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Sample records for isolated cardiac mitochondria

  1. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

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    Solinas, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Fujioka, Hisashi [Electron Microscopy Facility, Department of Pharmacology, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tandler, Bernard [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Hoppel, Charles L., E-mail: charles.hoppel@case.edu [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  2. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Prevents Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Tafazzin Gene Knockdown in Cardiac Myocytes

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    Quan He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tafazzin, a mitochondrial acyltransferase, plays an important role in cardiolipin side chain remodeling. Previous studies have shown that dysfunction of tafazzin reduces cardiolipin content, impairs mitochondrial function, and causes dilated cardiomyopathy in Barth syndrome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the development of cardiomyopathy and are also the obligated byproducts of mitochondria. We hypothesized that tafazzin knockdown increases ROS production from mitochondria, and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents tafazzin knockdown induced mitochondrial and cardiac dysfunction. We employed cardiac myocytes transduced with an adenovirus containing tafazzin shRNA as a model to investigate the effects of the mitochondrial antioxidant, mito-Tempo. Knocking down tafazzin decreased steady state levels of cardiolipin and increased mitochondrial ROS. Treatment of cardiac myocytes with mito-Tempo normalized tafazzin knockdown enhanced mitochondrial ROS production and cellular ATP decline. Mito-Tempo also significantly abrogated tafazzin knockdown induced cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, and cell death. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents cardiac dysfunction induced by tafazzin gene knockdown in cardiac myocytes and suggest mito-Tempo as a potential therapeutic for Barth syndrome and other dilated cardiomyopathies resulting from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

  3. Isolation of Mitochondria from Potato Tubers

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    Havelund, Jesper F.; Salvato, Fernanda; Chen, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    One way to study the function of plant mitochondria is to extract them from plant tissues in an uncontaminated, intact and functional form. The reductionist assumption is that the components present in such a preparation and the in vitro measurable functions or activities reliably reflect...... the in vivo properties of the organelle inside the plant cell. Here, we describe a method to isolate mitochondria from a relatively homogeneous plant tissue, the dormant potato tuber. The homogenization is done using a juice extractor, which is a relatively gentle homogenization procedure where...... the mitochondria are only exposed to strong shearing forces once. After removal of starch and large tissue pieces by filtration, differential centrifugation is used to remove residual starch as well as larger organelles. The crude mitochondria are then first purified by using a step Percoll gradient...

  4. Changes in calcium uptake rate by rat cardiac mitochondria during postnatal development.

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    Bassani, R A; Fagian, M M; Bassani, J W; Vercesi, A E

    1998-10-01

    Ca2+ uptake, transmembrane electrical potential (Deltapsim) and oxygen consumption were measured in isolated ventricular mitochondria of rats from 3 days to 5 months of age. Estimated values of ruthenium red-sensitive, succinate-supported maximal rate of Ca2+ uptake (Vmax, expressed as nmol Ca2+/min/mg protein) were higher in neonates and gradually fell during postnatal development (from 435+/-24 at 3-6 days, to 156+/-10 in adults,Palpha-ketoglutarate as substrates) and state 3ADP (alpha-ketoglutarate-supported) respiration rates, as well as Deltapsim values (approximately-150 mV). Respiration-independent Deltapsim and Ca2+ uptake, supported by valinomycin-induced K+ efflux were also investigated at these ages. A transient Deltapsim (approximately -30 mV) was evoked by valinomycin in both neonatal and adult mitochondria. Respiration-independent Ca2+ uptake was also transient, but its initial rate was significantly higher in neonates than in adults (49. 4+/-10.0v 28.0+/-5.7 mmol Ca2+/min/mg protein,P<0.01). These results indicate that Ca2+ uptake capacity of rat cardiac mitochondria is remarkably high just after birth and declines over the first weeks of postnatal life, without change in apparent affinity of the transporter. Increased mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate in neonates appears to be related to the uniporter itself, rather than to modification of the driving force of the transport. Copyright 1998 Academic Press

  5. Huperzine A protects isolated rat brain mitochondria against beta-amyloid peptide.

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    Gao, Xin; Zheng, Chun Yan; Yang, Ling; Tang, Xi Can; Zhang, Hai Yan

    2009-06-01

    Our previous work in cells and animals showed that mitochondria are involved in the neuroprotective effect of huperzine A (HupA). In this study, the effects of HupA on isolated rat brain mitochondria were investigated. In addition to inhibiting the Abeta(25-35) (40 microM)-induced decrease in mitochondrial respiration, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, enzyme activity, and transmembrane potential, HupA (0.01 or 0.1 microM) effectively prevented Abeta-induced mitochondrial swelling, reactive oxygen species increase, and cytochrome c release. More interestingly, administration of HupA to isolated mitochondria promoted the rate of ATP production and blocked mitochondrial swelling caused by normal osmosis. These results indicate that HupA protects mitochondria against Abeta at least in part by preserving membrane integrity and improving energy metabolism. These direct effects on mitochondria further extend the noncholinergic functions of HupA.

  6. Atorvastatin affects negatively respiratory function of isolated endothelial mitochondria.

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    Broniarek, Izabela; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to elucidate the direct effects of two popular blood cholesterol-lowering drugs used to treat cardiovascular diseases, atorvastatin and pravastatin, on respiratory function, membrane potential, and reactive oxygen species formation in mitochondria isolated from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926 cell line). Hydrophilic pravastatin did not significantly affect endothelial mitochondria function. In contrast, hydrophobic calcium-containing atorvastatin induced a loss of outer mitochondrial membrane integrity, an increase in hydrogen peroxide formation, and reductions in maximal (phosphorylating or uncoupled) respiratory rate, membrane potential and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. The atorvastatin-induced changes indicate an impairment of mitochondrial function at the level of ATP synthesis and at the level of the respiratory chain, likely at complex I and complex III. The atorvastatin action on endothelial mitochondria was highly dependent on calcium ions and led to a disturbance in mitochondrial calcium homeostasis. Uptake of calcium ions included in atorvastatin molecule induced mitochondrial uncoupling that enhanced the inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain by atorvastatin. Our results indicate that hydrophobic calcium-containing atorvastatin, widely used as anti-atherosclerotic agent, has a direct negative action on isolated endothelial mitochondria. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Involvement of oxygen free radicals in the respiratory uncoupling induced by free calcium and ADP-magnesium in isolated cardiac mitochondria: comparing reoxygenation in cultured cardiomyocytes.

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    Meynier, Alexandra; Razik, Hafida; Cordelet, Catherine; Grégoire, Stéphane; Demaison, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we have observed that the simultaneous application of free calcium (fCa) and ADP-magnesium (Mg) reduced the ADP:O ratio in isolated cardiac mitochondria. The uncoupling was prevented by cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the permeability transition pore. The purpose of this study was to know if the generation of oxygen free radicals (OFR) is involved in this phenomenon and if it occurs during reoxygenation (Reox) of cultured cardiomyocytes. Cardiac mitochondria were harvested from male Wistar rats. Respiration was assessed in two media with different fCa concentrations (0 or 0.6 microM) with palmitoylcarnitine and ADP-Mg as respiration substrates. The production of Krebs cycle intermediates (KCI) was determined. Without fCa in the medium, the mitochondria displayed a large production of citrate + isocitrate + alpha-ketoglutarate. fCa drastically reduced these KCI and promoted the accumulation of succinate. To know if OFR are involved in the respiratory uncoupling, the effect of 4OH-TEMPO (250 microM), a hydrosoluble scavenger of OFR, was tested. 4OH-TEMPO completely abolished the fCa- and ADP-Mg-induced uncoupling. Conversely, vitamin E contributed to further decreasing the ADP:O ratio. Since no hydrosoluble electron acceptor was added in our experiment, the oxygen free radical-induced oxidized vitamin E was confined near the mitochondrial membranes, which should reduce the ADP:O ratio by opening the permeability transition pore. The generation of OFR could result from the matrix accumulation of succinate. Taken together, these results indicate that mitochondrial Ca uptake induces a slight increase in membrane permeability. Thereafter, Mg enters the matrix and, in combination with Ca, stimulates the isocitrate and/or alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenases. Matrix succinate favors oxygen free radical generation that further increases membrane permeability and allows respiratory uncoupling through proton leakage. To determine whether the phenomenon takes place

  8. Catalase-dependent H2O2 consumption by cardiac mitochondria and redox-mediated loss in insulin signaling.

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    Rindler, Paul M; Cacciola, Angela; Kinter, Michael; Szweda, Luke I

