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Yi; SONG; Jinming; ZHANG; Hui

    2004-01-01

    Carbon isotopes of individual lipids in typical organisms from the Nansha sea area were measured by the GC-IRMS analytical technique. δ13C values of saturated fatty acids in different organisms examined are from -25.6‰ to -29.7‰ with the average values ranging from -26.4‰ to -28.2‰ and the variance range of 1.8‰ between different organisms is also observed.Unsaturated fatty acids have heavy carbon isotopic compositions and the mean differences of 2.9‰-6.8‰ compared to the same carbon number saturated fatty acids. δ13C values of n-alkanes range from -27.5‰ to -29.7‰ and their mean values, ranging from -28.6‰ to -28.9‰, are very close in different organisms. The mean difference in δ13C between the saturated fatty acids and n-alkanes is only 1.5‰, indicating that they have similar biosynthetic pathways. The carbon isotopic variations between the different carbon-number lipids are mostly within ±2.0‰, reflecting that they experienced a biosynthetic process of the carbon chain elongation. At the same time, the carbon isotopic genetic relationships between the biological and sedimentary lipids are established by comparative studies of carbon isotopic compositions of individual lipids in organisms and sediments from the Nansha sea area, which provides scientific basis for carbon isotopic applied research of individual lipids.

  10. Study of the Photon Strength Functions for Gadolinium Isotopes with the DANCE Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. The gadolinium isotopes have some of the largest neutron capture cross sections. As a consequence they are used in the control rod in reactor fuel assembly. From the basic science point of view, there are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying degrees of deformation. Therefore they provide a good testing ground for the study of deformation dependent structure such as the scissors mode. Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  11. Effects of isotopic disorder on the Raman spectra of crystals: Theory and ab initio calculations for diamond and germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vast, Nathalie; Baroni, Stefano

    2000-04-01

    We present a method to study the effects of isotopic composition on the Raman spectra of crystals, in which disorder is treated exactly without resorting to any kind of mean-field approximation. The Raman cross section is expressed in terms of a suitable diagonal element of the vibrational Green's function, which is accurately and efficiently calculated using the recursion technique. This method can be used in conjunction with both semiempirical lattice-dynamical models and with first-principles interatomic force constants. We have applied our technique to diamond and germanium using the most accurate interatomic force constants presently available, obtained from density-functional perturbation theory. Our method correctly reproduces the light scattering in diamond-where isotopic effects dominates over the anharmonic ones-as well as in germanium, where anharmonic effects are larger.

  12. Study of Yb isotopes with the coherent state formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, I.

    2016-08-01

    Coherent state approach (CSA) is applied to the interacting boson model (IBM) in the rotational region. States of the N particle system are built up in a most general form as a function of the shape parameters β and γ. The parameter χ occurring in the quadrupole operator which determines the degree of the γ-softness is taken to be varying with the boson number. The excitation energy equations are formed by using the moment of inertia of a rotating system which is obtained from the solution of the cranking problem. For each isotope, the deformation parameter is found by minimizing the ground state energy equation. The results are used to fit the experimental excitation energy spectrum and the electric quadrupole transition ratios of Yb isotopes. It is found that CSA works well to predict the energy of the states up to L = 10. But the predictions about the electric quadrupole transitions are nearly 1.5 times greater than the experimental data.

  13. Effects of different water storage procedures on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically contrasted waters from the Amazon River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Daniel S; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo R

    2015-11-15

    Although recent studies have investigated the Fe isotopic composition of dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases from continental and oceanic natural waters, few efforts have been made to evaluate whether water sample storage and the separation of different pore-size fractions through filtration can cause any change to the Fe isotopic compositions. The present study investigates the possible biases introduced by different water storage conditions on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically different waters. Water samples were collected from an organic-rich river and from mineral particulate-rich rivers. Filtered and unfiltered water samples were stored either at room temperature or frozen at -18°C in order to assess possible biases due to (i) different water storage temperature, and (ii) storage of bulk (unfiltered) vs filtered water. Iron isotope measurements were performed by Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry with a Thermo Electron Neptune instrument, after Fe purification using anion-exchange resins. Our data reveal that bulk water storage at room temperature without filtration produces minor changes in the dissolved Fe isotopic composition of mineral particulate-rich waters, but significant isotopic composition changes in organic-rich waters. In both cases, however, the impact of the different procedures on the Fe concentrations was strong. On the other hand, the bulk water stored frozen without filtration produced more limited changes in the dissolved Fe concentrations, and also on isotopic compositions, relative to the samples filtered in the field. The largest effect was again observed for the organic-rich waters. These findings suggest that a time lag between water collection and filtration may cause isotopic exchanges between the dissolved and particulate Fe fractions. When it is not possible to filter the samples in the field immediately after collection, the less detrimental approach is to

  14. A comparative study of boron isotopes and trace elements of the marine foraminifers during the last glacial maximum and Holocene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Boron isotopic compositions in marine planktonic foraminifers can record changes in seawater pH and hence provide a new tool to reconstruct the changes of paleo-atmospheric PCO2.Here a comparative study was done on boron isotopes and trace element abundances of planktonic foraminifers,Globigerinoides sacculifer and Globigerinoides ruber from three tropical ODP sites,Site 806B,Site 664C and Site 999A.It is demonstrated here that G.ruber is a better species to be used for downcore boron isotope analyses on glacial-interglacial scales,particularly since G.sacculifer is prone to dissolution causing unexpectedly light boron isotopes during glacial times.It has been shown that the trace elements composition of foraminifers (i.e.,Mg/Ca,U/Ca,B/Ca,and Li/Ca) can reflect the variations of seawater temperature and/or [CO3 2-].However,all of these systems are highly species de-pendent and affected by other vital effects,and it is therefore important to perform necessary calibrations when applying them to the downcore analyses.

  15. Effects of photorespiration, the cytochrome pathway, and the alternative pathway on the triple isotopic composition of atmospheric O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angert, Alon; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Barkan, Eugeni; Luz, Boaz

    2003-03-01

    The triple isotopic composition of atmospheric O2 is a new tracer used to estimate changes in global productivity. To estimate such changes, knowledge of the relationship between the discrimination against 17O and the discrimination against 18O is needed. This relationship is presented as θ = ln(17α)/ln(18α). Here, the value of theta was evaluated for the most important processes that affect the isotopic composition of oxygen. Similar values were found for dark respiration through the cytochrome pathway (0.516 ± 0.001) and the alternative pathway (0.514 ± 0.001), and slightly higher value was found for diffusion in air (0.521 ± 0.001). The combined effect of diffusion and respiration on the atmosphere was shown to be close to that of dark respiration. The value we found for photorespiration (0.506 ± 0.005) is considerably lower than that of dark respiration. Our results clearly show that the triple isotopic composition of the atmosphere is affected by the relative rates of photorespiration and dark respiration. Also, we show that closing the current global isotopic balance will enable the estimation of the current global rate of photorespiration. Using the Last Glacial Maximum as a case study, we show that variations in global rate of photorespiration affected the triple isotopic composition in the past. Strong fractionations measured in illuminated plants indicated that the alternative pathway is activated in the same conditions that favor high rate of photorespiration. This activation suggests that the global rate of the alternative pathway is higher than believed thus far, and may help to close the gap between the calculated and measured Dole Effect.

  16. Isotope Effect on Electron-Phonon Coupling in Multiband Superconductor MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Daixiang; Taufour, Valentin; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Bud'Ko, Serguei; Canfield, Paul; Kaminski, Adam

    We systematically investigate the isotope effect of electron-phonon coupling in multi-band superconductor MgB2 by laser based Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV on two σ bands, which is caused by electron coupling to E2 g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy in Mg10B2 than that in Mg11B2. The measured shifting energy of 3.5 meV is consistent with theoretical calculation based on harmonic phonon in MgB2. Our temperature dependent measurement also indicates the isotope effect of kink structure is not dependent on superconducting transition.

  17. Isotope effect on electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Daixiang; Manni, Soham; Taufour, Valentin; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the effect of isotope substitution on the electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2 using tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV in the σ band, which is caused by electron coupling to the E2 g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy by ˜3.5 meV in Mg 10B2 and the shift is not affected by superconducting transition. These results serve as the benchmark for investigations of isotope effects in known, unconventional superconductors and newly discovered superconductors where the origin of pairing is unknown.

  18. Oxygen isotope effect in cuprates results from polaron-induced superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Weyeneth, S.; Müller, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    The planar oxygen isotope effect coefficient measured as a function of hole doping in the Pr- and La-doped YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and the Ni-doped La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 (LSCO) superconductors quantitatively and qualitatively follows the form originally proposed by Kresin and Wolf [Phys. Rev. B 49, 3652 (1994)], which was derived for polarons perpendicular to the superconducting planes. Interestingly, the inverse oxygen isotope effect coefficient at the pseudogap temperature also obeys the...

  19. The effect of warming on grassland evapotranspiration partitioning using laser-based isotope monitoring techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lixin

    2013-06-01

    The proportion of transpiration (T) in total evapotranspiration (ET) is an important parameter that provides insight into the degree of biological influence on the hydrological cycles. Studies addressing the effects of climatic warming on the ecosystem total water balance are scarce, and measured warming effects on the T/ET ratio in field experiments have not been seen in the literature. In this study, we quantified T/ET ratios under ambient and warming treatments in a grassland ecosystem using a stable isotope approach. The measurements were made at a long-term grassland warming site in Oklahoma during the May-June peak growing season of 2011. Chamber-based methods were used to estimate the δ2H isotopic composition of evaporation (δE), transpiration (δT) and the aggregated evapotranspiration (δET). A modified commercial conifer leaf chamber was used for δT, a modified commercial soil chamber was used for δE and a custom built chamber was used for δET. The δE, δET and δT were quantified using both the Keeling plot approach and a mass balance method, with the Craig-Gordon model approach also used to calculate δE. Multiple methods demonstrated no significant difference between control and warming plots for both δET and δT. Though the chamber-based estimates and the Craig-Gordon results diverged by about 12‰, all methods showed that δE was more depleted in the warming plots. This decrease in δE indicates that the evaporation flux as a percentage of total water flux necessarily decreased for δET to remain constant, which was confirmed by field observations. The T/ET ratio in the control treatment was 0.65 or 0.77 and the ratio found in the warming treatment was 0.83 or 0.86, based on the chamber method and the Craig-Gordon approach. Sensitivity analysis of the Craig-Gordon model demonstrates that the warming-induced decrease in soil liquid water isotopic composition is the major factor responsible for the observed δE depletion and the temperature

  20. Correlation of the vapor pressure isotope effect with molecular force fields in the liquid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollin, J.S.; Ishida, T.

    1976-07-01

    The present work is concerned with the development and application of a new model for condensed phase interactions with which the vapor pressure isotope effect (vpie) may be related to molecular forces and structure. The model considers the condensed phase as being represented by a cluster of regularly arranged molecules consisting of a central molecule and a variable number of molecules in the first coordination shell. The methods of normal coordinate analysis are used to determine the modes of vibration of the condensed phase cluster from which, in turn, the isotopic reduced partition function can be calculated. Using the medium cluster model, the observed vpie for a series of methane isotopes has been successfully reproduced with better agreement with experiment than has been possible using the simple cell model. We conclude, however, that insofar as the medium cluster model provides a reasonable picture of the liquid state, the vpie is not sufficiently sensitive to molecular orientation to permit an experimental determination of intermolecular configuration in the condensed phase through measurement of isotopic pressure ratios. The virtual independence of vapor pressure isotope effects on molecular orientation at large cluster sizes is a demonstration of the general acceptability of the cell model assumptions for vpie calculations.

  1. Effects of organic matter on carbonate stable isotope ratios (δ13C, δ18O values)--implications for analyses of bulk sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlerich, Markus; Baumer, Marlene; Lücke, Andreas; Mayr, Christoph

    2013-03-30

    Stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C, δ(18)O values) analyses of carbonates can be biased by CO(2) release from organic impurities. This is most critical for carbonate isotope analyses from bulk sediments containing comparably high amounts of organic matter (OM). Several methods have been developed to remove OM prior to analyses, but none of them can be universally applied. Moreover, pretreatment methods cause isotopic bias in themselves and should probably best be avoided. Thus, it is essential to have indicators for reliable isotope values of untreated carbonate-OM mixtures. Artificial mixtures of organic compounds with a standard carbonate were analyzed to investigate the bias on carbonate isotope ratios caused by OM in the sample. The total-inorganic-carbon to total-organic-carbon ratio (TIC/TOC) was used as a measure for the " organic impurity" of the sample. The target was to evaluate TIC/TOC as a measure for sample quality and to define TIC/TOC thresholds for reliable isotope measurements of mixtures between calcium carbonate and organic compounds. The effect of organic impurities on carbonate stable isotope values depended on the specific OM compound and the respective TIC/TOC ratio. Different CO(2) release rates were determined for the pure OM compounds. A sample TIC/TOC ratio ≥0.3 was found to be a threshold for reliable measurements of the isotope composition of calcium carbonate. Bulk carbonate analyses from carbonate-OM mixtures are reliable only if the TIC/TOC values do not fall below certain thresholds. This has implications for carbonate isotope studies from bulk sediments for which the TIC/TOC ratios should be considered as an easy-to-determine measure for sample-quality assessment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The effectiveness of using carbonate isotope measurements of body tissues to infer diet in human evolution: Evidence from wild western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Geraldine E; Boesch, Christophe; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Richards, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Changes in diet throughout hominin evolution have been linked with important evolutionary changes. Stable carbon isotope analysis of inorganic apatite carbonate is the main isotopic method used to reconstruct fossil hominin diets; to test its effectiveness as a paleodietary indicator we present bone and enamel carbonate carbon isotope data from a well-studied population of modern wild western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) of known sex and age from Taï, Cote d'Ivoire. We found a significant effect of age class on bone carbonate values, with adult chimpanzees being more (13)C- and (18)O-depleted compared to juveniles. Further, to investigate habitat effects, we compared our data to existing apatite data on eastern chimpanzees (P. troglodytes schweinfurthii) and found that the Taï chimpanzees are significantly more depleted in enamel δ(13)Cap and δ(18)Oap compared to their eastern counterparts. Our data are the first to present a range of tissue-specific isotope data from the same group of wild western chimpanzees and, as such, add new data to the growing number of modern non-human primate comparative isotope datasets providing valuable information for the interpretation of diet throughout hominin evolution. By comparing our data to published isotope data on fossil hominins we found that our modern chimpanzee bone and enamel data support hypotheses that the trend towards increased consumption of C4 foods after 4 Ma (millions of years ago) is unique to hominins.

  3. A STUDY ON CARBON ISOTOPE OF CO2 AND CH4 IN WESTERN DIENG PLATEU BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY- ISOTOPE RATIO MASS SPECTROMETER (GC-IRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanik Humaida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The carbon isotope can be used to evaluate volcanism phenomenon of volcano. The study of carbon isotope of CO2 and CH4 was carried out in western Dieng Plateau by mass-spectrometer. Before analysis, sampel was separated by gas chromatography using a Porapak-Q column and a FID (Flame Ionization Detector detector. The gas was oxidized by copper oxide at 850oC before being ionized in mass-spectrometer for isotope analysis. The CO2 content in Candradimuka crater (-4.10 O/OO, indicated that the gas may be as volcanic gas. The other CO2 from Sumber and western Gua Jimat, had isotope value  of -10.05 and -12.07 O/OO, respectively, indicating contamination from crustal and subduction material. The carbon isotope of CH4 gas from Pancasan village was -63.42 O/OO, that may be categorized as biogenic gas.   Keywords: isotope, CO2, CH4, Dieng.

