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Sample records for isolates modulating effect

  1. Habitat amount modulates the effect of patch isolation on host-parasitoid interactions

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    Valérie eCoudrain

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 1.Habitat amount and patch isolation are important determinants of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. We studied the separate and interactive effects of these two components of habitat fragmentation on host-parasitoid interactions in a replicated landscape-scale study. 2.We used trap-nesting solitary bees, wasps and their natural enemies as study system. We exposed trap nests in 30 tree patches in agricultural landscapes in northern Switzerland. Study sites were either (i adjacent to forest (adjacent, (ii distant from forest but connected through woody elements (connected or (iii distant from forest with no connecting woody elements (isolated. Independent of the three levels of isolation, the amount of woody habitat in the landscapes covered a gradient from 4 to 74%. 3.Host and parasitoid species richness increased with the amount of habitat in the landscape and was strongly reduced at isolated compared to adjacent and connected sites. Loss of host species richness was 21% at isolated compared to non-isolated sites, whereas parasitoid species richness decreased by 68%, indicating that the higher trophic level was more adversely affected by isolation. Most importantly, habitat amount and isolation had a pronounced interactive effect on parasitism: while isolation resulted in a strong decrease in parasitism in landscapes with low habitat amount, this effect was mitigated by high habitat amount. These interactive effects were consistent across the three years of the study. 4.The observed interplay between habitat amount and patch isolation may explain the often conflicting results in the habitat fragmentation literature and should be considered in future research on multitrophic communities and ecosystem functioning in fragmented landscapes.

  2. Isolating the Unique Effects of the Unified Protocol Treatment Modules Using Single Case Experimental Design.

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    Sauer-Zavala, Shannon; Cassiello-Robbins, Clair; Conklin, Laren R; Bullis, Jacqueline R; Thompson-Hollands, Johanna; Kennedy, Katherine A

    2017-03-01

    The Unified Protocol (UP) for the Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders is a cognitive-behavioral intervention designed to treat the range of anxiety, depressive, and related disorders. Thus far, the UP treatment modules have only been studied when they are delivered in their entirety and presented in a standard sequence. To personalize the presentation of the UP modules for a given patient's presentation (e.g., providing the modules in a varied order, dropping irrelevant modules), it is first necessary to establish that each module leads to change in the skill it is designed to promote, and that these changes can occur in the absence of the other modules. Using a multiple baseline design in accordance with the single-case reporting guidelines in behavioral interventions (SCRIBE), eight patients with heterogeneous emotional disorders were randomly assigned to a 1- or 3-week baseline assessment phase followed by four sessions of one of four UP modules (psychoeducation, emotional awareness, cognitive flexibility, and countering emotional behaviors). Results provide preliminary support for the notion that each UP module under study leads to change in its associated skill in the absence of the other modules (five of eight patients demonstrated reliable change in the module-specific skill). In addition, exploratory analyses suggest that the emotion awareness training and cognitive flexibility modules appeared to exhibit change specific to their associated skills, psychoeducation, and countering emotional behaviors demonstrated somewhat more broad-based change across skills.

  3. Anti-proliferative effects of estrogen receptor-modulating compounds isolated from Rheum palmatum.

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    Kang, Se Chan; Lee, Chang Min; Choung, Eui Su; Bak, Jong Phil; Bae, Jong Jin; Yoo, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Zee, Ok Pyo

    2008-06-01

    The Rheum palmatum L., a traditional medicine in Korea, was screened for their estrogenic activity in a recombinant yeast system with a human estrogen receptor (ER) expression plasmid and a reporter plasmid used in a previous study. The EC50 values of the n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water fractions of the methanolic extract of R. palmatum in the yeast-based estrogenicity assay system were 0.145, 0.093, 0.125, 1.459, 2.853 microg/mL, respectively, with marked estrogenic activity in the dichloromethane fraction. Using an activity-guided fractionation approach, five known anthraquinones, chrysophanol (1), physcion (2), emodin (3), aloe-emodin (4) and rhein (5), were isolated from the dichloromethane fraction. Compound 3 had the highest estrogenic relative potency (RP, 17bestradiol = 1.00) (6.3 x 10(-2)), followed by compound 4 (3.8 x 10(-3)), compound 5 (2.6 x 10(-4)), a compound 1 (2.1 x 10(-4)). Also, compound 3 and fraction 3 (which contained compound 3) of the dichloromethane fraction of R. palmatum showed strong cytotoxicity in both ER-positive (MCF-7) and-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines.

  4. Immune-modulating effects in mouse dendritic cells of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria isolated from individuals following omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan diets.

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    Luongo, Diomira; Treppiccione, Lucia; Sorrentino, Alida; Ferrocino, Ilario; Turroni, Silvia; Gatti, Monica; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Sanz, Yolanda; Rossi, Mauro

    2017-09-01

    Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria play a primary role in modulation of gut immunity. By considering that microbiota composition depends on various factors, including diet, we asked whether functional differences could characterize faecal populations of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria isolated from individuals with different dietary habits. 155 healthy volunteers who followed omnivorous, ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diets were recruited at four Italian centres (Turin, Parma, Bologna and Bari). Faecal samples were collected; lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were isolated on selective media and their immunomodulatory activity was tested in mouse dendritic cells (DCs). Pre-incubation with lactobacilli increased LPS-induced expression of the maturation markers CD80 and CD86, whereas pre-incubation with bifidobacteria decreased such expression. Analysis of the cytokine profile indicated that strains of both genera induced down-regulation of IL-12 and up-regulation of IL-10, whereas expression of TNF-α was not modulated. Notably, analysis of anti-inflammatory potential (IL-10/IL-12 ratio) showed that lactobacilli evoked a greater anti-inflammatory effect than did bifidobacteria in the omnivorous group (P<0.05). We also found significantly reduced anti-inflammatory potential in the bacterial strains isolated from Bari's volunteers in comparison with those from the cognate groups from the other centres. In conclusion, lactobacilli and bifidobacteria showed a genus-specific ability of modulating in vitro innate immunity associated with a specific dietary habit. Furthermore, the geographical area had a significant impact on the anti-inflammatory potential of some components of faecal microbiota. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Corynoline Isolated from Corydalis bungeana Turcz. Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Effects via Modulation of Nfr2 and MAPKs

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    Chunjuan Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Corydalis bungeana Turcz. is an anti-inflammatory medicinal herb used widely in traditional Chinese medicine for upper respiratory tract infections. It is demonstrated that corynoline is its active anti-inflammatory component. The nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/antioxidant response element (ARE pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway play important roles in the regulation of inflammation. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of corynoline through modulation of Nfr2 and MAPKs. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells were used to explore modulatory role of NO production and the activation of signaling proteins and transcription factors using nitrite assay, Western bloting and qPCR. Treatment with corynoline reduced production of nitric oxide (NO and the protein and mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 Treatment also significantly increased the expression of Nrf2, quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 at the mRNA and protein levels, which demonstrated that corynoline may protect cells from inflammation through the Nrf2/ARE pathway In addition, corynoline suppressed the expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β, at the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, molecular data revealed that corynoline inhibited lipopolysaccharide-stimulated phosphorylation of c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and p38. Taken together, these results suggest that corynoline reduces the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α and IL-1β, by suppressing extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK and p38 phosphorylation in RAW264.7 cells, which is regulated by the Nrf2/ARE pathway. These findings reveal part of the molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory properties of corynoline.

  6. Corynoline Isolated from Corydalis bungeana Turcz. Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Effects via Modulation of Nfr2 and MAPKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunjuan; Zhang, Chengyue; Wang, Zhibin; Tang, Zhenqiu; Kuang, Haixue; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2016-07-27

    Corydalis bungeana Turcz. is an anti-inflammatory medicinal herb used widely in traditional Chinese medicine for upper respiratory tract infections. It is demonstrated that corynoline is its active anti-inflammatory component. The nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway play important roles in the regulation of inflammation. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of corynoline through modulation of Nfr2 and MAPKs. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells were used to explore modulatory role of NO production and the activation of signaling proteins and transcription factors using nitrite assay, Western bloting and qPCR. Treatment with corynoline reduced production of nitric oxide (NO) and the protein and mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) Treatment also significantly increased the expression of Nrf2, quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) at the mRNA and protein levels, which demonstrated that corynoline may protect cells from inflammation through the Nrf2/ARE pathway In addition, corynoline suppressed the expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), at the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, molecular data revealed that corynoline inhibited lipopolysaccharide-stimulated phosphorylation of c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Taken together, these results suggest that corynoline reduces the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α and IL-1β, by suppressing extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) and p38 phosphorylation in RAW264.7 cells, which is regulated by the Nrf2/ARE pathway. These findings reveal part of the molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory properties of corynoline.

  7. Autophagy-modulating aminosteroids isolated from the sponge Cliona celata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Keyzers; J. Daoust; M.T. Davies-Coleman; R. van Soest; A. Balgi; E. Donohue; M. Roberge; R.J. Andersen

    2008-01-01

    Clionamines A−D (1−4), new aminosteroids that modulate autophagy, have been isolated from South African specimens of the sponge Cliona celata. Clionamine D (4) has an unprecedented spiro bislactone side chain.

  8. Bridging the gap between modules in isolation and as part of networks: A systems framework for elucidating interaction and regulation of signalling modules.

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    Menon, Govind; Krishnan, J

    2016-07-21

    While signalling and biochemical modules have been the focus of numerous studies, they are typically studied in isolation, with no examination of the effects of the ambient network. In this paper we formulate and develop a systems framework, rooted in dynamical systems, to understand such effects, by studying the interaction of signalling modules. The modules we consider are (i) basic covalent modification, (ii) monostable switches, (iii) bistable switches, (iv) adaptive modules, and (v) oscillatory modules. We systematically examine the interaction of these modules by analyzing (a) sequential interaction without shared components, (b) sequential interaction with shared components, and (c) oblique interactions. Our studies reveal that the behaviour of a module in isolation may be substantially different from that in a network, and explicitly demonstrate how the behaviour of a given module, the characteristics of the ambient network, and the possibility of shared components can result in new effects. Our global approach illuminates different aspects of the structure and functioning of modules, revealing the importance of dynamical characteristics as well as biochemical features; this provides a methodological platform for investigating the complexity of natural modules shaped by evolution, elucidating the effects of ambient networks on a module in multiple cellular contexts, and highlighting the capabilities and constraints for engineering robust synthetic modules. Overall, such a systems framework provides a platform for bridging the gap between non-linear information processing modules, in isolation and as parts of networks, and a basis for understanding new aspects of natural and engineered cellular networks.

  9. Bridging the gap between modules in isolation and as part of networks: A systems framework for elucidating interaction and regulation of signalling modules

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    Menon, Govind; Krishnan, J.

    2016-07-01

    While signalling and biochemical modules have been the focus of numerous studies, they are typically studied in isolation, with no examination of the effects of the ambient network. In this paper we formulate and develop a systems framework, rooted in dynamical systems, to understand such effects, by studying the interaction of signalling modules. The modules we consider are (i) basic covalent modification, (ii) monostable switches, (iii) bistable switches, (iv) adaptive modules, and (v) oscillatory modules. We systematically examine the interaction of these modules by analyzing (a) sequential interaction without shared components, (b) sequential interaction with shared components, and (c) oblique interactions. Our studies reveal that the behaviour of a module in isolation may be substantially different from that in a network, and explicitly demonstrate how the behaviour of a given module, the characteristics of the ambient network, and the possibility of shared components can result in new effects. Our global approach illuminates different aspects of the structure and functioning of modules, revealing the importance of dynamical characteristics as well as biochemical features; this provides a methodological platform for investigating the complexity of natural modules shaped by evolution, elucidating the effects of ambient networks on a module in multiple cellular contexts, and highlighting the capabilities and constraints for engineering robust synthetic modules. Overall, such a systems framework provides a platform for bridging the gap between non-linear information processing modules, in isolation and as parts of networks, and a basis for understanding new aspects of natural and engineered cellular networks.

  10. Isolation of key retinoid signalling and metabolic modules in invertebrates

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    Ana André

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Retinoids are a class of molecules related to vitamin A (Retinol that are required for regulation of critical chordate ndocrine-mediated process, such as embryonic development, reproduction, and vision. To maintain such physiological process, chordates have a complex mechanism to regulate the spatial and temporal distribution of retinoids that includes metabolic and signalling modules. Initially, retinoid modules were seen as a chordate novelty. However, emerging biochemical and genomic evidences have challenged this view, clearly pointing to a more basal ancestry than previously thought. However, for the majority of non-chordate invertebrate lineages a clearly characterization of the main enzymatic/molecular players is still missing. Despite limited, the available evidence supports the presence of biologically active retinoid pathways in invertebrates. In order to enhance our insights on retinoid biology, evolution, and its putative disruption by environmental chemicals, the isolation and functional characterization of key retinoid metabolic players in marine invertebrates has been carried out.

  11. MICROFLUIDIC MODULES FOR ISOLATION OF RECOMBINANT CYTOKINE FROM BACTERIAL LYSATES

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    Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The portability and personalization of health-care diagnostics and treatments benefits from advancements and applications of micro and nanotechnology. Modularization and miniaturization of standardized biochemical processes and tests facilitates the advancement and customization of analyte detection and diagnosis on-chip. The goal of our work here is to develop modular platforms for on-chip biochemical processing of synthesized biologics for a range of on-demand applications. Our report focuses on the initial development, characterization and application of microfluidic size exclusion/gel filtration and ion exchange protein concentration modules for cytokine isolation from spiked cell extracts.

  12. Modulation of the pharmacological effects of enzymatically-active PLA2 by BTL-2, an isolectin isolated from the Bryothamnion triquetrum red alga

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    Nagano Celso S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An interaction between lectins from marine algae and PLA2 from rattlesnake was suggested some years ago. We, herein, studied the effects elicited by a small isolectin (BTL-2, isolated from Bryothamnion triquetrum, on the pharmacological and biological activities of a PLA2 isolated from rattlesnake venom (Crotalus durissus cascavella, to better understand the enzymatic and pharmacological mechanisms of the PLA2 and its complex. Results This PLA2 consisted of 122 amino acids (approximate molecular mass of 14 kDa, its pI was estimated to be 8.3, and its amino acid sequence shared a high degree of similarity with that of other neurotoxic and enzymatically-active PLA2s. BTL-2 had a molecular mass estimated in approximately 9 kDa and was characterized as a basic protein. In addition, BTL-2 did not exhibit any enzymatic activity. The PLA2 and BTL-2 formed a stable heterodimer with a molecular mass of approximately 24–26 kDa, estimated by molecular exclusion HPLC. In the presence of BTL-2, we observed a significant increase in PLA2 activity, 23% higher than that of PLA2 alone. BTL-2 demonstrated an inhibition of 98% in the growth of the Gram-positive bacterial strain, Clavibacter michiganensis michiganensis (Cmm, but only 9.8% inhibition of the Gram-negative bacterial strain, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv passiflorae (Xap. PLA2 decreased bacterial growth by 27.3% and 98.5% for Xap and Cmm, respectively, while incubating these two proteins with PLA2-BTL-2 inhibited their growths by 36.2% for Xap and 98.5% for Cmm. PLA2 significantly induced platelet aggregation in washed platelets, whereas BTL-2 did not induce significant platelet aggregation in any assay. However, BTL-2 significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by PLA2. In addition, PLA2 exhibited strong oedematogenic activity, which was decreased in the presence of BTL-2. BTL-2 alone did not induce oedema and did not decrease or abolish the oedema induced by the 48

  13. Modulation of the pharmacological effects of enzymatically-active PLA2 by BTL-2, an isolectin isolated from the Bryothamnion triquetrum red alga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Simone CB; Fonseca, Fabiana V; Antunes, Edson; Camargo, Enilton A; Morganti, Rafael P; Aparício, Ricardo; Toyama, Daniela O; Beriam, Luís OS; Nunes, Eudismar V; Cavada, Benildo S; Nagano, Celso S; Sampaio, Alexandre H; Nascimento, Kyria S; Toyama, Marcos H

    2008-01-01

    Background An interaction between lectins from marine algae and PLA2 from rattlesnake was suggested some years ago. We, herein, studied the effects elicited by a small isolectin (BTL-2), isolated from Bryothamnion triquetrum, on the pharmacological and biological activities of a PLA2 isolated from rattlesnake venom (Crotalus durissus cascavella), to better understand the enzymatic and pharmacological mechanisms of the PLA2 and its complex. Results This PLA2 consisted of 122 amino acids (approximate molecular mass of 14 kDa), its pI was estimated to be 8.3, and its amino acid sequence shared a high degree of similarity with that of other neurotoxic and enzymatically-active PLA2s. BTL-2 had a molecular mass estimated in approximately 9 kDa and was characterized as a basic protein. In addition, BTL-2 did not exhibit any enzymatic activity. The PLA2 and BTL-2 formed a stable heterodimer with a molecular mass of approximately 24–26 kDa, estimated by molecular exclusion HPLC. In the presence of BTL-2, we observed a significant increase in PLA2 activity, 23% higher than that of PLA2 alone. BTL-2 demonstrated an inhibition of 98% in the growth of the Gram-positive bacterial strain, Clavibacter michiganensis michiganensis (Cmm), but only 9.8% inhibition of the Gram-negative bacterial strain, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv passiflorae (Xap). PLA2 decreased bacterial growth by 27.3% and 98.5% for Xap and Cmm, respectively, while incubating these two proteins with PLA2-BTL-2 inhibited their growths by 36.2% for Xap and 98.5% for Cmm. PLA2 significantly induced platelet aggregation in washed platelets, whereas BTL-2 did not induce significant platelet aggregation in any assay. However, BTL-2 significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by PLA2. In addition, PLA2 exhibited strong oedematogenic activity, which was decreased in the presence of BTL-2. BTL-2 alone did not induce oedema and did not decrease or abolish the oedema induced by the 48/80 compound. Conclusion The

  14. Cyclic modulation of semi-active controllable dampers for tonal vibration isolation

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    Anusonti-Inthra, P.; Gandhi, F.

    2004-08-01

    The present study examines the potential of using a semi-active controllable damper, whose damping coefficient can be modulated in real time, for tonal vibration isolation applications. A frequency-domain control algorithm is developed for determining the damping coefficient variation (at twice the disturbance frequency) that minimizes the force transmitted to the support at the disturbance frequency. The effectiveness of open-loop, closed-loop, and adaptive controllers in rejecting the transmitted disturbances are evaluated. The results of the study indicate that when limits in damping coefficient variation are considered, the support force could be reduced by about an additional 30%, beyond the levels due to the passive isolation characteristics (no cyclic damping modulation). When the disturbance phase changes during operation, the effectiveness of the open-loop controller is rapidly degraded. While the closed-loop controller (with inputs based on current levels of force transmitted to the support) performed better, there was still some degradation in performance, and transmitted support forces were not reduced to levels prior to the change in disturbance phase. The results show that for the semi-active system to retain its effectiveness in rejecting disturbances, a closed-loop, adaptive controller (with on-line system identification) is required; even when there is only a change in disturbance, and no change in basic system properties. An explanation for this phenomenon, related to the bi-linear nature of the semi-active system, is provided. Cyclic modulations in the damping coefficient were more effective in reducing the transmitted forces at the disturbance frequency than simply reducing the baseline damping coefficient (to improve the passive isolation characteristics).

  15. Modulation of ventricular fibrillation in isolated perfused heart by dofetilide.

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    Amitzur, Giora; Shenkar, Nitza; Leor, Jonathan; Novikov, Ilia; Eldar, Michael

    2003-06-01

    The authors studied the involvement of IKr potassium current in ventricular fibrillation during perfusion. Electrophysiologic parameters were measured before and after dofetilide administration (2.5, 7.5, and 12.5 x 10-7 M, n = 8) in isolated perfused feline hearts. During pacing, these parameters included epicardial conduction time, refractoriness, and the fastest rate for 1:1 pacing/response capture. During 8 minutes of electrically induced tachyarrhythmias, they included heart rate and normalized entropy reflecting the degree of organization. In all groups, arrhythmia rate was slower in the right ventricle than in the left ventricle. Dofetilide decreased the arrhythmia rate more than it increased organization, reduced its maintenance, or increased difficulty in initiation. Refractoriness was prolonged in a reverse use-dependent way which was less than 1:1 pacing/response capture. Unexpectedly, a moderate prolongation of conduction time was observed. Inverse correlation was found between the arrhythmia rate and changes in refractoriness and conduction time and between the degree of organization and refractoriness (both ventricles) and conduction time (right ventricle). Dofetilide, which intensively blocks IKr current and unexpectedly suppressed conduction, has different quantitative effects on fibrillation features. These changes in fibrillation suggest that these effects are mainly associated with refractoriness prolongation and do not seem to be attenuated by conduction suppression.

  16. Anticarcinogenic effect of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from grape seeds in human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells: modulation of mitogenic signaling and cell-cycle regulators and induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis.

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    Agarwal, C; Sharma, Y; Agarwal, R

    2000-07-01

    There is an increasing interest in identifying potent cancer preventive and therapeutic agents against prostate cancer (PCA). In a recent study, we showed that a polyphenolic fraction isolated from grape seeds (hereafter referred to as GSP) that is substantially rich in antioxidant procyanidins exerts exceptionally high preventive effects against tumorigenesis in a murine skin model. In the present study, we investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of GSP against PCA by employing DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells. GSP treatment (10-100 microg/mL doses for 2-6 d) of cells resulted in a highly significant (P < 0.01-0.001) inhibition of cell growth in both dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with the vehicle, 2 d of GSP treatment resulted in 27, 39, and 76% growth inhibition at 50, 75, and 100 microg/mL doses, respectively, whereas 28-97% and 12-98% inhibition was evident at 10-100 microg/mL doses of GSP after 4 and 6 d of treatment, respectively. These doses of GSP also resulted in dose- and time-dependent cell death (6-50%, P <0.1-0. 001) that was later characterized as apoptotic death. In molecular mechanistic studies, treatment of DU145 cells with GSP at 25-75 microg/mL doses for 24, 48, and 72 h resulted in 77-88%, 65-93%, and 38-98% reduction, respectively (P < 0.001), in phospho-extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1 and 78%, 19-76%, and 63-71% reduction (P < 0.1-0.001) in phospho-ERK2 levels, respectively. In other studies, similar doses of GSP showed up to 1.9-fold increases in Cip1/p21 and a significant (P < 0.001) decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 (up to 90% decrease), CDK2 (up to 50% decrease), and cyclin E (up to 60% decrease). GSP treatment of DU145 cells also resulted in a significant (P < 0.001) G1 arrest in cell-cycle progression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-inhibitory and cell-death effects of GSP were also observed in another human PCA line, LNCaP. Together, these results suggest that GSP may exert strong

  17. Electrochemical aging effects in photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, G. R.

    Leakage currents were experimentally measured in PV modules undergoing natural aging outdoors, and in PV modules undergoing accelerated aging in laboratory environmental chambers. The significant contributors to module leakage current were identified with a long range goal to develop techniques to reduce or stop module leakage currents. For outdoor aging in general, module leakage current is relatively insensitive to temperature fluctuations, but is very sensitive to moisture effects such as dew, precipitation, and fluctuations in relative humidity. Comparing ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and polyvinyl butyral (PVB), module leakage currents are much higher in PVB as compared to EVA for all environmental conditions investigated. Leakage currents proceed in series along two paths, bulk conduction followed by interfacial (surfaces) conduction.

  18. Melatonin modulates permeability transition pore and 5-hydroxydecanoate induced KATP channel inhibition in isolated brain mitochondria.

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    Waseem, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing recognition of the magnitude of mitochondria in neurodegenerative disorders. Mitochondria play a key role in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Melatonin (Mel), an indoleamine produced in several organs including the pineal gland has been known for its neuroprotective actions. In our study, we have investigated whether the mitochondrial ATP sensitive potassium (mtKATP) channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) and calcium (Ca(2+)) affects permeability transition pore (PTP) alterations in isolated brain mitochondria treated with melatonin (Mel) and cyclosporin A (CsA). Mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), ROS measurement and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated in isolated brain mitochondria. In our results, mitochondrial swelling stimulated by exposing Ca(2+) ions and 5-HD associated by mPTP opening as depicted by modulation of CsA and Mel. In addition, Ca(2+) and 5-HD decreased Δψm, depleted intracellular ROS, and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration (state 3 and state 4) in isolated brain mitochondria. Addition of Mel and CsA has shown significant restoration in mitochondrial swelling, Δψm, intracellular ROS measurement and mitochondrial respiration in isolated brain mitochondria. Therefore, we speculate the modulatory effect of Mel and CsA in mitochondria treated with 5-HD and Ca(2+) hinders the mPTP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular oxidative stress. We conclude that inhibition of mPT is one likely mechanism of CsA's and its neuroprotective actions. Development of neuroprotective agents including Mel targeting the mPTP therefore bears hope for future treatment of severe neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic-free non-reciprocity and isolation based on parametrically modulated coupled-resonator loops

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    Estep, Nicholas A.; Sounas, Dimitrios L.; Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Non-reciprocal components, which are essential to many modern communication systems, are almost exclusively based on magneto-optical materials, severely limiting their applicability. A practical and inexpensive route to magnetic-free non-reciprocity could revolutionize radio-frequency and nanophotonic communication networks. Angular-momentum biasing was recently proposed as a means of realizing isolation for sound waves travelling in a rotating medium, and envisaged as a path towards compact, linear integrated non-reciprocal electromagnetic components. Inspired by this concept, here we demonstrate a subwavelength, linear radio-frequency non-reciprocal circulator free from magnetic materials and bias. The scheme is based on the parametric modulation of three identical, strongly and symmetrically coupled resonators. Their resonant frequencies are modulated by external signals with the same amplitude and a relative phase difference of 120°, imparting an effective electronic angular momentum to the system. We observe giant non-reciprocity, with up to six orders of magnitude difference in transmission for opposite directions. Furthermore, the device topology is tunable in real time, and can be directly embedded in a conventional integrated circuit.

  20. Two Lactobacillus strains, isolated from breast milk, differently modulate the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz-Ropero, M.P.; Martin, R.; Sierra, S.; Lara-Villoslada, F.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Xaus, J.; Olivares, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The ability of two different Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 and Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716), isolated from human breast milk, to modulate the immune response was examined. Methods and Results: In rodent bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), the presence of Lac

  1. Two Lactobacillus strains, isolated from breast milk, differently modulate the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz-Ropero, M.P.; Martin, R.; Sierra, S.; Lara-Villoslada, F.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Xaus, J.; Olivares, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The ability of two different Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 and Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716), isolated from human breast milk, to modulate the immune response was examined. Methods and Results: In rodent bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), the presence of Lac

  2. Maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules over non-isolated surface singularities and matrix problems

    CERN Document Server

    Burban, Igor

    2017-01-01

    In this article the authors develop a new method to deal with maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules over non-isolated surface singularities. In particular, they give a negative answer on an old question of Schreyer about surface singularities with only countably many indecomposable maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules. Next, the authors prove that the degenerate cusp singularities have tame Cohen-Macaulay representation type. The authors' approach is illustrated on the case of \\mathbb{k} x,y,z/(xyz) as well as several other rings. This study of maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules over non-isolated singularities leads to a new class of problems of linear algebra, which the authors call representations of decorated bunches of chains. They prove that these matrix problems have tame representation type and describe the underlying canonical forms.

  3. Isolated PDM and PWM DC-AC SICAMs[Pulse Density Modulated; Pulse Width Modulated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.

    2004-03-15

    In this report a class of isolated PDM and PWM DC-AC SICAMs is described, which introduce the audio reference only in the output stage. AC-DC power supply is implemented in its simplest form: diode rectifier followed by a medium-size charge-storage capacitor. Isolation from the AC mains is achieved using a high frequency (HF) transformer, receiving the HF voltage pulses from the input 'inverter' stage and transferring them to the output 'rectifier+inverter' stage, which can use either PDM or PWM. The latter stage is then interfaced to the load using an output low-pass filter. Each of the dedicated stages is discussed in detail. Measurements on the master/slave PWM DC-AC SICAM prototype are presented to help benchmarking the performance of this class of SICAMs and identify the advantages and drawbacks. (au)

  4. Osmotically and thermally isolated forward osmosis-membrane distillation (fo-md) integrated module for water treatment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2016-09-01

    An integrated forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) module and systems and methods incorporating the module is disclosed providing higher efficiencies and using less energy. The FO-MD module is osmotically and thermally isolated. The isolation can prevent mixing of FO draw solution/FO permeate and MD feed, and minimize dilution of FO draw solution and cooling of MD feed. The module provides MD feed solution and FO draw solution streams that flow in the same module but are separated by an isolation barrier. The osmotically and thermally isolated FO-MD integrated module, systems and methods offer higher driving forces of both FO and MD processes, higher recovery, and wider application than previously proposed hybrid FO- MD systems.

  5. Rescue of Isolated GH Deficiency Type II (IGHD II) via Pharmacologic Modulation of GH-1 Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2016-10-01

    Isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) type II, the autosomal dominant form of GHD, is mainly caused by mutations that affect splicing of GH-1. When misspliced RNA is translated, it produces a toxic 17.5-kDa GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild-type-human GH (wt-hGH). Usually, isolated GHD type II patients are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH in order to maintain normal growth. However, this type of replacement therapy does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa GH isoform on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Here, we tested the possibility to restore the constitutive splicing pattern of GH-1 by using butyrate, a drug that mainly acts as histone deacetylase inhibitor. To this aim, wt-hGH and/or different hGH-splice site mutants (GH-IVS3+2, GH-IVS3+6, and GH-ISE+28) were transfected in rat pituitary cells expressing human GHRH receptor (GHRHR) (GC-GHRHR). Upon butyrate treatment, GC-GHRHR cells coexpressing wt-hGH and each of the mutants displayed increased GH transcript level, intracellular GH content, and GH secretion when compared with the corresponding untreated condition. The effect of butyrate was most likely mediated by the alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2. Overexpression of alternative ASF/SF2 in the same experimental setting, indeed, promoted the amount of full-length transcripts thus increasing synthesis and secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that modulation of GH-1 splicing pattern to increase the 22-kDa GH isoform levels can be clinically beneficial and hence a crucial challenge in GHD research.

  6. Isolated PWM DC-AC SICAM with an active capacitive voltage clamp[Pulse Density Modulated; Pulse Width Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.

    2004-03-15

    In this report an isolated PWM DC-AC SICAM with an active capacitive voltage clamp is presented. AC-DC power supply is implemented in its simplest form: diode rectifier followed by a medium-size charge-storage capacitors and possibly with an EMC filter on the mains entrance. Isolation from the AC mains is achieved using a high frequency (HF) transformer, whose voltages are not audio-modulated. The latter simplifies the design and is expected to have many advantages over the approach where the transformer voltages are modulated in regards to the audio signal reference. Input stage is built as a DC-AC inverter (push-pull, half-bridge or a full-bridge) and operated with 50% duty cycle, with all the challenges to avoid transformer saturation and obtain symmetrical operation. On the secondary side the output section is implemented as rectifier+inverter AC-AC stage, i.e. a true bidirectional bridge, which operation is aimed towards amplification of the audio signal. In order to solve the problem with the commutation of the load current, a dead time between the incoming and outgoing bidirectional switch is implemented, while a capacitive voltage clamp is used to keep the induced overvoltage to reasonable levels. The energy stored in the clamping capacitor is not wasted as in the dissipative clamps, but is rather transferred back to the primary side for further processing using an auxiliary isolated single-switch converter, i.e. an active clamping technique is used. (au)

  7. Design of integrated YIG-based isolators and high-speed modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firby, C. J.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present the design of integrable magnetoplasmonic isolators and modulators, based on a longrange magnetoplasmonic waveguide structure. With the addition of magnetized cerium-substituted yttrium iron garnet waveguides and planar samarium-cobalt biasing magnets to a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), we show that an efficient isolator architecture can be implemented with insertion loss of 2.51 dB and an isolation of 22.82 dB within a small footprint of 6:4 x 10-3 mm2. Additionally, employing bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet in a MZI and transient magnetic fields from nearby transmission lines, we propose a high-speed electrical-to-optical clock multiplier. Such a device exhibits a modulation depth of 16.26 dB, and an output modulation frequency of 279.9 MHz. Thus, input clock signals can be multiplied by factors of 2:1 x 103. These devices are envisioned as fundamental constituents of future integrated nanoplasmonic circuits.

  8. Evaluation of probiotic characteristics of newly isolated Lactobacillus spp.: immune modulation and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Yun, Hyun Sun; Cho, Kyu Won; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Sae Hun; Chun, Taehoon; Kim, Bongjoon; Whang, Kwang Youn

    2011-08-02

    In the current study, the probiotic potential of approximately 350 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Korean infant feces and Kimchi was investigated. Common probiotic properties of the bacterial strains, such as acid tolerance, bile tolerance and adhesion to human intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29 cells), were examined. Some strains were found to have immune modulatory and antimicrobial properties. Antagonistic activity against a panel of pathogenic bacteria was found to be strain dependent. To evaluate the immune modulatory activity of the strains, lymphocyte interferon (IFN)-γ secretion was determined in conjunction with cell proliferation. Some strains of Lactobacillus gasseri, L. fermentum and L. plantarum exhibited increased IFN-γ levels and lymphocyte proliferation. To evaluate the effects of these immune modulating lactobacilli on host life span, Caenorhabditis elegans was used as an in vivo model. Nematodes that were supplied heat-killed lactobacilli as a food source exhibited obvious differences in life span compared with those fed Escherichia coli OP50. The mean life span (determined as mean percent survival) of worms fed L. plantarum CJLP133 and L. fermentum LA12 was 13.89% and 13.69% greater, respectively, than that of control nematodes after 21 days (P=0.036 and 0.043, respectively). In addition, some of safety profiles, including hemolytic type, gelatin hydration and degradation of urea, were found to be positive. These newly identified lactobacilli hold promise for use as probiotic agents, feed additives and/or in food applications.

  9. (-)Epicatechin induces and modulates endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated rat mesenteric artery rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Xiao-Qiang; CHAN Franky Leung; LAU Chi-Wai; HUANG Yu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: The present study was aimed to examine the role of endothelial nitric oxide in the relaxant response to green tea (-)epicatechin and its modulation of endothelium-mediated relaxation in the isolated rat mesenteric artery rings.METHODS: Changes in the isometric tension were measured with Grass force-displacement transducers. RESULTS:The (-)epicatechin-induced relaxation was largely dependent on the presence of intact endothelium and was reversed by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester 10 μmol/L or methylene blue 10 μmol/L, the inhibitors of nitric oxidemediated relaxation. L-Arginine at 1 mmol/L antagonized the effect of L-NAME or methylene blue. Pretreatment of endothelium-intact rings with (-)epicatechin 10 μmol/L enhanced the relaxation induced by endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine, while this concentration did not influence the endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside in the endothelium-denuded artery rings. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the endothelium-dependent vasodilation by (-)epicatechin is mainly mediated through nitric oxide and low concentration of (-)epicatechin augments endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in the rat mesenteric arteries.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a thylakoid membrane module showing partial light and dark reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Diksha Narhar; Sainis, Jayashree Krishna

    2005-05-15

    A functional thylakoid membrane module of photosynthesis was isolated from cell free extracts of Anacystis nidulans by stepwise sequential ultracentrifugation. The thylakoid membrane fractions sedimenting at 40,000 x g, followed by 90,000 x g and finally at 150,000 x g were collected. These fractions had all the components of electron transport chain, ATP synthase, phycobiliproteins, ferredoxin-NADP reductase but no ferredoxin. Five sequential enzymes of Calvin cycle viz phosphoriboisomerase, phosphoribulokinase, RuBP carboxylase, 3-PGA kinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were found to be associated with thylakoid membranes. Among the three different thylakoid fractions, the 150,000 x g fraction showed highest activities of these enzymes and also higher rate of whole chain electron transport activity on chlorophyll basis. An important finding was that the 150,000 x g fraction showed appreciably higher rate of R-5-P+ADP+Pi dependent CO2 fixation in light compared to the other two fractions, indicating the efficiency of this fraction in utilizing ATP for Calvin cycle. This thylakoid membrane fraction represents a fully functional module exhibiting a synchronized system of light and dark reactions of photosynthesis. Most of the components of this module remained together even after sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This is the first report on the isolation of a photosynthetic module involving membrane and soluble proteins.

  11. Effects of Metallothionein on Isolated Rat Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhongdong; XIA Jiahong; DONG Nianguo; DU Xinling; CHI Yifan; YANG Tienan; YANG Chenyuan

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effects of metallothionein (MT) on isolated rat heart, 16 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 2 groups. In control group (group C), distilled water was injected intraperitoneally and 24 h later isolated hearts were perfused with Langendorff and stored at 4℃ for 3 h with histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solutions, and then isolated hearts were perfused for 2 h by Langendorff. In experimental group (group E), 3.6% ZnSO4 was injected intraperitoneally, 24 h later isolated hearts were perfused by Langendorff and stored at 4℃ for 3 h with HTK solutions, and then the isolated herts were perfused for 2 h with Langendorff. MT content, the recovery of hemodynamics, myocardial water content (MWC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) leakage, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, myocardial cell Ca2+ content, Ca2+-ATPase activity of mitochondria ([Ca2+-ATPase]m) and its Ca2+ content ([Ca2+]m), synthesizing ATP activity of mitochondria ([ATP]m), and the ultrastructure of cells were examined. There were a significant increase in group E in hemodynamic recovery, ATP content, SOD activity, [Ca2+-ATPase]m activity, [ATP]m activity, and substantial reduction in MWC, LDH and CK leakage, MDA content, myocardial cell Ca2+ content, [Ca2+]m content,and the ultrastructural injury were obviously milder than that of group C. This study demonstrated that MT has protective effects on isolated rat heart.

  12. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  13. IM-135-562-00 IDIM instruction manual for the isolated digital input module for SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, J.

    1983-01-01

    This unit is designed as a general purpose digital input module. Each input is opto-isolated, and is designed to operate over a wide range of positive input voltages. The unit is nonlatching, each CAMAC Read of the unit presenting the data as seen at the inputs at the time of the Read command. The manual includes the following sections: specifications; front panel, lights and connectors; reference list; functional description; 82S100 logic equations; test and checkout procedures; appendix A, SLAC 82S100 programming data; and appendix B, JXK-FORTH 135-562 program listing.

  14. In vitro modulation of tumor necrosis factor α production in THP-1 cells by lactic acid bacteria isolated from healthy human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladda, Boonyarut; Theparee, Talent; Chimchang, Juntana; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Taweechotipatr, Malai

    2015-06-01

    The human microbiota is a source of probiotics capable of modulating the host immune system. In this study, we collected fecal samples from 100 healthy infants and isolated lactic acid bacteria which were screened for immune modulating effects on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production. Cell-free culture supernatants from 26 isolates were able to decrease TNF-α production in vitro and three of the isolates were selected as candidate probiotics (MSMC39-1, MSMC39-3, MSMC57-1). These isolates were identified using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus casei, and Weissella confusa respectively. All three isolates were acid tolerant and bile tolerant to pH 3.0 and 4% bile respectively. Preparations of cell-free culture supernatants were processed and tested, and revealed that cell-free culture supernatants of isolates L. paracasei MSMC39-1, L. casei MSMC39-3, and W. confusa MSMC57-1 decreased the production of TNF-α significantly and were heat resistant. Only L. paracasei MSMC39-1 supernatant was proteinase-K sensitive. The effects of viable bacteria, heat-killed bacteria, and sonicated bacteria were compared. The heat-killed preparations of isolate W. confusa MSMC57-1 decreased the production of TNF-α. Sonicated cell preparations did not significantly alter TNF-α production. For isolates L. paracasei MSMC39-1 and L. casei MSMC39-3, this suggests that a substance in the cell-free culture supernatant may be responsible for in vitro cytokine modulation.

  15. Effectiveness of Base Isolation Technique and Influence of Isolator Characteristics on Response of a Base Isolated Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Tolani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns with the seismic response comparison of a fixed base building with a base isolated building and parametric study of a base isolated building. The structural system considered for analysis is a three storey reinforced concrete building, which is idealized as a shear type building with one lateral degree of freedom at each floor level. The isolation systems considered for this study are Laminated Rubber bearing (LRB, Lead Rubber Bearing (N-Z bearing and Friction Pendulum System (FPS. The response of fixed base building and of base isolated building is compared in terms of maximum top floor acceleration, interstorey drift, maximum floor displacements and base shear. For parametric study important isolation system parameters considered are: (i isolation time period, isolator damping for LRB; (ii isolator yield strength, isolation time period, isolator damping for N-Z bearing and (iii isolation time period, friction coefficient for FPS. It is found that base isolation technique is very effective in reducing seismic response of structure and isolation system parameters significantly influence the earthquake response of a base isolated structure.

  16. Interleukin-1 beta-induced nitric oxide production from isolated rat islets is modulated by D-glucose and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H U; Mauricio, D; Karlsen, Allan Ertman

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-1 beta has been proposed to cause selective beta-cell destruction via the induction of nitric oxide synthesis. The cytotoxic effect of interleukin-1 beta is modulated by the concentration of D-glucose in the medium. The aim of this study was to investigate if D......-glucose-mediated modulation of interleukin-1 beta effects on insulin release from isolated rat islets was related to modulation of nitric oxide production. Further, we wished to investigate the effects of agents increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP on interleukin-1 beta-induced nitrite production. We...... demonstrated that D-glucose potentiated interleukin-1 beta-induced nitrite production in rat islets without affecting the mRNA level of the inducible nitric oxide synthase. This effect was dissociated from interleukin-1 beta action on insulin release, since a relative protection against interleukin-1 beta...

  17. Modulation of frontal effective connectivity during speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Rachel; Leff, Alex P; Penny, William D; Rothwell, John C; Crinion, Jenny

    2016-10-15

    Noninvasive neurostimulation methods such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can elicit long-lasting, polarity-dependent changes in neocortical excitability. In a previous concurrent tDCS-fMRI study of overt picture naming, we reported significant behavioural and regionally specific neural facilitation effects in left inferior frontal cortex (IFC) with anodal tDCS applied to left frontal cortex (Holland et al., 2011). Although distributed connectivity effects of anodal tDCS have been modelled at rest, the mechanism by which 'on-line' tDCS may modulate neuronal connectivity during a task-state remains unclear. Here, we used Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM) to determine: (i) how neural connectivity within the frontal speech network is modulated during anodal tDCS; and, (ii) how individual variability in behavioural response to anodal tDCS relates to changes in effective connectivity strength. Results showed that compared to sham, anodal tDCS elicited stronger feedback from inferior frontal sulcus (IFS) to ventral premotor (VPM) accompanied by weaker self-connections within VPM, consistent with processes of neuronal adaptation. During anodal tDCS individual variability in the feedforward connection strength from IFS to VPM positively correlated with the degree of facilitation in naming behaviour. These results provide an essential step towards understanding the mechanism of 'online' tDCS paired with a cognitive task. They also identify left IFS as a 'top-down' hub and driver for speech change.

  18. Isolation of a new quinic acid derivative and its antibacterial modulating activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Gohari

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: The species Hymenocrater calycinus, belongs to the plant family Lamiaceae and grows wildly in the north-east of Iran. Previously, the antimicrobial activity of the plant extracts was reported. In the present study, the bioactivity-guided fractionation of the methanol extract of H. calycinus and the combination effects of the isolated compound with cell wall active agents against S. aureus and E. coli was investigated. "n "nMethods: Column and thin layer chromatographic methods were used for isolation and purification and spectroscopic data (MS, 1H- and 13C-NMR, HMQC, HMBC and 1H-1H COSY were employed for identification of the compound isolated from the extract. A disk diffusion method was used to determine the antibacterial activity of the isolated compound against S. aureus and E. coli in comparison with 7 different antibiotics.Results: The isolated compound 1 was identified as 3-(3, 4- dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid 2-O-quinic acid. Compound 1 (500 µg/disc enhanced antibacterial effect of ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin and cefepime against S. aureus and activated the effects of ampicillin and vancomycin against E. coli. "nConclusion: Results showed that the compound 1 was not active against both tested strains at any concentration below 1 mg/disk, and as a result the enhancing effect of the compound could be due its association with antibiotics.

  19. Vagal Reactions during Cryoballoon-Based Pulmonary Vein Isolation: A Clue for Autonomic Nervous System Modulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Peyrol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF is known to be initiated by rapid firing of pulmonary veins (PV and non-PV triggers, the crucial role of cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS in the initiation and maintenance of AF has long been appreciated in both experimental and clinical studies. The cardiac intrinsic ANS is composed of ganglionated plexi (GPs, located close to the left atrium-pulmonary vein junctions and a vast network of interconnecting neurons. Ablation strategies aiming for complete PV isolation (PVI remain the cornerstone of AF ablation procedures. However, several observational studies and few randomized studies have suggested that GP ablation, as an adjunctive strategy, might achieve better clinical outcomes in patients undergoing radiofrequency-based PVI for both paroxysmal and nonparoxysmal AF. In these patients, vagal reactions (VR such as vagally mediated bradycardia or asystole are thought to reflect intrinsic cardiac ANS modulation and/or denervation. Vagal reactions occurring during cryoballoon- (CB- based PVI have been previously reported; however, little is known on resulting ANS modulation and/or prevalence and significance of vagal reactions during PVI with the CB technique. We conducted a review of prevalence, putative mechanisms, and significance of VR during CB-based PVI.

  20. Temperature Effect on Photovoltaic Modules Power Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais Mohammed Aish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine what type of photovoltaic solar module could best be used in a thermoelectric photovoltaic power generation. Changing in powers due to higher temperatures (25oC, 35oC, and 45oC have been done for three types of solar modules: monocrystalline , polycrystalline, and copper indium gallium (di selenide (CIGS. The Prova 200 solar panel analyzer is used for the professional testing of three solar modules at different ambient temperatures; 25oC, 35oC, and 45oC and solar radiation range 100-1000 W/m2. Copper indium gallium (di selenide module has the lowest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.38%/oC while monocrystalline module has the highest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.54%/oC, while polycrystalline module has a percentage power drop of 0.49%/oC.

  1. Studies on Modulation of Gut Microbiota by Wine Polyphenols: From Isolated Cultures to Omic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Dueñas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Moderate consumption of wine seems to produce positive health effects derived from the occurrence of bioactive polyphenols. The gut microbiota is involved in the metabolism of phenolic compounds, and these compounds and/or their metabolites may modulate gut microbiota through the stimulation of the growth of beneficial bacteria and the inhibition of pathogenic bacteria. The characterization of bacterial metabolites derived from polyphenols is essential in order to understand their effects, including microbial modulation, and therefore to associate dietary intake with particular health effects. This review aims to summarize the current information about the two-way “wine polyphenols–gut microbiota” interaction, from a perspective based on the experimental and analytical designs used. The availability of advanced methods for monitoring bacterial communities, along with the combination of in vitro and in vivo models, could help to assess the metabolism of polyphenols in the human body and to monitor total bacterial communities, and, therefore, to elucidate the implications of diet on the modulation of microbiota for delivering health benefits.

  2. Phytochemical Analysis and Modulation of Antibiotic Activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in Multiresistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto Júnior, João T.; Morais, Selene M.; Martins, Clécio G.; Vieira, Larissa G.; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B.; Carneiro, Joara N. P.; Machado, Antonio J. P.; Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea. PMID:25821822

  3. Phytochemical analysis and modulation of antibiotic activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto Júnior, João T; Morais, Selene M; Martins, Clécio G; Vieira, Larissa G; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B; Carneiro, Joara N P; Machado, Antonio J P; Menezes, Irwin R A; Tintino, Saulo R; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea.

  4. Modulation of cytokine gene expression by selected Lactobacillus isolates in the ileum, caecal tonsils and spleen of Salmonella-challenged broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie-Lun; Yu, Hai; Kulkarni, Raveendra R; Sharif, Shayan; Cui, Steve W; Xie, Ming-Yong; Nie, Shao-Ping; Gong, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization in the chicken intestine. Recently, we demonstrated that certain selected Lactobacillus isolates were able to reduce Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver as well as down-regulated Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 virulence gene expression in the chicken caecum. To further understand the mechanisms through which Lactobacillus protected chickens from Salmonella infection, the present study has investigated the Lactobacillus isolate(s)-induced host immune response of chickens to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. A thorough examination of cytokine gene expression in the ileum, caecal tonsils, and spleen on days 1 and 3 post-Salmonella infection showed a dynamic spatial and temporal response to Salmonella infection and Lactobacillus treatments. In most instances, it was evident that treatment of chickens with Lactobacillus isolates could significantly attenuate Salmonella-induced changes in the gene expression profile. These included the genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines [lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF factor, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8], T helper 1 cytokines [IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ], and T helper 2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Another important observation from the present investigation was that the response induced by a combination of Lactobacillus isolates was generally more effective than that induced by a single Lactobacillus isolate. Our results show that administration of certain selected Lactobacillus isolates can effectively modulate Salmonella-induced cytokine gene expression, and thus help reduce Salmonella infection in chickens.

  5. Effect of Fibonacci modulation on superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjay; Sil, Shreekantha; Bhattacharyya, Bibhas

    2006-02-15

    We have studied finite-sized single band models with short-range pairing interactions between electrons in the presence of diagonal Fibonacci modulation in one dimension. Two models, namely the attractive Hubbard model and the Penson-Kolb model, have been investigated at half-filling at zero temperature by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations in real space within a mean-field approximation. The competition between 'disorder' and the pairing interaction leads to a suppression of superconductivity (of usual pairs with zero centre-of-mass momenta) in the strong-coupling limit while an enhancement of the pairing correlation is observed in the weak-coupling regime for both models. However, the dissimilarity of the pairing mechanisms in these two models brings about notable differences in the results. The extent to which the bond-ordered wave and the η-paired (of pairs with centre-of-mass momenta = π) phases of the Penson-Kolb model are affected by the disorder has also been studied in the present calculation. Some finite size effects are also identified.

  6. Ultracompact Field Effect Electro-Absorption Plasmonic Modulator

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kaifeng

    2015-01-01

    One of the technical barriers impeding the wide applications of integrated photonic circuits is the lack of ultracompact, high speed, broadband electro-optical (EO) modulators, which up-convert electronic signals into high bit-rate photonic data. In addition to direct modulation of lasers, EO modulators can be classified into (i) phase modulation based on EO effect or free-carrier injection, or (ii) absorption modulation based on Franz-Keldysh effect or quantum-confined Stark effect. Due to the poor EO properties of regular materials, a conventional EO modulator has a very large footprint. Based on high-Q resonators, recent efforts have advanced EO modulators into microscale footprints, which have nearly reached their physical limits restricted by the materials. On-chip optical interconnects require ultrafast EO modulators at the nanoscale. The technical barrier may not be well overcome based on conventional approaches and well-known materials. Herein, we report an EO modulator, more specifically electro-abso...

  7. Modulation Effects of Curcumin on Erythrocyte Ion-Transporter Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin ((1E,6E-1,7-Bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione, the yellow biphenolic pigment isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa, has various medicinal benefits through antioxidation, anti-inflammation, cardiovascular protection, immunomodulation, enhancing of the apoptotic process, and antiangiogenic property. We explored the effects of curcumin in vitro (10−5 M to 10−8 M and in vivo (340 and 170 mg/kg b.w., oral on Na+/K+ ATPase (NKA, Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE activity, and membrane lipid hydroperoxides (ROOH in control and experimental oxidative stress erythrocytes of Wistar rats. As a result, we found that curcumin potently modulated the membrane transporters activity with protecting membrane lipids against hydro-peroxidation in control as well as oxidatively challenged erythrocytes evidenced by stimulation of NKA, downregulation of NHE, and reduction of ROOH in the membrane. The observed results corroborate membrane transporters activity with susceptibility of erythrocyte membrane towards oxidative damage. Results explain the protective mechanism of curcumin against oxidative stress mediated impairment in ions-transporters activity and health beneficial effects.

  8. Isolation of human umbilical cord blood aldehyde dehydrogenase-expressing progenitor cells that modulate vascular regenerative functions in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, David M; Hess, David A

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the isolation and application of human umbilical cord blood progenitor cells to modulate vascular regenerative functions using in vitro co-culture systems and in vivo transplantation models. Using aldehyde dehydrogenase as a marker of stem cell function, blood-derived progenitors can be efficiently purified form human umbilical cord blood using flow cytometry. We describe in vitro approaches to measure cell-mediated effects on the survival, proliferation, and tube-forming function of endothelial cells using growth-rate assays and Matrigel tube-forming assays. Additionally, we provide a detailed protocol for inducing acute unilateral hindlimb ischemia in immune-deficient mice to assess progenitor cell-modulated effects on vascular regeneration by tracking the recovery of blood flow using noninvasive laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Collectively, we present combined in vitro and in vivo transplantation strategies for the pre-clinical assessment of human progenitor cell-based therapies to treat ischemic disease.

  9. Modulation of noradrenaline release in rat isolated stomach by prostanoids, but not by histaminergic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racké, K; Berrino, L; Möhlig, A; Jäger, R; Griepenkerl, I; Bräutigam, M; Reimann, A

    1995-12-01

    Several gastric functions are modulated by the sympathetic nervous system, but local mechanisms involved in the control of noradrenaline release are largely unknown. Overflow of endogenous noradrenaline was studied from isolated rat stomach incubated in Ussing chambers allowing the separate determination of mucosal and serosal overflow. Spontaneous noradrenaline overflow was similar at the mucosal and serosal side, but electrical field stimulation caused a frequency-dependent increase in noradrenaline overflow selectively at the serosal side. Evoked noradrenaline overflow was blocked by tetrodotoxin, not affected by indometacin and markedly enhanced (by about 250%) by yohimbine. In the presence of indometacin and yohimbine, sulprostone (an agonist at EP1/EP3 receptors) and misoprostol (an agonist at EP2/EP3 receptors) reduced the noradrenaline overflow evoked by stimulation at 3 Hz maximally by about 80% (EC50: 6 nmol/l and 11 nmol/l, respectively). The EP1 receptor selective antagonist AH 6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid) did not antagonize the inhibition by sulprostone. Noradrenaline overflow evoked by stimulation at 1 Hz and 3 Hz was increased by scopolamine by about 50% and almost completely inhibited by oxotremorine. Neither, histamine nor the H3 receptor selective agonist (R)-alpha-methyl-histamine, nor the H1, H2 and H3 selective receptor antagonists mepyramine, cimetidine and thioperamide significantly affected noradrenaline overflow evoked by stimulation at 1 Hz or 3 Hz. In conclusion, impulse-induced noradrenaline release in the rat stomach is controlled by multiple presynaptic mechanisms involving alpha 2-adrenergic autoreceptors, EP3 prostanoid and muscarine heteroreceptors, whereas histaminergic mechanisms do not appear to be significant.

  10. Effect of signal modulating noise in bistable stochastic dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖方红; 闫桂荣; 张新武

    2003-01-01

    The effect of signal modulating noise in bistable stochastic dynamical systems is studied.The concept of instan taneous steady state is proposed for bistable dynamical systems.By making a dynamical analysis of bistable stochastic systems,we find that global and local effect of signal modulating noise as well as stochastic resonance can occur in bistable dynamical systems on which both a weak sinusoidal signal and noise are forced.The effect is demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  11. Acetylcholine modulates transient outward potassium channel in acutely isolated cerebral cortical neurons of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanwei Cui; Tao Sun; Lihui Qu; Yurong Li; Haixia Wen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The neuronal transient outward potassium channel has been shown to be highly associated with acetylcholine.However,the influence of acetylcholine on the transient outward potassium current in cerebral cortical neurons remains poorly understood.OBJECTIVE:To investigate acetylcholine modulation on transient outward potassium current in rat parietal cortical neurons using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A neuroelectrophysiology study was performed at the Department of Physiology,Harbin Medical University between January 2005 and January 2006.MATERIALS:Wistar rats were provided by the Animal Research Center,the Second Hospital of Harbin Medical University;PC-IIC patch-clamp amplifier and IBBClamp data collection analysis system were provided by Huazhong University for Science and Technology,Wuhan,China;PP-83 microelectrode puller was purchased from Narrishage,Japan.METHODS:The parietal somatosensory cortical neurons were acutely dissociated,and the modulation of acetylcholine (0.1,1,10,100 μmol/L) on transient outward potassium channel was recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Influence of acetylcholine on transient outward potassium current,potassium channel activation,and inactivation.RESULTS:The inhibitory effect of acetylcholine on transient outward potassium current was dose- and voltage-dependent (P<0.01).Acetylcholine was found to significantly affect the activation process of transient outward potassium current,i.e.,the activation curve of transient outward potassium current was left-shifted,while the inactivation curve was shifted to hyperpolarization.Acetylcholine significantly prolonged the time constant of recovery from inactivation of transient outward potassium current (P<0.01).CONCLUSION:These results suggest that acetylcholine inhibits transient outward potassium current by regulating activation and inactivation processes of the transient outward potassium channel.

  12. Effect of Fluorescent Particle Size on the Modulation Efficiency of Ultrasound-Modulated Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether the size of fluorescent particles affects the modulation efficiency of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence (UMF, we measured UMF and DC (direct current signals of the fluorescence emission from four different-sized fluorescent particles: (1 three carboxylate-modified fluorescent microspheres (FM with diameters of 20 nm, 200 nm, and 1.0 μm and (2 streptavidin-conjugated Alexa Fluor 647 with a diameter of approximately 5 nm. The UMF and DC signals were simultaneously measured using a broadband lock-in amplifier and a narrowband amplifier, respectively. The ratio of the UMF strength to the DC signal strength is defined as the modulation efficiency. This modulation efficiency was then used to evaluate the effects of fluorophore size and concentration. Results show that the modulation efficiency was improved by approximately a factor of two when the size of the fluorescent particles is increased from 5 nm to 1 μm. In addition, the linear relationship between the UMF strength and ultrasound pressure (observed in our previous study was maintained regardless of the fluorescent particle sizes.

  13. Effects of spectral modulation filtering on vowel identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Eddins, David A

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to measure the effects of global spectral manipulations on vowel identification by progressively high-pass filtering vowel stimuli in the spectral modulation domain. Twelve American-English vowels, naturally spoken by a female talker, were subjected to varied degrees of high-pass filtering in the spectral modulation domain, with cutoff frequencies of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 cycles/octave. Identification performance for vowels presented at 70 dB sound pressure level with and without spectral modulation filtering was measured for five normal-hearing listeners. Results indicated that vowel identification performance was progressively degraded as the spectral modulation cutoff frequency increased. Degradation of vowel identification was greater for back vowels than for front or central vowels. Detailed acoustic analyses indicated that spectral modulation filtering resulted in a more crowded vowel space (F1xF2), reduced spectral contrast, and reduced spectral tilt relative to the original unfiltered vowels. Changes in the global spectral features produced by spectral modulation filtering were associated with substantial reduction in vowel identification. The results indicated that the spectral cues critical for vowel identification were represented by spectral modulation frequencies below 2 cycles/octave. These results are considered in terms of the interactions among spectral shape perception, spectral smearing, and speech perception.

  14. Nonlinear Resonance Islands and Modulational Effects in a Proton Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata, Todd Jeffrey [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    We examine both one-dimensional and two-dimensional nonlinear resonance islands created in the transverse phase space of a proton synchrotron by nonlinear magnets. We also examine application of the theoretical framework constructed to the phenomenon of modulational diffusion in a collider model of the Fermilab Tevatron. For the one-dimensional resonance island system, we examine the effects of two types of modulational perturbations on the stability of these resonance islands: tune modulation and beta function modulation. Hamiltonian models are presented which predict stability boundaries that depend on only three paramders: the strength and frequency of the modulation and the frequency of small oscillations inside the resonance island. These. models are compared to particle tracking with excellent agreement. The tune modulation model is also successfully tested in experiment, where frequency domain analysis coupled with tune modulation is demonstrated to be useful in measuring the strength of a nonlinear resonance. Nonlinear resonance islands are also examined in two transverse dimensions in the presence of coupling and linearly independent crossing resonances. We present a first-order Hamiltonian model which predicts fixed point locations, but does not reproduce small oscillation frequencies seen in tracking; therefore in this circumstance such a model is inadequate. Particle tracking is presented which shows evidence of two-dimensional persistent signals, and we make suggestions on methods for observing such signals in future experiment.

  15. Effects of communication training on real practice performance: a role-play module versus a standardized patient module.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlegel, C.; Woermann, U.; Shaha, M.; Rethans, J.J.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of modules involving standardized patients and role-plays on training communication skills. The first module involved standardized patients and an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE); the second module consisted of peer role-plays and a written

  16. Effects of communication training on real practice performance: a role-play module versus a standardized patient module.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlegel, C.; Woermann, U.; Shaha, M.; Rethans, J.J.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of modules involving standardized patients and role-plays on training communication skills. The first module involved standardized patients and an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE); the second module consisted of peer role-plays and a written

  17. Implementation of the ecotoxicological, effects module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Payet, Jerome; Molander, S;

    The goal of this report is to come up with recommendations on how to calculate the ecotoxicity effect indicator (termed ecotox effect indicator) for use in the OMNIITOX base model (BM). The ecotox effect indicator is used together with the input from the fate modelling to calculate a characterisa...