    2016-11-01

    We have recently demonstrated that catalase content in mouse cardiac mitochondria is selectively elevated in response to high dietary fat, a nutritional state associated with oxidative stress and loss in insulin signaling. Catalase and various isoforms of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin each catalyze the consumption of H 2 O 2 Catalase, located primarily within peroxisomes and to a lesser extent mitochondria, has a low binding affinity for H 2 O 2 relative to glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin. As such, the contribution of catalase to mitochondrial H 2 O 2 consumption is not well understood. In the current study, using highly purified cardiac mitochondria challenged with micromolar concentrations of H 2 O 2 , we found that catalase contributes significantly to mitochondrial H 2 O 2 consumption. In addition, catalase is solely responsible for removal of H 2 O 2 in nonrespiring or structurally disrupted mitochondria. Finally, in mice fed a high-fat diet, mitochondrial-derived H 2 O 2 is responsible for diminished insulin signaling in the heart as evidenced by reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. While elevated mitochondrial catalase content (∼50%) enhanced the capacity of mitochondria to consume H 2 O 2 in response to high dietary fat, the selective increase in catalase did not prevent H 2 O 2 -induced loss in cardiac insulin signaling. Taken together, our results indicate that mitochondrial catalase likely functions to preclude the formation of high levels of H 2 O 2 without perturbing redox-dependent signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. ANGULAR LIGHT-SCATTERING STUDIES ON ISOLATED MITOCHONDRIA

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    Gotterer, Gerald S.; Thompson, Thomas E.; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1961-01-01

    Angular light-scattering studies have been carried out on suspensions of isolated rat liver mitochondria. The angular scatter pattern has a large forward component, typical of large particles. Changes in dissymmetry and in the intensity of light scattered at 90° have been correlated with changes in optical density during the course of mitochondrial swelling and contraction. Such changes can be measured at mitochondrial concentrations much below those required for optical density measurements. Changes in mitochondrial geometry caused by factors "leaking" from mitochondria, not detectable by optical density measurements, have been demonstrated by measuring changes in dissymmetry. Angular light-scattering measurements therefore offer the advantages of increased sensitivity and of added indices of changes in mitochondrial conformation. PMID:19866589

  10. Edaravone Decreases Paraquat Toxicity in A549 Cells and Lung Isolated Mitochondria

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    Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Shaki, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Rezagholizadeh, Neda; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone, an antioxidant and radical scavenger, showed protective effects against oxidative stress-like condition. Paraquat (PQ) is toxic herbicide considerable evidence suggests that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to PQ toxicity. In this study, protective effect of edaravone against PQ induced toxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in A549 cells and lung isolated mitochondria were evaluated. A549 cells and lung isolated mitochondria were divided int...

  11. High Throughput Microplate Respiratory Measurements Using Minimal Quantities Of Isolated Mitochondria

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    Rogers, George W.; Brand, Martin D.; Petrosyan, Susanna; Ashok, Deepthi; Elorza, Alvaro A.; Ferrick, David A.; Murphy, Anne N.

    2011-01-01

    Recently developed technologies have enabled multi-well measurement of O2 consumption, facilitating the rate of mitochondrial research, particularly regarding the mechanism of action of drugs and proteins that modulate metabolism. Among these technologies, the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer was designed for use with intact cells attached in a monolayer to a multi-well tissue culture plate. In order to have a high throughput assay system in which both energy demand and substrate availability can be tightly controlled, we have developed a protocol to expand the application of the XF24 Analyzer to include isolated mitochondria. Acquisition of optimal rates requires assay conditions that are unexpectedly distinct from those of conventional polarography. The optimized conditions, derived from experiments with isolated mouse liver mitochondria, allow multi-well assessment of rates of respiration and proton production by mitochondria attached to the bottom of the XF assay plate, and require extremely small quantities of material (1–10 µg of mitochondrial protein per well). Sequential measurement of basal, State 3, State 4, and uncoupler-stimulated respiration can be made in each well through additions of reagents from the injection ports. We describe optimization and validation of this technique using isolated mouse liver and rat heart mitochondria, and apply the approach to discover that inclusion of phosphatase inhibitors in the preparation of the heart mitochondria results in a specific decrease in rates of Complex I-dependent respiration. We believe this new technique will be particularly useful for drug screening and for generating previously unobtainable respiratory data on small mitochondrial samples. PMID:21799747

  12. High throughput microplate respiratory measurements using minimal quantities of isolated mitochondria.

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    George W Rogers

    Full Text Available Recently developed technologies have enabled multi-well measurement of O(2 consumption, facilitating the rate of mitochondrial research, particularly regarding the mechanism of action of drugs and proteins that modulate metabolism. Among these technologies, the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer was designed for use with intact cells attached in a monolayer to a multi-well tissue culture plate. In order to have a high throughput assay system in which both energy demand and substrate availability can be tightly controlled, we have developed a protocol to expand the application of the XF24 Analyzer to include isolated mitochondria. Acquisition of optimal rates requires assay conditions that are unexpectedly distinct from those of conventional polarography. The optimized conditions, derived from experiments with isolated mouse liver mitochondria, allow multi-well assessment of rates of respiration and proton production by mitochondria attached to the bottom of the XF assay plate, and require extremely small quantities of material (1-10 µg of mitochondrial protein per well. Sequential measurement of basal, State 3, State 4, and uncoupler-stimulated respiration can be made in each well through additions of reagents from the injection ports. We describe optimization and validation of this technique using isolated mouse liver and rat heart mitochondria, and apply the approach to discover that inclusion of phosphatase inhibitors in the preparation of the heart mitochondria results in a specific decrease in rates of Complex I-dependent respiration. We believe this new technique will be particularly useful for drug screening and for generating previously unobtainable respiratory data on small mitochondrial samples.

  13. Human cultured cells are capable to incorporate isolated plant mitochondria loaded with exogenous DNA

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    Laktionov P. P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the possibility of human cultured cells to incorporate isolated mitochondria together with exogenous DNA introduced into organelles. Methods. Two approaches were used for this purpose, fluorescent labelling of mitochondria and/or DNA with subsequent analysis of the cells subjected to incubation by microscopy or by quantitative PCR. Results. We have shown that human cultured cells lines, HeLa and HUVEC, are capable to uptake isolated plant mitochondria and that this process depends on the incubation time and concentration of organelles present in medium. The incorporated mitochondria can serve as vehicles to deliver exogenous DNA into human cells, this DNA is then distributed in different cell compartments. Conclusions. These results are preliminary and need further investigations, including testing the possibility of human cells to incorporate the mitochondria of human or animal origin and creating genetic construction which could provide certain selectivity or stability of the transferred exogenous DNA upon cell uptake of the mitochondria as vectors.

  14. Fe-S Cluster Biogenesis in Isolated Mammalian Mitochondria

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    Pandey, Alok; Pain, Jayashree; Ghosh, Arnab K.; Dancis, Andrew; Pain, Debkumar

    2015-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential cofactors, and mitochondria contain several Fe-S proteins, including the [4Fe-4S] protein aconitase and the [2Fe-2S] protein ferredoxin. Fe-S cluster assembly of these proteins occurs within mitochondria. Although considerable data exist for yeast mitochondria, this biosynthetic process has never been directly demonstrated in mammalian mitochondria. Using [35S]cysteine as the source of sulfur, here we show that mitochondria isolated from Cath.A-derived cells, a murine neuronal cell line, can synthesize and insert new Fe-35S clusters into aconitase and ferredoxins. The process requires GTP, NADH, ATP, and iron, and hydrolysis of both GTP and ATP is necessary. Importantly, we have identified the 35S-labeled persulfide on the NFS1 cysteine desulfurase as a genuine intermediate en route to Fe-S cluster synthesis. In physiological settings, the persulfide sulfur is released from NFS1 and transferred to a scaffold protein, where it combines with iron to form an Fe-S cluster intermediate. We found that the release of persulfide sulfur from NFS1 requires iron, showing that the use of iron and sulfur for the synthesis of Fe-S cluster intermediates is a highly coordinated process. The release of persulfide sulfur also requires GTP and NADH, probably mediated by a GTPase and a reductase, respectively. ATP, a cofactor for a multifunctional Hsp70 chaperone, is not required at this step. The experimental system described here may help to define the biochemical basis of diseases that are associated with impaired Fe-S cluster biogenesis in mitochondria, such as Friedreich ataxia. PMID:25398879

  15. Specificity of DNA import into isolated mitochondria from plants and mammals

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    Koulintchenko M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Investigation of different features of DNA import into plant and human mitochondria, for a better understanding of mitochondrial genetics and generation of biotechnological tools. Methods. DNA up-take experiments with isolated plant mitochondria, using as substrates various sequences associated or not with the specific terminal inverted repeats (TIRs present at each end of the plant mitochondrial linear plasmids. Results. It was established that the DNA import efficiency has a non-linear dependence on DNA size. It was shown that import into plant mitochondria of DNA molecules of «medium» sizes, i. e. between 4 and 7 kb, barely has any sequence specificity: neither TIRs from the 11.6 kb Brassica plasmid, nor TIRs from the Zea mays S-plasmids influenced DNA import into Solanum tuberosum mitochondria. Conclusions. The data obtained support the hypothesis about species-specific import mechanism operating under the mitochondrial linear plasmids transfer into plant mitochondria.