  4. A stable isotopic study of the diet of Potamonautes sidneyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-04

    Jul 4, 2015 ... At the time of the study, the level of the lake was low accord- ing to previous records ... 1112 series elemental analyser (Thermo Finnigan, Italy). Gases ..... enrichment of benthic algae compared to phytoplankton due to the effects of a CO2 ..... Brachyura) in the St Lucia Estuary, South Africa. Afr. Invert. 55.

  5. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  6. Ab initio calculation of the Zn isotope effect in phosphates, citrates, and malates and applications to plants and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Albarède, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated the Zn isotope effect in aqueous citrates, malates, and phosphates by ab initio methods. For pHphosphates, with respect to leaves, which concentrate malates and citrates, by about one permil. It is proposed that Zn isotope fractionation represents a useful tracer of Zn availability and mobility in soils.

  7. Deuterium isotope effects on acid ionization and transition metal hydrolysis at reactor conditions by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacyshyn, M.; Madekufamba, M.; Tremaine, P. [Univ. of Guelph, Dept. of Chemistry, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports the preliminary measurements from an experimental study to measure the small differences between light (H{sub 2}O) and heavy (D{sub 2}O) water under reactor operating conditions (250-300 {sup o}C, 10 MPa), using Raman spectroscopy. The deuterium isotope effect δpK = pK{sub D2O} - pK{sub H2O}, for sodium bisulphate NaDSO{sub 4} and phosphoric acid D{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, has now been determined at temperatures of 25 {sup o}C and 80 {sup o}C by measuring the isotropic Raman spectra at different concentrations. The results for the pK and ΔpK at 25 {sup o}C agree with the literature, confirming the reliability of the method. High temperature cells have been constructed. (author)

  8. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12 -dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-06-08

    Coenzyme B12 -dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12 , it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small.

  9. Dual Isotope SPECT Study With Epilepsy Patients Using Semiconductor SPECT System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Atsuro; Sakurai, Kotarou; Kurita, Tsugiko; Takeuchi, Wataru; Toyonaga, Takuya; Hirata, Kenji; Kobashi, Keiji; Katoh, Chietsugu; Kubo, Naoki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2017-09-01

    We developed a prototype CdTe SPECT system with 4-pixel matched collimator for brain study. This system provides high-energy-resolution (6.6%), high-sensitivity (220 cps/MBq/head), and high-spatial-resolution images. The aim of this study was to evaluate dual-isotope study of CBF and central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) images using Tc-ECD and I-IMZ with the new SPECT system in patients with epilepsy comparing with single-isotope study using the conventional scintillation gamma camera. This study included 13 patients with partial epilepsy. The BZR images were acquired at 3 hours after I-IMZ injection for 20 minutes. The images of IMZ were acquired with a conventional 3-head scintillation gamma camera. After BZR image acquisition with the conventional camera, Tc-ECD was injected, and CBF and BZR images were acquired simultaneously 5 minutes after ECD injection with the new SPECT system. The CBF images were also acquired with the conventional camera on separate days. The findings were visually analyzed, and 3D-SSP maximum Z scores of lesions were compared between the 2 studies. There were 47 abnormal lesions on BZR images and 60 abnormal lesions on CBF images in the single-isotope study with the conventional camera. Dual-isotope study with the new system showed concordant abnormal findings of 46 of 47 lesions on BZR and 54 of 60 lesions on CBF images with the single-isotope study with the conventional camera. There was high agreement between the 2 studies in both BZR and CBF findings (Cohen κ values = 0.96 for BZR and 0.78 for CBF). In semiquantitative analysis, maximum Z scores of dual-isotope study with the new system strongly correlated with those of single-isotope study with the conventional camera (BZR: r = 0.82, P < 0.05, CBF: r = 0.87, P < 0.05). Our new SPECT system permits dual-isotope study for pixel-by-pixel analysis of CBF and BZR information with the same pathophysiological condition in patients with epilepsy.

  10. Gallium self-diffusion in gallium arsenide: A study using isotope heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Hsu, L.; Haller, E.E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Erickson, J.W. [Evans (Charles) and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Fischer, A.; Eberl, K.; Cardona, M. [Max-Planck-Institut, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    Ga self-diffusion was studied with secondary-ion mass spectroscopy in {sup 69}GaAs/{sup 71}GaAs isotope heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. Results show that the Ga self- diffusion coefficient in intrinsic GaAs can be described accurately with D = (43{+-}25 cm{sup 2}s{sup -1})exp(-4.24{+-}0.06 eV/k{sub B}T) over 6 orders of magnitude between 800 and 1225 C under As-rich condition. Experimental results combined with theoretical calculations strongly suggest Ga vacancy being the dominant native defect controlling the diffusion. No significant doping effects were observed in samples where the substrates were doped with Te up to 4x10{sup 17}cm{sup -3} or Zn up to 1x10{sup 19}cm{sup -3}.

  11. Hydrogen isotope effect on storage behavior of U{sub 2}Ti and UZr{sub 2.3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jat, Ram Avtar; Sawant, S.G.; Rajan, M.B.; Dhanuskar, J.R. [Product Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kaity, Santu [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Parida, S.C., E-mail: sureshp@barc.gov.in [Product Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-11-15

    U{sub 2}Ti and UZr{sub 2.3} alloys were prepared by arc melting method, vacuum annealed and characterized by XRD, SEM and EDX methods. Hydrogen isotope effect on the storage behavior of these alloys were studied by measuring the hydrogen/deuterium desorption pressure–composition–temperature (PCT) profiles in the temperature range of 573–678 K using a Sievert’s type volumetric apparatus. It was observed that, in the temperature and pressure range of investigation, all the isotherms show a single desorption plateau. The PCT data reveals that both U{sub 2}Ti and UZr{sub 2.3} alloys had normal isotope effects on hydrogen/deuterium desorption at all experimental temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters for dehydrogenation and dedeuteration reactions of the corresponding hydrides and deuterides of the above alloys were deduced from the PCT data.

  12. Strong isotope effects on melting dynamics and ice crystallisation processes in cryo vitrification solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, Oleg; Soper, Alan; Dzyuba, Boris; Callear, Sam; Fuller, Barry

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of crystalline ice during cooling, and further crystallization processes during re-warming are considered to be key processes determining the success of low temperature storage of biological objects, as used in medical, agricultural and nature conservation applications. To avoid these problems a method, termed vitrification, is being developed to inhibit ice formation by use of high concentration of cryoprotectants and ultra-rapid cooling, but this is only successful across a limited number of biological objects and in small volume applications. This study explores physical processes of ice crystal formation in a model cryoprotective solution used previously in trials on vitrification of complex biological systems, to improve our understanding of the process and identify limiting biophysical factors. Here we present results of neutron scattering experiments which show that even if ice crystal formation has been suppressed during quench cooling, the water molecules, mobilised during warming, can crystallise as detectable ice. The crystallisation happens right after melting of the glass phase formed during quench cooling, whilst the sample is still transiting deep cryogenic temperatures. We also observe strong water isotope effects on ice crystallisation processes in the cryoprotectant mixture. In the neutron scattering experiment with a fully protiated water component, we observe ready crystallisation occurring just after the glass melting transition. On the contrary with a fully deuteriated water component, the process of crystallisation is either completely or substantially supressed. This behaviour might be explained by nuclear quantum effects in water. The strong isotope effect, observed here, may play an important role in development of new cryopreservation strategies.

  13. Stable isotope study of precipitation and cave drip water in Florida (USA): implications for speleothem-based paleoclimate studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onac, Bogdan P; Pace-Graczyk, Kali; Atudirei, Viorel

    2008-06-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen were used to examine how the isotopic signal of meteoric water is modified as it travels through soil and epikarst into two caves in Florida. Surface and cave water samples were collected every week from February 2006 until March 2007. The isotopic composition of precipitation at the investigated sites is highly variable and shows little seasonal control. The delta18O vs. delta2H plot shows a mixing line having a slope of 5.63, suggesting evaporation effects dominate the isotopic composition of most rainfall events of less than 8 cm/day, as indicated by their low d-excess values. The delta18O values of the drip water show little variability (paleoclimate reconstructions at inter-annual time scales.dagger.

  14. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-02-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics.

  15. Stable isotope utilization methodology; Methodologie de l`emploi des isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1994-12-31

    The various applications of stable isotope utilization are reviewed, as a function of their specific properties: poly-isotopic abundance modification is used for tracer applications; the accurate measurement of the stable isotope abundance may be applied to isotopic dilution for ultra-trace measurement, physical constant determination, fluid volume and concentration measurement; isotopic effects, such as reaction equilibrium differences are used for separation and identification of molecule active centers (pharmacology, paleoclimatology, hydrogeological studies) while reaction rate differences (competitive and non competitive methods) are used for the study of reaction mechanisms, such as enzymatic reactions. Analysis techniques (mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, optical methods) are reviewed. 2 figs., 18 refs.

  16. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Janet E.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NOthat introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that δ18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO and NO and the δ18O values of the H2O, NO, and SO. Typical δ18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1‰ in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO, which can cause similar errors in δ17O and Δ17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO from NO, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured δ18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO. These procedures are demonstrated for SO isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SOsources and reaction mechanisms.

  17. Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

    2011-09-01

    Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

  18. Ab initio path-integral calculations of kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects on base-catalyzed RNA transphosphorylation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Xu, Yuqing; York, Darrin M

    2014-06-30

    Detailed understandings of the reaction mechanisms of RNA catalysis in various environments can have profound importance for many applications, ranging from the design of new biotechnologies to the unraveling of the evolutionary origin of life. An integral step in the nucleolytic RNA catalysis is self-cleavage of RNA strands by 2'-O-transphosphorylation. Key to elucidating a reaction mechanism is determining the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of transition state. A direct and powerful probe of transition state is measuring isotope effects on biochemical reactions, particularly if we can reproduce isotope effect values from quantum calculations. This article significantly extends the scope of our previous joint experimental and theoretical work in examining isotope effects on enzymatic and nonenzymatic 2'-O-transphosphorylation reaction models that mimic reactions catalyzed by RNA enzymes (ribozymes), and protein enzymes such as ribonuclease A (RNase A). Native reactions are studied, as well as reactions with thio substitutions representing chemical modifications often used in experiments to probe mechanism. Here, we report and compare results from eight levels of electronic-structure calculations for constructing the potential energy surfaces in kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (KIE and EIE) computations, including a "gold-standard" coupled-cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)]. In addition to the widely used Bigeleisen equation for estimating KIE and EIE values, internuclear anharmonicity and quantum tunneling effects were also computed using our recently developed ab initio path-integral method, that is, automated integration-free path-integral method. The results of this work establish an important set of benchmarks that serve to guide calculations of KIE and EIE for RNA catalysis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of Different Carbon Substrates on Nitrate Stable Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer; Einsiedl, Florian

    2012-01-01

    .1 ± 0.8‰; ε18O, −23.7 ± 1.8‰ to −19.9 ± 0.8‰). The observed isotope effects did not depend on the growth kinetics which were similar for the three types of electron donors. We suggest that different carbon sources change the observed isotope enrichment factors by changing the relative kinetics...... of nitrate transport across the cell wall compared to the kinetics of the intracellular nitrate reduction step of microbial denitrification....

  20. Rubidium isotope effect in superconducting Rb[sub 3]C[sub 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burk, B.; Crespi, V.H.; Zettl, A.; Cohen, M.L. (Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1994-06-06

    We have measured the resistive supercondeucting transition temperature in C[sub 60] single crystals intercalated with isotopically pure [sup 87]Rb and [sup 85]Rb and with natural abundance rubidium. We obtain a rubidium isotope effect exponent of [alpha][sub Rb]=[minus]0.028[plus minus]0.036, a result which implies that the Rb-C[sub 60] optic phonons play at most a minor role in the pairing mechanism of Rb[sub 3]C[sub 60].

  1. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope investigation in historical lime mortar and plaster - Results from field and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosednar-Legenstein, B. [Institute of Applied Geosciences, Graz University of Technology, Rechbauerstrasse 12, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Dietzel, M. [Institute of Applied Geosciences, Graz University of Technology, Rechbauerstrasse 12, A-8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: martin.dietzel@tugraz.at; Leis, A. [Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrogeology and Geophysics, Joanneum Research, Elisabethstrasse 16/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Stingl, K. [Institute of Applied Geosciences, Graz University of Technology, Rechbauerstrasse 12, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2008-08-15

    Lime mortar and plaster were sampled from Roman, medieval and early modern buildings in Styria. The historical lime mortar and plaster consist of calcite formed in the matrix during setting and various aggregates. The stable C and O isotopic composition of the calcite matrix was analyzed to get knowledge about the environmental conditions during calcite formation. The {delta}{sup 13}C{sub matrix} and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub matrix} values range from -31 to 0 per mille and -26 to -3 per mille (VPDB), respectively. Obviously, such a range of isotope values does not represent the local natural limestone assumed to be used for producing the mortar and plaster. In an ideal case, the calcite matrix in lime mortar and plaster is isotopically lighter in the exterior vs. the interior mortar layer according to the relationship {delta}{sup 18}O{sub matrix} = 0.61 . {delta}{sup 13}C{sub matrix} - 3.3 (VPDB). Calcite precipitation by uptake of gaseous CO{sub 2} into alkaline Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions shows a similar relationship, {delta}{sup 18}O{sub calcite} = 0.67 . {delta}{sup 13}C{sub calcite} - 6.4 (VPDB). Both relationships indicate that the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O values of the calcite reflect the setting behaviour of the lime mortar and plaster. Initially, CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere is fixed as calcite, which is accompanied by kinetic isotope fractionation mostly due to the hydroxylation of CO{sub 2} ({delta}{sup 13}C{sub matrix} {approx} -25 per mille and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub matrix} {approx} -20 per mille ). As calcite formation continued the remaining gaseous CO{sub 2} is subsequently enriched in {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O causing later formed calcite to be isotopically heavier along the setting path in the matrix. Deviations from such an ideal isotopic behaviour may be due to the evolution of H{sub 2}O, e.g. evaporation, the source of CO{sub 2}, e.g. from biogenic origin, relicts of the natural limestone, and secondary effects, such as

  2. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  3. Isotopic Effect on the Kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Tiezzi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present results about the deuterium isotope effect on the globalkinetics of a Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in batch conditions. A nonlinear dependenceof the Induction Period upon the percentage of deuterated reactants was found. The isotopiceffect on the bromination reaction of malonic acid was evaluated.

  4. Isotopic labelling studies on far-infrared spectra of nickel-histamine complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drożdżewski, Piotr; Kordon, Ewa

    2000-11-01

    Nickel-histamine (hm) complexes type [Ni(hm)Cl 2] and [Ni(hm) 3] X2 (Where X=Cl, Br, I, ClO 4) were investigated in the far-infrared region. Metal isotope labelling and deuteration effects were employed for observed band assignments. Metal-ligand vibrations were discussed and correlated with the structures of the complexes.