  18. The sterols isolated from Evening Primrose oil modulate the release of proinflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Fernández-Arche, Angeles; Angel-Martín, María; García-Giménez, María Dolores

    2012-09-15

    Evening Primrose oil is a natural product extracted by cold-pressed from Oenothera biennis L. seeds. The unsaponifiable matter of this oil is an important source of interesting minor compounds, like long-chain fatty alcohols, sterols and tocopherols. In the present study, sterols were isolated from the unsaponifiable matter of Evening Primrose oil, and the composition was identified and quantified by GC and GC-MS. The major components of sterols fraction were β-Sitosterol and campesterol. We investigated the ability of sterols from Evening Primrose oil to inhibit the release of different proinflammatory mediators in vitro by murine peritoneal macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Sterols significantly and dose-dependently decreased nitric oxide production. Western blot analysis showed that nitric oxide reduction was a consequence of the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthetase expression. Sterols also reduced tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukine 1β and tromboxane B₂. However, sterols did not reduce prostaglandin E₂. The reduction of eicosanoid release was related to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 expression. These results showed that sterols may have a protective effect on some mediators involved in inflammatory damage development, suggesting its potential value as a putative functional component of Evening Primrose oil.

  19. An effective method for network module extraction from microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanta Priyakshi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of high-throughput Microarray technologies has provided various opportunities to systematically characterize diverse types of computational biological networks. Co-expression network have become popular in the analysis of microarray data, such as for detecting functional gene modules. Results This paper presents a method to build a co-expression network (CEN and to detect network modules from the built network. We use an effective gene expression similarity measure called NMRS (Normalized mean residue similarity to construct the CEN. We have tested our method on five publicly available benchmark microarray datasets. The network modules extracted by our algorithm have been biologically validated in terms of Q value and p value. Conclusions Our results show that the technique is capable of detecting biologically significant network modules from the co-expression network. Biologist can use this technique to find groups of genes with similar functionality based on their expression information.

  20. Effects of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil on germ tube formation by Candida albicans isolated from denture wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurdete Maria Rocha Gauch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil on germ tube formation by Candida albicans isolated from denture wearers. Methods Ten C. albicans isolates recovered from denture wearers were tested using 10% fetal bovine serum with or without 4% R. officinalis essential oil. Results The essential oil from R. officinalis completely inhibited germ tube formation in the investigated C. albicans isolates. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the essential oil of R. officinalis modulates C. albicans pathogenicity through its primary virulence factor (i.e., germ tube formation was suppressed.

  1. Genotypes and pathogenicity of cellulitis isolates reveal traits that modulate APEC virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolle Lima Barbieri

    Full Text Available We characterized 144 Escherichia coli isolates from severe cellulitis lesions in broiler chickens from South Brazil. Analysis of susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials revealed frequencies of resistance of less than 30% for most antimicrobials except tetracycline (70% and sulphonamides (60%. The genotyping of 34 virulence-associated genes revealed that all the isolates harbored virulence factors related to adhesion, iron acquisition and serum resistance, which are characteristic of the avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC pathotype. ColV plasmid-associated genes (cvi/cva, iroN, iss, iucD, sitD, traT, tsh were especially frequent among the isolates (from 66.6% to 89.6%. According to the Clermont method of ECOR phylogenetic typing, isolates belonged to group D (47.2%, to group A (27.8%, to group B2 (17.4% and to group B1 (7.6%; the group B2 isolates contained the highest number of virulence-associated genes. Clonal relationship analysis using the ARDRA method revealed a similarity level of 57% or higher among isolates, but no endemic clone. The virulence of the isolates was confirmed in vivo in one-day-old chicks. Most isolates (72.9% killed all infected chicks within 7 days, and 65 isolates (38.1% killed most of them within 24 hours. In order to analyze differences in virulence among the APEC isolates, we created a pathogenicity score by combining the times of death with the clinical symptoms noted. By looking for significant associations between the presence of virulence-associated genes and the pathogenicity score, we found that the presence of genes for invasins ibeA and gimB and for group II capsule KpsMTII increased virulence, while the presence of pic decreased virulence. The fact that ibeA, gimB and KpsMTII are characteristic of neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC suggests that genes of NMEC in APEC increase virulence of strains.

  2. Algorithm of constructing hybrid effective modules for elastic isotropic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Miciński, J.; Kupriyanov, N. A.; Barashkov, V. N.; Lushnikov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    The algorithm of constructing of new effective elastic characteristics of two-component composites based on the superposition of the models of Reiss and Voigt, Hashin and Strikman, as well as models of the geometric average for effective modules. These effective characteristics are inside forks Voigt and Reiss. Additionally, the calculations of the stress-strain state of composite structures with new effective characteristics give more accurate prediction than classical models do.

  3. Tilt angle dependence of the modulated interference effects in photo-elastic modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Md. Abdul Ahad; Geerts, Wilhelmus J.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the PEM tilt angle and incident polarization on the PEM interference is studied for a single axis photo-elastic modulator. The dc, 1ω , and 2ω components of the detector signal vary periodically as a function of PEM tilt angle. Although it is possible to adjust the PEM tilt angle to minimize the 1ω or 2ω detector signal at small tilt angles, it is not possible to null both of them simultaneously. For the case where no analyzer is used, the ac detector signals can be minimized simultaneously by adjusting the polarization angle of the light incident on the PEM and the PEM tilt angle. Direct observations of the detector signal indicate that the effects of refraction index and thickness variations are opposite consistent with a lower polarizability for compressive strain of the modulator.

  4. Tilt angle dependence of the modulated interference effects in photo-elastic modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Ahad Talukder

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the PEM tilt angle and incident polarization on the PEM interference is studied for a single axis photo-elastic modulator. The dc, 1ω, and 2ω components of the detector signal vary periodically as a function of PEM tilt angle. Although it is possible to adjust the PEM tilt angle to minimize the 1ω or 2ω detector signal at small tilt angles, it is not possible to null both of them simultaneously. For the case where no analyzer is used, the ac detector signals can be minimized simultaneously by adjusting the polarization angle of the light incident on the PEM and the PEM tilt angle. Direct observations of the detector signal indicate that the effects of refraction index and thickness variations are opposite consistent with a lower polarizability for compressive strain of the modulator.

  5. Decreasing Seismic Effects of Structures Using Base Isolation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Baciu, Cristina-Elena; Atanasiu, Gabriela M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents many different energy dissipating dispositives that had been proposed to assist in mitigation the harmful effects of earthquakes on structures. The general details of the isolation systems were described, and a particular situation of an isolation system formed by elastomeric supports in the case study. Romania is a country with a strong seismicity, mainly in Vrancea zone, and the Earthquakes affect a large part of the state. To prevent any further structural damages, ...

  6. Isolation, purification and effects of hypoglycemic functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-04-12

    Apr 12, 2012 ... Obesity, high blood glucose and diabetes which are the significant chronic ... effects on the pancreatic islands, and on hepatic and kidney injury in ... polysaccharides that might defend against cancers and obesity are needed ...

  7. Implementation of the ecotoxicological, effects module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Payet, Jerome; Molander, S

    a characterisation factor for the chemical in question. Within the OMNIITOX project consortium it have been decided that the ecotox effect indicator for the BM should be able to work on minimum three measured EC50 acute laboratory test data. The main reason for this decision is that the BM should be able to work...... restrictions. The ability of a geometric mean to represent the toxicity of very toxic substances and very sensitive species has not been dealt with yet, and further research is needed here. However, it may be anticipated on the basis of the results from the practical test of different average approaches...

  8. Modulating effect of cerulein on benzodlazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasar, E.E.; Marmets, M.O.; Nurk, A.M.; Rego, L.K.; Soosar, A.H.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies the role of benzodiazepine receptors in the anticonvulsant action of cerulein. Parallel with the study of the behavioral reactions, the effect of cerulein binding of tritium-flunitrazepam was investtigated in vitro and in vivo. It was shown that preliminary subcutaneous injection of relatively high doses of cerulein (over 100 micro/kg) delayed the development of picrotoxin seizures; the latent period of clonic and tonic convulsions and the survival of the mice were lengthened. In doses inhibiting picrotoxen seizures, cerulein significantly inhibited binding of tritium-flunitrazepam in vitro.

  9. Modulation of the antibiotic activity against multidrug resistant strains of coumarins isolated from Rutaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeiro, Sara A L; Borges, Nathalie H P B; Souto, Augusto L; de Figueiredo, Pedro T R; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Tavares, Josean F

    2017-03-01

    The first occurrences and dissemination of resistant microorganisms led to the inefficacy of many antibiotics, available in the market nowadays, therefore, the search for new substances with antimicrobial activity from natural sources has gained a great importance. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the antibacterial activity and modulation of drug resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by coumarins such as bergapten, xantotoxin, isopimpinellin and imperatorin obtained from two Rutaceae species (Metrodorea mollis and Pilocarpus spicatus). The antimicrobial activity was assessed based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), using the microdilution method. The MIC was >256 g/mL for all coumarins tested. Regarding the modulation of drug resistance assay, the isopimpinellin reducted the MIC of erytromicin by 4 times, whereas imperatorin exhibited the best result, reducing the MIC of tetracycline (2 times), erytomicin (4 times) and norfloxacin (4 times). By reducing the MIC of ethidium bromide, the imperatorin is consider in fact, as a putative efflux pump inhibitor of bacteria.

  10. Effects of Auxiliary-Source Connection in Multichip Power Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Wang, Xiongfei

    2017-01-01

    Auxiliary-source bond wires and connections are widely used in power modules with paralleled MOSFETs or IGBTs. This paper investigates the operation mechanism of the auxiliary-source connections in multichip power modules. It reveals that the auxiliary-source connections cannot fully decouple...... the power loop and the gate loop like how the Kelvin-source connection does, owing to their involvement in the loop of the power source current. Three effects of the auxiliary-source connections are then analyzed, which are 1) the common source stray inductance reduction, 2) the transient drain-source...

  11. Effectiveness of Online Module for Graduate Astronomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lauren E. P.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Brame, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    We noticed that teaching an important galaxy formation model in a graduate-level course (Structure and Dynamics of Galaxies) with lecture-style instruction did not promote active learning on the part of the student and that the level and quality of in-class discussion varied wildly from semester to semester. Hoping to improve the learning experience for the students, we designed and incorporated an online module to deliver course content, activities, and assessments. We investigate the effectiveness of this online module as a teaching tool by monitoring students’ learning gains and present our preliminary results.

  12. Performance Study of optical Modulator based on electrooptic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodiya, V.; Raghuwanshi, S. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have studied and derive performance parameter of highly integrated Lithium Niobate optical modulator. This is a chirp free modulator having low switching voltage and large bandwidth. For an external modulator in which travelling-wave electrodes length L imposed the modulating switching voltage, the product of Vπ and L is fixed for a given electro optic material Lithium Niobate. We investigate to achieve a low Vπ by both magnitude of the electro-optic coefficient for a wide variety of electro-optic materials. A Sellmeier equation for the extraordinary index of congruent lithium niobate is derived. For phase-matching, predictions are accmate for temperature between room temperature 250°C and wavelength ranging from 0.4 to 5µm. The Sellmeier equations predict more accmately refractive indices at long wavelengths. Theoretical result is confirmed by simulated results. We have analysed the various parameters such as switching voltage, device performance index, time constant, transmittance, cut-off frequency, 3-dB bandwidth, power absorption coefficient and transmission bit rate of Lithium Niobate optical Modulator based on electro -optic effect.

  13. Drift effects on the galactic cosmic ray modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurenza, M.; Storini, M. [INAF/IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Vecchio, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia-Sede di Cosenza, I-87036 Rende (CS) (Italy); Carbone, V., E-mail: monica.laurenza@iaps.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) modulation is driven by both solar activity and drift effects in the heliosphere, although their role is only qualitatively understood as it is difficult to connect the CR variations to their sources. In order to address this problem, the Empirical Mode Decomposition technique has been applied to the CR intensity, recorded by three neutron monitors at different rigidities (Climax, Rome, and Huancayo-Haleakala (HH)), the sunspot area, as a proxy for solar activity, the heliospheric magnetic field magnitude, directly related to CR propagation, and the tilt angle (TA) of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), which characterizes drift effects on CRs. A prominent periodicity at ∼six years is detected in all the analyzed CR data sets and it is found to be highly correlated with changes in the HCS inclination at the same timescale. In addition, this variation is found to be responsible for the main features of the CR modulation during periods of low solar activity, such as the flat (peaked) maximum in even (odd) solar cycles. The contribution of the drift effects to the global Galactic CR modulation has been estimated to be between 30% and 35%, depending on the CR particle energy. Nevertheless, the importance of the drift contribution is generally reduced in periods nearing the sunspot maximum. Finally, threshold values of ∼40°, ∼45°, and >55° have been derived for the TA, critical for the CR modulation at the Climax, Rome, and HH rigidity thresholds, respectively.

  14. Isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Frank Juul

    2011-01-01

    Næringsstoffet har i dette nummer sat fokus på ”velvære i vinterkulden”, ”indendørsaktiviteter” og ”fedtafgift”. I klummen vises det, at disse tre fokusområder, der for en umiddelbar betragtning måske nok synes noget uensartede, falder sammen i ét tema: Isolation!......Næringsstoffet har i dette nummer sat fokus på ”velvære i vinterkulden”, ”indendørsaktiviteter” og ”fedtafgift”. I klummen vises det, at disse tre fokusområder, der for en umiddelbar betragtning måske nok synes noget uensartede, falder sammen i ét tema: Isolation!...

  15. The Attraction Effect Modulates Reward Prediction Errors and Intertemporal Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Sebastian; Hotaling, Jared M; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2017-01-11

    Classical economic theory contends that the utility of a choice option should be independent of other options. This view is challenged by the attraction effect, in which the relative preference between two options is altered by the addition of a third, asymmetrically dominated option. Here, we leveraged the attraction effect in the context of intertemporal choices to test whether both decisions and reward prediction errors (RPE) in the absence of choice violate the independence of irrelevant alternatives principle. We first demonstrate that intertemporal decision making is prone to the attraction effect in humans. In an independent group of participants, we then investigated how this affects the neural and behavioral valuation of outcomes using a novel intertemporal lottery task and fMRI. Participants' behavioral responses (i.e., satisfaction ratings) were modulated systematically by the attraction effect and this modulation was correlated across participants with the respective change of the RPE signal in the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, we show that, because exponential and hyperbolic discounting models are unable to account for the attraction effect, recently proposed sequential sampling models might be more appropriate to describe intertemporal choices. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the attraction effect modulates subjective valuation even in the absence of choice. The findings also challenge the prospect of using neuroscientific methods to measure utility in a context-free manner and have important implications for theories of reinforcement learning and delay discounting.

  16. Peltier-effect module for highly localized temperature manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Wang, Wanjun; Murphy, Michael C.

    1999-11-01

    A Peltier-effect module suitable for applications that require manipulation of the temperature (cooling or heating) of microsized subjects or at a highly localized spot was developed. The module was constructed from a commercial electronic refrigeration device based on the Peltier effect with an array of microprobes attached to its top surface. The microprobes were fabricated using the LIGA (German acronym for lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung) process—one of the microelectromechanical systems technologies. The 1000-μm-tall microprobes were fabricated on a titanium plate and then bonded onto the top surface of a commercial Peltier device. When an electrical current was supplied to the Peltier device, the top surface (with microprobes) of the device was cooled and the other side was heated. Heat was conducted from a microsample on the tip of microprobe to the top surface of the Peltier device. A dynamic model of the module was developed and numerical simulation studies were conducted. The prototype module was tested and the experimental results matched well with those predicted by the numerical simulations. The maximum difference between the temperature of a microsample and that at the surface of the Peltier device was approximately 1 °C.

  17. Effects of auxiliary source connections in multichip power module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2016-01-01

    Auxiliary source bond wires and connections are widely used to in the power module with paralleled MOSFETs or IGBTs. This paper investigates the working mechanism and the effects of the auxiliary source connections in multichip power modules. It reveals that the auxiliary source connections cannot...... totally decouple the power loop and the gate loop like how the Kelvin source connection does, because they are still in the loop of power source current. Three effects of the auxiliary source connection are investigated and analyzed: common source stray inductance reduction, transient drain-source current...... imbalance mitigation and influence on the steady state bond wire current distribution. Simulation and experimental results validate the working mechanism analysis and the effects of the auxiliary source connections....

  18. Behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of injected leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Haque, Zeba; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin is viewed as an important target for developing novel therapeutics for obesity, depression/anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study therefore concerns behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of systemically injected leptin. Pharmacological doses (100 and 500 μg/kg) of leptin injected systemically decreased 24h cumulative food intake and body weight in freely feeding rats and improved acquisition and retention of memory in Morris water maze test. Potential anxiety reducing, hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of the peptide hormone were determined in a separate experiment. Animals injected with 100 or 500 μg/kg leptin were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze test 1h later. A significant increase in the number of entries and time passed in open arm of the elevated plus maze in leptin injected animals suggested pronounced anxiety reducing effect. Moreover, circulating levels of leptin correlated significantly with anxiety reducing effects of the peptide hormone. Serum serotonin increased and ghrelin decreased in leptin injected animals and correlated, positively and negatively respectively, with circulating leptin. Corticosterone increased at low dose and levels were normal at higher dose. Serotonin metabolism in the hypothalamus and hippocampus decreased only at higher dose of leptin. The results support a role of leptin in the treatment of obesity, anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. It is suggested that hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of leptin can alter treatment efficacy in particularly comorbid conditions.

  19. Isolating relativistic effects in large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvin, Camille

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully relativistic calculation of the observed galaxy number counts in the linear regime. We show that besides the density fluctuations and redshift-space distortions, various relativistic effects contribute to observations at large scales. These effects all have the same physical origin: they result from the fact that our coordinate system, namely the galaxy redshift and the incoming photons' direction, is distorted by inhomogeneities in our universe. We then discuss the impact of the relativistic effects on the angular power spectrum and on the two-point correlation function in configuration space. We show that the latter is very well adapted to isolate the relativistic effects since it naturally makes use of the symmetries of the different contributions. In particular, we discuss how the Doppler effect and the gravitational redshift distortions can be isolated by looking for a dipole in the cross-correlation function between a bright and a faint population of galaxies.

  20. Cortical axons, isolated in channels, display activity-dependent signal modulation as a result of targeted stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta K. Lewandowska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cortical axons are extremely thin processes that are difficult to study as a result of their small diameter: they are too narrow to patch while intact, and super-resolution microscopy is needed to resolve single axons. We present a method for studying axonal physiology by pairing a high-density microelectrode array with a microfluidic axonal isolation device, and use it to study activity-dependent modulation of axonal signal propagation evoked by stimulation near the soma. Up to three axonal branches from a single neuron, isolated in different channels, were recorded from simultaneously using 10-20 electrodes per channel. The axonal channels amplified spikes such that propagations of individual signals along tens of electrodes could easily be discerned with high signal to noise. Stimulation from 10 Hz up to 160 Hz demonstrated similar qualitative results from all of the cells studied: extracellular action potential characteristics changed drastically in response to stimulation. Spike height decreased, spike width increased, and latency increased, as a result of reduced propagation velocity, as the number of stimulations and the stimulation frequencies increased. Quantitatively, the strength of these changes manifested itself differently in cells at different frequencies of stimulation. Some cells’ signal fidelity fell to 80% already at 10 Hz, while others maintained 80% signal fidelity at 80 Hz. Differences in modulation by axonal branches of the same cell were also seen for many different stimulation frequencies, starting at 10 Hz. Potassium ion concentration changes altered the behavior of the cells causing propagation failures at lower concentrations and improving signal fidelity at higher concentrations.

  1. Mirage effect from thermally modulated transparent carbon nanotube sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, Ali E; Baughman, Ray H [Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Gartstein, Yuri N, E-mail: Ali.Aliev@utdallas.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2011-10-28

    The single-beam mirage effect, also known as photothermal deflection, is studied using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet as the heat source. The extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of these transparent forest-drawn carbon nanotube sheets enables high frequency modulation of sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range, thereby providing a sharp, rapidly changing gradient of refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas. The advantages of temperature modulation using carbon nanotube sheets are multiple: in inert gases the temperature can reach > 2500 K; the obtained frequency range for photothermal modulation is {approx} 100 kHz in gases and over 100 Hz in high refractive index liquids; and the heat source is transparent for optical and acoustical waves. Unlike for conventional heat sources for photothermal deflection, the intensity and phase of the thermally modulated beam component linearly depends upon the beam-to-sheet separation over a wide range of distances. This aspect enables convenient measurements of accurate values for thermal diffusivity and the temperature dependence of refractive index for both liquids and gases. The remarkable performance of nanotube sheets suggests possible applications as photo-deflectors and for switchable invisibility cloaks, and provides useful insights into their use as thermoacoustic projectors and sonar. Visibility cloaking is demonstrated in a liquid.

  2. Light modulators and deflectors based on polariton effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of constructing light modulators and deflectors based on polariton effects is considered. The polariton is a mixed complex consisting of a superposition of a one-photon state and a crystal excitation state. By influencing the crystal excitation state by means of external fields, t......, and temperature gradients are shown with orders of magnitude of deflections computed. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  3. 17β Estradiol Modulates Perfusion Pressure and Expression of 5-LOX and CYP450 4A in the Isolated Kidney of Metabolic Syndrome Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zúñiga-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and progression of nephropathy depend on sex. We examined a protective effect of estradiol against nephropathy in metabolic syndrome through the modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolism by activating the 5-lipoxygenase and cytochrome p450 4A pathways. 28 female Wistar rats were divided into four groups of seven animals each: control, intact metabolic syndrome, ovariectomized metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome ovariectomized plus estradiol. Blood pressure, body weight, body fat, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA-index, albuminuria, and TNF-α were increased in ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats (p<0.001. The perfusion pressure in isolated kidneys of ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats in presence of 4 μg of arachidonic acid was increased. The inhibitors of the arachidonic acid metabolism Baicalein, Miconazole, and Indomethacin in these rats decreased the perfusion pressure by 57.62%, 99.83%, and 108.5%, respectively and they decreased creatinine clearance and the arachidonic acid percentage. Phospholipase A2 expression in the kidney of ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats was not modified. 5-lipoxygenase was increased in metabolic syndrome ovariectomized rats while cytochrome p450 4A was decreased. In conclusion, the loss of estradiol increases renal damage while the treatment with estradiol benefits renal function by modulating arachidonic acid metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase and cytochrome p450 4A pathways.

  4. [Modulating effect of dopamine on amplitude of GABA-produced chemocontrolled currents in multipolar spinal cord neurons of ammocaete].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukinich, A A

    2010-01-01

    By using the patch-clamp method in the whole cell configuration, modulating effect of dopamine on GABA-activated currents has been studied on isolated multipolar spinal cord neurons of the ammocaete (larva of the lamprey Lampetra planeri). At application of dopamine (5 microM), there was observed in some cases a decrease of the GABA-activated current, on average, by 33.3 +/- 8.7 (n = 8, p multipolar neurons of the ammocaete spinal cord.

  5. The effects of chrysin and pinostrobin, two flavonoids isolated from Teloxys graveolens leaves, on isolated guinea-pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, M; Paz, D; Acosta, J; Mata, R

    1998-12-01

    The pharmacological effects of pinostrobin and chrysin obtained from the aerial parts of Teloxys graveolens (Chenopodiaceae) were evaluated using isolated in vitro guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle. Both flavonoids inhibited the contractions evoked by high concentrations of potassium. The potency of the relaxant effect was determined by measuring the capacity of each product in reducing the phasic and the slower sustained tonic contractile responses induced by depolarization with 60 mM K(+). Concentrations up to 5 × 10(-7) M of pinostrobin and 1 × 10(-7) M of chrysin induced a non-competitive depression of responses to Ca(2+) in ileum preparations bathed in a Ca(2+)-free, high K(+) medium. Both compounds produced a rightward displacement of the concentration-response curves to Ca(2+) with a concentration-dependant increase of EC(50) and a decrease of the maximal response. Examination of the inhibitory effect produced by these flavonoids on the phasic component of contractile response evoked with K(+) and on the contraction induced with caffeine, led to propose a different intracellular mechanism of action used by these compounds. The results obtained led us to conclude that the previously detected relaxant effect of Teloxys graveolens crude extract is due in part, to the presence of chrysin and pinostrobin, which inhibit intestinal smooth muscle contractions by means of a calcium-mediated mechanism. Since the modulation of calcium fluxes in the mucosal epithelium may play a role in antidiarrheal drug action, the observed effects in vitro could in the same way explain the popular use of the plant for the treatment of diarrhea. Copyright © 1998 Gustav Fischer Verlag. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  6. Exopolysaccharides isolated from hydrothermal vent bacteria can modulate the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Anthony; Berthou, Christian; Guézennec, Jean; Boisset, Claire; Bordron, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is involved in the defence against bacterial infection, or in the elimination of tumour cells. However, disturbances in this system contributes to the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases. The efficiency of therapeutic anti-tumour antibodies is enhanced when the complement system is stimulated. In contrast, cancer cells are able to inhibit the complement system and thus proliferate. Some marine molecules are currently being developed as new drugs for use in humans. Among them, known exopolyssacharides (EPSs) generally originate from fungi, but few studies have been performed on bacterial EPSs and even fewer on EPSs extracted from deep-sea hydrothermal vent microbes. For use in humans, these high molecular weight EPSs must be depolymerised. Furthermore, the over-sulphation of EPSs can modify their biological activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunodulation of the complement system by either native or over-sulphated low molecular weight EPSs isolated from vent bacteria in order to find pro or anti-activators of complement.

  7. Strontium titanate resistance modulation by ferroelectric field effect

    CERN Document Server

    Marré, D; Bellingeri, E; Pallecchi, I; Pellegrino, L; Siri, A S

    2003-01-01

    Among perovskite oxides strontium titanate (STO) SrTiO sub 3 undergoes a metal-insulator transition at very low carrier concentration and exhibits high mobility values at low temperature. We exploited such electrical properties and the structural compatibility of perovskite oxide materials in realizing ferroelectric field effect epitaxial heterostructures. By pulsed laser deposition, we grew patterned field effect devices, consisting of lanthanum doped STO and Pb(Zr,Ti)O sub 3. Such devices showed a resistance modulation up to 20%, consistent with geometrical parameters and carrier concentration of the semiconducting channel.

  8. Frequency modulation via the Doppler effect in optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberson, P; Huttner, B; Gisin, N

    1999-04-01

    We present the principle of optical frequency modulation via the Doppler effect obtained by rapidly stretching an optical fiber and thus modifying the optical path of the light propagating in the fiber. This procedure creates a pure frequency shift, with no degradation of the spectrum. Moreover, the effect is wavelength independent and can therefore be applied to any type of light source. We show an experimental realization in which a frequency excursion of ~100 MHz was obtained with a bobbin vibrating at 180 Hz.

  9. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 2: Combined effect of radiation and some drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N. [Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Obninsk (Russian Federation). Medical Radiology research Center

    1995-09-01

    The combined effects of microwave radiation and some drugs were studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The experiments established that exposure to pulse-modulated 915 Mhz microwaves for up to 40 min had no effect on either the rate or the amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches, unless the average absorbed power was high enough to produce preparation heating. Treatment of the preparation with saline containing (0.6--3.0) 10{sup {minus}5} M of propranolol or (0.5--1.5) 10{sup {minus}7} M of atropine altered neither its pacemaker nor its contractile functions; these drugs also had no effect when they were combined with nonthermal microwave irradiation. Caffeine (1 mM) strongly increased the average heart power, which was calculated as the product of twitch rate ad amplitude. The caffeine effect appeared to be significantly augmented (by about 15%, P<0.02) under exposure to burst-type pulsed microwaves (pulse width, 1.5 msec; pause, 2.5 msec; 8 pulses/burst, 16 bursts/s; average SAR, 8--10 W/kg). By itself, this modulation was not effective; the heating of the preparation and saline during exposure was approximately 0.1 C, which could not account for the detected changes. The experimental results demonstrate that caffeine treatment increases the microwave sensitivity of the frog auricle preparation and reveals primarily subthreshold, nonthermal microwave effect.

  10. Potential therapeutic effects of functionally active compounds isolated from garlic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Ban, Jung Ok; Park, Kyung-Ran; Lee, Chong Kil; Jeong, Heon-Sang; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-05-01

    The medicinal properties of functionally active organosulfur compounds such as allin, diallyl disulfide, S-allylmercaptocysteine, and S-trityl-L-cysteine isolated from garlic have received great attention from a large number of investigators who have studied their pharmacological effects for the treatment of various diseases. These organosulfur compounds are able to prevent for development of cancer, cardiovascular, neurological, and liver diseases as well as allergy and arthritis. There have been also many reports on toxicities and pharmacokinetics of these compounds. The aim of this study is to review a variety of experimental and clinical reports, and describe the effectiveness, toxicities and pharmacokinetics, and possible mechanisms of pharmaceutical actions of functionally active compounds isolated from garlic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effective thermodynamics of isolated entangled squeezed and coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Seroje, King Karl R; Paraan, Francis N C

    2015-01-01

    The R\\'enyi entanglement entropy is calculated exactly for mode-partitioned isolated systems such as the two-mode squeezed state and the multi-mode Silbey-Harris polaron ansatz state. Effective thermodynamic descriptions of the correlated partitions are constructed to present quantum information theory concepts in the language of thermodynamics. Boltzmann weights are obtained from the entanglement spectrum by deriving the exact relationship between an effective temperature and the physical entanglement parameters. The partition function of the resulting effective thermal theory can be obtained directly from the single-copy entanglement.

  12. CD4 and MHC class I down-modulation activities of nef alleles from brain- and lymphoid tissue-derived primary HIV-1 isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Gabuzda, Dana; Cowley, Daniel; Ellett, Anne; Chiavaroli, Lisa; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 nef undergoes adaptive evolution in the CNS, reflecting altered requirements for HIV-1 replication in macrophages/microglia and brain-specific immune selection pressures. The role of Nef in HIV-1 neurotropism and the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is unclear. In this study, we characterized 82 nef alleles cloned from brain, CSF, spinal cord and blood/lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates from 7 subjects with HAD. CNS isolate-derived nef alleles were genetically compartmentalized and had reduced sequence diversity compared to those from lymphoid tissue isolates. Defective nef alleles predominated in a brain-derived isolate from one of the 7 subjects (MACS2-br). The ability of Nef to down-modulate CD4 and MHC class 1 (MHC-1) was generally conserved among nef alleles from both CNS and lymphoid tissues. However, the potency of CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation was variable, which was associated with sequence alterations known to influence these Nef functions. These results suggest that CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation are highly conserved functions among nef alleles from CNS- and lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates that may contribute to viral replication and escape from immune surveillance in the CNS. PMID:21165790

  13. Effects of communication training on real practice performance: a role-play module versus a standardized patient module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Claudia; Woermann, Ulrich; Shaha, Maya; Rethans, Jan-Joost; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of modules involving standardized patients and role-plays on training communication skills. The first module involved standardized patients and an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE); the second module consisted of peer role-plays and a written examination. A randomized posttest-only control group design with first-year nursing students was used. The intervention group received one-to-one communication training with direct oral feedback from the standardized patient. The control group had training with peer role-playing and mutual feedback. The posttest involved students' rating their self-efficacy, and real patients and clinical supervisors evaluated their communication skills. No significant differences were found between self-efficacy and patient ratings. However, the clinical supervisors rated the intervention group's communication skills to be significantly (p communication training modules including standardized patients and an OSCE are superior to communication training modules with peer role-playing.

  14. Pro-cognitive drug effects modulate functional brain network organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten eGiessing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies document that cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs improve attention, memory and cognitive control in healthy subjects and patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. In humans neural mechanisms of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation have mainly been analyzed by investigating drug-induced changes of task-related neural activity measured with fMRI. Endogenous neural activity has often been neglected. Further, although drugs affect the coupling between neurons, only a few human studies have explicitly addressed how drugs modulate the functional connectome, i.e. the functional neural interactions within the brain. These studies have mainly focused on synchronization or correlation of brain activations. Recently, there are some drug studies using graph theory and other new mathematical approaches to model the brain as a complex network of interconnected processing nodes. Using such measures it is possible to detect not only focal, but also subtle, widely distributed drug effects on functional network topology. Most important, graph theoretical measures also quantify whether drug-induced changes in topology or network organization facilitate or hinder information processing. Several studies could show that functional brain integration is highly correlated with behavioral performance suggesting that cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs which improve measures of cognitive performance should increase functional network integration. The purpose of this paper is to show that graph theory provides a mathematical tool to develop theory-driven biomarkers of pro-cognitive drug effects, and also to discuss how these approaches can contribute to the understanding of the role of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in the human brain. Finally we discuss the global workspace theory as a theoretical framework of pro-cognitive drug effects and argue that pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs might be related to higher

  15. Effects of endocannabinoid system modulation on cognitive and emotional behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eZanettini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has long been known to produce cognitive and emotional effects. Research has shown that cannabinoid drugs produce these effects by driving the brain's endogenous cannabinoid system and that this system plays a modulatory role in many cognitive and emotional processes. This review focuses on the effects of endocannabinoid-system modulation in animal models of cognition (learning and memory and emotion (anxiety and depression. We review studies in which natural or synthetic cannabinoid agonists were administered to directly stimulate cannabinoid receptors or, conversely, where cannabinoid antagonists were administered to inhibit the activity of cannabinoid receptors. In addition, studies are reviewed that involved genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or genetic or pharmacological manipulation of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Endocannabinoids affect the function of many neurotransmitter systems, some of which play opposing roles. The diversity of cannabinoid roles and the complexity of task-dependent activation of neuronal circuits may lead to the effects of endocannabinoid system modulation being strongly dependent on environmental conditions. Recent findings are reviewed that raise the possibility that endocannabinoid signaling may change the impact of environmental influences on emotional and cognitive behavior rather than affecting one or another specific behavior.

  16. Adult male mice emit context-specific ultrasonic vocalizations that are modulated by prior isolation or group rearing environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Chabout

    Full Text Available Social interactions in mice are frequently analysed in genetically modified strains in order to get insight of disorders affecting social interactions such as autism spectrum disorders. Different types of social interactions have been described, mostly between females and pups, and between adult males and females. However, we recently showed that social interactions between adult males could also encompass cognitive and motivational features. During social interactions, rodents emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs, but it remains unknown if call types are differently used depending of the context and if they are correlated with motivational state. Here, we recorded the calls of adult C57BL/6J male mice in various behavioral conditions, such as social interaction, novelty exploration and restraint stress. We introduced a modulator for the motivational state by comparing males maintained in isolation and males maintained in groups before the experiments. Male mice uttered USVs in all social and non-social situations, and even in a stressful restraint context. They nevertheless emitted the most important number of calls with the largest diversity of call types in social interactions, particularly when showing a high motivation for social contact. For mice maintained in social isolation, the number of calls recorded was positively correlated with the duration of social contacts, and most calls were uttered during contacts between the two mice. This correlation was not observed in mice maintained in groups. These results open the way for a deeper understanding and characterization of acoustic signals associated with social interactions. They can also help evaluating the role of motivational states in the emission of acoustic signals.

  17. Effect of transition metals on recovery from plasma of the growth-modulating tripeptide glycylhistidyllysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, L; Thaler, M M; Millard, M

    1979-07-11

    Isolation and purification of growth-modulating peptides from biological sources is often accompanied by excessive losses of bioactive material. During the isolation of a growth-modulating tripeptide glycylhistidyllysine (GHL) from human plasma, copper and iron were found to co-isolate with the peptide. Studies with [3H]GHL demonstrated that these metals interfere at several steps of the procedure for the isolation of GHL from plasma (gel filtration chromatography, high-pressure silica-gel). Removal of these metals with an insoluble chelating resin (Cellex 100) enhanced recovery of [3H]GHL from plasma 8-fold. These results suggest that removal of transition metals may aid in the recovery of peptides which are difficult to isolate from biological sources.

  18. Effects of morphine in the isolated mouse urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, C G; Tamayo, L; Contreras, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute morphine increased the responses to acetylcholine of the isolated mouse urinary bladder. A chronic morphine treatment did not change the responses of the urinary bladder to acetylcholine or ATP. The acute administration of morphine did not modify the contractile response to ATP in the urinary bladders from untreated or chronically morphine treated mice. Methadone and ketocyclazocine decreased the responses to the electrical stimulation of the urinary bladder. These depressant effects were not modified by naloxone. The results suggest the nonexistence of opiate receptors in the mouse urinary bladder and the lack of direct effects of morphine on the neuroeffector junction.

  19. Social closeness and feedback modulate susceptibility to the framing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sip, Kamila E; Smith, David V; Porcelli, Anthony J; Kar, Kohitij; Delgado, Mauricio R

    2015-01-01

    Although we often seek social feedback (SFB) from others to help us make decisions, little is known about how SFB affects decisions under risk, particularly from a close peer. We conducted two experiments using an established framing task to probe how decision-making is modulated by SFB valence (positive, negative) and the level of closeness with feedback provider (friend, confederate). Participants faced mathematically equivalent decisions framed as either an opportunity to keep (gain frame) or lose (loss frame) part of an initial endowment. Periodically, participants were provided with positive (e.g., "Nice!") or negative (e.g., "Lame!") feedback about their choices. Such feedback was provided by either a confederate (Experiment 1) or a gender-matched close friend (Experiment 2). As expected, the framing effect was observed in both experiments. Critically, an individual's susceptibility to the framing effect was modulated by the valence of the SFB, but only when the feedback provider was a close friend. This effect was reflected in the activation patterns of ventromedial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, regions involved in complex decision-making. Taken together, these results highlight social closeness as an important factor in understanding the impact of SFB on neural mechanisms of decision-making.

  20. Synaptic contribution of Ca2+-permeable and Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptors on isolated carp retinal horizontal cells and their modulation by Zn2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Jiang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xue; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2010-03-04

    Ca(2+)-permeable and Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors are co-expressed on carp retinal horizontal cells. In the present study, we examined the synaptic contribution and Zn(2+) modulatory effect of these two AMPA receptor subtypes using whole-cell patch clamp technique. Specific Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor antagonist (1-naphthyl acetyl spermine, NAS) and selective Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptor blocker (pentobarbital, PB) were used to separate the glutamate-response in isolated H1 horizontal cell mediated by these two subtypes of AMPA receptors respectively. Application of 100 microM NAS substantially suppressed the current elicited by 3 mM glutamate and the remaining NAS-insensitive component was completely blocked by application of 100 microM PB. In addition, Zn(2+) had dual effects on Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor-mediated current: at low concentration (10 microM), Zn(2+) potentiated the current, but at higher concentrations (100 and 1000 microM), Zn(2+) reduced the current in a dose-dependent manner. However, Zn(2+) (10, 100 and 1000 microM) failed to modulate the NAS-insensitive current mediated by Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors. Overall, our results suggest that Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors contribute more to the cell's glutamate-response than Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors. Furthermore, Zn(2+) has dual effects on the Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor activity without affecting Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammatory Modulation Effect of Glycopeptide from Ganoderma capense (Lloyd Teng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycopeptide from Ganoderma capense (Lloyd Teng (GCGP injection is widely used in kinds of immune disorders, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of how GCGP could interfere with immune cell function. In the present study, we have found that GCGP had inflammatory modulation effects on macrophage cells to maintain NO production and iNOS expression at the normal level. Furthermore, western blot analysis showed that the underlying mechanism of immunomodulatory effect of GCGP involved NF-κB p65 translation, IκB phosphorylation, and degradation; NF-κB inhibitor assays also confirmed the results. In addition, competition study showed that GCGP could inhibit LPS from binding to macrophage cells. Our data indicates that GCGP, which may share the same receptor(s expressed by macrophage cells with LPS, exerted immunomodulatory effect in a NF-κB-dependent signaling pathway in macrophages.

  2. Effects of imidazolines on neurogenic contraction in isolated urinary bladder detrusor strips from rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Mei; Ren, Lei-Ming; Tian, He-Lin; Lu, Hai-Gang; Zhao, Ding

    2012-02-01

    Moxonidine and clonidine, which are imidazoline compounds, are sympathetic modulators used as centrally acting antihypertensive drugs. Moxonidine, clonidine, and agmatine produce extensive effects in mammalian tissues via imidazoline recognition sites (or receptors) or α(2)-adrenoceptors. To investigate the effects of imidazolines on the function of the urinary bladder, we tested the effects of moxonidine, clonidine, and agmatine on the neurogenic contraction induced by electric field stimulation, and on the post-synaptic receptors in isolated urinary bladder detrusor strips from rabbit. Both moxonidine at 1.0-10.0 µmol/L and clonidine at 0.1-10.0 µmol/L inhibited electric-field-stimulation-induced contraction in a concentration-dependent manner, but not agmatine (10.0-1000.0 µmol/L). Both moxonidine and clonidine failed to affect carbachol or adenosine-triphosphate-induced contractions; however, 1000.0 µmol/L agmatine significantly increased these contractions. Our study indicates that (i) moxonidine and clonidine produce a concentration-dependent inhibition of the neurogenic contractile responses to electric field stimulation in isolated detrusor strips from male New Zealand rabbits; (ii) post-synaptic muscarinic receptor and purinergic receptor stimulation are not involved in the responses of moxinidine and clonidine in this study; (iii) the inhibitory effects of these agents are probably not mediated by presynaptic imidazoline receptors.

  3. The attentional modulation of the flash-lag effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V.C. Baldo

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available If a dot is flashed in perfect alignment with a pair of dots rotating around the visual fixation point, most observers perceive the rotating dots as being ahead of the flashing dot (flash-lag effect. This perceptual effect has been interpreted to result from the perceptual extrapolation of the moving dots, the differential visual latencies between flashing and moving stimuli, as well as the modulation of attentional mechanisms. Here we attempted to uncouple the attentional effects brought about by the spatial predictability of the flashing dot from the sensory effects dependent on its visual eccentricity. The stimulus was a pair of dots rotating clockwise around the fixation point. Another dot was flashed at either the upper right or the lower left of the visual field according to three separate blocked situations: fixed, alternate and random positions. Twenty-four participants had to judge, in all three situations, the location of the rotating dots in relation to the imaginary line connecting the flashing dot and the fixation point at the moment the dot was flashed. The flash-lag effect was observed in all three situations, and a clear influence of the spatial predictability of the flashing dot on the magnitude of the perceptual phenomenon was revealed, independently of sensory effects related to the eccentricity of the stimulus in the visual field. These findings are consistent with our proposal that, in addition to sensory factors, the attentional set modulates the magnitude of the differential latencies that give rise to the flash-lag phenomenon.

  4. GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulators: Enhancement of GABAB Receptor Agonist Effects In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo effects of GABAB receptor-positive modulators suggest that they have therapeutic potential for treating central nervous system disorders such as anxiety, depression, and drug abuse. Although these effects generally are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABAB receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. The present study was aimed at further examining the in vivo positive modulatory properties of the GABAB receptor-positive modulators, 2,6-di-tert-but...

  5. The effect of zinc diffusion on extinction ratio of MQW electroabsorption modulator integrated with DFB laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daibing; Zhang, Ruikang; Wang, Huitao; Wang, Baojun; Bian, Jing; An, Xin; Zhao, Lingjuan; Zhu, Hongliang; Ji, Chen; Wang, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Monolithically integrated electroabsorption modulated lasers (EML) are widely being used in the optical fiber communication systems, due to their low chip, compact size and good compatible with the current communication systems. In this paper, we investigated the effect of Zinc diffusion on extinction ratio of electroabsorption modulator (EAM) integrated with distributed feedback laser (DFB). EML was fabricated by selective area growth (SAG) technology. The MQW structure of different quantum energy levels was grown on n-type InP buffer layer with 150nm thick SiO2 parallel stripes mask by selective area metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A 35nm photoluminescence wavelength variation was observed between the laser area (λPL=1535nm) and modulator area (λPL=1500nm) by adjusting the dimension of parallel stripes. The grating (λ=1550nm) was fabricated in the selective area. The device was mesa ridge structure, which was constituted of the DFB laser, isolation gap and modulator. The length of every part is 300μm, 50μm, and 150μm respectively. Two samples were fabricated with the same structure and different p-type Zn-doped concentration, the extinction ratio of heavy Zn-doped device is 12.5dB at -6V. In contrast, the extinction ratio of light Zn-doped device is 20dB at -6V, that was improved for approximate 60%. The different Zn diffusion depth into the MQW absorption layer was observed by Secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). The heavy Zn-doped device diffused into absorption layer deeper than the light Zn-doped device, which caused the large non-uniformity of the electric field in the MQW layer. So the extinction ratio characteristics can be improved by optimizing the Zn-doped concentration of p-type layer.

  6. Passive Micro Vibration Isolator Utilizing Flux Pinning Effect for Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Takuma; Sakai, Shin-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Information related to the origin of space and evolution of galaxy can be obtained using the observation satellites. In recent years, high pointing accuracy is demanded for getting more detailed data about distant stars and galaxies. As a result, vibration isolators that consist of a main structure and a TTM (Tip Tilt Mirror) have been adopted for observation satellites. However, cutting the low frequency vibrations off passively with the conventional methods is difficult. A vibration isolator that uses pinning effect is proposed for solving this problem. The pinning effect is acquired by cooling the type-II superconductor below the critical temperature and it generates a pinning force to maintain the relative distance and attitude between a type- II superconductor and a material that generates magnetic flux. The mission part and the bus part of the satellite are equipped with superconductors and permanent magnets and these parts perform short distance formation flight by applying the effect. This method can cut vibrations from low to high frequency bands off passively. In addition, Meissner effect can prevent collision of the mission and bus parts. In order to investigate the performance of this system, experiments and simulations are carried out and the results are discussed.

  7. Isolation of Positive Modulator of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Signaling from Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Klim; Lin, Nai-Pin; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Chen, Gao-Hui; Chein, Rong-Jie

    2015-10-23

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many tissues and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions, such as energy homeostasis and cognition. GLP-1 analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are undergoing clinical trials for other disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 analog therapies maintain chronically high plasma levels of the analog and can lead to loss of spatiotemporal control of GLP-1R activation. To avoid adverse effects associated with current therapies, we characterized positive modulators of GLP-1R signaling. We screened extracts from edible plants using an intracellular cAMP biosensor and GLP-1R endocytosis assays. Ethanol extracts from fenugreek seeds enhanced GLP-1 signaling. These seeds have previously been found to reduce glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels in humans. An active compound (N55) with a new N-linoleoyl-2-amino-γ-butyrolactone structure was purified from fenugreek seeds. N55 promoted GLP-1-dependent cAMP production and GLP-1R endocytosis in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. N55 specifically enhanced GLP-1 potency more than 40-fold, but not that of exendin 4, to stimulate cAMP production. In contrast to the current allosteric modulators that bind to GLP-1R, N55 binds to GLP-1 peptide and facilitates trypsin-mediated GLP-1 inactivation. These findings identify a new class of modulators of GLP-1R signaling and suggest that GLP-1 might be a viable target for drug discovery. Our results also highlight a feasible approach for screening bioactive activity of plant extracts.

  8. Drug effects on functional structures in isolated perfused pig heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinks, Tobias; Rauh, Robert; Hiller, Michael; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Until today monitoring of immediate drug tissue interaction in living organs is an unsolved problem. However, for the development of new drugs and the improvement of medical therapy outcome it would be helpful to get new tools to visualize drug effects on tissue directly. With the EMPHO II SSK and a 3D-scanning device we detected changes of functional structures in an isolated perfused pig heart model after adding commonly used drugs like verapamil, nitroglycerin and salviae miltiorrhizae (Chinese herbal drug). In the paper the results are presented.

  9. Isolation of a polysaccharide with antiviral effect from Ulva lactuca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, V; Rouseva, R; Kolarova, M; Serkedjieva, J; Rachev, R; Manolova, N

    1994-05-01

    A polysaccharide from the green marine algae Ulva lactuca has been isolated. The substance has been investigated after acid hydrolysis by thin-layer and gas chromatography. The following carbohydrate components have been found: arabinose-xylose-rhamnose-galactose-mannose-glucose in ratio 1:1:9:5:2.5:16 respectively. One unidentified sugar has been demonstrated too. The polysaccharide has been studied for antiviral activity in vitro against a number of human and avian influenza viruses. A considerable inhibition of the viral reproduction was found. The effect was dose-dependent, strain-specific and selective.

  10. SiC Optically Modulated Field-Effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2009-01-01

    An optically modulated field-effect transistor (OFET) based on a silicon carbide junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is under study as, potentially, a prototype of devices that could be useful for detecting ultraviolet light. The SiC OFET is an experimental device that is one of several devices, including commercial and experimental photodiodes, that were initially evaluated as detectors of ultraviolet light from combustion and that could be incorporated into SiC integrated circuits to be designed to function as combustion sensors. The ultraviolet-detection sensitivity of the photodiodes was found to be less than desired, such that it would be necessary to process their outputs using high-gain amplification circuitry. On the other hand, in principle, the function of the OFET could be characterized as a combination of detection and amplification. In effect, its sensitivity could be considerably greater than that of a photodiode, such that the need for amplification external to the photodetector could be reduced or eliminated. The experimental SiC OFET was made by processes similar to JFET-fabrication processes developed at Glenn Research Center. The gate of the OFET is very long, wide, and thin, relative to the gates of typical prior SiC JFETs. Unlike in prior SiC FETs, the gate is almost completely transparent to near-ultraviolet and visible light. More specifically: The OFET includes a p+ gate layer less than 1/4 m thick, through which photons can be transported efficiently to the p+/p body interface. The gate is relatively long and wide (about 0.5 by 0.5 mm), such that holes generated at the body interface form a depletion layer that modulates the conductivity of the channel between the drain and the source. The exact physical mechanism of modulation of conductivity is a subject of continuing research. It is known that injection of minority charge carriers (in this case, holes) at the interface exerts a strong effect on the channel, resulting in amplification

  11. The effect of cinnamon extract on isolated rat uterine strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Cinnamon is a spice used by some populations as a traditional remedy to control blood pressure and thus hypertension. Cinnamon extract decreases contractility in some smooth muscles, but its effect on uterine smooth muscle is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and pharmacological effects of cinnamon extract (CE) on the contractions of isolated rat uterine strips and to investigate its possible mechanism of action. Isolated longitudinal uterine strips were dissected from non-pregnant rats, mounted vertically in an organ bath chamber, and exposed to different concentrations of CE (10-20mg/mL). The effect of CE was investigated in the presence of each of the following solutions: 60mM KCl, 5nM oxytocin, and 1μM Bay K8644. CE significantly decreased the force of uterine contraction in a concentration-dependent manner and significantly attenuated the uterine contractions elicited by KCl and oxytocin. In addition, CE significantly decreased the contractile force elicited when L-type Ca(2+) channels were activated by Bay K8644. CE's major mechanism may be inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels, which limits calcium influx. These data demonstrate that CE can be a potent tocolytic that can decrease uterine activity regardless of how the force was produced, even when the uterus was stimulated by agonists. As a result, cinnamon may be used to alleviate menstrual pain associated with dysmenorrhoea or prevent unwanted uterine activity in early pregnancy.

  12. Progress in piezo-phototronic effect modulated photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Miaoling; Zhou, Ranran; Wang, Xiandi; Yuan, Zuqing; Hu, Guofeng; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-11-01

    Wurtzite structured materials, like ZnO, GaN, CdS, and InN, simultaneously possess semiconductor and piezoelectric properties. The inner-crystal piezopotential induced by external strain can effectively tune/control the carrier generation, transport and separation/combination processes at the metal-semiconductor contact or p-n junction, which is called the piezo-phototronic effect. This effect can efficiently enhance the performance of photovoltaic devices based on piezoelectric semiconductor materials by utilizing the piezo-polarization charges at the junction induced by straining, which can modulate the energy band of the piezoelectric material and then accelerate or prevent the separation process of the photon-generated electrons and vacancies. This paper introduces the fundamental physics principles of the piezo-phototronic effect, and reviews recent progress in piezo-phototronic effect enhanced solar cells, including solar cells based on semiconductor nanowire, organic/inorganic materials, quantum dots, and perovskite. The piezo-phototronic effect is suggested as a suitable basis for the development of an innovative method to enhance the performance of solar cells based on piezoelectric semiconductors by applied extrinsic strains, which might be appropriate for fundamental research and potential applications in various areas of optoelectronics.

  13. Progress in piezo-phototronic effect modulated photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Miaoling; Zhou, Ranran; Wang, Xiandi; Yuan, Zuqing; Hu, Guofeng; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-11-02

    Wurtzite structured materials, like ZnO, GaN, CdS, and InN, simultaneously possess semiconductor and piezoelectric properties. The inner-crystal piezopotential induced by external strain can effectively tune/control the carrier generation, transport and separation/combination processes at the metal-semiconductor contact or p-n junction, which is called the piezo-phototronic effect. This effect can efficiently enhance the performance of photovoltaic devices based on piezoelectric semiconductor materials by utilizing the piezo-polarization charges at the junction induced by straining, which can modulate the energy band of the piezoelectric material and then accelerate or prevent the separation process of the photon-generated electrons and vacancies. This paper introduces the fundamental physics principles of the piezo-phototronic effect, and reviews recent progress in piezo-phototronic effect enhanced solar cells, including solar cells based on semiconductor nanowire, organic/inorganic materials, quantum dots, and perovskite. The piezo-phototronic effect is suggested as a suitable basis for the development of an innovative method to enhance the performance of solar cells based on piezoelectric semiconductors by applied extrinsic strains, which might be appropriate for fundamental research and potential applications in various areas of optoelectronics.

  14. Effects of Pupil Diameter on Light Detection and Temporal Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachel S Li; Andrew W Siu; Johnny C Liyu; Elice C Chan

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the effects of pupil variation on light detection and temporal modulation across the central visual field.Methods:Light detection sensitivity (LDS) and low flickering frequency (6Hz) temporal modulation sensitivity (TMS) of 20 young subjects were measured from the central visual field of the right eyes using an automated perimeter (Medmont M600). The measurements were taken under 3 artificial pupils, I.e. 3 mm, 4.3 mm and 6 mm diameters.The sensitivities were grouped and averaged for different retinal eccentricities(3°, 6°, 10° and 15°).Results:TMS and LDS were reduced with increasing retinal eccentricities( P < 0.001)and decreasing pupil diameters( P < 0.001). TMS collected from all pupil diameters were significantly different from each other( P < 0.001). Similarly, LDS under 3 mm pupil was statistically different from those of 4.3 mm and 6 mm(P < 0.003). Comparison of the hills of vision showed that pupil variation resulted in significantly different slopes (P=0.001).The slopes were also found to be significantly different between TMS and LDS (P=0.012).Conclusions: The data showed that dilated pupil resulted in significantly higher sensitivities than those of smaller pupil for both visual functions. The difference in the slopes of hills of vision also suggested that the variation in retinal illumination affected the visual responses differently at various retinal eccentricitities for TMS and LDS.

  15. Inferring modulators of genetic interactions with epistatic nested effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkl, Martin; Diekmann, Madeline; van der Wees, Marlies; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Fröhlich, Holger; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Maps of genetic interactions can dissect functional redundancies in cellular networks. Gene expression profiles as high-dimensional molecular readouts of combinatorial perturbations provide a detailed view of genetic interactions, but can be hard to interpret if different gene sets respond in different ways (called mixed epistasis). Here we test the hypothesis that mixed epistasis between a gene pair can be explained by the action of a third gene that modulates the interaction. We have extended the framework of Nested Effects Models (NEMs), a type of graphical model specifically tailored to analyze high-dimensional gene perturbation data, to incorporate logical functions that describe interactions between regulators on downstream genes and proteins. We benchmark our approach in the controlled setting of a simulation study and show high accuracy in inferring the correct model. In an application to data from deletion mutants of kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae we show that epistatic NEMs can point to modulators of genetic interactions. Our approach is implemented in the R-package 'epiNEM' available from https://github.com/cbg-ethz/epiNEM and https://bioconductor.org/packages/epiNEM/.

  16. The Amoebicidal Effect of Ergosterol Peroxide Isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Suárez-Medellín, Jorge; Del Ángel-Piña, Christian; Trigos, Ángel

    2015-12-01

    Dysentery is an inflammation of the intestine caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and is a recurrent health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. Because of the magnitude of this disease, finding novel strategies for treatment that does not affect human cells is necessary. Ergosterol peroxide is a sterol particularly known as a major cytotoxic agent with a wide spectrum of biological activities produced by edible and medicinal mushrooms. The aim of this report is to evaluate the amoebicidal activity of ergosterol peroxide (5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol isolated from 5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol) (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida. Our results show that ergosterol peroxide produced a strong cytotoxic effect against amoebic growth. The inhibitory concentration IC50 of ergosterol peroxide was evaluated. The interaction between E. histolytica and ergosterol peroxide in vitro resulted in strong amoebicidal activity (IC50  = 4.23 nM) that may be due to the oxidatory effect on the parasitic membrane. We also tested selective toxicity of ergosterol peroxide using a cell line CCL-241, a human epithelial cell line isolated from normal human fetal intestinal tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the cytotoxicity of ergosterol peroxide against E. histolytica, which uncovers a new biological property of the lipidic compound isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida.

  17. Effects of hispidulin, a flavone isolated from Inula viscosa, on isolated guinea-pig smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Abu-Zarga, M; Afifi, F; Al-Khalil, S; Sabri, S

    1988-01-01

    1. In small concentrations (10(-7)-3 X 10(-6) M), hispidulin caused concentration-dependent contraction of isolated guinea-pig ileum and only mild relaxation of guinea-pig tracheal rings. 2. Larger concentrations (up to 3 X 10(-4) M) caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the ileum and the trachea. All the effects on the ileum and the trachea are reversible upon removal of the compound. 3. In concentrations from 10(-7) to 3 X 10(-4) M, hispidulin had no effect on the tone of the epinephrine-contracted rings of the guinea-pig main pulmonary artery. 4. Hispidulin caused a shift to the right of the acetylcholine concentration-effect curves on ileum and trachea and significantly inhibited the maximum contractions induced by acetylcholine. 5. In Ca2+-free, depolarizing solution, hispidulin caused both a shift to the right, and an inhibition of the maximum contractions, of the CaCl2 concentration-effect curves on ileum, trachea and pulmonary artery. 6. In Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing solution, hispidulin caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the contractions induced in the pulmonary artery by epinephrine and in the ileum by histamine. 7. These observations suggest that hispidulin may interfere with Ca2+ binding to the Ca2+-receptor protein(s) in the smooth muscle cell and/or with the agonist-induced Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Less likely, hispidulin may interfere with Ca2+ influx through smooth muscle cell membrane.

  18. Effectiveness of the Biology PTechLS Module in a Felda Science Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Norlidah; DeWitt, Dorothy; Rahman, Mohd Nazri Abdul; Gelamdin, Rashidah Begum; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Siraj, Saedah

    2014-01-01

    The PTechLS module combines learning styles with the use of technology to increase students' learning experience, especially in learning abstract concepts. The PTechLS module prototype was developed by Norlidah Alias (2010). The aim of this study is to evaluate the implementation effectiveness of the Biology PTechLS module in a Felda Learning…

  19. Antiarrhythmic effect of L-propionylcarnitine in isolated cardiac preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonin, P U; Ramacci, M T; Pahor, M; Di Gennaro, M; Gambassi, G; Lo Giudice, P; Sgadari, A; Pacifici, L

    1991-06-01

    The effects of L-propionylcarnitine on reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias were studied in isolated hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats. During reperfusion, 60% (n = 15) of the hearts from control spontaneously hypertensive rats hearts developed irreversible ventricular fibrillation. In contrast, irreversible ventricular fibrillation did not occur in hearts from normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (n = 11, p less than 0.01). In a second group of spontaneously hypertensive rats, the addition of 10(-6) M L-propionylcarnitine to the medium during ischemia and reperfusion reduced the incidence of irreversible ventricular fibrillation to 14% (n = 14, p less than 0.05 versus control spontaneously hypertensive rats, NS versus Wistar Kyoto rats). Concentrations of L-propionylcarnitine from 10(-6) to 10(-2) M were tested on isolated guinea pig papillary muscles using microelectrodes. Resting potential, action potential amplitude, action potential duration and active tension were not modified by L-propionylcarnitine; and 10(-3) M L-propionylcarnitine did not influence the oscillatory afterpotentials induced by digitalis. We conclude that reperfusion ventricular arrhythmias are more severe in spontaneously hypertensive rats than in Wistar Kyoto rats and that the antiarrhythmic effect of L-propionylcarnitine in spontaneously hypertensive rats is mediated by myocardial protection from damage induced by reperfusion.

  20. Seismic isolation effect of lined circular tunnels with damping treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyyed M. Hasheminejad; Amir K. Miri

    2008-01-01

    The Havriliak-Negami model for dynamic viscoelastic material behavior and Biot's theory of poroelasticity are employed to develop an exact solution for three-dimensional scattering effect of harmonic plane P-SV waves from a circular cavity lined with a multilayered fluid-filled shell of infinite length containing viscoelastic damping materials and embedded within a fluid-saturated permeable surrounding soil medium. The analytical results are illustrated with numerical examples where the effects of liner/coating structural arrangement, viscoelastic material properties, liner-soil interface bonding condition, seismic excitation frequency, and angle of incidence on the induced dynamic stress concentrations are evaluated and discnssed to obtain representative values of the parameters that characterize the system. It is demonstrated that incorporating viscoelastic damping materials with a low shear modulus in the constrained layer configuration is an efficient means of enhancing the overall seismic isolation performance, especially for near-normally incident seismic shear waves where the amplitudes of induced dynamic stresses may be reduced by up to one-third of those without isolation in a relatively wide frequency range. Some additional cases are considered and good agreements with solutions available in the literature are obtained.