  16. Oxaliplatin-induced Oxidative Stress Provokes Toxicity in Isolated Rat Liver Mitochondria.

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    Tabassum, Heena; Waseem, Mohammad; Parvez, Suhel; Qureshi, M Irfan

    2015-11-01

    Oxaliplatin is a widely employed platinum-derived chemotherapeutic agent commonly used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Unfortunately, the benefit of this important drug is compromised by severe side effects such as neuropathy, ototoxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and hematological toxicity. Recently, few studies have also suggested the occurrence of hepatotoxicity in oxaliplatin-treated patients. Mitochondria have emerged as targets for anticancer drugs in various kinds of toxicity including hepatotoxicity that can lead to neoplastic disease. Oxidative stress is a well-established biomarker of mitochondrial toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-dependent damage caused by oxaliplatin on isolated liver mitochondria under in vitro conditions. The study was conducted in mitochondria isolated from liver of Wistar rats. Oxaliplatin was incubated with mitochondria in a dose-dependent manner under in vitro conditions. Oxidative stress indexes, non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants were evaluated, looking at the overall armamentarium against the toxicity induced by oxaliplatin. Oxaliplatin caused a significant rise in the mitochondrial oxidative stress indexes lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl. Alterations in the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants and activities of enzymatic antioxidants were also observed. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the mitochondrial toxicity of oxaliplatin. The integrity of the hepatic tissue is compromised by the reactive oxygen species-mediated lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl formation. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

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    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  18. Early transcriptional changes in cardiac mitochondria during chronic doxorubicin exposure and mitigation by dexrazoxane in mice

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    Vijay, Vikrant; Moland, Carrie L.; Han, Tao; Fuscoe, James C. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Department of Mathematics, Korea University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Herman, Eugene H. [Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch, Developmental Therapeutics Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, The National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850-9734 (United States); Jenkins, G. Ronald [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lewis, Sherry M. [Office of Scientific Coordination, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Cummings, Connie A. [UltraPath Imaging, 2228 Page Road, Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Gao, Yuan; Cao, Zhijun; Yu, Li-Rong [Biomarkers and Alternative Models Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Desai, Varsha G., E-mail: varsha.desai@fda.hhs.gov [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Identification of early biomarkers of cardiotoxicity could help initiate means to ameliorate the cardiotoxic actions of clinically useful drugs such as doxorubicin (DOX). Since DOX has been shown to target mitochondria, transcriptional levels of mitochondria-related genes were evaluated to identify early candidate biomarkers in hearts of male B6C3F{sub 1} mice given a weekly intravenous dose of 3 mg/kg DOX or saline (SAL) for 2, 3, 4, 6, or 8 weeks (6, 9, 12, 18, or 24 mg/kg cumulative DOX doses, respectively). Also, a group of mice was pretreated (intraperitoneally) with the cardio-protectant, dexrazoxane (DXZ; 60 mg/kg) 30 min before each weekly dose of DOX or SAL. At necropsy a week after the last dose, increased plasma concentrations of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were detected at 18 and 24 mg/kg cumulative DOX doses, whereas myocardial alterations were observed only at the 24 mg/kg dose. Of 1019 genes interrogated, 185, 109, 140, 184, and 451 genes were differentially expressed at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg cumulative DOX doses, respectively, compared to concurrent SAL-treated controls. Of these, expression of 61 genes associated with energy metabolism and apoptosis was significantly altered before and after occurrence of myocardial injury, suggesting these as early genomics markers of cardiotoxicity. Much of these DOX-induced transcriptional changes were attenuated by pretreatment of mice with DXZ. Also, DXZ treatment significantly reduced plasma cTnT concentration and completely ameliorated cardiac alterations induced by 24 mg/kg cumulative DOX. This information on early transcriptional changes during DOX treatment may be useful in designing cardioprotective strategies targeting mitochondria. - Highlights: • Altered mitochondria-related gene expression before heart injury by doxorubicin • Dexrazoxane mitigated doxorubicin-induced early expression changes in mitochondria. • Dexrazoxane completely ameliorated doxorubicin-induced pathology in mouse heart.

  19. The role of mitochondria for the regulation of cardiac alternans

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    Stela M Florea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Electromechanical and Ca alternans is a beat-to-beat alternation of action potential duration, contraction strength and Ca transient amplitude observed in cardiac myocytes at regular stimulation frequency. Ca alternans is a multifactorial process that is causally linked to cardiac arrhythmias. At the cellular level, conditions that increase fractional release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum or reduce diastolic Ca sequestration favor the occurrence of alternans. Mitochondria play a significant role in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and Ca signaling by providing the energy for contraction and ATP-dependent processes and possibly by serving as Ca buffering organelles. Here we tested the hypothesis that impairment of mitochondrial function generates conditions that favor the occurrence of Ca alternans. Alternans were elicited by electrical pacing (>1 Hz in single cat atrial myocytes and intracellular Ca ([Ca]i was measured with the fluorescent Ca indicator Indo-1. The degree of alternans was quantified as the alternans ratio (AR=1-S/L, where S/L is the ratio of the small to the large amplitude of a pair of alternating Ca transients. Dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (with FCCP as well as inhibition of mitochondrial F1/F0-ATP synthase (oligomycin, electrontransport chain (rotenone, antimycin, CN-, Ca-dependent dehydrogenases and mitochondrial Ca uptake or extrusion, all enhanced AR and lowered the threshold for the occurrence of Ca alternans. The data indicate that impairment of mitochondrial function adversely affects cardiac Ca cycling leading to proarrhythmic Ca alternans.

  20. Aerobic metabolism of human quadriceps muscle: in vivo data parallel measurements on isolated mitochondria

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    Rasmussen, U.F.; Rasmussen, H.N.; Krustrup, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether parameters of isolated mitochondria could account for the in vivo maximum oxygen uptake ( O2 max) of human skeletal muscle. O2 max and work performance of the quadriceps muscle of six volunteers were measured in the knee extensor model (range 10......-18 mmol O2 · min 1 · kg 1 at work rates of 22-32 W/kg). Mitochondria were isolated from the same muscle at rest. Strong correlations were obtained between O2 max and a number of mitochondrial parameters (mitochondrial protein, cytochrome aa3, citrate synthase, and respiratory activities). The activities...... of citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, measured in isolated mitochondria, corresponded to, respectively, 15, 3, and 1.1 times the rates calculated from O2 max. The respiratory chain activity also appeared sufficient. Fully coupled in vitro respiration, which is limited...

  1. Effect of sclerin on amino acid incorporation into mitochondria isolated from rat liver

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    Yamaguchi, Masanori; Satomura, Yukio

    1975-01-01

    Though sclerin (SCL) stimulated amino acid incorporation into the protein fraction of post mitochondrial supernatant of rat liver homogenate, it had no effect on the incorporation into the isolated mitochondria at pH 7.2, despite of its stimulating effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. SCL stimulated amino acid incorporation into the mitochondria at pH 6.1, and to some extent maintained the activity on that in mitochondria during aging in hypotonic Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.2). Since SCL prevented leakage of amino acids from the mitochondria into these buffers, it was suggested that SCL may protect a structure of mitochondrial membrane which appeared to have a significance on transport of amino acids. In liver slices, SCL stimulated amino acid incorporation only into the extra-mitochondrial fraction for the first 3 min, but gradually turned to simulate incorporation into mitochondria within 30 min. (auth.)

  2. Effect of sclerin on amino acid incorporation into mitochondria isolated from rat liver

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    Yamaguchi, M; Satomura, Y [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1975-08-01

    Though sclerin (SCL) stimulated amino acid incorporation into the protein fraction of post mitochondrial supernatant of rat liver homogenate, it had no effect on the incorporation into the isolated mitochondria at pH 7.2, despite of its stimulating effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. SCL stimulated amino acid incorporation into the mitochondria at pH 6.1, and to some extent maintained the activity on that in mitochondria during aging in hypotonic Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.2). Since SCL prevented leakage of amino acids from the mitochondria into these buffers, it was suggested that SCL may protect a structure of mitochondrial membrane which appeared to have a significance on transport of amino acids. In liver slices, SCL stimulated amino acid incorporation only into the extra-mitochondrial fraction for the first 3 min, but gradually turned to simulate incorporation into mitochondria within 30 min.

  3. Comparative studies on mitochondria isolated from neuron-enriched and glia-enriched fractions of rabbit and beef brain.

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    Hamberger, A; Blomstrand, C; Lehninger, A L

    1970-05-01

    Fractions enriched in neuronal and glial cells were obtained from dispersions of whole beef brain and rabbit cerebral cortex by large-scale density gradient centrifugation procedures. The fractions were characterized by appropriate microscopic observation. Mitochondria were then isolated from these fractions by differential centrifugation of their homogenates. The two different types of mitochondria were characterized with respect to certain enzyme activities, respiratory rate, rate of protein synthesis, and their buoyant density in sucrose gradients. The mitochondria from the neuron-enriched fraction were distinguished by a higher rate of incorporation of amino acids into protein, higher cytochrome oxidase activity, and a higher buoyant density in sucrose density gradients. Mitochondria from the glia-enriched fraction showed relatively high monoamine oxidase and Na(+)- and K(+)-stimulated ATPase activities. The rates of oxidation of various substrates and the acceptor control ratios did not differ appreciably between the two types of mitochondria. The difference in the buoyant density of mitochondria isolated from the neuron-enriched and glia-enriched cell fractions was utilized in attempts to separate neuronal and glial mitochondria from the mixed mitochondria obtained from whole brain homogenates in shallow sucrose gradients. The appearance of two peaks of cytochrome oxidase, monoamine oxidase, and protein concentration in such gradients shows the potential feasibility of such an approach.