  5. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies of metamorphic fluid-rock interactions in the Dabie Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅斌; 郑永飞; 李一良; 肖益林; 龚冰

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies were carried out on mineral separates from high to ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks at Huangzhen and Shuanghe in the eastern Dabie Mountains, East China. The δ 18O values of eelogites cover a wide range of-5‰ to+9‰, but the δD values of micas fall within a narrow range of -85‰ to -70‰. Both equilibrium and disequilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations were observed between quartz and the other minerals, with reversed fractionations between omphacite and garnet in some eclogite samples. The δ 18O values of -5‰ to -1‰ for some of the eclogites represent the oxygen isotope compositions of their protoliths which underwent meteoric water-rock interaction prior to plate subduction. The preservation of oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the eclogites implies a channelized flow of fluids during progressive metamorphism caused by rapid subduetion. Retrograde metamorphism has caused oxygen and hydrogen isotope disequilibria between some of the minerals, but the f

  6. Studies of colossal magnetoresistive oxides with radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and Neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; Amaral, V S; Araújo, J P; Butz, T; Correia, J G; Dubourdieu, C; Habermeier, H U; Lourenço, A A; Marques, J G; Da Silva, M F A; Senateur, J P; Soares, J C; Sousa, J B; Suryan, R; Tokura, Y; Tavares, P B; Tomioka, Y; Tröger, W; Vantomme, A; Vieira, J M; Wahl, U; Weiss, F P; INTC

    2000-01-01

    We propose to study Colossal Magnetoresistive (CMR) oxides with several nuclear techniques, which use radioactive elements at ISOLDE. Our aim is to provide local and element selective information on some of the doping mechanisms that rule electronic interactions and magnetoresistance, in a complementary way to the use of conventional characterisation techniques. Three main topics are proposed: \\\\ \\\\ a) Studies of local [charge and] structural modifications in antiferromagnetic LaMnO$_{3+ \\delta}$ and La$_{1-x}$R$_{x}$MnO$_{3}$ with R=Ca and Cd, doped ferromagnetic systems with competing interactions: - research on the lattice site and electronic characterisation of the doping element. \\\\ \\\\ b) Studies of self doped La$_{x}$R$_{1-x}$MnO$_{3+\\delta}$ systems, with oxygen and cation non-stoichiometry: -learning the role of defects in the optimisation of magnetoresistive properties. \\\\ \\\\ c) Probing the disorder and quenched random field effects in the vicinity of the charge or orbital Ordered/Ferromagnetic phase...

  7. Studies of Colossal Magnetoresistive Oxides with Radioactive Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study Colossal Magnetoresistive (CMR) oxides with several nuclear techniques, which use radioactive elements at ISOLDE. Our aim is to provide local and element selective information on some of the doping mechanisms that rule electronic interactions and magneto- resistance, in a complementary way to the use of conventional characterisation techniques. Three main topics are proposed: \\\\ \\\\ a) Studies of local [charge and] structural modifications in antiferromagnetic LaMnO$_{3+\\delta}$ and La$_{1-x}$R$_{x}$MnO$_{3}$ with R=Ca and Cd, doped ferromagnetic systems with competing interactions: - research on the lattice site and electronic characterisation of the doping element. \\\\ \\\\ b) Studies of self doped La$_{x}$R$_{1-x}$MnO$_{3+\\delta}$ systems, with oxygen and cation non- stoichiometry: - learning the role of defects in the optimisation of magnetoresestive properties. \\\\ \\\\ c) Probing the disorder and quenched random field effects in the vicinity of the charge or orbital Ordered/Ferromagnetic p...

  8. Sulfur isotope composition of metasomatised mantle xenoliths from the Bultfontein kimberlite (Kimberley, South Africa): Contribution from subducted sediments and the effect of sulfide alteration on S isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Andrea; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Martin, Laure A. J.; Farquhar, James; Phillips, David; Griffin, William L.; LaFlamme, Crystal

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur isotopes are a powerful geochemical tracer in high-temperature processes, but have rarely been applied to the study of mantle metasomatism. In addition, there are very limited S isotope data on sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) material. For cratonic regions, these data are restricted to sulfide inclusions in diamonds. To provide new constraints on the S isotope composition of the SCLM and on the source(s) of mantle metasomatic fluids beneath the diamondiferous Kimberley region (South Africa), we investigated the S isotope systematics of five metasomatised mantle xenoliths from the Bultfontein kimberlite. Pentlandite and chalcopyrite in these xenoliths were analysed by in situ secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with bulk-rock material measured by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques. Based on previous studies, the xenoliths experienced different types of metasomatism to one another at distinct times (∼180 and ∼90-80 Ma). Contained pentlandite grains show variable alteration to heazlewoodite (i.e. Ni sulfide) + magnetite. The in situ S isotope analyses of pentlandite exhibit a relatively restricted range between -5.9 and - 1.4 ‰δ34 S (compared to VCDT), with no statistically meaningful differences between samples. Chalcopyrite only occurs in one sample and shows δ34 S values between -5.4 and - 1.0 ‰. The bulk-rock Ssulfide isotope analyses vary between -3.4 and + 0.8 ‰δ34 S. Importantly, the only sample hosting dominantly fresh sulfides shows a bulk-rock δ34 S value consistent with the mean value for the sulfides, whereas the other samples exhibit higher bulk 34S/32S ratios. The differences between bulk-rock and average in situδ34 S values are directly correlated with the degree of sulfide alteration. This evidence indicates that the elevated 34S/32S ratios in the bulk samples are not due to the introduction of heavy S (commonly as sulfates) and are best explained by isotopic fractionation coupled with the removal

  9. Thermal Water's Isotope Geochemistry Study of Evros Area, NE Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elissavet, Dotsika; Paraskevi, Chantzi

    2016-10-01

    Thermal waters from Evros area were collected and subjected to chemical and isotopic analysis in order to understand all the physicochemical mechanisms (mixing, dilution, precipitating) that contribute to the shallow and deep geothermal water tables and determine the origin of these fluids as well as their mineralization. Physicochemical characteristics EC, T°C, pH was determined at the field. The ionic concentrations of samples indicate solutions with high salinity. Two chemical water types were arisen: Na-SO4 concerning low temperatures and shallow aquifers and Na- Cl concerning high temperatures and deeper geothermal circulation. The ratio Br/Cl definitely considered marine origin indicator is the same as the sea confirming the involvement of the seawater in the geothermal system. The marine component and water-rock interaction process under high temperatures seem to contribute to the mineralization of thermal waters. Moreover, water-rock interaction process is also responsible for the alternation of δ18O values. Geothermometers concluded to a middle enthalpy geothermal field.

  10. Effects of Continental Weathering and Sedimentary Sorting on the Hf, Nd, and Pb Isotopic Composition of Sediments and Implications for Dissolved Input to the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Flierdt, T.; Hemming, S. R.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    The application of radiogenic isotopes of dissolved trace metals (Hf, Pb, Nd) in the ocean to study climate induced weathering changes on the continents is a relatively new and exciting field of research. Most studies on the radiogenic isotope composition of past seawater are based on chemical sediments such as ferromanganese crusts, and suggest a strong linkage in changes in the style of weathering (chemical vs. physical/glacial) on the continents and the isotopic composition of seawater for elements such as Hf and Pb. This is evidenced by records from the northwest Atlantic, which show significant changes in the Hf and Pb isotopic composition of seawater associated with the onset of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) over the past 3 Myr. On the other hand, the impact of glacial weathering on the Nd isotopic composition of seawater is generally thought to be negligible. In order to better understand the systematics and mechanisms of weathering, erosion, and run-off, as well as their bearing on the isotopic composition of the ocean we choose the following strategy: sediments from the Amerilik and Gothabs Fjords near Nuuk (Greenland) have been analyzed for their bulk rock and grain size specific Hf, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions (sand, silt, mud). Both Fjords are surrounded by early Archean gneisses, among the oldest rocks on Earth, and are filled with glacially floured sediments. Precambrian rocks surround a large fraction of the circum-North Atlantic area that was covered by ice sheets during the NHG, and the source rocks in this region are the most extreme examples. Current knowledge about the impact of weathering processes on isotope systematics implies that the largest changes in the Hf (and Pb) isotopic composition of seawater are expected to arise from glacial weathering of old continental sources. Our data reveal large differences in grain size specific isotope ratios, e.g. between the mud and sand fractions, for sediments with an old provenance

  11. Using stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon to study seabird ecology: applications in the Mediterranean seabird community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela G. Forero

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The application of the stable isotope technique to ecological studies is becoming increasingly widespread. In the case of seabirds, stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon have been mainly used as dietary tracers. This approach relieson the fact that food web isotopic signatures are reflected in the tissues of the consumer. In addition to the study of trophic ecology, stable isotopes have been used to track the movement of seabirds across isotopic gradients, as individuals moving between isotopically distinct foodwebs can carry with them information on the location of previous feeding areas. Studies applying the stable isotope methodology to the study of seabird ecology show a clear evolution from broad and descriptive approaches to detailed and individual-based analyses. The purpose of this article is to show the different fields of application of stable isotopes to the study of the seabird ecology. Finally, we illustrate the utility of this technique by considering the particularities of the Mediterranean seabird community, suggesting different ecological questions and conservation problems that could be addressed by using the stable isotope approach in this community.

  12. Oxygen Isotope Effect and Structural Phase Transitions in La2CuO4-Based Superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, M K; Farneth, W E; McCarronn, E M; Harlow, R L; Moudden, A H

    1990-12-07

    The oxygen isotope effect on the superconducting transition temperature (alpha(o)) varies as a function of x in La2-xSrxCuO(4) and La2-xBaxCuO(4), with the maximum alpha(o) values (alpha(o) >/= 0.5) found for x near 0.12. This unusual x dependence implies that the isotope effect is influenced by proximity to the Abma --> P4(2)/ncm structural phase transition in these systems. Synchrotron x-ray difaction measurements reveal little change in lattice parameters or orthorhombicity due to isotope exchange in strontium-doped materials where alpha(o) > 0.5, eliminating static structural distortion as a cause of the large isotope effects. The anomalous behavior of alpha(o) in both strontium- and barium-doped materials, in combination with the previously discovered Abma --> P4(2)/ncm structural phase-transition in La(1.88)B(0.12)CuO(4), suggests that an electronic contribution to the lattice instability is present and maximizes at approximately 1/8 hole per copper atom. These observations indicate a dose connection between hole doping of the Cu-O sheets, tilting instabilities of the CuO(6) octahedra, and superconductivity in La(2)CuO(4)-based superconductors.

  13. An unusual isotope effect in a high-transition-temperature superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gweon, G-H; Sasagawa, T; Zhou, S Y; Graf, J; Takagi, H; Lee, D-H; Lanzara, A

    2004-07-08

    In conventional superconductors, the electron pairing that allows superconductivity is caused by exchange of virtual phonons, which are quanta of lattice vibration. For high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) superconductors, it is far from clear that phonons are involved in the pairing at all. For example, the negligible change in T(c) of optimally doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta (Bi2212; ref. 1) upon oxygen isotope substitution (16O --> 18O leads to T(c) decreasing from 92 to 91 K) has often been taken to mean that phonons play an insignificant role in this material. Here we provide a detailed comparison of the electron dynamics of Bi2212 samples containing different oxygen isotopes, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our data show definite and strong isotope effects. Surprisingly, the effects mainly appear in broad high-energy humps, commonly referred to as 'incoherent peaks'. As a function of temperature and electron momentum, the magnitude of the isotope effect closely correlates with the superconducting gap--that is, the pair binding energy. We suggest that these results can be explained in a dynamic spin-Peierls picture, where the singlet pairing of electrons and the electron-lattice coupling mutually enhance each other.

  14. β decay studies of n-rich Cs isotopes with the ISOLDE Decay Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lică, R.; Benzoni, G.; Morales, A. I.; Borge, M. J. G.; Fraile, L. M.; Mach, H.; Madurga, M.; Sotty, C.; Vedia, V.; De Witte, H.; Benito, J.; Berry, T.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Charviakova, V.; Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Costache, C.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Creswell, J.; Fernández-Martínez, G.; Fynbo, H.; Greenlees, P.; Homm, I.; Huyse, M.; Jolie, J.; Karayonchev, V.; Köster, U.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Lazarus, I.; Leoni, S.; Lund, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Mihai, R.; Negret, A.; Orduz, A.; Patyk, Z.; Pascu, S.; Pucknell, V.; Rahkila, P.; Regis, J. M.; Rotaru, F.; Saed-Sami, N.; Sánchez-Tembleque, V.; Stanoiu, M.; Tengblad, O.; Thuerauf, M.; Turturica, A.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.

    2017-05-01

    Neutron-rich Ba isotopes are expected to exhibit octupolar correlations, reaching their maximum in isotopes around mass A = 146. The odd-A neutron-rich members of this isotopic chain show typical patterns related to non-axially symmetric shapes, which are however less marked compared to even-A ones, pointing to a major contribution from vibrations. In the present paper we present results from a recent study focused on 148–150Cs β-decay performed at the ISOLDE Decay Station equipped with fast-timing detectors. A detailed analysis of the measured decay half-lives and decay scheme of 149Ba is presented, giving a first insight in the structure of this neutron-rich nucleus.

  15. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes measurement by CF-IRMS with applications in hydrology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costinel, Diana; Vremera, Raluca [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, 4 Uzinei, POBox Raureni 7, 240050 Ramnicu Valcea (Romania); Grecu, Voicu V [University Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, 405 Atomistilor, CP MG 11, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Cuna, Stela, E-mail: diana@icsi.r [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    The major changes in isotopic composition of natural waters occur in the atmospheric part of the water cycle and in surface waters which are exposed to the atmosphere. This study demonstrated the utility of the Continuous Flow - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry method for measuring natural variation of the occurring isotopes of hydrogen ({sup 2}H) and oxygen ({sup 18}O) in meteoric waters. The variation of {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 2}D values from precipitation fallen in Raureni-Valcea area between May-December 2007 and September 2008-March 2009 were measured together with the {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 2}D values from the Bistrita River. The Local Meteoric Water Line was reported for this area. Also, the variation of {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 2}D values was correlated with the temperature and humidity in the same period.

  16. Lithium isotopic separation: preliminary studies; Separacao isotopica de litio: estudos preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Sandra Helena Goulart de

    1998-07-01

    In order to get the separation of natural isotopes of lithium by electrolytic amalgamation, an electrolytic cell with a confined mercury cathode was used to obtain data for the design of a separation stage. The initial work was followed by the design of a moving mercury cathode electrolytic cell and three experiments with six batches stages were performed for the determination of the elementary separation factor. The value obtained, 1.053, was ill agreement: with the specialized literature. It was verified in all experiments that the lithium - 6 isotope concentrated in the amalgam phase and that the lithium - 7 isotope concentrated in the aqueous phase. A stainless-steel cathode for the decomposition of the lithium amalgam and the selective desamalgamation were also studied. In view of the results obtained, a five stages continuous scheme was proposed. (author)

  17. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from -3.4±0.3 to -4.3±0.3‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from -7.0±0.4 to -13.6±1.2‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO4(-)). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO).