  1. The effect of pH and ion channel modulators on human placental arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyba Y Ali

    Full Text Available Chorionic plate arteries (CPA are located at the maternofetal interface where they are able to respond to local metabolic changes. Unlike many other types of vasculature, the placenta lacks nervous control and requires autoregulation for controlling blood flow. The placental circulation, which is of low-resistance, may become hypoxic easily leading to fetal acidosis and fetal distress however the role of the ion channels in these circumstances is not well-understood. Active potassium channel conductances that are subject to local physicochemical modulation may serve as pathways through which such signals are transduced. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulation of CPA by pH and the channels implicated in these responses using wire myography. CPA were isolated from healthy placentae and pre-contracted with U46619 before testing the effects of extracellular pH using 1 M lactic acid over the pH range 7.4-6.4 in the presence of a variety of ion channel modulators. A change from pH 7.4 to 7.2 produced a 29±3% (n = 9 relaxation of CPA which increased to 61±4% at the lowest pH of 6.4. In vessels isolated from placentae of women with pre-eclampsia (n = 6, pH responses were attenuated. L-methionine increased the relaxation to 67±7% (n = 6; p<0.001 at pH 6.4. Similarly the TASK 1/3 blocker zinc chloride (1 mM gave a maximum relaxation of 72±5% (n = 8; p<0.01 which compared with the relaxation produced by the TREK-1 opener riluzole (75±5%; n = 6. Several other modulators induced no significant changes in vascular responses. Our study confirmed expression of several ion channel subtypes in CPA with our results indicating that extracellular pH within the physiological range has an important role in controlling vasodilatation in the human term placenta.

  2. IM-135-648-00 IDIM tester instruction manual for the TESTER for (135 to 562) Isolated Digital Input Module for SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, J.

    1983-01-01

    This unit is designed to provide all of the input levels and channels needed to perform complete production and maintenance testing of the SLC Isolated Digital Input Module (SLAC 135 to 562). The manual includes the following sections: specifications; front panel, lights and connectors; reference list; functional description; 82S100 logic equations; test and checkout procedures; appendix A, SLAC 82S100 programming data; and appendix B, JXK-FORTH 135 to 648 program listing.

  3. Effects of mesoglycan sulfate on the arterial elastic module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, G M; Signorelli, S; Lo Duca, S; Minacapelli, C; Amico-Roxas, M T; Minardo, G; Cacciaguerra, G

    1987-08-01

    Ten patients with peripheral obstructive arterial disease (POAD) in stages I and II according to Leriche-Fontaine, were subjected to therapy with mesoglycan sulfate (60 mg/day for twenty days), to evaluate the effect of the drug on the elastic module of the arterial wall. The wall elasticity was deduced from some Doppler velocitographic indices (arterial dynamics index, resistance index, perfusion pressure index, tibial distensibility index); from the analysis of systolic, protodiastolic, and end diastolic velocity variations; and from computerized analysis of the Doppler sound spectrum. The results show a significant improvement of arterial wall elasticity, which suggests a rational use for the drug in the initial stages of peripheral obstructive arterial disease.

  4. New grape stems' isolated phenolic compounds modulate reactive oxygen species, glutathione, and lipid peroxidation in vitro: Combined formulations with vitamins C and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Marcelo; Oppolzer, David; Gouvinhas, Irene; Silva, Amélia M; Barros, Ana I R N A; Domínguez-Perles, Raúl

    2017-07-01

    The antioxidant potential of grape (Vitis vinífera L.) stems has been reported in the last decade although no identification of the individual compounds responsible for such action has been done. In this work, polyphenolic extract of grape stems was processed resorting to semi-preparative HPLC, allowing to obtain 5 purified polyphenols (caftaric acid, malvidin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, mailvidin-3-O-(6-O-caffeoyl)-glucoside, and Σ-viniferin), which were fully characterized by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS(n). Isolated compounds were featured on their radical scavenging capacity (DPPH and ABTS), cell viability, anti-inflammatory activity, and capacity to modulate the level of reactive oxygen species, glutathione, lipid peroxidation, and overall oxidative stress in a biological model (human keratinocytes) in vitro, under basal and oxidative conditions. The results obtained noticed the combinations malvidin-3-O-glucoside+Vitamin E and quercetin-3-O-glucuronide+vitamin C as the most effective, allowing to improve the capacity of complete extracts or individual compounds, and being candidates to be used in the development of new functional products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modulation of nerve-evoked contractions by β3-adrenoceptor agonism in human and rat isolated urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouget, Céline; Rekik, Moèz; Camparo, Philippe; Botto, Henry; Rischmann, Pascal; Lluel, Philippe; Palea, Stefano; Westfall, Timothy D

    2014-02-01

    Activation of β3-adrenoceptors has been shown to have a direct relaxant effect on urinary bladder smooth muscle from both rats and humans, however there are very few studies investigating the effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonists on nerve-evoked bladder contractions. Therefore in the current study, the role of β3-adrenoceptors in modulating efferent neurotransmission was evaluated. The effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonism on neurogenic contractions induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were compared with effects on contractions induced by exogenous acetylcholine (Ach) and αβ-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβ-meATP) in order to determine the site of action. Isoproterenol inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of human bladder (pD2=6.79; Emax=65%). The effect of isoproterenol was selectively inhibited by the β3-adrenoceptor antagonist L-748,337 (pKB=7.34). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach (0.5-1μM) were inhibited 25% by isoproterenol (3μM) while contractions to 10Hz in the same strip were inhibited 67%. The selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL-316,243 inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of rat bladder (pD2=7.83; Emax=65%). The effects of CL-316,243 were inhibited in a concentration dependent manner by L-748,337 (pA2=6.42). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach and αβ-meATP were significantly inhibited by CL-316,243, 29% and 40%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the activation of β3-adrenoceptors inhibits neurogenic contractions of both rat and human urinary bladder. Contractions induced by exogenously applied parasympathetic neurotransmitters are also inhibited by β3-agonism however the effect is clearly less than on neurogenic contractions (particularly in human), suggesting that in addition to a direct effect on smooth muscle, activation of prejunctional β3-adrenoceptors may inhibit neurotransmitter release.

  6. Effect of Potassium Channel Modulators on Morphine Withdrawal in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Seth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of potassium channel openers and blockers on morphine withdrawal syndrome. Mice were rendered dependent on morphine by subcutaneous injection of morphine; four hours later, withdrawal was induced by using an opioid antagonist, naloxone. Mice were observed for 30 minutes for the withdrawal signs ie, the characteristic jumping, hyperactivity, urination and diarrhea. ATP-dependent potassium (K + ATP channel modulators were injected intraperitoneally (i.p. 30 minutes before the naloxone. It was found that a K + ATP channel opener, minoxidil (12.5–50 mg/kg i.p., suppressed the morphine withdrawal significantly. On the other hand, the K + ATP channel blocker glibenclamide (12.5–50 mg/kg i.p. caused a significant facilitation of the withdrawal. Glibenclamide was also found to abolish the minoxidil's inhibitory effect on morphine withdrawal. The study concludes that K + ATP channels play an important role in the genesis of morphine withdrawal and K + ATP channel openers could be useful in the management of opioid withdrawal. As morphine opens K + ATP channels in neurons, the channel openers possibly act by mimicking the effects of morphine on neuronal K + currents.

  7. Field-effect transistor self-electrooptic effect device integrated photodiode, quantum well modulator and transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.A.B.; Feuer, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Shunk, S.C.; Henry, J.E.; Burrows, D.J.; Chemla, D.S.

    1989-03-01

    The authors propose and demonstrate the integration of a photodiode, a quantum-confined Stark effect quantum well optical modulator and a metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MESFET), to make a field-effect transistor self-electrooptic effect device. This integration allows optical inputs and outputs on the surface of a GaAs-integrated circuit chip, compatible with standard MESFET processing. As an illustration of feasibility, the authors demonstrate optical signal amplification with a single MESFET.

  8. Influence of various parameters on effectiveness of seismic base isolation of nuclear equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisawa, K. [Japan Atomic Research Inst., Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kameoka, H. [CRC Research Inst., Chiba-chi (Japan); Takenouchi, I.; Kajiki, S. [Oiles Corp. (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Authors developed a methodology and EBISA code for evaluating the applicability and the effectiveness of seismic base isolation of nuclear equipment. In order to investigate the influence of various parameters on the effectiveness of seismic base isolation, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for an emergency transformer with the base isolation devices. It was proved that seismic base isolation of equipment is very effective. This effectiveness can be influenced by the differences of the base isolation devices and the direction of the input seismic wave. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Effect of modulated ultrasound parameters on ultrasound-induced thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, Azita; Volz, Kim R; Hansmann, Doulas R [Research and Development Department, EKOS Corporation, 11911 N Creek Parkway S, Bothell, WA 98011 (United States)], E-mail: asoltani@ekoscorp.com

    2008-12-07

    The potential of ultrasound to enhance enzyme-mediated thrombolysis by application of constant operating parameters (COP) has been widely demonstrated. In this study, the effect of ultrasound with modulated operating parameters (MOP) on enzyme-mediated thrombolysis was investigated. The MOP protocol was applied to an in vitro model of thrombolysis. The results were compared to a COP with the equivalent soft tissue thermal index (TIS) over the duration of ultrasound exposure of 30 min (p < 0.14). To explore potential differences in the mechanism responsible for ultrasound-induced thrombolysis, a perfusion model was used to measure changes in average fibrin pore size of clot before, after and during exposure to MOP and COP protocols and cavitational activity was monitored in real time for both protocols using a passive cavitation detection system. The relative lysis enhancement by each COP and MOP protocol compared to alteplase alone yielded values of 33.69 {+-} 12.09% and 63.89 {+-} 15.02% in a thrombolysis model, respectively (p < 0.007). Both COP and MOP protocols caused an equivalent significant increase in average clot pore size of 2.09 x 10{sup -2} {+-} 0.01 {mu}m and 1.99 x 10{sup -2} {+-} 0.004 {mu}m, respectively (p < 0.74). No signatures of inertial or stable cavitation were observed for either acoustic protocol. In conclusion, due to mechanisms other than cavitation, application of ultrasound with modulated operating parameters has the potential to significantly enhance the relative lysis enhancement compared to application of ultrasound with constant operating parameters.

  10. Antifungal effect of (+)-pinoresinol isolated from Sambucus williamsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Bomi; Lee, Juneyoung; Liu, Qing-He; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Dong Gun

    2010-05-14

    In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity and mechanism of action of (+)-pinoresinol, a biphenolic compound isolated from the herb Sambucus williamsii,used in traditional medicine. (+)-Pinoresinol displays potent antifungal properties without hemolytic effects on human erythrocytes. To understand the antifungal mechanism of (+)-pinoresinol, we conducted fluorescence experiments on the human pathogen Candida albicans. Fluorescence analysis using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) indicated that the (+)-pinoresinol caused damage to the fungal plasma membrane. This result was confirmed by using rhodamine-labeled giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) experiments. Therefore, the present study indicates that (+)-pinoresinol possesses fungicidal activities and therapeutic potential as an antifungal agent for the treatment of fungal infectious diseases in humans.

  11. Antifungal Effect of (+-Pinoresinol Isolated from Sambucus williamsii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomi Hwang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity and mechanism of action of (+-pinoresinol, a biphenolic compound isolated from the herb Sambucus williamsii,used in traditional medicine. (+-Pinoresinol displays potent antifungal properties without hemolytic effects on human erythrocytes. To understand the antifungal mechanism of (+-pinoresinol, we conducted fluorescence experiments on the human pathogen Candida albicans. Fluorescence analysis using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH indicated that the (+-pinoresinol caused damage to the fungal plasma membrane. This result was confirmed by using rhodamine-labeled giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV experiments. Therefore, the present study indicates that (+-pinoresinol possesses fungicidal activities and therapeutic potential as an antifungal agent for the treatment of fungal infectious diseases in humans.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory effect of lignans isolated from Schizandra chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tran Manh; Na, MinKyun; Min, Byung Sun; Ngoc, Tran Minh; Lee, IkSoo; Zhang, XinFeng; Bae, KiHwan

    2007-06-01

    The hexane extract of the fruit of Schizandra chinensis (Schisandraceae) was found to show significant inhibition of the activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE). In further studies, fourteen lignans were isolated, and evaluated for their inhibitory effect on AChE. The compounds having both aromatic methylenedioxy and hydroxyl groups on their cyclooctadiene ring, such as gomisin C (6), gomisin G (7), gomisin D (8), schisandrol B (11) and gomisin A (13), entirely inhibited AChE in dose dependent manners, with IC50 values of 6.71 +/- 0.53, 6.55 +/- 0.31, 7.84 +/- 0.62, 12.57 +/- 1.07 and 13.28 +/- 1.68 microM, respectively. These results indicate that the lignans could potentially be a potent class of AChE inhibitors.

  13. Effect of Career Education Module on Career Development of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Jasmi A.; Salleh, Amla; Amat, Salleh; Ghavifekr, Simin; Ariff, Azlinda M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a pre-post and control group design, we examined the effect of a career education module on career development among a group of 122 community college students in Malaysia. The effect of gender and the interaction effect of gender and career education module on career development were also investigated. MANOVA analyses showed significant…

  14. Cytotoxic effects of Oosporein isolated from endophytic fungus Cochliobolus kusanoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rmaesha eA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, oosporein, a fungal toxic secondary metabolite known to be a toxic agent causing chronic disorders in animals, was isolated from fungus Cochliobolus kusanoi of Nerium oleander L. Toxic effects of oosporein and the possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity as well as the role of oxidative stress in cytotoxicity to MDCK kidney cells and RAW 264.7 splene cells were evaluated in-vitro. Also to know the possible in-vivo toxic effects of oosporein on kidney and spleen, Balb/C mouse were treated with different concentrations of oosporein ranging from 20 uM to 200 µM. After 24 hrs of post exposure histopathological observations were made to know the effects of oosporein on target organs. Oosporein induced elevated levels of ROS generation and high levels of MDA, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, induced glutathione hydroxylase production was observed in a dose depended manner. Effects oosporein on chromosomal DNA damage was assessed by Comet assay, and increase in DNA damage were observed in both the studied cell lines by increasing the oosprin concentration. Further, oosporein treatment to studied cell lines indicated significant suppression of oxidative stress related gene (SOD1 and CAT expression, and increased levels of mRNA expression in apoptosis or oxidative stress

  15. Differential effect of three polyunsaturated aldehydes on marine bacterial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribalet, Francois; Intertaglia, Laurent; Lebaron, Philippe; Casotti, Raffaella

    2008-01-31

    Bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are produced by several marine phytoplankton (mainly diatoms) and have been shown to have a detrimental effect on a wide variety of organisms, including phytoplankton and invertebrates. However, their potential impact on marine bacteria has been largely neglected. We assess here the effect of three PUAs produced by marine diatoms: 2E,4E-decadienal, 2E,4E-octadienal and 2E,4E-heptadienal, on the growth of 33 marine bacterial strains, including 16 strains isolated during a bloom of the PUA-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi in the Northern Adriatic Sea. A concentration-dependent growth reduction was observed for 19 bacterial strains at concentrations ranging from 3 to 145 micromolL(-1). Surprisingly, Eudora adriatica strain MOLA358 (Flavobacteriaceae) and Alteromonas hispanica strain MOLA151 (Alteromonadaceae) showed growth stimulation upon exposure to PUAs at concentrations between 13 and 18 micromolL(-1). The remaining 12 strains were unaffected by even very high PUA concentrations. Strains isolated during the diatom bloom showed remarkable resistance to PUA exposures, with only two out of 16 strains showing growth inhibition at PUA concentrations below 106, 130, and 145 micromolL(-1) for 2E,4E-decadienal, 2E,4E-octadienal and 2E,4E-heptadienal, respectively. No correlation between taxonomical position and sensitivity to PUA was observed. Considering that many bacteria thrive in close vicinity of diatom cells, it is likely that these compounds may shape the structure of associated bacterial communities by representing a selection force. This is even more relevant during the final stages of blooms, when senescence and nutrient limitation increase the potential production and release of aldehydes.

  16. Object familiarity modulates effective connectivity during haptic shape perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Hu, Xiaoping; Lacey, Simon; Stilla, Randall; Sathian, K

    2010-02-01

    In the preceding paper (Lacey, S., Flueckiger, P., Stilla, R., Lava, M., Sathian, K., 2009a. Object familiarity modulates involvement of visual imagery in haptic shape perception), we showed that the activations evoked by visual imagery overlapped more extensively, and their magnitudes were more correlated, with those evoked during haptic shape perception of familiar, compared to unfamiliar, objects. Here we used task-specific analyses of functional and effective connectivity to provide convergent evidence. These analyses showed that the visual imagery and familiar haptic shape tasks activated similar networks, whereas the unfamiliar haptic shape task activated a different network. Multivariate Granger causality analyses of effective connectivity, in both a conventional form and one purged of zero-lag correlations, showed that the visual imagery and familiar haptic shape networks involved top-down paths from prefrontal cortex into the lateral occipital complex (LOC), whereas the unfamiliar haptic shape network was characterized by bottom-up, somatosensory inputs into the LOC. We conclude that shape representations in the LOC are flexibly accessible, either top-down or bottom-up, according to task demands, and that visual imagery is more involved in LOC activation during haptic shape perception when objects are familiar, compared to unfamiliar.

  17. Cardiac effect of vitamin D receptor modulators in uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahide; Ogata, Hiroaki; Yamazaki-Nakazawa, Ai; Hosaka, Nozomu; Kondo, Fumiko; Koiwa, Fumihiko; Kinugasa, Eriko; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) modulators (VDRMs) are commonly used to control secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) associated with chronic kidney disease, and are associated with beneficial outcomes in cardiovascular disease. In this study, we compared the cardiac effect of VS-105, a novel VDRM, with that of paricalcitol in 5/6 nephrectomized uremic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were 5/6 nephrectomized, fed a standard diet for 4 weeks to establish uremia, and then treated (intraperitoneally, 3 times/week) with vehicle (propylene glycol), paricalcitol (0.025 and 0.15μg/kg), or VS-105 (0.05 and 0.3μg/kg) for 4 weeks. In uremic rats, neither VDRM (low and high doses) altered serum creatinine and phosphorus levels. Serum calcium was significantly higher with high dose paricalcitol compared to sham rats. PTH levels were significantly decreased with low dose paricalcitol and VS-105, and were further reduced in the high dose groups. Interestingly, serum FGF23 was significantly higher with high dose paricalcitol compared to sham rats, whereas VS-105 had no significant effect on FGF23 levels. Left ventricle (LV) weight and LV mass index determined by echocardiography were significantly suppressed in both high dose VDRM groups. This suppression was more evident with VS-105. Western blotting showed significant decreases in a fibrosis marker TGF-β1 in both high dose VDRM groups (vs. vehicle) and Masson trichrome staining showed significant decreases in cardiac fibrosis in these groups. These results suggest that VS-105 is less hypercalcemic than paricalcitol and has favorable effects on SHPT and cardiac parameters that are similar to those of paricalcitol in uremic rats. The cardioprotective effect is a noteworthy characteristic of VS-105.

  18. Earthquake Response and Isolation Layer Parameter Effect of Seismic Isolation Systems of Transformers With Bushings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Meigen; ZHOU Fulin; TAN Ping; ZHANG Guangping; GAO Zhengguo

    2012-01-01

    Seismic damage data and experiences on power transformers at home and abroad indicate that the destruction type of high-power transformers is various and the vulnerability is very high. Furthermore, the post-disaster reconstruction of transformers, which needs a long recovery cycle and a high cost, will be very difficult. Studies have shown that the acceleration response of the transformer and bushings will be quickly reduced and seismic reliability of transformer will be improved because there is one seismic isolation layer between the bottom of transformer tank and the base which form the seismic isolation system of the transformer and bushings (SISTB). But isolation layer design and parameters selection of SISTB have larger difference with general structures.

  19. Cardiac effects of 3-iodothyronamine: a new aminergic system modulating cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiellini, Grazia; Frascarelli, Sabina; Ghelardoni, Sandra; Carnicelli, Vittoria; Tobias, Sandra C; DeBarber, Andrea; Brogioni, Simona; Ronca-Testoni, Simonetta; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Grandy, David K; Scanlan, Thomas S; Zucchi, Riccardo

    2007-05-01

    3-Iodothyronamine T1AM is a novel endogenous thyroid hormone derivative that activates the G protein-coupled receptor known as trace anime-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). In the isolated working rat heart and in rat cardiomyocytes, T1AM produced a reversible, dose-dependent negative inotropic effect (e.g., 27+/-5, 51+/-3, and 65+/-2% decrease in cardiac output at 19, 25, and 38 microM concentration, respectively). An independent negative chronotropic effect was also observed. The hemodynamic effects of T1AM were remarkably increased in the presence of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, whereas they were attenuated in the presence of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate. No effect was produced by inhibitors of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, calcium-calmodulin kinase II, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, or MAP kinases. Tissue cAMP levels were unchanged. In rat ventricular tissue, Western blot experiments with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies showed reduced phosphorylation of microsomal and cytosolic proteins after perfusion with synthetic T1AM; reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction experiments revealed the presence of transcripts for at least 5 TAAR subtypes; specific and saturable binding of [125I]T1AM was observed, with a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range (5 microM); and endogenous T1AM was detectable by tandem mass spectrometry. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence for the existence of a novel aminergic system modulating cardiac function.

  20. Effects of ethanol on antioxidant capacity in isolated rat hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sien-Sing Yang; Chi-Chang Huang; Jiun-Rong Chen; Che-Lin Chiu; Ming-Jer Shieh; Su-Jiun Lin; Suh-Ching Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate dose-response and time-course of the effects of ethanol on the cell viability and antioxidant capacity in isolated rat hepatocytes.METHODS: Hepatocytes were isolated from male adult Wistar rats and seeded into 100-mm dishes. Hepatocytes were treated with ethanol at concentrations between 0 (C), 10 (E10), 50 (E50), and 100 (E100) mmol/L (dose response) for 12, 24, and 36 h (time course). Then,lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, glutathione (GSH) level, and activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GRD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were measured.RESULTS: Our data revealed that LDH leakage was significantly increased by about 30% in group E100 over those in groups C and E10 at 24 and 36 h, The MDA concentration in groups C, E10 and E50 were significantly lower than that in group E100 at 36 h. Furthermore,the concentration of MDA in group E100 at 36 h was significantly higher by 4.5- and 1.7-fold, respectively,than that at 12 and 24 h. On the other hand, the GSH level in group E100 at 24 and 36 h was significantly decreased, by 32% and 28%, respectively, compared to that at 12 h. The activities of GRD and CAT in group E100 at 36 h were significantly less than those in groups C and E10. However, The GPX and SOD activities showed no significant change in each group.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that longtime incubation with higher concentration of ethanol (100 mmol/L) decreased the cell viability by means of reducing GRD and CAT activities and increasing lipid peroxidation.

  1. Damping Effects of Drogue Parachutes on Orion Crew Module Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubuchon, Vanessa V.; Owens, D. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Because simulations of the Orion Crew Module (CM) dynamics with drogue parachutes deployed were under-predicting the amount of damping seen in free-flight tests, an attach-point damping model was applied to the Orion system. A key hypothesis in this model is that the drogue parachutes' net load vector aligns with the CM drogue attachment point velocity vector. This assumption seems reasonable and has historically produced good results, but has never been experimentally verified. The wake of the CM influences the drogue parachutes, which makes performance predictions of the parachutes difficult. Many of these effects are not currently modeled in the simulations. A forced oscillation test of the CM with parachutes was conducted in the NASA LaRC 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to gather additional data to validate and refine the attach-point damping model. A second loads balance was added to the original Orion VST model to measure the drogue parachute loads independently of the CM. The objective of the test was to identify the contribution of the drogues to CM damping and provide additional information to quantify wake effects and the interactions between the CM and parachutes. The drogue parachute force vector was shown to be highly dependent on the CM wake characteristics. Based on these wind tunnel test data, the attach-point damping model was determined to be a sufficient approximation of the parachute dynamics in relationship to the CM dynamics for preliminary entry vehicle system design. More wake effects should be included to better model the system.

  2. Attention effects on vicarious modulation of nociception and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Ali; Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Schrooten, Martien; Vlaeyen, Johan; Rainville, Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The observation of others' facial expressions of pain has been shown to facilitate the observer's nociceptive responses and to increase pain perception. We investigated how this vicarious facilitation effect is modulated by directing the observer's attention toward the meaning of pain expression or the facial movements. In separate trials, participants were instructed to assess the "intensity of the pain expression"(meaning) or to "discriminate the facial movements" in the upper vs lower part of the face shown in 1-second dynamic clips displaying mild, moderate, or strong pain expressions or a neutral control. In 50% of the trials, participants received a painful electrical stimulation to the sural nerve immediately after the presentation of the expression. Low-level nociceptive reactivity was measured with the RIII-response, and pain perception was assessed using pain ratings. Pain induced by the electrical stimulation increased after viewing stronger pain expressions in both tasks, but the RIII-response showed this vicarious facilitation effect only in the movement discrimination task at the strongest expression intensity. These findings are consistent with the notion that vicarious processes facilitate self-pain and may prime automatic nociceptive responses. However, this priming effect is influenced by top-down attentional processes. These results provide another case of dissociation between reflexive and perceptual processes, consistent with the involvement of partly separate brain networks in the regulation of cortical and lower-level nociceptive responses. Combined with previous results, these findings suggest that vicarious pain facilitation is an automatic process that may be diminished by top-down attentional processes directed at the meaning of the expression.

  3. Mapping the performance of PV modules, effects of module type and data averaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huld, Thomas [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, T.P. 450, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Gottschalg, Ralph [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Beyer, Hans Georg [Institut fuer Elektrotechnik, Hochschule Magdeburg-Stendal, Breitscheidstrasse 2, D-39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Topic, Marko [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-02-15

    A method is presented for estimating the energy yield of photovoltaic (PV) modules at arbitrary locations in a large geographical area. The method applies a mathematical model for the energy performance of PV modules as a function of in-plane irradiance and module temperature and combines this with solar irradiation estimates from satellite data and ambient temperature values from ground station measurements. The method is applied to three different PV technologies: crystalline silicon, CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe based thin-film technology in order to map their performance in fixed installations across most of Europe and to identify and quantify regional performance factors. It is found that there is a clear technology dependence of the geographical variation in PV performance. It is also shown that using long-term average values of irradiance and temperature leads to a systematic positive bias in the results of up to 3%. It is suggested to use joint probability density functions of temperature and irradiance to overcome this bias. (author)

  4. Pretreatment with turmeric modulates the inhibitory influence of cisplatin and paclitaxel on CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2 in isolated rat hepatic microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Enas M; EL-Maraghy, Shohda A; Teleb, Zakaria A; Shaheen, Amira A

    2014-09-05

    Previous animal studies have shown that turmeric can significantly modulate the activity of several drug metabolizing enzymes, this may dramatically affect the bioavailability of several drugs resulting in over dose or less therapeutic effects. This study was directed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel on two CYP450 enzymes namely CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2 in hepatic microsomes isolated from normal and turmeric pretreated rats. Cisplatin and paclitaxel were added by different concentrations to hepatic microsomes isolated from untreated and turmeric (100 mg/kg/day) pretreated rats for 15 days after receiving pyrazole or dexamethasone for induction of CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2 respectively. The kinetic potency of these drugs as CYP inhibitors was determined by analysis of Lineweaver-Burk plot. Addition of cisplatin or paclitaxel by (10, 50 and 100 μM) to hepatic microsomes from normal or turmeric pretreated rats caused a concentration dependent inhibition of CYP2E1, with an evidence of less inhibition in turmeric pretreated microsomes particularly at higher concentration. Both drugs at 100 μM displayed a mixed type of inhibition of CYP2E1 in normal or turmeric pretreated microsomes where paclitaxel was the most potent inhibitor. Cisplatin (10, 50 and 100 μM) caused a concentration dependant inhibition of CYP3A1/2 that was enhanced by turmeric pretreatment. The inhibition of CYP3A1/2 by cisplatin (100 μM) was in non-competitive manner with a smaller Ki value in turmeric pretreated microsomes. The inhibitory influence of paclitaxel (10, 50 and 100 μM) on CYP3A1/2 decreased with increasing the drug concentration and this inhibition was augmented by turmeric pretreatment. Interestingly, the inhibition of this enzyme by paclitaxel (10 μM) was switched from mixed type in normal microsomes to competitive manner in turmeric pretreated ones with a marked reduction of Ki values reflecting greater inhibitory influence of paclitaxel on CYP3A1/2 by turmeric

  5. Kefir-isolated bacteria and yeasts inhibit Shigella flexneri invasion and modulate pro-inflammatory response on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, P A; Abraham, A G; Pérez, P F; de Los Angeles Serradell, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of a kefir-isolated microbial mixture containing three bacterial and two yeast strains (MM) to protect intestinal epithelial cells against Shigella flexneri invasion, as well as to analyse the effect on pro-inflammatory response elicited by this pathogen. A significant decrease in S. flexneri strain 72 invasion was observed on both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells pre-incubated with MM. Pre-incubation with the individual strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIDCA 8112 or Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CIDCA 8221 also reduced the internalisation of S. flexneri into HT-29 cells although in a lesser extent than MM. Interestingly, Lactobacillus plantarum CIDCA 83114 exerted a protective effect on the invasion of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells by S. flexneri. Regarding the pro-inflammatory response on HT-29 cells, S. flexneri infection induced a significant activation of the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) encoding genes (Pkefir, resulted in inhibition of S. flexneri internalisation into human intestinal epithelial cells, along with the inhibition of the signalling via NF-κB that in turn led to the attenuation of the inflammatory response.

  6. Early effects of reward anticipation are modulated by dopaminergic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thore Apitz

    Full Text Available The abilities to predict future rewards and assess the value of reward delivery are crucial aspects of adaptive behavior. While the mesolimbic system, including dopaminergic midbrain, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex have long been associated with reward processing, recent studies also indicate a prominent role of early visual brain regions. However, the precise underlying neural mechanisms still remain unclear. To address this issue, we presented participants with visual cues predicting rewards of high and low magnitudes and probability (2 × 2 factorial design, while neural activity was scanned using magnetoencephalography. Importantly, one group of participants received 150 mg of the dopamine precursor levodopa prior to the experiment, while another group received a placebo. For the placebo group, neural signals of reward probability (but not magnitude emerged at ∼ 100 ms after cue presentation at occipital sensors in the event-related magnetic fields. Importantly, these probability signals were absent in the levodopa group indicating a close link. Moreover, levodopa administration reduced oscillatory power in the high (20-30 Hz and low (13-20 Hz beta band during both reward anticipation and delivery. Taken together, our findings indicate that visual brain regions are involved in coding prospective reward probability but not magnitude and that these effects are modulated by dopamine.

  7. Immune System Modulators with Antidepressant Effects: Evidence from Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelaira, Helena M; Maciel, Amanda L; Quevedo, Joao; Reus, Gislaine Z

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates, and currently, approximately 340 million people worldwide suffer from depression at some point in life. In view of the growing socio-economic and clinical impact, several studies have focused on the etiopathology of MDD, suggesting that not only the monoaminergic system but also other brain mechanisms may be involved in the pathophysiology of MDD. Recent studies have shown a link between inflammation and MDD and have also demonstrated that antidepressants and antiinflammatory drugs can act to reduce inflammation, thereby improving depressive symptoms. Animal models of depression are indispensable for studying the pathophysiology of this disorder and new treatments for it. Further, studies have shown that rodent models of depression are also associated with elevated levels of inflammation in the periphery and brain. This review will highlight the role of immune inflammation in MDD and the significance of immune system modulators with antidepressant effects in the treatment of MDD, based on studies using animal models of depression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Cytotoxic effect of acriflavine against clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Zubeyda Akin; Karakus, Gulderen

    2013-02-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a potentially devastating and sight-threatening infection of the cornea caused by the ubiquitous free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba species. Its eradication is difficult because the amoebas encyst, making it highly resistant to anti-amoebic drugs. Acriflavine neutral (ACF) has been used for treatment of microbial infections for humans and fishes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the time-dependent cytotoxicities of ACF against Acanthamoeba spp. Trophozoites and cysts of three different strains (strain PAT06 Acanthamoeba castellanii, strain 2HH Acanthamoeba hatchetti, and strain 11DS A. hatchetti) of Acanthamoeba spp. were tested. All strains had been isolated from patients suffering from a severe AK. The effects of the ACF with the concentrations ranging from 15 to 500 mg mL(-1) on the cytotoxicity of Acanthamoeba strains were examined. ACF showed a time- and dose-dependent amebicidal action on the trophozoites and cysts. Pat06 (A. castellanii) was the most resistant, while strain 11DS (A. hatchetti) was the most sensitive. As a result, ACF could be concluded as a new agent for the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections. On the other hand, it still needs to be further evaluated by in vivo test systems to confirm the efficiency of its biological effect.

  9. Channel Capacity of DWDM Networks with Cross-phase Modulation Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In dense wavelength division multiplexing(DWDM) optical transmission systems, cross phase modulation(XPM) due to Kerr effect causes phase shift and intensity modulation in each channel, which will lead the channel capacity to be a random variable. An expression of the channel capacity dealing with XPM effect is presented, and the correctness and accuracy of this method are demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  10. A large-scale deforestation experiment: effects of patch area and isolation on Amazon birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Gonçalo; Nichols, James D; Hines, James E; Stouffer, Philip C; Bierregaard, Richard O; Lovejoy, Thomas E

    2007-01-12

    As compared with extensive contiguous areas, small isolated habitat patches lack many species. Some species disappear after isolation; others are rarely found in any small patch, regardless of isolation. We used a 13-year data set of bird captures from a large landscape-manipulation experiment in a Brazilian Amazon forest to model the extinction-colonization dynamics of 55 species and tested basic predictions of island biogeography and metapopulation theory. From our models, we derived two metrics of species vulnerability to changes in isolation and patch area. We found a strong effect of area and a variable effect of isolation on the predicted patch occupancy by birds.

  11. A large-scale deforestation experiment: Effects of patch area and isolation on Amazon birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, G.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Stouffer, P.C.; Bierregaard, R.O.; Lovejoy, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    As compared with extensive contiguous areas, small isolated habitat patches lack many species. Some species disappear after isolation; others are rarely found in any small patch, regardless of isolation. We used a 13-year data set of bird captures from a large landscape-manipulation experiment in a Brazilian Amazon forest to model the extinction-colonization dynamics of 55 species and tested basic predictions of island biogeography and metapopulation theory. From our models, we derived two metrics of species vulnerability to changes in isolation and patch area. We found a strong effect of area and a variable effect of isolation on the predicted patch occupancy by birds.

  12. Endogenous RGS proteins modulate SA and AV nodal functions in isolated heart: implications for sick sinus syndrome and AV block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Huang, Xinyan; Piao, Lin; Lopatin, Anatoli N; Neubig, Richard R

    2007-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors play a pivotal role in regulating cardiac automaticity. Their function is controlled by regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins acting as GTPase-activating proteins for Galpha subunits to suppress Galpha(i) and Galpha(q) signaling. Using knock-in mice in which Galpha(i2)-RGS binding and negative regulation are disrupted by a genomic Galpha(i2)G184S (GS) point mutation, we recently (Fu Y, Huang X, Zhong H, Mortensen RM, D'Alecy LG, Neubig RR. Circ Res 98: 659-666, 2006) showed that endogenous RGS proteins suppress muscarinic receptor-mediated bradycardia. To determine whether this was due to direct regulation of cardiac pacemakers or to alterations in the central nervous system or vascular responses, we examined isolated, perfused hearts. Isoproterenol-stimulated beating rates of heterozygote (+/GS) and homozygote (GS/GS) hearts were significantly more sensitive to inhibition by carbachol than were those of wild type (+/+). Even greater effects were seen in the absence of isoproterenol; the potency of muscarinic-mediated bradycardia was enhanced fivefold in GS/GS and twofold in +/GS hearts compared with +/+. A(1)-adenosine receptor-mediated bradycardia was unaffected. In addition to effects on the sinoatrial node, +/GS and GS/GS hearts show significantly increased carbachol-induced third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block. Atrial pacing studies demonstrated an increased PR interval and AV effective refractory period in GS/GS hearts compared with +/+. Thus loss of the inhibitory action of endogenous RGS proteins on Galpha(i2) potentiates muscarinic inhibition of cardiac automaticity and conduction. The severe carbachol-induced sinus bradycardia in Galpha(i2)G184S mice suggests a possible role for alterations of Galpha(i2) or RGS proteins in sick sinus syndrome and pathological AV block.

  13. Antitumor properties and modulation of antioxidant enzymes' activity by Aloe vera leaf active principles isolated via supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shemy, H A; Aboul-Soud, M A M; Nassr-Allah, A A; Aboul-Enein, K M; Kabash, A; Yagi, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential anticancer properties and modulatory effect of selected Aloe vera (A. vera) active principles on antioxidant enzyme activities. Thus, three anthraquinones (Namely: aloesin, aloe-emodin and barbaloin) were extracted from A. vera leaves by supercritical fluid extraction and subsequently purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, the N-terminal octapeptide derived from verectin, a biologically active 14 kDa glycoprotein present in A. vera, was also tested. In vivo, active principles exhibited significant prolongation of the life span of tumor-transplanted animals in the following order: barbaloin> octapeptide> aloesin > aloe-emodin. A. vera active principles exhibited significant inhibition on Ehrlich ascite carcinoma cell (EACC) number, when compared to positive control group, in the following order: barbaloin> aloe-emodin > octapeptide > aloesin. Moreover, in trypan blue cell viability assay, active principles showed a significant concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphocytes leukemia (ALL) cancerous cells. Furthermore, in MTT cell viability test, aloe-emodin was found to be active against two human colon cancer cell lines (i.e. DLD-1 and HT2), with IC(50) values of 8.94 and 10.78 microM, respectively. Treatments of human AML leukemic cells with active principles (100 microg ml(-1)) resulted in varying intensities of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, hallmark of cells undergoing apoptosis, in the following order: aloe-emodin> aloesin> barbaloin> octapeptide. Intererstingly, treatment of EACC tumors with active principles resulted in a significant elevation activity of key antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GST, tGPx, and LDH). Our data suggest that the tested A. vera compounds may exert their chemo-preventive effect through modulating antioxidant and detoxification enzyme activity levels, as they are one of the indicators of tumorigenesis. These

  14. Cost-effective bidirectional digitized radio-over-fiber systems employing sigma delta modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Woon; Jung, HyunDo; Park, Jung Ho

    2016-11-01

    We propose a cost effective digitized radio-over-fiber (D-RoF) system employing a sigma delta modulation (SDM) and a bidirectional transmission technique using phase modulated downlink and intensity modulated uplink. SDM is transparent to different radio access technologies and modulation formats, and more suitable for a downlink of wireless system because a digital to analog converter (DAC) can be avoided at the base station (BS). Also, Central station and BS share the same light source by using a phase modulation for the downlink and an intensity modulation for the uplink transmission. Avoiding DACs and light sources have advantages in terms of cost reduction, power consumption, and compatibility with conventional wireless network structure. We have designed a cost effective bidirectional D-RoF system using a low pass SDM and measured the downlink and uplink transmission performance in terms of error vector magnitude, signal spectra, and constellations, which are based on the 10MHz LTE 64-QAM standard.

  15. Effect of indomethacin on electrical field stimulation-induced contractions of isolated transverse and longitudinal rat gastric fundus strips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salimeh Afshin; Mansoor Keshavarz; Mahmood Salami; Fatemeh Mirershadi; Bijan Djahanguiri

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of indomethacin on the isolated transverse and longitudinal rat gastric fundus strips.METHODS: The strips were suspended in an organ bath containing oxygenated Krebs solution, and contractile responses to electrical field stimulation were recorded on a physiograph in an isotonic manner after administration of cumulative concentrations of indomethacin. The effects of indomethacin on the strips pretreated with KATP channel modulators, diazoxide and glybenclamide were studied.RESULTS: Treatment of the transverse strips with indomethacin resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibitory response. In longitudinal strips, biphasic responses were seen, which included a stimulatory response at low concentrations of indomethacin, followed by an inhibitory response at higher concentrations.Diazoxide pre-treatment inhibited the stimulatory response of longitudinal strips. Glybenclamide pre-treatment not only blocked inhibitory effect of the low concentrations of indomethacin on transverse strips, but also increased the amplitude of contractions. Moreover, the drug decreased the amplitude of contractions in longitudinal strips.CONCLUSION: Responses of the isolated longitudinal and transverse rat gastric fundus strips to indomethacin are not similar, and are influenced by KATP channel modulators.

  16. Effects of lithium chloride on outward potassium currents in acutely isolated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chaofeng; DU Huizhi; YANG Pin

    2006-01-01

    Although lithium possesses neuroprotective functions, the molecular mechanism underlying its actions has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, the effects of lithium chloride on voltage-dependent potassium currents in the CA1 pyramidal neurons acutely isolated from rat hippocampus were studied using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Depolarizing test pulses activated two components of outward potassium currents: a rapidly activating and inactivating component, IA and a delayed component, IK. Results showed that lithium chloride increased the amplitude of IA in a concentration-dependent manner. Half enhancement concentration (EC50) was 22.80±5.45 μmol·L-1. Lithium chloride of 25 μmol·L-1 shifted the steady-state activation curve and inactivation curve of IA to more negative potentials, but mainly affected the activation kinetics. The amplitude and the activation processes of IK were not affected by lithium chloride. The effects of lithium chloride on potassium channel appear to possess neuroprotective properties by Ca2+-lowing effects modulate neuronal excitability by activating IA in rat hippocampal neurons.

  17. Effects of microcystin-LR in isolated perfused rat kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.L. Nobre

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Microcystin is a hepatotoxic peptide which inhibits protein phosphatase types 1 and 2A. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the physiopathologic effects of microcystin-LR in isolated perfused rat kidney. Adult Wistar rats (N = 5 of both sexes (240-280 g were utilized. Microcystin-LR (1 µg/ml was perfused over a period of 120 min, during which samples of urine and perfusate were collected at 10-min intervals to determine the levels of inulin, sodium, potassium and osmolality. We observed a significant increase in urinary flow with a peak effect at 90 min (control (C = 0.20 ± 0.01 and treated (T = 0.32 ± 0.01 ml g-1 min-1, P<0.05. At 90 min there was a significant increase in perfusate pressure (C = 129.7 ± 4.81 and T = 175.0 ± 1.15 mmHg and glomerular filtration rate (C = 0.66 ± 0.07 and T = 1.10 ± 0.04 ml g-1 min-1 and there was a significant reduction in fractional sodium tubular transport at 120 min (C = 78.6 ± 0.98 and T = 73.9 ± 0.95%. Histopathologic analysis of the perfused kidneys showed protein material in the urinary space, suggestive of renal toxicity. These data demonstrate renal vascular, glomerular and urinary effects of microcystin-LR, indicating that microcystin acts directly on the kidney by probable inhibition of protein phosphatases.

  18. Screening, Identification and Antibacterial Activities of Effective Thermotolerant Bacillus spp. Strains Isolated from Raw Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannikar SANTONG

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-one isolates of Bacillus species were isolated from raw milk, analyzed using the spot on lawn and agar diffusion method in terms of their general inhibition effects to test bacteria (Escherichia coli TISTR 887 and Staphylococcus aureus TISTR 517. The results demonstrated that most isolates are effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria whereas their extensive inhibition effect is particularly against Gram-positive bacteria. Only 2 effective thermotolerant isolates, BA8 and BA16, exerted broad spectrum antibacterial activities against both test bacteria.  Based on biochemical and physiological properties, they were classified as Brevibacillus laterosporus and Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius, respectively.

  19. Modulation of oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial protective effect of Semecarpus anacardium in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, Aseervatham; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanadham

    2010-04-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress play an important role in the complications of diabetes mellitus. Free radicals are produced when there is an electron leak in the mito-chondria and a change in the mitochondrial membrane potential. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of Semecarpus anacardium in protecting the mito-chondria by modulating the production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced using streptozotocin at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight and, starting 3 days after the induction, Semecarpus anacardium nut milk extract was administered for 21 days. The same duration of study was used for control, diabetes-induced and drug control groups, together with a group treated with metformin. After the experimental period, the animals were sacrificed and the levels of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, nitrate and nitrite were estimated. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium were also determined. Confocal laser microscopic images were taken for mitochondria isolated from the liver and kidneys. The results of the study revealed that Semecarpus anacardium was able to decrease the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and reverse the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and the influx of calcium into the mitochondria. The mitochondrial protective effect may be mediated by scavenging of free radicals and complexing of metal ions by virtue of the antioxidative effect of Semecarpus anacardium.

  20. The Effect of Gravitational Focusing on Annual Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Samuel K; Peter, Annika H G; Safdi, Benjamin R

    2014-01-01

    The scattering rate at dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to the Earth's orbit around the Sun. The rate is typically thought to be extremized around June 1, when the relative velocity of the Earth with respect to the dark-matter wind is maximal. We point out that gravitational focusing can alter this modulation phase. Unbound dark-matter particles are focused by the Sun's gravitational potential, affecting their phase-space density in the lab frame. Gravitational focusing can result in a significant overall shift in the annual-modulation phase, which is most relevant for dark matter with low scattering speeds. The induced phase shift for light O(10) GeV dark matter may also be significant, depending on the threshold energy of the experiment.

  1. In vitro evaluation of verapamil and other modulating agents in Brazilian chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum isolates Avaliação in vitro do verapamil e de outros agentes moduladores em isolados de Plasmodium falciparum resistentes à cloroquina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M.S. Menezes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Verapamil, was assayed to record its modulating effect upon Brazilian Plasmodium falciparum isolates resistant to chloroquine. Other cardiovascular drugs known to be modulating agents in resistant malaria and/or multidrug-resistant neoplasias, including nifedipine, nitrendipine, diltiazem and propranolol, were also evaluated. Concentrations similar to those for cardiovascular therapy were used in the in vitro microtechnique for antimalarial drug susceptibility. Intrinsic antiplasmodial activity was observed from the lowest concentrations without a significant modulating action. Other reported modulating agents, such as the antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine and the antidepressants desipramine and imipramine, demonstrated similar responses under the same experimental conditions. Results suggest a much higher susceptibility of Brazilian strains, as well as an indifferent behaviour in relation to modulating agents.Verapamil foi ensaiado quanto ao efeito modulador em isolados brasileiros de Plasmodium falciparum resistentes à cloroquina. Outros agentes cardiovasculares, considerados como moduladores da resistência em malária e/ou em neoplasias multiresistentes a fármacos, como nifedipino, nitrendipino, diltiazem e propranolol foram ensaiados quanto ao mesmo efeito. Concentrações semelhantes às da terapia cardiovascular foram empregadas no ensaio de microtécnica de sensibilidade para fármacos antimaláricos. Atividade antiplasmódica intrínsica foi observada desde as menores concentrações, sem, entretanto, ocorrência de modulação significativa da resistência. Sob as mesmas condições experimentais, respostas semelhantes foram observadas para outros agentes moduladores conhecidos como o antipsicótico trifluoperazina e os antidepressivos desipramina e imipramina. Em conjunto, estes resultados sugerem alta sensibilidade e comportamento indiferente de cepas brasileiras ao efeito de agentes moduladores da resistência.

  2. Effect of surface steps on the microstructure of lateral composition modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; NORMAN,A.G.; RENO,JOHN L.; JONES,ERIC D.; TWESTEN,R.D.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; MOUTINHO,H.; MASCARENHAS,A.

    2000-03-23

    Growth of InAs/AlAs short-period superlattices on appropriately miscut (001) InP substrates is shown to alter the microstructure of composition modulation from a 2D organization of short compositionally enriched wires to a single dominant modulation direction and wire lengths up to {approximately}1 {micro}m. The effects of miscut are interpreted in terms of surface step orientation and character. The material is strongly modulated and exhibits intense optical emission. The 1D modulations appear potentially useful for new devices that take advantage of the preferred direction formed in the growth plane.

  3. Ultra-wideband signal generator based on cross gain modulation effect in a distributed feedback laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dalei; Wang, Rong; Xiang, Peng; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Li, Yuandong; Su, Yang; Zheng, Jiling; Huang, Long; Zhu, Huatao; Huang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme to generate ultra-wideband (UWB) signals based on cross-gain modulation (XGM) effect in a DFB laser is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, and the modulation and transmission of the UWB signals are also experimentally investigated. In the proposed system, a gain-switched laser (GSL) is used as master laser (ML) and the optical pulses from the ML are optically injected into a DFB laser, which is used as slave laser (SL). By proper system configuration, UWB monocycle, doublet or triplet UWB signals can be generated after the balanced photodiode (BPD) detection. Besides, other modulation formats can also be realized, such as on-off keying (OOK) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) by properly modulating the ML optical pulses. Finally, fiber transmission of the modulated UWB signals is experimentally investigated, and it is shown that the UWB signals can be well maintained after 40 km optical fiber transmission.

  4. Thermal Impedance Model of High Power IGBT Modules Considering Heat Coupling Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Thermal loading of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) modules is important for the reliability performance of power electronic systems, thus the thermal information of critical points inside module like junction temperature must be accurately modeled and predicted. Usually in the existing...... thermal models, only the self-heating effects of the chips are taken into account, while the thermal coupling effects among chips are less considered. This could result in inaccurate temperature estimation, especially in the high power IGBT modules where the chips are allocated closely to each other...... with large amount of heat generated. In this paper, both the self-heating and heat-coupling effects in the of IGBT module are investigated based on Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation, a new thermal impedance model is thereby proposed to better describe the temperature distribution inside IGBT modules...

  5. The effect of conductor loss on half-wave voltage and modulation bandwidth of electro-optic modulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zilong Liu(刘子龙); Daqing Zhu(朱大庆)

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically deduce the expressions of half-wave voltage and 3-dB modulation bandwidth in which conductor loss is taken into account. The results suggest that it will affect the theoretical values of half-wave voltage and bandwidth as well as the optimized electrode's dimension whether considering the conductor loss or not. As an example, we present a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) type polymer waveguide amplitude modulator. The half-wave voltage increases by 1 V and the 3-dB bandwidth decreases by 30% when the conductor loss is taken into account. Besides, the effects of impedance mismatching and velocity mismatching between microwave and light wave on the half-wave voltage, and 3-dB bandwidth are discussed.

  6. The Effectiveness of a Virtual Field Trip (VFT) Module in Learning Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, Norbaizura; Osman, Kamisah

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Field Trip is a computer aided module of science developed to study the Colonisation and Succession in Mangrove Swamps, as an alternative to the real field trip in Form for Biology. This study is to identify the effectiveness of the Virtual Field Trip (VFT) module towards the level of achievement in the formative test for this topic. This…

  7. Effects of indole-3-acetic acid on Botrytis cinerea isolates obtained from potted plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J A; Valdés, R; Gómez-Bellot, M J; Bañón, S

    2011-01-01

    We study the growth of different isolates of Botrytis cinerea collected from potted plants which were affected by Botrytis blight in southern Spain during recent years. These isolates, which show widely phenotypic differences when grown in vitro, are differentially affected by growth temperature, gibberellic acid applications and paclobutrazol, an efficient plant growth retardant and fungicide at the same time. In this work, we have evaluated the effect of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) dose (0, 1, 10, and 100 mg/plate) on the growth of the collection of B. cinerea isolates obtained from the following potted plants: Cyclamen persicum, Hydrangea macrophylla, Lantona camara, and Lonicera japonica. B. cinerea produces indolacetic acid, but so far the precise biosynthetic pathway and some effects on this fungal species are still unclear, although recent studies have revealed an antifungal activity of IAA on several fungi, including B. cinerea isolated from harvested fruits. Mycelial growth curves and growth rates assessed from difference in colony areas during the both linear and deceleration phase, conidiation (measured as time of appearance), conidia length (microm), and sclerotia production (number/plate) were evaluated in the isolates, which were grown at 26 degrees C on Petri dishes containing potato dextrose agar for up to 35 days. Mycelial growth curves fitted a typical kinetic equation of fungi grown on solid media. B. cinerea isolates showed a high degree of variability in their growth kinetics, depending on the isolate and auxin dose. This plant growth substance delayed mycelial growth during the linear phase in an isolate-dependent manner, thus isolates from C. persicum, H. macrophylla and L. camara were more affected by IAA than L. japonica. On the other hand, 100 mg of IAA was the critical dose to significantly reduce the growth rate in all isolates and to promote brown-striped hyphae development, especially in isolate from C. persicum. 10 and 100 mg

  8. Effect of PV module output power on module temperature; Taiyo denchi no shutsuryoku henka ga module hyomen ondo ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongo, T.; Kitamura, A. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan); Igaki, K.; Mizumoto, T. [Kanden Kako Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Effect of the photovoltaic (PV) module output power variation on the module surface temperature has been investigated by field measurements. PV modules with capacity of 54 W were used for the temperature measurements. Three 2 kW-class PV systems were operated. T-type thermocouples were used for measuring temperatures. Measurement time intervals were 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, and 24 hours. Measurement period was between May 25, 1995 and June 25, 1996. The surface temperature increased during non-loaded PV output, and decreased during load-carrying PV output. Difference of the surface temperature between non-loaded PV output and load-carrying PV output was 3.5{degree}C at maximum through a year. The surface temperature was saturated within 30 minutes. When PV output was changed in 30 or 60 minutes interval, the variation of surface temperature was distinctly observed. When PV output was changed in 15 minutes interval, it was not observed distinctly. There was no difference of the surface temperatures during the time zones with less solar radiation, such as in the morning and evening, and at night. Except these time zones, difference of the surface temperatures was 3.5{degree}C at maximum. 4 figs.

  9. Aging and sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects: An EEG study in arithmetic problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinault, Thomas; Lemaire, Patrick; Phillips, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated age-related differences in electrophysiological signatures of sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects. Sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects refer to decreased poorer strategy effects (i.e., poorer performance when the cued strategy is not the best) on current problem following poorer strategy problems compared to after better strategy problems. Analyses on electrophysiological (EEG) data revealed important age-related changes in time, frequency, and coherence of brain activities underlying sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects. More specifically, sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects were associated with earlier and later time windows (i.e., between 200- and 550 ms and between 850- and 1250 ms). Event-related potentials (ERPs) also revealed an earlier onset in older adults, together with more anterior and less lateralized activations. Furthermore, sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects were associated with theta and alpha frequencies in young adults while these modulations were found in delta frequency and theta inter-hemispheric coherence in older adults, consistent with qualitatively distinct patterns of brain activity. These findings have important implications to further our understanding of age-related differences and similarities in sequential modulations of cognitive control processes during arithmetic strategy execution.

  10. Growth hormone modulation of arginine-induced glucagon release: studies of isolated growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Y; Taminato, T; Goto, Y; Inoue, Y; Kadowaki, S; Hattori, M; Mori, K; Kato, Y; Matsukura, S; Imura, H

    1978-12-01

    Plasma glucagon and insulin responses to L-arginine were compared in normal controls and patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly. Patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency were characterized by high plasma glucagon response and low plasma insulin response, whereas acromegalic patients showed exaggerated plasma glucagon response and almost normal insulin response. These results suggest that growth hormone is probably required for optimum function of the islets, and since hyperglucagonaemia was observed in both growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly, metabolic disturbances stemming from the respective primary diseases may affect glucagon secretion.

  11. Antibacterial Effect of Copper on Microorganisms Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Jara, Angelica; Cordero, Ninoska; Aguirre, Juan; Troncoso, Miriam; Figueroa, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial properties of copper have been recognized for several years; applying these properties to the prevention of diseases such as bovine mastitis is a new area of research. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vitro the antimicrobial activity of copper on bacteria isolated from subclinical and clinical mastitis milk samples from two regions in Chile. A total of 327 microorganisms were recovered between March and September 2013, with different prevalence by sample origin (25 and 75% from the central and southern regions of Chile, respectively). In the central region, Escherichia coli and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS) were the most frequently detected in clinical mastitis cases (33%), while in the southern region S. uberis, S. aureus, and CNS were detected with frequencies of 22, 21, and 18%, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility studies revealed that 34% of isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics and the resistance profile was different between bacterial species and origins of isolation of the bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration of copper (MIC-Cu) was evaluated in all the isolates; results revealed that a concentration as low as 250 ppm copper was able to inhibit the great majority of microorganisms analyzed (65% of isolates). The remaining isolates showed a MIC-Cu between 375 and 700 ppm copper, and no growth was observed at 1000 ppm. A linear relationship was found between the logarithm of viable bacteria number and time of contact with copper. With the application of the same concentration of copper (250 ppm), CNS showed the highest tolerance to copper, followed by S. uberis and S. aureus; the least resistant was E. coli. Based on these in vitro results, copper preparations could represent a good alternative to dipping solutions, aimed at preventing the presence and multiplication of potentially pathogenic microorganisms involved in bovine mastitis disease. PMID:27199953

  12. Antibacterial effect of copper on microorganisms isolated from bovine mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica eReyes-Jara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial properties of copper have been recognized for several years; applying these properties to the prevention of diseases such as bovine mastitis is a new area of research. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vitro the antimicrobial activity of copper on bacteria isolated from subclinical and clinical mastitis milk samples from two regions in Chile. A total of 327 microorganisms were recovered between March and September 2013, with different prevalence by sample origin (25% and 75% from the central and southern regions of Chile, respectively. In the central region, E. coli and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS were the most frequently detected in clinical mastitis cases (33%, while in the southern region S. uberis, S. aureus and CNS were detected with frequencies of 22%, 21% and 18%, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility studies revealed that 34% of isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics and the resistance profile was different between bacterial species and origins of isolation of the bacteria.The minimum inhibitory concentration of copper (MIC-Cu was evaluated in all the isolates; results revealed that a concentration as low as 250 ppm copper was able to inhibit the great majority of microorganisms analyzed (65% of isolates. The remaining isolates showed a MIC-Cu between 375 and 700 ppm copper, and no growth was observed at 1000 ppm. A linear relationship was found between the logarithm of viable bacteria number and time of contact with copper. With the application of the same concentration of copper (250 ppm, CNS showed the highest tolerance to copper, followed by S. uberis and S. aureus; the least resistant was E.coli. Based on these in vitro results, copper preparations could represent a good alternative to dipping solutions, aimed at preventing the presence and multiplication of potentially pathogenic microorganisms involved in bovine mastitis disease.

  13. Automated Image Segmentation And Characterization Technique For Effective Isolation And Representation Of Human Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Reddy N

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In areas such as defense and forensics, it is necessary to identify the face of the criminals from the already available database. Automated face recognition system involves face isolation, feature extraction and classification technique. Challenges in face recognition system are isolating the face effectively as it may be affected by illumination, posture and variation in skin color. Hence it is necessary to develop an effective algorithm that isolates face from the image. In this paper, advanced face isolation technique and feature extraction technique has been proposed.

  14. Effect of modulator sorption on gradient shape in ion-exchange chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayudhan, A.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Mobile phase additives, or modulators, are used in gradient elution chromatography to facilitate separation and reduce separation time. The modulators are usually assumed to be linearly adsorbed or unadsorbed. Here, the consequences of nonlinear modulator adsorption are examined for ion-exchange gradient elution through a series of simulations. Even when the buffer salt is identical to the modulator salt, gradient deformation is observed; the extent of deformation increases as the volume of the feed is increased. When the modulator salt is different from the buffer salt, unusual effects are observed, and the chromatograms are quite different from those predicted by classical gradient elution theory. In particular, local increases in the buffer concentration are found between feed bands, and serve to improve the separation. These effects become more pronounced as the feed volume increases, and could therefore prove valuable in preparative applications.

  15. The effect of input phase modulation to a phase-sensitive optical amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tian; Horrom, Travis; Jones, Kevin M; Lett, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Many optical applications depend on amplitude modulating optical beams using devices such as acousto-optical modulators (AOMs) or optical choppers. Methods to add amplitude modulation (AM) often inadvertently impart phase modulation (PM) onto the light as well. While this PM is of no consequence to many phase-insensitive applications, phase-sensitive processes can be affected. Here we study the effects of input phase and amplitude modulation on the output of a quantum-noise limited phase-sensitive optical amplifier (PSA) realized in hot $^{85}$Rb vapor. We investigate the dependence of PM on AOM alignment and demonstrate a novel approach to quantifying PM by using the PSA as a diagnostic tool. We then use this method to measure the alignment-dependent PM of an optical chopper which arises due to diffraction effects as the chopper blade passes through the optical beam.

  16. Cost Effective System Modeling of Active Micro- Module Solar Tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Faisal Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing interests in using renewable energies are coming from solar thermal energy and solar photovoltaic systems to the micro production of electricity. Usually we already have considered the solar tracking topology in large scale applications like power plants and satellite but most of small scale applications don’t have any solar tracker system, mainly because of its high cost and complex circuit design. From that aspect, this paper confab microcontroller based one dimensional active micro-module solar tracking system, in which inexpensive LDR is used to generate reference voltage to operate microcontroller for functioning the tracking system. This system provides a fast response of tracking system to the parameters like change of light intensity as well as temperature variations. This micro-module model of tracking system can be used for small scale applications like portable electronic devices and running vehicles.

  17. Antibiotic cytotoxic effects of microorganisms isolated from Jachymov uranium mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuska, J.; Fuskova, A. (Slovenska Vysoka Skola Technicka, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Chemickotechnologicka Fakulta); Jilek, R. (Vyzkumny Ustav Veterinarniho Lekarstvi, Brno-Medlanky (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-01-01

    Microorganisms were isolated from old relinquished uranium mines in Jachymov; they had been growing for several decades in darkness in temperatures of 5 to 12 degC and relative humidity from 80 to 100%. The concentration of uranium salts in mine waters varied from 10/sup -4/ to 10/sup -5/ g.l/sup -1/, that of Rn in the atmosphere was from 0.04 to 40 Bq.l/sup -1/. Of 324 cultures, 18.8% inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Candida pseudotropicalis and 16.6% that of HeLa cells. The frequency of microorganisms inhibiting the growth of HeLa or Ehrlich ascites cells was markedly higher in this set of cultures than among microorganisms kept in culture collections or isolated from other natural habitats. About 10% of the isolated cultures were mycelia sterilia. The following antibiotics were isolated from microorganisms obtained from uranium mines: frequentin, vermiculin, vermicillin, vermistatin, cytostipin and duclauxin.