  4. Reversible blockade of complex I or inhibition of PKCβ reduces activation and mitochondria translocation of p66Shc to preserve cardiac function after ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Yang

    Full Text Available Excess mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS play a vital role in cardiac ischemia reperfusion (IR injury. P66Shc, a splice variant of the ShcA adaptor protein family, enhances mROS production by oxidizing reduced cytochrome c to yield H2O2. Ablation of p66Shc protects against IR injury, but it is unknown if and when p66Shc is activated during cardiac ischemia and/or reperfusion and if attenuating complex I electron transfer or deactivating PKCβ alters p66Shc activation during IR is associated with cardioprotection.Isolated guinea pig hearts were perfused and subjected to increasing periods of ischemia and reperfusion with or without amobarbital, a complex I blocker, or hispidin, a PKCβ inhibitor. Phosphorylation of p66Shc at serine 36 and levels of p66Shc in mitochondria and cytosol were measured. Cardiac functional variables and redox states were monitored online before, during and after ischemia. Infarct size was assessed in some hearts after 120 min reperfusion.Phosphorylation of p66Shc and its translocation into mitochondria increased during reperfusion after 20 and 30 min ischemia, but not during ischemia only, or during 5 or 10 min ischemia followed by 20 min reperfusion. Correspondingly, cytosolic p66Shc levels decreased during these ischemia and reperfusion periods. Amobarbital or hispidin reduced phosphorylation of p66Shc and its mitochondrial translocation induced by 30 min ischemia and 20 min reperfusion. Decreased phosphorylation of p66Shc by amobarbital or hispidin led to better functional recovery and less infarction during reperfusion.Our results show that IR activates p66Shc and that reversible blockade of electron transfer from complex I, or inhibition of PKCβ activation, decreases p66Shc activation and translocation and reduces IR damage. These observations support a novel potential therapeutic intervention against cardiac IR injury.

  5. Uncoupling and oxidative stress in liver mitochondria isolated from rats with acute iron overload

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo Andreu, G.L. [Centro de Quimica Farmaceutica, Departamento de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba); Inada, N.M.; Vercesi, A.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Departamento de Patologia Clinica, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Curti, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    One hypothesis for the etiology of cell damage arising from iron overload is that its excess selectively affects mitochondria. Here we tested the effects of acute iron overload on liver mitochondria isolated from rats subjected to a single dose of i.p. 500 mg/kg iron-dextran. The treatment increased the levels of iron in mitochondria (from 21{+-}4 to 130{+-}7 nmol/mg protein) and caused both lipid peroxidation and glutathione oxidation. The mitochondria of iron-treated rats showed lower respiratory control ratio in association with higher resting respiration. The mitochondrial uncoupling elicited by iron-treatment did not affect the phosphorylation efficiency or the ATP levels, suggesting that uncoupling is a mitochondrial protective mechanism against acute iron overload. Therefore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS)/H{sup +} leak couple, functioning as a mitochondrial redox homeostatic mechanism could play a protective role in the acutely iron-loaded mitochondria. (orig.)

  6. The effect of 2,4-D and ABA on respiration of isolated mitochondria from maize coleoptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Raczek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of isolated maize mitochondria to the growth regulators: 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D and abscisic acid (ABA was studied. It was found that 2,4-D (a herbicide inhibits respiration in mitochondria, as do other herbicides or phenoxy-acids. In the entire range of concentrations used (10-3-10-9 M, 2,4-D introduced into the medium before the respiration reaction was begun, or during it, limited the intensity of succinate oxidation. It did not, however, markedly change phosphorylation properties. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation took place only after preincubation of mitochondria with 2,4-D and was the result of the destruction of mitochondrial membranes. ABA (a growth inhibitor of plants caused a similar response in maize mitochondria. Preincubation of mitochondria with ABA lead to the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Whereas ABA introduced during respiration (state 4 respiration or before its onset, lowered the oxidative potential of mitochondria, it also changed the pattern of state 4-3-4 transition after addition of ADP (it was especially visible at high concentrations, which indicates that the coupling of oxidative phosphorylation with the respiratory chain has faltered. It seems that this negative effect of 2,4-D and ABA on respiration of isolated maize mitochondria is connected with the inhibitory effect of these growth regulators on the growth of maize coleoptiles. Interference in the organization mitochondrial membranes results in a lowered supply of ATP - a source of energy needed in elongation processes.

  7. Mitochondria As the Target for the Modulatory Effect of Curcumin in Oxaliplatin-induced Toxicity in Isolated Rat Liver Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Mohammad; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2017-01-01

    To explore hepatoprotective action of curcumin (CMN, a bioflavonoid) on oxaliplatin (Oxa)-triggered mitochondrial oxidative stress and respiratory chain complexes in liver of rats. Oxa is a ubiquitously utilized platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent commonly used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Mitochondria have recently emerged as targets for anticancer drugs in several kinds of toxicity including hepatotoxicity that can lead to neoplastic disease. There is a dearth of evidence involving the role of mitochondria in mediating Oxa-evoked hepatotoxicity and its underlying mechanism is still debatable. The study was performed in mitochondria isolated from liver of Wistar rats. Oxa (200 μg/mL) and CMN (5 μmol) were incubated under in vitro conditions. Oxa evoked a significant increase in the membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, protein carbonyl (PC) contents, decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) and nonprotein thiol (NP-SH) levels. Oxa also caused a marked decline in the activities of enzymatic antioxidants and respiratory chain enzymes (I, II, III and V) in liver mitochondria. CMN pre-treatment significantly prevented the activities of enzymatic antioxidants and mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes. CMN also restored the LPO and PC contents, GSH and NP-SH levels in liver mitochondria. CMN intake might be effective in regulation of Oxa-evoked mitotoxicity during chemotherapy. Moreover, it is included in the armamentarium for anticancer agent-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Villarroel, José Paul Perales; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  9. Efficient Isolation of Cardiac Stem Cells from Brown Adipose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac stem cells represent a logical cell type to exploit in cardiac regeneration. The efficient harvest of cardiac stem cells from a suitable source would turn promising in cardiac stem cell therapy. Brown adipose was recently found to be a new source of cardiac stem cells, instrumental to myocardial regeneration. Unfortunately, an efficient method for the cell isolation is unavailable so far. In our study we have developed a new method for the efficient isolation of cardiac stem cells from brown adipose by combining different enzymes. Results showed that the total cell yield dramatically increased (more than 10 times, P<.01 compared with that by previous method. The content of CD133-positive cells (reported to differentiate into cardiomyocytes with a high frequency was much higher than that in the previous report (22.43% versus 3.5%. Moreover, the isolated cells could be the efficiently differentiated into functional cardiomyocytes in optimized conditions. Thus, the new method we established would be of great use in further exploring cardiac stem cell therapy.

  10. Redox reactions of cytochrome c in isolated mitochondria exposed to blue or red lasers using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Michael L.; Gonzalez, Cherry C.; Noojin, Gary D.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2018-02-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy of cytochrome c was used to follow reduction/oxidation (redox) states of isolated mitochondria in response to blue or red laser exposure. Mitochondria were isolated from hTERT-RPE1 cells and were kept in a buffer formulation known to be conducive to electron transport chain (ETC) activity. Using either pyruvate or succinate as substrates for ETC, we found differences in the redox responses of cytochrome c for different exposure laser irradiance and excitation wavelength. We anticipate that the proposed new method will be valuable in the study of metabolic processes in mitochondria in response to low level laser exposure, and thus aid in elucidating the mechanism(s) of photobiomodulation.

  11. Kidney outer medulla mitochondria are more efficient compared to cortex mitochondria as a strategy to sustain ATP production in a suboptimal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Tomas A; Gustafsson, Håkan; Palm, Fredrik

    2018-05-30

    The kidneys receive approximately 25% of cardiac output, which is a prerequisite in order to maintain sufficient glomerular filtration rate. However, both intrarenal regional renal blood flow and tissue oxygen levels are heterogeneous with decreasing levels in the inner part of the medulla. These differences in combination with the heterogeneous metabolic activity of the different nephron segment located in the different parts of the kidney may constitute a functional problem when challenged. The proximal tubule and the medullary thick ascending limb of Henle are considered to have the highest metabolic rate, which is relating to the high mitochondria content needed to sustain sufficient ATP production from oxidative phosphorylation in order to support high electrolyte transport activity in these nephron segments. Interestingly, the cells located in kidney medulla functions at the verge of hypoxia and the mitochondria may have adapted to the surrounding environment. However, little is known about intrarenal differences in mitochondria function. We therefore investigated functional differences between mitochondria isolated from kidney cortex and medulla of healthy normoglycemic rats were estimated using high-resolution respirometry. The results demonstrate that medullary mitochondria had a higher degree of coupling, are more efficient and have higher oxygen affinity, which would make them more suitable to function in an environment with limited oxygen supply. Furthermore, these results support the hypothesis that mitochondria of medullary cells have adapted to the normal hypoxic in vivo situation as a strategy of sustaining ATP production in a suboptimal environment.