  18. Isotopic study of mercury sources and transfer between a freshwater lake and adjacent forest food web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sae Yun, E-mail: saeyunk@umich.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Blum, Joel D. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, 830 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Nadelhoffer, Knute J. [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, 830 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Timothy Dvonch, J. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Tsui, Martin Tsz-Ki [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 321 McIver Street, Greensboro, NC 27402 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Studies of monomethylmercury (MMHg) sources and biogeochemical pathways have been extensive in aquatic ecosystems, but limited in forest ecosystems. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant mercury (Hg) exchange between aquatic and forest ecosystems. We use Hg stable isotope ratios (δ{sup 202}Hg and Δ{sup 199}Hg) to investigate the relative importance of MMHg sources and assess Hg transfer pathways between Douglas Lake and adjacent forests located at the University of Michigan Biological Station, USA. We characterize Hg isotopic compositions of basal resources and use linear regression of % MMHg versus δ{sup 202}Hg and Δ{sup 199}Hg to estimate Hg isotope values for inorganic mercury (IHg) and MMHg in the aquatic and adjacent forest food webs. In the aquatic ecosystem, we found that lake sediment represents a mixture of IHg pools deposited via watershed runoff and precipitation. The δ{sup 202}Hg and Δ{sup 199}Hg values estimated for IHg are consistent with other studies that measured forest floor in temperate forests. The Δ{sup 199}Hg value estimated for MMHg in the aquatic food web indicates that MMHg is subjected to ~ 20% photochemical degradation prior to bioaccumulation. In the forest ecosystem, we found a significant negative relationship between total Hg and δ{sup 202}Hg and Δ{sup 199}Hg of soil collected at multiple distances from the lakeshore and lake sediment. This suggests that IHg input from watershed runoff provides an important Hg transfer pathway between the forest and aquatic ecosystems. We measured Δ{sup 199}Hg values for high trophic level insects and compared these insects at multiple distances perpendicular to the lake shoreline. The Δ{sup 199}Hg values correspond to the % canopy cover suggesting that forest MMHg is subjected to varying extents of photochemical degradation and the extent may be controlled by sunlight. Our study demonstrates that the use of Hg isotopes adds important new insight into the relative

  19. The diet-body offset in human nitrogen isotopic values: a controlled dietary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, T C; Kneale, C J; Tasevska, N; Kuhnle, G G C

    2012-11-01

    The "trophic level enrichment" between diet and body results in an overall increase in nitrogen isotopic values as the food chain is ascended. Quantifying the diet-body Δ(15) N spacing has proved difficult, particularly for humans. The value is usually assumed to be +3-5‰ in the archaeological literature. We report here the first (to our knowledge) data from humans on isotopically known diets, comparing dietary intake and a body tissue sample, that of red blood cells. Samples were taken from 11 subjects on controlled diets for a 30-day period, where the controlled diets were designed to match each individual's habitual diet, thus reducing problems with short-term changes in diet causing isotopic changes in the body pool. The Δ(15) N(diet-RBC) was measured as +3.5‰. Using measured offsets from other studies, we estimate the human Δ(15) N(diet-keratin) as +5.0-5.3‰, which is in good agreement with values derived from the two other studies using individual diet records. We also estimate a value for Δ(15) N(diet-collagen) of ≈6‰, again in combination with measured offsets from other studies. This value is larger than usually assumed in palaeodietary studies, which suggests that the proportion of animal protein in prehistoric human diet may have often been overestimated in isotopic studies of palaeodiet.

  20. Stable N isotope values of black spruce ecosystem components integrate source N isotope values, soil fertility, and microbial biomass: a natural and experimental study from Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, J. R.; Schuur, T.; Mack, M. C.; Nettelton Hollingsworth, T.; Bååth, E.

    2009-12-01

    The productivity and ecosystem dynamics of many northern ecosystems are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. Understanding N dynamics is especially important in boreal forests where slight changes in N availability can have profound effects on ecosystem productivity and diversity of plants and microbes. However, because N cycling processes vary profoundly in time and space, assessing ecosystem N supply and cycling pathways are difficult even with frequent measurements. Recent soil, plant, and fungal meta-analyses have indicated that stable isotopes of N may provide just such an integrative measure of N cycling by recording pathways of N flux through ecosystems. Here we present N stable isotope patterns across 30 plots varying in natural fertility and in 4 blocks of 16 experimentally fertilized plots of mature black spruce forest in central Alaska. We measured soil N isotope ratios of NO3, NH4, and salt extracted dissolved organic N (DON) using persulfate oxidation coupled to the bacterial denitrifier technique. The soil N isotope values varied from 15 to -26‰ across the landscape and were a poor predictor of the variability in plant N isotope values ranging from 5-11‰. Instead a combination of fungal biomass (PLFA 18:2ω6,9), fungal ingrowth, cation exchange capacity, and resin extractable phosphate (P) were better explanatory variables in a multiple regression context. This suggests that plant N isotope ratios are a product of numerous soil and microbial processes and not simply a direct reflection of source N pools. Denitrification in soils and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) assimilation and delivery of N were also likely causal as each influence pathways of N cycling that can alter the N isotope values of source and receiving pools. In contrast with the very low N environment present in our natural gradient, we found that N fertilization, both singly and in conjunction with P, caused the N isotope values of foliage, fine roots, soil N, and fungal fruiting bodies to

  1. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunde [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Aiguo, E-mail: aiguozhou@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from − 3.4 ± 0.3 to − 4.3 ± 0.3 ‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from − 7.0 ± 0.4 to − 13.6 ± 1.2 ‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). - Highlights: • Significant C isotope fractionation for TCE degradation by Fe{sup 0} activated persulfate. • The enrichment factors was independent of Fe{sup 0}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, or HCO{sub 3}{sup −} concentration. • Cl{sup −} significantly influenced the carbon isotope fractionation.

  2. Quantum-instanton evaluation of the isotopic effects on the rate constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.

    2004-03-01

    We present a general quantum-mechanical method suitable for numerical evaluation of the isotopic effects on the rate constants of chemical reactions. Our method is based on the quantum instanton approximation [1-3] and on the path-integral Metropolis Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Boltzmann operator matrix elements. The method is more accurate than existing transition-state theory or semiclassical instanton method since we do not assume a single reaction path and do not use a semiclassical approximation of the Boltzmann operator. In order to calculate the isotopic effect we use a "charging algoritm," whereby the mass of the isotope is continuously changed from the initial to the final value. Direct calculation of the isotopic ratio turns out to be much more efficient than finding the absolute rate constants first and then calculating their ratio. While the Monte-Carlo implementation should make the method accessible to systems with a larger number of atoms, we present numerical results for the Eckart barrier and for the reactions H + H2 arrow H2 + H and H + DH arrow HD + H. [1] W.H. Miller, Y. Zhao, M. Ceotto, and Sandy Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 1329 (2003). [2] T. Yamamoto and W.H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. (in press). [3] Y. Zhao, T. Yamamoto, and W.H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. (in press).

  3. Oxygen isotope studies of phosphite oxidation: purification and analysis of reactants and products by high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sae Jung; Blake, Ruth E

    2015-11-15

    Increased attention has been recently focused on the origin and reactions of reduced-P oxyanions such as phosphite [PO3 (III)] in terrestrial and biological systems. We present new methods for studying O-isotopic reactions between PO3 (III) and other oxygen sources during oxidation of PO3 (III) to PO4 (V). Na2 (HPO3 )·5H2 O, used as a PO3 (III) source, contains structural water due to its hygroscopic nature; thus, we developed a method for determining the δ(18) O value of PO3 (III) after the removal of structural water. Next, we tested two techniques for purifying PO4 (V) from aqueous PO3 (III)/PO4 (V) mixtures: (1) precipitation of PO4 (V) as ammonium phosphomolybdate (APM); and (2) precipitation of PO4 (V) as magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP). The O-isotope compositions, (18) O:(16) O (δ(18) O values), of Na2 (HPO3 ) and Ag3 PO4 were analyzed by TC/EA/IRMS. Structural water was removed from Na2 (HPO3 )·5H2 O after drying at 100 °C under vacuum and the δ(18) O value of PO3 (III) was obtained. The δ(18) O values of PO4 (V), which was extracted from (18) O-labeled PO3 (III)/PO4 (V) mixtures by APM and MAP precipitations, were not altered by the precipitation process. This result confirms that PO3 (III) is not converted into PO4 (V) by oxidation or hydrolysis under either strong acidic/oxidizing (APM) or alkaline (MAP) conditions for up to a 24-h period. We conclude that both APM and MAP precipitation are reliable and effective methods for the separation and purification of PO4 (V) from aqueous PO3 (III)/PO4 (V) mixtures. The methods described here will permit the study of the isotopic evolution of various pathways of geochemical as well as biological PO3 (III) oxidation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Radiometric assay for cytochrome P-450-catalyzed progesterone 16 alpha-hydroxylation and determination of an apparent isotope effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osawa, Y.; Coon, M.J.

    1987-08-01

    In the course of studies on the oxygenation of steroids by purified P-450 cytochromes, particularly rabbit liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 form 3b, a rapid and reliable radiometric assay has been devised for progesterone 16 alpha-hydroxylation. In view of the lack of a commercially available, suitably tritiated substrate, (1,2,6,7,16,17-3H)progesterone was treated with alkali to remove the label from potential hydroxylation sites other than the 16 alpha position. The resulting (1,7,16-3H)progesterone was added to a reconstituted enzyme system containing cytochrome P-450 form 3b, NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase, and NADPH, and the rate of 16 alpha-hydroxylation was measured by the formation of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O. This reaction was shown to be linear with respect to time and to the cytochrome P-450 concentration. An apparent tritium isotope effect of 2.1 was observed by comparison of the rates of formation of tritium oxide and 16 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, and the magnitude of the isotope effect was confirmed by an isotope competition assay in which a mixture of (1,7,16-/sup 3/H)progesterone and (4-14C)progesterone was employed.

  5. You Are What You Eat: Mass spectrometry in paediatric kinetic studies using stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schierbeek (Henk)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAn overview will be presented about applications of stable isotopes in paediatric research. Mass spectrometry has proven to be an essential tool for unravelling kinetic studies in a large range of different research disciplines related to intestinal diseases, obesities, severe cerebral p

  6. Baseline identification in stable isotope studies of temperate lotic systems and implications for calculated trophic positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Brinkmann; Riis, Tenna; Dylmer, Hans Erik;

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between land use and stream consumer δ15N values are well established and, as a consequence, different primary consumers have been suggested as suitable system-specific baseline indicators in isotope studies of trophic structure. These baselines are often based on bulked data includ...

  7. Silicon isotope study of thermal springs in Jiaodong Region,Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐跃通; 李红梅; 冯海霞; 周晨; 吴元芳; 张邦花

    2001-01-01

    Based on δ30Si and δ32Si isotope geochemistry, the origin and evolutionary mechanism of thermal springs in Jiaodong region are studied. The mean value of δ30Si of dissolved silica of thermal spring water in Jiaodong is 0.1‰. Thermal spring water ages using δ32Si dating method range from 387a to 965a.

  8. Dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) applications study. Volume I. Summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prickett, W. Z.

    1979-11-01

    The Nuclear Integrated Multimission Spacecraft (NIMS) is designed for communications, surveillance, navigation and meteorelogical missions. This study assesses th attributes of the Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) for this spacecraft. These attributes include cost, system and mission compatibility, and survivability. (LCL)

  9. A study of oxygen isotopic fractionation during bio-induced calcite precipitation in eutrophic Baldeggersee, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teranes, J.L.; McKenzie, J.A.; Bernasconi, S.M.; Lotter, A.F.; Sturm, M.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract—In order to better understand environmental factors controlling oxygen isotope shifts in autochthonous lacustrine carbonate sequences, we undertook an extensive one-year study (March, 1995 to February, 1996) of water-column chemistry and daily sediment trap material from a small lake in Cen

  10. A Study of the Molecular Cloud S64 with Multiple Lines of CO Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhu; Yue-Fang Wu; Yue Wei

    2006-01-01

    We report on a study of the molecular cloud S64 with observations at millimeter wavelengths of multiple molecular lines of CO isotopes. A weak outflow is found, and its physical parameters are estimated. The departure of the core of S64 from the S64 HⅡ region indicates that there are still other star formation activities in that region.

  11. Integrated Fe- and S-isotope study of seafloor hydrothermal vents at East Pacific Rise 9-10°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Bach, W.; Edwards, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we report on coupled Fe- and S-isotope systematics of hydrothermal fluids and sulfide deposits from the East Pacific Rise at 9–10°N to better constrain processes affecting Fe-isotope fractionation in hydrothermal environments. We aim to address three fundamental questions: (1) Is there significant Fe-isotope fractionation during sulfide precipitation? (2) Is there significant variability of Fe-isotope composition of the hydrothermal fluids reflecting sulfide precipitation in subsurface environments? (3) Are there any systematics between Fe- and S-isotopes in sulfide minerals? The results show that chalcopyrite, precipitating in the interior wall of a hydrothermal chimney displays a limited range of δ56Fe values and δ34S values, between − 0.11 to − 0.33‰ and 2.2 to 2.6‰ respectively. The δ56Fe values are, on average, slightly higher by 0.14‰ relative to coeval vent fluid composition while δ34S values suggest significant S-isotope fractionation (− 0.6 ± 0.2‰) during chalcopyrite precipitation. In contrast, systematically lower δ56Fe and δ34S values relative to hydrothermal fluids, by up to 0.91‰ and 2.0‰ respectively, are observed in pyrite and marcasite precipitating in the interior of active chimneys. These results suggest isotope disequilibrium in both Fe- and S-isotopes due to S-isotopic exchange between hydrothermal H2S and seawater SO42− followed by rapid formation of pyrite from FeS precursors, thus preserving the effects of a strong kinetic Fe-isotope fractionation during FeS precipitation. In contrast, δ56Fe and δ34S values of pyrite from inactive massive sulfides, which show evidence of extensive late-stage reworking, are essentially similar to the hydrothermal fluids. Multiple stages of remineralization of ancient chimney deposits at the seafloor appear to produce minimal Fe-isotope fractionation. Similar affects are indicated during subsurface sulfide precipitation as demonstrated by the lack of systematic

  12. C-13 isotopic studies of the surface catalysed reactions of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, M.A.; He, S.J.X.; Adebajo, M. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    The ability of methane to methylate aromatic compounds, which are considered to be models for coal, is being studied. Related to this reaction, but at higher temperatures, is the direct formation of benzene from methane in the presence of these catalysts. Controversy exists in the literature on the former reaction, and {sup 13}C isotope studies are being used to resolve the question. The interest in this reaction arises because the utilisation of methane, in the form of natural gas, in place of hydrogen for direct coal liquefaction would have major economic advantage. For this reason Isotope studies in this area have contributed significantly to an understanding of the methylation reactions. The paper describes experiments utilising methane{sup 13}C, which show that methylation of aromatics such as naphthalene by the methane{sup 13}C is catalysed by microporous, Cu-exchanged SAPO-5, at elevated pressures (6.8 MPa) and temperatures around 400 degree C. The mass spectrometric analysis and n.m.r. study of the isotopic composition of the products of the methylation reaction demonstrate unequivocally that methane provides the additional carbon atom for the methylated products. Thermodynamic calculations predict that the reaction is favourable at high methane pressures under these experimental conditions. The mechanism as suggested by the isotope study is discussed. The catalysts which show activity for the activation of methane for direct methylation of organic compounds, such as naphthalene, toluene, phenol and pyrene, are substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves, EIAPO-5 (where El=Pb, Cu, Ni and Si) and a number of metal substituted zeolites. Our earlier tritium studies had shown that these catalysts will activate alkanes, at least as far as isotope hydrogen exchange reactions are concerned

  13. Continuous flow stable isotope methods for study of δ13C fractionation during halomethane production and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, Robert M.; Hamilton, John T.G.; Harper, David B.; Miller, Laurence G.; Lamb, Clare; Kennedy, James T.; Downey, Angela; McCauley, Sean; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/MS/IRMS) methods for δ13C measurement of the halomethanes CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I and methanethiol (CH3SH) during studies of their biological production, biological degradation, and abiotic reactions are presented. Optimisation of gas chromatographic parameters allowed the identification and quantification of CO2, O2, CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I and CH3SH from a single sample, and also the concurrent measurement of δ13C for each of the halomethanes and methanethiol. Precision of δ13C measurements for halomethane standards decreased (±0.3, ±0.5 and ±1.3‰) with increasing mass (CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I, respectively). Given that carbon isotope effects during biological production, biological degradation and some chemical (abiotic) reactions can be as much as 100‰, stable isotope analysis offers a precise method to study the global sources and sinks of these halogenated compounds that are of considerable importance to our understanding of stratospheric ozone destruction. 