  18. Aging-related changes in the effects of social isolation on social behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hirotaka; Mizoguchi, Kazushige

    2011-01-10

    Aging is generally associated with cognitive dysfunction and alterations in emotional response. Moreover, in social situations, aging decreases social interaction with unfamiliar individuals, suggesting the decline of social cognition/motivation and a high level of anxiety. Although it is known that isolation housing has various effects on subsequent behavior, including social interaction depending on the age at isolation, the effects of isolation on aged subjects have not been examined. In the present study, we investigated the effects of aging and different periods of isolation housing on social interaction in male F344/N rats. Young (3-4months old) and aged (24-25months old) rats were either group-housed or socially isolated for 2 or 4weeks. The rats were tested with age-matched and group-housed unfamiliar males in a social interaction test, and social (e.g. approach/following and sniffing) and non-social behaviors (e.g. self-grooming and ambulation) were recorded. The results indicated that group-housed aged rats showed less approach/following, sniffing, and ambulation than group-housed young rats. Moreover, in young rats, isolation housing gradually increased approach/following and sniffing depending on the isolation period. In contrast, in aged rats, more prolonged isolation (4weeks) attenuated the 2-week isolation-induced increase of sniffing behavior and had no effect on approach/following. The present study suggests that aging decreases social investigation and induces high emotional response to a novel social environment, and that the behaviors can be differentially affected by social isolation depending on the age at isolation and the period of isolation.

  19. Effects of morphine and endomorphins on the polysynaptic reflex in the isolated rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Pao-Luh; Lai, Yong-Shang; Chow, Lok-Hi; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2005-01-01

    At the spinal level, mu-opioids exert their actions on nociceptive primary afferent neurons both pre- and postsynaptically. In the present study, we used an in vitro isolated neonatal rat (11-15 days old) spinal cord preparation to examine the effects of morphine and the endogenous mu-opioid ligands endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) on the polysynaptic reflex (PSR) of dorsal root-ventral root (DR-VR) reflex. The actions of mu-opioids on spinal nociception were investigated by quantification of the firing frequency and the mean amplitude of the PSR evoked by stimuli with 20 x threshold intensity. EM-1 decreased the mean amplitude of PSR, whereas EM-2 and morphine decreased the firing frequency. The pattern of the effects elicited by morphine was the same as that for EM-2, except at high concentration. Naloxonazine, a selective mu(1) opioid receptor antagonist, had no significant effect on PSR by itself, but blocked the inhibition of PSR firing frequency or amplitude induced by EM-1, -2 and morphine. This may suggest that EM-1, EM-2 and morphine modulate spinal nociception differently and act mainly at the mu(1)-opioid receptors. Although they all act via mu(1)-opioid receptors, their different effects on the PSR may suggest the existence of different subtypes of the mu(1)-opioid receptor. The present data is also consistent with a further hypothesis, namely, that morphine and EM-2 activate a subtype of mu(1)-opioid receptor presynaptically, while EM-1 acts mainly through another subtype postsynaptically. However, since other reports indicate that EM-2, but not EM-1, could stimulate the release of enkephalins or dynorphin, presynaptic delta and kappa receptors may be also involved indirectly in the different regulation by mu-opioids at the spinal level.

  20. Pharmacological modulation of late radio-induced side effects; Modulation pharmacologique des effets tardifs de l'irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, C.; Bourhis, J.; Deutsch, E. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Monceau, V. [Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Vozenin, M.C. [Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Unite mixte de recherche ' cellules souches et radiations' , Inserm unite 967, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, institut de radiobiologie cellulaire et moleculaire (iRCM), direction des sciences du vivant, CEA, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, universite Paris-Diderot Paris 7, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, universite Paris Sud 11, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    After normal tissue exposure to radiation therapy, late side effects can occur and may reduce patients' quality of life due to their progressive nature. Late toxicities occurrence is the main limiting factor of radiotherapy. Various biological disorders related to irradiation are involved in the development of late toxicities including fibrosis. The present review will focus on the recent physiopathological and molecular mechanisms described to be involved in the development of late radio-induced toxicities, that provide therapeutic perspective for pharmaco-modulation. (authors)

  1. Asymmetrically pumped Bragg scattering with the effects of nonlinear phase modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Reddy, Dileep V.

    2014-01-01

    We derive exact solutions to asymmetrically pumped Bragg scattering with nonlinear phase-modulation (NPM) and show that this setup allows for the frequency conversion of many temporal modes, while reducing the effects due to NPM.......We derive exact solutions to asymmetrically pumped Bragg scattering with nonlinear phase-modulation (NPM) and show that this setup allows for the frequency conversion of many temporal modes, while reducing the effects due to NPM....

  2. Effect of cAMP on short-circuit current in isolated human ciliary body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-yi; MA Ning; HU Qian-qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) could activate chloride channels in bovine ciliary body and trigger an increase in the ionic current (short-circuit current,Isc) across the ciliary processes in pigs.The purpose of this study was to investigate how cAMP modulates Isc in isolated human ciliary processes and the possible involvement of chloride transport across the tissue in cAMP-induced Isc change.Methods In an Ussing-type chamber system,the Isc changes induced by the cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP and an adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in isolated human ciliary processes were assessed.The involvement of Cl-component in the bath solution was investigated.The effect of Cl-channel (10 μmol/L niflumic acid and 1 mmol/L 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS)),K+ channel (10 mmol/L tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA)),or Na+ channel blockers (1 mmol/L amiloride) on 8-bromo-cAMP-induced Isc change was also studied.Results Dose-dependently,8-bromo-cAMP (10 nmol/L-30 μmol/L) or forskolin (10 nmol/L-3 μmol/L) increased Isc across the ciliary processes with an increase in negative potential difference on the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) side of the tissue.Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP was more pronounced when the drug was applied on the NPE side than on the pigmented epithelium side.When the tissue was bathed in low Cl-solutions,the Isc increase was significantly inhibited.Finally,niflumic acid and DIDS,but not TEA or amiloride,significantly prevented the Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP.Conclusions cAMP stimulates stroma-to-aqueous anionic transport in isolated human ciliary processes.Chloride is likely to be among the ions,the transportation of which across the tissue is triggered by cAMP,suggesting the potential role of cAMP in the process of aqueous humor formation in human eyes.

  3. Isolation of cDNAs of scrapie-modulated RNAs by subtractive hybridization of a cDNA library.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We have developed a subtractive cloning procedure based on the hybridization of single-stranded cDNA libraries constructed in pi H3M, a vector containing the phage M13 origin of replication. We have used this strategy to isolate three transcripts whose abundance is increased in scrapie-infected brain. DNA sequence analysis showed that they represent glial fibrillary acidic protein, metallothionein II, and the B chain of alpha-crystallin; the latter two may represent a response to stress.

  4. Theoretical and experimental investigation of fluid rheology effects on modulated ultrasound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkök, Okan; Uludag, Yusuf

    2014-09-01

    A mathematical model is developed and presented to capture the effect of viscoelastic nature of a material on modulated ultrasound (US) pulses. The model is established by considering perturbation of material elements subject to modulated US pulses and by introducing the exponential relaxation of the perturbed fluid elements with a spectrum of time constants. Both the model and experimental findings revealed that consecutive perturbation of a material via the modulated US pulses enabled to probe the relaxation times of similar order of magnitudes to the frequency of the US modulation while filtering out the impact of other relaxation times on the US measurement. The US experimental results were verified by those of a conventional rheometer. Hence carrying out measurements at different US modulation frequencies in the Hz ranges seems to allow one to obtain the relaxation time spectrum of the investigated material in the time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of mindfulness meditation training on anticipatory alpha modulation in primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Catherine E; Jones, Stephanie R; Wan, Qian; Pritchett, Dominique L; Wasserman, Rachel H; Wexler, Anna; Villanueva, Joel J; Shaw, Jessica R; Lazar, Sara W; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Littenberg, Ronnie; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Moore, Christopher I

    2011-05-30

    During selective attention, ∼7-14 Hz alpha rhythms are modulated in early sensory cortices, suggesting a mechanistic role for these dynamics in perception. Here, we investigated whether alpha modulation can be enhanced by "mindfulness" meditation (MM), a program training practitioners in sustained attention to body and breath-related sensations. We hypothesized that participants in the MM group would exhibit enhanced alpha power modulation in a localized representation in the primary somatosensory neocortex in response to a cue, as compared to participants in the control group. Healthy subjects were randomized to 8-weeks of MM training or a control group. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recording of the SI finger representation, we found meditators demonstrated enhanced alpha power modulation in response to a cue. This finding is the first to show enhanced local alpha modulation following sustained attentional training, and implicates this form of enhanced dynamic neural regulation in the behavioral effects of meditative practice.

  6. EVALUATION METHOD FOR PARASITIC EFFECTS OF THE ELECTRO-OPTICAL MODULATOR IN A FIBER OPTIC GYROSCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Volkovskiy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper proposes an original method for studying the parasitic effects in the electro-optic modulator of the fiber optic gyroscope. Proposed method is based on the usage of a special waveform phase modulation signal. Method. The essence of the proposed method lies in modification of serrodyne modulation signal, thereby providing a periodic displacement of the phase difference signal to the maximum of the interference curve. In this case, the intensity level reflects the influence of parasitic effects with the degree of manifestation being determined by the sequence of voltage control signals applied to the modulator. Enumeration of combinations of control signals and the corresponding intensity levels gives the possibility to observe an empirical dependence of the parasitic effects and use it later for compensation. Main Results. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated by the program model of the fiber optic gyroscope. The results of the method application on a production sample of the device were obtained. Comparison with the results of direct estimate of the parasitic intensity modulation effect testifies to the effectiveness of the proposed method. Practical Relevance. The method can be used as a diagnostic tool to quantify the influence of parasitic effects in the electro-optic modulator of the fiber optic gyroscope as well as for their subsequent compensation.

  7. Effects of linguistic experience on the ability to benefit from temporal and spectral masker modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandruccio, Lauren; Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W

    2014-03-01

    Masked speech perception can often be improved by modulating the masker temporally and/or spectrally. These effects tend to be larger in normal-hearing listeners than hearing-impaired listeners, and effects of temporal modulation are larger in adults than young children [Hall et al. (2012). Ear Hear. 33, 340-348]. Initial reports indicate non-native adult speakers of the target language also have a reduced ability to benefit from temporal masker modulation [Stuart et al. (2010). J. Am. Acad. Aud. 21, 239-248]. The present study further investigated the effect of masker modulation on English speech recognition in normal-hearing adults who are non-native speakers of English. Sentence recognition was assessed in a steady-state baseline masker condition and in three modulated masker conditions, characterized by spectral, temporal, or spectro-temporal modulation. Thresholds for non-natives were poorer than those of native English speakers in all conditions, particularly in the presence of a modulated masker. The group differences were consistent across maskers when assessed in percent correct, suggesting that a single factor may limit the performance of non-native listeners similarly in all conditions.

  8. On the effect of self-steepening in modulation instability

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, Santiago M; Bonetti, Juan; Grosz, Diego F

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the problem of modulation instability (MI) in optical fibers, including higher-order dispersion terms, self-steepening, and Raman response. We derive expressions for the MI gain and use them to explore the role of self-steepening towards a high-power limit. We show that, contrary to common wisdom, there is a pump power level that maximizes the MI gain. Further increasing the power not only diminishes the gain, but eventually makes it disappear. We believe these findings to be of special relevance, for instance, when applied to the generation of supercontinuum in the mid and far infrared bands. Finally, numerical simulations confirming our analytical results are presented.

  9. Organic fragments from graphene oxide: Isolation, characterization and solvent effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravula Thirupathi; Y Jayasubba Reddy; Erode N Prabhakaran; Hanudatta S Atreya

    2014-05-01

    As-prepared graphene oxide (GO) contains oxidative debris which can be washed using basic solutions. We present the isolation and characterization of these debris. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used to monitor the separation of the debris in various solvents in the presence of different protic and aprotic alkylamino bases. The study reveals that the debris are rich in carbonyl functional groups and water is an essential component for separation and removal of the debris from GO under oxidative reaction conditions.

  10. Studies on transmitted beam modulation effect from laser induced damage on fused silica optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Ma, Ping; Li, Haibo; Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin

    2013-07-15

    UV laser induced damage (LID) on exit surface of fused silica could cause modulation effect to transmitted beam and further influence downstream propagation properties. This paper presents our experimental and analytical studies on this topic. In experiment, a series of measurement instruments are applied, including beam profiler, interferometer, microscope, and optical coherent tomography (OCT). Creating and characterizing of LID on fused silica sample have been implemented. Morphological features are studied based on their particular modulation effects on transmitted beam. In theoretical investigation, analytical modeling and numerical simulation are performed. Modulation effects from amplitude, phase, and size factors are analyzed respectively. Furthermore, we have novelly designed a simplified polygon model to simulate actual damage site with multiform modulation features, and the simulation results demonstrate that the modeling is usable and representative.

  11. An effective technique for isolating adult activated Schwann cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jifei Zhang; Lianhong Jin; Yuzhen Zhao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schwann cells (SCs) are neuroglial cells of peripheral nerve and play a key role in repairing peripheral nerve injury; therefore, it provides an important evidence for transplantation of SCs which are characterized by active proliferation and adult high-purity in vitro after nerve injury in clinic, and also develops a new therapeutic way for nerve injury.OBJECTIVE: To investigate an effective technique for isolating adult activated Schwann cells.DESIGN: Controlled observational study.SETTING: Mudanjiang Medical College.MATERIALS: The experiment was completed at the Department of Medical Genetics of Harbin Medical University from March 2003 to April 2005. Health female Wistar rats, aged 2 months, weighting 150-160 g, were randomly divided into 3 groups with 5 in each group.METHODS: The right sciatic nerves from 15 Wistar rats were exposed and transected at the mid thigh under pentobarbital anesthesia (4 mg/kg, I.p). Seven days later, the distal segments of the predegenerated nerves were removed and used to produce adult Schwann cell cultures. The distal segment of the predegenerated nerve, 20 mm in length, was resected. The nerve was cut into pieces 1 mm in length and incubated for 3 hours under CO2 at 37 ℃ with an enzyme mixture of 0.05% collagenase/dispase. Rats were divided into 3 groups:① Group 1: The nerve fragments were explanted in poly-L-lysine and laminin-coated dishes with BS medium from the 1st to the 6th day. On the 6th day, the fragments were removed into a new poly-L-lysine-laminin-coated dish and the BS medium was changed to BS with 10% FBS. The nerve fragments were replaced repeatedly in the same way in new dishes on the 12th and the 18th days. ②Group 2: For the first 3 days, the nerve fragments were fed with BS with 10% FBS. This medium was changed to BS medium on the third day. The nerve fragments were removed to another dish on day 6 and BS medium was changed to BS with 25 mL/L FBS. Hereafter the culture method was the same as

  12. Sulphated Polysaccharide Isolated from the Seaweed Gracilaria caudata Exerts an Antidiarrhoeal Effect in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Douglas S; Araújo, Thiago S L; Sousa, Nayara A; Souza, Luan K M; Pacífico, Dvison M; Sousa, Francisca Beatriz M; Nicolau, Lucas A D; Chaves, Luciano S; Barros, Francisco Clark N; Freitas, Ana Lúcia P; Medeiros, Jand Venes R

    2016-06-01

    Diarrhoea is a significant health problem for children in developing countries that causes more than 1 million deaths annually. This study aimed to evaluate the antidiarrhoeal effect of sulphated polysaccharide (PLS) from the alga Gracilaria caudata in rodents. For the evaluation, acute diarrhoea was induced in Wistar rats (150-200 g) by administration of castor oil (10 mg/kg). Then, different parameters, including enteropooling and gastrointestinal transit and its pharmacological modulation by opioid and cholinergic pathways, were assessed using activated charcoal in Swiss Mice (25-30 g). Secretory diarrhoea was examined using cholera toxin (CT) (1 mg/loop)-treated, isolated intestinal loops from Swiss mice (25-30 g), which were also used to examine fluid secretion, loss of chloride ions into the intestinal lumen and absorption. In addition, a GM1-dependent ELISA was used to evaluate the interaction between PLS, CT and the GM1 receptor. Pre-treatment with PLS (10, 30 and 90 mg/kg) reduced faecal mass, diarrhoeal faeces and enteropooling. However, 90 mg/kg more effectively reduced these symptoms; therefore, it was used as the standard dose in subsequent experiments. Gastrointestinal transit was also reduced by PLS treatment via a cholinergic mechanism. Regarding the diarrhoea caused by CT, PLS reduced all study parameters, and the ELISA showed that PLS can interact with both the GM1 receptor and CT. These results show that PLS from G. caudata effectively improved the parameters observed in acute and secretory diarrhoea, which affects millions of people, and may lead to the development of a new alternative therapy for this disease.

  13. The effect of endovascular treatment on isolated iliac artery aneurysm treatment and mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B.; Bensley, Rodney P.; Darling, Jeremy; Curran, Thomas; McCallum, John C.; Moll, Frans L.; Van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are rare, but potentially fatal. The effect of recent trends in the use of endovascular iliac aneurysm repair (EVIR) on isolated iliac artery aneurysm-associated mortality is unknown. Methods We identified all patients with a primary diagnosis of iliac arter

  14. Effects on the Floor Response Spectra by the Nonlinear Behavior of a Seismic Base Isolation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyungkui; Kim, Jung Han; Choi, Inkil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    An evaluation of safety being carried out for various risk factors of prevents for nuclear power plant accident. In general, an evaluation of the structural integrity was performed about seismic risk. In recent years, an assessment of integrity of internal equipment being carried out for earthquake loads owing to the possibility of severe accidents caused by the destruction of internal equipment or a blackout. Floor response spectra of the structure should be sought for evaluating of the integrity of internal equipment. The floor response spectra depends on the characteristics of seismic base isolation system such as the natural frequency, damping ratio, and height of the floor of the structure. An evaluation of the structural integrity using the equivalent stiffness of the seismic base isolation system was satisfactory. In this study, the effect of the non-linearity of isolated system in the floor response spectrum of the structure is analyzed. In this study, the floor response spectrum of the seismic base isolation system by the non-linear effect of the rubber isolator was analyzed. As a result, the influence of the non-linear isolated system was increased in hi-frequency domain. In addition, each floor exhibited a more different of responses compared with the equivalent linear model of the isolated structure. The non-linearity of the isolation system of the structure was considered, because of a more reliable assessment of integrity of equipment at each floor of seismic base the isolation system.

  15. Purification and biological effects of C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops insularis venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Marcus Davis Machado; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Amora, Daniela Nascimento; de Menezes, Dalgimar Beserra; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Toyama, Daniela Oliveira; Marangoni, Sergio; Barbosa, Paulo Sérgio Ferreira; de Sousa Alves, Renata; Fonteles, Manassés Claudino; Monteiro, Helena Serra Azul

    2006-06-15

    Bothrops insularis is a snake from Queimada Grande Island, which is an island located about 20 miles away from the southeastern coast of Brazil. Compared to other Brazilian species of Bothrops, the toxinology of B. insularis is still poorly understood. Its C-type lectin is involved in several biological processes including anticoagulant and platelet-modulating activities. We purified the C-type lectin (BiLec) from Bothrops insularis venom and investigated its effect in the isolated kidney. BiLec was purified after two chromatographic steps; firstly, the whole venom was submitted to an HPLC molecular exclusion chromatography followed by a second purification through affinity chromatography. B. insularis lectin (BiLec) was studied as to its effect on the renal function of isolated perfused rat kidneys with the use of six Wistar rats. The concentration of 10mug/mL increased perfusion pressure (PP; control(60)=108.27+/-4.9; BiLec(60)=112.9+/-5.4 mmHg; *p<0.05) and renal vascular resistance (RVR; control(60)=5.38+/-0.51; BiLec(60)=6.01+/-0.57 mmHg; *p<0.05). The urinary flow reduced significantly at 90 and 120 min of perfusion (UF; control(120)=0.160+/-0.020; BiLec(120)=0.082+/-0.008 mL g(-1) min(-1); *p<0.05). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR; control(120)=0.697+/-0.084; BiLec(120)=0.394+/-0.063 mL g(-1) min(-1); *p<0.05) diminished only at 120 min. BiLec did not change the percentage of sodium (TNa(+)), potassium (TK(+)) and chloride tubular transport (TCl(-)). The histological alterations probably reflected direct injury on glomerular and tubular renal cells, as demonstrated by the rise in permeability of glomerular endothelial cells, revealed by the presence of a proteinaceous material in the Bowman space. We postulate that the C-type lectin B. insularis promoted its effects probably through interactions with endothelial cells or through the release of other mediators by tubular, mesangial and endothelial cells.

  16. Notice of Violation of IEEE Publication PrinciplesJoint Redundant Residue Number Systems and Module Isolation for Mitigating Single Event Multiple Bit Upsets in Datapath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Hu, Jianhao

    2010-12-01

    Notice of Violation of IEEE Publication Principles"Joint Redundant Residue Number Systems and Module Isolation for Mitigating Single Event Multiple Bit Upsets in Datapath"by Lei Li and Jianhao Hu,in the IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, vol.57, no.6, Dec. 2010, pp. 3779-3786After careful and considered review of the content and authorship of this paper by a duly constituted expert committee, this paper has been found to be in violation of IEEE's Publication Principles.This paper contains substantial duplication of original text from the paper cited below. The original text was copied without attribution (including appropriate references to the original author(s) and/or paper title) and without permission.Due to the nature of this violation, reasonable effort should be made to remove all past references to this paper, and future references should be made to the following articles:"Multiple Error Detection and Correction Based on Redundant Residue Number Systems"by Vik Tor Goh and M.U. Siddiqi,in the IEEE Transactions on Communications, vol.56, no.3, March 2008, pp.325-330"A Coding Theory Approach to Error Control in Redundant Residue Number Systems. I: Theory and Single Error Correction"by H. Krishna, K-Y. Lin, and J-D. Sun, in the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing, vol.39, no.1, Jan 1992, pp.8-17In this paper, we propose a joint scheme which combines redundant residue number systems (RRNS) with module isolation (MI) for mitigating single event multiple bit upsets (SEMBUs) in datapath. The proposed hardening scheme employs redundant residues to improve the fault tolerance for datapath and module spacings to guarantee that SEMBUs caused by charge sharing do not propagate among the operation channels of different moduli. The features of RRNS, such as independence, parallel and error correction, are exploited to establish the radiation hardening architecture for the datapath in radiation environments. In the proposed

  17. Field-effect modulation of the thermoelectric characteristics of silicon nanowires on plastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinyong; Jeon, Youngin; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the substantial enhancement of the thermoelectric power factors of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) on plastic substrates achievable by field-effect modulation. The Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity are adjusted by varying the charge carrier concentration via electrical modulation with a gate voltage in the 0 to ±5 range, thus enhancing the power factors from 2.08 to 935 μW K-2 m-1) for n-type SiNWs, and from 453 to 944 μW K-2 m-1) for p-type SiNWs. The electrically modulated thermoelectric characteristics of SiNWs are analyzed and discussed.

  18. Polymer Electro-optic Modulator Linear Bias Using the Thermo-optic Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-Qiang; CHEN Chang-Ming; LI Xiao-Dong; WANG Xi-Bin; YANG Tian-Fu; ZHANG Da-Ming; WANG Fei; XIE Zhi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A quasi-rectangular waveguide polymer Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) electro-optic (EO) modulator based on an organic/inorganic hybrid material with thermal bias control is fabricated and demonstrated. Linear bias for the modulator is obtained through thermo-optic effect. The optical output is adjusted by changing phase difference between the two arms of the M-Z interferometer. A power consumption of 16.1 mW for π phase change is observed owing to the application of silica cladding. This approach is proved to be effective to suppress direct current drift in polymer EO modulators.%A quasi-rectangular waveguide polymer Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) electro-optic (EO) modulator based on an organic/inorganic hybrid material with thermal bias control is fabricated and demonstrated.Linear bias for the modulator is obtained through thermo-optic effect.The optical output is adjusted by changing phase difference between the two arms of the M-Z interferometer.A power consumption of 16.1 m W for π phase change is observed owing to the application of silica cladding.This approach is proved to be effective to suppress direct current drift in polymer EO modulators.

  19. Effect of Mean Angle of Attack Modulation on Dynamic Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Kyle; Corke, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments at M = 0 . 2 were conducted on a cambered airfoil instrumented with surface pressure transducers that was oscillated with two independent frequencies. The primary input, f1, corresponds to a range of reduced frequencies, while the slower, secondary input, f2, drives the modulation of the mean angle of attack, thus varying the stall-penetration angle, αpen. Various combinations transitioned different regimes of dynamic stall from "light" to "deep". Results suggest that when αpen is falling between consecutive cycles, the aerodynamic loads do not fully recover to the values seen when αpen is rising, even though the airfoil recedes to αpen load coefficients, aerodynamic damping, and their phase relationships to pitch angle. APS Fellow.

  20. Effects of intensity-modulated radiotherapy on human oral microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zi-Yang; Tang, Zi-Sheng; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Yun-Tao; Ma, Rui; Liu, Zheng; Huang, Zheng-Wei

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in the biodiversity of the oral microflora of patients with head and neck cancer treated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Pooled dental plaque samples were collected during the radiation treatment from patients receiving IMRT (n = 13) and CRT (n = 12). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to analyze the temporal variation of these plaque samples. The stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were also compared between IMRT and CRT patients. Reductions in the severity of hyposalivation were observed in IMRT patients compared with CRT patients. We also observed that the temporal stability of the oral ecosystem was significantly higher in the IMRT group (69.96 ± 7.82%) than in the CRT group (51.98 ± 10.45%) (P oral ecosystem than CRT.

  1. Anti-thrombotic effects of selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Manasa K; Singh, Sunil K; Roy, Arnab; Prakash, Vivek; Kumar, Anand; Dash, Debabrata

    2011-10-01

    Tamoxifen is a known anti-cancer drug and established estrogen receptor modulator. Few clinical studies have earlier implicated the drug in thrombotic complications attributable to lower anti-thrombin and protein S levels in plasma. However, action of tamoxifen on platelet signalling machinery has not been elucidated in detail. In the present report we show that tamoxifen is endowed with significant inhibitory property against human platelet aggregation. From a series of in vivo and in vitro studies tamoxifen was found to inhibit almost all platelet functions, prolong tail bleeding time in mouse and profoundly prevent thrombus formation at injured arterial wall in mice, as well as on collagen matrix perfused with platelet-rich plasma under arterial shear against the vehicle dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). These findings strongly suggest that tamoxifen significantly downregulates platelet responses and holds potential as a promising anti-platelet/anti-thrombotic agent.

  2. An Effective Method for Total RNA Isolation from Bamboo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhimin; LI Xueping; LI Lubin; PENG Zhenhua

    2006-01-01

    Trizol reagent was used for RNA isolation from fresh leaves of Dendrocalamopsis oldhami, Bambusa ventricosa and Phyllostachys aureosulcata cv. Pekinensis. The extracted RNA from leaves had the normal ultraviolet absorption, the value of OD26(/OD280 varied between 1.8-2.0. The 28s rRNA was more than two times brighter than 18s rRNA in electrophoresis. These results indicated that the total RNA was complete and not degraded. According to our experiments, RNA could be obtained simply with this method, and can be used for molecular manipulation such as cDNA synthesis and gene cloning.

  3. APPLICATION OF MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE AND MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING IN STUDYING ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence is a widely used tool to monitor the photosynthetic process in plants subjected to environmental stresses.this review reports the theoretical bases of Chl fluorescence, and the significance of the most important Chl fluorescence parameters. it also reportshow these parameters can be utilised to estimate changes in photosystem ii (PSII photochemistry, linear electron flux and energy dissipationmechanisms. the relation between actual PSII photochemistry and CO2 assimilation is discussed, as is the role of photochemical andnon-photochemical quenching in inducing changes in PSII activity. the application of Chl fluorescence imaging to study heterogeneity on leaflamina is also considered. this review summarises only some of the results obtained by this methodology to study the effects of differentenvironmental stresses, namely water and nutrients availability, pollutants, temperature and salinity.

  4. Side-gate modulation effects on high-quality BN-Graphene-BN nanoribbon capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Xiaolong; Ye, Weiguang; Wu, Zefei; Han, Yu; Han, Tianyi; He, Yuheng; Cai, Yuan; Wang, Ning, E-mail: phwang@ust.hk [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-12-15

    High-quality BN-Graphene-BN nanoribbon capacitors with double side-gates of graphene have been experimentally realized. The double side-gates can effectively modulate the electronic properties of graphene nanoribbon capacitors. By applying anti-symmetric side-gate voltages, we observed significant upward shifting and flattening of the V-shaped capacitance curve near the charge neutrality point. Symmetric side-gate voltages, however, only resulted in tilted upward shifting along the opposite direction of applied gate voltages. These modulation effects followed the behavior of graphene nanoribbons predicted theoretically for metallic side-gate modulation. The negative quantum capacitance phenomenon predicted by numerical simulations for graphene nanoribbons modulated by graphene side-gates was not observed, possibly due to the weakened interactions between the graphene nanoribbon and side-gate electrodes caused by the Ga{sup +} beam etching process.

  5. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  6. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  7. LIGHT MODULATION COMBINING POCKELS EFFECT WITH FARADAY EFFECT AND ITS FUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChertJidong; QiaoSong

    1996-01-01

    With brief statements of the linear electro-optical modulation and magnetooptical modulation, using the method of resultant of optical amplitude vectors and themethod of Jones matrix, formulas for intensity of transmitted light through the opticalanalyzer of various composition of electro-optical effect with magneto-optical effect arederived. The results show that the output beam from the analyzer carries informationon current (or magnetic field), voltage (or electric field), active power and apparentpower. When the light beam transmitted through the analyzer are transformed intoelectric signals, three kinds of information are included: the DC term corresponding toan active power, the term with frequency ω(50 Hz) corresponding to current or voltage, and the term with frequency 2ω(100 Hz) corresponding to an apparent power. So, we can use the elctric filter circuit to pick out the DC component for measuringactive power to pick out the component with frequency ω(50 Hz) for measuring current or voltage and to pick out the component with frequency 2ω(100 Hz) for measuring apparent power. The paper discusses: what quantifies are measured when theanalyzer is set on certain definite values, and points out the optimum selection for various measurements.

  8. Analysis of Bi-directional Effects on the Response of a Seismic Base Isolation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung-Kui; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In-Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The floor response spectrum depends on the height of the floor of the structure. Also FRS depends on the characteristics of the seismic base isolation system such as the natural frequency, damping ratio. In the previous study, the floor response spectrum of the base isolated structure was calculated for each axis without considering bi-directional effect. However, the shear behavior of the seismic base isolation system of two horizontal directions are correlated each other by the bi-directional effects. If the shear behavior of the seismic isolation system changes, it can influence the floor response spectrum and displacement response of isolators. In this study, the analysis of a bi-directional effect on the floor response spectrum was performed. In this study, the response of the seismic base isolation system based on the bi-directional effects was analyzed. By analyzing the time history result, while there is no alteration in the maximum shear force of seismic base isolation system, it is confirmed that the shear force is generally more decreased in a one-directional that in a two-directional in most parts. Due to the overall decreased shear force, the floor response spectrum is more reduced in a two-directional than in a one-directional.

  9. Effect of putative mitoviruses on in vitro growth of Gremmeniella abietina isolates under different laboratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeralo, C.; Botella, L.; Santamaria, O.; Diez, J.

    2012-07-01

    Mitoviruses have been found in several forest pathogens (i.e. Cryphonectria parasitica, Gremmeniella abietina), and because they have been shown to reduce the virulence of host fungi there is a growing interest in studying their use as a biocontrol. This study was carried out to test the effect of temperature (5 degree centigrade, 15 degree centigrade, 25 degree centigrade and 35 degree centigrade), pH (4, 5, 7 and 9) and osmotic potential (-0.6, -1.2, -1.8 and 2.4 MPa) on the mycelial growth of seven G. abietina isolates under controlled laboratory conditions. Four of the isolates hosted mitoviruses and three of them did not. During the experiment, mycelial growth was recorded every week for a period of 8 weeks. Results showed no differences in growth behavior between mitovirus infected and non-infected isolates when placed under different pH modifications. However, the mitovirus-infected isolates presented larger mycelial growth than the mitovirus-free ones when at the fungi's optimal growing temperature of 15 degree centigrade. When growing at certain osmotic potentials (-0.6 and -1.8 MPa) a reduction in growth of the mitovirus-infected isolates was observed. The results of this experiment suggest that mycelial growth among non-infected isolates and isolates naturally infected by mitovirus vary under different culture conditions, thus providing further insight into the effects of mitovirus on Gremmeniella abietina isolates. (Author) 57 refs.

  10. Effect of isoorientin isolated from Arum palaestinum on uterine smooth muscle of rats and guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, F U; Khalil, E; Abdalla, S

    1999-05-01

    The phytochemical investigation of Arum palaestinum resulted in the isolation of two flavone C-glucosides, namely isoorientin (luteolin 6-C-glucoside) and vitexin (apigenin 8-C glucoside). The effects of isoorientin on rat isolated aorta, ileum, trachea and uterus and on guinea-pig uterus were studied. Isoorientin (10(-7)M-6 x 10(-4)M) caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the amplitude and the frequency of the phasic contractions of the rat and guinea-pig uterus but did not affect the isolated aorta, ileum or trachea. The results were discussed in relation to the effects of its aglycone luteolin reported in the literature.

  11. Effect of Modulated Alternating and Direct Current Iontophoresis on Transdermal Delivery of Lidocaine Hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Bhatia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride through porcine skin and to compare the effects of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis. Continuous and modulated iontophoresis was applied for one hour and two hours (0-1 h and 4-5th h using a 1% w/v solution of lidocaine hydrochloride. Tape stripping was done to quantify the amount of drug permeated into stratum corneum and skin extraction studies were performed to determine the amount of drug in stripped skin. Receptor was sampled and analyzed over predefined time periods. The amount of lidocaine delivered across porcine skin after modulated direct current iontophoresis for 2 h was 1069.87±120.03 μg/sq·cm compared to 744.81±125.41 μg/sq·cm after modulated alternating current iontophoresis for 2 h. Modulated direct current iontophoresis also enhanced lidocaine delivery by twelvefold compared to passive delivery as 91.27±18.71 μg/sq·cm of lidocaine was delivered after passive delivery. Modulated iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride across porcine skin compared to the passive delivery. Modulated alternating current iontophoresis for duration of 2 h at frequency of 1 kHz was found to be comparable to the continuous direct current iontophoresis for 1 h.

  12. Effect of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis on transdermal delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride through porcine skin and to compare the effects of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis. Continuous and modulated iontophoresis was applied for one hour and two hours (0-1 h and 4-5th h) using a 1% w/v solution of lidocaine hydrochloride. Tape stripping was done to quantify the amount of drug permeated into stratum corneum and skin extraction studies were performed to determine the amount of drug in stripped skin. Receptor was sampled and analyzed over predefined time periods. The amount of lidocaine delivered across porcine skin after modulated direct current iontophoresis for 2 h was 1069.87 ± 120.03 μ g/sq · cm compared to 744.81 ± 125.41 μ g/sq · cm after modulated alternating current iontophoresis for 2 h. Modulated direct current iontophoresis also enhanced lidocaine delivery by twelvefold compared to passive delivery as 91.27 ± 18.71 μ g/sq · cm of lidocaine was delivered after passive delivery. Modulated iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride across porcine skin compared to the passive delivery. Modulated alternating current iontophoresis for duration of 2 h at frequency of 1 kHz was found to be comparable to the continuous direct current iontophoresis for 1 h.

  13. A Natural Seismic Isolating System: The Buried Mangrove Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gueguen, Philippe; Foray, Pierre; Rousseau, Christophe; Maury, Julie; 10.1785/0120100129

    2011-01-01

    The Belleplaine test site, located in the island of Guadeloupe (French Lesser Antilles) includes a three-accelerometer vertical array, designed for liquefac- tion studies. The seismic response of the soil column at the test site is computed using three methods: the spectral ratio method using the vertical array data, a numerical method using the geotechnical properties of the soil column, and an operative fre- quency domain decomposition (FDD) modal analysis method. The Belleplaine test site is characterized by a mangrove layer overlaid by a stiff sandy deposit. This con- figuration is widely found at the border coast of the Caribbean region, which is exposed to high seismic hazard. We show that the buried mangrove layer plays the role of an isolation system equivalent to those usually employed in earthquake engineering aimed at reducing the seismic shear forces by reducing the internal stress within the structure. In our case, the flexibility of the mangrove layer reduces the distortion and the stress in the...

  14. Unstart coupling mechanism analysis of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin; Bao, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted.

  15. The cefazolin inoculum effect in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus blood isolates: their association with dysfunctional accessory gene regulator (agr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Yu Mi; Park, Young Kyoung; Moon, Chisook; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Lee, Hyuck; Ki, Hyun Kyun; Cheong, Hae Suk; Son, Jun Seong; Lee, Jin Seo; Kwon, Ki Tae; Kim, June Myong; Ha, Young Eun; Kang, Cheol In; Ko, Kwan Soo; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated the clinical significance of the cefazolin inoculum effect (CIE) in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolates. In total, 146 isolates were recovered from patients with MSSA bacteremia at 9 hospitals in Korea. The CIE was observed in 16 MSSA isolates, and while type A was the only detected β-lactamase in MSSA isolates exhibiting the CIE, no strains expressing type B, C, or D β-lactamases exhibited this effect. The CIE was only observed in agr group III and I isolates and was significantly more common in isolates with agr dysfunction than in those with functional agr (P<0.001). Even among isolates producing type A β-lactamase, the CIE was also prevalent in isolates with dysfunctional agr than in isolates with functional agr (P=0.025). This study demonstrates an association between the CIE of MSSA isolates and agr dysfunction, in addition to those between the CIE and type A β-lactamase.

  16. Signal modulating noise effect in bistable stochastic resonance systems and its analog simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fang-hong; YAN Gui-rong; XIE Shi-cheng

    2006-01-01

    The effect of signal modulating noise in bistable stochastic resonance systems was studied theoretically and experimentally. A mathematical analysis was made on the bistable stochastic resonance model with small system parameters. An analogue circuit was designed to perform the effect. The effect of signal modulating noise was shown in the analog simulation experiment. The analog experiment was conducted for two sinusoidal signals with different frequencies. The results show that there are a sinusoidal component corresponding to the input sinusoidal signal and a noise component presented as a Wiener process corresponding to the input white noise in the system output. By properly selecting system parameters, the effect of signal modulating noise can be manifested in the system output.

  17. Nanoscale Field Effect Optical Modulators Based on Depletion of Epsilon-Near-Zero Films

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Zhaolin; Shi, Kaifeng

    2015-01-01

    The field effect in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors plays a key role in field-effect transistors (FETs), which are the fundamental building blocks of modern digital integrated circuits. Recent works show that the field effect can also be used to make optical/plasmonic modulators. In this paper, we report field effect electro-absorption modulators (FEOMs) each made of an ultrathin epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) film, as the active material, sandwiched in a silicon or plasmonic waveguide. Without a bias, the ENZ film maximizes the attenuation of the waveguides and the modulators work at the OFF state; contrariwise, depletion of the carriers in the ENZ film greatly reduces the attenuation and the modulators work at the ON state. The double capacitor gating scheme is used to enhance the modulation by the field effect. According to our simulation, extinction ratio up to 3.44 dB can be achieved in a 500-nm long Si waveguide with insertion loss only 0.71 dB (85.0%); extinction ratio up to 7.86 dB can be achieved...

  18. Effects of continuous-wave, pulsed, and sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated microwaves on brain energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, A P; Joines, W T; Allis, J W

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the effects of continuous-wave, sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated, and pulsed square-wave-modulated 591-MHz microwave exposures on brain energy metabolism was made in male Sprague-Dawley rats (175-225 g). Brain NADH fluorescence, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration, and creatine phosphate (CP) concentration were determined as a function of modulation frequency. Brain temperatures of animals were maintained between -0.1 and -0.4 degrees C from the preexposure temperature when subjected to as much as 20 mW/cm2 (average power) CW, pulsed, or sinusoidal-amplitude modulated 591-MHz radiation for 5 min. Sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated exposures at 16-24 Hz showed a trend toward preferential modulation frequency response in inducing an increase in brain NADH fluorescence. The pulse-modulated and sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated (16 Hz) microwaves were not significantly different from CW exposures in inducing increased brain NADH fluorescence and decreased ATP and CP concentrations. When the pulse-modulation frequency was decreased from 500 to 250 pulses per second the average incident power density threshold for inducing an increase in brain NADH fluorescence increased by a factor of 4--ie, from about 0.45 to about 1.85 mW/cm2. Since brain temperature did not increase, the microwave-induced increase in brain NADH and decrease in ATP and CP concentrations was not due to hyperthermia. This suggests a direct interaction mechanism and is consistent with the hypothesis of microwave inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain function of ATP production.

  19. Effect of heat release on movement characteristics of shock train in an isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenlin; Chang, Juntao; Liu, MengMeng; Feng, Shuo; Shi, Wen; Bao, Wen

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the effect of heat release on movement characteristics of shock train is numerically investigated in an isolator. It is found that the combustion heat release has a distinct effect on the shock train movement characteristics in the isolator. With increasing heat release, a shock train gradually forms and then propagates toward isolator entrance. In process of shock train formation, separation bubbles before injection ports entrain the high temperature burning gas into the boundary layer, which causes the shock train to shrink and stretch, and changes in configuration and number of shock waves. At the same time, the system force fluctuates. In addition, the shock train movement is divided into three stages, which have different wall pressure distribution. It is believed that these findings have a help the better understanding of the effect of heat release on the movement characteristics of shock train in an isolator.

  20. Frequency Modulation of Directly Imaged Exoplanets: Geometric Effect as a Probe of Planetary Obliquity

    CERN Document Server

    Kawahara, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We consider the time-frequency analysis of a scattered light curve by a directly imaged exoplanet. We show that the geometric effect due to planetary obliquity and orbital inclination induce the frequency modulation of the apparent diurnal periodicity. We construct a model of the frequency modulation and compare with the instantaneous frequency extracted from the pseudo-Wigner distribution of the simulated light curves of a cloudless Earth. The model provides good agreement with the simulated modulation factor even for the light curve with Gaussian noise comparable to the signal. Notably, the shape of the instantaneous frequency is sensitive to the difference between prograde, retrograde, and pole-on spin rotations. Whereas our technique requires the static property of the albedo map, it does not need to solve the albedo map of the planet. The time-frequency analysis is complementary to other methods which utilize the amplitude modulation. This paper demonstrates the importance of the frequency domain of the ...

  1. Trading experience modulates anterior insula to reduce the endowment effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lester C P; Ye, Karen J; Asai, Kentaro; Ertac, Seda; List, John A; Nusbaum, Howard C; Hortaçsu, Ali

    2016-08-16

    People often demand a greater price when selling goods that they own than they would pay to purchase the same goods-a well-known economic bias called the endowment effect. The endowment effect has been found to be muted among experienced traders, but little is known about how trading experience reduces the endowment effect. We show that when selling, experienced traders exhibit lower right anterior insula activity, but no differences in nucleus accumbens or orbitofrontal activation, compared with inexperienced traders. Furthermore, insula activation mediates the effect of experience on the endowment effect. Similar results are obtained for inexperienced traders who are incentivized to gain trading experience. This finding indicates that frequent trading likely mitigates the endowment effect indirectly by modifying negative affective responses in the context of selling.

  2. Transmissible Plasmid Containing Salmonella enterica Heidelberg Isolates Modulate Cytokine Production During Early Stage of Interaction with Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Khare, Sangeeta; Williams, Katherine; Foley, Steven L

    2016-08-01

    The variation in cytokine production during bacterial invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) is a contributing factor for progression of the infection. A few Salmonella enterica Heidelberg strains isolated from poultry products harbor transmissible plasmids (TPs), including those that encode a type-IV secretion system. Earlier, we showed that these TPs are responsible for increased virulence during infection. This study examines the potential role of these TPs in cytokine production in IECs. This study showed that S. Heidelberg strains containing TPs (we refer as virulent strains) caused decreased interleukin (IL)-10 production in IECs after 1 h infection. The virulent strains induced a high level of tumor necrosis factor-α production under identical conditions. The virulent strains of S. Heidelberg also altered the production of IL-2, IL-17, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor compared to an avirulent strain. As a part of infection, bacteria cross the epithelial barrier and encounter intestinal macrophages. Hence, we examined the cytotoxic mechanism of strains of S. Heidelberg in macrophages. Scanning electron microscopy showed cell necrosis occurs during the early stage of infection. In conclusion, virulent S. Heidelberg strains were able to modify the host cytokine profile during the early stages of infection and also caused necrosis in macrophages.

  3. Sex Stereotyping and Bias: Their Origin and Effects. Training Module IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Reeve; Gonzales, Frank, Ed.

    The origin and effects of sex stereotyping and bias is the subject of this training module. It guides trainers through the activities and lessons necessary to aid education personnel in identifying sources and effects of sex stereotyping and bias in the classroom setting and in society as a whole. Seven activities are described and materials,…

  4. Inhibitory effects of polysaccharides isolated from Phellinus gilvus on benzo(a)pyrene-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae-Sung Bae; Kwang-Ho Jang; Hyunee Yim; Seung-Chun Park; Hee-Kyung Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although polysaccharides from Phellinus mushrooms are a well-known material with anti-tumor properties, there is no information about the effect of polysaccharides from Phellinus gilvus (PG) on tumor. The modulating effect of polysaccharides isolated from PG on the benzo(a)pyrene (BaP)-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in ICR female mice was investigated in this study.METHODS: A forestomach carcinogenesis model was established in 40 ICR female mice receiving oral administration of BaP for 4 wk. The mice were randomly assigned to 4 groups (10 each). The mice in each group were treated with sterile water or PG for 4 and 8 wk (SW4,PGW4, SW8, and PGW8 groups). Eight or 12 wk after the first dose of BaP, forestomachs were removed for histopathological and RT-PCR analysis.RESULTS: In histopathological changes and RT-PCR analysis, sterile water-treated mice showed significant hyperplasia of the gastric mucosa with a significantly increased expression of mutant p53 mRNA compared to mice treated with PG for 8 wk.CONCLUSION: Polysaccharides isolated from PG may inhibit BaP-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in mice bydown-regulating mutant p53 expression.

  5. GanedenBC30™ cell wall and metabolites: anti-inflammatory and immune modulating effects in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Steve G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to evaluate anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties of the probiotic, spore-forming bacterial strain: Bacillus coagulans: GBI-30, (PTA-6086, GanedenBC30TM. In addition, cell wall and metabolite fractions were assayed separately to address whether biological effects were due to cell wall components only, or whether secreted compounds from live bacteria had additional biological properties. The spores were heat-activated, and bacterial cultures were grown. The culture supernatant was harvested as a source of metabolites (MTB, and the bacteria were used to isolate cell wall fragments (CW. Both of these fractions were compared in a series of in vitro assays. Results Both MTB and CW inhibited spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced ROS formation in human PMN cells and increased the phagocytic activity of PMN cells in response to bacteria-like carboxylated fluorospheres. Both fractions supported random PMN and f-MLP-directed PMN cell migration, indicating a support of immune surveillance and antibacterial defense mechanisms. In contrast, low doses of both fractions inhibited PMN cell migration towards the inflammatory mediators IL-8 and LTB4. The anti-inflammatory activity was strongest for CW, where the PMN migration towards IL-8 was inhibited down to dilutions of 1010. Both MTB and CW induced the expression of the CD69 activation marker on human CD3- CD56+ NK cells, and enhanced the expression of CD107a when exposed to K562 tumor cells in vitro. The fractions directly modulated cytokine production, inducing production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and inhibiting production of IL-2. Both fractions further modulated mitogen-induced cytokine production in the following manner: Both fractions enhanced the PHA-induced production of IL-6 and reduced the PHA-induced production of TNF-alpha. Both fractions enhanced the PWM-induced production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In addition, MTB

  6. Agentic extraversion modulates the cardiovascular effects of the dopamine D2 agonist bromocriptine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Jan; Stemmler, Gerhard

    2006-07-01

    A recent psychobiological theory postulates a dopaminergic basis for the agency facet of extraversion, leading to the prediction that this personality trait modulates the psychophysiological effects of dopaminergic drugs. A single dose of the dopamine D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine reduces blood pressure in healthy volunteers. However, it is currently unknown whether this hypotensive effect of bromocriptine is modulated by agentic extraversion. Therefore, we measured resting cardiovascular activation in groups of healthy male volunteers either high or low in agentic extraversion, either under bromocriptine (1.25 mg) or placebo. Focusing the analyses on activation components derived from 18 cardiovascular variables, we found that bromocriptine reduces alpha-adrenergic activation in the sample as a whole, whereas the effects on beta-adrenergic and cholinergic activation are modulated by agentic extraversion.

  7. The Modulation of Ionospheric Alfven Resonator on Heating HF Waves and the Doppler Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NiBin-bin; ZhaoZheng-yu; XieShu-guo

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of HF waves in IAR can produce many nonlinear effects, including the modulation effect of IAR on HF waves and the Doppler effect. To start with the dependence of the ionospheric electron temperature varia-tions on the Alfven resonant field, We discuss the mechanism of the modulation effect and lucubrate possible reasons for the Doppler effect. The results show that the Alfven resonant field can have an observable modulation effect on HF waves while its mechanism is quite different from that of Schumann resonant field on HF waves. The depth of modulation of IAR on HF waves has a quasi-quadratic relation with the Alfven field, which directly inspires the formation of cross-spectrum between ULF waves and HF waves and results in spectral peaks at some gyro-frequencies of IAR. With respect to the Doppler effect during the propagation of HF waves in IAR, it is mainly caused by the motion of the high-speed flyer and the drifting electrons and the frequency shift from the phase vari-ation of the reflected waves can be neglected when the frequency of HF incident wave is high enough.

  8. [Effects of the 520-day isolation on the functional state of the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, G P; Buĭlov, S P; Eshchenko, A I; Skedina, M A; Voronkov, Iu I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to study the cardiovascular effects of simulated factors in a 520-day crewed mission to Mars, and to validate the diagnostic value of the ultrasonic investigation of microcirculation and endothelium-dependent dilation of the right brachial artery in 6 male volunteers at the age of 28 to 39 years. It appears that 520-d isolation affected intracardiac hemodynamics and endothelium function more dramatically compared with 105-d isolation, increasing the risk of atherosclerosis. These findings add insight into the "cost of human adaptation" to very long isolation.

  9. Theory of Optical Rectification Effect in Metallic Thin Film with Periodic Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki, Kurosawa; Seigo, Ohno; Kazuyuki, Nakayama

    2014-01-01

    We conducted theoretical and numerical investigations of the optical rectification (OR) effect in metallic structures with periodic modulation. A new formulation of the OR effect is presented, and the mechanism by which the OR effect is generated, which has been a controversial issue in previous studies, is clarified. We reveal that the OR effect is strongly enhanced by a combination of spatial variation of the metallic structure and local electric field enhancement. Our theory was numericall...

  10. Theory of Optical Rectification Effect in Metallic Thin Film with Periodic Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hiroyuki, Kurosawa; Nakayama, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We carried out theoretical and numerical investigation of optical rectification (OR) effect in metallic structure with periodic modulation. A new formulation of the OR effect is presented and the generation mechanism of OR effect, which was a controversy issue in previous works, is clarified. We revealed that OR effect is strongly enhanced by the combination of spatial variation of metallic structure and local electric field enhancement. Our theory was numerically evaluated and showed fairly well agreement with experiment.

  11. Genotoxic and enzymatic effects of fluoranthene in microsomes and freshly isolated hepatocytes from sole (Solea solea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, N; Ménard, D; Pichavant-Rafini, K; Ollivier, H; Le Goff, J; Burgeot, T; Akcha, F

    2012-02-01

    The fluoranthene (Fluo) is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in human food and in marine compartments. However, the existing data on its genotoxicity is poor and controversial. The aim of this study was to assess in vitro the potential genotoxicity of Fluo in sole and its possible effect on CYP450 modulation. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were exposed for 24 h to a range of Fluo concentrations from 0.5 to 50 μM in both culture flasks and microplate wells. The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity was measured as an indicator of the activity of the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). The genotoxic effects were evaluated by measuring both DNA strand breaks and DNA adducts by the alkaline comet assay and the postlabeling technique respectively. Calf thymus DNA was also exposed to Fluo in the presence of sole liver microsomes in order to check for Fluo DNA adduct formation. In sole hepatocytes, Fluo was shown to induce a decrease in the EROD activity in a concentration-dependent manner. A significant genotoxic effect was observed in terms of DNA strand breakage from an exposure concentration of 5 μM: despite a concentration-dependent effect was observed, it did not follow a linear dose-response. The response was similar whatever the way of exposure in flasks or in wells. One reproducible adduct was detected in the hepatocytes exposed to the highest concentrations of Fluo. The formation of Fluo adducts was confirmed by the detection of one reproducible adduct following in vitro exposure of calf thymus DNA to 100 and 200 μM of Fluo in the presence of sole microsomes. These results demonstrate the potential of sole hepatocytes to metabolize Fluo in 24 h into reactive species, able to induce genotoxicity by DNA strand breakage and DNA adduct formation. Moreover, a miniaturized cell exposure system was validated for further experiments using fewer amounts of hepatocytes and contaminants, and allowing exposure to PAH metabolites. Copyright

  12. Modulation of the composite face effect by unintended emotion cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Katie L H; Murphy, Jennifer; Marsh, Jade E; Cook, Richard

    2017-04-01

    When upper and lower regions from different emotionless faces are aligned to form a facial composite, observers 'fuse' the two halves together, perceptually. The illusory distortion induced by task-irrelevant ('distractor') halves hinders participants' judgements about task-relevant ('target') halves. This composite-face effect reveals a tendency to integrate feature information from disparate regions of intact upright faces, consistent with theories of holistic face processing. However, observers frequently perceive emotion in ostensibly neutral faces, contrary to the intentions of experimenters. This study sought to determine whether this 'perceived emotion' influences the composite-face effect. In our first experiment, we confirmed that the composite effect grows stronger as the strength of distractor emotion increased. Critically, effects of distractor emotion were induced by weak emotion intensities, and were incidental insofar as emotion cues hindered image matching, not emotion labelling per se. In Experiment 2, we found a correlation between the presence of perceived emotion in a set of ostensibly neutral distractor regions sourced from commonly used face databases, and the strength of illusory distortion they induced. In Experiment 3, participants completed a sequential matching composite task in which half of the distractor regions were rated high and low for perceived emotion, respectively. Significantly stronger composite effects were induced by the high-emotion distractor halves. These convergent results suggest that perceived emotion increases the strength of the composite-face effect induced by supposedly emotionless faces. These findings have important implications for the study of holistic face processing in typical and atypical populations.

  13. Interactions between the Isolated-Interactive Elements Effect and Levels of Learner Expertise: Experimental Evidence from an Accountancy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, Paul; Kalyuga, Slava; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated interactions between the isolated-interactive elements effect and levels of learner expertise with first year undergraduate university accounting students. The isolated-interactive elements effect occurs when learning is facilitated by initially presenting elements of information sequentially in an isolated form rather than…

  14. Interactions between the Isolated-Interactive Elements Effect and Levels of Learner Expertise: Experimental Evidence from an Accountancy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, Paul; Kalyuga, Slava; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated interactions between the isolated-interactive elements effect and levels of learner expertise with first year undergraduate university accounting students. The isolated-interactive elements effect occurs when learning is facilitated by initially presenting elements of information sequentially in an isolated form rather than…

  15. Effects of walk-off on cross-phase modulation induced modulation instability in an optical fibre with high-order dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Xian-Qiong; Xiang An-Ping

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of walk-off among optical pulses on cross-phase modulation induced modulation instability in the normal dispersion region of an optical fibre with high-order dispersion. The results indicate that, in the case of high-order dispersion, the walk-off effect takes on new characteristics and will influence considerably the shape, position and especially the number of the spectral regions of the gain spectra of modulation instability. Not only the group-velocity mismatch, but also the difference of the third-order dispersion of two optical waves will alter the gain spectra of modulation instability but in different ways. Depending on the values of the walk-off parameters, the number of the spectral regions may increase from two to at most four, and the spectral shape and position may change too.

  16. Effect of Thermoelectric Modules' Topological Connection on Automotive Exhaust Heat Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. D.; Zheng, S. J.; Su, C. Q.; Yuan, X. H.; Yu, C. G.; Wang, Y. P.

    2016-03-01

    In automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generators (AETEGs), a certain number of thermoelectric modules are connected in series and/or parallel to recover energy from exhaust gas, which provides a way to improve fuel efficiency of the vehicle. Because of the temperature distribution on the surfaces of heat exchanger, several types of modules are planned for use in an AETEG; however, property disparities among modules exist and wire resistance cannot be neglected in practical application, so experiments have been carried out to research effects of the two factors on the maximum output power of series and parallel connection. The performance of series and parallel connections have been characterized, and mathematic models have been built to analyze and predict the performance of each connection. Experiments and theoretical analysis reveal that parallel connection shows a better performance than series connection when large differences of Seebeck coefficient and resistivity exist. However, wire resistance will cause more significant power dissipation in parallel connection. The authors believe the research presented in this paper is the first to carry out an examination of the impact of module property disparity and wire resistance on the output power of an array of thermoelectric modules connected in series and parallel, which provides a reference for choosing module connection in AETEGs.

  17. Anti-tumor effect of polysaccharides isolated from Taraxacum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PTM showed significant anti-tumor effect on MCF-7 cells in vitro. The expressions of ... natural plants have been proved to have various biological activities. ..... Jones G. Effect of pulsed electric fields on the activity of neutral trehalase from beer ...

  18. The effect of small-wave modulation on the electromagnetic bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ernesto; Kim, Yunjin; Martin, Jan M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the modulation of small ocean waves by large waves on the physical mechanism of the EM bias is examined by conducting a numerical scattering experiment which does not assume the applicability of geometric optics. The modulation effect of the large waves on the small waves is modeled using the principle of conservation of wave action and includes the modulation of gravity-capillary waves. The frequency dependence and magnitude of the EM bias is examined for a simplified ocean spectral model as a function of wind speed. These calculations make it possible to assess the validity of previous assumptions made in the theory of the EM bias, with respect to both scattering and hydrodynamic effects. It is found that the geometric optics approximation is inadequate for predictions of the EM bias at typical radar altimeter frequencies, while the improved scattering calculations provide a frequency dependence of the EM bias which is in qualitative agreement with observation. For typical wind speeds, the EM bias contribution due to small-wave modulation is of the same order as that due to modulation by the nonlinearities of the large-scale waves.

  19. A computational vector-map model of neonate saccades: modulating the externality effect through refraction periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Peter A; Fiacconi, Chris M; Gibson, Laura C

    2010-11-23

    The present study develops an explicit and predictive computational model of neonate saccades based on the interaction of several simple mechanisms, including the tendency to fixate towards areas of high contrast, and the decay and recovery of a world-centered contrast representation simulating a low-level inhibition of return mechanism. Emergent properties similar to early visual behaviors develop, including the externality effect (or tendency to focus on external then internal features). The age-associated progression of this effect is modulated by the decay period of the model's contrast representation, where the high-level behavior of either scanning broadly or locally is modulated by a single decay parameter.

  20. Heat Transport of Non-Local Effect with Modulated SMBI on HL-2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hong-Juan; DING Xuan-Tong; YAO Liang-Hua; FENG Bei-Bin; LIU Ze-Tian; GAO Ya-Dong; LI Wei; LI Xue-Hong; DUAN Xu-Ru; YANG Qing-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Modulated supersonic molecular beam (SMB) injection is introduced to study transport features of non-local transport phenomenon on HL-2A.Repetitive non-local effect induced by modulated SMBI allows Fourier transformation of the temperature perturbation,yielding detailed investigation of the pulse propagation. Fourier analysis provides evidence for existence of internal transport barriers.Meanwhile,experimental progress of nonlocal effect was made in the HL-2A Tokamak in 2007.The core electron temperature Te rise increases from 18% to more than 40% and the duration of the Te rise could be prolonged by changing the conditions of SMB injection.

  1. [Effect of burn blister fluid on human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in vitro and its phenotypic modulation in culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Zhu; Rong, Xin-Zhou; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Rong-Hua; Wang, Zhen

    2009-06-01

    To study the effect of blister fluid obtained from burn patient on human MSCs in vitro and its phenotypic modulation in culture. Blister fluid from burn patients was collected at 12, 24, 48 post burn hour (PBH). The human MSCs were isolated, cultured, amplified and identified in vitro, then were divided into A (culture with 20% blister fluid collected at 12 PBH) , B (culture with 20% blister fluid collected at 24 PBH), C (culture with 20% blister fluid collected at 48 PBH), N (with ordinary culture medium) groups. The growth of MSCs and micro-organisms in blister fluid were observed. Positive expression rates of CD44 and CK7 were detected by flow cytometry after culture for 8 days. Bacterial and fungal growths were absent in 15 blister fluid samples. There was no obvious change in MSC morphology in each group. Compared with that of N group, the number of MSCs in A, B, C groups was decreased, especially in C group. CD44 positive expression rate in A, B, C groups was (83.0 +/- 3.1)%, (77.2 +/- 2.9)% and (65.1 +/- 2.3)%, respectively,which was obviously lower than that in N group [(89.5 +/- 3.2)%, P blister fluid can obviously inhibit the growth of human MSC cultured in vitro, and may promote modulation of its phenotype to certain extent.