  12. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  13. New method of plant mitochondria isolation and sub-fractionation for proteomic analyses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Tomáš; Honys, David; Čapková, Věra

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 3 (2004), s. 389-395 ISSN 0168-9452 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LZ1K03018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : plant mitochondria isolation * sub-fractionation * protein analysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.389, year: 2004

  14. Data on effects of rotenone on calcium retention capacity, respiration and activities of respiratory chain complexes I and II in isolated rat brain mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Rekuviene

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Rotenone decreases ischemia-induced injury by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition in mature brains” (Rekuviene et al., 2017 [1]. Data in this article present the direct effects of rotenone on calcium retention capacity (CRC in isolated normal cortex and cerebellum mitochondria, effects of rotenone intravenous infusion on leak and phosphorylating respiration rates of isolated cortex and cerebellum mitochondria, on activities of respiratory chain complexes I and II in freezed-thawed/sonicated cortex and cerebellum mitochondria after brain ischemia. In addition, detailed experimental procedures of isolation of brain mitochondria, measurements of CRC, respiration, activities of respiratory chain complexes and H2O2 generation in cortex and cerebellum mitochondria are described.

  15. Swelling and functional disorders of isolated liver mitochondria induced by ultraviolet light exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayanagi, Hideaki

    1977-01-01

    Biochemical and morphological disruption of liver mitochondria exposed to ultraviolet light were discussed. The mitochondria was prepared from rat liver, and the suspension was exposed to a broad spectrum ultraviolet light. The ultraviolet exposure of isolated rat liver mitochondria prepared from group 1 (regular laboratory chow), caused the great acceleration of swelling of mitochondria and the loss of the ability to couple the phosphorylation with respiration chain. The irradiated mitochondria produced an increase of lipid peroxide which was proportional to the dose of ultraviolet energy. By the use of a difference spectra technic, the absorption bands of cytochrome b, c (c 1 ), and flavoprotein were found to decrease in absorption after ultraviolet exposure. However, mitochondrial suspension prepared from rat in group 2 (regular chow supplemented with 3 mg% riboflavin free form), 3 (with 3 mg% riboflavin tetrabutyrate), 4 (with 5 mg% glutathione (GSH)), provided some degree of protection against the above deleterious effects of ultraviolet radiation. The irradiation effects could be reduced in the irradiated mitochondrial suspension which was incubated with riboflavin and GSH respectively after exposure. Riboflavin B 2 tetrabutyrate was found to show the significant effect of anti-oxidation. Riboflavin free-form was also active in this respect but to a lesser extent. (auth.)

  16. Isolated Cardiac Hydatid Cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakil, U.; Rehman, A. U.; Shahid, R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cyst disease is common in our part of the world. Cardiac hydatid cyst is its rare manifestation. We report this case of 48-year male having isolated cardiac hydatid cyst, incidentally found on computed tomography. This patient presented in medical OPD of Combined Military Hospital, Lahore with one month history of mild retrosternal discomfort. His general physical and systemic examinations as well as ECG were unremarkable. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged cardiac shadow with mildly irregular left heart border. Contrast enhanced CT scan of the chest showed a large well defined multiloculated non-enhancing cystic lesion with multiple daughter cysts involving wall of left ventricle and overlying pericardium. Serology for echinococcus confirmed the diagnosis of hydatid cyst. Patient was offered the surgical treatment but he opted for medical treatment only. Albendezol was prescribed. His follow-up echocardiography after one month showed no significant decrease in size of the cyst. (author)

  17. Accurate determination of the oxidative phosphorylation affinity for ADP in isolated mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Gouspillou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunctions appear strongly implicated in a wide range of pathologies. Therefore, there is a growing need in the determination of the normal and pathological integrated response of oxidative phosphorylation to cellular ATP demand. The present study intends to address this issue by providing a method to investigate mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation affinity for ADP in isolated mitochondria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proposed method is based on the simultaneous monitoring of substrate oxidation (determined polarographically and phosphorylation (determined using the glucose-hexokinase glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-NADP(+ enzymatic system rates, coupled to the determination of actual ADP and ATP concentrations by bioluminescent assay. This enzymatic system allows the study of oxidative phosphorylation during true steady states in a wide range of ADP concentrations. We demonstrate how the application of this method allows an accurate determination of mitochondrial affinity for ADP from both oxidation (K(mVox and phosphorylation (K(mVp rates. We also demonstrate that determination of K(mVox leads to an important overestimation of the mitochondrial affinity for ADP, indicating that mitochondrial affinity for ADP should be determined using phosphorylation rate. Finally, we show how this method allows the direct and precise determination of the mitochondrial coupling efficiency. Data obtained from rat skeletal muscle and liver mitochondria illustrate the discriminating capabilities of this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because the proposed method allows the accurate determination of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation affinity for ADP in isolated mitochondria, it also opens the route to a better understanding of functional consequences of mitochondrial adaptations/dysfunctions arising in various physiological/pathophysiological conditions.

  18. Photo-oxidative damage to isolated rat liver mitochondria induced by phenothiazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. RODRIGUES

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Photosensitization is a well-known side-effect of phenothiazines that could involve photochemically promoted oxidative damage to mitochondria, leading to the impairment of metabolic functions and apoptosis. In this work, for the first time, we investigated the effects of photoexcited thioridazine (TR, trifluoperazine (TFP and fluphenazine (FP on isolated rat liver mitochondria. Under UV irradiation, the presence of these phenothiazines led to a dose-dependent lack of the respiratory control ratio. These effects were not accompanied by significant swelling and oxidation of protein thiol groups but were accompanied by lipid peroxidation. Lycopene and sorbate, well-known quenchers of singlet oxygen and triplet species, respectively, were ineffective at protecting mitochondrial lipids against the damage promoted by the excited phenothiazines, suggesting that photochemically-produced cation radicals were the prooxidant species. Corroborating this proposal, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT completely inhibited the lipid peroxidation induced by UV irradiation in the presence of phenothiazines. These novel results make a significant contribution to the understanding of the photochemical properties of phenothiazines in biological systems. Keywords: Trifluoperazine, thioridazine, fluphenazine, rat liver mitochondria, oxidative stress, photochemistry, photodamage, respiratory chain.

  19. Exercise training restores cardiac protein quality control in heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane C Campos

    Full Text Available Exercise training is a well-known coadjuvant in heart failure treatment; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects remain elusive. Despite the primary cause, heart failure is often preceded by two distinct phenomena: mitochondria dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption. The objective of the study was to determine the contribution of exercise training in regulating cardiac mitochondria metabolism and cytosolic protein quality control in a post-myocardial infarction-induced heart failure (MI-HF animal model. Our data demonstrated that isolated cardiac mitochondria from MI-HF rats displayed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced maximum calcium uptake and elevated H₂O₂ release. These changes were accompanied by exacerbated cardiac oxidative stress and proteasomal insufficiency. Declined proteasomal activity contributes to cardiac protein quality control disruption in our MI-HF model. Using cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, we showed that either antimycin A or H₂O₂ resulted in inactivation of proteasomal peptidase activity, accumulation of oxidized proteins and cell death, recapitulating our in vivo model. Of interest, eight weeks of exercise training improved cardiac function, peak oxygen uptake and exercise tolerance in MI-HF rats. Moreover, exercise training restored mitochondrial oxygen consumption, increased Ca²⁺-induced permeability transition and reduced H₂O₂ release in MI-HF rats. These changes were followed by reduced oxidative stress and better cardiac protein quality control. Taken together, our findings uncover the potential contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption to heart failure and highlight the positive effects of exercise training in re-establishing cardiac mitochondrial physiology and protein quality control, reinforcing the importance of this intervention as a non-pharmacological tool for heart failure therapy.

  20. Regulation of mitochondrial respiration by inorganic phosphate; comparing permeabilized muscle fibers and isolated mitochondria prepared from type-1 and type-2 rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    ADP is generally accepted as a key regulator of oxygen consumption both in isolated mitochondria and in permeabilized fibers from skeletal muscle. The present study explored inorganic phosphate in a similar regulatory role. Saponin permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria from type-I and type...

  1. ATP synthesis is impaired in isolated mitochondria from myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minet, Ariane D; Gaster, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To date, it is unknown whether mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle from subjects with type 2 diabetes is based on primarily reduced mitochondrial mass and/or a primarily decreased mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Mitochondrial mass were determined in myotubes established from eight lean, eight...... mass and the ATP synthesis rate, neither at baseline nor during acute insulin stimulation, were not different between groups. The ratio of ATP synthesis rate at hexokinase versus ATP synthesis rate at baseline was lower in diabetic mitochondria compared to lean mitochondria. Thus the lower content...... obese and eight subjects with type 2 diabetes precultured under normophysiological conditions. Furthermore, mitochondria were isolated and ATP production was measured by luminescence at baseline and during acute insulin stimulation with or without concomitant ATP utilization by hexokinase. Mitochondrial...