  14. Femtometer accuracy EXAFS measurements: Isotopic effect in the first, second and third coordination shells of germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purans, J; Timoshenko, J; Kuzmin, A [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, LV-1063 Riga (Latvia); Dalba, G; Fornasini, P; Grisenti, R; Afify, N D [Dip. di Fisica dell' Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Rocca, F [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie del CNR, Sezione ' FBK-CeFSA' di Trento, Povo, Trento (Italy); De Panfilis, S [Research Center Soft INFM-CNR, c/o Universita di Roma La Sapienza, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Ozhogin, I [Institute of Molecular Physics, Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tiutiunnikov, S I, E-mail: purans@cfi.lu.l [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of the EXAFS signals from {sup 70}Ge and {sup 76}Ge has evidenced the low-temperature effect of isotopic mass difference on the amplitude of relative atomic vibrations. This effect is reflected in the difference of the Debye-Waller factors of the first three coordination shells, and on the difference of nearest-neighbour average interatomic distances, evaluated with femtometer accuracy. The experimental results are in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  15. Comprehensive Isotopic and Elemental Analysis of a Multi-Oxide Glass By Multicollector ICP-MS in Isotope Substitution Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    v, Mitroshkov; JV, Ryan

    2016-04-07

    Multicollector ICP-MS was used to comprehensively analyze different types of isotopically-modified glass created in order to investigate the processes of glass corrosion in the water. The analytical methods were developed for the analyses of synthesized, isotopically-modified solid glass and the release of glass constituents upon contact with deionized water. To validate the methods, results from an acid digestion sample of the Analytical Reference Glass (ARG) showed good agreement when compared to data from multiple prior analyses on the same glass [Smith-1]. In this paper, we present the results of this comprehensive analysis from the acid digestion of six types of isotopically-modified glass and the release of glass constituents into water corrosion after one year of aqueous corrosion.

  16. Studies on accuracy of trichothecene multitoxin analysis using stable isotope dilution assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asam, S; Rychlik, M

    2007-12-01

    Critical parameters in mycotoxin analysis were examined by using stable isotope-labelled tricho-thecenes. Sample weight was downsized to 1 g without loosing precision when sufficiently homogenized samples were taken for analysis. Complete extraction of trichothecenes could be achieved with a solvent mixture of acetonitrile+water (84+16; v+v) even without the use of stable isotope labelled standards. However, in particular for the analysis of deoxynivalenol the absolute amount of water in the solvent volume used for extraction appeared critical. Depending on the matrix a low water amount resulted in too low quantitative values when no stable isotope-labelled standards are applied to correct for incomplete extraction. In this case the used extraction volume had to be at least 10 ml for 1 g sample when acetonitrile + water (84+16; v+v) was used as extraction solvent.Losses during sample preparation using two different clean-up columns were not observed. On the contrary, matrix suppression in the ESI-interface of the LC-MS equipment was found to be a serious problem. Depending on the matrix, the latter effect resulted in considerably lower values for trichothecenes when no stable isotope-labelled standards were used to counterbalance this suppression.

  17. Peculiar oxygen and copper isotope effects on the pseudogap formation temperature in underdoped to overdoped cuprates: Pseudogap induced by pairing correlations above Tc in cuprates with large and small Fermi surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhumanov, S.; Khudayberdiev, Z. S.; Djumanov, Sh. S.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the pseudogap (PG) state and the peculiar oxygen and copper isotope effects on the PG onset temperature T* in cuprate superconductors with large and small Fermi surfaces within the polaron model and two different BCS-based approaches extended to the intermediate coupling regime. We argue that the unconventional electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the polaron formation and BCS-like pairing correlations above Tc in underdoped to overdoped cuprates, which are exotic (non-BCS) superconductors. Using the generalized BCS-like theory, we calculate pseudogap formation temperatures T*, isotope shifts ΔT*, oxygen and copper isotope exponents (i.e. αT*O and αT*Cu) and show that isotope effects on T* strongly depend on strengths of Coulomb and electron-phonon interactions, doping levels and dielectric constants of the cuprates. This theory explains the existence of small positive or sign reversed oxygen isotope effect, sizable and very large negative oxygen and copper isotope effects on T* in cuprates with large Fermi surfaces. Further, we use another version of the extended BCS-like model to study the PG formation and the peculiar isotope effects on T* in deeply underdoped cuprates with small Fermi surfaces and predict the existence of small and sizable negative oxygen and copper isotope effects on T* in such underdoped cuprates. The results for T*, isotope shifts ΔT* and exponents (αT*O and αT*Cu) in different classes of high-Tc cuprates are in good agreement with the existing well-established experimental data and explain the controversy between various experiments on isotope effects for T* in the cuprates.

  18. Preliminary isotopic studies of fluids from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truesdell, A.H.; Rye, R.O.; Pearson, F.J.; Olson, E.R.; Nehring, N.L.; Whelan, J.F.; Huebner, M.A.; Coplen, T.B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary isotopic studies of Cerro Prieto geothermal fluids and earlier studies of Mexicali Valley ground waters suggest local recharge of the geothermal system from the area immediately to the west. Oxygen isotope exchange of water with reservoir rock minerals at temperatures increasing with depth has produced fluids with oxygen-18 contents increasing with depth, and pressure drawdown in the southeastern part of the field has allowed lower oxygen-18 fluids to invade the production aquifer from above. The contents of tritium and carbon-14 in the fluid suggest only that the age of the fluid is between 50 and 10,000 years. The isotopic compositions of carbon and sulfur are consistent with a magmatic origin of these elements but a mixed sedimentary-organic origin appears more likely for carbon and is also possible for sulfur. Investigations of the isotopic compositions of geothermal and cold ground waters continue and are being expanded as fluids become available and as separation and analysis methods are improved. ?? 1979.

  19. New constraints on kinetic isotope effects during CO2(aq) hydration and hydroxylation: Revisiting theoretical and experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Ziv; Halevy, Itay

    2017-10-01

    CO2 (de)hydration (i.e., CO2 hydration/HCO3- dehydration) and (de)hydroxylation (i.e., CO2 hydroxylation/HCO3- dehydroxylation) are key reactions in the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) system. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) during these reactions are likely to be expressed in the DIC and recorded in carbonate minerals formed during CO2 degassing or dissolution of gaseous CO2. Thus, a better understanding of KIEs during CO2 (de)hydration and (de)hydroxylation would improve interpretations of disequilibrium compositions in carbonate minerals. To date, the literature lacks direct experimental constraints on most of the oxygen KIEs associated with these reactions. In addition, theoretical estimates describe oxygen KIEs during separate individual reactions. The KIEs of the related reverse reactions were neither derived directly nor calculated from a link to the equilibrium fractionation. Consequently, KIE estimates of experimental and theoretical studies have been difficult to compare. Here we revisit experimental and theoretical data to provide new constraints on oxygen KIEs during CO2 (de)hydration and (de)hydroxylation. For this purpose, we provide a clearer definition of the KIEs and relate them both to isotopic rate constants and equilibrium fractionations. Such relations are well founded in studies of single isotope source/sink reactions, but they have not been established for reactions that involve dual isotopic sources/sinks, such as CO2 (de)hydration and (de)hydroxylation. We apply the new quantitative constraints on the KIEs to investigate fractionations during simultaneous CaCO3 precipitation and HCO3- dehydration far from equilibrium.

  20. Sorption- and diffusion-associated isotope effects for chlorinated and non chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons in a sediment pore water diffusion sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeport, E.; Chu, K.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Landis, R.; Lutz, E. J.; Mack, E. E.; West, K.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2013-12-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) has gained prominence for evaluation of microbial and abiotic degradation processes governing the fate of organic contaminants in groundwater. At the sediment pore water interface, in wetland or river bottom sediments, variations in oxidation-reduction conditions can affect reaction mechanisms and hence the contaminant mass flux discharged to surface waters. Carbon isotope fractionation has been shown to be an important tool in identifying the effects of degradation and differentiating between different degradation pathways. To date, while passive diffusion samplers (commonly called 'peepers') have provided a powerful tool for high spatial resolution sampling for dissolved VOC across the sediment water interface, peepers' compatibility with CSIA has never been evaluated. The operating principle of peepers involves compound diffusion from the sediment pore water to the peeper chambers via a membrane. In this study, we evaluated the isotope effects of diffusion through, and possible adsorption to a polysulfone membrane for priority groundwater contaminants including chlorinated and non-chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Chlorinated benzenes tend to accumulate in the food web and therefore represent a significant threat to water resources. This is due to their larger sorption coefficients (Koc) and higher hydrophobicity properties (logKow) compared to other commonly-studied compounds (e.g., chlorinated ethenes). Application of CSIA to BTEX and chlorinated ethenes has demonstrated that non-degradative processes (e.g., sorption, volatilization, diffusion) typically result in smaller carbon isotope fractionation compared to degradative processes that involve breaking bonds. The large sorption properties of chlorinated benzenes preclude a direct extrapolation to these compounds of existing data on sorption-associated isotope effects obtained on other compounds. To date, similar studies have not been done for chlorinated aromatics

  1. Hemodynamic effects of metoprolol and nifedipine in angina pectoris measured by isotope technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the therapeutic effects of metoprolol, nifedipine, and their combination, 11 patients with secondary angina pectoris and with thallium tomographic findings indicating coronary artery disease were studied before and after these three treatment regimes in a single-blind cross-over study. The therapeutic effect was measured by standardized working test and isotope angiocardiography, which enabled evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction, stroke volume, and phase analysis of left ventricular contraction. Treatment with metoprolol and combination therapy increased work performance. Ejection fraction did not differentiate the treatment regimes, whereas stroke volume was significantly lower at work and heart rate higher at rest and at work during nifedipine treatment compared to either metoprolol or combination treatment (p less than 0.05). Cardiac output was significantly reduced during nifedipine and metoprolol treatment during work (p less than 0.05). Phase improved after all therapeutic regimes, but reached significance only during the metoprolol treatment period at rest (p less than 0.05).

  2. Isotopic studies of rare gases in terrestrial samples and natural nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    This project is concerned with research in rare gas mass spectrometry. Using a two-pronged attack, we study fluids using a system (RARGA) designed for fluid analysis in bulk which is sometimes deployed in the field and a laser microprobe mass spectrometer for fluid inclusion studies. In 1991 the RARGA project continued monitoring helium isotope variations associated with renewed seismic activity in Long Valley Caldera and expanded our geothermal data base to include Lassen National Park. An important objective, continuing in 1992, is to understand better the reasons for somewhat elevated {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios in regions where there is no contemporary volcanism which could produce the effect by addition of mantle helium. To this end, 1991 saw continued efforts to understand variations in composition between fluids and associated reservoir rocks and extended the data base to include fluids from the Gulf of Mexico. Our DOE work in calibrating a sensitive laser microprobe mass spectrometer for noble gases in fluid inclusions continues with successful returns particularly in calibrating neutron irradiated samples for tracing halogen ratios. In connection with observations of neutron-produced noble gas nuclides in granites, we have begun comparing measurements with calculations for both thermal and epithermal neutrons. We submitted a third paper on noble gases in diamonds, concentrating on observed effects of {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, and fission xenon implantation from nuclear processes in adjacent material in the matrix rock. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Isotopic studies of rare gases in terrestrial samples and natural nucleosynthesis. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    This project is concerned with research in rare gas mass spectrometry. Using a two-pronged attack, we study fluids using a system (RARGA) designed for fluid analysis in bulk which is sometimes deployed in the field and a laser microprobe mass spectrometer for fluid inclusion studies. In 1991 the RARGA project continued monitoring helium isotope variations associated with renewed seismic activity in Long Valley Caldera and expanded our geothermal data base to include Lassen National Park. An important objective, continuing in 1992, is to understand better the reasons for somewhat elevated {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios in regions where there is no contemporary volcanism which could produce the effect by addition of mantle helium. To this end, 1991 saw continued efforts to understand variations in composition between fluids and associated reservoir rocks and extended the data base to include fluids from the Gulf of Mexico. Our DOE work in calibrating a sensitive laser microprobe mass spectrometer for noble gases in fluid inclusions continues with successful returns particularly in calibrating neutron irradiated samples for tracing halogen ratios. In connection with observations of neutron-produced noble gas nuclides in granites, we have begun comparing measurements with calculations for both thermal and epithermal neutrons. We submitted a third paper on noble gases in diamonds, concentrating on observed effects of {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, and fission xenon implantation from nuclear processes in adjacent material in the matrix rock. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  4. The geographic distribution of strontium isotopes in Danish surface waters - A base for provenance studies in archaeology, hydrology and agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Karin Margarita; Frei, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Sr isotope signatures are reported for 192 surface water (lakes/ponds and rivers/creeks) samples from within Denmark and an isotope distribution map is presented that may serve as a base for provenance applications, including archaeological migration studies, ground water – surface ...

  5. Species-specific isotope tracers to study the accumulation and biotransformation of mixtures of inorganic and methyl mercury by the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Andrea Garcia; Le Faucheur, Séverine; Monperrus, Mathilde; Amouroux, David; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2014-09-01

    The present study demonstrates that species-specific isotope tracing is an useful tool to precisely measure Hg accumulation and transformations capabilities of living organisms at concentrations naturally encountered in the environment. To that end, a phytoplanktonic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard (Chlamydomonadales, Chlorophyceae) was exposed to mixtures of (199)-isotopically enriched inorganic mercury ((199)IHg) and of (201)-isotopically enriched monomethylmercury ((201)CH3Hg) at a concentration range between less than 1 pM to 4 nM. Additionally, one exposure concentration of both mercury species was also studied separately to evaluate possible interactive effects. No difference in the intracellular contents was observed for algae exposed to (199)IHg and (201)CH3Hg alone or in their mixture, suggesting similar accumulation capacity for both species at the studied concentrations. Demethylation of (201)CH3Hg was observed at the highest exposure concentrations, whereas no methylation was detected.