  2. Warming effect of dust aerosols modulated by overlapping clouds below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Jianping; Wang, Yuan; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Zhibo; Min, Min; Miao, Yucong; Liu, Huan; He, Jing; Zhou, Shunwu; Zhai, Panmao

    2017-10-01

    Due to the substantial warming effect of dust aerosols overlying clouds and its poor representation in climate models, it is imperative to accurately quantify the direct radiative forcing (DRF) of above-cloud dust aerosols. When absorbing aerosol layers are located above clouds, the warming effect of aerosols strongly depends on the cloud macro- and micro-physical properties underneath, such as cloud optical depth and cloud fraction at visible wavelength. A larger aerosol-cloud overlap is believed to cause a larger warming effect of absorbing aerosols, but the influence of overlapping cloud fraction and cloud optical depth remains to be explored. In this study, the impact of overlapping cloud properties on the shortwave all-sky DRF due to springtime above-cloud dust aerosols is quantified over northern Pacific Ocean based on 10-year satellite measurements. On average, the DRF is roughly 0.62 Wm-2. Furthermore, the warming effect of dust aerosols linearly increases with both overlapping cloud fraction and cloud optical depth. An increase of 1% in overlapping cloud fraction will amplify this warming effect by 1.11 Wm-2τ-1. For the springtime northern Pacific Ocean, top-of-atmosphere cooling by dust aerosols turns into warming when overlapping cloud fraction is beyond 0.20. The variation of critical cloud optical depth beyond which dust aerosols switch from exerting a net cooling to a net warming effect depends on the concurrent overlapping cloud fraction. When the overlapping cloud coverage range increases from 0.2 to -0.4 to 0.6-0.8, the corresponding critical cloud optical depth reduces from 6.92 to 1.16. Our results demonstrate the importance of overlapping cloud properties for determining the springtime warming effect of dust aerosols.

  3. Angiotensin II modulates the intrarenal effects of atrial natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siragy, H M; Lamb, N E; Rose, C E; Peach, M J; Carey, R M

    1988-09-01

    The mechanism by which atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increases renal water and solute excretion is not fully understood. We studied the renal effects of ANP and angiotensin II (ANG II) separately and together in uninephrectomized conscious dogs (n = 7) in sodium metabolic balance (80 meq/day). Exogenous ANG II and ANP were without measurable systemic effects as demonstrated by absence of changes in blood pressure, plasma aldosterone concentration, and plasma renin activity. The quantity of ANG II that had significant renal effects that were without measurable systemic effects was 0.2 pmol.kg-1.min-1. Three infusion rates of ANP had significant renal effects (1, 10, and 20 pmol.kg-1.min-1). These quantities of ANP caused significant diuresis, natriuresis, kaliuresis, and increased glomerular filtration rate without significant changes in renal plasma flow. ANG II alone caused significant antidiuresis, antinatriuresis, and decreased glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow. When ANG II and ANP were given together, no change in urinary flow rate, urinary sodium or potassium excretion, or renal plasma flow was observed, whereas glomerular filtration rate increased. Filtration fraction increased significantly with ANG II and ANP separately and together. Intrarenal ANP prevents the ANG II-induced decrement in urinary sodium excretion and urine flow rate. ANP may play an important role in escape from the sodium-retaining action of intrarenal ANG II.

  4. Nanoscale field effect optical modulators based on depletion of epsilon-near-zero films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaolin; Shi, Kaifeng; Yin, Peichuan

    2016-12-01

    The field effect in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors plays a key role in field-effect transistors (FETs), which are the fundamental building blocks of modern digital integrated circuits. Recent works show that the field effect can also be used to make optical/plasmonic modulators. In this paper, we report the numerical investigation of field effect electro-absorption modulators each made of an ultrathin epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) film, as the active material, sandwiched in a silicon or plasmonic waveguide. Without a bias, the ENZ films maximize the attenuation of the waveguides and the modulators work at the OFF state; on the other hand, depletion of the carriers in the ENZ films greatly reduces the attenuation and the modulators work at the ON state. The double capacitor gating scheme with two 10-nm HfO2 films as the insulator is used to enhance the modulation by the field effect. The depletion requires about 10 V across the HfO2 layers. According to our simulation, extinction ratio up to 3.44 dB can be achieved in a 500-nm long Si waveguide with insertion loss only 0.71 dB (85.0% pass); extinction ratio up to 7.86 dB can be achieved in a 200-nm long plasmonic waveguide with insertion loss 1.11 dB (77.5% pass). The proposed modulators may find important applications in future on-chip or chip-to-chip optical interconnection.

  5. Food-derived serotonergic modulators: effects on mood and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsken, S.; Martin, A.; Mohajeri, M.H.; Homberg, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The most frequently described drugs in the treatment of mood disorders are selective serotonin reuptake and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, enhancing serotonin levels in the brain. However, side-effects have been reported for these drugs. Because serotonin levels in the brain are dependent on

  6. Food-derived serotonergic modulators: effects on mood and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsken, S.; Martin, A.; Mohajeri, M.H.; Homberg, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The most frequently described drugs in the treatment of mood disorders are selective serotonin reuptake and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, enhancing serotonin levels in the brain. However, side-effects have been reported for these drugs. Because serotonin levels in the brain are dependent on th

  7. Food-derived serotonergic modulators: effects on mood and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsken, Sjoerd; Märtin, Antje; Mohajeri, M Hasan; Homberg, Judith Regina

    2013-12-01

    The most frequently described drugs in the treatment of mood disorders are selective serotonin reuptake and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, enhancing serotonin levels in the brain. However, side-effects have been reported for these drugs. Because serotonin levels in the brain are dependent on the availability of the food-derived precursor tryptophan, foods such as chicken, soyabeans, cereals, tuna, nuts and bananas may serve as an alternative to improve mood and cognition. Here we discuss the effects of high- or low-tryptophan-containing food, as well as plant extracts with a modest monoamine reuptake and MAO-A inhibition functional profile, on mood and cognition in healthy and vulnerable human subjects and rodents. Together the studies suggest that there is an inverted U-shaped curve for plasma tryptophan levels, with low and too high tryptophan levels impairing cognition, and moderate to high tryptophan levels improving cognition. This relationship is found for both healthy and vulnerable subjects. Whereas this relationship may also exist for mood, the inverted U-shaped curve for plasma tryptophan levels and mood may be based on different tryptophan concentrations in healthy v. vulnerable individuals. Animal studies are emerging and allow further understanding of effects and the mode of action of food-derived serotonergic components on mood, cognition and mechanisms. Ultimately, insight into the concentrations of tryptophan and other serotonergic components in food having beneficial effects on mood and cognition in healthy, but particularly vulnerable, subjects may support well-being in our highly demanding society.

  8. Food-derived serotonergic modulators: effects on mood and cognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hulsken, S; Martin, A; Mohajeri, M.H; Homberg, J.R

    2013-01-01

    ... as an alternative to improve mood and cognition. Here we discuss the effects of high- or low-tryptophan-containing food, as well as plant extracts with a modest monoamine reuptake and MAO-A inhibition functional profile, on mood and cognition...

  9. Effects of periodic modulation on the nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Li-Hua; Duan Wen-Shan

    2009-01-01

    We study the Landau-Zener tunneling of a nonlinear two-level system by applying a periodic modulation on its energy bias. We find that the two levels are splitting at the zero points of the zero order Bessel function for high-frequency modulation. Moreover, we obtain the effective coupling constant between two levels at the zero points of the zero order Bessel function by calculating the final tunneling probability at these points. It seems that the effective coupling constant can be regarded as the approximation of the higher order Bessel function at these points. For the low-frequency modulation, we find that the final tunneling probability is a function of the interaction strength. For the weak inter-level coupling case, we find that the final tunneling probability is more disordered as the interaction strength becomes larger.

  10. The modulation effect for supersymmetric dark matter detection with asymmetric velocity dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D

    2000-01-01

    The detection of the theoretically expected dark matter is central to particle physics cosmology. Current fashionable supersymmetric models provide a natural dark matter candidate which is the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). Such models combined with fairly well understood physics like the quark substructure of the nucleon and the nuclear form factor and the spin response function of the nucleus, permit the evaluation of the event rate for LSP-nucleus elastic scattering. The thus obtained event rates are, however, very low or even undetectable. So it is imperative to exploit the modulation effect, i.e. the dependence of the event rate on the earth's annual motion. In this review we study such a modulation effect in directional and undirectional experiments. We calculate both the differential and the total rates using symmetric as well as asymmetric velocity distributions. We find that in the symmetric case the modulation amplitude is small, less than 0.07. There exist, however, regions of the phase sp...

  11. Effects of UV on power degradation of photovoltaic modules in combined acceleration tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Trang; Heta, Yushi; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    UV exposure and other factors such as high/low temperature, humidity and mechanical stress have been reported to degrade photovoltaic (PV) module materials. By focusing on the combined effects of UV stress and moisture on PV modules, two new acceleration tests of light irradiation and damp heat (DH) were designed and conducted. The effects of UV exposure were validated through a change in irradiation time (UV dosage) and a change of the light irradiation side (glass side vs backsheet side) in the UV-preconditioned DH and cyclic sequential tests, respectively. The chemical corrosion of finger electrodes in the presence of acetic acid generated from ethylene vinyl acetate used as an encapsulant was considered to be the main origin of degradation. The module performance characterized by electroluminescence images was confirmed to correlate with the measured acetic acid concentration and Ag finger electrode resistance.

  12. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alongi Filippo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Methods Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc. We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments. Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. Results All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Conclusions Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes.

  13. Antibacterial effects of Iranian Mentha pulegium essential oil on isolates of Klebsiella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazani, N H; Ghasemnejad-Berenji, H; Sadegpoor, S

    2009-01-15

    The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the antibacterial activity of Mentha pulegium essential oil on isolates of Klebsiella. Thirty nine isolates were collected from urine specimens submitted to two educational hospitals in Urmia, Iran. The susceptibility of isolates was determined using a broth microdilution method. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) of isolates to Mentha pulegium essential oil were determined. The susceptibilities of isolates to different antibiotics were tested using agar disk diffusion method. The rates of resistance were determined to antibiotics as follows: gentamicin 46.1%, tobramycin 48.7%, ceftizoxime 41%, co-trimoxazole 46.1%, amikacin 33.3%, cephtazidime 51.3%, ciprofloxacin 30.8%, kanamycin 53.8%, nalidixic acid 30.8% ampicillin 79.5% and nitrofurantoin 41%. Mentha pulegium essential oil possessed antibacterial effect against all isolates of Klebsiella sp. with MIC and MBC values in the range of 1.9 x 10(-3) to 4.9 x 10(-4) mm3 mm(-3). In this study clinical isolates of Klebsiella sp. showed very high resistance to tested antibiotics. These results suggest the potential use of the Mentha pulegium essential oil for the control of multi-drug resistant Klebsiella sp. infections. However, more adequate toxicological study must be carried out to verify the possibility of using it for fighting microorganisms in human.

  14. Effects of Tylosin Use on Erythromycin Resistance in Enterococci Isolated from Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Charlene R.; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Barrett, John B.; Ladely, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of tylosin on erythromycin-resistant enterococci was examined on three farms; farm A used tylosin for growth promotion, farm B used tylosin for treatment of disease, and farm C did not use tylosin for either growth promotion or disease treatment. A total of 1,187 enterococci were isolated from gestation, farrowing, suckling, nursery, and finishing swine from the farms. From a subset of those isolates (n = 662), 59% (124 out of 208), 28% (80 out of 281), and 2% (4 out of 170) were resistant to erythromycin (MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml) from farms A, B, and C, respectively. PCR analysis and Southern blotting revealed that 95% (65 out of 68) of isolates chosen from all three farms for further study were positive for ermB, but all were negative for ermA and ermC. By using Southern blotting, ermB was localized to the chromosome in 56 of the isolates while 9 isolates from farms A and B contained ermB on two similar-sized plasmid bands (12 to 16 kb). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the isolates were genetically diverse and represented a heterogeneous population of enterococci. This study suggests that although there was resistance to a greater number of enterococcal isolates on a farm where tylosin was used as a growth promotant, resistant enterococci also existed on a farm where no antimicrobial agents were used. PMID:15240302

  15. Individual differences in dopamine level modulate the ego depletion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yumeng; Mao, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Initial exertion of self-control impairs subsequent self-regulatory performance, which is referred to as the ego depletion effect. The current study examined how individual differences in dopamine level, as indexed by eye blink rate (EBR), would moderate ego depletion. An inverted-U-shaped relationship between EBR and subsequent self-regulatory performance was found when participants initially engaged in self-control but such relationship was absent in the control condition where there was no initial exertion, suggesting individuals with a medium dopamine level may be protected from the typical ego depletion effect. These findings are consistent with a cognitive explanation which considers ego depletion as a phenomenon similar to "switch costs" that would be neutralized by factors promoting flexible switching.

  16. Modulation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and B-cells by MCS-18 a natural product isolated from Helleborus purpurascens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littmann, Leonie; Rössner, Susanne; Kerek, Franz; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Zinser, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    MCS-18, a natural product isolated from Helleborus purpurascens has been shown to have several beneficial effects in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. However, very little is known regarding the immuno-modulatory capacity of MCS-18 in respect to murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC) and B-cells. Thus, in the present study we examined the effect of MCS-18 on murine BM-DC and B-cells. Interestingly MCS-18 inhibited the expression of important DC-specific molecules and lead to an impaired T-cell stimulation capacity. In addition, MCS-18 also reduced B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin production.

  17. Hypoxia modulates the effect of dihydroartemisinin on endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    D'Alessandro, S.; Basilico, N.; Corbett, Y; Scaccabarozzi, D.; Omodeo-Salè, F.; Saresella, M.; Marventano, I.; Vaillant, M.; P. Olliaro; Taramelli, D

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Artemisinin derivatives, the current cornerstone of malaria treatment, possess also anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activity. Hypoxia plays a crucial role both in severe malaria (as a consequence of the cytoadherence of infected erythrocytes to the microvasculature) and in cancer (due to the restricted blood supply in the growing tumour mass). However, the consequences of hypoxia onto the effects of artemisinins is under-researched. This study aimed at assessing ...

  18. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A VIRTUAL FIELD TRIP (VFT MODULE IN LEARNING BIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbaizura HARIS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Field Trip is a computer aided module of science developed to study the Colonisation and Succession in Mangrove Swamps, as an alternative to the real field trip in Form for Biology. This study is to identify the effectiveness of the Virtual Field Trip (VFT module towards the level of achievement in the formative test for this topic. This study was conducted to 60 students employing a quasi-experimental design involving a treatment group taught using the VFT module and a control group who were taught using conventional methods. Analysis into the effectiveness of the virtual module was done descriptively, followed by inferential analysis involving the two-way ANOVA. The results showed significant differences in the mean scores of pre and post achievement between students taught using VFT and students who were taught using conventional methods for objective, structure and essay type questions. The study concluded that teaching and learning by using the VFT module, integrated with ICT, has a positive impact on student achievement whencompared to conventional methods. This study focuses on the use of the VFT recognizing that teachers are often unable to conduct a real field trip on location.

  19. Context modulates effects of nicotine abstinence on human cooperative responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, R; Day, J D; Schmitz, J M; Broitman, M; Elk, R; Caperton-Brown, H

    1998-11-01

    The effects of ad libitum smoking, abstinence, and 0-, 2-, and 4-mg nicotine gum on human cooperative responding were examined. Participants were provided the opportunity to respond cooperatively or independently to episodes initiated by a computer-simulated other person. Participants could also initiate episodes that ostensibly provided the other person the opportunity to respond cooperatively or independently of the participant. Working cooperatively added points to both the participant's and other person's counters. Working independently added points only to the participant's counter. Results demonstrated that abstinence decreased cooperative responses during episodes initiated by the computer-stimulated other person. Relative to abstinence and placebo gum conditions, ad libitum smoking and administration of 2- and 4-mg nicotine gum increased these cooperative responses. No gender differences were observed. The number of cooperative episodes initiated by the participants was not affected significantly by the smoking or gum conditions. Nicotine increased reports of vigor and decreased abstinence-engendered reports of depression, anger, confusion, and tension. The difference in the effects of nicotine abstinence on the 2 classes of cooperative responding demonstrates that the social contingency mediates the behavioral effects of abstinence.

  20. Effects of thapsigargin in isolated rat thoracic aorta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, E O; Thastrup, Ole; Christensen, S B

    1988-01-01

    response to Tg was resistent to wash-out in drug-free PSS and was not affected by phentolamine, indomethacin or mepyramine but partly reduced by the calcium-antagonist nitrendipine and eliminated by wash-out in calcium-free PSS. Atropine eliminated the endothelium dependent relaxant effect of carbachol...

  1. Effects of embryo induction media and pretreatments in isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... chemical + heat and also the effects of 5 embryo induction media (NPB-99, C17, W14, CHB-2 and P2) on .... In the second experiment, the collected tillers were cold pre-treated (4°C) for 3 weeks and ... less steel mesh filter.

  2. Modulation Effects in Multi-Section Semiconductor Lasers (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    semiconductor lasers based on quantum well gain lever,” Appl. Phys. Lett., 59, 2216–2218 (1991). [33] C. P. Seltzer , L. D. Westbrook, and H. J. Wickes...Improved signal-to-noise ratio in gain-levered InGaAsP/InP MQW lasers,” Electron. Lett., 29, 230–231 (1993). [34] L. D. Westbrook and C. P. Seltzer ...Electron. Lett., 30, 37–39 (1994). [37] C. P. Seltzer , L. D. Westbrook, and H. J. Wickes, “The “gain-lever” effect in InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum well

  3. Orbital fibroblast chemokine modulation: effects of dexamethasone and cyclosporin A

    OpenAIRE

    BURNSTINE, M.; Elner, S.; Elner, V.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—Orbital inflammation is common, but the mechanisms underlying leucocytic infiltration of orbital tissue are poorly understood. Human orbital fibroblasts (OF) express chemokines, interleukin 8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), when exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. The effects of dexamethasone (DEX) and cyclosporin A (CSA) on OF IL-8 and MCP-1 were examined.
METHODS—Cultured human OF were incubated with recombinant interleukin 1β (rIL-1β; 0.2, 2.0, 20 ng/ml) alone or i...

  4. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of anpirtoline and citalopram in isolated and group housed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilke, O; Will, K; Jähkel, M; Oehler, J

    2001-07-01

    Acute effects of serotonergic drugs acting via different mechanisms were investigated by a social interaction test and subsequent determination of serotonin and dopamine metabolisms in mice housed in groups or isolated for 6 weeks. A resident/intruder test was performed with anpirtoline (5-HT1B receptor agonist in rodents; 1 mg/kg), citalopram (SSRI; 0.5 mg/kg) and saline treatment before animals were decapitated and different brain regions were frozen for subsequent HPLC-analyses. Behavioral investigations indicated a strong increase of aggressive behavior after 6 weeks of isolation housing. Acute citalopram treatment did not influence behavioral parameters of isolated and group housed mice. In contrast, anpirtoline antagonized isolation induced aggressive behavioral components in a specific manner. Analysis of dopamine and serotonin metabolism revealed that citalopram treatment did not affect dopamine metabolism, but reduced serotonin metabolism in the striatum, hippocampus, cortex and midbrain independent of housing conditions. In contrast, anpirtoline treatment increased dopamine metabolism in cortex, striatum and midbrain as well as influenced serotonin metabolism in a structure- and state-specific manner. Whereas anpirtoline decreased serotonin metabolism in the cortex, the midbrain and the hippocampus independent of housing conditions, in the striatum anpirtoline abolished the isolation induced decrease of serotonin metabolism. These results indicate that anpirtoline might induce antiaggressive effects via postsynaptic receptor- and structure-specific activation of serotonergic but also dopaminergic processes, whereas structure independent increase of synaptic serotonin via citalopram was ineffective to reverse aggressivity in isolated mice.

  5. The effect of patch isolation on epifaunal colonization in two different seagrass ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Camilla; Salo, Tiina

    2012-01-01

    The macrofaunal colonization of isolated habitats is affected by many factors, ranging from distance to the nearest source population to the dispersal mechanism of the species. We investigated the initial epifaunal colonization at two sites, one situated in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and the other...... in the Northern Baltic Sea. At each site, artificial seagrass units were placed at 10- and 0-m distances from a continuous seagrass meadow, as well as inside the meadow over a 5-day colonization time. With the exception of amphipods in Gulf of Mexico, patch isolation had a negative effect on colonization...... for the other faunal species, irrespective of the sites. This inverse colonization pattern of amphipods suggests that they are not equally sensitive to patch isolation in different regions. Our results indicate that increasing habitat isolation can have serious consequences for the community composition...

  6. ISOLATION OF ENDOPHYTIC ACTINOMYCETES FROM MEDICINAL PLANTS AND ITS MUTATIONAL EFFECT IN BIOCONTROL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Shenpagam N.*, D. Kanchana Devi ** and Sinduja G.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the endophytic actinomycetes were collected from three medicinal plants Azadiracta indica, Ocimum sanctum and Phyllanthus amarus. Endophytic actinomycetes were isolated using different media like Starch casein agar, Starch casein nitrate agar, Actinomycetes isolation agar and Soyabean agar, while it showed more colonies in Starch casein agar. The endophytic actinomycetes were stained and biochemical tests were performed. Antimicrobial compound was purified from the filtrate by ethanol extraction method. Antagonistic activities of endophytic actinomycetes isolates were tested against bacterial pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the fungi Rhizopus. For the selected isolates antibiotic resistance was checked using various antibiotic discs like Amoxycillin, Penicillin, Rifampicin and Ampicillin. The strains which showed efficient antibacterial activity were selected to study the effect of mutation by physical and chemical method. In this study, UV mutated endophytic actinomycetes increase antibiotic production than non-mutated endophytic Actinomycetes, whereas in chemical mutation it does not increase the antibiotic production.

  7. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Modulate Antimigratory and Apoptotic Effects of Doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Said

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticancer drug resistance is a multifactorial process that includes acquired and de novo drug resistances. Acquired resistance develops during treatment, while de novo resistance is the primary way for tumor cells to escape chemotherapy. Tumor microenvironment has been recently shown to be one of the important factors contributing to de novo resistance and called environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR. Two forms of EMDR have been described: soluble factor-mediated drug resistance (SFM-DR and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR. Anthracyclines, among the most potent chemotherapeutic agents, are widely used in clinics against hematopoietic and solid tumors. Their main mechanism of action relies on the inhibition of topoisomerase I and/or II and the induction of apoptosis. Beyond this well-known antitumor activity, it has been recently demonstrated that anthracyclines may display potent anti-invasive effects when used at subtoxic concentrations. In this paper, we will describe two particular modes of EMDR by which microenvironment may influence tumor-cell response to one of these anthracyclines, doxorubicin. The first one considers the influence of type I collagen on the antimigratory effect of doxorubicin (CAM-DR. The second considers the protection of tumor cells by thrombospondin-I against doxorubicin-induced apoptosis (SFM-DR.

  8. Shizukaol D, a Dimeric Sesquiterpene Isolated from Chloranthus serratus, Represses the Growth of Human Liver Cancer Cells by Modulating Wnt Signalling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lisha; Zhu, Hengrui; Yang, Xianmei; Xie, Fang; Peng, Jingtao; Jiang, Deke; Xie, Jun; Qi, Meiyan; Yu, Long

    2016-01-01

    Natural products have become sources of developing new drugs for the treatment of cancer. To seek candidate compounds that inhibit the growth of liver cancer, components of Chloranthus serratus were tested. Here, we report that shizukaol D, a dimeric sesquiterpene from Chloranthus serratus, exerted a growth inhibition effect on liver cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We demonstrated that shizukaol D induced cells to undergo apoptosis. More importantly, shizukaol D attenuated Wnt signalling and reduced the expression of endogenous Wnt target genes, which resulted in decreased expression of β-catenin. Collectively, this study demonstrated that shizukaol D inhibited the growth of liver cancer cells by modulating Wnt pathway.

  9. Model for the effect of static magnetic fields on isolated neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Moral, A.; Azanza, María J.

    1992-08-01

    A model which explains the effect of static magnetic fields on isolated neurons through Ca 2+ liberation from their binding sites at cell membrane, by a combined effect of lipid membrane molecules cooperative superdiamagnetism and electrostatic repulsion (Coulomb explosion) of Ca 2+ at both sides of the membrane, is developed.

  10. Interleukin-1 beta-induced nitric oxide production from isolated rat islets is modulated by D-glucose and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H U; Mauricio, D; Karlsen, Allan Ertman

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-1 beta has been proposed to cause selective beta-cell destruction via the induction of nitric oxide synthesis. The cytotoxic effect of interleukin-1 beta is modulated by the concentration of D-glucose in the medium. The aim of this study was to investigate if D-glucose-mediated modula......Interleukin-1 beta has been proposed to cause selective beta-cell destruction via the induction of nitric oxide synthesis. The cytotoxic effect of interleukin-1 beta is modulated by the concentration of D-glucose in the medium. The aim of this study was to investigate if D...... effects on acute insulin release was found at high (28 mmol/l) concentrations of D-glucose, and blocking nitrite production by the L-arginine analog aminoguanidine, which selectively inhibits the cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase, did not result in protection against the inhibitory action...... that could be reproduced by the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP. Addition of 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine resulted in a threefold reduction in the mRNA level of interleukin-1 beta-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase. We conclude that interleukin-1 beta-induced islet nitric oxide synthesis is augmented by D...

  11. Clay Modeling versus Written Modules as Effective Interventions in Understanding Human Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareither, Mary Lou; Arbel, Vered; Growe, Meghan; Muszczynski, Emily; Rudd, Adam; Marone, Jane R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of clay modeling to written modules is examined to determine the degree of improvement in learning and retention of anatomical 3D relationships among students with different learning preferences. Thirty-nine undergraduate students enrolled in a cadaver dissection course completed a pre-assessment examination and the VARK…

  12. EPEC-O for African Americans - Module 7 AA - Communicating Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  13. Effects of Agricultural Sales CDE Modules on Content Knowledge and Argumentation Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Sarah B.; Thoron, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the type of training module on argumentation skill, student content knowledge achievement, and performance in an agricultural sales practicum completed by secondary school agriculture students. Current research has concluded that most students do not possess the academic or transferable…

  14. Effects of nonlinear phase modulation on Bragg scattering in the low-conversion regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Cargill, D. S.; McKinstrie, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the effects of nonlinear phase modulation on frequency conversion by four-wave mixing (Bragg scattering) in the low-conversion regime. We derive the Green functions for this process using the time-domain collision method, for partial collisions, in which the four fields...

  15. Effects of nonlinear phase modulation on low-conversion four-wave mixing Bragg scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Mejling; McKinstrie, C. J.; Rottwitt, Karsten

    We consider the effects of nonlinear phase modulation (NPM) on frequency converseon by Bragg scattering. Previously we found that arbitrary mode reshaping without temporal entanglement (separability) was possible. When NPM is included, the modes are chirped and the separability is no longer compl...

  16. The pharmacological effect of positive KCNQ (Kv7) modulators on dopamine release from striatal slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majbrit M; Lange, Sofie Cecilie; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt;

    2011-01-01

    Retigabine is an anti-epileptic drug that inhibits neuronal firing by stabilizing the membrane potential through positive modulation of voltage-dependent KCNQ potassium channels in cortical neurons and in mesencephalic dopamine (DA) neurons. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of ...

  17. Effect of Junction Temperature Swing Durations on a Lifetime of a Transfer Molded IGBT Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Jorgensen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of junction temperature swing duration on the lifetime of a transfer molded Intelligent Power IGBT Module is studied and a relevant lifetime factor is modeled. A temperature swing duration dependent lifetime factor is defined based on 38 accelerated power cycling test...

  18. The Quantitative Effect of Students Using Podcasts in a First Year Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Grant; Barry, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This study reports the quantitative effect of students using podcasts in a 1st year undergraduate exercise physiology module. From a cohort of 70 students, 50 volunteered and completed the study. Using a pre-post random allocation research design, students were allocated to either a podcast group (PG) or control group (CG) based on a 32-question…

  19. Sex-Role Stereotyping and Its Effects. Physical Educators for Equity. Module 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neikirk, Mary; Leslie, Mary Dee

    This module, intended for use either as part of a self-study program or in a workshop, is designed to aid secondary school physical education teachers to identify effects of sex-role stereotyping on girls, boys, men, and women and to recognize examples of sex-role stereotyping in three areas of physical education: achievement, self-esteem, and…

  20. Investigation of Four wave mixing effects using different modulation formats in optical communication system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhpreet Kaur,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the four wave mixing effect on sixteen channel wavelength divison multiplexing has been compared for different modulation formats at various values of dispersion, core effective area, channel spacing.The performance of system has been evaluated in terms of four wave mixing power, BER and Q-factor.This paper simulates that with increase in the channel spacing,core effective area of fiber, signal interference between input signals decreases hence four wave mixing effect also decreases. It has been observed that for duobinary FWM decreases 1dBm more than NRZ. So duobinary modulation format is best suitable technique to reduce four wave mixing power by varying dispersion from 0 to 4 ps/nm.km, core effective area and channel spacing.

  1. The relationship between subjective perception and the psychological effects of patients in spatial isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibert, Fabienne

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spatial isolation is a common infection control measure, but negative psychological effects are often neglected. We investigated which factors influence the perception of single room isolated patients.Methods: In the present correlative cross-sectional study, 32 isolated patients have been interviewed within three departments of the Heidelberg University Hospital, one of Germany’s largest hospitals. The following questionnaires were used: 10-Item Big Five Inventory (BFI-10, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and a self-developed questionnaire to evaluate the individual experience of isolation. Data were analysed using correlation and regression analysis.Results: A significant positive correlation was found between the isolation period and anxiety (r=.42, p<.05. Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was demonstrated between the duration of contact to nursing staff and negative daydreaming (r=.89, p<.01. The activity watching television was associated with higher levels of anxiety (r=.38, p<.05. Surfing the internet had a positive relationship with thinking about beautiful things (r=.41, p<.05. Conclusions: Our study results have implications how to improve the psychological situation of patients during spatial isolation. Contact between nursing staff and patients is crucial, since this contact significantly associated with negative daydreaming, probably due to increased neediness of emotional and physical care in some patients. The duration of the isolation has an influence on the experience of anxiety. Activities to cope with the isolation, however, not always have positive effects on the well-being of the patient.

  2. Effective Simulation of Quantum Entanglement Based on Classical Fields Modulated with Pseudorandom Phase Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jian; Xu, Yingying; Dong, Hongtao

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that n classical fields modulated with n different pseudorandom phase sequences can constitute a 2^n-dimensional Hilbert space that contains tensor product structure. By using classical fields modulated with pseudorandom phase sequences, we discuss effective simulation of Bell states and GHZ state, and apply both correlation analysis and von Neumann entropy to characterize the simulation. We obtain similar results with the cases in quantum mechanics and find that the conclusions can be easily generalized to n quantum particles. The research on simulation of quantum entanglement may be important, for it not only provides useful insights into fundamental features of quantum entanglement, but also yields new insights into quantum computation.

  3. Design of Ge/SiGe quantum-confined Stark effect modulators for CMOS compatible photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Leon; Ikonić, Zoran; Valavanis, Alex; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2010-02-01

    A simulation technique for modeling optical absorption in Ge/SiGe multiple quantum well (MQW) heterostructures is described, based on a combined 6 × 6 k • p hole wave-function a one-band effective mass electron wavefunction calculation. Using this model, we employ strain engineering to target a specific applications-oriented wavelength, namely 1310 nm, and arrive at a design for a MQW structure to modulate light at this wavelength. The modal confinement in a proposed device is then found using finite-element modeling, and we estimate the performance of a proposed waveguide-integrated electroabsorption modulator.

  4. Effectiveness of rf phase modulation for increasing bunch length in electron storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini; Mosnier

    2000-04-01

    Aiming at increasing the apparent bunch length and hence the beam lifetime in electron storage rings, rf phase modulation near one parametric resonance has been experimentally investigated. Since the possible benefit of this technique depends greatly on the ring parameters, we studied the effect of such a modulation for different rf parameters on the longitudinal emittance. Theoretical predictions and results of simulations are compared and discussed. It is shown that synchrotron radiation tends to spoil the parametric resonance. In particular, a criterion for island survival has been found.

  5. Effect of tunneling injection on the modulation response of quantum dot lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yekta kiya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, modulation bandwidth characteristics of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD laser were theoretically investigated. Simulation was done by using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method. Effect of carrier relaxation life time, temperature and current density on characteristics of tunneling injection QD laser (TIL and conventional QD laser (CL were analyzed. Results showed that tunneling injection in QD laser increases the modulation bandwidth indicating that it is very useful for using in the fiber optic communication systems.

  6. Effects of long-term blindness on preparatory emg modulation in humans performing landing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Goroso, Daniel Gustavo

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the long-term effect of blindness on the task of leaping down to a lower landing surface, five blind individuals were compared with 10 sighted individuals who performed landing movements with and without sight. Participants performed six consecutive drop-landings from four different heights, during which the prelanding modulation of EMG timing and amplitude in four lower-limb muscles were recorded. Analysis showed that blind individuals showed specific prelanding EMG modulation, suggesting that long-term dependence on somesthetic and vestibular cues leads to different preparatory measures for vertical falls.

  7. Study on Effect of Junction Temperature Swing Duration on Lifetime of Transfer Molded Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Jørgensen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of junction temperature swing duration on lifetime of transfer molded power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules is studied and a relevant lifetime factor is modeled. This study is based on 39 accelerated power cycling test results under six different...... conditions by an advanced power cycling test setup, which allows tested modules to be operated under more realistic electrical conditions during the power cycling test. The analysis of the test results and the temperature swing duration dependent lifetime factor under different definitions and confidence...

  8. Effect of Modulated Alternating and Direct Current Iontophoresis on Transdermal Delivery of Lidocaine Hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Bhatia; Banga, Ajay K.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride through porcine skin and to compare the effects of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis. Continuous and modulated iontophoresis was applied for one hour and two hours (0-1 h and 4-5th h) using a 1% w/v solution of lidocaine hydrochloride. Tape stripping was done to quantify the amount of drug permeated into stratum corneum and skin extraction studies were performed to determi...

  9. Can ropinirole modulate reinforcing subjective effects of cocaine in humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Giovanni Icro eMaremmani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated, by means of the Cocaine Rush Visual Analogue Scale (CRVAS, the impact of ropinirole on the expected rush induced by cocaine in a group of heroin addicts abusing cocaine; the self-reported reaction to the rush blockade (if any on cocaine consumption, and the correlations between this self-reported reaction and individual, clinical and therapeutic parameters. Nineteen cocaine abuser heroin-dependent patients entered the study. Their experienced cocaine rush was 61.31±32.1% of the maximum effect previously experienced. Compared with their previous rush intensity 16 patients experienced significantly lower intensity, three the same intensity and none a higher intensity. In particular, two patients experienced a complete blockade of rush and reported a reduced use of cocaine. Fourteen patients experienced a partial blockade of cocaine rush; of these, nine reported they had reduced their use of cocaine. Ropinirole does diminish the subjective intensity of an expected cocaine rush, so interfering with the dynamics of reward, while supporting its possible use in the treatment of cocaine dependence.

  10. Characteristics analysis of polarization module on optical proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chanha; Hong, Jongkyun; Yang, Kiho; Theeuwes, Thomas; Gautier, Frederic; Min, Young-Hong; Chen, Alek; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu; Kim, Jinwoong

    2007-03-01

    In hyper NA system, specific illumination combined with polarization can be used as one of major RET techniques. Polarization at high NA dry system is also regarded as important technology to bring improvement of very low k1 process. The benefits of polarization on repeated structure are very well known. However we also need to understand the effect on random pattern in peripheral region to adopt polarization technology successfully into real devices. Memory device such as DRAM and NAND Flash has repeated cell structure and also loose pattern in peripheral region. In this study two kinds of polarization function will be applied to real memory devices and the polarization behavior on various patterns in peripheral circuit will be analyzed through actual printing process using 6% attenuated PSM at ArF high NA dry system. The printed result will be compared on random patterns through in-line metrology tool and process guideline including OPC treatment will be discussed based on this study, especially with regard to ID bias.

  11. Effect of Integrated Yoga Module on Selected Psychological Variables among Women with Anxiety Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, S; Jaiganesh, K; Duraisamy

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of yogic practices has proven benefits in both organic and psychological diseases. Forty-five women with anxiety selected by a random sampling method were divided into three groups. Experimental group I was subjected to asanas, relaxation and pranayama while Experimental group II was subjected to an integrated yoga module. The control group did not receive any intervention. Anxiety was measured by Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale before and after treatment. Frustration was measured through Reaction to Frustration Scale. All data were spread in an Excel sheet to be analysed with SPSS 16 software using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Selected yoga and asanas decreased anxiety and frustration scores but treatment with an integrated yoga module resulted in significant reduction of anxiety and frustration. To conclude, the practice of asanas and yoga decreased anxiety in women, and yoga as an integrated module significantly improved anxiety scores in young women with proven anxiety without any ill effects.

  12. Degradation analysis of photovoltaic modules based on operational data: effects of seasonal pattern and sensor drifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Degradation analysis of photovoltaic (PV) modules based on real operational data is essential to the future development of the PV industry. Weather conditions and system drifting often lead to large uncontrollable fluctuations in operational data, which present great challenges for calculating degradation rates of PV modules. In this paper, we propose a new numerical two-step approach to overcome these difficulties. In particular, we will show that our method is able to eliminate effects of seasonal patterns and systematic sensor drifting in evaluating degradation rates of PV modules. The method is applied to the six-year operational data of a solar PV system installed at CA United States. We demonstrate that our approach can greatly improve the degradation calculations, compared with other widely used methods.

  13. Effect of Phase Shifted Frequency Modulation on Two Level Atom-Field Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.V. Priyesh; Ramesh Babu Thayyullathil

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the effect of phase shifted frequency modulation on two level atom with field interaction using Jaynes-Cummings model. Here the frequency of the interacting field is sinusoidally varying with time with a constant phase. Due to the presence of phase in the frequency modulation, the variation of population inversion with time is different from the standard case. There are no exact collapses and revivals in the variation of population inversion but it oscillates sinusoidally with time. In coherent field atom interaction the population inversion behaves as in the case of Fock state atom interaction, when frequency modulation with a non zero phase is applied. The study done with squeezed field has shown the same behavior of the population inversion.

  14. Effect of wire obstructions on the formation of modulated plasma waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Andrew; Yoon, Sung; Hine, George; Magill, Jeff; Milchberg, Howard

    2012-10-01

    Modulated plasma waveguides have been proposed as a means of quasi-phase matching laser plasma interactions for applications including direct acceleration of electrons by a high intensity laser pulse. We have demonstrated a technique for axially modulating plasma waveguides by periodically obstructing gas flow out of a cluster jet using an array of wires. This technique is inherently simpler and more easily varied compared to demonstrated optical techniques which axially modulate laser intensity at the target. However, in the previous study [B. Layer, et. al., Opt. Exp. 17, 4263(2009)] the modulation period could not be made less than 200um due to an observed density drop in the plasma between the wires for unknown reasons. By obstructing gas flow with only two wires with variable separation, we examine the aforementioned issue. Since the gas flow out of the cluster jet is supersonic, we observe shock wave formation from the wires with transverse interferometry and shadowgraphy. We find that as we increase the mean cluster size in the gas flow the effect of the shock wave to decrease plasma density between the wires is diminished, representing a transition to a ballistic flow regime. By optimizing jet parameters (e.g. temperature and height of plasma from the wires) we have been able to achieve plasma guiding structures with modulation periods less than 200um.

  15. Moxonidine modulates cytokine signalling and effects on cardiac cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceros, Henry; Farah, Georges; Noiseux, Nicolas; Mukaddam-Daher, Suhayla

    2014-10-05

    Regression of left ventricular hypertrophy and improved cardiac function in SHR by the centrally acting imidazoline I1-receptor agonist, moxonidine, are associated with differential actions on circulating and cardiac cytokines. Herein, we investigated cell-type specific I1-receptor (also known as nischarin) signalling and the mechanisms through which moxonidine may interfere with cytokines to affect cardiac cell viability. Studies were performed on neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts incubated with interleukin (IL)-1β (5 ng/ml), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (10 ng/ml), and moxonidine (10(-7) and 10(-5) M), separately and in combination, for 15 min, and 24 and 48 h for the measurement of MAPKs (ERK1/2, JNK, and p38) and Akt activation and inducible NOS (iNOS) expression, by Western blotting, and cardiac cell viability/proliferation and apoptosis by flow cytometry, MTT assay, and Live/Dead assay. Participation of imidazoline I1-receptors and the signalling proteins in the detected effects was identified using imidazoline I1-receptor antagonist and signalling protein inhibitors. The results show that IL-1β, and to a lower extent, TNF-α, causes cell death and that moxonidine protects against starvation- as well as IL-1β -induced mortality, mainly by maintaining membrane integrity, and in part, by improving mitochondrial activity. The protection involves activation of Akt, ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and iNOS. In contrast, moxonidine stimulates basal and IL-1β-induced fibroblast mortality by mechanisms that include inhibition of JNK and iNOS. Thus, apart from their actions on the central nervous system, imidazoline I1-receptors are directly involved in cardiac cell growth and death, and may play an important role in cardiovascular diseases associated with inflammation.

  16. Interaction Effect of Social Isolation and High Dose Corticosteroid on Neurogenesis and Emotional Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jackie N-M; Lee, Jada C-D; Lee, Sylvia S P; Hui, Katy K Y; Chan, Alan H L; Fung, Timothy K-H; Sánchez-Vidaña, Dalinda I; Lau, Benson W-M; Ngai, Shirley P-C

    2017-01-01

    Hypercortisolemia is one of the clinical features found in depressed patients. This clinical feature has been mimicked in animal studies via application of exogenous corticosterone (CORT). Previous studies suggested that CORT can induce behavioral disturbance in anxious-depressive like behavior, which is associated with suppressed neurogenesis. Hippocampal neurogenesis plays an important role in adult cognitive and behavioral regulation. Its suppression may thus lead to neuropsychiatric disorders. Similar to the effects of CORT on the animals' depression-like behaviors and neurogenesis, social deprivation has been regarded as one factor that predicts poor prognosis in depression. Furthermore, social isolation is regarded as a stressor to social animals including experimental rodents. Hence, this study aims to examine if social isolation would induce further emotional or anxiety-like behavior disturbance and suppress neurogenesis in an experimental model that was repeatedly treated with CORT. Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study to determine the effects of different housing conditions, either social isolated or group housing, in vehicle-treated control and CORT-treated animals. Forced swimming test (FST), open field test (OFT) and social interaction test (SIT) were used to assess depression-like, anxiety-like and social behaviors respectively. Immunohistochemistry was performed to quantify the number of proliferative cells and immature neurons in the hippocampus, while dendritic maturation of immature neurons was analyzed by Sholl analysis. Social isolation reduced latency to immobility in FST. Furthermore, social isolation could significantly reduce the ratio of doublecortin and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) positive cells of the neurogenesis assay under CORT-treated condition. The current findings suggested that the behavioral and neurological effect of social isolation is dependent on the condition of hypercortisolemia. Furthermore, social isolation may

  17. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATION USING MODIFICATION MODULE TOWARDS NUTRITIONAL INTAKE DURING PREGNANCY IN KENDARI, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Energy metabolism speeds up during pregnancy that requires pregnant women to have extra amount of nutritions. Provision of education on nutrition during pregnancy is an effort to prevent and tackle malnutrition. Aim: This study aimed to determine the effect of education using modification module towards nutritional intake during pregnancy in Kendari, Indonesia Methods: This was Quasi Experimental study with pre-post design. There were 4 groups in this study, which were: 1 The group that received educational intervention using a modification module from the MHC book of the Department of Health, 2 The group that received educational intervention using MHC book of the Department of Health, 3 The group that only used modification modules from MHC book of the Department of Health, and 4 The group that only used the MHC book of Department of Health. The intervention was given for 6 months. Seventy eight of 4-months pregnant women were selected in this study. Data were collected by using 24 hours food recall instrument, and questionnaire adopted from Child and Maternal Nutrition Survey’s Questionnaire of Faculty of Public Health, Hasanuddin University. Data were analyzed by using Wilcoxon test and Kruskal Wallis test. Results: Results showed there was an effect of education by using the module modifications to the intake of nutritions during pregnancy. Increased nutrient intake was higher in pregnant women using a module class modifications. Conclusion: Education affects nutritional intake of pregnant women. Changes in nutritional intake was higher in group 1 (education modules with modifications, compared with the education group MCH handbook. It is suggested that mothers should improve the nutrition during pregnancy for the better growth of the fetus, composition and metabolic changes in the mother's body.

  18. Effects of internal mass distribution and its isolation on the acoustic characteristics of a submerged hull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Herwig; Kinns, Roger; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    The primary aim of machinery isolation in marine vessels is to isolate structural vibration of the onboard machinery from the hull and to reduce far-field radiation of underwater noise. A substantial proportion of the total submarine mass is on flexible mounts that isolate supported masses from the hull at frequencies above the mounting system resonant frequency. This reduces the dynamically effective mass of the hull and affects the signature of the marine vessel due to propeller excitation. A fully coupled finite element/boundary element (FE/BE) model has been developed to investigate the effect of mass distribution and isolation in a submerged hull. The finite element model of the structure includes internal structures to represent the machinery and other flexibly mounted components. Changes in the radiated sound power demonstrate the effect of machinery isolation on the acoustic signature of the submerged hull due to the external propeller forces. Results are also presented to show how the arrangement of flexible mounts for a large internal structure can influence the radiation due to machinery forces.

  19. 2.3-MW Medium-Voltage, Three-Level Wind Energy Inverter Applying a Unique Bus Structure and 4.5-kV Si/SiC Hybrid Isolated Power Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdman, W.; Keller, J.; Grider, D.; VanBrunt, E.

    2014-11-01

    A high-efficiency, 2.3-MW, medium-voltage, three-level inverter utilizing 4.5-kV Si/SiC (silicon carbide) hybrid modules for wind energy applications is discussed. The inverter addresses recent trends in siting the inverter within the base of multimegawatt turbine towers. A simplified split, three-layer laminated bus structure that maintains low parasitic inductances is introduced along with a low-voltage, high-current test method for determining these inductances. Feed-thru bushings, edge fill methods, and other design features of the laminated bus structure provide voltage isolation that is consistent with the 10.4-kV module isolation levels. Inverter efficiency improvement is a result of the (essential) elimination of the reverse recovery charge present in 4.5-kV Si PIN diodes, which can produce a significant reduction in diode turn-off losses as well as insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) turn-on losses. The hybrid modules are supplied in industry-standard 140 mm x 130 mm and 190 mm x 130 mm packages to demonstrate direct module substitution into existing inverter designs. A focus on laminated bus/capacitor-bank/module subassembly level switching performance is presented.

  20. Isolation of Cellulose Nanofibers: Effect of Biotreatment on Hydrogen Bonding Network in Wood Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekumar Janardhnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cellulose nanofibres as high-strength reinforcement in nano-biocomposites is very enthusiastically being explored due to their biodegradability, renewability, and high specific strength properties. Cellulose, through a regular network of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, is organized into perfect stereoregular configuration called microfibrils which further aggregate to different levels to form the fibre. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding at various levels, especially at the elementary level, is the major binding force that one need to overcome to reverse engineer these fibres into their microfibrillar level. This paper briefly describes a novel enzymatic fibre pretreatment developed to facilitate the isolation of cellulose microfibrils and explores effectiveness of biotreatment on the intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the fiber. Bleached Kraft Softwood Pulp was treated with a fungus (OS1 isolated from elm tree infected with Dutch elm disease. Cellulose microfibrils were isolated from these treated fibers by high-shear refining. The % yield of nanofibres and their diameter distribution (<50 nm isolated from the bio-treated fibers indicated a substantial increase compared to those isolated from untreated fibers. FT-IR spectral analysis indicated a reduction in the density of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding within the fiber. X-ray spectrometry indicated a reduction in the crystallinity. Hydrogen bond-specific enzyme and its application in the isolation of new generation cellulose nano-fibers can be a huge leap forward in the field of nano-biocomposites.

  1. The effects of social isolation on wound healing mechanisms in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyter, Leah M; Yang, Linglan; da Rocha, José M; Engeland, Christopher G

    2014-03-29

    Various stressors impair wound healing in humans and rodents. For example, social isolation delays wound closure in rodents, but the healing mechanisms that underlie this delay have yet to be identified. Here, the effects of three weeks of social isolation on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses and healing factors involved in the inflammatory and proliferative phases of wound healing were assessed in adult female hairless mice. Social isolation reduced basal circulating corticosterone concentrations and increased body and thymus weights compared with group-housed controls. Isolation impaired dermal wound closure by up to 30% and reduced initial total wound bacterial load relative to controls. Inflammatory gene expression in the wounds was not affected by the observed differences in wound bacterial load. However, isolation reduced wound gene expression of keratinocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, which are involved in keratinocyte proliferation/migration and angiogenesis during the proliferative phase of healing. These data indicate that social isolation induces healing impairments that may be attributed to reductions in growth factors necessary for proper skin cell proliferation and blood vessel growth during healing. This healing impairment occurred in the absence of both high wound bacterial load and elevated circulating glucocorticoids, which have previously been hypothesized to be required for stress-impaired healing in mice.

  2. Relativistic effects on the modulational instability of electron plasma waves in quantum plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudev Ghosh; Swarniv Chandra; Sailendra Nath Paul

    2012-05-01

    Relativistic effects on the linear and nonlinear properties of electron plasma waves are investigated using the one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model for a twocomponent electron–ion dense quantum plasma. Using standard perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) containing both relativistic and quantum effects has been derived. This equation has been used to discuss the modulational instability of the wave. Through numerical calculations it is shown that relativistic effects significantly change the linear dispersion character of the wave. Unlike quantum effects, relativistic effects are shown to reduce the instability growth rate of electron plasma waves.

  3. Antiinflammatory effects of different extracts and harpagoside isolated from Scrophularia frutescens L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, D; Fernández, A; Sáenz, T; Ahumada, C

    1996-06-01

    Most species belonging to Scrophularia genus had been used as antiinflammatory drugs by the folk medicine. The phenylpropanoids are considered to be the active principles of these drugs with antiinflammatory action by different Authors, especially harpagoside and harpagide. In this report, the antiinflammatory effects of Scrophularia frutescens L. (Scrophulariaceae) was studied and the iridoid glucoside harpagoside has been evidenced and isolated for the first time from this plant. Aqueous extract, methanolic extract and harpagoside, isolated from the methanolic extract, were tested for antiinflammatory activity on the rat paw oedema. The results obtained showed that the aqueous extract has a small but significant antiinflammatory effect on carrageenan-induced oedema test, while methanolic extract has a lower antiinflammatory activity and the activity of the isolated harpagoside is remarkably low. Thus, the conclusion may be that S. frutescens L. is a potential antiiflammatory agent but its activity is not due to harpagoside.

  4. Effects of Temperature Stresses on the Resistance of Chickpea Genotypes and Aggressiveness of Didymella rabiei Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seid Ahmed Kemal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. is an important food and rotation crop in many parts of the world. Cold (freezing and chilling temperatures and Ascochyta blight (Didymella rabiei are the major constraints in chickpea production. The effects of temperature stresses on chickpea susceptibility and pathogen aggressiveness are not well documented in the Cicer-Didymella pathosystem. Two experiments were conducted under controlled conditions using chickpea genotypes and pathogen isolates in 2011 and 2012. In Experiment 1, four isolates of D. rabiei (AR-01, AR-02, AR-03 and AR-04, six chickpea genotypes (Ghab-1, Ghab-2, Ghab-3, Ghab-4, Ghab-5 and ICC-12004 and four temperature regimes (10, 15, 20, and 25°C were studied using 10 day-old seedlings. In Experiment 2, three chickpea genotypes (Ghab-1, Ghab-2, and ICC-12004 were exposed to 5 and 10 days of chilling temperature exposure at 5°C and non-exposed seedlings were used as controls. Seedlings of the three chickpea genotypes were inoculated with the four pathogen isolates used in Experiment 1. Three disease parameters (incubation period, latent period and disease severity were measured to evaluate treatment effects. In Experiment 1, highly significant interactions between genotypes and isolates; genotypes and temperature; and isolate and temperature were observed for incubation and latent periods. Genotype x isolate and temperature x isolate interactions also significantly affected disease severity. The resistant genotype ICC-12004 showed long incubation and latent periods and low disease severity at all temperatures. The highly aggressive isolate AR-04 caused symptoms, produced pycnidia in short duration as well as high disease severity across temperature regimes, which indicated it is adapted to a wide range of temperatures. Short incubation and latent periods and high disease severity were observed on genotypes exposed to chilling temperature. Our findings showed that the significant interactions of

  5. Effects of Moat Wall Impact on the Seismic Response of Base Isolated Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Jung Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mosqueda, Gilberto; Sarebanhab, Alireza [University of California, San Diego (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The objectives of this study are to examine the effects of impact on the response of seismically isolated NPPs and identify characteristics of the isolation hardware and hard stop that minimize these effects. Considering variable distances to the hard stop and properties of the moat wall, the amplification in response is reported for acceleration and floor spectral accelerations at different points along the height of a NPP containment structure. Base isolation can be an effective strategy to protect critical facilities such as Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) from the damaging effects of horizontal earthquake ground shaking. To be effective in reducing accelerations and deformations of the structure above, the seismic isolation bearings can be subjected to large displacements. In the case of an extreme earthquake, bearing displacements need to be limited by a hard stop in order to prevent failure of the bearings. Impact to the hard stop, which is often the moat wall at the basement level, is also of significant concern due to the potential for increased transfer of forces and amplification in response of the structural system, piping and other contents. However, the consequences of impact or factors important to mitigate its effects are not very well understood. The main findings of this study are related to modeling of NPP with moat wall in OpenSees and LSDyna as well as observations resulting from the parametric study of the performance of the NPP under different intensity levels of seismic excitations for different properties of the moat wall and bearings. • Variation in the isolator properties should be considered when examining seismic pounding. For BDBE even, 58.5 % cases result to the impact for lower bound properties while this value was 5.5 % for upper bound properties. Since the impact results are dependent to the assumed bearing properties, a better range of properties can be obtained from experimental testing of the bearing under large shear strains.

  6. Functional effects of the KCNQ modulators retigabine and XE991 in the rat urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Frederik; Svalø, Julie; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2010-01-01

    The anticonvulsant retigabine has previously been reported to inhibit bladder overactivity in rats in vivo but the mechanism and site of action are not known. In the present study we investigated the effect of retigabine in isolated rat bladder tissue. Bladders from Sprague-Dawley rats were cut t...

  7. Highly effective bacterial agents against Cimbex quadrimaculatus (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae): isolation of bacteria and their insecticidal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakici, Filiz Ozkan; Ozgen, İnanc; Bolu, Halil; Erbas, Zeynep; Demirbağ, Zihni; Demir, İsmail

    2015-01-01

    Cimbex quadrimaculatus (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae) is one of the serious pests of almonds in Turkey and worldwide. Since there is no effective control application against this pest, it has been a serious problem up to now. Therefore, we aimed to find an effective bacterium that can be utilized as a biocontrol agent against C. quadrimaculatus in pest management. We isolated seven bacteria from dead and live C. quadrimaculatus larvae, and evaluated the larvicidal potency of all isolates on the respective pest. Based on the morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular properties (partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene), the isolates were identified to be Bacillus safensis (CQ1), Bacillus subtilis (CQ2), Bacillus tequilensis (CQ3), Enterobacter sp. (CQ4), Kurthia gibsonii (CQ5), Staphylococcus sp. (CQ6) and Staphylococcus sciuri (CQ7). The results of the larvicidal activities of these isolates indicated that the mortality value obtained from all treatments changed from 58 to 100 %, and reached 100 % with B. safensis (CQ1) and B. subtilis (CQ2) on the 3rd instar larvae within 10 days of application of 1.89 × 10(9) cfu/mL bacterial concentration at 25 °C under laboratory conditions. Findings from this study indicate that these isolates appear to be a promising biocontrol agent for C. quadrimaculatus.

  8. Effect of some Trichoderma spp. isolates on promoting growth of cucumber seedlings under greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Taghinasab Darzi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was performed to investigate the effect of some Trichoderma spp. isolates as growth promoters of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. seedlings under greenhouse conditions. Inoculai of 19 Thrichoderma spp. isolates were prepared from disinfected wheat grain. The upper half of the soil in pots (containing field soil and sand was mixed with these inoculai at 3% ratio and the pots were irrigated with tap water for 28 days. After four weeks, the seedlings were sampled for growth comparison on stem length, root length and total fresh weight. The results showed that some isolates improved significantly the cucumber seedlings’ growth and others had inhibitory effect. Application of Trichoderma spp. 17 and T. longibraciatum increased stem length more than 74% as compared to control. Also, these isolates increased significantly P<0.05 the total fresh weight about 40% and 25%, respectively, as compared to control. Furthermore, Trichoderma sp. 19 decreased significantly the stem length, root length and total fresh weight as compared to control. These results show the ability of Persian Trichoderma spp. isolates in promoting cucumber growth and its potential for other plants.

  9. Halogenation generates effective modulators of amyloid-Beta aggregation and neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Edward Wong

    Full Text Available Halogenation of organic compounds plays diverse roles in biochemistry, including selective chemical modification of proteins and improved oral absorption/blood-brain barrier permeability of drug candidates. Moreover, halogenation of aromatic molecules greatly affects aromatic interaction-mediated self-assembly processes, including amyloid fibril formation. Perturbation of the aromatic interaction caused by halogenation of peptide building blocks is known to affect the morphology and other physical properties of the fibrillar structure. Consequently, in this article, we investigated the ability of halogenated ligands to modulate the self-assembly of amyloidogenic peptide/protein. As a model system, we chose amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ, which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, and a novel modulator of Aβ aggregation, erythrosine B (ERB. Considering that four halogen atoms are attached to the xanthene benzoate group in ERB, we hypothesized that halogenation of the xanthene benzoate plays a critical role in modulating Aβ aggregation and cytotoxicity. Therefore, we evaluated the modulating capacities of four ERB analogs containing different types and numbers of halogen atoms as well as fluorescein as a negative control. We found that fluorescein is not an effective modulator of Aβ aggregation and cytotoxicity. However, halogenation of either the xanthenes or benzoate ring of fluorescein substantially enhanced the inhibitory capacity on Aβ aggregation. Such Aβ aggregation inhibition by ERB analogs except rose bengal correlated well to the inhibition of Aβ cytotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that halogenation of aromatic rings substantially enhance inhibitory capacities of small molecules on Aβ-associated neurotoxicity via Aβ aggregation modulation.

  10. Demodulation effect is observed in neurones by exposure to low frequency modulated microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bruzón, R. N.; Figols, T.; Azanza, M. J.; del Moral, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neurones exposure to a microwave (carrier fc=13.6 GHz; power P simeq 5 mW; Ho simeq 0.10 Am-1 = 1.25 mOe; E0 simeq 3.5 V/m; ΔT simeq 0.01°C SAR: 3.1×10-3 - 5.8×10-3 W/Kg) EMF amplitude modulated by ELF-AC field (frequency, fm= 0-100 Hz) shows no electrophysiological effect under the carrier MF alone, but "frequency resonances: at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 50, 100 Hz: demodulation effect. Resonances appear when applied ELF-MF is close to a dominant characteristic frequency of the neurone impulse Fourier spectrum. This is an interesting result considering that ELF-MF modulating RF or MW in the range of human EEG could induce frequency-resonant effects on exposed human brain.

  11. Chaperone-like effect of the linker on the isolated C-terminal domain of rabbit muscle creatine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Xia, Mengdie; He, Hua-Wei; Wang, Sha; Liu, Huihui; Gong, Haipeng; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2012-08-01

    Intramolecular chaperones (IMCs), which are specific domains/segments encoded in the primary structure of proteins, exhibit chaperone-like activity against the aggregation of the other domains in the same molecule. In this research, we found that the truncation of the linker greatly promoted the thermal aggregation of the isolated C-terminal domain (CTD) of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (RMCK). Either the existence of the linker covalently linked to CTD or the supply of the synthetic linker peptide additionally could successfully protect the CTD of RMCK against aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. Truncated fragments of the linker also behaved as a chaperone-like effect with lower efficiency, revealing the importance of its C-terminal half in the IMC function of the linker. The aggregation sites in the CTD of RMCK were identified by molecular dynamics simulations. Mutational analysis of the three key hydrophobic residues resulted in opposing effects on the thermal aggregation between the CTD with intact or partial linker, confirming the role of linker as a lid to protect the hydrophobic residues against exposure to solvent. These observations suggested that the linkers in multidomain proteins could act as IMCs to facilitate the correct folding of the aggregation-prone domains. Furthermore, the intactness of the IMC linker after proteolysis modulates the production of off-pathway aggregates, which may be important to the onset of some diseases caused by the toxic effects of aggregated proteolytic fragments.