  2. Toxicity of thallium on isolated rat liver mitochondria: the role of oxidative stress and MPT pore opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, M R; Mashayekhi, Vida; Aslani, Majid; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2015-02-01

    Thallium(I) is a highly toxic heavy metal; however, up to now, its mechanisms are poorly understood. The authors' previous studies showed that this compound could induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, reduced glutathione (GSH) oxidation, membrane lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse in isolated rat hepatocyte. Because the liver is the storage site of thallium, it seems that the liver mitochondria are one of the important targets for hepatotoxicity. In this investigation, the effects of thallium on mitochondria were studied to investigate its mechanisms of toxicity. Mitochondria were isolated from rat liver and incubated with different concentrations of thallium (25-200 µM). Thallium(I)-treated mitochondria showed a marked elevation in oxidative stress parameters accompanied by MMP collapse when compared with the control group. These results showed that different concentrations of thallium (25-200 µM) induced a significant (P thallium(I)-induced liver toxicity is a result of the disruptive effect of this metal on the mitochondrial respiratory complexes (I, II, and IV), which are the obvious causes of metal-induced ROS formation and ATP depletion. The latter two events, in turn, trigger cell death signaling via opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and cytochrome c expulsion. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mitochondrial bioenergetics during the initiation of mercuric chloride-induced renal activity. II. Functional alterations of renal cortical mitochondria isolated after mercuric chloride treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, J.M. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI); Harding, P.G.; Humes, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mitochondrial functional defects occurring in the early stages of nephrotoxic renal injury secondary to mercuric chloride have been characterized. No loss of cellular integrity or major mitochondrial structural alterations occurred within the first 3 hr after a subcutaneous injection of 5 mg/kg of HgCl/sub 2/. At 3 h, levels of Hg/sup 2 +/ in renal cortex and isolated renal cortical mitochondria were 1.87 and 0.72 nmol/mg of protein, respectively. Much evidence suggested that this Hg/sup 2 +/ had reached the mitochondria in situ and not during the isolation process. Mitochondria isolated beginning 1 h after treatment with HgCl/sub 2/ showed depressed ADP uptake. At 2 h, inhibitions of State 3 and 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration were detected. Inhibition of 2,4-dinitrophenol-activated mitochondrial ATPase activity was present when measured on mitochondria isolated at 3 h. These effects were not reversed by 2 mM dithioerythritol, 50 mg/ml of albumin or 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/. Analysis of the data in the context of information available on the in vitro effects of HgCl/sub 2/ (Weinberg, J.M., Harding, P.G., and Humes, H.D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 60-67) indicated that the mitochondrial functional effects could not be attributed to interaction of the mitochondria with Hg/sup 2 +/ during their isolation. These studies implicate compromised mitochondrial bioenergetic function as one of the earliest intracellular effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ in the production of nephrotoxicity but suggest that the intracellular process involves events in addition to those seen with direct exposure of mitochondria to Hg/sup 2 +/ in vitro.

  4. Assessing Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Isolated Mitochondria from Various Mouse Tissues Using Seahorse XF96 Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuso, Arcangela; Repp, Birgit; Biagosch, Caroline; Terrile, Caterina; Prokisch, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Working with isolated mitochondria is the gold standard approach to investigate the function of the electron transport chain in tissues, free from the influence of other cellular factors. In this chapter, we outline a detailed protocol to measure the rate of oxygen consumption (OCR) with the high-throughput analyzer Seahorse XF96. More importantly, this protocol wants to provide practical tips for handling many different samples at once, and take a real advantage of using a high-throughput system. As a proof of concept, we have isolated mitochondria from brain, heart, liver, muscle, kidney, and lung of a wild-type mouse, and measured basal respiration (State II), ADP-stimulated respiration (State III), non-ADP-stimulated respiration (State IV o ), and FCCP-stimulated respiration (State III u ) using respiratory substrates specific to the respiratory chain complex I (RCCI) and complex II (RCCII). Mitochondrial purification and Seahorse runs were performed in less than eight working hours.

  5. Arsenate uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated plant mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickes, W A; Wiskich, J T

    1976-01-01

    The uncoupling by arsenate of beetroot and cauliflower bud mitochondria showed the following characteristics: arsenate stimulation of respiration above the rate found with phosphate; inhibition of arsenate-stimulated respiration by phosphate; enhancement of arsenate-stimulated respiration by ADP; only partial prevention of this ADP-enhanced respiration by atractyloside; inhibition by oligomycin of the arsenate-stimulated respiration back to the phosphate rate; and the absence of any stimulatory effect of ADP in the presence of oligomycin. These results are qualitatively analogous to those reported for arsenate uncoupling in rat liver mitochondria. Arsenate stimulated malate oxidation, presumably by stimulating malate entry, in both beetroot and cauliflower bud mitochondria; however, high rates of oxidation, and presumably entry, were only sustained with arsenate in beetroot mitochondria. NADH was oxidized rapidly in cauliflower bud mitochondria in the presence of arsenate, showing that arsenate did not inhibit electron transfer processes.

  6. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON HEPATOBILIARY TRANSPORT OF CATIONIC DRUGS - A STUDY IN THE ISOLATED-PERFUSED RAT-LIVER, RAT HEPATOCYTES AND RAT MITOCHONDRIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEEN, H; MEIJER, DKF; Merema, M.T.

    The effect of ethanol on the hepatic uptake of various cationic drugs was studied in isolated perfused rat livers, isolated rat hepatocytes and isolated rat liver mitochondria. In isolated rat hepatocytes and in isolated perfused rat livers, the uptake of the model organic cation

  7. Efficient isolation of pure and functional mitochondria from mouse tissues using automated tissue disruption and enrichment with anti-TOM22 magnetic beads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Franko

    Full Text Available To better understand molecular mechanisms regulating changes in metabolism, as observed e.g. in diabetes or neuronal disorders, the function of mitochondria needs to be precisely determined. The usual isolation methods such as differential centrifugation result in isolates of highly variable quality and quantity. To fulfill the need of a reproducible isolation method from solid tissues, which is suitable to handle parallel samples simultaneously, we developed a protocol based on anti-TOM22 (translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 22 homolog antibody-coupled magnetic beads. To measure oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria from various mouse tissues, a traditional Clark electrode and the high-throughput XF Extracellular Flux Analyzer were used. Furthermore, Western blots, transmission electron microscopic and proteomic studies were performed to analyze the purity and integrity of the mitochondrial preparations. Mitochondrial fractions isolated from liver, brain and skeletal muscle by anti-TOM22 magnetic beads showed oxygen consumption capacities comparable to previously reported values and little contamination with other organelles. The purity and quality of isolated mitochondria using anti-TOM22 magnetic beads was compared to traditional differential centrifugation protocol in liver and the results indicated an obvious advantage of the magnetic beads method compared to the traditional differential centrifugation technique.

  8. Effect of heavy water on isolated rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, G.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of O 2 consumption by isolated rat liver mitochondria was determined polarographically with a Clark electrode at 25 0 C in the active (state 3), strongly coupled (state 4) and decoupled state of the mitochondria in media containing H 2 16 O, D 2 16 O or H 2 18 O. The results confirm the value of the D 2 O isotope effect in the form on an O 2 -consumption inhibition. In H 2 18 O no isotope effect has been detected in the state of controlled respiration. In contrast, a strongly marked inverse isotope effect has been found in the active state after ADP addition and in the decoupled state after DNP addition. This inverse isotope effect occurs in reactions involving a preceding equilibrium. According to the chemiosmotic hypothesis of oxidative phosphorylation the formation of hydronium ions is part of this reaction. The equilibrium constant k 2 = 0.9774 for the hydronium ion in H 2 16 O and H 2 18 O implies that the formation of the hydronium ion in H 2 18 O is preferred to that in H 2 16 O. The high inverse H 2 18 O isotope effect respiration shows that the formation of H 3 O + contributes to the vectorial proton transport, probably as a preceding equilibrium, and that in the active state of the respiratory chain this reaction may be the rate-determining step. (author)

  9. An improved, simple, inexpensive and highly flexible hydroponic setup for root mitochondria isolation from arabidopsis and nicotiana pants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, M. W.; Udddin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydroponic setups are frequently developed and improved as they are convenient platforms for studying whole plant physiology. Mostly, the available systems produce small amounts of plant material and are therefore, unsuitable for studies requiring large quantities of plant material like isolation of mitochondria. To address this issue, we have modified a hydroponic setup that can sustain hundreds of Arabidopsis and tobacco plants until adult plants are established. The setup is very flexible and easy to construct. It is based on the use of recyclable and sterilizable plastic-net-pots and media containers, which are easily available from the local suppliers. The modified seed-pots and styrofoam sheets facilitate the transfer and harvesting of seedlings. We have used the Percoll based two-step density gradient centrifugation method for the isolation of root mitochondria from the hydroponically grown plants. (author)

  10. The dynamic equilibrium between ATP synthesis and ATP consumption is lower in isolated mitochondria from myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minet, Ariane D; Gaster, Michael

    2011-01-01

    compared to lean control. The ATP synthesis rate without ATP consumption was not different between groups and there were no significant gender differences. The mitochondrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes in vivo is partly based on a primarily impaired ATP synthesis....... or not in the mitochondria of diabetic skeletal muscle from subjects with type 2 diabetes. ATP synthesis was measured on mitochondria isolated from cultured myotubes established from lean (11/9), obese (9/11) and subjects with type 2 diabetes (9/11) (female/male, n=20 in each group), precultured under normophysiological...... selects the mitochondria based on an antibody recognizing the mitochondrial outer membrane and not by size through gradient centrifugation. The dynamic equilibrium between ATP synthesis and ATP consumption is 35% lower in isolated mitochondria from myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects...