  6. Hydrochemistry and boron isotopes as natural tracers in the study of groundwaters from North Chianan Plain, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsueh-Yu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, hydrochemistry and boron isotopes are successfully applied to elucidate hydrogeological processes by the use of natural tracers. The hydrochemical analysis identifies four end-members in the hydrochemical evolution of groundwater from the North Chianan plain groundwater district. A few groundwater contain extraordinary chlorine concentrations of up to 48,000 mg l(-1). However, the hydrochemistry of groundwater only reveals that high saline water is a dominant factor in groundwater hydrochemistry. It is thought that these groundwater experienced precipitation of carbonates during seawater evaporation that did not involve the precipitation of gypsum. Boron isotopes are very efficient tracers in determining the source of salinisation. The boron isotopes reveal the results of mixing of evaporated seawater and water-sediment interaction. In general, the boron isotope ratio of the groundwater is controlled by a two-end-member mixing system, which is composed of evaporated seawater (isotopically heavy) and fresh surface water (isotopically light). Due to a long lagoonal period in the coastal plain, the groundwaters in the downstream area generally have high Cl/B ratios and relatively heavy boron isotope ratios while those in the upstream area are composed of low Cl/B and light boron isotopes. However, there is not a resolvable mixing trend between the Cl/B ratio and the isotopic composition of boron. It is probably obscured by a highly variable boron isotope ratio in fresh surface water and through fractionation associated with water-rock interaction. Both factors would decrease the boron isotope ratio but one effect cannot be distinguished from the other.

  7. Maximum reasonable radioxenon releases from medical isotope production facilities and their effect on monitoring nuclear explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Theodore W; Kephart, Rosara; Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Miley, Harry S; Saey, Paul R J

    2013-01-01

    Fission gases such as (133)Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of (99)Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Stocki et al., 2005; Saey, 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5 × 10(9) Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers.

  8. Neonatal Respiratory Diseases in the Newborn Infant: Novel Insights from Stable Isotope Tracer Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnielli, Virgilio P; Giorgetti, Chiara; Simonato, Manuela; Vedovelli, Luca; Cogo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome is a common problem in preterm infants and the etiology is multifactorial. Lung underdevelopment, lung hypoplasia, abnormal lung water metabolism, inflammation, and pulmonary surfactant deficiency or disfunction play a variable role in the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome. High-quality exogenous surfactant replacement studies and studies on surfactant metabolism are available; however, the contribution of surfactant deficiency, alteration or dysfunction in selected neonatal lung conditions is not fully understood. In this article, we describe a series of studies made by applying stable isotope tracers to the study of surfactant metabolism and lung water. In a first set of studies, which we call 'endogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled intravenous surfactant precursors, we showed the feasibility of measuring surfactant synthesis and kinetics in infants using several metabolic precursors including plasma glucose, plasma fatty acids and body water. In a second set of studies, named 'exogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled phosphatidylcholine tracer given endotracheally, we could estimate surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholine pool size and half-life. Very recent studies are focusing on lung water and on the endogenous biosynthesis of the surfactant-specific proteins. Information obtained from these studies in infants will help to better tailor exogenous surfactant treatment in neonatal lung diseases.

  9. Decay study of neutron-rich zirconium isotopes employing a Penning trap as a spectroscopy tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinta-Antila, S.; Eronen, T.; Elomaa, V.V.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Penttilae, H.; Rissanen, J.; Sonoda, T.; Saastamoinen, A.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland)

    2007-01-15

    A new technique to produce isobarically pure ion beams for decay spectroscopy by using a gas-filled Penning trap was commissioned at the ion guide isotope separator on-line facility, IGISOL. {beta}-decays of neutron-rich {sup 100}Zr, {sup 102}Zr and {sup 104}Zr isotopes were studied with this technique. In addition, the Q{sub {beta}{sup -}} values of {sup 100,102,104}Zr {beta}-decays were determined from the direct mass measurements of zirconium and niobium isotopes performed with a high-precision Penning trap. The mass of {sup 104}Nb was directly measured for the first time and the obtained mass excess value for the longer-living (1{sup +}) state is -71823{+-}10 keV. For the ground states of {sup 100}Nb and {sup 102}Nb the obtained mass excess values were -79802{+-}20 keV and -76309{+-}10 keV, respectively. The observed distribution of the {beta} strength supports a prolate deformation assignment for {sup 100,102,104}Zr isotopes. (orig.)

  10. The effect of bonding environment on iron isotope fractionation between minerals at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2017-01-01

    Central to understanding the processes that drive stable isotope fractionation in nature is their quantification under controlled experimental conditions. The polyvalent element iron, given its abundance in terrestrial rocks, exerts controls on the structural and chemical properties of minerals and melts. The iron isotope compositions of typical high temperature minerals are, however, poorly constrained and their dependence on intensive (e.g. fO2) and extensive (e.g. compositional) variables is unknown. In this work, experiments involving a reference phase, 2 M FeCl2·4H2O(l), together with an oxide mix corresponding to the bulk composition of the chosen mineral were performed in a piston cylinder in Ag capsules. The oxide mix crystallised in situ at 1073 K and 1 GPa, in equilibrium with the iron chloride, and was held for 72 h. In order to characterise the effect of co-ordination and oxidation state on the isotope composition independently, exclusively Fe2+ minerals were substituted in: VIII-fold almandine, VI-fold ilmenite, fayalite and IV-fold chromite and hercynite. Δ57FeMin-FeCl2 increases in the order VIII ion. The composition of the VIFe2+-bearing minerals is similar to that of the aqueous FeCl2 fluid. To the degree that this represents the speciation of iron in fluids exsolving from magmas, the fractionation between them should be small, unless the iron is hosted in magnetite. By contrast, predominantly Fe2+-bearing mantle garnets should preserve a much lighter δ57Fe than their lower pressure spinel counterparts, a signature that may be reflected in partial melts from these lithologies. As the Fe-O bond lengths in fayalite and ilmenite are comparable, their isotope compositions overlap, suggesting that high Ti mare basalts acquired their heavy isotopic signature from ilmenite that crystallised late during lunar magma ocean solidification.

  11. Geochemical and isotopic study of soils and waters from an Italian contaminated site: Agro Aversano (Campania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, M.A.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.

    2011-01-01

    Lead isotope applications have been widely used in recent years in environmental studies conducted on different kinds of sampled media. In the present paper, Pb isotope ratios have been used to determine the sources of metal pollution in soils and waters in the Agro Aversano area. During three different sampling phases, a total of 113 surface soils (5-20. cm), 20 samples from 2 soil profiles (0-1. m), 11 stream waters and 4 groundwaters were collected. Major element concentrations in sampled media have been analyzed by the ICP-MS technique. Surface soils (20 samples), all soil profiles and all waters have been also analyzed for Pb isotope compositions by thermal ionization (TIMS). The geochemical data were assessed using statistic methods and cartographically elaborated in order to have a clear picture of the level of disturbance of the area. Pb isotopic data were studied to discriminate between anthropogenic and geologic sources. Our results show that As (5.6-25.6. mg/kg), Cu (9-677. mg/kg), Pb (22-193. mg/kg), Tl (0.53-3.62. mg/kg), V (26-142. mg/kg) and Zn (34-215. mg//kg) contents in analyzed soils, exceed the intervention limits fixed by the Italian Environmental Law for residential areas in some of the sampled sites, while intervention limit for industrial areas is exceeded only for Cu concentrations. Lead isotopic data, show that there is a high similarity between the ratios measured in the leached soil samples and those deriving from anthropic activities. This similarity with anthropogenic Pb is also evident in the ratios measured in both groundwater and stream water samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects.

  13. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism in preterm infants studied with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAIM OF THE STUDIES 1. To develop and use a novel method to study surfactant metabolism in preterm and older infants. (chapters 3 and 4). 2. To study endogenous surfactant synthesis in relation to prenatal glucocorticosteroids. (chapters 5 and 6). 3. To study the influence of surfactant

  14. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism in preterm infants studied with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAIM OF THE STUDIES 1. To develop and use a novel method to study surfactant metabolism in preterm and older infants. (chapters 3 and 4). 2. To study endogenous surfactant synthesis in relation to prenatal glucocorticosteroids. (chapters 5 and 6). 3. To study the influence of surfactant t

  15. Kinetic isotope effects in the OH and Cl reactions of the clumped methane species 13CH3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Magnus

    Methane is an potent greenhouse gas, second only to carbon dioxide of the anthropogenic greenhouse gases in its influence on Earth’s radiative budget. Although less abundant in the atmosphere, methane’s global warming potential is about twentyeight times that of carbon dioxide. Sources of methane...... at significantly different temperatures, therefore, the clumped isotope signatures of methane can be used to identify the process by which the gas was formed. Clumped isotopes can thus be a helpful tool in refining the budget of atmospheric methane. However, the isotopic composition of the atmospheric methane pool....... As is proven in the current research project, the clumped isotopes are removed by oxidation mechanisms at a slower rate. The residual methane pool is therefore enriched in clumped isotopes compared to the methane from the sources. In order to construct a top-down budget of methane, the clumped kinetic effect...

  16. Geochemical study of boron isotopes in the process of loess weathering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Zhiqi; (

    2003-01-01

    [1]Palmer, M. R., Swihart, G. H., Boron isotope geochemistry: An overview, in Rev. Mineral 33, Boron Mineralogy, Petrology and Geochemistry (eds. Grew, E. S., Anovitz, L. M.), Washington, D. C.: Mineral Soc. Am., 1996, 709-744.[2]Chaussidon, M., Albarède, F., Secular boron isotope variations in the continental crust: An ion microprobe study, Earth Planet Sci. Lett., 1992, 108: 229-241.[3]Spivack, A. J., Edmond, J. M., Boron isotope exchange between seawater and the oceanic crust, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1987, 51: 1033-1043.[4]Vengosh, A., Chivas, A. R., Mcculloch, M. T. et al., Boron isotope geochemistry of Australian salt lakes, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1991, 55: 2591-2606.[5]Xiao, Y. K., Sun, D. P., Wang, Y. H. et al., Boron isotopic compositions of brine, sediments and source water in Da Qaidam Lake, Qinghai, China, Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 1992,56: 1561-1568.[6]Mcmullen, C. C., Cragg, C. B., Thode, H. G., Absolute rations of 11B/10B in Searles Lake borax, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1961, 23: 147-150.[7]Palmer, M. R., Sturchio, N. C., The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1990, 54: 2811-2815.[8]Arndsson, S., Andrèsdèttir, A., Processes controlling the distribution of boron and chlorine in natural waters in Iceland, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1995, 59: 4125-4146.[9]Aggarwal, J. K., Palmer, M. R., Bullen, T. D. et al., The boron isotope systematics of Iceland geothermal waters: 1. Meteoric water charged systems, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2000, 64: 579-585.[10]Spivack, A. J., Palmer, M. R., Edmond, J. M., The sedimentary cycle of the boron isotopes, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1987, 51: 1939-1949.[11]Liu Yingjun, Cao Liming, Li Zhaolin et al., Element Geochemistry (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1984, 422-428.[12]Schwarcz, H. P., Agyei, E. K., Mcmullen, C. C., Boron isotopic fractionation during clay adsorption

  17. Neutron skin effect of some Mo isotopes in pre-equilibrium reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H Bölükdemir; E Tel; S Okuducu; N N Akti

    2011-03-01

    The neutron skin effect has been investigated for even isotopes of molybdenum at 25.6 MeV 94−100Mo(, ) reaction using the geometry-dependent hybrid model of pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. Here the initial neutron/proton exciton numbers were calculated from the neutron/proton densities obtained from an effective nucleon–nucleon interaction of the Skyrme type. Initial exciton numbers from different radii of even Mo isotopes were used to obtain the corresponding neutron emission spectra. In this investigation the calculated results are compared with the experimental data as also with each other. The results using central densities in the geometry-dependent hybrid model are in better agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Reaction of dimethyl ether with hydroxyl radicals: kinetic isotope effect and prereactive complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bänsch, Cornelie; Kiecherer, Johannes; Szöri, Milan; Olzmann, Matthias

    2013-09-05

    The kinetic isotope effect of the reactions OH + CH3OCH3 (DME) and OH + CD3OCD3 (DME-d6) was experimentally and theoretically studied. Experiments were carried out in a slow-flow reactor at pressures between 5 and 21 bar (helium as bath gas) with production of OH by laser flash photolysis of HNO3 and time-resolved detection of OH by laser-induced fluorescence. The temperature dependences of the rate coefficients obtained can be described by the following modified Arrhenius expressions: k(OH+DME) = (4.5 ± 1.3) × 10(-16) (T/K)(1.48) exp(66.6 K/T) cm(3) s(-1) (T = 292-650 K, P = 5.9-20.9 bar) and k(OH+DME-d6) = (7.3 ± 2.2) × 10(-23) (T/K)(3.57) exp(759.8 K/T) cm(3) s(-1) (T = 387-554 K, P = 13.0-20.4 bar). A pressure dependence of the rate coefficients was not observed. The agreement of our experimental results for k(OH+DME) with values from other authors is very good, and from a fit to all available literature data, we derived the following modified Arrhenius expression, which reproduces the values obtained in the temperature range T = 230-1500 K at pressures between 30 mbar and 21 bar to better than within ±20%: k(OH+DME) = 8.45 × 10(-18) (T/K)(2.07) exp(262.2 K/T) cm(3) s(-1). For k(OH+DME-d6), to the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental study. For the analysis of the reaction pathway and the kinetic isotope effect, potential energy diagrams were calculated by using three different quantum chemical methods: (I) CCSD(T)/cc-pV(T,Q)Z//MP2/6-311G(d,p), (II) CCSD(T)/cc-pV(T,Q)Z//CCSD/cc-pVDZ, and (III) CBS-QB3. In all three cases, the reaction is predicted to proceed via a prereaction OH-ether complex with subsequent intramolecular hydrogen abstraction and dissociation to give the methoxymethyl radical and water. Overall rate coefficients were calculated by assuming a thermal equilibrium between the reactants and the prereaction complex and by calculating the rate coefficients of the hydrogen abstraction step from canonical transition state theory