  12. Interdisciplinary Integration of the CVS Module and Its Effect on Faculty and Student Satisfaction as Well as Student Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuob Nasra N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beyond the adoption of the principles of horizontal and vertical integration, significant planning and implementation of curriculum reform is needed. This study aimed to assess the effect of the interdisciplinary integrated Cardiovascular System (CVS module on both student satisfaction and performance and comparing them to those of the temporally coordinated CVS module that was implemented in the previous year at the faculty of Medicine of the King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. Methods This interventional study used mixed method research design to assess student and faculty satisfaction with the level of integration within the CVS module. A team from the medical education department was assembled in 2010/2011 to design a plan to improve the CVS module integration level. After delivering the developed module, both student and faculty satisfaction as well as students performance were assessed and compared to those of the previous year to provide an idea about module effectiveness. Results Many challenges faced the medical education team during design and implementation of the developed CVS module e.g. resistance of faculty members to change, increasing the percentage of students directed learning hours from the total contact hour allotted to the module and shifting to integrated item writing in students assessment, spite of that the module achieved a significant increase in both teaching faculty and student satisfaction as well as in the module scores. Conclusion The fully integrated CVS has yielded encouraging results that individual teachers or other medical schools who attempt to reformulate their curriculum may find valuable.

  13. Geometry effect of isolated roughness on boundary layer transition investigated by tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Q.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; Scarano, F.

    2015-01-01

    Transitional flow over isolated roughness elements is investigated in the incompressible flow regime using Tomographic PIV. Three different geometries are considered (micro-ramp, cylinder and square) with same height and span. Their effect on accelerating boundary layer transition is compared and di

  14. The renal effects of alginates isolated from brown seaweed Sargassum vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Alves Sousa, Alessandra; Barbosa, Paulo Sergio Ferreira; Torres, Márcia Rocha; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Martins, René Duarte; de Sousa Alves, Renata; de Sousa, Daniel Freire; Alves, Claudênio Diógenes; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras; Monteiro, Helena Serra Azul

    2008-04-01

    Alginates isolated from Sargassum vulgare, present a strong antitumor activity, associated with kidney reversible damage, as analysed by histopathology of treated animals. In the present study, the renal alteration mechanisms of S. vulgare alginates were investigated using the isolated perfused rat kidney and the isolated perfused rat mesenteric blood vessel methods. The results showed that the effects of Sargassum vulgare low viscosity (SVLV) alginate were more potent than those of Sargassum vulgare high viscosity (SVHV) alginate in the isolated rat kidney. The SVLV alginate caused considerable changes in renal physiology, as shown by an increase in parameters such as perfusion pressure, renal vascular resistance, glomerular filtration rate, urinary flow and sodium, potassium and chloride excretion and by reduction of chloride tubular transport. The effects of SVHV were weaker than those of SVLV. The effects of SVLV on kidney could be related to direct vascular action as demonstrated with SVLV alginate on mesenteric blood vessels. In conclusion, the Sargassum vulgare alginate altered the renal function parameters evaluated. S. vulgare low viscosity alginate renal effects were more potent than S. vulgare high viscosity alginate. It is suggested that physicochemical differences between SVHV and SVLV could explain the differences found in the results.

  15. Effects of early treatment with glatiramer acetate in patients with clinically isolated syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comi, G.; Martinelli, V.; Rodegher, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The placebo-controlled phase of the PreCISe study showed that glatiramer acetate delayed onset of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in patients with clinically isolated syndrome and brain lesions on MRI. Objective: To compare the effects of early versus delayed glatiramer ...

  16. Isolating the Effects of Training Using Simple Regression Analysis: An Example of the Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, C. Keith

    This paper provides a case example of simple regression analysis, a forecasting procedure used to isolate the effects of training from an identified extraneous variable. This case example focuses on results of a three-day sales training program to improve bank loan officers' knowledge, skill-level, and attitude regarding solicitation and sale of…

  17. Effects of Charred Fructus Crataegi on the contractilily of isolated rat gastric and intestine muscle strips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hou-li; DIAO Yun-peng; LIU Zhi-hao; HUANG Shan-shan; MA Xiao-chi; LIN Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of Charred Fructus Crataegi Alcohol Extract on contractililty of isolated rat gastric and intesting smooth muscle strips. Methods Isolated rat intestine was selected in the assay to test the effects of Charred Fructus Crataegi Alcohol Extract on contractilty of isolated rat gastric and intestine smooth muscle strips using Krebs' solution, to observe the effects of in the presence of acetylcholine or atropine. Results Charred Fructus Crataegi Alcohol Extract in the range of 2-8 rag crude drugs/mL could significantly reduce the contractility of rat gastric and intestine smooth muscle strips in a dose-dependent manner, and Charred Fructus Crataegi Alcohol Extract 8 mg·mL-1(crude drugs) could inhibit the stimulation induced by acetylcholine. Charred Fructus Crataegi Alcohol Extract 8 mg·mL-1(crude drugs) was found to have a inhibiton of the relaxtion concurrently used with atropin. Conclusions The results suggest that Charred Fructus Crataegi Alcohol Extract has prominent inhibitory effects on the contractile activity of isolated rat gastric and intestine smooth muscle strips.

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Some Pathogenic Bacteria Isolated From Women With Bacterial Vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eslami; Karimiravesh; Taheri; Azargashb

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis. ...

  19. Genetic effects of habitat fragmentation and population isolation on Etheostoma raneyi (Percidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken A. Sterling; David H. Reed; Brice P. Noonan; Melvin L. Warren

    2012-01-01

    The use of genetic methods to quantify the effects of anthropogenic habitat fragmentation on population structure has become increasingly common. However, in today’s highly fragmented habitats, researchers have sometimes concluded that populations are currently genetically isolated due to habitat fragmentation without testing the possibility that populations were...

  20. Potent airway smooth muscle relaxant effect of cynatratoside B, a steroidal glycoside isolated from Cynanchum stauntonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Chan, Kar-Man; To, Ming-Ho; Cheng, Ling; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2014-04-25

    The dried roots of Cynanchum stauntonii in having cough-relieving efficacy are commonly included in traditional antitussive formulas. The active components in a C. stauntonii root extract responsible for airway relaxation were isolated using an ex vivo bioassay-guided fractionation method, in which subfractions were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on the contraction of isolated rat tracheal rings by isometric tension measurements. A steroidal glycoside, cynatratoside B (1), identified by LC-MS and NMR spectroscopic analysis, was shown to have potent inhibition on acetylcholine- and carbachol-induced tracheal contractions. The present data provide scientific evidence to support the traditional use of C. stauntonii as an antitussive herbal medicine.

  1. Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from various ecological niches on Vibrio species pathogenic to crustaceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabhakaran Priyaja; Puthumana Jayesh; Neil Scolastin Correya; Balachandran Sreelakshmi; Naduthalmuriparambil S Sudheer; Rosamma Philip; Isaac Sarogeni Bright Singh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To abrogate pathogenic vibrios in aquaculture by testing the potential of Pseudomonas isolates from fresh water, brackish and marine environments as probiotics.Methods:Antagonistic activity of the compound against 7 Vibrio spp. was performed. Influence of salinity on the production of pyocyanin and the toxicity was done through the compound using brine shrimp lethality assay. Molecular characterization was performed to confirm that the isolates werePseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: Salinity was found to regulate the levels of pyocyanin production, with 5-10 g/L as the optimum. All Pseudomonas isolates grew at salinities ranging from 5 to 70 g/L. Isolates of marine origin produced detectable levels of pyocyanin up to 45 g/L salinity. Brackish and freshwater isolates ceased to produce pyocyanin at salinities above 30 g/L and 20 g/L, respectively. Culture supernatants of all 5 Pseudomonas isolates possessed the ability to restrict the growth of Vibrio spp. and maximum antagonistic effect on Vibrio harveyi was obtained when they were grown at salinities of 5 to 10 g/L. The marine isolate MCCB117, even when grown at a salinity of 45 g/L possessed the ability to inhibit Vibrio spp.Conclusions:Purification and structural elucidation of antagonistic compound were carried out. ideal for application in freshwater, MCCB102 and MCCB103 in brackish water and MCCB117 and The present investigation showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCCB119 would be MCCB118 in marine aquaculture systems as putative probiotics in the management of vibrios.

  2. Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from various ecological niches on Vibrio species pathogenic to crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakaran Priyaja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To abrogate pathogenic vibrios in aquaculture by testing the potential of Pseudomonas isolates from fresh water, brackish and marine environments as probiotics. Methods: Purification and structural elucidation of antagonistic compound were carried out. Antagonistic activity of the compound against 7 Vibrio spp. was performed. Influence of salinity on the production of pyocyanin and the toxicity was done through the compound using brine shrimp lethality assay. Molecular characterization was performed to confirm that the isolates were Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: Salinity was found to regulate the levels of pyocyanin production, with 5-10 g/L as the optimum. All Pseudomonas isolates grew at salinities ranging from 5 to 70 g/L. Isolates of marine origin produced detectable levels of pyocyanin up to 45 g/L salinity. Brackish and freshwater isolates ceased to produce pyocyanin at salinities above 30 g/L and 20 g/L, respectively. Culture supernatants of all 5 Pseudomonas isolates possessed the ability to restrict the growth of Vibrio spp. and maximum antagonistic effect on Vibrio harveyi was obtained when they were grown at salinities of 5 to 10 g/L. The marine isolate MCCB117, even when grown at a salinity of 45 g/L possessed the ability to inhibit Vibrio spp. Conclusions: The present investigation showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCCB119 would be ideal for application in freshwater, MCCB102 and MCCB103 in brackish water and MCCB117 and MCCB118 in marine aquaculture systems as putative probiotics in the management of vibrios.

  3. Effective nonlinearities and multi-wavelength second-harmonic generation in modulated quasi-phase-matching gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ole; Graversen, T. W.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev

    2000-01-01

    Quasi-phase-matching gratings induces Kerr effects in quadratic nonlinear materials. We show analytically and confirm numerically how modulating the grating changes the effective quadratic and cubic nonlinearities and allows for multi-wavelength second-harmonic generation....

  4. A Lactobacillus plantarum strain isolated from kefir protects against intestinal infection with Yersinia enterocolitica O9 and modulates immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Montijo-Prieto, Soumi; Moreno, Encarnación; Bergillos-Meca, Triana; Lasserrot, Agustín; Ruiz-López, María-Dolores; Ruiz-Bravo, Alfonso; Jiménez-Valera, María

    2015-10-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum C4, previously isolated from kefir and characterized as a potential probiotic strain, was tested for its protective and immunomodulatory capacity in a murine model of yersiniosis. The inoculation of BALB/c mice with a low pathogenicity serotype O9 strain of Yersinia enterocolitica results in a prolonged intestinal infection with colonization of Peyer's patches. Pretreatment with C4 was without effect on fecal excretion of yersiniae, but shortened the colonization of Peyer's patches. This protective effect was associated with pro-inflammatory status in the intestinal mucosa (TNF-α production in infected mice was increased by C4) and an increase in total IgA secretion. At a systemic level, C4 did not promote a pro-inflammatory response, although production of the immunoregulatory cytokine IFN-γ was enhanced. These findings suggest that L. plantarum C4 can increase resistance to intestinal infections through its immunomodulatory activity.

  5. Effect of the isolation of Sterculia apetala trees on the emergence of seedlings in Pantanal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marçal Henrique Amici Jorge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sterculia apetala trees aren’t removed during the conversion of forests into pastures due to rural landowners’ awareness that these trees are home to 95% of the nests of Hyacinth Macaw in Pantanal. Our aim was to compare the greenhouse emergence rate of seedlings from seeds of trees at conserved forest and those left isolated in a cultivated pastures. The seeds were collected directly from the ground, under 10 S. apetala trees in each area, at the Pantanal Wetland, Corumba, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The emergence of seedlings from isolated trees was 14% lower than that obtained from trees located in the inner part of the forest. There’s a need for further studies on the ecology of this species in Pantanal focused on the mating system, the identification of the pollination agent and the evaluation of the effects of isolation on the viability of species population, which may impact the Hyacinth Macaw reproduction success.

  6. I get so lonely, baby: The effects of loneliness and social isolation on romantic dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Michelle; Clark, Eddie M

    2016-09-16

    Individuals lacking fulfilling interpersonal interactions may experience feelings of loneliness. Consequently, these individuals may over-rely on their romantic partners to fulfill the need to belong. This study examined the effects of loneliness and social isolation on dependency on a romantic partner in a sample of college students (N = 104). Participants who were in a romantic relationship completed measures of loneliness, social isolation, and romantic dependency near the beginning of the semester (Time 1) and approximately 6 weeks later toward the end of the semester (Time 2). Toward the beginning of the semester, there were no significant predictors of dependency. Toward the end of the semester, individuals who reported higher social isolation reported higher levels of dependency. Time 1 dependency also predicted Time 2 dependency. Future methodological directions and suggestions regarding the examination of perceptions of loneliness and relationship expectations are discussed.

  7. Amplitude modulation detection with cochlear implants: Effects of electrode separation and stimulus level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Chatterjee, Monita

    2001-05-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) detection performance has been studied in the past with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired populations. The temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) is a plot of AM detection performance as a function of modulation rate and provides a way of characterizing temporal sensitivity. Typically the TMTF takes the form of a low-pass filter, with performance declining above 50-70-Hz modulation rate. TMTFs have also been measured with cochlear implant patients, showing a similar low-pass characteristic, with a cutoff around 140-Hz rate, while sensitivity to AM was found to increase with increasing current level. The present study investigated the effects of stimulation level and electrode separation on TMTFs with cochlear implant patients. TMTFs were measured for narrow through wide electrode separations and three different (loudness-balanced) percentages of the dynamic range. Preliminary results indicate that sensitivity increases (lower thresholds) with increasing stimulation level, for a given electrode separation. However, comparing TMTFs across different electrode separations, sensitivity is independent of current level, but increases as a function of percentage of dynamic range. In summary, it appears that AM detection performance with cochlear implants depends primarily on sensation level, rather than current level or electrode separation. [Work supported by NIDCD Grant No. R01DC04786.

  8. Additive effects of threat-of-shock and picture valence on startle reflex modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Bublatzky

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of sustained anticipatory anxiety on the affective modulation of the eyeblink startle reflex. Towards this end, pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures were presented as a continuous stream during alternating threat-of-shock and safety periods, which were cued by colored picture frames. Orbicularis-EMG to auditory startle probes and electrodermal activity were recorded. Previous findings regarding affective picture valence and threat-of-shock modulation were replicated. Of main interest, anticipating aversive events and viewing affective pictures additively modulated defensive activation. Specifically, despite overall potentiated startle blink magnitude in threat-of-shock conditions, the startle reflex remained sensitive to hedonic picture valence. Finally, skin conductance level revealed sustained sympathetic activation throughout the entire experiment during threat- compared to safety-periods. Overall, defensive activation by physical threat appears to operate independently from reflex modulation by picture media. The present data confirms the importance of simultaneously manipulating phasic-fear and sustained-anxiety in studying both normal and abnormal anxiety.

  9. Amplitude modulation detection with cochlear implants: Effects of electrode separation and stimulus level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Chatterjee, Monita

    2004-05-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) detection performance has been studied in the past with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired populations. The temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) is a plot of AM detection performance as a function of modulation rate and provides a way of characterizing temporal sensitivity. Typically the TMTF takes the form of a low-pass filter, with performance declining above 50-70-Hz modulation rate. TMTFs have also been measured with cochlear implant patients, showing a similar low-pass characteristic, with a cutoff around 140-Hz rate, while sensitivity to AM was found to increase with increasing current level. The present study investigated the effects of stimulation level and electrode separation on TMTFs with cochlear implant patients. TMTFs were measured for narrow through wide electrode separations and three different (loudness-balanced) percentages of the dynamic range. Preliminary results indicate that sensitivity increases (lower thresholds) with increasing stimulation level, for a given electrode separation. However, comparing TMTFs across different electrode separations, sensitivity is independent of current level, but increases as a function of percentage of dynamic range. In summary, it appears that AM detection performance with cochlear implants depends primarily on sensation level, rather than current level or electrode separation. [Work supported by NIDCD Grant No. R01DC04786.

  10. Effects of bFGF on the Modulation of Apoptosis in Gingival Fibroblasts with Different Host Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Tanimoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF treatment on the proliferation and apoptosis of cultured gingival fibroblasts (GFs. Human GFs were isolated from the palatal gingival tissues of 16 healthy volunteers ranging in the age from 9 to 35 years old. Cultured GFs were subjected to the analyses for cell proliferation by ELISA assay, gene expression by RT-PCR analysis, and apoptosis potency by caspase-3 assay. The cell proliferation activity and gene expression of type-I collagen and caspase-3 activity were enhanced significantly by the treatment with bFGF in cultured GFs. Furthermore, the activity of caspase-3 in cultured GFs from young subjects was significantly higher than that in GFs from adults. It is shown that bFGF significantly enhances the gene expression of type-I collagen in cultured fibroblasts from human gingival tissues. It also demonstrated that bFGF modulates the apoptosis of periodontal fibroblasts, and the effect is higher in young subjects, indicating a significant role of bFGF in the prevention of scar formation during wound healing.

  11. In Vitro Effects of Metronidazole and Albendazole on Giardia lamblia Isolated from Iranian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dalimi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of metronidazole and albendazole against clinical isolates of Giardia lamblia in vitro. Methods: From all human samples of containing cysts, 10 isolates were successfully excysted in vitro. Trophozites viability was assessed by eosine 0.1% and cultured axenically in TYI-S-33 modified medium supplemented with heat inactivated bovine serum 10%. All cultures were incubated in 37°C for 24-48 h. After this time trophozoites were exposed to different concentration (0.05, 0.1, 2, 10, 50 µg/ml of drugs at 37º for 4 h.  The IC50 estimated between 0.1 and 10µg/ml for metronidazole and 0.062 and 0.1 µg/ml for albendazole. Results: Eight isolates were found susceptible to the metronidazole while all isolates were found susceptible to the albendazole. Statistical results indicated that there was significant difference (P<0.05 in the sensitivity to metronidazole and albendazole in all isolates.

  12. Effects of d-Amphetamine and Haloperidol on Modulation of the Human Acoustic Startle Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kaviani

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective:This study aimed to examine the effects of haloperidol and amphetamine on human startle response modulated by emotionally-toned film clips. "n "n Method:Sixty participants, in two groups (one receiving haloperidol and the other receiving amphetamine were tested using electromyography (EMG to measure eye-blink muscle (orbicular oculi while different emotions were induced by six 2-minute film clips. Results:An affective rating shows the negative and positive effects of the two drugs on emotional reactivity, neither amphetamine nor haloperidol had any impact on the modulation of the startle response. Conclusion: The methodological and theoretical aspects of the study and findings will be discussed.

  13. Effect of stochastic modulation of inter-pulse interval during stimulated isokinetic leg extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Anil Aksöz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recumbent cycling exercise achieved by functional electrical stimulation (FES of the paralyzed leg muscles is effective for cardiopulmonary and musculoskeletal conditioning after spinal cord injury, but its full potential has not yet been realized. Mechanical power output and efficiency is very low and endurance is limited due to early onset of muscle fatigue. The aim of this work was to compare stochastic modulation of the inter-pulse interval (IPI to constant-frequency stimulation during an isokinetic leg extension task similar to FES-cycling. Seven able-bodied subjects participated: both quadriceps muscles were stimulated (n = 14 with two activation patterns (P1-constant frequency, P2-stochastic IPI. There was significantly higher power output with P2 during the first 30 s (p = 0.0092, the last 30 s (p = 0.018 and overall (p = 0.0057, but there was no overall effect on fatiguability when stimulation frequency was randomly modulated.

  14. Effect of Stochastic Modulation of Inter-Pulse Interval During Stimulated Isokinetic Leg Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksöz, Efe Anil; Laubacher, Marco; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Recumbent cycling exercise achieved by functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the paralyzed leg muscles is effective for cardiopulmonary and musculoskeletal conditioning after spinal cord injury, but its full potential has not yet been realized. Mechanical power output and efficiency is very low and endurance is limited due to early onset of muscle fatigue. The aim of this work was to compare stochastic modulation of the inter-pulse interval (IPI) to constant-frequency stimulation during an isokinetic leg extension task similar to FES-cycling. Seven able-bodied subjects participated: both quadriceps muscles were stimulated (n = 14) with two activation patterns (P1-constant frequency, P2-stochastic IPI). There was significantly higher power output with P2 during the first 30 s (p = 0.0092), the last 30 s (p = 0.018) and overall (p = 0.0057), but there was no overall effect on fatiguability when stimulation frequency was randomly modulated. PMID:27990242

  15. THE EFFECTS OF LEFT VS. RIGHT EAR STIMULATION ON HUMAN STARTLE REFLEX MODULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kaviani

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported previously that modulatory effects of pleasant and unpleasant slides on the human acoustic reflex are observed only if startle probes are presented to the left ear or with binaural presentation. The present study examined the effects of the left and the right ear stimulation on modulated startle reflex (as indexed by eyeblink component, measured at the right eye employing short (2-min film-clips to elicit emotions. Sixteen right-handed subjects served as volunteers. The experiment included two consecutive sessions, on a single occasion. The acoustic stimuli were presented monaurally to one of the ears in each session, counterbalanced across order. The laterality phenomenon in startle modulation previously observed with affect-toned slides was not confirmed in this experiment. The probable discrepancy will be discussed methodologically.

  16. Throughflow and Gravity Modulation Effects on Heat Transport in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palle Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of vertical throughflow and time-periodic gravity field has been investigated on Darcy convection. The amplitude of gravity modulation is considered to be very small and the disturbances are expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of convection. A weak nonlinear stability analysis has been performed for the stationary mode of convection. As a consequence heat transport evaluated in terms of the Nusselt number, which is governed by the non-autonomous Ginzburg-Landau equation. Throughflow can stabilize or destabilize the system for stress free and isothermal boundary conditions. The amplitude and frequency of modulation, Prandtl Darcy number on heat transport have been analyzed and depicted graphically. Further, the study establishes that the heat transport can be controlled effectively by a mechanism that is external to the system. Finally flow patterns are presented in terms of streamlines and isotherms.

  17. Shizukaol D, a Dimeric Sesquiterpene Isolated from Chloranthus serratus, Represses the Growth of Human Liver Cancer Cells by Modulating Wnt Signalling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisha Tang

    Full Text Available Natural products have become sources of developing new drugs for the treatment of cancer. To seek candidate compounds that inhibit the growth of liver cancer, components of Chloranthus serratus were tested. Here, we report that shizukaol D, a dimeric sesquiterpene from Chloranthus serratus, exerted a growth inhibition effect on liver cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We demonstrated that shizukaol D induced cells to undergo apoptosis. More importantly, shizukaol D attenuated Wnt signalling and reduced the expression of endogenous Wnt target genes, which resulted in decreased expression of β-catenin. Collectively, this study demonstrated that shizukaol D inhibited the growth of liver cancer cells by modulating Wnt pathway.

  18. Effective Use of Interactive Learning Modules in Classroom Study in Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Jamwal, Goldee

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is spending substantial resources to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States. The ultimate goal of these programs is to produce students with a better knowledge of math and science and who are more likely to pursue careers in STEM fields. Interactive learning modules can be used in the classroom environment for effective learning. This study examines the learning preferences of Logan High School (...

  19. Effective use of Interactive Learning Modules in Classroom Study for Computer Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jamwal, Goldee

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is spending substantial resources to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States. The ultimate goal of these programs is to produce students with a better knowledge of math and science and who are more likely to pursue careers in STEM fields. Interactive learning modules can be used in the classroom environment for effective learning. This study examines the learning preferences of Logan High School (...

  20. Second-Harmonic Generation in Optical Fibres Induced by a Cross-Phase Modulation Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Wei-Na; HUANG Guo-Xiang

    2005-01-01

    @@ When two optical pulses copropagate inside a single-modefibre, intensity-dependent refractive index couples the pulses through a cross-phase modulation (XPM). We show that a second-harmonic generation (SHG) on a continuous-wave background is possible in the optical fibre induced by the XPM effect. By means of a multiscale method the nonlinearly coupled envelope equations for the SHG are derived and their explicit solutions are provided and discussed.

  1. Effect of stochastic modulation of inter-pulse interval during stimulated isokinetic leg extension

    OpenAIRE

    Efe Anil Aksöz; Marco Laubacher; Stuart Binder-Macleod; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Recumbent cycling exercise achieved by functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the paralyzed leg muscles is effective for cardiopulmonary and musculoskeletal conditioning after spinal cord injury, but its full potential has not yet been realized. Mechanical power output and efficiency is very low and endurance is limited due to early onset of muscle fatigue. The aim of this work was to compare stochastic modulation of the inter-pulse interval (IPI) to constant-frequency stimulation during ...

  2. Synergistic effect of fluorination on molecular energy level modulation in highly efficient photovoltaic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Maojie; Guo, Xia; Zhang, Shaoqing; Hou, Jianhui

    2014-02-01

    The synergistic effect of fluorination on molecular energy level modulation is realized by introducing fluorine atoms onto both the donor and the acceptor moieties in a D-A polymer, and as a result, the polymer solar cell device based on the trifluorinated polymer, PBT-3F, shows a high efficiency of 8.6%, under illumination of AM 1.5G, 100 mW cm(-) (2) . © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Effect of Junction Temperature Swing Durations on a Lifetime of a Transfer Molded IGBT Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Jorgensen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of junction temperature swing duration on the lifetime of a transfer molded Intelligent Power IGBT Module is studied and a relevant lifetime factor is modeled. A temperature swing duration dependent lifetime factor is defined based on 38 accelerated power cycling test...... electrical conditions during the power cycling test. The analysis of the test results and the temperature swing duration dependent lifetime factor under different definitions and confidence levels are presented....

  4. The analysis of the effect of vertical component of earthquake ground motions on the behavior of equipment base isolation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M. K.; Jeon, Y. S.; Choi, I. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the effect of vertical component of earthquake ground motions on the behavior of equipment base isolation system. For this purpose, the base isolation effects are considered when the 3 dimensional shaking tests are performed. The vertical seismic isolation effects are also considered. The Friction Pendulum System (FPS), natural rubber bearing (NRB) and high damping rubber bearing (HDRB) were selected for the isolation. The three kinds of seismic motions which frequency contents are much different are selected for the shaking table test.

  5. Protein conformational modulation by photons: a mechanism for laser treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Ann D; Bicknell, Brian T; Adams, Roger D

    2014-03-01

    Responsiveness to low-level laser treatment (LLTT) at a wavelength of 450-910 nm has established it as an effective treatment of medical, veterinary and dental chronic pain, chronic inflammation conditions (arthritis and macular degeneration), wound repair, and lymphoedema, yet the mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of LLLT remain unclear. However, there is now sufficient evidence from recent research to propose an integrated model of LLLT action. The hypothesis presented in this paper is that external applications of photons (through laser at an appropriate dose) modulates the nervous system through an integrated mechanism. This stimulated mechanism involves protein-to-protein interaction, where two or more proteins bind together to facilitate molecular processes, including modification of proteins by members of SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier proteins) and also protein phosphorylation and tyrosination. SUMO has been shown to have a role in multiple nuclear and perinuclear targets, including ion channels, and in the maintenance of telomeres and the post-translational modification of genes. The consequence of laser application in treatment, therefore, can be seen as influencing the transmission of neural information via an integrated and rapid modulation of ion channels, achieved through both direct action on photo-acceptors (such as cytochrome c-oxidase) and through indirect modulation via enzymes, including tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), tyrosine kinases and tyrosine kinase receptors. This exogenous action then facilitates an existing photonic biomodulation mechanism within the body, and initiates ion channel modulation both in the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS). Evidence indicates that the ion channel modulation functions predominately through the potassium channels, including two pore leak channels (K2P), which act as signal integrators from the periphery to the cortex. Photonic action also transforms SUMOylation processes at the cell

  6. Effects of nonlinear phase modulation on quantum frequency conversion using four-wave mixing Bragg scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Mejling; McKinstrie, C. J.; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we solved the coupled-mode equations for Bragg scattering (BS) in the low- and high-conversion regimes, but without the effects of nonlinear phase modulation (NPM). We now present solutions and Green functions in the low-conversion regime that include NPM. We find that NPM does not change...... are still possible, even when the effects of NPM are included. Finally, the effects of using different input signals are considered, and we conclude that using the natural input modes of the system drastically increases the efficiency. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers...

  7. Glutathione modulates the formation of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine in isolated DNA and mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 induced by mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, P J; Faux, S P

    1996-10-01

    Treatment of isolated DNA with crocidolite and man-made vitreous fibre-21 (MMVF-21) significantly increased the concentration of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in isolated DNA above background levels and co-treatment with glutathione (GSH) eliminated this effect. Crocidolite, MMVF-21 and chrysotile fibres increased the number of revertants in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and GSH-deficient strains, TA100/NG-54 and TA100/NG-57, over background levels. This increase was small in TA100 but was greater in the GSH-deficient strains. When these bacterial strains were further depleted of GSH by co-culture with buthionine sulfoximine, all fibres tested caused a significant increase in the number of revertants over the parent strains. Pre-treatment with the GSH precursor N-acetyl-L-cysteine reduced the number of revertants to below that of the parent strain. Previous studies have shown a mechanistic role for iron-catalyzed production of oxygen radicals in the mutagenicity of fibres and this study suggests a protective role for GSH against such oxidative damage possibly by acting as a radical scavenger.

  8. Relaxant effect of an estrone derivate EA303 on isolated colonic smooth muscle of rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Lan; FU Shou-ting; CHEN Guo-liang; ZHOU Qian-qian

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the relaxant effect mechanism of an estrone derivate EA303 on isolate colonic smooth muscle of rabbits. Methods Preparations of the isolated colonic smooth muscle of rabbits were prepared. The effect of EA303 on potassium channel, β receptor and prostaglandin were studied by observing the difference of relaxant dose-effect curves of EA303 on preparations pre-contracted with BaCl3, High K+ solution and Acetylcholine chloride (ACh) in the absence or presence incubation with glibenclamide (10 μM), propranolol (0.1 μM) and Indometacin (10 μM). Results The relaxant effect of EA303 on contraction caused by BaCl2 and High K+ solution were weakened by glibenclamide inhibiting the opening of K+ channel while the relaxant effect of that on contraction caused by ACh was strengthened, after adding propranolol inhabiting β receptor, EA303 attenuated the relaxant action on contraction caused by BaCl2. EA303 had some relaxant impact on contraction induced by High K+ solution after adding indometacin inhabiting the synthesis the prostaglandin (PG). Conclusions The relaxant effect of EA303 on isolated colonic smooth muscle of rabbits may be related with PG synthesis enzyme, potassium channel and β receptor.

  9. Effect of edible sesame oil on growth of clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Toshiko; Nishio, Junko; Okada, Shinobu

    2014-07-01

    Elderly individuals are at increased risk of oral thrush (oral candidiasis) due to decreased saliva secretion. Due to their antimicrobial properties, edible oils can be effective natural agents for oral care. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of sesame oil, which is widely used for cooking in Asian countries, and two other edible oils on the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms of five clinical isolates of Candida albicans, a causative microorganism of oral thrush. We assessed the effect of each oil in concentrations of 0.078%, 0.156%, and 0.313% on growth of the mycelial forms of the clinical isolates over 24 hr using the crystal violet method. We also evaluated the effect of each oil on growth of the yeast forms by counting the number of viable yeast cells after culturing in the oils for 24 hr. Sesame oil inhibited the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms. Safflower and olive oil also inhibited the growth of both forms of C. albicans but to a lesser extent than sesame oil. The ability to inhibit the growth of the mycelial form correlated with sesame oil concentration. Roasting influenced growth inhibition ability and high-roasted sesame oil most effectively inhibited the yeast form. The growth inhibitory effect differed among the five isolates. We hypothesize that the sesamin and fatty acid components of sesame oil are involved in its antifungal activity. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON HEPATOBILIARY TRANSPORT OF CATIONIC DRUGS - A STUDY IN THE ISOLATED-PERFUSED RAT-LIVER, RAT HEPATOCYTES AND RAT MITOCHONDRIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEEN, H; MEIJER, DKF; Merema, M.T.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on the hepatic uptake of various cationic drugs was studied in isolated perfused rat livers, isolated rat hepatocytes and isolated rat liver mitochondria. In isolated rat hepatocytes and in isolated perfused rat livers, the uptake of the model organic cation tri-n-butylmethylam

  11. Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism modulates the effects of social support on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthak, Magdalena K; Chen, Frances S; Kumsta, Robert; Hill, LaBarron K; Thayer, Julian F; Heinrichs, Markus

    2016-05-01

    A large body of empirical research has demonstrated stress-buffering effects of social support. However, recent studies suggest that genetic variation of the oxytocin system (specifically, a common single nucleotide polymorphism, rs53576, of the oxytocin receptor gene) modulates the efficacy of social support. The timing and neurobiological basis of this genetic modulation were investigated using a standardized, laboratory-based psychological stress procedure (Trier Social Stress Test for Groups, TSST-G). To index potential stress buffering effects of social support mediated by the oxytocin system, heart rate variability (HRV) was obtained before and during the TSST-G from 40 healthy participants. Results indicate that social support is associated with higher HRV only in G allele carriers. Specifically, social support increased heart rate variability during direct social interaction and only in individuals with at least one copy of the G allele of rs53576. These findings support the idea that the stress-attenuating effects of social support are modulated by genetic variation of the oxytocin system.

  12. Effectiveness of zinc in modulating perinatal effects of arsenic on the teratological effects in mice offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Wadaa, Mohammad A M; Farooq, Muhammad; Daghestani, Maha H; Sami, Ahmed S

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is considered as a worldwide problem. Studies have shown that arsenic exposure during pregnancy affects embryogenesis and offspring development in rats and mice. Zinc as a micronutrient regulates many physiological functions, including an antioxidative role under various toxic conditions. However, studies on the perinatal protective effect of zinc on offspring need further attention. The present study was designed to evaluate the potential protective role of zinc in mitigating the adverse effects in the offspring of arsenic exposure during pregnancy. The arsenic (40mg/kg body weight) and zinc (4% w/v) doses formed the only drinking fluid source for the experimental groups of dams during the perinatal period of the experiment. The early development of sensory motor coordination reflexes together with morphological development in the male pups was measured during the weaning period. In adolescence, the offspring were tested for their motor behavior. The enzyme γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) and the oxidative stress indices like reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) were also estimated in the serum of the young adult male mice. Perinatal arsenic exposure caused depletion in body weight gain, delay in morphological development and retardation in the development of all sensory motor reflexes of the pups. In young adults, significant decrease in motor behavior with significant decrease in GSH level in the serum was observed. On the other hand, γ-GT and TBARS were significantly increased in the serum due to arsenic treatment. However, animals exposed to arsenic in the presence of zinc showed a remarkable ameliorating effect of zinc on all observed teratological and biochemical arsenic toxicity in male offspring. It was observed that zinc has an antioxidative role in the perinatal toxicity of arsenic. It is concluded from the present study that zinc consumed during the perinatal period of pregnancy can ameliorate

  13. Hierarchical effects of task engagement on amplitude modulation encoding in auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Mamiko; O'Connor, Kevin N; Engall, Elizabeth; Johnson, Jeffrey S; Sutter, M L

    2015-01-01

    We recorded from middle lateral belt (ML) and primary (A1) auditory cortical neurons while animals discriminated amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds and also while they sat passively. Engagement in AM discrimination improved ML and A1 neurons' ability to discriminate AM with both firing rate and phase-locking; however, task engagement affected neural AM discrimination differently in the two fields. The results suggest that these two areas utilize different AM coding schemes: a "single mode" in A1 that relies on increased activity for AM relative to unmodulated sounds and a "dual-polar mode" in ML that uses both increases and decreases in neural activity to encode modulation. In the dual-polar ML code, nonsynchronized responses might play a special role. The results are consistent with findings in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices during discrimination of vibrotactile modulation frequency, implicating a common scheme in the hierarchical processing of temporal information among different modalities. The time course of activity differences between behaving and passive conditions was also distinct in A1 and ML and may have implications for auditory attention. At modulation depths ≥ 16% (approximately behavioral threshold), A1 neurons' improvement in distinguishing AM from unmodulated noise is relatively constant or improves slightly with increasing modulation depth. In ML, improvement during engagement is most pronounced near threshold and disappears at highly suprathreshold depths. This ML effect is evident later in the stimulus, and mainly in nonsynchronized responses. This suggests that attention-related increases in activity are stronger or longer-lasting for more difficult stimuli in ML.

  14. Modulation of heart rate by acute or chronic aerobic exercise. Potential effects on blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Kingsley, J Derek; Malkani, Kabir; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian

    2017-07-10

    It was initially assumed that heart rate and arterial blood pressure were modulated by normal respiration and muscle contraction. The arterial baroreflex, an inverse relationship between blood pressure and heart rate, was later reported. Nonetheless, it was then assumed that those responses involved vagal modulation. We summarize available evidence on the modulation of heart rate by acute or chronic aerobic exercise as well as its potential implications on BP control. Numerous studies have tried to clarify whether aerobic exercise modifies neurally-mediated vasoconstriction, but they report contradictory results. In view of these incongruities, the aim of this narrative review is to summarize available evidence on the modulation of heart rate by acute or chronic aerobic exercise as well as its potential implications on blood pressure control. We mainly focus on the effects of aerobic exercise in both heart rate and blood pressure. Heart rate and heart rate variability have been indistinctly considered similar metrics, but they have completely different meanings when properly used. Both are risk markers in cardiac disease, whereas heart rate variability is also an index of sympathovagal modulation of heart rate. On the other hand, heart rate recovery has been also used as an index for mirroring both cardiovascular fitness and autonomic function, and can be used as a measure of vagal reactivation. Importantly, it is now well-known that a reduced rate of heart rate recovery represents a powerful predictor of overall mortality. In this review, due to its complexity, we have included studies in which any of these three parameters have been analyzed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhengzheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is to report 1 the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2 the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery.

  16. On high-speed cross-gain modulation without pattern effects in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, A.V.; Mørk, Jesper; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    In the regime with maximum linear gain in a quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), instantaneous gain modulation by change of the photon density is possible due to spectral hole burning effects. This, in turn, leads to the opportunity of ultrafast cross-gain modulation (XGM...

  17. Theoretical study on coupling effects of modulation depth between two photorefractive phase gratings with an external applied field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Baohong; ZHOU Zhongxiang; HOU Chunfeng; SUN Xiudong

    2001-01-01

    We used the perturbation expanding method to the hopping model and studied coupling effects of the modulation depth between two photorefractive phase gratings stored in one point with an external applied DC electric field . It has been found that the modulation depth of one of the two gratings seriously affects the spatial-charge field of the other grating.

  18. Effect of Social Odor Context on the Emission of Isolation-induced Ultrasonic Vocalizations in the BTBR T+tf/J Mouse Model for Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eWöhr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An important diagnostic criterion for social communication deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASD are difficulties in adjusting behavior to suit different social contexts. While the BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR inbred strain of mice is one of the most commonly used mouse models for ASD, little is known about whether BTBR mice display deficits in detecting changes in social context and their ability to adjust to them. Here, it was tested therefore whether the emission of isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations (USV in BTBR mouse pups is affected by the social odor context, in comparison to the standard control strain with high sociability, C57BL/6J (B6. It is known that the presence of odors from mothers and littermates leads to a calming of the isolated mouse pup, and hence to a reduction in isolation-induced USV emission. In accordance with their behavioral phenotypes with relevance to all diagnostic core symptoms of ASD, it was predicted that BTBR mouse pups would not display a calming response when tested under soiled bedding conditions with home cage bedding material containing maternal odors, and that similar isolation-induced USV emission rates would be seen in BTBR mice tested under clean and soiled bedding conditions. Unexpectedly, however, the present findings show that BTBR mouse pups display such a calming response and emit fewer isolation-induced USV when tested under soiled as compared to clean bedding conditions, similar to B6 mouse pups. Yet, in contrast to B6 mouse pups, which emitted isolation-induced USV with shorter call durations and lower levels of frequency modulation under soiled bedding conditions, social odor context had no effect on acoustic call features in BTBR mouse pups. This indicates that the BTBR mouse model for ASD does not display deficits in detecting changes in social context, but has a limited ability and/or reduced motivation to adjust to them.

  19. STUDIES ON ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT OF APAMARGA (ACHYRANTHES ASPERA ON MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT CLINICAL ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Usha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports on emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria are cause of concern in medical world. Several ayurvedic drugs have been proved to contain the antimicrobial activity. Literature on effect of ayurvedic drugs on multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens is limited. Present study reports the antimicrobial effect of Achyranthes aspera (Apamarga crude extracts on the clinical isolates of multidrug resistant bacteria. The drug was evaluated by using phytochemical tests. Crude extracts of aqueous, methanol, ethanol and chloroform was prepared. Antibacterial activity against clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacteria belonging to groups of bacillus, citrobacter, E.coli, klebsiella, proteus and salmonella was tested. The drug showed highest efficacy against Bacillus organism while least effectiveness on Proteus spp bacteria. Results of the study conclude that the medicinal plant A. aspera might be useful against multidrug resistance in pathogens of clinical importance.

  20. The effect and design of time delay in feedback control for a nonlinear isolation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuting; Xu, Jian; Fu, Jiangsong

    2017-03-01

    The optimum value of time delay of active control used in a nonlinear isolation system for different types of external excitation is studied in this paper. Based on the mathematical model of the nonlinear isolator with time-delayed active control, the stability, response and displacement transmissibility of the system are analyzed to obtain the standards for appropriate values of time delay and control strengths. The effects of nonlinearity and time delay on the stability and vibration response are discussed in details. For impact excitation and random excitation, the optimal value of time delay is obtained based on the vibration dissipation time via eigenvalues analysis, while for harmonic excitation, the optimal values are determined based on multiple vibration properties including natural frequency, amplitude death region and effective isolation region by the Averaging Method. This paper establishes the relationship between the parameters and vibration properties of a nonlinear isolation system which provides the guidance for optimizing time-delayed active control for different types of excitation in engineering practices.

  1. Effects of social isolation stress on immune response and survival time of mouse with liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Zhun Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of isolation stress on mouse with liver cancer and possible associated mechanisms.METHODS: Transplantable murine hepatoma22 (H22) model was used to evaluate the effects of social isolation stress on murine liver cancer. Mice were immunized with sheep red blood cell (SRBC) and intraperitoneally inoculated with H22 cell, then divided into two groups, one reared individually as group (Ⅰ) and the other reared in groups as group (G). Titer of antibody to SRBC and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in serum was monitored. The survival time of mouse with liver cancer was observed.RESULTS: The titer of antibody to SRBC in group (G) was 1:24.5 and that in group (Ⅰ) was 1:11.2. There was a significant difference between these two groups (t = 2.60,P = 0.02). A significant difference in IL-2 concentration was observed between group (G) (39.6 ng/L) and group (Ⅰ) (47.1 ng/L, t= 2.14, P = 0.046). The survival time in group (G) (16.5 d) was markedly longer than that in group (Ⅰ) (13.2 d, t = 3.46, P = 0.002).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that survival time of the mouse bearing H22 tumor is affected by the social isolation stress and the associated mechanism may be the immunological changes under the social isolation stress.

  2. Field isolates of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae exhibit distinct cytopathic effects in ovine tracheal organ cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, M; Rosenbusch, R F; DeBey, M C; Niyo, Y; Andrews, J J; Kaeberle, M L

    1998-02-01

    Ovine tracheal ring explants were infected with four different Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and one M. arginini field isolate and their ability to induce cytopathic effects was tested by measuring ciliary activity and intracellular calmodulin release. Infected tracheal rings showed significantly decreased ciliary activity as compared to the non-infected control rings. There were, however, marked differences between isolates in the onset and severity of the effects which correlated with their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. Infected tracheal rings released more calmodulin than the non-infected controls. The amount of calmodulin released also varied between isolates, and somewhat reflected the degree of loss of ciliary activity in the corresponding rings induced by the different isolates. Light and electron microscopic examinations of infected tracheal rings revealed disorganisation and sloughing of the epithelium, and association of mycoplasmas only with the cilia. Following repeated in vitro passages, the organisms had reduced ability to inhibit ciliary activity which correlated with decreased hydrogen peroxide production. Addition of catalase to the organ cultures delayed loss of ciliary activity. These results suggest that M. ovipneumoniae induced ciliostasis in ovine tracheal ring explants which correlated with hydrogen peroxide production. Furthermore, these M. ovipneumoniae-induced injuries to respiratory epithelial cells could contribute to the role that this organism may play in sheep respiratory disease.

  3. Genoprotective effects of lignin isolated from oil palm black liquor waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Prashantha; Rozman, Hj Din; Bhat, Rajeev

    2013-07-01

    Black liquor waste (BLW), a major by-product of palm oil extraction process contains lignin as one of the constituents. Lignin isolated from BLW was evaluated for antioxidant and genoprotective properties and was compared with the commercial lignin for overall efficacy. Antioxidant compounds (phenolics and tannins) and antioxidant activities (phosphomolybdenum assay, ABTS(+) and FRAP assays) of lignin isolated from BLW were compared with commercial lignin. Bone marrow micronucleus (MN) test was employed for evaluating the dose-yield protective effect against cyclophosphamide (CP, 50mg/kg b.w.) induced genotoxicity in mouse. Results revealed isolated lignin to exhibit rich antioxidant activities. A decrease in MN frequency and recovery of P/N ratio (P: polychromatic erythrocytes, N: normochromatic erhythocytes) indicated protective effects of lignin against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity. The efficacy of BLW-derived lignin as an antioxidant and genoprotective agent was comparable to commercial lignin. Results on lignin isolated from BLW are envisaged to find potential applications in food and/or pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuroprotective effect of a triterpenoid saponin isolated from Momordica cymbalaria Fenzl in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneri, Raju B; Samaddar, Suman; Simi, S M; Rao, Srinivas T

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective potential of a saponin isolated from the roots of Momordica cymbalaria against peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. A steroidal saponin (SMC) was isolated from M. cymbalaria Fenzl and purified by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. Diabetes was induced in male Wister rats by injecting streptozotocin 45 mg/kg. Diabetic rats were divided into six groups for neuroprotective effect--three each for preventive and curative groups. Neuropathic analgesia was assessed by tail-flick and hot-plate methods. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sciatic nerves were isolated, and histopathological analysis was performed. Antioxidant activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) of the saponin was also carried out on the isolated DRG neurons and sciatic nerves to assess total oxidative stress. In both preventive and curative protocols, rats administered with SMC showed significant decrease in tail immersion latency time and increase in pain sensitivity when compared to diabetic control group. There was improvement in the myelination and degenerative changes of the nerve fiber in both the groups, and an obvious delay in the progression of neuropathy was evident. SMC treatment showed significant decrease in superoxide dismutase, catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation in the nerves. The steroidal saponin of M. cymbalaria (SMC) possesses potential neuroprotective effect in diabetic peripheral neuropathy with respect to neuropathic analgesia, improvement in neuronal degenerative changes, and significant antioxidant activity.

  5. Feedback of mechanical effectiveness induces adaptations in motor modules during cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano eDe Marchis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported evidence that the motor system may rely on a modular organization, even if this behavior has yet to be confirmed during motor adaptation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the modular motor control mechanisms underlying the execution of pedaling by untrained subjects in different biomechanical conditions. We use the muscle synergies framework to characterize the muscle coordination of 11 subjects pedaling under two different conditions. The first one consists of a pedaling exercise with a strategy freely chosen by the subjects (Preferred Pedaling Technique,PPT, while the second condition constrains the gesture by means of a real time visual feedback of mechanical effectiveness (Effective Pedaling Technique,EPT. Pedal forces, recorded using a pair of instrumented pedals, were used to calculate the Index of Effectiveness, IE. EMG signals were recorded from 8 muscles of the dominant leg and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization was applied for the extraction of muscle synergies. All the synergy vectors, extracted cycle by cycle for each subject, were pooled across subjects and conditions and underwent a 2-dimensional Sammon's non-linear mapping. 7 representative clusters were identified on the Sammon's projection, and the corresponding 8-dimensional synergy vectors were used to reconstruct the repertoire of muscle activation for all subjects and all pedaling conditions (VAF > 0.8 for each individual muscle pattern. Only 5 out of the 7 identified modules were used by the subjects during the PPT pedaling condition, while 2 additional modules were found specific for the pedaling condition EPT. The temporal recruitment of three identified modules was highly correlated with IE. The structure of the identified modules was found similar to that extracted in other studies of human walking, partly confirming the existence of shared and task specific muscle synergies, and providing further evidence on the modularity of

  6. Feedback of mechanical effectiveness induces adaptations in motor modules during cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Cristiano; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Castronovo, Anna Margherita; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Conforto, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported evidence that the motor system may rely on a modular organization, even if this behavior has yet to be confirmed during motor adaptation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the modular motor control mechanisms underlying the execution of pedaling by untrained subjects in different biomechanical conditions. We use the muscle synergies framework to characterize the muscle coordination of 11 subjects pedaling under two different conditions. The first one consists of a pedaling exercise with a strategy freely chosen by the subjects (Preferred Pedaling Technique, PPT), while the second condition constrains the gesture by means of a real time visual feedback of mechanical effectiveness (Effective Pedaling Technique, EPT). Pedal forces, recorded using a pair of instrumented pedals, were used to calculate the Index of Effectiveness (IE). EMG signals were recorded from eight muscles of the dominant leg and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) was applied for the extraction of muscle synergies. All the synergy vectors, extracted cycle by cycle for each subject, were pooled across subjects and conditions and underwent a 2-dimensional Sammon's non-linear mapping. Seven representative clusters were identified on the Sammon's projection, and the corresponding eight-dimensional synergy vectors were used to reconstruct the repertoire of muscle activation for all subjects and all pedaling conditions (VAF > 0.8 for each individual muscle pattern). Only 5 out of the 7 identified modules were used by the subjects during the PPT pedaling condition, while 2 additional modules were found specific for the pedaling condition EPT. The temporal recruitment of three identified modules was highly correlated with IE. The structure of the identified modules was found similar to that extracted in other studies of human walking, partly confirming the existence of shared and task specific muscle synergies, and providing further evidence on the modularity

  7. The Modulation of Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator on Heating HF Waves and the Doppler Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Bin-bin; Zhao Zheng-yu; Xie Shu-guo

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: The propagation of HF waves in IAR can produce many nonlinear effects, including the modulation effect of IAR on HF waves and the Doppler effect. To start with the dependence of the ionospheric electron temperature variaof the modulation effect and lucubrate possible reasons for the field can have an observable modulation effect on HF waves while its mechanism is quite different from that of Schumann resonant field on HF waves. The depth of modulation of IAR field, which directly inspires the formation of cross-spectrum between ULF waves and HF waves and results in spectral peaks at some gyro-frequencies of IAR. With respect to the Doppler effect during the propagation of HF waves in IAR, it is mainly caused by the motion of the high-speed flyer and the drifting electrons and the frequency shift from the phase variation of the reflected waves can be neglected when the frequency of HF incident wave is high enough.

  8. The effect of spherical and other aberrations upon the modulation transfer of the defocussed human eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, NM; Kooijman, AC

    1998-01-01

    Relative modulation transfer is defined as contrast sensitivity under blur normalised to contrast sensitivity at optimum focus. Measured relative modulation transfer exceeds relative modulation transfer as calculated for aberration free optics at higher spatial frequencies (>2 cpd). The contribution

  9. In Vitro Killing Effect of Moxifloxacin on Clinical Isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Resistant to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole

    OpenAIRE

    Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.; Karnesis, Lazaros; Galani, Irene; Giamarellou, Helen

    2002-01-01

    The time-kill effect of moxifloxacin on 20 genetically distinct isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was studied. The majority (80%) were killed by a concentration equivalent to four times the MIC; the MIC induced a transient decrease in bacterial counts at 4 h, followed by regrowth. No effect was detected in four isolates. These results merit further clinical consideration.

  10. GABAB receptor-positive modulators: enhancement of GABAB receptor agonist effects in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2010-10-01

    In vivo effects of GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators suggest that they have therapeutic potential for treating central nervous system disorders such as anxiety, depression, and drug abuse. Although these effects generally are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABA(B) receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. The present study was aimed at further examining the in vivo positive modulatory properties of the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl) phenol (CGP7930) and (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF). Both compounds enhanced loss of righting induced by baclofen in mice. However, CGP7930 was less effective and rac-BHFF was less potent for enhancing loss of righting induced by γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), which, like baclofen, has GABA(B) receptor agonist properties. In contrast with baclofen- and GHB-induced loss of righting, the hypothermic effects of baclofen and GHB were not enhanced by rac-BHFF but were enhanced by CGP7930 only at doses that produced hypothermia when given alone. CGP7930-induced hypothermia was not attenuated by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348), at doses that blocked baclofen-induced hypothermia, and was not increased by the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, at doses that increased the hypothermic effects of baclofen and GHB. The results provide evidence that CGP7930 and rac-BHFF act in vivo as positive modulators at GABA(B) receptors mediating loss of righting, but not at GABA(B) receptors mediating hypothermia. Conceivably, CGP7930, but not rac-BHFF, acts as an allosteric agonist at these latter receptors. Taken together, the results provide further evidence of pharmacologically distinct GABA(B) receptor subtypes, possibly allowing for a more selective therapeutic interference with the GABA(B) system.

  11. Isolation of modulators of the liver-specific organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) 1B1 and 1B3 from Rollinia emarginata Schlecht (Annonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Megan; Araya, Juan J; Timmermann, Barbara N; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2011-11-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 (OATP1B1 and OATP1B3) are liver-specific transporters that mediate the uptake of a broad range of drugs into hepatocytes, including statins, antibiotics, and many anticancer drugs. Compounds that alter transport by one or both of these OATPs could potentially be used to target drugs to hepatocytes or improve the bioavailability of drugs that are cleared by the liver. In this study, we applied a bioassay-guided isolation approach to identify such compounds from the organic extract of Rollinia emarginata Schlecht (Annonaceae). Fractions of the plant extract were screened for effects on OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated transport of the model substrates estradiol-17β-glucuronide and estrone-3-sulfate. We isolated three compounds, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, and 8-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-α-terpineol, which inhibited estradiol-17β-glucuronide uptake by OATP1B1 but not OATP1B3. In addition, a rare compound, quercetin 3-O-α-l-arabinopyranosyl(1→2) α-L-rhamnopyranoside, was identified that had distinct effects on each OATP. OATP1B1 was strongly inhibited, as was OATP1B3-mediated transport of estradiol-17β-glucuronide. However, OATP1B3-mediated uptake of estrone-3-sulfate was stimulated 4- to 5-fold. Kinetic analysis of this stimulation revealed that the apparent affinity for estrone-3-sulfate was increased (decreased K(m)), whereas the maximal rate of transport (V(max)) was significantly reduced. These results demonstrate a mechanism through which the hepatic uptake of drug OATP substrates could be stimulated.

  12. [Effect of immune modulation on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal'nik, B V; Ponomareva, T S; Deriabin, P N; Denisova, T G; Mel'nikova, N N; Tugambaev, T I; Atshabar, B B; Zakarian, S B

    2014-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of the effect of polyoxidonium and betaleukin on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine in model animal experiments. Plague vaccine EV, polyoxidonium, betaleukin, erythrocytic antigenic diagnosticum for determination of F1 antibodies and immune reagents for detection of lymphocytes with F1 receptors (LFR) in adhesive test developed by the authors were used. The experiments were carried out in 12 rabbits and 169 guinea pigs. Immune modulation accelerated the appearance and disappearance of LFR (early phase) and ensured a more rapid and intensive antibody formation (effector phase). Activation by betaleukin is more pronounced than by polyoxidonium. The more rapid and intensive was the development of early phase, the more effective was antibody response to the vaccine. Immune modulation in the experiment with guinea pigs significantly increased protective activity of the vaccine. The use of immune modulators increased immunogenic (in both early and effector phases of antigen-specific response) and protective activity of the EV vaccine. A connection between the acceleration of the first phase of antigen-specific response and general intensity of effector phase of immune response to the EV vaccine was detected. ,

  13. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham S. Mohammed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day. EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  14. Mitigation of nonlinear transmission effects for OFDM 16-QAM optical signal using adaptive modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidin, Anton S; Sidelnikov, Oleg S; Fedoruk, Mikhail P; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-12-26

    The impact of the fiber Kerr effect on error statistics in the nonlinear (high power) transmission of the OFDM 16-QAM signal over a 2000 km EDFA-based link is examined. We observed and quantified the difference in the error statistics for constellation points located at three power-defined rings. Theoretical analysis of a trade-off between redundancy and error rate reduction using probabilistic coding of three constellation power rings decreasing the symbol-error rate of OFDM 16-QAM signal is presented. Based on this analysis, we propose to mitigate the nonlinear impairments using the adaptive modulation technique applied to the OFDM 16-QAM signal. We demonstrate through numerical modelling the system performance improvement by the adaptive modulation for the large number of OFDM subcarriers (more than 100). We also show that a similar technique can be applied to single carrier transmission.

  15. Top-down modulations from dorsal stream in lexical recognition: an effective connectivity FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuan; Guo, Ruifang; Ding, Guosheng; Peng, Danling

    2012-01-01

    Both the ventral and dorsal visual streams in the human brain are known to be involved in reading. However, the interaction of these two pathways and their responses to different cognitive demands remains unclear. In this study, activation of neural pathways during Chinese character reading was acquired by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. Visual-spatial analysis (mediated by the dorsal pathway) was disassociated from lexical recognition (mediated by the ventral pathway) via a spatial-based lexical decision task and effective connectivity analysis. Connectivity results revealed that, during spatial processing, the left superior parietal lobule (SPL) positively modulated the left fusiform gyrus (FG), while during lexical processing, the left SPL received positive modulatory input from the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and sent negative modulatory output to the left FG. These findings suggest that the dorsal stream is highly involved in lexical recognition and acts as a top-down modulator for lexical processing.

  16. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Haitham S; Fahmy, Heba M; Radwan, Nasr M; Elsayed, Anwar A

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  17. Effects of the Curing Process on the Residual Stress in Solar Cell Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidu Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Panels using solar power require high reliability, and the residual stress in the solar panel has an important effect on its reliability and lifetime. The finite element method was adopted to simulate the impacts of the rectangular solar panel encapsulation process parameters, such as the elastic modulus, the thickness of adhesive, and the curing temperature on the residual stress in the solar cell module. The results show that the residual stress in the solar cell module increases linearly with the increase in these three factors. The residual strain is consistent with that of the stress. The generation mechanism and distribution evolution of stress are discussed in detail. Both the thickness and the elastic modulus of the silicone rubber have significant impact on the residual stress. However, the influence of the curing temperature is less observable.

  18. Protective effect of magnesium and selenium on cadmium toxicity in the isolated perfused rat liver system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghaffarian-Bahraman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL model has been used into toxicology study of rat liver. This model provides an opportunity at evaluation of liver function in an isolated setting. Studies showed that Cd, in a dose-dependent manner, induced toxic effects in IPRL models, and these effects were associated with aminotransferase activity and lipid peroxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Mg  and/or Se could have protective effects against the Cd toxicity in the IPRL model. Male Wistar rats (9-10 weeks weighing 260-300 gr were used in this study. They were randomly divided into 8 groups of 4-6 rats per cage. In group 1, liver was perfused by Krebs-Henseleit buffer without MgSO4 (Control. Groups 2-8 were exposed to Mg, Se, Cd, Mg +Se, Cd + Mg, Cd + Se, Cd + Mg + Se respectively in Krebs-Henseleit buffer with no added MgSo4. Biochemical changes in the liver were examined within 90 minutes, and the result showed that the exposure to Cd, lowered glutathione level, while it increased malondialdehyde level and aminotransferase activities in IPRL model. Mg administration during exposure to Cd reduces the toxicity of Cd in the liver isolated while Se administration during exposure to Cd did not decrease Cd hepatotoxicity. Nevertheless, simultaneous treatment with Se and Mg on Cd toxicity have strengthened protective effects than the supplementation of Se alone in the liver.

  19. NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ON ISOLATED GUINEA PIG LEFT ATRIUM AND PAPILLARY MUSCLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡浩; 臧伟进; 于晓江; 王昌利; 张凤杰; 孙强; 张春虹

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of ethanol on physiologic al characteristics of the isolated guinea pig left atrium and papillary muscles.Methods The effects of ethanol on contractility, post-rest potentiatio n and positive staircase phenomenon were observed in isolated left atrium and pa pillary muscles of guinea pig.Results Ethanol(50.0,100.0,200.0mmol*L-1)prominently inhibited the con traction of papillary muscles. Ethanol(12.5,25.0,50.0,100.0,200.0mmol*L-1 ) inhibited the contraction of left atrium, and markedly decreased the post-r est potentiation of myocardial contractility in left atrium. High concentration of ethanol(100,200mmol*L-1) depressed the positive staircase phenomenon of isolated guinea pig left atrium.Conclusion These results suggest that ethanol induces inhibitor y effects of the contractility, post-rest potentiation, positive staircase phen omenon of left atrium. The mechanism by which ethanol induces the negative inotr opic effects may be related to decrease the amount of calcium released from the intracellular stores.

  20. NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ON ISOLATED GUINEA PIG LEFT ATRIUM AND PAPILLARY MUSCLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective :To investigate the effects of ethanol on physiological characteristics of the isolated guinea pig left atrium and papillary muscles,Methods:The effects of ethanol on contractility,post-rest potentiation and positive staircase phenomenon were observed in isolated left atrium and papillary muscles of guinea pig.Results:Ethanol(50.0,100.0,200.0mmol.L-1) prominently inhibited the contraction of papillary muscles.Ethanol(12.5,25.0,50.0,100.0,200.0mmol.L-1)inhibited the contraction of left atrium,and markedly decreased the post-rest potentiation of myocardial contractility in left atrium.High concentration of ethanol(100,200mmol.L-1)depressed the positive staircase phenomenon of isolated guinea pig left atrium.Conclusion:These results suggest that ethanol induces inhibitory effects of the contractility,post-rest potentiation,positive staircase phenomenon of letf atrium.The mechanism by which ethanol induces the negative inotropic effects may be related to decrease the amount of calcium released from the intracellular stores.