  11. Lipid droplets interact with mitochondria using SNAP23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jägerström, Sara; Polesie, Sam; Wickström, Ylva

    2009-01-01

    peroxisomes and the endoplasmic reticulum. We have used electron and confocal microscopy to demonstrate that LD form complexes with mitochondria in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Using an in vitro system of purified LD and mitochondria, we also show the formation of the LD-mitochondria complex, in which cytosolic...... factors are involved. Moreover, the presence of LD markers in mitochondria isolated by subcellular fractionations is demonstrated. Finally, ablation of SNAP23 using siRNA reduced complex formation and beta oxidation, which suggests that the LD-mitochondria complex is functional in the cell....

  12. [Isolation, purification and primary culture of adult mouse cardiac fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rujun; Gong, Kaizheng; Zhang, Zhengang

    2017-01-01

    Objective To establish a method for primary culture of adult mouse cardiac fibroblasts. Methods Myocardial tissues from adult mice were digested with 1 g/L trypsin and 0.8 g/L collagenase IV by oscillating water bath for a short time repeatedly. Cardiac fibroblasts and myocardial cells were isolated with differential adhesion method. Immunofluorescence staining was used to assess the purity of cardiac fibroblasts. The cell morphology was observed under an inverted phase contrast microscope. The proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts was analyzed by growth curve and CCK-8 assay. The Smad2/3 phosphorylation induced by TGF-β1 was detected by Western blotting. Results After 90 minutes of differential adhesion, adherent fibroblasts formed spherical cell mass and after 3 days, cells were spindle-shaped and proliferated rapidly. Cells were confluent after 5 days and the growth curve presented nearly "S" shape. The positive expression rate of vimentin was 95%. CCK-8 assay showed that the optimal cell proliferating activity was found from day 3 to day 5. The level of phosphorylated Smad2/3 obviously increased at the second passage induced by TGF-β1. Conclusion This method is economical and stable to isolate cardiac fibroblasts with high activity and high purity from adult mice.

  13. Sex-specific differences in mitochondria biogenesis, morphology, respiratory function, and ROS homeostasis in young mouse heart and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Abdel Rahman M; Abdel-Rahman, Engy A; Mahmoud, Ali M; Ali, Mohamed H; Noureldin, Maha; Saber, Saber H; Mohsen, Mahmoud; Ali, Sameh S

    2017-03-01

    Sex-specific differences in mitochondrial function and free radical homeostasis are reported in the context of aging but not well-established in pathogeneses occurring early in life. Here, we examine if sex disparity in mitochondria function, morphology, and redox status starts early and hence can be implicated in sexual dimorphism in cardiac as well as neurological disorders prevalent at young age. Although mitochondrial activity in the heart did not significantly vary between sexes, female brain exhibited enhanced respiration and higher reserve capacity. This was associated with lower H 2 O 2 production in female cardiac and brain tissues. Using transmission electron microscopy, we found that the number of female cardiac mitochondria is moderately greater (117 ± 3%, P  = 0.049, N  = 4) than male's, which increased significantly for cortical mitochondria (134 ± 4%, P  = 0.001, N  = 4). However, male's cardiac mitochondria exhibited fragmented, circular, and smaller mitochondria relative to female's mitochondria, while no morphologic sex-dependent differences were observed in cortical mitochondria. No sex differences were detected in Nox2 and Nox4 proteins or O 2 -consuming/H 2 O 2 -producing activities in brain homogenate or synaptosomes. However, a strong trend of increased EPR-detected NOX superoxide in male synaptosomes hinted at higher superoxide dismutase activity in female brains, which was confirmed by two independent protocols. We also provide direct evidence that respiring mitochondria generally produce an order-of-magnitude lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) proportions than currently estimated. Our results indicate that sex differences in mitochondrial biogenesis, bioenergetics, and morphology may start at young age and that sex-dependent SOD capacity may be responsible for differences in ROS homeostasis in heart and brain. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological

  14. Oxidative metabolism and Ca2+ handling in isolated brain mitochondria and striatal neurons from R6/2 mice, a model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, James; Pellman, Jessica J; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Harris, Robert A; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in oxidative metabolism and defects in mitochondrial Ca 2+ handling have been implicated in the pathology of Huntington's disease (HD), but existing data are contradictory. We investigated the effect of human mHtt fragments on oxidative metabolism and Ca 2+ handling in isolated brain mitochondria and cultured striatal neurons from the R6/2 mouse model of HD. Non-synaptic and synaptic mitochondria isolated from the brains of R6/2 mice had similar respiratory rates and Ca 2+ uptake capacity compared with mitochondria from wild-type (WT) mice. Respiratory activity of cultured striatal neurons measured with Seahorse XF24 flux analyzer revealed unaltered cellular respiration in neurons derived from R6/2 mice compared with neurons from WT animals. Consistent with the lack of respiratory dysfunction, ATP content of cultured striatal neurons from R6/2 and WT mice was similar. Mitochondrial Ca 2+ accumulation was also evaluated in cultured striatal neurons from R6/2 and WT animals. Our data obtained with striatal neurons derived from R6/2 and WT mice show that both glutamate-induced increases in cytosolic Ca 2+ and subsequent carbonilcyanide p-triflouromethoxyphenylhydrazone-induced increases in cytosolic Ca 2+ were similar between WT and R6/2, suggesting that mitochondria in neurons derived from both types of animals accumulated comparable amounts of Ca 2+ Overall, our data argue against respiratory deficiency and impaired Ca 2+ handling induced by human mHtt fragments in both isolated brain mitochondria and cultured striatal neurons from transgenic R6/2 mice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Persistent changes in the initial rate of pyruvate transport by isolated rat liver mitochondria after preincubation with adenine nucleotides and calcium ions

    OpenAIRE

    Vaartjes, W.J.; Breejen, J.N. den; Geelen, M.J.H.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1980-01-01

    1. Preincubation of isolated rat-liver mitochondria in the presence of adenine nucleotides or Ca2+ results in definite and persistent changes in the initial rate of pyruvate transport. 2. These changes in the rate of pyruvate transport are accompanied by equally persistent changes in the opposite direction of the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC. 1.2.4.1). 3. Changes of the transmembrane pH gradient and of the membrane potential, brought about by the pretreatments of the mitochondria, c...

  16. Dioxin-induced acute cardiac mitochondrial oxidative damage and increased activity of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Susana P.; Pereira, Gonçalo C.; Pereira, Cláudia V.; Carvalho, Filipa S.; Cordeiro, Marília H.; Mota, Paula C.; Ramalho-Santos, João; Moreno, António J.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2013-01-01

    The environmental dioxin 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is classified as a Group 1 human carcinogen and teratogenic agent. We hypothesize that TCDD-induced oxidative stress may also interfere with mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels (mitoKATP), which are known to regulate and to be regulated by mitochondrial redox state. We investigated the effects of an acute treatment of male Wistar rats with TCDD (50 μg/kg i.p.) and measured the regulation of cardiac mitoKATP. While the function of cardiac mitochondria was slightly depressed, mitoKATP activity was 52% higher in animals treated with TCDD. The same effects were not observed in liver mitochondria isolated from the same animals. Our data also shows that regulation of mitochondrial ROS production by mitoKATP activity is different in both groups. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that TCDD increases mitoKATP activity in the heart, which may counteract the increased oxidative stress caused by the dioxin during acute exposure. -- Highlights: •Acute TCDD treatment of Wistar rats causes cardiac oxidative stress. •Acute TCDD treatment causes cardiac mitochondrial alterations. •Mitochondrial liver vs. heart alterations are distinct. •TCDD treatment resulted in altered activity of cardiac mitochondrial K-ATP channels. -- Dioxin alters the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels and disturbs mitochondrial physiology

  17. Your mitochondria are what you eat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Wenche; Rud, Kasper Abildgaard; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig

    2017-01-01

    of the mitochondria. Here, we report that rat muscle mitochondria does show the normal Randle‐type fat‐carbohydrate interaction seen in vivo. The mechanism behind this metabolic flexibility at the level of the isolated mitochondria is a regulation of the flux‐ratio: pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)/β‐oxidation to suit...... the actual substrate availability, with the PDH flux as the major point of regulation. We further report that this regulatory mechanism of carbohydrate‐fat metabolic interaction surprisingly is lost in mitochondria obtained from animals exposed for 12 weeks to a HF‐ or a HS diet as compared to rats given...... a normal chow diet. The mechanism seems to be a loss of the PDH flux decrease seen in controls, when fatty acid is supplied as substrate in addition to pyruvate, and vice versa for the supply of pyruvate as substrate to mitochondria oxidizing fatty acid. Finally, we report that the calculated TCA flux...