  19. The suitability of the dual isotope approach (δ13C and δ18O) in tree ring studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The use of stable isotopes, complementary to tree ring width data in tree ring research has proven to be a powerful tool in studying the impact of environmental parameters on tree physiology and growth. These three proxies are thus instrumental for climate reconstruction and improve the understanding of underlying causes of growth changes. In various cases, however, their use suggests non-plausible interpretations. Often the use of one isotope alone does not allow the detection of such "erroneous isotope responses". A careful analysis of these deviating results shows that either the validity of the carbon isotope discrimination concept is no longer true (Farquhar et al. 1982) or the assumptions for the leaf water enrichment model (Cernusak et al., 2003) are violated and thus both fractionation models are not applicable. In this presentation we discuss such cases when the known fractionation concepts fail and do not allow a correct interpretation of the isotope data. With the help of the dual isotope approach (Scheidegger et al.; 2000) it is demonstrated, how to detect and uncover the causes for such anomalous isotope data. The fractionation concepts and their combinations before the background of CO2 and H2O gas exchange are briefly explained and the specific use of the dual isotope approach for tree ring data analyses and interpretations are demonstrated. References: Cernusak, L. A., Arthur, D. J., Pate, J. S. and Farquhar, G. D.: Water relations link carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination to phloem sap sugar concentration in Eucalyptus globules, Plant Physiol., 131, 1544-1554, 2003. Farquhar, G. D., O'Leary, M. H. and Berry, J. A.: On the relationship between carbon isotope discrimination and the intercellular carbon dioxide concentration in leaves, Aust. J. Plant Physiol., 9, 121-137, 1982. Scheidegger, Y., Saurer, M., Bahn, M. and Siegwolf, R.: Linking stable oxygen and carbon isotopes with stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity: A conceptual model

  20. Electron–Rotor Interaction in Organic–Inorganic Lead Iodide Perovskites Discovered by Isotope Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jue; Yang, Mengjin; Ma, Xiangchao; Schaller, Richard D.; Liu, Gang; Kong, Lingping; Yang, Ye; Beard, Matthew C.; Lesslie, Michael; Dai, Ying; Huang, Baibiao; Zhu, Kai; Xu, Tao

    2016-08-04

    We report on the carrier-rotor coupling effect in perovskite organic-inorganic hybrid lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) compounds discovered by isotope effects. Deuterated organic-inorganic perovskite compounds including CH3ND3PbI3, CD3NH3PbI3, and CD3ND3PbI3 were synthesized. Devices made from regular CH3NH3PbI3 and deuterated CH3ND3PbI3 exhibit comparable performance in band gap, current-voltage, carrier mobility, and power conversion efficiency. However, a time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) study reveals that CH3NH3PbI3 exhibits notably longer carrier lifetime than that of CH3ND3PbI3, in both thin-film and single-crystal formats. Furthermore, the comparison in carrier lifetime between CD3NH3PbI3 and CH3ND3PbI3 single crystals suggests that vibrational modes in methylammonium (MA+) have little impact on carrier lifetime. In contrast, the fully deuterated compound CD3ND3PbI3 reconfirmed the trend of decreasing carrier lifetime upon the increasing moment of inertia of cationic MA+. Polaron model elucidates the electron-rotor interaction.

  1. Phase diagram and isotopic effect in high-Tc pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianhui

    2010-03-01

    We will talk about the discovery of superconductivity with Tc higher than 40 K in Fe-based superconductors SmFeAsO1-xF. Tc higher than McMillan limit of 39 K definitely proves pnictide superconductors high-Tc superconductivity^1,2. In this talk, we present the transport properties: resistivity, Hall coefficient and transport properties under high magnetic field. These results suggest a quantum phase transition around x=0.14 in SmFeAsO1-xFx system. A electronic phase diagram is proposed, and coexistence of superconductivity and spin-density-wave is observed in Sm-1111 and Ba-122 system. We discuss the effect of isotopic effect on TC and TSDW in SmFeAsO1-xFx and Ba1-xKxFe2As2 systems. Our results show that oxygen isotope effect on TC and TSDW is very little, while the iron isotope exponent is about 0.35. Surprisingly, the iron isotope exchange shows the same effect on SDW transition as on superconductivity. Our results indicate that electron-phonon interaction plays some role in the superconducting mechanism, but simple electron-phonon coupling mechanism seems to be rather unlikely because a strong magnon-phonon coupling is included^3. 1. Chen, X. H. et al. Nature 453, 761-762 (2008). 2. Liu, R. H. et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 087001 (2008). 3. R. H. Liu et al., Nature 459, 64-67(2009).

  2. Kinetic Isotope Effects (KIE) and Density Functional Theory (DFT): A Match Made in Heaven?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Fristrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Determination of experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIE) is one of the most useful tools for the exploration of reaction mechanisms in organometallic chemistry. The approach has been further strengthened during the last decade with advances in modern computational chemistry. This allows for th...... reaction). The approach is highlighted by using recent examples from both stoichiometric and catalytic reactions, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and enzyme catalysis to illustrate the expected accuracy and utility of this approach....

  3. Isotope effects in dense solid hydrogen - Phase transition in deuterium at 190 + or - 20 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    Raman measurements of solid normal deuterium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell indicate that the material undergoes a structural phase transformation at 190 + or - 20 GPa and 77 K. Spectroscopically, the transition appears analogous to that observed in hydrogen at 145 + or - 5 GPa. The large isotope effect on the transition pressure suggests there is a significant vibrational contribution to the relative stability of the solid phases of hydrogen at very high densities.

  4. Studies of runoff isotope composition and hydrology regularity in Jiuzhaigou, Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹观; 范晓; 郭建强; 杨俊义

    2001-01-01

    Jiuzhaigou in Sichuan has been classified as a world nature legacy by UNESCO. The hydrologic cycle is the research emphasis in this area. Using isotope technique of natural water can effectively trace water origin and transportation process, and reveal recharge and discharge relation of various water bodies and hydraulic connection about various hydrogeologic units. This has important applications and scientific significance for protecting and developing the precious natural resource.

  5. Kinetic isotope effect studies on aspartate aminotransferase: Evidence for a concerted 1,3 prototropic shift mechanism for the cytoplasmic isozyme and L-aspartate and dichotomy in mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julin, D.A.; Kirsch, J.F. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1989-05-02

    The C alpha primary hydrogen kinetic isotope effects (C alpha-KIEs) for the reaction of the cytoplasmic isozyme of aspartate aminotransferase (cAATase) with (alpha-2H)-L-aspartate are small and only slightly affected by deuterium oxide solvent (DV = 1.43 +/- 0.03 and DV/KAsp = 1.36 +/- 0.04 in H{sub 2}O; DV = 1.44 +/- 0.01 and DV/KAsp = 1.61 +/- 0.06 in D{sub 2}O). The D{sub 2}O solvent KIEs (SKIEs) are somewhat larger and are essentially independent of deuterium at C alpha (D{sub 2}OV = 2.21 +/- 0.07 and D{sub 2}OV/KAsp = 1.70 +/- 0.03 with ({alpha}-1H)-L-aspartate; D{sub 2}OV = 2.34 +/- 0.12 and D{sub 2}OV/KAsp = 1.82 +/- 0.06 with ({alpha}-2H)-L- aspartate). The C alpha-KIEs on V and on V/KAsp are independent of pH from pH 5.0 to pH 10.0. These results support a rate-determining concerted 1,3 prototropic shift mechanism by the multiple KIE criteria. The large C alpha-KIEs for the reaction of mitochondrial AATase (mAATase) with L-glutamate (DV = 1.88 +/- 0.13 and DV/KGlu = 3.80 +/- 0.43 in H{sub 2}O; DV = 1.57 +/- 0.05 and DV/KGlu = 4.21 +/- 0.19 in D{sub 2}O) coupled with the relatively small SKIEs (D{sub 2}OV = 1.58 +/- 0.04 and D{sub 2}OV/KGlu = 1.25 +/- 0.05 with ({alpha}-1H)-L-glutamate; D{sub 2}OV = 1.46 +/- 0.06 and D{sub 2}OV/KGlu = 1.16 +/- 0.05 with (alpha-2H)-L-glutamate) are most consistent with a two-step mechanism for the 1,3 prototropic shift for this isozyme-substrate pair.

  6. Hf isotope evidence for effective impact melt homogenisation at the Sudbury impact crater, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Gavin G.; Petrus, Joseph A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Daly, J. Stephen; Kamber, Balz S.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the first zircon hafnium-oxygen isotope and trace element study of a transect through one of the largest terrestrial impact melt sheets. The differentiated melt sheet at the 1.85 Ga, originally ca. 200 km in diameter Sudbury impact crater, Ontario, Canada, yields a tight range of uniform zircon Hf isotope compositions (εHf(1850) of ca. -9 to -12). This is consistent with its well-established crustal origin and indicates differentiation from a single melt that was initially efficiently homogenised. We propose that the heterogeneity in other isotopic systems, such as Pb, in early-emplaced impact melt at Sudbury is associated with volatility-related depletion during the impact cratering process. This depletion leaves the isotopic systems of more volatile elements more susceptible to contamination during post-impact assimilation of country rock, whereas the systems of more refractory elements preserve initial homogeneities. Zircon oxygen isotope compositions in the melt sheet are also restricted in range relative to those in the impacted target rocks. However, they display a marked offset approximately one-third up the melt sheet stratigraphy that is interpreted to be a result of post-impact assimilation of 18O-enirched rocks into the base of the cooling impact melt. Given that impact cratering was a more dominant process in the early history of the inner Solar System than it is today, and the possibility that impact melt sheets were sources of ex situ Hadean zircon grains, these findings may have significance for the interpretation of the early zircon Hf record. We speculate that apparent εHf-time arrays observed in the oldest terrestrial and lunar zircon datasets may be related to impact melting homogenising previously more diverse crust. We also show that spatially restricted partial melting of rocks buried beneath the superheated impact melt at Sudbury provided a zircon crystallising environment distinct to the impact melt sheet itself.

  7. Holocene paleotemperature signals based on polar firn water isotope diffusion studies from two Greenland ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinis, Vasileios; Terkelsen Holme, Christian; Møllesøe Vinther, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Polar ice cores provide a wealth of paleoclimatic information that is characterised by high temporal resolution and continuity, with water isotopic ratios of polar precipitation (δ18O, δD) being one of the most prominent proxies for past temperatures. In particular, ice cores from Greenland, record the series of abrupt stadial - interstadial transitions during the last Glacial, pinpointing in time, abrupt temperature transitions adjoined by similar accumulation trends. While the signal to noise ratio of the isotopic signal clearly allows the observation of sizable climate changes during the Glacial, the situation differs considerably when one looks into the Holocene. With the exception of the 8.2ky event, the signal to noise ratio of δ18O over the Holocene is extremely low, suggesting negligible temperature changes during this period. This is contrary to signals obtained by other proxies from marine and terrestrial records from high latitudes. In this study we bypass the discussion that deals with the various processes that can negatively affect paleotemperature reconstructions based on the δ18O proxy from ice cores. Based on two ultra-high resolution and high precision isotopic records covering the last 20,000 years from the NorthGRIP and NEEM ice cores we make use of the available spectral information to infer polar firn paleotemperatures using a coupled densification - firn water isotope diffusion model. The processes involved in the densification of firn and the diffusion of water isotopes that takes place after deposition and until the pore close-off are temperature-dependent and do not present the limitations of the normal δ18O thermometer. We show here how this approach reveals significant temperature changes over the Holocene. We compare the signals of the two records and pay particular attention to the indications of a mid-Holocene climatic shift towards colder temperatures that is apparent in both temperature reconstructions.

  8. An integrated biomarker, isotopic and palaeoenvironmental study through the Late Permian event at Lusitaniadalen, Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbefeld, Birgit; Grice, Kliti; Twitchett, Richard J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hays, Lindsay; Böttcher, Michael E.; Asif, Muhammad

    2010-03-01

    The largest extinction of the Phanerozoic occurred near the Permian/Triassic (P/Tr) boundary some 252 Ma ago. Several scenarios and drivers have been proposed for this event. Here we report for the first time an integrated study comprising sedimentological data, biomarker distributions/abundances and selected stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes along with bulk isotopes (δ 34S pyrite, δ 13C carb, δ 13C org) for a Late Permian section from Lusitaniadalen, Spitsbergen, Norway. Sedimentological and geochemical data support a marine transgression and collapse of the marine ecosystem in the Late Permian. Strong evidence for waxing and waning of photic zone euxinia throughout the Late Permian is provided by Chlorobiaceae-derived biomarkers (including δ 13C data) and δ 34S pyrite, implying multiple phases of H 2S outgassing and potentially several pulses of extinction. A rapid decrease in abundance of various land-plant biomarkers prior to the marine collapse event indicates a dramatic decline of land-plants during the Late Permian and/or increasing distance from palaeoshoreline as a consequence of sea level rise. Changes in δD of selected biomarkers also suggest a change in source of organic matter (OM) or sea level rise. We also found biomarker and isotopic evidence for a phytoplanktonic bloom triggered by eutrophication as a consequence of the marine collapse. Compound specific isotope analyses (CSIA) of algal and land-plant-derived biomarkers, as well as δ 13C of carbonate and bulk OM provide strong evidence for synchronous changes in δ 13C of marine and atmospheric CO 2, attributed to a 13C-depleted source. The source could be associated with isotopically depleted methane released from the melting of gas clathrates and/or from respired OM, due to collapse of the marine ecosystem.

  9. Studies of unbound states in isotopes at the N = 8 shell closure

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study low-lying resonances in the two unbound isotopes $^{13}$Be and $^{10}$Li as well as low-lying resonances in $^{12}$Be. This will be done using an $^{11}$Be beam impinging on a tritium target leading to one- or two-particle transfer reactions. The decay scheme of the resonances will be studied using the MINIBALL and differential cross sections will be determined using T-REX.

  10. Theoretical study of band structure of odd-mass 115,117I isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhanvir; Kumar, Amit; Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun

    2016-05-01

    By using the microscopic approach of Projected Shell Model (PSM), negative-parity band structures of odd mass neutron-rich 115,117I nuclei have been studied with the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential. For these isotopes, the band structures have been analyzed in terms of quasi-particles configurations. The phenomenon of back bending in moment of inertia is also studied in the present work.

  11. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi, J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Benmore, C J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Neuefeind, J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tomberli, B [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Tulk, C A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Guthrie, M [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Egelstaff, P A [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Klug, D D [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, K0A 0R6 (Canada)

    2003-06-11

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully 'annealed' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is {approx} 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 A{sup -1}. This compares to a maximum effect of {approx} 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 A{sup -1} in the isotopic difference function is not reproduced in the temperature difference and suggests that additional longer-range correlations are present in the more ordered deuterated form.

  12. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi, J.; Benmore, C. J.; Neuefeind, J.; Tomberli, B.; Tulk, C. A.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Klug, D.D.; CHM; IPNS; APS-USR

    2003-06-11

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully ''annealed'' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is {approx} 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 {angstrom}{sup -1}. This compares to a maximum effect of {approx} 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 {angstrom}{sup -1} in the isotopic difference function is not reproduced in the temperature difference and suggests that additional longer-range correlations are present in the more ordered deuterated form.

  13. Transmission of Helium Isotopes through Graphdiyne Pores: Tunneling versus Zero Point Energy Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Marta I; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Campos-Martínez, José

    2015-10-29

    Recent progress in the production of new two-dimensional (2D) nanoporous materials is attracting considerable interest for applications to isotope separation in gases. In this paper we report a computational study of the transmission of (4)He and (3)He through the (subnanometer) pores of graphdiyne, a recently synthesized 2D carbon material. The He-graphdiyne interaction is represented by a force field parametrized upon ab initio calculations, and the (4)He/(3)He selectivity is analyzed by tunneling-corrected transition state theory. We have found that both zero point energy (of the in-pore degrees of freedom) and tunneling effects play an extraordinary role at low temperatures (≈20-30 K). However, both quantum features work in opposite directions in such a way that the selectivity ratio does not reach an acceptable value. Nevertheless, the efficiency of zero point energy is in general larger, so that (4)He tends to diffuse faster than (3)He through the graphdiyne membrane, with a maximum performance at 23 K. Moreover, it is found that the transmission rates are too small in the studied temperature range, precluding practical applications. It is concluded that the role of the in-pore degrees of freedom should be included in computations of the transmission probabilities of molecules through nanoporous materials.