  1. Bend effect of the electrode for travelling wave integrated electro-optic modulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuwen Zhang(张阜文); Fushen Chen(陈福深); Kun Qiu(邱昆)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied electrode bend effects on electrical characteristics of the modulator in thethree aspects, which are arc length, characteristic impedance, and loss, applying the model in Ref. [1] andthe finite element method (FEM). The results have shown that the effect only caused by the characteristicimpedance is necessarily considered while its deviation is large, but others are negligible as we design apractical device. Finally, some transmission characteristics of coplanar line with different arc length of thebend have been tested, and the measured results are in good agreement with the theoretical analyses.

  2. Enhanced soliton-effect pulse compression by cross-phase modulation in optical fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹文华; 刘颂豪

    2000-01-01

    A new method is proposed to enhance the soliton-effect compression of optical pulses. It consists of copropagating two optical pulses with close wavelengths in the anomalous group-velocity dispersion regime of single-mode fibers. Numerical simulations show that, as compared with the traditional single pulse compression method, cross-phase modulation can not only dramatically increase the compression ratio but also decrease the optimum fiber length. The effects of initial pulse-width mismatch, Raman self-scattering, and pulse walk-off on the pulse compression are also discussed.

  3. Study on the modulating effect of polysaccharide upon the mineralization of iron hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jiangbo; SUN Zhenya

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the modulating effect of polysaccharide upon the mineralization of iron hydroxide, a series of simulative biomineralization experiments using dextran and chitosan as organic substrates were conducted in this paper. The results showed that iron hydroxide gel nucleated and grew in polysaccharide molecules, with the self-assemble effect of dextran or chitosan, the nanometer-sized akaganeite was formed. The shape, size and crystal structural type of iron oxyhydroxide formed from iron hydroxide gel depend on the type of polysaccharide and its concentrations.

  4. Using nonlinearity and spatiotemporal property modulation to control effective structural properties: dynamic rods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel; Blekhman, Iliya I.

    2007-01-01

    , and to call these dynamic materials or spatiotemporal composites. Also, according to theoretical predictions, structural nonlinearity enhances the possibilities of achieving specific effective properties. For example, with an elastic rod having cubical elastic nonlinearities, it seems possible to control......, and exemplified. Then simple approximate analytical expressions are derived for the effective wave speed and natural frequencies for one-dimensional wave propagation in a nonlinear elastic rod, where the spatiotemporal modulation is imposed as a high-frequency standing wave, supposed to be given. Finally the more...

  5. Morphine-induced sensitization of locomotor activity in mice: effect of social isolation on plasma corticosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francès, H; Graulet, A; Debray, M; Coudereau, J P; Guéris, J; Bourre, J M

    2000-03-31

    This study examined the influence of social isolation on behavioural sensitization to the locomotor effect of morphine and the link between this behaviour and plasma corticosterone concentrations. Four weeks isolation induced an increase in the locomotor effect of morphine. In social and isolated mice, repeated administrations (6) of morphine (one injection every 3 or 4 days) followed by 3 h in an actimeter induced behavioural sensitization to the locomotor effect of morphine. No interaction was observed between social isolation and behavioural sensitization to morphine. Resocializing previously isolated mice for 3 weeks reduced the morphine-induced locomotor effect without altering the behavioural sensitization. Corticosterone plasma levels were more increased (416%) in mice isolated 5 weeks than in mice isolated for 2 weeks (243%) and they return to the control levels following 3 weeks of resocialization. Since there was no interaction between the increase in morphine locomotor effect induced by social isolation and the morphine-induced behavioural sensitization, it is suggested that each of these two events acts independently. Whether or not a common mechanism (plasma corticosterone levels?) partly underlies both effects, the result resembles a simple additive effect.

  6. Reduction of conditioned pain modulation in humans by naltrexone: an exploratory study of the effects of pain catastrophizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher D; Goodin, Burel; Kindler, Lindsay L; Caudle, Robert M; Edwards, Robert R; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Riley, Joseph L; Fillingim, Roger B

    2013-06-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that conditioned pain modulation is mediated by the release of endogenous opioids with a placebo-controlled (sugar pill) study of naltrexone (50 mg) in 33 healthy volunteers over two counter-balanced sessions. Pain modulation consisted of rating of heat pain (palm) during concurrent cold water immersion (foot). Compared to baseline heat pain ratings, concurrent foot immersion lowered pain intensity ratings, which suggests an inhibitory effect, was reduced with naltrexone, suggesting at least partial dependence of inhibition on endogenous opioids. An exploratory analysis revealed that individual differences in catastrophizing moderated the effects of naltrexone; endogenous opioid blockade abolished modulation in subjects lower in catastrophizing while modulation was unaffected by naltrexone among high catastrophizers. The results suggest a role of endogenous opioids in endogenous analgesia, but hint that multiple systems might contribute to conditioned pain modulation, and that these systems might be differentially activated as a function of individual differences in responses to pain.

  7. Effect of rotational speed modulation on heat transport in a fluid layer with temperature dependent viscosity and internal heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bhadauria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theoretical investigation has been carried out to study the combined effect of rotation speed modulation and internal heating on thermal instability in a temperature dependent viscous horizontal fluid layer. Rayleigh–Bénard momentum equation with Coriolis term has been considered to describe the convective flow. The system is rotating about it is own axis with non-uniform rotational speed. In particular, a time-periodic and sinusoidally varying rotational speed has been considered. A weak nonlinear stability analysis is performed to find the effect of modulation on heat transport. Nusselt number is obtained in terms of amplitude of convection and internal Rayleigh number, and depicted graphically for showing the effects of various parameters of the system. The effect of modulated rotation speed is found to have a stabilizing effect for different values of modulation frequency. Further, internal heating and thermo-rheological parameters are found to destabilize the system.

  8. Prenatal cocaine exposure effects on arousal-modulated attention during the neonatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmel, B Z; Gardner, J M

    1996-07-01

    The organization of arousal and attention as a function of intrauterine cocaine exposure was investigated in 180 normal nursery infants prior to hospital discharge and at 1 month of age. This was done by studying visual looking preferences when infants were in three arousal conditions: less aroused (after feeding); more aroused-endogenous (before feeding); and more aroused-exogenous (after feeding but including 8-Hz visual stimulation prior to each visual preference trial). The stimuli were light panels illuminated at three temporal frequencies between 1 and 8 Hz presented in pairs using a balanced presentation series of trials. Infants not exposed to cocaine demonstrated strong arousal-modulated attention, preferring faster frequencies when less aroused and slower frequencies when more aroused in both endogenous and exogenous conditions. In contrast, cocaine-exposed infants showed a lack of arousal-modulated attention and preferred faster frequencies of stimulation regardless of arousal condition. Similar differences in arousal-modulated attention as a function of cocaine exposure were obtained at 1 month after birth, indicating that these effects lasted longer than would be reasonable to attribute to the active presence of cocaine or its metabolites. This form of stimulus-seeking behavior was shown to be independent of confounding factors associated with prenatal cocaine exposure such as the absence of prenatal care, alcohol use, minority status, or gender, as well as mediating factors associated with growth such as birthweight. A direct and more chronic effect of intrauterine cocaine exposure on arousal-modulated attention and presumably on the developing CNS therefore was supported.

  9. Auto-modulation of neuroactive steroids on GABA A receptors: a novel pharmacological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Florian; Rassler, Cornelia; Allgaier, Clemens; Strecker, Karl; Wohlfarth, Kai

    2007-02-01

    GABA(A) receptor function is modulated by various important drugs including neuroactive steroids that act on allosteric modulatory sites and can directly activate GABA(A) receptor channels at high concentrations. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings and rapid applications of the neuroactive steroid alphaxalone to investigate repetitive steroid effects. Alphaxalone potentiation of submaximal GABA-evoked currents was enhanced significantly by repetitive coapplications at all investigated recombinant isoforms (alpha1beta3delta, alpha1beta3gamma2L, alpha6beta3delta, alpha6beta3gamma2L) and at GABA(A) receptors of differentiated human NT2 neurons. A similar increase of current amplitudes was induced by repetitive applications of a high steroid concentration without GABA. We refer to these reversible effects as auto-modulation because repeated interactions of steroids enhanced their own pharmacological impact at the receptor sites in a time and concentration dependent manner without affecting GABA controls. Pronounced auto-modulatory actions were also measured using the neurosteroid 5alpha-THDOC in contrast to indiplon, THIP, and pentobarbital indicating a steroid specificity. Protein kinase A inhibition significantly reduced alphaxalone auto-modulation at alpha1beta3gamma2L, alpha6beta3gamma2L, and alpha6beta3delta subtypes while it enhanced potentiation at alpha1beta3delta isoforms suggesting a crucial influence of receptor subunit composition and phosphorylation for steroid actions. Especially at extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor sites containing the delta subunit steroid auto-modulation may have a critical role in enhancing potentiation of GABA-induced currents.

  10. Study on the dynamic response analysis for evaluating the effectiveness of base isolation for nuclear components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kazunari; Tsutsumi, Hideaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Ebisawa, Katsumi; Shibata, Katsuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Introduction of the base isolation technique into the seismic design of nuclear power plant components as well as buildings has been expected as one of the effective countermeasure to reduce the seismic force applied to components. A research program on the base isolation of nuclear components has been carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) since 1991. A methodology and a computer code (EBISA: Equipment Base Insolation System Analysis) for evaluating the failure frequency of the nuclear component with the base isolation were developed. In addition, a test program, which is concerned with the above development, aiming at improvement of failure frequency analysis models in the code has been conducted since 1996 to investigate the dynamic behavior and to verify the effectiveness of component base isolation systems. In the failure frequency analysis, methodology for evaluating the actual dynamic responses of the nuclear components with the base isolation in detail has been examined. In the methodology, the actual responses are computed by considering the scatter in mechanical properties of rock masses, reactor building and components under many earthquake motions with various frequency characteristics. The failure frequency of component is computed as the conditional probability where the actual response exceeds the capacity of components. It is a very important in the above methodology to investigates the dynamic response analysis method for the ground, reactor building and nuclear components as well as the scattering factors in the dynamic analysis. This report describes the accuracy of the dynamic response analysis method and analysis models, and the influence of scatters in properties of rock masses and reactor building on the dynamic response. (author)

  11. Post-Lamination Manufacturing Process Automation for Photovoltaic Modules; Annual Technical Progress Report: 15 June 1999--14 July 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Lewis, E. R.; Hogan, S. J.

    2000-09-29

    Spire is addressing the PVMaT project goals of photovoltaic (PV) module cost reduction and improved module manufacturing process technology. New cost-effective automation processes are being developed for post-lamination PV module assembly, where post-lamination is defined as the processes after the solar cells are encapsulated. These processes apply to both crystalline and thin-film solar cell modules. Four main process areas are being addressed: (1) Module buffer storage and handling between steps; (2) Module edge trimming, edge sealing, and framing; (3) Junction-box installation; and (4) Testing for module performance, electrical isolation, and ground-path continuity.

  12. Convulsive and Neurodegenerative Effects in Rats of Some Isolated Toxins from the Tityus bahiensis Scorpion Venom

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Despite Tityus bahiensis being one of the most dangerous scorpions in Brazil, there are few studies about the effects of its venom, which acts mainly on the central nervous system. Previous studies demonstrated the convulsive ability of this venom. The present work aimed to study the hippocampal effects in rats of some toxins isolated from pool V, which induces a pronounced epileptogenic effect. The pool was separated by reverse-phase HPLC, and the peaks with higher yield (Tb V-1, V-5, V-24, ...

  13. The Isolated Effect of Adductor Canal Block on Quadriceps Femoris Muscle Strength After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Johan Kløvgaard; Jæger, Pia; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using peripheral nerve block after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), without impeding mobility, is challenging. We hypothesized that the analgesic effect of adductor canal block (ACB) could increase the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris muscle after......, expressed as a percentage of postoperative preblock values. In this manner, the effect of the ACB could be isolated from the detrimental effect on muscle strength caused by the surgery. Secondary end points were differences between groups in mobility and pain scores. We planned a subgroup analysis dividing......: ACB improves quadriceps femoris muscle strength, but whether this translates into enhanced mobility is not clearly supported by this study....

  14. Effect of an organophosphate pesticide, monocrotophos, on phosphate-solubilizing efficiency of soil fungal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena; Saxena, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Soil is a sink of pesticide residues as well as microorganisms. Fungi are well known for solubilization of inorganic phosphates, and this activity of fungal isolates may be affected by the presence of pesticide residues in the soil. In the present study, five generically different fungal isolates, viz. Aspergillus niger JQ660373, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium aculeatum JQ660374, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp., were tested and compared for their phosphate-solubilizing ability in the absence and presence of monocrotophos (500 mg L(-1)). After 168 h of incubation, four times high amount of tricalcium phosphate was solubilized by isolates in the growth medium containing monocrotophos in comparison to control (without monocrotophos). Concurrently, 78 % of the applied monocrotophos was degraded by these fungal isolates. Kinetics of phosphate solubilization shifted from logarithmic to power model in the presence of monocrotophos. Similarly, the phosphatase activity was also found significantly high in the presence of monocrotophos. The combined order of phosphate solubilization as well as monocrotophos degradation was found to be A. niger JQ660373 > P. aculeatum JQ660374 > A. flavus > F. pallidoroseum > Macrophomina sp. On the contrary, phosphate solubilization negatively correlated with the pH of the growth medium. Hence, it could be concluded that these fungal species efficiently solubilize inorganic phosphates and monocrotophos poses a positive effect on their ability and in turn degraded by them. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on P solubilization by Macrophomina sp. and F. pallidoroseum.

  15. Citotoxicity of Fipronil on Hepatocytes Isolated from Rat and Effects of Its Biotransformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieli Guelfi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanism of toxicity of fipronil on hepatocytes isolated from the rat and the effect of its biotransformation on the toxicological potential. The toxicity of fipronil was assessed by monitoring the oxygen consumption and mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP concentration, Ca2+ homeostasis and cell viability. The cell viability was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion in hepatocytes that were isolated from the normal rats and by the release of the enzymes alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in hepatocytes that were isolated from the normal rats or proadifen-pretreated rats. Fipronil reduced mitochondrial respiration in the cells that were energized with glutamate plus malate in a dose-dependent manner and dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential that was accompanied by a reduction in ATP concentration and a disruption of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. The cell viability was affected by fipronil with higher potency in hepatocytes that were isolated from the normal rats, which indicated that the metabolism of this insecticide increased its toxicological potential. The results of this study indicated that the toxicity of fipronil to the hepatocytes was related to the inhibition of mitochondrial activity, which led to decreased ATP synthesis and a consequent alteration in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and ultimately resulted in cell death.

  16. Effects of juvenile isolation and morphine treatment on social interactions and opioid receptors in adult rats: behavioural and autoradiographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, C L; Van Ree, J M; Spruijt, B M; Kitchen, I

    1999-09-01

    The consequences of juvenile isolation and morphine treatment during the isolation period on (social) behaviour and mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in adulthood were investigated by using a social interaction test and in vitro autoradiography in rats. Juvenile isolation reduced social exploration in adults. Morphine treatment counteracted this reduction in isolated rats, but decreased social exploration in nonisolated rats. Self-grooming and nonsocial exploration were enhanced after juvenile isolation. Morphine treatment had no effect on self-grooming, but suppressed nonsocial exploration in isolated rats. With respect to the opioid receptors, juvenile isolation resulted in regiospecific increases in mu-binding sites with a 58% increase in the basolateral amygdala and a 33% increase in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis. Morphine treatment in isolated rats reversed this upregulation in both areas. The number of delta-binding sites did not differ between the experimental groups. A general upregulation of kappa-binding sites was observed after juvenile isolation, predominantly in the cortical regions, the hippocampus and the substantia nigra. Morphine treatment did not affect the upregulation of kappa-receptors. The results show that juvenile isolation during the play period causes long-term effects on social and nonsocial behaviours and on the number of mu- and kappa- but not delta-opioid receptors in distinct brain areas. The number of mu-receptors in the basolateral amygdala appears to be negatively correlated with the amount of social exploration in adult rats.

  17. The modulation of stimulus structure on visual field asymmetry effects: the case of Chinese character recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Janet H; Cheng, Liao

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that visual field (VF) asymmetry effects in visual recognition may be influenced by information distribution within the stimuli for the recognition task in addition to hemispheric processing differences: Stimuli with more information on the left have a right VF (RVF) advantage because the left part is closer to the centre, where the highest visual acuity is obtained. It remains unclear whether visual complexity distribution of the stimuli also has similar modulation effects. Here we used Chinese characters with contrasting structures-left-heavy, symmetric, and right-heavy, in terms of either visual complexity of components or information distribution defined by location of the phonetic component-and examined participants' naming performance. We found that left-heavy characters had the largest RVF advantage, followed by symmetric and right-heavy characters; this effect was only observed in characters that contrasted in information distribution, in which information for pronunciation was skewed to the phonetic component, but not in those that contrasted only in visual complexity distribution and had no phonetic component. This result provides strong evidence for the influence of information distribution within the stimuli on VF asymmetry effects; in contrast, visual complexity distribution within the stimuli does not have similar modulation effects.

  18. Implications of astrocytes in mediating the protective effects of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators upon brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs are steroidal or non-steroidal compounds that are already used in clinical practice for the treatment of breast cancer, osteoporosis and menopausal symptoms. While SERMs actions in the breast, bone, and uterus have been well characterized, their actions in the brain are less well understood. Previous works have demonstrated the beneficial effects of SERMs in different chronic neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer, Parkinson’s disease and Multiple sclerosis, as well as acute degeneration as stroke and traumatic brain injury. Moreover, these compounds exhibit similar protective actions as those of estradiol in the Central Nervous System, overt any secondary effect. For these reasons, in the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the neuroprotective effects exerted directly or indirectly by SERMs in the SNC. In this context, astrocytes play an important role in the maintenance of brain metabolism, and antioxidant support to neurons, thus indicating that better protection of astrocytes are an important asset targeting neuronal protection. Moreover, various clinical and experimental studies have reported that astrocytes are essential for the neuroprotective effects of SERMs during neuronal injuries, as these cells express different estrogen receptors in cell membrane, demonstrating that part of SERMs effects upon injury may be mediated by astrocytes. The present work highlights the current evidence on the protective mechanisms of SERMs, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, in the SNC, and their modulation of astrocytic properties as promising therapeutic targets during brain damage.

  19. Critical role of extracellular vesicles in modulating the cellular effects of cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Géza Tamás; Tarr, Bettina; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Éder, Katalin; Lajkó, Eszter; Kittel, Ágnes; Tóth, Sára; György, Bence; Pásztói, Mária; Németh, Andrea; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Pállinger, Éva; Falus, András; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2014-10-01

    Under physiological and pathological conditions, extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in the extracellular compartment simultaneously with soluble mediators. We hypothesized that cytokine effects may be modulated by EVs, the recently recognized conveyors of intercellular messages. In order to test this hypothesis, human monocyte cells were incubated with CCRF acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line-derived EVs with or without the addition of recombinant human TNF, and global gene expression changes were analyzed. EVs alone regulated the expression of numerous genes related to inflammation and signaling. In combination, the effects of EVs and TNF were additive, antagonistic, or independent. The differential effects of EVs and TNF or their simultaneous presence were also validated by Taqman assays and ELISA, and by testing different populations of purified EVs. In the case of the paramount chemokine IL-8, we were able to demonstrate a synergistic upregulation by purified EVs and TNF. Our data suggest that neglecting the modulating role of EVs on the effects of soluble mediators may skew experimental results. On the other hand, considering the combined effects of cytokines and EVs may prove therapeutically useful by targeting both compartments at the same time.

  20. [Identification of two Fusarium isolates and their crude toxin allelopathic effect on Cucumis melo seedlings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Xue, Quan-Hong; Du, Jun-Zhi; Chen, Jiao-Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Eight fungi isolates were obtained from Fusarium-infected Cucumis melo (melon) plants and their rhizosphere soils. Taking melon cultivar 'Xitian 1' as test material, the re-inoculation and seed germination experiments were conducted to investigate the pathogenicity and growth inhibition effect of these fungi isolates on melon. Through the determination of the induced enzyme activities, resistant substance contents, and cell membrane permeability of potted melon roots, the allelopathic effect of the crude toxins of two harmful fungi was studied, and according to the morphological characteristics and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) sequencing, the two harmful fungi were identified. The crude toxins of the two harmful fungi TF and HF had strong inhibition effects on the germination and growth of the melon seeds. The MDA and soluble protein contents and the cell membrane permeability of the 'Xitian 1' seedlings roots all increased, among which, the MDA content and cell membrane permeability increased by 108.6% and 40.6%, respectively when treated with the stock solution of TF toxin, compared with the control. The crude toxins of the two harmful fungi improved the induced enzyme activities of the melon roots, with the increment of the PAL and POD activities under the treatment of 10-fold dilution of TF crude toxin increased by 25.6% and 23.2%, respectively. When treated with the stock solution of HF toxin, the PAL activity significantly increased by 30.0%. The two harmful fungi TF and HF were primarily identified as Fusarium equisti and F. proliferatum, respectively. This study showed that the two Fusarium isolates could not infect melon via re-inoculation, but could negatively affect the melon's normal growth and normal physiological and biochemical metabolism via toxins excretion, and in the meantime, improve the root protective enzyme activities, with the effects of both benefit and harmfulness on melon plants. The allelopathic hazard of the crude toxins of the

  1. Antiproliferative, Antimicrobial and Apoptosis Inducing Effects of Compounds Isolated from Inula viscosa

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The antiproliferative and antimicrobial effects of thirteen compounds isolated from Inula viscosa (L.) were tested in this study. The antiproliferative activity was tested against three cell lines using the MTT assay. The microdilution method was used to study the antimicrobial activity against two Gram positive bacteria, two Gram negative bacteria and one fungus. The apoptotic activity was determined using a TUNEL colorimetric assay. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the morphol...

  2. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on glycogenolysis in isolated hepatocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Brass, E. P.; Garrity, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    E-series prostaglandins have previously been demonstrated to inhibit hormone-stimulated glycogenolysis when added to isolated hepatocytes of the rat. In the present study, the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which inhibit cyclo-oxygenase activity, on glycogenolysis was examined in the hepatocyte model. Ibuprofen (80 microM), indomethacin (50 microM) and meclofenamate (60 microM) all increased rates of glycogenolysis when added under basal conditions. In contrast, piroxicam (50...

  3. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gita Eslami; Sudabeh Taheri; Eznollah Azargashb; raheleh karimiravesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis, respectively.Materials and Methods: 96 samples from women with bacterial vaginosis di...

  4. Response-Stimulus Interval Duration Modulates Interference Effects in the Stroop Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Galer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Stroop task, incongruent stimuli (e.g. “red” printed in blue induce a robust interference effect. The impact of both the changes in the duration of the interval between the subject’s response and the next stimulus (RSI and the development from childhood to adulthood on the size of the interference have not been systematically studied. We have therefore tested the modulation of within-task RSI (from 1000 to 5000 ms on the interference effect in 8–10 years old children and young adults. Results disclose a stronger interference effect for the shortest RSI duration (1000 ms in both adults and children, indicating more effective inhibitory processses for longer RSI durations. Moreover, similar interference effect were found between children and adults suggesting that both groups are similarly affected by interference. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibitory processes require a certain amount of time to develop.

  5. Warming effects on greenhouse gas fluxes in peatlands are modulated by vegetation composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susan E; Ostle, Nicholas J; Oakley, Simon; Quirk, Helen; Henrys, Peter A; Bardgett, Richard D

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the effects of warming on greenhouse gas feedbacks to climate change represents a major global challenge. Most research has focused on direct effects of warming, without considering how concurrent changes in plant communities may alter such effects. Here, we combined vegetation manipulations with warming to investigate their interactive effects on greenhouse gas emissions from peatland. We found that although warming consistently increased respiration, the effect on net ecosystem CO2 exchange depended on vegetation composition. The greatest increase in CO2 sink strength after warming was when shrubs were present, and the greatest decrease when graminoids were present. CH4 was more strongly controlled by vegetation composition than by warming, with largest emissions from graminoid communities. Our results show that plant community composition is a significant modulator of greenhouse gas emissions and their response to warming, and suggest that vegetation change could alter peatland carbon sink strength under future climate change.

  6. Experimentally Investigating the Effect of Temperature Differences in the Particle Deposition Process on Solar Photovoltaic (PV Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an experimental investigation of the dust particle deposition process on solar photovoltaic (PV modules with different surface temperatures by a heating plate to illustrate the effect of the temperature difference (thermophoresis between the module surface and the surrounding air on the dust accumulation process under different operating temperatures. In general, if the temperature of PV modules is increased, the energy conversion efficiency of the modules is decreased. However, in this study, it is firstly found that higher PV module surface temperature differences result in a higher energy output compared with those modules with lower temperature differences because of a reduced accumulation of dust particles. The measured deposition densities of dust particles were found to range from 0.54 g/m2 to 0.85 g/m2 under the range of experimental conditions and the output power ratios were found to increase from 0.861 to 0.965 with the increase in the temperature difference from 0 to 50 °C. The PV module with a higher temperature difference experiences a lower dust density because of the effect of the thermophoresis force arising from the temperature gradient between the module surface and its surrounding air. In addition, dust particles have a significant impact on the short circuit current, as well as the output power. However, the influence of particles on open circuit voltage can be negligible.

  7. Effects of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil on germ tube formation by Candida albicans isolated from denture wearers

    OpenAIRE

    Lurdete Maria Rocha Gauch; Fabíola Silveira-Gomes; Renata Antunes Esteves; Simone Soares Pedrosa; Ely Simone Cajueiro Gurgel; Alberto Cardoso Arruda; Silvia Helena Marques-da-Silva

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil on germ tube formation by Candida albicans isolated from denture wearers. Methods Ten C. albicans isolates recovered from denture wearers were tested using 10% fetal bovine serum with or without 4% R. officinalis essential oil. Results The essential oil from R. officinalis completely inhibited germ tube formation in the investigated C. albicans isolates. Conclusions The results demo...

  8. Study of antimicrobial effects of vancomycin loaded PLGA nanoparticles against enterococcus clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, F; Abdollahi, S; Jelvehgari, M; Valizadeh, H; Hassan, M; Milani, M

    2014-07-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that antimicrobial agents in nanoparticle (NP) forms have better activities. Vancomycin (VCM), as a glycopeptide antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria, is poorly absorbed from the intestinal tract. Enterococcus is a genus of bacteria that became resistant to a wide range of antibiotics in last decades, and cause severe infections in hospitalized patients. This paper describes preparation of VCM--loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs and compares the antimicrobial effects with drug solution against clinical Enterococcus isolates. VCM-loaded PLGA NPs were fabricated by W1/O/W2 solvent evaporation method. The comparison of obtained Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values showed a significant decrease in the antimicrobial effect of VCM -loaded NPs. Results also indicated that the potency of the NPs against VCM resistant isolates of Enterococcus was less than VCM susceptible isolates. The reduced antimicrobial effect of formulated NPs in invitro condition is perhaps related to the strong electrostatic linkage between hydrophilic drug (VCM) and hydrophobic polymer (PLGA) that lead to the slow release of the antibiotic from polymeric NPs.

  9. Extraction, identification, fractionation and isolation of phenolic compounds in plants with hepatoprotective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-03-15

    The liver is one of the most important organs of human body, being involved in several vital functions and regulation of physiological processes. Given its pivotal role in the excretion of waste metabolites and drugs detoxification, the liver is often subjected to oxidative stress that leads to lipid peroxidation and severe cellular damage. The conventional treatments of liver diseases such as cirrhosis, fatty liver and chronic hepatitis are frequently inadequate due to side effects caused by hepatotoxic chemical drugs. To overcome this problematic paradox, medicinal plants, owing to their natural richness in phenolic compounds, have been intensively exploited concerning their extracts and fraction composition in order to find bioactive compounds that could be isolated and applied in the treatment of liver ailments. The present review aimed to collect the main results of recent studies carried out in this field and systematize the information for a better understanding of the hepatoprotective capacity of medicinal plants in in vitro and in vivo systems. Generally, the assessed plant extracts revealed good hepatoprotective properties, justifying the fractionation and further isolation of phenolic compounds from different parts of the plant. Twenty-five phenolic compounds, including flavonoids, lignan compounds, phenolic acids and other phenolic compounds, have been isolated and identified, and proved to be effective in the prevention and/or treatment of chemically induced liver damage. In this perspective, the use of medicinal plant extracts, fractions and phenolic compounds seems to be a promising strategy to avoid side effects caused by hepatotoxic chemicals.

  10. Age differences in the emotional modulation of ERP old/new effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; Van Strien, Jan W

    2008-11-01

    The emotional salience of stimuli influences ERP old/new effects, but despite proven age differences in emotional processing, the influence of emotion on old/new effects has previously been investigated in younger adults only. Therefore, we set out to examine age differences in the emotional modulation of old/new effects. To this end, the electroencephalogram of younger (17-27 years) and older (63-77 years) adults was recorded while they completed a continuous recognition test with unpleasant, neutral and pleasant pictures. Because recollection is typically enhanced by emotion, the parietal old/new effect was expected to be larger for emotional than neutral stimuli in the younger adults. Because recollection suffers from age-related decline, emotion enhancement of the parietal old/new effect was not expected in the older adults. The results showed that, in both age groups, recognition accuracy was not affected by emotion and that the response bias was more liberal for unpleasant pictures. The younger adults displayed an early, a parietal and a late frontal old/new effect, whereas the older adults showed an early, no parietal and an inverse left-lateralized late frontal old/new effect. Further, the emotional modulation of the old/new effects differed with age. Importantly, emotion enhanced the parietal and late frontal old/new effects in younger adults, and the early old/new effect in older adults. This suggests that whereas recollection and post-retrieval processes are augmented in emotional recognition memory in younger adults, familiarity is enhanced by emotional salience in older adults.

  11. The effect of amplitude modulation on subharmonic imaging with chirp excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, Sevan; Arif, Muhammad; McLaughlan, James; Cowell, David M J; Freear, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Subharmonic generation from ultrasound contrast agents depends on the spectral and temporal properties of the excitation signal. The subharmonic response can be improved by using wideband and long-duration signals. However, for sinusoidal tone-burst excitation, the effective bandwidth of the signal is inversely proportional to the signal duration. Linear frequency-modulated (LFM) and nonlinear frequency-modulated (NLFM) chirp excitations allow independent control over the signal bandwidth and duration; therefore, in this study LFM and NLFM signals were used for the insonation of microbubble populations. The amplitude modulation of the excitation waveform was achieved by applying different window functions. A customized window was designed for the NLFM chirp excitation by focusing on reducing the spectral leakage at the subharmonic frequency and increasing the subharmonic generation from microbubbles. Subharmonic scattering from a microbubble population was measured for various excitation signals and window functions. At a peak negative pressure of 600 kPa, the generated subharmonic energy by ultrasound contrast agents was 15.4 dB more for NLFM chirp excitation with 40% fractional bandwidth when compared with tone-burst excitation. For this reason, the NLFM chirp with a customized window was used as an excitation signal to perform subharmonic imaging in an ultrasound flow phantom. Results showed that the NLFM waveform with a customized window improved the subharmonic contrast by 4.35 ± 0.42 dB on average over a Hann-windowed LFM excitation.

  12. [Effects of long-term Tai Ji Quan exercise on automatic nervous modulation in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng

    2015-03-01

    To examine the effects of long-term Tai Ji Quan (Chinnese Traditional Exercise) on automatic nervous modulation in the elders. The 18 subjects from Tai Ji Quan exercise class in Liaoning University of Retired Veteran Cadres were assigned into long-term Tai Ji Quan exercise group including 10 subjects and novice group including 8 subjects. Electrocardiography, respiratory and blood pressure data were collected on the following time points: at rest before Tai Ji Qhuan exercise and 30 min or 60 min after Tai Ji Quan exercise. The subjects at rest state in the long-term Tai Ji Quan exercise group showed higher than the subjects in the novice group in resperitory rate (RR), standard deviations of normal to normal intervals (SDNN), total power (TP), low frequency power (LFP), high frequency power (HFP), normalized high frequency power (nHFP), but lower in LFP/HFP, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate. At rest state the respiratory rate of subjects in long-term Tai Ji Quan exercise group was significantly lower than the novices. After Tai Ji Quan exercise, TP, nHFP, LFP/HFP, heart rate and systolic pressure showed significantly changes, and the change level of Tai Ji Quan on these indices was larger in Tai Ji Quan exercise group than that in the novice group. Long-term Tai Ji Quan exercise can improve vagal modulations, and tend to reduce the sympathetic modulations.

  13. Caffeine Positively Modulates Ferritin Heavy Chain Expression in H460 Cells: Effects on Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Anna Martina; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Both the methylxanthine caffeine and the heavy subunit of ferritin molecule (FHC) are able to control the proliferation rate of several cancer cell lines. While caffeine acts exclusively as a negative modulator of cell proliferation, FHC might reduce or enhance cell viability depending upon the different cell type. In this work we have demonstrated that physiological concentrations of caffeine reduce the proliferation rate of H460 cells: along with the modulation of p53, pAKT and Cyclin D1, caffeine also determines a significant FHC up-regulation through the activation of its transcriptional efficiency. FHC plays a central role in the molecular pathways modulated by caffeine, ending in a reduced cell growth, since its specific silencing by siRNA almost completely abolishes caffeine effects on H460 cell proliferation. These results allow the inclusion of ferritin heavy subunits among the multiple molecular targets of caffeine and open the way for studying the relationship between caffeine and intracellular iron metabolism. PMID:27657916

  14. Effects of a blended learning module on self-reported learning performances in baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2011-11-01

    This article is a report of a quasi-experimental study of the effects of blended modules on nursing students' learning of ethics course content. There is yet to be an empirically supported mix of strategies on which a working blended learning model can be built for nursing education. This was a two-group pretest and post-test quasi-experimental study in 2008 involving a total of 233 students. Two of the five clusters were designated the experimental group to experience a blended learning model, and the rest were designated the control group to be given classroom lectures only. The Case Analysis Attitude Scale, Case Analysis Self-Evaluation Scale, Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale, and Metacognition Scale were used in pretests and post-tests for the students to rate their own performance. In this study, the experimental group did not register significantly higher mean scores on the Case Analysis Attitude Scale at post-test and higher mean ranks on the Case Analysis Self-Evaluation Scale, the Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale, and the Metacognition Scale at post-test than the control group. Moreover, the experimental group registered significant progress in the mean ranks on the Case Analysis Self-Evaluation Scale and the Metacognition Scale from pretest to post-test. No between-subjects effects of four scales at post-test were found. Newly developed course modules, be it blended learning or a combination of traditional and innovative components, should be tested repeatedly for effectiveness and popularity for the purpose of facilitating the ultimate creation of a most effective course module for nursing education. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Founder effects and the evolution of asymmetrical sexual isolation in a rapidly-speciating clade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevin P.OH; Gina L.CONTE; Kerry L.SHAW

    2013-01-01

    Sexual isolation resulting from differences in mate choice behaviors is a hallmark of rapidly-speciating lineages.When present,asymmetrical sexual isolation may provide insights into the mechanisms responsible for the evolutionary change in mate signaling traits.In particular,Kaneshiro's hypothesis suggests that divergence in sexual characters between populations may arise in allopatry when ‘derived’ founding populations are subject to severe population bottlenecks,accompanied by a relaxation of sexual selection relative to ‘ancestral’ source populations.In the present study,we tested predictions of asymmetrical sexual isolation between two allopatric species of Hawaiian Laupala crickets,representing ‘ancestral’ (L.makaio) and ‘derived’ (L.nigra)taxa.While crickets in this genus are notable for rapid divergence of male courtship songs,these species share similar song types,thus suggesting that pattems of sexual isolation are likely due to other mating cues.Analysis of behavioral responses in conspecific and heterospecific ‘no-choice’ mating trials revealed pronounced asymmetrical isolation in the direction predicted by Kaneshiro's hypothesis,wherein we observed a significant reduction in mating success for crosses involving ‘derived’ males paired with ‘ancestral’ females,compared to the reciprocal heterospecific and both conspecific pairings.Further dissection of courtship behaviors suggested this difference did not reflect male mate choice,but rather,marked reduced spermatophore acceptance rates by ‘ancestral’ females paired with ‘derived’ males.The results are discussed with respect to founder effect models of speciation and the potential role of chemosensory signals in mate choice in these species.

  16. A modest but significant effect of CGB5 gene promoter polymorphisms in modulating the risk of recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rull, Kristiina; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne; Nagirnaja, Liina

    2013-01-01

    To confirm the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chorionic gonadotropin beta (CGB) genes in modulating the susceptibility to recurrent miscarriage (RM) in Danes and in a meta-analysis across Danes and the discovery samples from Estonia and Finland.......To confirm the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chorionic gonadotropin beta (CGB) genes in modulating the susceptibility to recurrent miscarriage (RM) in Danes and in a meta-analysis across Danes and the discovery samples from Estonia and Finland....

  17. Analysis of the Effect of Module Thickness Reduction on Thermoelectric Generator Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, F. P.; Figueiredo, L.; Rocha, L. A.; Cruz, A. P.; Goncalves, L. M.; Martins, J.; Hall, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional thermoelectric generators (TEGs) used in applications such as exhaust heat recovery are typically limited in terms of power density due to their low efficiency. Additionally, they are generally costly due to the bulk use of rare-earth elements such as tellurium. If less material could be used for the same output, then the power density and the overall cost per kilowatt (kW) of electricity produced could drop significantly, making TEGs a more attractive solution for energy harvesting of waste heat. The present work assesses the effect of reducing the amount of thermoelectric (TE) material used (namely by reducing the module thickness) on the electrical output of conventional bismuth telluride TEGs. Commercial simulation packages (ANSYS CFX and thermal-electric) and bespoke models were used to simulate the TEGs at various degrees of detail. Effects such as variation of the thermal and electrical contact resistance and the component thickness and the effect of using an element supporting matrix (e.g., eggcrate) instead of having air conduction in void areas have been assessed. It was found that indeed it is possible to reduce the use of bulk TE material while retaining power output levels equivalent to thicker modules. However, effects such as thermal contact resistance were found to become increasingly important as the active TE material thickness was decreased.

  18. Phorbol ester-modulation of estrogenic genomic effects triggered by the environmental contaminant benzanthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa, Elise; Balaguer, Patrick; Houlbert, Noémie; Fardel, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent genomic effects of environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been shown to be modulated by non-genomic protein kinase C (PKC)-related pathways. The present study was designed to determine whether PKC activation may also impair estrogenic genomic response triggered by PAHs. Treatment by the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was found to markedly and differentially impair the up-regulation of estrogenic markers triggered by the estrogenic PAH benzanthracene (BZA) in cultured human mammary cells; BZA-mediated mRNA up-regulation of pS2 and amphiregulin was thus increased, whereas that of progesterone receptor and CXCL12 was repressed. BZA/PMA cotreatment however failed to alter BZA-mediated increase of activity of a luciferase gene reporter construct driven by an estrogen response element, thus discarding any global effect of PMA toward BZA-triggered estrogen receptor activation. Various chemicals inhibiting PKCs or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) as well as the knock-down of PKCδ expression counteracted the PMA-mediated increase of pS2 mRNA up-regulation triggered by BZA, demonstrating that it was dependent on PKCs, including PKCδ isoform, and ERKs. This non-genomic modulation of estrogenic effects of PAHs by PKC activation may have to be considered when considering the deleterious effects of these environmental contaminants towards the endocrine system.

  19. Protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis by the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Hua; Ping, Li-Feng; Sun, Feng-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Sun, Zhi-Juan

    2016-12-01

    Taraxasterol is an effective component of dandelion that has anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro. The present study was performed to explore whether taraxasterol exhibits a protective effect against rheumatoid arthritis through the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice. Eight-week-old CCR9-deficient mice were injected with a collagen II monoclonal antibody cocktail to create a rheumatoid arthritis model. In the experimental group, arthritic model mice were treated with 10 mg/kg taraxasterol once per day for 5 days. Treatment with taraxasterol significantly increased the pain thresholds and reduced the clinical arthritic scores of the mice in the experimental group compared with those of the model group. Furthermore, treatment with taraxasterol significantly suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and nuclear factor-κB protein expression levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model mice. Taraxasterol treatment also significantly reduced nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model group. These observations indicate that the protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis is mediated via the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice.

  20. Modulation of Ethanol-Metabolizing Enzymes by Developmental Lead Exposure: Effects in Voluntary Ethanol Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam B. Virgolini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This review article provides evidence of the impact of the environmental contaminant lead (Pb on the pattern of the motivational effects of ethanol (EtOH. To find a mechanism that explains this interaction, the focus of this review article is on central EtOH metabolism and the participating enzymes, as key factors in the modulation of brain acetaldehyde (ACD accumulation and resulting effect on EtOH intake. Catalase (CAT seems a good candidate for the shared mechanism between Pb and EtOH due to both its antioxidant and its brain EtOH-metabolizing properties. CAT overactivation was reported to increase EtOH consumption, while CAT blockade reduced it, and both scenarios were modified by Pb exposure, probably as the result of elevated brain and blood CAT activity. Likewise, the motivational effects of EtOH were enhanced when brain ACD metabolism was prevented by ALDH2 inhibition, even in the Pb animals that evidenced reduced brain ALDH2 activity after chronic EtOH intake. Overall, these results suggest that brain EtOH metabolizing enzymes are modulated by Pb exposure with resultant central ACD accumulation and a prevalence of the reinforcing effects of the metabolite in brain against the aversive peripheral ACD accumulation. They also support the idea that early exposure to an environmental contaminant, even at low doses, predisposes at a later age to differential reactivity to challenging events, increasing, in this case, vulnerability to acquiring addictive behaviors, including excessive EtOH intake.

  1. The effect of verapamil and diltiazem on cardiac stimulant effect of adrenaline and calcium chloride on isolated frog heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhavat Sudhakar, Naveen Kumar T, Tadvi NA, Venkata Rao Y

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers block voltage dependent L-type of calcium channel and thus reduce the frequency of opening of these channels in response to depolarization. The result is a marked decrease in transmembrane calcium current associated with long lasting relaxation of vascular smooth muscle, reduction in contractility in cardiac muscle, decrease in pacemaker activity in the SA node and decrease in conduction velocity in the AV node. Among Calcium channel blockers verapamil, is cardio selective, nifedipine is vascular smooth muscle selective, while diltiazem exhibits intermediate selectivity. Methods: In the present study, the effect of two Ca++ channel blocker, Verapamil and Diltiazem were compared on the isolated frog heart by using adrenaline & calcium chloride as standard on frog heart contractility. Results and conclusion: Adrenaline and calcium chloride increased the amplitude of contraction of isolated perfused frog heart. The L- type of Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem produced dose dependent (2mg, 4mg, 8mg, and 16mg reduction in the amplitude of contraction produced by calcium chloride in isolated perfused frog heart. There was no statistical significant difference (p > 0.05 between the inhibitory effect of diltiazem and verapamil on calcium chloride induced contraction of isolated frog heart.

  2. Loureirin B: An Effective Component in Dragon's Blood Modulating Sodium Currents in TG Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangming; Yin, Shijin; Chen, Su; Ma, Quanshun

    2005-01-01

    To test, analyze and express the relationship between the pharmacological effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) dragon's blood and that of its component loureirin B, specify an operational definition for effective component from raw drug of TCM. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, the effects of dragon's blood and its component loureirin B on tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons were observed. The results show that both dragon's blood and loureirin B suppressed two types of peak sodium currents in a dose-dependent way. 0.1% dragon's blood and 0.2mmol/L loureirin B affected the activation and inactivation of sodium channels. The results further prove the analgetic mechanism of dragon's blood interfering with the nociceptive transmission. According to the above definition, loureirin B is the effective component in dragon's blood modulating sodium currents in TG neurons.

  3. Climate and litter quality differently modulate the effects of soil fauna on litter decomposition across biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Maestre, Fernando T; Kattge, Jens; Wall, Diana H

    2013-08-01

    Climate and litter quality have been identified as major drivers of litter decomposition at large spatial scales. However, the role played by soil fauna remains largely unknown, despite its importance for litter fragmentation and microbial activity. We synthesised litterbag studies to quantify the effect sizes of soil fauna on litter decomposition rates at the global and biome scales, and to assess how climate, litter quality and soil fauna interact to determine such rates. Soil fauna consistently enhanced litter decomposition at both global and biome scales (average increment ~ 37%). [corrected]. However, climate and litter quality differently modulated the effects of soil fauna on decomposition rates between biomes, from climate-driven biomes to those where climate effects were mediated by changes in litter quality. Our results advocate for the inclusion of biome-specific soil fauna effects on litter decomposition as a mean to reduce the unexplained variation in large-scale decomposition models. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  4. Psychophysiological effects of an iTBS modulated virtual reality challenge including participants with spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notzon, S; Deppermann, S; Fallgatter, A; Diemer, J; Kroczek, A; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P; Ehlis, A-C

    2015-12-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests beneficial effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on anxiety. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) as a form of TMS on acute anxiety provoked by a virtual reality (VR) scenario. Participants with spider phobia (n=41) and healthy controls (n=42) were exposed to a spider scenario in VR after one session of iTBS over the prefrontal cortex or sham treatment. Participants with spider phobia reacted with more anxiety compared to healthy controls. Their heart rate and skin conductance increased compared to baseline. Contrary to expectations, iTBS did not influence these reactions, but modulated heart rate variability (HRV). Sympathetic influence on HRV showed an increase in the active iTBS group only. This study does not support the idea of beneficial effects of a single session of iTBS on anxiety, although other protocols or repeated sessions might be effective.

  5. A review of in vitro experimental evidence for the effect of spatial and temporal modulation of radiation dose on response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchowerska, Natalka (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)), E-mail: Natalka@email.cs.nsw.gov.au; McKenzie, David R. (School of Physics, Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Ebert, Martin A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia (Australia)); Jackson, Michael (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales (Australia))

    2010-11-15

    Background. Intensity modulated radiation therapy introduces strong spatial and temporal modulation of the dose delivery that may have therapeutic benefits, as yet unrealized. Material and methods. Experimental evidence for spatial and temporal modulation affecting the cell survival following in vitro irradiation has been derived using clonogenic assays. Results and discussion. The experimental results show that the survival status of a cell is strongly influenced by the spatial dose modulation. The classical bystander effect of decreased survival has now been supplemented by observations of increased survival, which may result from the same or different signaling mechanisms. Temporal dose modulation experiments show that dose protraction significantly increases cell survival. An appropriate choice of temporal dose modulation pattern enables cell death to be maximized or minimized for a constant dose and delivery time. Conclusion. Bystander effects challenge the assumption that outcome is solely dependent on local dose. Intra-fractional temporal modulation via protracted treatments and time varying dose delivery both affect the cell survival. The presence of bystander and temporal effects emphasize the need for a mathematical framework which incorporates their influence on cell survival

  6. Effect of Antimicrobials on Salmonella Spp. Strains Isolated from Poultry Processing Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mion

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The routine use of antimicrobials in animal production for the treatment of infections, disease prevention, or as growth promoters is a predisposing factor for the development and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. In food industries, sanitizers are used for the control of microbial colonization, and their efficacy depends on contact time and on the dilution of the products used. The present study assessed the effect of 12 antimicrobials and four commercial sanitizers on 18 Salmonella spp. strains isolated from poultry processing plants. None of the evaluated antimicrobials was 100% effective against the tested Salmonella spp. strains; however, 94% of the isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, 77% to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and to ampicillin, and 72% to enrofloxacin, whereas 100% of the isolates were resistant to penicillin G, 16% to tetracycline, and 11% to sulfonamide. The tested Salmonella spp. strains were 100% inhibited by peracetic acid after five minutes of contact, 0.5% by quaternary ammonium after 15 minutes, and 85.7% by chlorhexidine after 15 minutes. The results indicate the importance of testing of efficacy of antimicrobials used in animal production and in public health to monitor their action and the development of resistance.

  7. Inhibitory effect against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria of Pseudomonas strains isolated from spoiled and fresh fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, L

    1993-01-01

    The antibacterial effects of 209 Pseudomonas strains isolated from spoiled iced fish and newly caught fish were assessed by screening target organisms in agar diffusion assays. One-third (67 strains) inhibited the growth of one or several of six target organisms (Escherichia coli, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas sobria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus), of which S. aureus and A. sobria were the most sensitive. The inhibitory action was most pronounced among the strains producing siderophores, and the presence of iron eliminated the antibacterial effect of two-thirds of the inhibitory strains. Siderophore-mediated competition for iron may explain the inhibitory activity of these strains. All but nine of the inhibiting strains were found to inhibit the growth of 38 psychrotrophic S. putrefaciens strains isolated from spoiling fish and fish products. Siderophore-containing Pseudomonas culture supernatants inhibited growth of S. putrefaciens, as did the addition of iron chelators (ethylenediamine dihydroxyphenylacetic acid [EDDHA]). In particular, Pseudomonas strains isolated from newly caught and spoiled Nile perch (Lates niloticus) inhibited S. putrefaciens. This suggests that microbial interaction (e.g., competition or antagonism) may influence the selection of a microflora for some chilled food products. PMID:8357253

  8. Effects of boldine on mouse diaphragm and sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J J; Cheng, Y W

    1998-02-01

    The effects of boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxyaporphine], a major alkaloid in the leaves and bark of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.), on skeletal muscle were studied using mouse diaphragm and isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles. Boldine, at 10-200 microM, has little effect on the muscle-evoked twitches; however, the ryanodine-induced contracture was potentiated dose-dependently. At higher concentrations of 300 microM, boldine by itself induced muscle contracture of two phases, which were caused by the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and induction of Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site, the sarcoplasmic reticulum, respectively. When tested with isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles, boldine dose-dependently induced Ca2+ release from actively loaded sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle of rabbit or rat which was inhibited by ruthenium red, suggesting that the release was through the Ca2+ release channel, also known as the ryanodine receptor. Boldine also dose-dependently increased apparent [3H]-ryanodine binding with the EC50 value of 50 microM. In conclusion, we have shown that boldine could sensitize the ryanodine receptor and induce Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site of skeletal muscle.

  9. Purification and biological effects of a C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops moojeni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PSF Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom proteins from the C-type lectin family have very distinct biological activities despite their highly conserved primary structure, which is homologous to the carbohydrate recognition region of true C-type lectins. We purified a lectin-like protein (BmLec from Bothrops moojeni venom and investigated its effect on platelet aggregation, insulin secretion, antibacterial activity, and isolated kidney cells. The BmLec was purified using two chromatographic steps: affinity chromatography and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. BmLec showed a dose-dependent platelet aggregation and significantly decreased the bacterial growth rate in approximately 15%. During scanning electron microscopy, the profile of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. passiflorae treated with lectin disclosed a high vesiculation and membrane rupture. BmLec induced a strong and significant increase in insulin secretion at 2.8 and 16.7 mM glucose concentrations, and this effect was seen in the presence of EGTA in both experiments. BmLec (10 µg/mL increased the perfusion pressure, renal vascular resistance and urinary flow. The glomerular filtration rate and percentages of sodium, potassium and chloride tubular transport were reduced at 60 minutes of perfusion. Renal alterations caused by BmLec were completely inhibited by indomethacin in all evaluated parameters. In conclusion, the C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops moojeni affected platelet aggregation, insulin secretion, antibacterial activity and isolated kidney function.

  10. The isolation of nuclear envelopes. Effects of thiol-group oxidation and of calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerford, S A; McLuckie, I F; Gorman, M; Scott, K A; Agutter, P S

    1985-02-15

    The effects of (a) oxidative cross-linking of protein thiol groups and (b) the presence or absence of Ca2+ ions on rat liver nuclear-envelope isolation were studied. Two envelope-isolation procedures were compared: a well characterized low-ionic-strength method and a recently developed high-ionic-strength method. The latter method seems preferable to the former in respect of lower intranuclear contamination of the envelopes, suppression of endogenous serine proteinase, and maintenance of high specific activities of envelope-associated enzymes. In both procedures, however, the presence of Ca2+ gave rise to a rapid, apparently irreversible, contamination of the envelopes by intranuclear material. This effect was half-maximal at 20 microM-Ca2+. In addition, the envelopes became contaminated with intranuclear material by a Ca2+-independent mechanism, apparently resulting from N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive intermolecular disulphide-bond formation. This oxidative process seemed to have two major kinetic components (half-life, t1/2, approx. 2 min and 10 min). In view of these findings, it is recommended that (i) for most purposes, nuclear envelopes be isolated by the newly developed high-ionic-strength procedure, (ii) irrespective of the method used, Ca2+-chelators be included in all the buffers, (iii) thiol-group oxidation be prevented or reversed during the procedure.

  11. Inhibitory effect of Schisandrin on spontaneous contraction of isolated rat colon

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jiaming; Ip, Paul SP; Yeung, John HK; Che, Chun-Tao

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of schisandrin, one of the major lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, on spontaneous contraction in rat colon and its possible mechanisms. Schisandrin produced a concentration-dependent inhibition (EC50 = 1.66 μM) on the colonic spontaneous contraction. The relaxant effect of schisandrin could be abolished by the neuronal Na+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin (1 μM) but not affected by propranolol (1 μM), phentolamine (1 μM), atropine (1 μM) or nicotine desens...

  12. Effect of interleukin-1 on the biosynthesis of proinsulin and insulin in isolated rat pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgit Sehested; Linde, S; Spinas, G A

    1988-01-01

    Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is often preceded or associated with lymphocytic infiltration in the islets of Langerhans (insulitis). We recently demonstrated that interleukin-1 (IL-1) produced by activated macrophages exerts a bimodal effect on insulin release and biosynthesis...... in isolated rat islets. In the present study we have further analysed the effect of recombinant human interleukin-1 beta (rIL-1) on the biosynthesis and conversion of proinsulin 1 and 2 in rat islets. By RP-HPLC-analysis of islets labelled with [3H]leucine we found that exposure to 6 ng/ml of IL-1 for 24 h...

  13. Isolation & Characterization of Rhizobia and their Effect on Vigna radiata Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Rajpoot and Kain Singh Panwar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia is Gram negative bacteria that fix nitrogen , bacteria colonize plant cell with root nodules and commonly found in pulse . In present study rhizobia isolated from root nodules of vigna radiata and characterized morphologically, biochemical test were to as certain its physiology under normal conditions , three bacterial strain (Rp1 , Rp2, Rp3 were tested for their effect on root, Shoot and no. of nodules of vigna radiata plant in green house condition. Comparatively in all three strains Rp1 strain was found to most effective in positively Enhancing the growth of the plant in all parameters.

  14. Evaluation of hepatoprotective effect of Gentiana olivieri herbs on subacute administration and isolation of active principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Didem Deliorman; Aslan, Mustafa; Aktay, Göknur; Ergun, Ender; Yesilada, Erdem; Ergun, Fatma

    2003-04-04

    Hepatoprotective effect of Gentiana olivieri Griseb. (Gentianaceae) flowering herbs on subacute administration were studied using in vivo models in rats. For the activity assessment on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage following biochemical parameters were evaluated; plasma and hepatic tissue malondialdehyde formation, and liver tissue glutathione level, as well as plasma transaminase enzyme levels (aspartate transferase and alanine transferase). Results of biochemical tests were also confirmed by histopathological examination. Through bioassay-guided fractionation procedures isoorientin, a known C-glycosylflavone, was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction as the active antihepatotoxic constituent by silica gel column chromatography. Isoorientin exhibited significant hepatoprotective effect at 15 mg/kg b.w. dose.

  15. IDENTIFICATION AND EFFECTS OF MIXED INFECTION OF Potyvirus ISOLATES WITH Cucumber mosaic virus IN CUCURBITS

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    GRAZIELA DA SILVA BARBOSA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed infections in cucurbits are frequently observed in natural conditions between viruses from the Potyvirus genus and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, which significantly decreases productivity. The objectives of the present study was to compare the host range of PRSV - W, WMV, and ZYMV isolates and evaluate the effects of mixed infections with CMV in zucchini plants ( Cucurbita pepo L.. Host range studies comprising 23 plant species confirmed some similarities and biological differences among the isolates of PRSV - W, ZYMV, and WMV. RT - PCR confirmed the amplification of DNA fragments of the PRSV - W, WMV, and ZYMV coat protein gene ( cp and cytoplasm inclusion gene ( ci . The virus interaction studies in zucchini Caserta plants indicated synergistic interactions, particularly among species from the Potyvirus genus, and some CMV interference with some virus combinations.

  16. Antihepatotoxic effect of isolated chitin from Rhizopus oryzae against paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akila Ramanathan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at investigating the antihepatotoxic activity of isolated fungal chitin, a natural polysaccharide from Rhizopus oryzae NCIM1009 against paracetamol-induced toxicity in rats. Changes in the levels of biochemical markers of hepatic injury such as serum glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT, serum glutamic pyuruvic transaminase (SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin and total protein were determined in both treated and control group of rats. The effect of fungal chitin was compared with that of silymarin (25 mg/kg. The results showed that paracetamol (750 mg/kg elevated the levels of biomarkers enzymes. Treatment with fungal chitin (200 mg/kg brought the marker level near to normal and showed significant hepatoprotective activity. Acute toxicity studies of fungal chitin was carried out and found safe up to 2,000 mg/kg. The isolated fungal chitin was characterized by IR spectroscopy and compared with commercial chitin.

  17. Research of air-cushion isolation effects on high arch dam reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Jie; Chen, Jiang; Zhang, Yuan-Ze; Liu, Hao-Wu

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of air-cushion isolated arch dam is presented with the nonlinear gas-liquid-solid multi-field dynamic coupling effect taken into account. In this model, the displacement formulation in Lagrange method, pressure formulation in Euler method, nonlinear contact model based on Coulomb friction law are applied to the air-cushion, reservoir and contraction joint domain, respectively. The dynamic response of Jinping I arch dam with a height of 305 m is analyzed using the seismic records of the Wenchuan Earthquake in 2008. Numerical results show that the air-cushion isolation reduces significantly the hydrodynamic pressure as well as the opening width for the contraction joints of high arch dam.

  18. Cytotoxic effects of postharvest fungicides, ortho-phenylphenol, thiabendazole and imazalil, on isolated rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y; Moore, G A

    1995-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of ortho-phenylphenol (OPP), imazalil (IMZ) and thiabendazole (TBZ) on isolated rat hepatocytes were investigated. Addition of IMZ and OPP to hepatocyte suspensions at a concentration of 0.75 mM resulted in acute cell death, accompanied by depletion of intracellular levels of glutathione and protein thiols. Both compounds rapidly depleted cellular ATP which consistently preceded the cell death. In addition, the cell death caused by IMZ was accompanied by the accumulation of intracellular malondialdehyde, indicating initiation of lipid peroxidation. During a 3-hr incubation period, TBZ did not affect these parameters. In mitochondria isolated from rat liver, IMZ and OPP impaired respiration related to oxidative phosphorylation. Based on these results, the order of toxic potency is IMZ > OPP > TBZ.

  19. Effect of Processing Pressure on Isolated Pore Formation during Controlled Directional Solidification in Small Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Matthew C.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.; Grugel, RIchard N.; Lee, Chun P.

    2008-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments were performed, using succinonitrile saturated with nitrogen gas, to examine the effects of in-situ processing pressure changes on the formation growth, and evolution of an isolated, cylindrical gaseous pore. A novel solidification facility, capable of processing thin cylindrical samples (I.D. < 1.0 mm), under controlled pressure conditions, was used for the experiments. A new experimental method for growing the isolated pore from a seed bubble is introduced. The experimental results indicate that an in-situ processing pressure change will result in either a transient change in pore diameter or a complete termination of pore growth, indicating that pressure changes can be used as a control parameter to terminate bubble growth. A simple analytical model has been introduced to explain the experimental observations.

  20. Effects of Phytophthora cinnamomi isolate, inoculum delivery method, flood, and drought on vigor, disease severity and mortality of blueberry plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four studies evaluated the effect of Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates, inoculum delivery methods, and flood and drought conditions on vigor, disease severity scores, and survival of blueberry plants grown in pots in the greenhouse. Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates were obtained from blueberry plants ...