  14. Variation in nitrate isotopic signatures in sewage for source apportionment with urbanization: a case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Chaofan; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Li, Yanmin; Xiao, Yang; Ren, Yufen

    2016-11-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) pollution is a severe problem in urban aquatic systems especially within megacity undergoing rapid urbanization, and mostly, sewage is supposed as the prevailing NO3(-) source. A dual isotope approach (δ (15)N-NO3(-) and δ (18)O-NO3(-)) was applied to explore the variation in NO3(-) isotopic signatures in sewage processed by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Beijing from 2014 to 2015. We found that the raw and treated sewage owned the different NO3(-) isotopic signatures, including δ (15)N from 1.1 to 24.7 ‰ and δ (18)O from 1.6 to 22.8 ‰ in raw sewage, as well as δ (15)N from 6.1 to 22.8 ‰ and δ (18)O from 1.6 to 13.2 ‰ in treated effluents. The WWTP processing would result in the enrichment of NO3(-) isotopic compositions in discharged effluents with NO3(-) concentrations increasing. Besides, advanced sewage treatment technology with more pollutant N reduction may raise the heavier NO3(-) isotopic compositions further. The NO3(-) isotope value ranges of urban sewage and manure should be separated, and the seasonal and tighter NO3(-) isotope value ranges are supposed to improve the accuracy of source apportionment. The NO3(-) isotope value ranges conducted in this study might provide useful information for tracing NO3(-) sources towards the implementation of efficient water pollution control in Beijing.

  15. Rate constants and isotope effects for the reaction of H-atom abstraction from RH substrates by PINO radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opeida, I. A.; Litvinov, Yu. E.; Kushch, O. V.; Kompanets, M. A.; Shendrik, A. N.; Matvienko, A. G.; Novokhatko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen atom abstraction from the C-H bonds of substrates of different structures by phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals is studied. The rate constants of this reaction are measured and the kinetic isotope effects are determined. It is shown that in addition to the thermodynamic factor, Coulomb forces and donor-acceptor interactions affect the reaction between phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals and substrate molecules, altering the shape of the transition state. This favors the tunneling of hydrogen atoms and leads to a substantial reduction in the activation energy of the process.

  16. Insights on the mechanism for synthesis of methylenedianiline from aniline and formaldehyde through HPLC-MS and isotope tracer studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ye Wang; Hui Quan Li; Li Guo Wang; Yan Cao; Hai Tao Liu; Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism for synthesis of 4,4-methylenedianiline (MDA) via condensation reaction of aniline with formaldehyde has been studied extensively in this paper.The intermediate and by-products were isolated and identified.The combination of isotope labeling and HPLC-MS characterizations disclosed that the reaction proceeded through an SN2 reaction mechanism.Moreover,the effect of aniline/formaldehyde molar ratio on the formation of MDA was investigated.This work would be of significance to understand the reaction mechanism deeply and provide valuable information for further improving the yield of desired product.

  17. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  18. Determination of ionization potential of atomic gadolinium and its isotope effect. Analysis of unperturbed Rydberg series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Ohba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    Autoionizing Rydberg series converging to six states (0, 261.841, 633.273, 3082.011, 3427.274, 3444.235 cm{sup -1}) of Gd ion have been observed by using three-color three-step photoionization via ten different 2nd-step levels of J=0 or 1. While the perturbations with interlopers become significant in the region of n=30-35 for most of the observed series, long and well-defined series structures appeared in higher energy region. From an analysis of such unperturbed structures, the first ionization potential of Gd atom was estimated to be 49601.45 (30) cm{sup -1}. This is in good agreement with the previous value, but the accuracy is improved by about one order of magnitude. In addition, isotope effect on the ionization potential was also determined by isotope shifts of some Rydberg series. (author)

  19. The isotopic dipole moment of HDO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Mohallem, Jose R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, CP 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-03-14

    An adiabatic variational approximation is used to study the monodeuterated water molecule, HDO, accounting for the isotopic effect. The isotopic dipole moment, pointing from D to H, is then calculated for the first time, yielding (1.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -3} Debye, being helpful in the interpretation of experiments. (fast track communication)

  20. Design study of an ultra-compact superconducting cyclotron for isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Vincent, J.

    2014-11-01

    A 12.5 MeV, 25 μA, proton compact superconducting cyclotron for medical isotope production has been designed and is currently in fabrication. The machine is initially aimed at producing 13N ammonia for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cardiology applications. With an ultra-compact size and cost-effective price point, this system will offer clinicians unprecedented access to the preferred radiopharmaceutical isotope for cardiac PET imaging. A systems approach that carefully balanced the subsystem requirements coupled to precise beam dynamics calculations was followed. The system is designed to irradiate a liquid target internal to the cyclotron and to minimize the need for radiation shielding. The main parameters of the cyclotron, its design, and principal steps of the development work are presented here.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Kinetic Isotope Effect During Snow Crystal Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2007-12-01

    and allows us to scale the numerical calculations to atmospheric conditions. Our calculations confirm that the crystal/vapor isotopic fractionation approaches the equilibrium value, and the crystals are compact (circular in 2D) as the saturation factor approaches unity (S= 1.0). However, few natural crystals form under such conditions. At higher oversaturation (e.g. S = 1.2), dendritic crystals of millimeter size develop on timescales appropriate to cloud processes, and kinetic effects control isotopic fractionation. Fractionation factors for dendritic crystals are similar to those predicted by the spherical diffusion model, but the model also gives estimates of crystal heterogeneity. Dendritic crystals are constrained to be relatively large, with dimension much greater than about 20D/k. The most difficult aspect of the modeling is to account for the large density difference between air and ice, which requires us to use a fictitious higher density for the vapor-oversaturated air and scale the crystal growth time accordingly. An approach using a larger scale simulation and the domain decomposition method can provide a vapor flux for a nested smaller scale calculation. The results clarify the controls on crystal growth, and the relationships between saturation state, growth rate, crystal morphology and isotopic fractionation.

  2. Communication: Isotopic effects on tunneling motions in the water trimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, Pablo E. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rossky, Peter J. [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Laria, D., E-mail: dhlaria@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-14

    We present results of ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations that shed light on the effects of nuclear quantum fluctuations on tunneling motions in cyclic [H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} and [D{sub 2}O]{sub 3}, at the representative temperature of T = 75 K. In particular, we focus attention on free energies associated with two key isomerization processes: The first one corresponds to flipping transitions of dangling OH bonds, between up and down positions with respect to the O–O–O plane of the cluster; the second involves the interchange between connecting and dangling hydrogen bond character of the H-atoms in a tagged water molecule. Zero point energy and tunneling effects lead to sensible reductions of the free energy barriers. Due to the lighter nature of the H nuclei, these modifications are more marked in [H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} than in [D{sub 2}O]{sub 3}. Estimates of the characteristic time scales describing the flipping transitions are consistent with those predicted based on standard transition-state-approximation arguments.

  3. Systematic study of heavy cluster emission from {210-226}^Ra isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P; Priyanka, B; Unnikrishnan, M S

    2012-01-01

    The half lives for various clusters lying in the cold reaction valleys of {210-226}^Ra isotopes are computed using our Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). The computed half lives of 4^He and 14^C clusters from {210-226}^Ra isotopes are in good agreement with experimental data. Half lives are also computed using the Universal formula for cluster decay (UNIV) of Poenaru et al., and are found to be in agreement with CPPM values. Our study reveals the role of doubly magic 208^Pb daughter in cluster decay process. Geiger - Nuttall plots for all clusters up to 62^Fe are studied and are found to be linear with different slopes and intercepts. {12,14}^C emission from 220^Ra; 14^C emission from {222,224}^Ra; 14^C and 20^O emission from 226^Ra are found to be most favourable for measurement and this observation will serve as a guide to the future experiments.

  4. Recent studies to improve release properties from thick isotope separator on-line fission targets

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, C; Verney, D; Bajeat, O; Ibrahim, F; Clapier, F; Cottereau, E; Donzaud, C; Ducourtieux, M; Essabaa, S; Guillemaud-Müller, D; Hosni, F; Lefort, H; Le Blanc, F; Müller, A C

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the PARRNe program (Production d'Atomes Radioactifs Riches en Neutrons) of IPN Orsay, various techniques are currently used to characterize the release properties of elements of interest from a UC//X target. On-line studies have been carried out with two plasma ion sources: a Nier-Bernas and a hot plasma ISOLDE- type (the ISOLDE collaboration kindly supplied us a MK5 ion source for these studies). In parallel, the analysis of the chemical and structure properties of some UC//X samples as function of heating conditions has been carried out. Such data are essential to determine optimal conditions for the production of isotopes by the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique. First results are presented here for Kr and Ag. Investigations for other kinds of fission targets are planned.

  5. Ab initio calculation of the Zn isotope effect in phosphates, citrates, and malates and applications to plants and soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Fujii

    Full Text Available Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated the Zn isotope effect in aqueous citrates, malates, and phosphates by ab initio methods. For pH<5, the Zn isotopic compositions of the various parts of the plants are expected to be similar to those of groundwater. In the neutral to alkaline region, the calculations correctly predict that (66Zn is enriched over (64Zn in roots, which concentrate phosphates, with respect to leaves, which concentrate malates and citrates, by about one permil. It is proposed that Zn isotope fractionation represents a useful tracer of Zn availability and mobility in soils.

  6. Magnetic isotope effect and theory of atomic orbital hybridization to predict a mechanism of chemical exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epov, Vladimir N

    2011-08-07

    A novel approach is suggested to investigate the mechanisms of chemical complexation reactions based on the results of Fujii with co-workers; they have experimentally observed that several metals and metalloids demonstrate mass-independent isotope fractionation during the reactions with the DC18C6 crown ether using solvent-solvent extraction. In this manuscript, the isotope fractionation caused by the magnetic isotope effect is used to understand the mechanisms of chemical exchange reactions. Due to the rule that reactions are allowed for certain electron spin states, and forbidden for others, magnetic isotopes show chemical anomalies during these reactions. Mass-independent fractionation is suggested to take place due to the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin with the electron spin of the intermediate product. Moreover, the sign of the mass-independent fractionation is found to be dependent on the element and its species, which is also explained by the magnetic isotope effect. For example, highly negative mass-independent isotope fractionation of magnetic isotopes was observed for reactions of DC18C6 with SnCl(2) species and with several Ru(III) chloro-species, and highly positive for reactions of this ether with TeCl(6)(2-), and with several Cd(II) and Pd(II) species. The atomic radius of an element is also a critical parameter for the reaction with crown ether, particularly the element ions with [Kr]4d(n)5s(m) electron shell fits the best with the DC18C6 crown ring. It is demonstrated that the magnetic isotope effect in combination with the theory of orbital hybridization can help to understand the mechanism of complexation reactions. The suggested approach is also applied to explain previously published mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes in other types of chemical exchange reactions.

  7. Decay studies and mass measurements on isobarically pure neutron-rich Hg and Tl isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Schweikhard, L C; Savreux, R P; Hager, U D K; Beck, D; Blaum, K

    2007-01-01

    We propose to perform mass measurements followed by $\\beta$- and $\\gamma$-decay studies on isobarically pure beams of neutron-rich Hg and Tl isotopes, which are very poorly known due to a large contamination at ISOL-facilities with surface-ionised francium. The aim is to study the binding energies of mother Hg and Tl nuclides, as well as the energies, spins and parities of the excited and ground states in the daughter Tl and Pb isotopes. The proposed studies will address a new subsection of the nuclear chart, with Z 126, where only 9 nuclides have been observed so far. Our studies will provide valuable input for mass models and shell-model calculations: they will probe the proton hole-neutron interaction and will allow to refine the matrix elements for the two-body residual interaction. Furthermore, they also give prospects for discovering new isomeric states or even new isotopes, for which the half-lives are predicted in the minute- and second-range.\\\\ To reach the isobaric purity, the experiments will be p...

  8. The complex nature of superconductivity in MgB2 as revealed by the reduced total isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, D G; Claus, H; Jorgensen, J D

    2001-05-24

    Magnesium diboride, MgB2, was recently observed to become superconducting at 39 K, which is the highest known transition temperature for a non-copper-oxide bulk material. Isotope-effect measurements, in which atoms are substituted by isotopes of different mass to systematically change the phonon frequencies, are one of the fundamental tests of the nature of the superconducting mechanism in a material. In a conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductor, where the mechanism is mediated by electron-phonon coupling, the total isotope-effect coefficient (in this case, the sum of both the Mg and B coefficients) should be about 0.5. The boron isotope effect was previously shown to be large and that was sufficient to establish that MgB2 is a conventional superconductor, but the Mg effect has not hitherto been measured. Here we report the determination of the Mg isotope effect, which is small but measurable. The total reduced isotope-effect coefficient is 0.32, which is much lower than the value expected for a typical BCS superconductor. The low value could be due to complex materials properties, and would seem to require both a large electron-phonon coupling constant and a value of mu* (the repulsive electron-electron interaction) larger than found for most simple metals.

  9. Comparative isotope ecology of African great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelze, Vicky M; Fahy, Geraldine; Hohmann, Gottfried; Robbins, Martha M; Leinert, Vera; Lee, Kevin; Eshuis, Henk; Seiler, Nicole; Wessling, Erin G; Head, Josephine; Boesch, Christophe; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2016-12-01

    The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp.). First, we explore differences in isotope baselines across different habitats and whether isotopic signatures in apes can be related to feeding niches (faunivory and folivory). Secondly, we illustrate how stable isotopic variations within African ape populations compare to other extant and extinct primates and discuss possible implications for dietary flexibility. Using 701 carbon and nitrogen isotope data points resulting from 148 sectioned hair samples and an additional collection of 189 fruit samples, we compare six different great ape sites. We investigate the relationship between vegetation baselines and climatic variables, and subsequently correct great ape isotope data to a standardized plant baseline from the respective sites. We obtained temporal isotopic profiles of individual animals by sectioning hair along its growth trajectory. Isotopic signatures of great apes differed between sites, mainly as vegetation isotope baselines were correlated with site-specific climatic conditions. We show that controlling for plant isotopic characteristics at a given site is essential for faunal data interpretation. While accounting for plant baseline effects, we found distinct isotopic profiles for each great ape population. Based on evidence from habituated groups and sympatric great ape species, these differences could possibly be related to faunivory and folivory. Dietary flexibility in apes varied, but temporal variation was overall

  10. Microscopic insight in the study of yrast bands in selenium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parvaiz Ahmad Dar; Sonia Verma; Rani Devi; S K Khosa

    2008-05-01

    The yrast bands of even-even selenium isotopes with = 68-78 are studied in the framework of projected shell model, by employing quadrupole plus monopole and quadrupo