  1. Isolation, Molecular Identification and Evaluation of Antifungal Effects of the Bacilli Isolated from Rhizospheric Soil of Gorgan Region against Tricophyton Mentagrophytes

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    Pordeli, HR. (PhD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Soil bacteria, particularly Bacillus genus have thepotential of producing a range of bioactive substances with antimicrobial andantifungal properties. They have the ability to produce hundreds of active andeffective biologic compound against microorganisms. Therefore, it seems to be aproper candidate in the biocontrol of fungal pathogenesis.Material and Methods: In this study, soil samples were collected from differentparts of Gorgan in order to isolate Bacillus and to determine their antifungalactivity against T.mentagrophytes. The Isolates that had the highest antifungaleffects were analyzed by PCR and 16s rRNA sequencing.Results: Of 54 strains, 14 have antifungal activity. The Isolates, S4 and S12,identified as B.cereus and B.thuringiensis respectively show the highestantidermatofit effect. These isolates based on 16s rRNA sequence analysis show97% homology with Bacillus cereusstrain KU4 and Bacillus thuringiensisstrainucsc27.Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that the soil Bacilli have biocontrolpotential against dermatophytic agents such as T.mentagrophytes.Keywords: Antifungal effects; Bacillus; Rhizospheric soil; T.mentagrophytes

  2. Adolescent vulnerability to cardiovascular consequences of chronic social stress: Immediate and long-term effects of social isolation during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fábio C; Duarte, Josiane O; Leão, Rodrigo M; Hummel, Luiz F V; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that disruption of social bonds and perceived isolation (loneliness) are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Adolescence is proposed as a period of vulnerability to stress. Nevertheless, the impact of chronic social stress during this ontogenic period in cardiovascular function is poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the impact in cardiovascular function of social isolation for 3 weeks in adolescent and adult male rats. Also, the long-term effects of social isolation during adolescence were investigated longitudinally. Social isolation reduced body weight in adolescent, but not in adult animals. Disruption of social bonds during adolescence increased arterial pressure without affecting heart rate and pulse pressure (PP). Nevertheless, social isolation in adulthood reduced systolic arterial pressure and increased diastolic arterial pressure, which in turn decreased PP without affecting mean arterial pressure. Cardiovascular changes in adolescents, but not adults, were followed by facilitation of both baroreflex sensitivity and vascular reactivity to the vasodilator agent acetylcholine. Vascular responsiveness to either the vasodilator agent sodium nitroprusside or the vasoconstrictor agent phenylephrine was not affected by social isolation. Except for the changes in body weight and baroreflex sensitivity, all alterations evoked by social isolation during adolescence were reversed in adulthood after moving animals from isolated to collective housing. These findings suggest a vulnerability of adolescents to the effects of chronic social isolation in cardiovascular function. However, results indicate minimal cardiovascular consequences in adulthood of disruption of social bonds during adolescence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Different Modulating Effects of Adenosine on Neonatal and Adult Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

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    Pei-Chen Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs are the major leukocytes in the circulation and play an important role in host defense. Intact PMN functions include adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS release. It has been known for a long time that adenosine can function as a modulator of adult PMN functions. Neonatal plasma has a higher adenosine level than that of adults; however, little is known about the modulating effects of adenosine on neonatal PMNs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adenosine on neonatal PMN functions. We found that neonatal PMNs had impaired adhesion, chemotaxis, and ROS production abilities, but not phagocytosis compared to adult PMNs. As with adult PMNs, adenosine could suppress the CD11b expressions of neonatal PMNs, but had no significant suppressive effect on phagocytosis. In contrast to adult PMNs, adenosine did not significantly suppress chemotaxis and ROS production of neonatal PMNs. This may be due to impaired phagocyte reactions and a poor neonatal PMN response to adenosine. Adenosine may not be a good strategy for the treatment of neonatal sepsis because of impaired phagocyte reactions and poor response.

  4. Demodulation effect is observed in neurones by exposure to low frequency modulated microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Bruzon, R N; Figols, T; Azanza, M J [Laboratorio de Magnetobiologia, Departamento de Anatomia e Histologia Humanas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Moral, A del, E-mail: naogit@yahoo.co [Laboratorio de Magnetismo de Solidos, Departamento de Fisica de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and CSIC (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    Neurones exposure to a microwave (carrier f{sub c}=13.6 GHz; power P {approx_equal} 5 mW; H{sub o} {approx_equal} 0.10 Am{sup -1} = 1.25 mOe; E{sub 0} {approx_equal} 3.5 V/m; {Delta}T {approx_equal} 0.01{sup 0}C; SAR: 3.1x10{sup -3} - 5.8x10{sup -3} W/Kg) EMF amplitude modulated by ELF-AC field (frequency, f{sub m}= 0-100 Hz) shows no electrophysiological effect under the carrier MF alone, but {sup f}requency resonances: at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 50, 100 Hz: demodulation effect. Resonances appear when applied ELF-MF is close to a dominant characteristic frequency of the neurone impulse Fourier spectrum. This is an interesting result considering that ELF-MF modulating RF or MW in the range of human EEG could induce frequency-resonant effects on exposed human brain.

  5. Modulator effects of meloxicam against doxorubicin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Memy H; Ghobara, Mohamed; Abd-Allah, Gamil M

    2014-08-01

    Doxorubicin-induced renal toxicity overshadows its anticancer effectiveness. This study is aimed at assessing the possible modulator effects of meloxicam, a cyclooxigenase-2 inhibitor, on doxorubicin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice and exploring some of the modulator mechanisms. Forty male mice were divided for treatment, for 2 weeks, with saline, meloxicam (daily), doxorubicin (twice/week), or both meloxicam and doxorubicin. Doxorubicin induced a significant increase in relative kidney weight to body weight, kidney lipid perooxidation, plasma levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, kidney caspase-3 activity, and kidney prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content. Doxorubicin disturbed kidney histology, abrogated renal function tests (serum creatinine, uric acid, and blood urea nitrogen), induced a significant decrease in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase) and reduced glutathione (GSH) content. The administration of meloxicam with doxorubicin mitigated all doxorubicin-disturbed parameters. Meloxicam ameliorated doxorubicin-induced renal injury via inhibition of inflammatory PGE2, inflammatory cytokines, caspase-3 activity, antioxidant effect, and free radical scavenging activity.

  6. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B; Renaud, Helen J; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin+imipenem and cephalothin+neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin+imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin+neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism.

  7. Gallic acid isolated from Spirogyra sp. improves cardiovascular disease through a vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nalae; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Lee, WonWoo; Ko, Ju-Young; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Jin-Soo; Heu, Min-Soo; Kim, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, You-Jin

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects of gallic acid (GA), a polyphenol isolated from the green alga Spirogyra sp., to assess its suitability as a therapeutic for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). We examined the effect of GA on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). GA increased nitric oxide (NO) levels by increasing phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and its effect on NO production was attenuated by pretreatment with the eNOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). We also investigated its antihypertensive effect by examining GA-mediated inhibition of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE). GA inhibited ACE with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 37.38 ± 0.39 μg/ml. In silico simulations revealed that GA binds to the active site of ACE (PDB: 1O86) with a binding energy of -270.487 kcal/mol. Furthermore, GA clearly reduced blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) to an extent comparable to captopril. These results suggest that GA isolated from Spirogyra sp. exerts multiple therapeutic effects and has potential as a CVD treatment.

  8. Age-related decline in brain resources modulates genetic effects on cognitive functioning

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    Ulman Lindenberger

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in cognitive performance increase from early to late adulthood, likely reflecting influences of a multitude of factors. We hypothesize that losses in neurochemical and anatomical brain resources in normal aging modulate the effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that the function relating brain resources to cognition is nonlinear, so that genetic differences exert increasingly large effects on cognition as resources recede from high to medium levels in the course of aging.Direct empirical support for this hypothesis comes from a study by Nagel et al. (2008, who reported that the effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT gene on cognitive performance are magnified in old age and interacted with the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF gene. We conclude that common genetic polymorphisms contribute to the increasing heterogeneity of cognitive functioning in old age. Extensions of the hypothesis to other polymorphisms are discussed.

  9. Age-Related Decline in Brain Resources Modulates Genetic Effects on Cognitive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberger, Ulman; Nagel, Irene E.; Chicherio, Christian; Li, Shu-Chen; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Bäckman, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Individual differences in cognitive performance increase from early to late adulthood, likely reflecting influences of a multitude of factors. We hypothesize that losses in neurochemical and anatomical brain resources in normal aging modulate the effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that the function relating brain resources to cognition is nonlinear, so that genetic differences exert increasingly large effects on cognition as resources recede from high to medium levels in the course of aging. Direct empirical support for this hypothesis comes from a study by Nagel et al. (2008), who reported that the effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) gene on cognitive performance are magnified in old age and interacted with the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene. We conclude that common genetic polymorphisms contribute to the increasing heterogeneity of cognitive functioning in old age. Extensions of the hypothesis to other polymorphisms are discussed. (150 of 150 words) PMID:19225597

  10. The extreme relativity of perception: A new contextual effect modulates human resolving power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdar, Gal; Ganel, Tzvi; Algom, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The authors report the discovery of a new effect of context that modulates human resolving power with respect to an individual stimulus. They show that the size of the difference threshold or the just noticeable difference around a standard stimulus depends on the range of the other standards tested simultaneously for resolution within the same experimental session. The larger this range, the poorer the resolving power for a given standard. The authors term this effect the range of standards effect (RSE). They establish this result both in the visual domain for the perception of linear extent, and in the somatosensory domain for the perception of weight. They discuss the contingent nature of stimulus resolution in perception and psychophysics and contrast it with the immunity to contextual influences of visually guided action. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. CARBON-FIBRE-REINFORCED POLYMER PARTS EFFECT ON SPACECRAFT OPTOELECTRONIC MODULE LENS SCATTERING

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    S. S. Kolasha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spacecraft optoelectronic modules traditionally have aluminum alloy or titanium alloy casing which substantial weight increases fuel consumption required to put them into orbit and, consequently, total cost of the project. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer based composite constructive materials is an efficient solution that allows reducing weight and dimensions of large optoelectronic modules 1,5–3 times and the coefficient of linear thermal expansion 15–20 times if compared with metals. Optical characteristic is a crucial feature of carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer that determines composite material interaction with electromagnetic emission within the optical range. This work was intended to develop a method to evaluate Carbon fiber reinforced polymer optoelectronic modules casing effect on lens scattering by computer simulation with Zemax application software package. Degrees of scattered, reflected and absorbed radiant flux effect on imaging quality are described here. The work included experimental study in order to determine bidirectional reflectance distribution function by goniometric method for LUP-0.1 carbon fabric check test pieces of EDT-69U epoxy binder with EPOFLEX-0.4 glue layer and 5056-3.5-23-A aluminium honeycomb filler. The scattered emission was registered within a hemisphere above the check test piece surface. Optical detection direction was determined with zenith (0º < θ < 90º and azimuth (0º < φ < 180º angles with 10° increment. The check test piece surface was proved to scatter emission within a narrow angle range (approximately 20° with clear directivity. Carbon fiber reinforced polymers was found to feature integrated reflectance coefficient 3 to 4 times greater than special coatings do. 

  12. Protective effects of steroidal alkaloids isolated from Solanum paniculatum L. against mitomycin cytotoxic and genotoxic actions

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    PABLINE M. VIEIRA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Solanum paniculatum L. is a plant species widespread throughout tropical America, especially in the Brazilian Cerrado region. It is used in Brazil for culinary purposes and in folk medicine to treat liver and gastric dysfunctions, as well as hangovers. Previous studies with S. paniculatum ethanolic leaf extract or ethanolic fruit extract demonstrated that they have no genotoxic activity neither in mice nor in bacterial strains, although their cytotoxicity and antigenotoxicity were demonstrated in higher doses. In order to assess the possible compounds responsible for the activities observed, we fractionated the ethanolic fruit extract of S. paniculatum, characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectra, and evaluated two fractions containing steroidal alkaloids against mitomycin C (MMC using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. Swiss mice were orally treated with different concentrations (25, 50, or 100 mg.kg−1 of each fraction simultaneously with a single intraperitonial dose of MMC (4 mg.kg−1. Antigenotoxicity was evaluated by using the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE, whereas anticytotoxicity was assessed by the polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocytes ratio (PCE/NCE. Our results demonstrated that steroidal alkaloids isolated from S. paniculatum strongly protected cells against MMC aneugenic and/or clastogenic activities as well as modulated MMC cytotoxic action.

  13. Consolidation differentially modulates schema effects on memory for items and associations.

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    Marlieke T R van Kesteren

    Full Text Available Newly learned information that is congruent with a preexisting schema is often better remembered than information that is incongruent. This schema effect on memory has previously been associated to more efficient encoding and consolidation mechanisms. However, this effect is not always consistently supported in the literature, with differential schema effects reported for different types of memory, different retrieval cues, and the possibility of time-dependent effects related to consolidation processes. To examine these effects more directly, we tested participants on two different types of memory (item recognition and associative memory for newly encoded visuo-tactile associations at different study-test intervals, thus probing memory retrieval accuracy for schema-congruent and schema-incongruent items and associations at different time points (t = 0, t = 20, and t = 48 hours after encoding. Results show that the schema effect on visual item recognition only arises after consolidation, while the schema effect on associative memory is already apparent immediately after encoding, persisting, but getting smaller over time. These findings give further insight into different factors influencing the schema effect on memory, and can inform future schema experiments by illustrating the value of considering effects of memory type and consolidation on schema-modulated retrieval.

  14. Bactericidal effect of S-nitrosothiols against clinical isolates from keratitis

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    de Oliveira MG

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Angelino Julio Cariello,1 Paulo José Martins Bispo,2 Gabriela Freitas Pereira de Souza,3 Antonio Carlos Campos Pignatari,2 Marcelo Ganzarolli de Oliveira,3 Ana Luisa Hofling-Lima11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, Federal University of São Paulo, 3Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of two nitric oxide donors, ie, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO and S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine (SNAC, against clinical isolates from patients with infectious keratitis.Methods: Reference broth microdilution assays were performed to determine the minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations for GSNO and SNAC against four American Type Culture Collection strains and 52 clinical isolates from patients with infectious keratitis as follows: 14 (26.9% Pseudomonas species; 13 (25.0% coagulase-negative Staphylococci; 10 (19.2% Staphylococcus aureus; nine (17.3% Serratia marcescens; and six (11.5% Enterobacter aerogenes. Sterility control and bacterial growth control were also performed.Results: SNAC showed lower minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations than GSNO for all clinical isolates from patients with infectious keratitis. For Gram-positive bacteria, mean minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations were 2.1 ± 1.3 and 8.6 ± 3.8 mM for SNAC and 4.6 ± 3.2 and 21.5 ± 12.5 mM for GSNO (P < 0.01. For Gram-negative bacteria, mean minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations were 3.3 ± 1.4 and 6.1 ± 3.4 mM for SNAC and 12.4 ± 5.4 and 26.5 ± 10.1 mM for GSNO (P < 0.01. The minimum bactericidal to inhibitory concentration ratio was ≤8 in 100% of all isolates tested for SNAC and in 94.2% tested for GSNO.Conclusions: SNAC and GSNO had effective inhibitory and bactericidal effects against bacterial isolates from keratitis. SNAC showed greater antimicrobial activity than GSNO against all bacteria

  15. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Qiao [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Min [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Bian, Po [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of microgravity on the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) were definitely demonstrated. • The effects of microgravity on RIBE might be divergent for different biological events. • The microgravity mainly modified the generation or transport of bystander signals at early stage. - Abstract: Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots.

  16. The effect of the dispersal kernel on isolation-by-distance in a continuous population

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    Tara N. Furstenau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Under models of isolation-by-distance, population structure is determined by the probability of identity-by-descent between pairs of genes according to the geographic distance between them. Well established analytical results indicate that the relationship between geographical and genetic distance depends mostly on the neighborhood size of the population which represents a standardized measure of gene flow. To test this prediction, we model local dispersal of haploid individuals on a two-dimensional landscape using seven dispersal kernels: Rayleigh, exponential, half-normal, triangular, gamma, Lomax and Pareto. When neighborhood size is held constant, the distributions produce similar patterns of isolation-by-distance, confirming predictions. Considering this, we propose that the triangular distribution is the appropriate null distribution for isolation-by-distance studies. Under the triangular distribution, dispersal is uniform over the neighborhood area which suggests that the common description of neighborhood size as a measure of an effective, local panmictic population is valid for popular families of dispersal distributions. We further show how to draw random variables from the triangular distribution efficiently and argue that it should be utilized in other studies in which computational efficiency is important.

  17. Effects of Protein-pheromone Complexation on Correlated Chemical Shift Modulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perazzolo, Chiara; Wist, Julien [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland); Loth, Karine; Poggi, Luisa [Ecole Normale Superieure, Departement de chimie, associe au CNRS (France); Homans, Steve [University of Leeds, School of Biochemistry and Microbiology (United Kingdom); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland)], E-mail: Geoffrey.Bodenhausen@ens.fr

    2005-12-15

    Major urinary protein (MUP) is a pheromone-carrying protein of the lipocalin family. Previous studies by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) show that the affinity of MUP for the pheromone 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine (IBMP) is mainly driven by enthalpy, with a small unfavourable entropic contribution. Entropic terms can be attributed in part to changes in internal motions of the protein upon binding. Slow internal motions can lead to correlated or anti-correlated modulations of the isotropic chemical shifts of carbonyl C' and amide N nuclei. Correlated chemical shift modulations (CSM/CSM) in MUP have been determined by measuring differences of the transverse relaxation rates of zero- and double-quantum coherences ZQC{l_brace}C'N{r_brace} and DQC{l_brace}C'N{r_brace}, and by accounting for the effects of correlated fluctuations of dipole-dipole couplings (DD/DD) and chemical shift anisotropies (CSA/CSA). The latter can be predicted from tensor parameters of C' and N nuclei that have been determined in earlier work. The effects of complexation on slow time-scale protein dynamics can be determined by comparing the temperature dependence of the relaxation rates of APO-MUP (i.e., without ligand) and HOLO-MUP (i.e., with IBMP as a ligand)

  18. The effect of nicotine on sensorimotor gating is modulated by a CHRNA3 polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, Nadine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Kessler, Henrik; Mössner, Rainald; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; Dahmen, Norbert; Maier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Michael; Quednow, Boris B

    2013-09-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response, a measure of sensorimotor gating, can be enhanced by nicotine. Moreover, the TT genotype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α3-subunit (CHRNA3) rs1051730 polymorphism has previously been associated with diminished PPI and nicotine dependence. We tested whether this CHRNA3 polymorphism also modulates the nicotine-induced enhancement of PPI. We assessed the effect of nicotine on PPI, startle reactivity, and habituation in 52 healthy nonsmoking volunteers genotyped for CHRNA3 rs1051730 in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, counterbalanced, within-subjects design. Additionally, cotinine plasma levels were measured. Nicotine significantly enhanced PPI in TT homozygotes only and tended to worsen PPI in TC and CC carriers. Additionally, nicotine significantly reduced startle habituation. The present findings imply that the effect of nicotine on sensorimotor gating is modulated by nAChR α3-subunits. Thus, genetic variation in nicotinic receptor genes might be an important connecting link between early attentional processes and smoking behavior.

  19. Effective Modulation of Male Aggression through Lateral Septum to Medial Hypothalamus Projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Li Chin; Wang, Li; D'Amour, James A; Yumita, Tomohiro; Chen, Genghe; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Chang, Brian C; Bernstein, Hannah; You, Xuedi; Feng, James E; Froemke, Robert C; Lin, Dayu

    2016-03-07

    Aggression is a prevalent behavior in the animal kingdom that is used to settle competition for limited resources. Given the high risk associated with fighting, the central nervous system has evolved an active mechanism to modulate its expression. Lesioning the lateral septum (LS) is known to cause "septal rage," a phenotype characterized by a dramatic increase in the frequency of attacks. To understand the circuit mechanism of LS-mediated modulation of aggression, we examined the influence of LS input on the cells in and around the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl)-a region required for male mouse aggression. We found that the inputs from the LS inhibited the attack-excited cells but surprisingly increased the overall activity of attack-inhibited cells. Furthermore, optogenetic activation of the projection from LS cells to the VMHvl terminated ongoing attacks immediately but had little effect on mounting. Thus, LS projection to the ventromedial hypothalamic area represents an effective pathway for suppressing male aggression.

  20. Effect of Sintering Temperature on Electrical Properties of Chip on Glass Module with Direct Printing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Chul; Kim, Yongil; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2012-09-01

    In order to apply the direct printing method to the fabrication of chip on glass (COG) modules, we examined that the effect of the sintering temperature on the electrical properties of a COG module with direct printing method. Firstly, we fabricated an Ag conductive circuit on a glass substrate by the screen-printing method. To investigate its the effect on the electrical properties of the circuit, it was sintered at various temperatures, such as 150, 200, 250, and 300 °C for 30 min. Subsequently, we conducted Au electro-plating for the fabrication of a Si dummy chip. Finally, the flip-chip bonding process was conducted using anisotropic conductive film (ACF). The printed Ag circuits were well formed on the quartz substrate without any shorts or remarkable changes compared with the initial design. The electrical properties of the printed Ag circuits improved with increasing sintering temperature. The conductive particles in the ACF were well deformed in between the Au bumps and printed Ag pads after the bonding process. The four-point probe method was employed to measure the connection resistance of the joints constructed with the Au bumps on the Si chip and printed Ag circuit on the quartz substrate. The resistances of the interconnections drastically decreased with increasing sintering temperature, i.e., subsequently converged from 11.8 Ω to 7.36 mΩ.

  1. Modulation of the effective work function of TiN metal gate for PMOS application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Kai; Ma Xueli; Yang Hong; Wang Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    It is important to find a way to modulate the work function of TiN metal gate towards the valence band edge of Si,which can meet the lower threshold voltage requirement of p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistor.In this work,effects of TiN thickness,post-deposition annealing (PDA),oxygen incorporation and N concentration variation on the work function of TiN metal gate in MOS structures are systematically investigated.It can be found that the work function positively shifts at the initial stage as the thickness of the TiN layer increases and stabilizes at such a thickness.PDA at N2 ambience with a trace of O2 can also cause a positive shift in the work function of TiN metal gate.The same tendency can be observed when oxygen is incorporated into TiN.Finally,increasing the N concentration in TiN can also positively shift the work function.All these measures are effective in modulating the TiN metal gate so that it is more suitable for PMOS application.

  2. Effect of Lanthanum on Acid Secretion from Isolated Mouse Stomach in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐项桂; 夏洪涛; 芮光; 胡翠英; 袁福根

    2004-01-01

    To explore the effect and the mechanism of La3+ on gastric acid secretion (GAS) of isolated mouse stomach with perfused lumen, 12 cm H2O column intragastric pressure-provided, whole stomach preparations from mice were incubated in buffer at 37 ℃ in vitro, and perfusate was measured for pH with a pHS-3 type pH meter. The results show that La3+ (0.41~820×10-6 mol*L-1) significantly promotes GAS in a concentration-dependant manner. Proglutamine, a blocker of gastrin receptor, potently inhibits GAS, and it may block the promotive effect of La3+ on GAS, and this effect increases with the increase of proglutamin concentration. Cimetidine, a blocker of histamine H2 receptor, also potently inhibits GAS, and blocks the promotive effect of La3+ on GAS in the same manner with proglutamine. These results suggest that La3+ promotes GAS in isolated stomach possibly by stimulating the releases of gastrin from G cell and Histamine from ECL cell or by activating the gastrin receptors and Histamine H2 receptors on the parietal cell, thereby accelerating the acid secretion of parietal cells in stomach.

  3. Study of the antioxidant effects of Eremostachys laciniata rhizome extracts in isolated rat hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleh Vaez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eremostachys laciniata, having rich flavonoid content, is expected to have a considerable antioxidant effect. In this study We used ACMS (Accelerated cytotoxic or protective mechanism screening technique to evaluate the possible antioxidant effect of E. laciniata rhizome against oxidative cell damages induced by different types of oxidative stress such as iron-8-hydroxyquinolin (IQ complex and copper in freshly isolated liver cells. The extracts were prepared with n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol. Hepatocytes were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats by a two-step collagenase perfusion. Cell viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion method. DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay was used to evaluate the antioxidant activity. ROS formation was measured by using DCFDA (2, 7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate probe, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP was assessed by rhodamine 123 fluorescence and lipid peroxidation was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS assay. The MET extract was demonstrated to possess a significant radical scavenging activity (RC50%=0.212. Unlike MET extract, the n-hexane and dichloromethane extracts showed toxic effects in cell suspensions. The MET extract significantly decreased cell death and ROS formation induced by IQ complex and copper and demonstrated protective effects against copper-induced mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and lipid peroxidation. The protection induced by MET extract can be attributed to antioxidant characteristics of the phenylethanoids content.

  4. Jabuticaba-Induced Endothelium-Independent Vasodilating Effect on Isolated Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Medeiros Lobo de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Despite the important biological effects of jabuticaba, its actions on the cardiovascular system have not been clarified. Objectives: To determine the effects of jabuticaba hydroalcoholic extract (JHE on vascular smooth muscle (VSM of isolated arteries. Methods: Endothelium-denuded aortic rings of rats were mounted in isolated organ bath to record isometric tension. The relaxant effect of JHE and the influence of K+ channels and Ca2+ intra- and extracellular sources on JHE-stimulated response were assessed. Results: Arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine showed concentration-dependent relaxation (0.380 to 1.92 mg/mL. Treatment with K+ channel blockers (tetraethyl-ammonium, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine hindered relaxation due to JHE. In addition, phenylephrine-stimulated contraction was hindered by previous treatment with JHE. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase did not change relaxation due to JHE. In addition, JHE inhibited the contraction caused by Ca2+ influx stimulated by phenylephrine and KCl (75 mM. Conclusion: JHE induces endothelium-independent vasodilation. Activation of K+ channels and inhibition of Ca2+ influx through the membrane are involved in the JHE relaxant effect.

  5. Jabuticaba-Induced Endothelium-Independent Vasodilating Effect on Isolated Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Daniela Medeiros Lobo; Borges, Leonardo Luis; Torres, Ieda Maria Sapateiro; da Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso; Rocha, Matheus Lavorenti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the important biological effects of jabuticaba, its actions on the cardiovascular system have not been clarified. Objectives: To determine the effects of jabuticaba hydroalcoholic extract (JHE) on vascular smooth muscle (VSM) of isolated arteries. Methods: Endothelium-denuded aortic rings of rats were mounted in isolated organ bath to record isometric tension. The relaxant effect of JHE and the influence of K+ channels and Ca2+ intra- and extracellular sources on JHE-stimulated response were assessed. Results: Arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine showed concentration-dependent relaxation (0.380 to 1.92 mg/mL). Treatment with K+ channel blockers (tetraethyl-ammonium, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine) hindered relaxation due to JHE. In addition, phenylephrine-stimulated contraction was hindered by previous treatment with JHE. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase did not change relaxation due to JHE. In addition, JHE inhibited the contraction caused by Ca2+ influx stimulated by phenylephrine and KCl (75 mM). Conclusion: JHE induces endothelium-independent vasodilation. Activation of K+ channels and inhibition of Ca2+ influx through the membrane are involved in the JHE relaxant effect. PMID:27533258

  6. Antifungal Effect of Teucrium polium and Zingiber officinale Extracts on Clinical isolates of Candida Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Shoaie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Background & aim: Candida species are opportunistic pathogen that can cause superficial mucous membrane infections to life–threatening systemic diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effects of Teucrium polium and Zingiber officinale extracts against isolated Candida sp. from urinary catheters. Mthods: In the present study, 55 urine catheters from patients of ICU ward of the 501 Army Hospital of Tehran were collected. The isolates were identified according to the classic and molecular techniques as Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. Using serial micro dilutions method, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC were determined. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. Results: The extracts of Teucrium polium and Zingiber officinale had inhibitory effects against C. albicans while it had no effect against C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. MIC50 of Teucrium polium and Zingiber officinale for C. albicans were 1000 µg/ml and 62.25 µg/ ml respectively, with P-value≥0.002. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the extract of Teucrium polium and Zingiber officinale had antifungal properties. Further investigations must be done to purify effective fractions of these extracts and to test their cytotoxicity before applying them in yeast infection treatment. Key words: Candida Species, Teucrium polium, Zingiber officinale

  7. Protective effect of NAC against malathion-induced oxidative stress in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mostafalou

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Induction of oxidative stress by Organophosphate compounds (OPs has been previously reported. In the present work, the mechanism of protective effects of N-acetylcysteine as a glutathion (GSH prodrug against malathion–induced cell toxicity was investigated. In this work, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were used to determine the effect of NAC on malathion-induced cytotoxicity, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: Rat hepatocytes were isolated using collagenase perfusion and then cell viability, mitchondrial membrane potential (MMP and ROS formation were determined using trypan blue exclusion, Rhodamine 123 fluorescence and fluorogenic probe, 2', 7' -dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA, respectively. Results: Despite the protective effect of NAC on malathion-induced cell toxicity and MMP dysfunction, its efficacy against ROS formation was not adequate to completely protect the cells. Conclusion: Cytotoxic effects of malathion regardless of its cholinergic feature, is started with gradual free radical production but, the main factor that causes cell death, is mitochondrial dysfunction, so that reduction of ROS formation alone is not sufficient for cell survival, and the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity through different mechanisms is the most ameliorative factor specially at high levels of cell damage, as NAC seemed to protect cells with various fashions apart from ROS scavenging in concentrations higher than malathion’s LC50.

  8. THE EFFECT OF SEVERAL ANTIBIOTICS ON LACTOCOCCUS GARVIEAE ISOLATED FROM JORDANIAN DAIRY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizar Issa Alrabadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the antibiotic resistance profile of the L. garvieae isolated strains from Jordanian dairy products. Disk diffusion method was used. In particular, different antibiotics were tested against L. garvieae; the antibiotic disks were Trimethoprim (5 μg, Clindamycin (2 μg, Nitrofurantoin (300 μg, Erythromycin (15 μg, Ampicillin (15 μ, Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole (1.25/23.75 μg Polymyxin B (300U and Tetracycline (30 μg. The results indicated high and statistically significant effects of Trimethoprim, Nitrofurantoin and Trimethoprim/Sulfamthoxazole on L. garvieae. Trimethoprim had the greatest antimicrobial effect on L. garvieae strains. All of the strains were sensitive to this antibiotic. Trimethoprim showed 20 mm inhibition zone in some strains. On the other hand, there were no antibiotic effects of Clindamycin and Polymyxin B on L. garvieae. Slight and statistically insignificant effects were found of other tested antibiotics. The study recommended using Trimethoprim antibiotic against L. garvieae because it inhibited its growths in all isolated cultures.

  9. PHARMACOLOGICAL SCREENING OF ISOLATED COMPOUND FROM MADHUKA LONGIFOLIA SEEDS GIVES SIGNIFICANT ANALGESIC EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirantan S. Chakma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to assess the analgesic effect of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of isolated compound from M.longifolia seeds in rats and mice model. All three animal groups were administered the aq. and alc.ext of M.longifolia at a dose of 4 mg to 64 mg/kg body weight. The standard drug diclofenac 5 mg/kg b.w is used in three screening method. The paw licking time, tail withdrawal time and chemical writhings in mice both aq. and alc. extracts of M.longifolia prevents significant dose dependent anti-nociceptive effect. Diclofenac 5 mg/kg failed to alter significantly the antinociceptive effect of 16 to 32 mg of both extracts or the effect on chemical assay.

  10. Locomotor and peripheral effects of sibutramine modulated by 5-HT2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassetto, Silvana Soriano; Della Santa Rubio, Angela; Lopes, Janaína Jardim; Pereira, Patrícia; Brum, Clarice; Khazzaka, Márcia; Vinagre, Anapaula Sommer

    2006-12-01

    Sibutramine has been described as an anti-obesity drug with the ability to inhibit serotonin (5-HT), noradrenaline, and dopamine re-uptake, but without affinity to histamine and muscarinic receptors. On the other hand, cyproheptadine antagonizes serotonin 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2B), and 5-HT(2C), histamine H1, and muscarinic (M) receptors. There are many reports concerning the influence of sibutramine on central serotoninergic pathways. In this study, we suggest that peripheral pathways may also be involved in the serotoninergic effects of sibutramine. In vivo experiments were undertaken to investigate the serotoninergic effects of sibutramine on body mass, the glycogen concentration in the diaphragm of rats, and locomotor behaviour. Rats were submitted to oral treatment with sibutramine, cyproheptadine, or sibutramine applied in combination with cyproheptadine, for a period of 2 months to investigate the 5-HT2 effects of sibutramine on these parameters. As the results demonstrated, the lower increase in body mass and the increased glycogen levels in the diaphragm muscle of rats treated with sibutramine seem to be modulated by 5-HT2 receptors, since these effects were completely antagonized by cyproheptadine in the group treated with the 2 drugs co-applied. Furthermore, the behavioural results also suggest that mechanisms modulated by 5-HT2 receptors are involved in the increase of locomotion in the rats treated with sibutramine, since the effect did not occur in the rats treated with sibutramine co-applied with the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, cyproheptadine. The results suggest that sibutramine modifies energy-related parameters such as body mass, diaphragm glycogen, and locomotor behaviour in rats via 5-HT2 serotoninergic pathways.

  11. Social isolation increases aggressive behaviour and alters the effects of diazepam in the rat social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwitdecha, N; Marsden, C A

    1996-02-01

    Isolation rearing in the early stages of life has been shown to modify a variety of behaviours in many animals and the responsitivity to psychotropic drugs. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of isolation rearing on anxiety using the social interaction paradigm and to compare the effects of diazepam on social interaction behaviours in isolation and socially reared rats. Male Lister hooded rats were reared from weaning either alone (isolation reared) or in groups of four (socially reared) for 6 weeks and then were tested for social interaction. Both isolation and socially reared rats were exposed to the social interaction test either without drug treatment or following saline or diazepam (1 and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min before testing). The results demonstrate that under high light in an unfamiliar arena, the isolation compared to the socially reared rats showed a significantly (P < 0.01) higher level of social interaction, manifested as increases in aggressive and avoidance behaviours, and that this interaction occur for a greater length of time during the test period (10 min). However, when the light level was decreased or when the arena was familiar, active social interaction of isolation reared rats decreased but increased in the socially reared rats. In both conditions the isolation reared rats displayed more aggressive behaviours, in particular biting and boxing the partners which did not occur with the socially reared rats. Pretreatment of diazepam (1 and 2.5 mg/kg., i.p.) caused a dose-related reduction in aggressive behaviours in rats reared under both conditions but increased passive interactions in the socially reared rats. In contrast diazepam (2.5 mg/kg) reduced active interaction in the isolation reared rats but had no effect on passive interaction. These results indicate that isolation rearing increases aggressive behaviours and alters the effects of diazepam.

  12. Effect of light backscattering on high-speed modulation performance in strongly injection-locked unidirectional semiconductor ring lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Osinski, Marek

    2014-03-01

    Greatly enhanced high-speed modulation performance has been recently predicted in numerical calculations for a novel injection-locking scheme involving a DBR or DFB master laser monolithically integrated with a unidirectional semiconductor microring laser. In this work, we investigate the effect of light backscattering between the two counterpropagating modes on high-speed modulation performance of strongly injection-locked unidirectional semiconductor microring lasers.

  13. Ultrafast optical modulation of magneto-optical terahertz effects occurring in a graphene-loaded resonant metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto, S.; Lange, C.; Maag, T.; Pitanti, A.; Miseikis, V.; Coletti, C.; Degl'Innocenti, R.; Baldacci, L.; Huber, R.; Tredicucci, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of a static magnetic field and of optical pumping on the transmittance of a hybrid graphene-split ring resonator metasurface. A significant modulation of the transmitted spectra is obtained, both by optical pumping, and by a combination of optical pumping and magnetostatic biasing. The transmittance modulation features spectral fingerprints that are characteristic of a non-trivial interplay between the bare graphene response and the split ring resonance.

  14. Effects of anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate on ischemic preconditioning in isolated heart of sedentary rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Akbari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have shown that use of supraphysiologocal doses of anabolic adrogenic steroids (AAS associated with detrimental cardiovascular effects including ventricular hypertrophy, increased susceptibility to ischaemia/reperfusion injury, impairment of exercise-induced cardioprotection and sudden cardiac death. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of 8 weeks treatment of AAS nandrolone decanoate (10 mg/kg/week, on ischemic preconditioning (IPC phenomena in isolated hearts of sedentary rats. Materials and Methods: Three groups of animals were studied in the present study. Control ischemia/reperfusion injury group (IR, 2- Ischemic preconditioned group before main test ischemia and reperfusion (IPC+IR, and 3- Nandrolone treated ischemic preconditioned group before main test ischemia and reperfusion (Nan+IPC+IR. After two months of nandrolone and/or its solvent, the isolated Langendorff perfused rat hearts were subjected to 30 min of ischemia followed by 120 min reperfusion. The IPC was induced by three cycles of 3-min occlusion and 3-min reperfusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD before main test ischemia. Heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP, rate pressure product (RPP, Max dp/dt, Min dp/dt and coronary flow were recorded during experiment. Infarction size was measured after 120 min reperfusion by TTC staining. Results: Eight weeks’ nandrolone treatment decreased body weight and increased cardiac to body weight ratio in treated rats. Nandrolone increased pre-ischemic base line cardiac function parameters in the rat hearts. Cardiac function recovery parameters in different time points during reperfusion were also greater in nandrolone treated rats compared to their respective controls. IPC decreased infarct size in the rats (P<0.05. Nandrolone could not significantly change the infarct size lowering effect of IPC in the rat heart. Conclusion: The present study revealed

  15. Scale dependency in effectiveness, isolation, and social-ecological spillover of protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Judith M; Cumming, Graeme S

    2016-08-01

    Protected areas are considered vital for the conservation of biodiversity. Given their central role in many conservation strategies, it is important to know whether they adequately protect biodiversity within their boundaries; whether they are becoming more isolated from other natural areas over time; and whether they play a role in facilitating or reducing land-cover change in their surroundings. We used matching methods and national and local analyses of land-cover change to evaluate the combined effectiveness (i.e., avoided natural-cover loss), isolation (i.e., changes in adjacent areas), and spillover effects (i.e., impacts on adjacent areas) of 19 national parks in South Africa from 2000 to 2009. All parks had either similar or lower rates of natural-cover loss than matched control samples. On a national level, mean net loss of natural cover and mean net gain of cultivation cover decreased with distance from park boundary, but there was considerable variation in trends around individual parks, providing evidence for both increased isolation and buffering of protected areas. Fourteen parks had significant positive spillover and reduced natural-cover loss in their surroundings, whereas five parks experienced elevated levels of natural-cover loss. Conclusions about social-ecological spillover effects from protected areas depended heavily on the measures of land-cover change used and the scale at which the results were aggregated. Our findings emphasize the need for high-resolution data when assessing spatially explicit phenomena such as land-cover change and challenge the usefulness of large-scale (coarse grain, broad extent) studies for understanding social-ecological dynamics around protected areas.

  16. Isolate-specific effects of patulin, penicillic Acid and EDTA on biofilm formation and growth of dental unit water line biofilm isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaqat, Iram; Bachmann, Robert Thomas; Sabri, Anjum Nasim; Edyvean, Robert G J

    2010-08-01

    Dental unit water line (DUWL) contamination by opportunistic pathogens has its significance in nosocomial infection of patients, health care workers, and life-threatening infections to immunocompromized persons. Recently, the quorum sensing (QS) system of DUWL isolates has been found to affect their biofilm-forming ability, making it an attractive target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, the effect of two quorum-sensing inhibitory compounds (patulin; PAT, penicillic acid; PA) and EDTA on planktonic growth, AI-2 signalling and in vitro biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Achromobacter sp. was monitored. Vibrio harveyi BB170 bioassay and crystal violet staining methods were used to detect the AI-2 monitoring and biofilm formation in DUWL isolates, respectively. The V. harveyi BB170 bioassay failed to induce bioluminescence in A. xylosoxidans and Achromobacter sp., while P. aeruginosa showed AI-2 like activity suggesting the need of some pretreatments prior to bioassay. All strains were found to form biofilms within 72 h of incubation. The QSIs/EDTA combination have isolate-specific effects on biofilm formation and in some cases it stimulated biofilm formation as often as it was inhibited. However, detailed information about the anti-biofilm effect of these compounds is still lacking.

  17. Modulating effect of ascorbic Acid on transport-induced immunosuppression in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minka, Ndazo Salka; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun

    2011-01-01

    The effect of 12 h road transportation on some basic blood cells and the modulating role of ascorbic acid were investigated in 40 adult Red Sokoto goats during the hot dry season. The animals were divided into two groups, GI (experimental; n = 20) and GII (control; n = 20). Group 1 was administered with ascorbic acid (AA) per os at a dosage rate of 100 mg/kg body weight, while GII was given 10 mL of sterile water per goat. Forty minutes after the administration and loading, the goats were transported for 12 h. The result obtained in GII goats showed that loading, transportation, high ambient temperature (AT), and relative humidity (RH) encountered during transportation induced lymphopenia, neutrophilia, and eosinopenia, which can cause immunosuppression. In GI goats, the administration of AA prior to loading and transportation ameliorated the adverse effects of loading and transportation stress on neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and eosinopenia of the goats.

  18. Synergistic effects between catalase inhibitors and modulators of nitric oxide metabolism on tumor cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2014-10-01

    Inhibitors of catalase (such as ascorbate, methyldopa, salicylic acid and neutralizing antibodies) synergize with modulators of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism (such as arginine, arginase inhibitor, NO synthase-inducing interferons and NO dioxygenase inhibitors) in the singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase. This is followed by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent apoptosis induction. TGF-beta, NADPH oxidase-1, NO synthase, dual oxidase-1 and caspase-9 are characterized as essential catalysts in this process. The FAS receptor and caspase-8 are required for amplification of ROS signaling triggered by individual compounds, but are dispensable when the synergistic effect is established. Our findings explain the antitumor effects of catalase inhibitors and of compounds that target NO metabolism, as well as their synergy. These data may have an impact on epidemiological studies related to secondary plant compounds and open new perspectives for the establishment of novel antitumor drugs and for the improvement of established chemotherapeutics.

  19. The Effect of Amplitude Modulation on the Axial Resolution of Doppler-Based Ultrasonic Topography Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    RezaNejad Gatabi, Javad; Das, Sayantan; Forouzbakhsh, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    of the Doppler measurement techniques. A modified Doppler measurement system that significantly improves the measurement accuracy is also presented. The fabricated sensor has 72-μm measurement accuracy using 40-kHz transducers. This technique can also be employed in cost-effective displacement measurement...... variation of the received signal. Amplitude variation significantly affects the measurement accuracy when the surface axial displacement range is comparable with the ultrasonic wavelength. This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of the effect of amplitude modulation on the performance......Ultrasonic Doppler-based systems for surface topography measurements are attractive alternatives to the transit-time-based methods. Sensors used in Doppler systems are less dependent on the speed of the sound in air, although contemporary Doppler measurement systems are sensitive to the amplitude...

  20. Presenilin 2 Modulates Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondria Coupling by Tuning the Antagonistic Effect of Mitofusin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Filadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Communication between organelles plays key roles in cell biology. In particular, physical and functional coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria is crucial for regulation of various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here, we demonstrate that Presenilin 2 (PS2, mutations in which underlie familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD, promotes ER-mitochondria coupling only in the presence of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2. PS2 is not necessary for the antagonistic effect of Mfn2 on organelle coupling, although its abundance can tune it. The two proteins physically interact, whereas their homologues Mfn1 and PS1 are dispensable for this interplay. Moreover, PS2 mutants associated with FAD are more effective than the wild-type form in modulating ER-mitochondria tethering because their binding to Mfn2 in mitochondria-associated membranes is favored. We propose a revised model for ER-mitochondria interaction to account for these findings and discuss possible implications for FAD pathogenesis.

  1. Dynamic behavior and effectiveness of three-dimensional component base isolation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsumi, Hideaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Ebisawa, Katsumi; Shibata, Katsuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Fujimoto, Shigeru [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    Three-dimensional component base isolation system (3-DIS : horizontal natural frequency=0.4 Hz, vertical natural frequency=2 Hz) which consists of multi-layer-rubber-bearings and coil springs was fabricated. A verification test on the dynamic behavior and effectiveness of 3-DIS with and without oil dampers was carried out using shaking table test. From the test results, it is found that the amplification of rocking motion and vertical acceleration response of 3-DIS against various large seismic motions can be suppress by using oil dampers with total damping factor of 35%. (author)

  2. Renal vascular effects of leukotriene C4 in the isolated perfused kidney of the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Frölich, J C; Yoshizawa, M.

    1987-01-01

    1 The vascular effects of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were investigated in the isolated perfused kidney of the rat. 2 LTC4 (6.4 X 10(-10) to 3.2 X 10(-8) mol kg-1 min-1 given over 5 min) resulted in a prompt, dose-dependent increase in renal vascular resistance in a recirculating system, which lasted for more than 60 min. 3 LTC4 was 10 to 20 fold and 1000 to 2000 fold, respectively, less active on a molar basis than noradrenaline and angiotensin II in eliciting renal vasoconstriction. 4 The vascula...

  3. [Effective method of isolating M4-lactate dehydrogenase from rat liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Z V; Maglysh, S S; Konovalenko, O V

    1984-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase M4-isoform in the homogeneous state was isolated from the rat liver by successive application of sulphate-ammonium fractionation, phosphocellulose ion-exchange chromatography with high-affinity elution of 1 mM NADH and subsequent hydroxyl apatite fractionation. The method permits obtaining the preparation amounts of the enzymic protein with yield 37.5%, specific activity 386.8 units per 1 mg of protein. It is established that 1 mM NAD+, 10 mM pyruvate and 100 mM lactate are also effective as agents of the selective enzyme elution.

  4. Comparative effect of glucagon and isoproterenol on hepatic glycogenolysis and glycolysis in isolated perfused liver

    OpenAIRE

    Vardanega-Peicher Márcia; Galletto Ricardo; Pagliarini e Silva Sarah; Bazotte Roberto Barbosa

    2003-01-01

    The effect of glucagon and isoproterenol (beta-adrenergic agonist) on hepatic glycogenolysis and glycolysis in isolated perfused liver was compared. The levels of isoproterenol and glucagon which promoted the maximal activation of glycogenolysis were 20 muM and 1nM respectively. However, glucagon (1 nM) not only increased glycogenolysis but also inhibited glycolysis. Because adenosine-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is a common second messenger to glucagon and isoproterenol, the level of cA...

  5. Interactive effects of wildfire, forest management, and isolation on amphibian and parasite abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, Blake R.; Corn, P. Stephen; Winsor H. Lowe,; R. Kenneth Honeycutt,; Sean A. Parks,

    2013-01-01

    Projected increases in wildfire and other climate-driven disturbances will affect populations and communities worldwide, including host–parasite relationships. Research in temperate forests has shown that wildfire can negatively affect amphibians, but this research has occurred primarily outside of managed landscapes where interactions with human disturbances could result in additive or synergistic effects. Furthermore, parasites represent a large component of biodiversity and can affect host fitness and population dynamics, yet they are rarely included in studies of how vertebrate hosts respond to disturbance. To determine how wildfire affects amphibians and their parasites, and whether effects differ between protected and managed landscapes, we compared abundance of two amphibians and two nematodes relative to wildfire extent and severity around wetlands in neighboring protected and managed forests (Montana, USA). Population sizes of adult, male long-toed salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum) decreased with increased burn severity, with stronger negative effects on isolated populations and in managed forests. In contrast, breeding population sizes of Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris) increased with burn extent in both protected and managed protected forests. Path analysis showed that the effects of wildfire on the two species of nematodes were consistent with differences in their life history and transmission strategies and the responses of their hosts. Burn severity indirectly reduced abundance of soil-transmitted Cosmocercoides variabilis through reductions in salamander abundance. Burn severity also directly reduced C. variabilis abundance, possibly though changes in soil conditions. For the aquatically transmitted nematode Gyrinicola batrachiensis, the positive effect of burn extent on density of Columbia spotted frog larvae indirectly increased parasite abundance. Our results show that effects of wildfire on amphibians depend upon burn extent

  6. In vitro Effect of Monosaccharides on the Virulence of Acanthamoeba Isolated from Patients with Amoebic Keratitis

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    Y. Maroofi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Acanthamoeba is free-living amoeba that is found in soil, water, air as well as in human pharynx. Acanthamoeba is causative agent of granulomatose amoebic encephalitis (GAE in immunosuppressed and AIDS individuals and amoebic keratitis in people who use the lens. Pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba have protein receptors named mannose binding protein (MBP. Acanthamoeba via MBP adhere to the glycoproteins included mannose. Acanthamoeba adhesion to the target cells induces a protease secretion is called mannose inducing protein-133 (MIP-133. Exogense mannose can inhibit the adherence of Acanthamoeba; also, it can increase the cytopathatic effect (CPE through increase the secretion of MIP-133. In the present work, the effect of monosaccharides on the virulance of Acanthamoeba isolated from patient with amoebic keratitis, in HeLa cell culture was investigated.Materials & Methods: The isolates were cultured in HeLa cell culture, then 100, 50, 10, 1 and 0.1 mM of galactose, glucose and mannose were added to plates. Plates were observed with invert microscope in 8, 16, 32, 48, and 72 hours after culture.Results: Data implicated that mannose (100 mM showed the highest effect on increasing cytopathy of Acanthamoeba in HeLa cell culture. Meanwhile, galactose (100 mM increased the virulence of Acanthamoeba in the cell culture after 32 hours.Conclusion: Adding mannose and galactose to HeLa cell culture contain Acanthamoeba can increase the virulence of the parasite significantly.

  7. An X chromosome effect responsible for asymmetric reproductive isolation between male Drosophila virilis and heterospecific females.

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    Nickel, Desirée; Civetta, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive isolation between closely related species is expressed through uncoordinated courtship, failed fertilization, and (or) postzygotic barriers. Behavioural components of mating often form an initial barrier to hybridization between species. In many animals, females are responsible for mating discrimination in both intra- and interspecific crosses; males of Drosophila virilis group represent an exception to this trend. Using overall productivity tests, we show that a lower proportion of D. virilis males sire progeny when paired with a heterospecific female (Drosophila novamexicana or Drosophila americana texana) for 2 weeks. This suggests male mate discrimination or some other kind of asymmetrical incompatibility in courtship and mating or early zygote mortality. We used males from D. virilis-D. novamexicana and from D. virilis-D. a. texana backcross populations to map chromosome effects responsible for male reproductive isolation. Results from the analysis of both backcross male populations indicate a major X chromosome effect. Further, we conduct a male behavioural analysis to show that D. virilis males significantly fail to continue courtship after the first step of courtship, when they tap heterospecific females. The combined results of a major X chromosome effect and the observation that D. virilis males walk away from females after tapping suggest that future studies should concentrate on the identification of X-linked genes affecting the ability of males to recognize conspecific females.

  8. [Toxigenic effect of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from children with acute diarrhoea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Nina; Manzi, Lorna

    2008-03-01

    Diarrheal diseases with diarrhea are the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in children; however the causative agent cannot be identified always, which suggests the presence of unknown enteropathogens inducing diarrhea. The isolation of Acinetobacter sp. from feces of children with acute diarrhea, unrelated to known enteropathogens motivated this investigation to detect a possible enterotoxigenic effect on HT-29 cells. The study population comprised 150 children with an age range from 0 to 5 years old; 120 were assisted in the "Hospital Materno Infantil del Este'' with gastrointestinal syndrome and 30 healthy controls who went to the center for routine analysis. In 25% of symptomatic patients were diagnosed parasites and bacteria, identified routinely. From four symptomatic patients were isolated three Acinetobacter baumannii strains and two A. calcoaceticus strains. The strains were cultured in brain-heart infusion for 24 and 48 hrs, at 35 degrees C, and the supernatants were obtained by centrifugation and filtration and their activity tested on HT-29 cell monolayers. The supernatants of the three strains of A. baumannii induced alterations of the cell monolayer, showed by detachments of cell monolayers, cell segregation, cell rounding and swelling. These effects were more intense with the 48 h culture exoproducts of the 016 strain, which were higher than the positive control. This toxigenic effect of A. baumannii, could represent a pathogenic mechanism whose definition requires more studies to determine the possible role in the pathogenicity of this bacillus.

  9. Effect of aqueous extract of Ipomoea carnea leaf on isolated frog and mouse heart.

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    Bachhav, K V; Burande, M D; Rangari, V D; Mehta, J K

    1999-11-01

    Ipomoea carnea fam. Convolvulaceae is a poisonous plant and its toxicity is supposed to be due to the cardiac and respiratory failure. The present paper describes the cardiac effect of aqueous extract of the fresh leaves of I. carnea using mouse and frog heart. The aqueous extract produced an initial blockade of isolated frog heart for 5-10 sec followed by dose dependent increase in both amplitude and rate that lasts up to 2 min. Atropine (1 microgram/ml) blocked the initial depressant phase and potentiated the stimulant effect of the aqueous extract. The dose dependent increase in cardiac contractility of aqueous extract was not altered by propranolol or calcium channel blockers like nifedipine or diltiazem. The decrease in sodium chloride concentration or increase in potassium chloride concentration or calcium chloride concentration in physiological salt solution inhibited the responses to aqueous extract while an increase in sodium chloride concentration or decrease in potassium chloride or calcium chloride concentration in physiological salt solution potentiated the responses to the aqueous extract of I. carnea. It may be suggested from the data that aqueous extract of I. carnea produces positive inotropic effect on isolate frog heart possibly by sodium extrusion or release of the intracellular calcium.

  10. The Effect of the Isolated Aorticopulmonary Lymph Node on Survival in Lung Cancer

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    Serdar Ozkan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to investigate investigate the effects of aorticopulmonary LN metastasis and other N1 and N2 LN involvements on survival rates especially for left upper lobe tumors. Material and Method: 111 cases who underwent surgery due to NSCLC and were diagnosed with lymph node metastasis secondary to the postoperative pathological examination, were examined retrospectively. The cases on whom complete resection and mediastinal lymph node dissection were applied and who were diagnosed with postoperative mediastinal LN metastasis were examined with regard to the effects of some prognostic factors on survival. Results: 13 of the cases who were followed up for 21.41 months on average lost their lives. In the general survival analysis, it was found that isolated aorticopulmonary LN metastasis did not affect survival differently from other N2 diseases. Discussion: This paper claims that in cases with NSCLC located on the left upper lobe, isolated aorticopulmonary LN involvement does not have a negative effect on survival different from other N2 stations but further studies need for support this idea. Therefore, these cases should not be considered as inoperable and complete resection should be performed on the appropriate patients.

  11. Riluzole exerts central and peripheral modulating effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Steve; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi; Cheah, Benjamin C; Murray, Jenna; Menon, Parvathi; Krishnan, Arun V; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2013-05-01

    Riluzole, a benzothiazole derivative, has been shown to be effective in prolonging survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mechanisms by which riluzole exerts neuroprotective effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remains to be fully elucidated, although inhibition of glutamatergic transmission and modulation of Na+ channel function have been proposed. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms by which riluzole exerts neuroprotective effects, in particular to dissect the relative contributions of inhibition of glutamatergic transmission and Na+ channel modulation, the present study utilized a combination of cortical and peripheral axonal excitability approaches to monitor changes in excitability and function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cortical assessment was undertaken by utilising the threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique and combined with peripheral axonal excitability studies in 25 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Studies were performed at baseline and repeated when patients were receiving riluzole 100 mg/day. At the time of second testing all patients were tolerating the medication well. Motor evoked potential and compound muscle action potential responses were recorded over the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. At baseline, features of cortical hyperexcitability were evident in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, indicated by marked reduction in short interval intracortical inhibition (P amyotrophic lateral sclerosis had significant increases in depolarizing threshold electrotonus [amyotrophic lateral sclerosisbaseline TEd (90-100 ms) 49.1 ± 1.8%; controlsTEd (90-100 ms) 45.2 ± 0.6%, P amyotrophic lateral sclerosisbaseline 30.1 ± 2.3%; control subjects 23.4 ± 1.0%, P amyotrophic lateral sclerosisbaseline 30.1 ± 2.3%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosisON riluzole 27.3 ± 2.3%, P amyotrophic lateral sclerosisbaseline 98.7 ± 10.7%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosisON riluzole 67.8 ± 9

  12. Effects of dopaminergic modulation on automatic semantic priming: a double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Christina; Veith, Kristina; Bozikas, Vasilis P; Lincoln, Tania M; Moritz, Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Enhanced automatic spreading of activation in the semantic network has been suggested to underlie formal thought disorder in patients with schizophrenia, but it is not clear how this relates to the dopaminergic dysfunction implicated in the disorder. Previous studies on dopaminergic modulation of priming in healthy volunteers have focused on controlled rather than automatic processes. The present study aimed to examine the effects of both a dopaminergic agonist and a dopaminergic antagonist on semantic priming while minimizing the contribution of controlled processes. We investigated the effects of levodopa (L-Dopa; 100 mg), haloperidol (2 mg) and placebo on priming in healthy participants within a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. We used a pronunciation priming task with word triplets; the middle word was an ambiguous word, whereas the first word of the triplet served to provide either a congruent, incongruent or unbiased context for the target word. Two stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA) were used: 150 ms and 750 ms. The study involved 34 participants. At an SOA of 150 ms, L-Dopa accelerated responses to incongruent targets and subordinate targets of ambiguous words, whereas haloperidol was associated with faster responses in congruent contexts and dominant targets. At an SOA of 750 ms, haloperidol accelerated responses to subordinate targets. Modulations in the relative magnitude of priming according to substance and condition rather than absolute priming were assessed. Effects of L-Dopa on automatic priming processes appear to be different than those on controlled processes. Our results are consistent with those of studies on semantic priming and the effects on antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia.

  13. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  14. In Vitro Killing Effect of Moxifloxacin on Clinical Isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Resistant to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.; Karnesis, Lazaros; Galani, Irene; Giamarellou, Helen

    2002-01-01

    The time-kill effect of moxifloxacin on 20 genetically distinct isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was studied. The majority (80%) were killed by a concentration equivalent to four times the MIC; the MIC induced a transient decrease in bacterial counts at 4 h, followed by regrowth. No effect was detected in four isolates. These results merit further clinical consideration. PMID:12435710

  15. Effect of enzyme hydrolysis on solubility and antioxidative properties of potato protein isolates derived from heat coagulation

    OpenAIRE

    MIKOVÁ, Klára

    2014-01-01

    The bachelor thesis is focused on effect of enzyme hydrolysis on solubility and antioxidative properties of potato protein. It was used industrial potato fruit juice and potato fruit juice from tubers two varieties Sibu and Ornella. Isolates derived from heat coagulation are generally poorly soluble so their use is limited (only feeding purporses). This work describes positive effect of enzyme hydrolysis on solubility and antioxidative properties of potato protein isolates. For example, antio...

  16. Effects of a Science Education Module on Attitudes towards Modern Biotechnology of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, Tanja; Severiens, Sabine E.; Knippels, Marie-Christine P. J.; van Mil, Marc H. W.; Ten Dam, Geert T. M.

    2010-01-01

    This article evaluated the impact of a four-lesson science module on the attitudes of secondary school students. This science module (on cancer and modern biotechnology) utilises several design principles, related to a social constructivist perspective on learning. The expectation was that the module would help students become more articulate in…

  17. Analysis of Kirk effect of an innovated high side Side-Isolated N-LDMOS device

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    Lai Ciou Jhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An ESOA of LDMOS device is very critical for power device performance. Kirk effect is the one of the major problem which leads to poor ESOA performance. The cause of the problem mainly due to the high beta value of parasitic NPN transistor in the p-body. In this study, we proposed a new 3D high side Side–Isolated N-Channel LDMOS which we have obtained not only benchmark Ron and breakdown performance, but also better ESOA without Kirk effect. We have compared the analysis of Kirk effect between the new device and the conventional N–LDMOS structure with LATID technique for the formation of the p–body of both device structures.

  18. Consideration of Gyroscopic Effect in Fault Detection and Isolation for Unbalance Excited Rotor Systems

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    Zhentao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault detection and isolation (FDI in rotor systems often faces the problem that the system dynamics is dependent on the rotor rotary frequency because of the gyroscopic effect. In unbalance excited rotor systems, the continuously distributed unbalances are hard to be determined or estimated accurately. The unbalance forces as disturbances make fault detection more complicated. The aim of this paper is to develop linear time invariant (LTI FDI methods (i.e., with constant parameters for rotor systems under consideration of gyroscopic effect and disturbances. Two approaches to describe the gyroscopic effect, that is, as unknown inputs and as model uncertainties, are investigated. Based on these two approaches, FDI methods are developed and the results are compared regarding the resulting FDI performances. Results are obtained by the application in a rotor test rig. Restrictions for the application of these methods are discussed.

  19. High-Concentration Piperine: Capsaicin-Sensitive and -Insensitive Effects on Isolated Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencsik, Timea; Sandor, Zsolt; Bartho, Lorand

    2015-01-01

    Piperine (P), a sensory stimulant in black pepper, is an agonist on TRPV1 receptors. Earlier work has showed capsaicin-sensitive and -insensitive mechanisms of the contractile action of P on the intestine. The current isolated organ study in the guinea-pig ileum, urinary bladder and trachea (a) confirms the presence of such components of effect (ileum and bladder); (b) indicates TRPV1 involvement in the effect of 5 or 30 µmol/l of P on the basis of an inhibitory action of the antagonist BCTC (ileum); (c) indicates that HC 030031-sensitive TRPA1 receptors and nifedipine-sensitive Ca(2+) channels contribute to the capsaicin-resistant contraction to 30 µmol/l P (ileum) and (d) shows that the contractile effect of P up to 100 µmol/l (guinea-pig trachea) or 30 µmol/l (guinea-pig urinary bladder) is capsaicin-sensitive and mediated by TRPV1 receptors/channels.

  20. Effects of the solar wind termination shock and heliosheath on theheliospheric modulation of galactic and anomalous Helium

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    U. W. Langner

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the role of the solar wind termination shock and heliosheath in cosmic ray modulation studies has increased significantly as the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft approach the estimated position of the solar wind termination shock. The effect of the solar wind termination shock on charge-sign dependent modulation, as is experienced by galactic cosmic ray Helium (He++ and anomalous Helium (He+, is the main topic of this work, and is complementary to the previous work on protons, anti-protons, electrons, and positrons. The modulation of galactic and anomalous Helium is studied with a numerical model including a more fundamental and comprehensive set of diffusion coefficients, a solar wind termination shock with diffusive shock acceleration, a heliosheath and particle drifts. The model allows a comparison of modulation with and without a solar wind termination shock and is applicable to a number of cosmic ray species during both magnetic polarity cycles of the Sun. The modulation of Helium, including an anomalous component, is also done to establish charge-sign dependence at low energies. We found that the heliosheath is important for cosmic ray modulation and that its effect on modulation is very similar for protons and Helium. The local Helium interstellar spectrum may not be known at energies <~1GeV until a spacecraft actually approaches the heliopause because of the strong modulation that occurs in the heliosheath, the effect of the solar wind termination shock and the presence of anomalous Helium.