  18. Current role of cardiac and extra-cardiac pathologies in clinically indicated cardiac computed tomography with emphasis on status before pulmonary vein isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohns, J.M.; Lotz, J. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Menke, J.; Staab, W.; Fasshauer, M.; Kowallick, J.T.; Zwaka, P.A.; Schwarz, A. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Spiro, J. [Koeln University Hospital (Germany). Radiology; Bergau, L.; Unterberg-Buchwald, C. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Cardiology and Pneumology

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of cardiac and significant extra-cardiac findings in clinical computed tomography of the heart in patients with atrial fibrillation before pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Materials and Methods: 224 patients (64 ± 10 years; male 63%) with atrial fibrillation were examined by cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT before PVI. Extra-cardiac findings were classified as 'significant' if they were recommended to additional diagnostics or therapy, and otherwise as 'non-significant'. Additionally, cardiac findings were documented in detail. Results: A total of 724 cardiac findings were identified in 203 patients (91% of patients). Additionally, a total of 619 extra-cardiac findings were identified in 179 patients (80% of patients). Among these extra-cardiac findings 196 (32%) were 'significant', and 423 (68%) were 'non-significant'. In 2 patients (1%) a previously unknown malignancy was detected (esophageal cancer and lung cancer, local stage, no metastasis). 203 additional imaging diagnostics followed to clarify the 'significant' findings (124 additional CT, costs 38,314.69 US dollars). Overall, there were 3.2 cardiac and 2.8 extra-cardiac findings per patient. Extra-cardiac findings appear significantly more frequently in patients over 60 years old, in smokers and in patients with a history of cardiac findings (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Cardiac CT scans before PVI should be screened for extracardiac incidental findings that could have important clinical implications for each patient. (orig.)

  19. Differentiating between apparent and actual rates of H2O2 metabolism by isolated rat muscle mitochondria to test a simple model of mitochondria as regulators of H2O2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treberg, Jason R.; Munro, Daniel; Banh, Sheena; Zacharias, Pamela; Sotiri, Emianka

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are often regarded as a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in animal cells, with H2O2 being the predominant ROS released from mitochondria; however, it has been recently demonstrated that energized brain mitochondria may act as stabilizers of H2O2 concentration (Starkov et al. [1]) based on the balance between production and the consumption of H2O2, the later of which is a function of [H2O2] and follows first order kinetics. Here we test the hypothesis that isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria, from the rat, are able to modulate [H2O2] based upon the interaction between the production of ROS, as superoxide/H2O2, and the H2O2 decomposition capacity. The compartmentalization of detection systems for H2O2 and the intramitochondrial metabolism of H2O2 leads to spacial separation between these two components of the assay system. This results in an underestimation of rates when relying solely on extramitochondrial H2O2 detection. We find that differentiating between these apparent rates found when using extramitochondrial H2O2 detection and the actual rates of metabolism is important to determining the rate constant for H2O2 consumption by mitochondria in kinetic experiments. Using the high rate of ROS production by mitochondria respiring on succinate, we demonstrate that net H2O2 metabolism by mitochondria can approach a stable steady-state of extramitochondrial [H2O2]. Importantly, the rate constant determined by extrapolation of kinetic experiments is similar to the rate constant determined as the [H2O2] approaches a steady state. PMID:26001520

  20. Mitochondria as Key Targets of Cardioprotection in Cardiac Ischemic Disease: Role of Thyroid Hormone Triiodothyronine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Forini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic heart disease is the major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Early reperfusion after acute myocardial ischemia has reduced short-term mortality, but it is also responsible for additional myocardial damage, which in the long run favors adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure evolution. A growing body of experimental and clinical evidence show that the mitochondrion is an essential end effector of ischemia/ reperfusion injury and a major trigger of cell death in the acute ischemic phase (up to 48–72 h after the insult, the subacute phase (from 72 h to 7–10 days and chronic stage (from 10–14 days to one month after the insult. As such, in recent years scientific efforts have focused on mitochondria as a target for cardioprotective strategies in ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy. The present review discusses recent advances in this field, with special emphasis on the emerging role of the biologically active thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3.

  1. Mitochondria as key targets of cardioprotection in cardiac ischemic disease: role of thyroid hormone triiodothyronine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forini, Francesca; Nicolini, Giuseppina; Iervasi, Giorgio

    2015-03-19

    Ischemic heart disease is the major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Early reperfusion after acute myocardial ischemia has reduced short-term mortality, but it is also responsible for additional myocardial damage, which in the long run favors adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure evolution. A growing body of experimental and clinical evidence show that the mitochondrion is an essential end effector of ischemia/ reperfusion injury and a major trigger of cell death in the acute ischemic phase (up to 48-72 h after the insult), the subacute phase (from 72 h to 7-10 days) and chronic stage (from 10-14 days to one month after the insult). As such, in recent years scientific efforts have focused on mitochondria as a target for cardioprotective strategies in ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy. The present review discusses recent advances in this field, with special emphasis on the emerging role of the biologically active thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3).

  2. Substrate specific effects of calcium on metabolism of rat heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, A V; Scaduto, R C

    1996-04-01

    Oxidative metabolism in the heart is tightly coupled to mechanical work. Because this coupling process is believed to involve Ca2+, the roles of mitochondrial Ca2+ in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation was studied in isolated rat heart mitochondria. The electrical component of the mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi) and the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides were determined during the oxidation of various substrates under different metabolic states. In the absence of added adenine nucleotides, the NADP+ redox couple was almost completely reduced, regardless of the specific substrate and the presence of Ca2+, whereas NAD+ couple redox state was highly dependent on the substrate type and the presence of Ca2+. Titration of respiration with ADP, in the presence of excess hexokinase and glucose, showed that both respiration and NAD(P)+ reduction were very sensitive to ADP. The maximal enzyme reaction rate of ADP-stimulated respiration Michaelis constants (Km) for ADP were dependent on the particular substrate employed. delta psi was much less sensitive to ADP. With either alpha-ketoglutarate or glutamate as substrate, Ca2+ significantly increased reduction of NAD(P)+.Ca2+ did not influence NAD(P)+ reduction with either acetylcarnitine or pyruvate as substrate. In the presence of ADP, delta psi was increased by Ca2+ at all metabolic states with glutamate plus malate, 0.5 mM alpha-ketoglutarate plus malate, or pyruvate plus malate as substrates. The data presented support the hypothesis that cardiac respiration is controlled by the availability of both Ca2+ and ADP to mitochondria. The data indicate that an increase in substrate supply to mitochondria can increase mitochondrial respiration at given level of ADP. This effect can be produced by Ca2+ with substrates such as glutamate, which utilize alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity for oxidation. Increases in respiration by Ca2+ may mitigate an increase in ADP during periods of increased

  3. Zebrafish cardiac muscle thick filaments: isolation technique and three-dimensional structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Solá, Maryví; Al-Khayat, Hind A; Behra, Martine; Kensler, Robert W

    2014-04-15

    To understand how mutations in thick filament proteins such as cardiac myosin binding protein-C or titin, cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, it is important to determine the structure of the cardiac thick filament. Techniques for the genetic manipulation of the zebrafish are well established and it has become a major model for the study of the cardiovascular system. Our goal is to develop zebrafish as an alternative system to the mammalian heart model for the study of the structure of the cardiac thick filaments and the proteins that form it. We have successfully isolated thick filaments from zebrafish cardiac muscle, using a procedure similar to those for mammalian heart, and analyzed their structure by negative-staining and electron microscopy. The isolated filaments appear well ordered with the characteristic 42.9 nm quasi-helical repeat of the myosin heads expected from x-ray diffraction. We have performed single particle image analysis on the collected electron microscopy images for the C-zone region of these filaments and obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction at 3.5 nm resolution. This reconstruction reveals structure similar to the mammalian thick filament, and demonstrates that zebrafish may provide a useful model for the study of the changes in the cardiac thick filament associated with disease processes. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphoproteome analysis of functional mitochondria isolated from resting human muscle reveals extensive phosphorylation of inner membrane protein complexes and enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Leon, Ileana R; Bak, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    . In skeletal muscle, mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to insulin resistance in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. We performed a phosphoproteomic study of functional mitochondria isolated from human muscle biopsies with the aim to obtain a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial phosphoproteins...... in insulin resistance. We also assigned phosphorylation sites in mitochondrial proteins involved in amino acid degradation, importers and transporters, calcium homeostasis, and apoptosis. Bioinformatics analysis of kinase motifs revealed that many of these mitochondrial phosphoproteins are substrates....... Future comparative phosphoproteome analysis of mitochondria from healthy and diseased individuals will provide insights into the role of abnormal phosphorylation in pathologies, such as type 2 diabetes....

  5. High Dietary Fat Selectively Increases Catalase Expression within Cardiac Mitochondria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, Paul M.; Plafker, Scott M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a predictor of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. One consequence of obesity is dyslipidemia characterized by high blood triglycerides. It has been proposed that oxidative stress, driven by utilization of lipids for energy, contributes to these diseases. The effects of oxidative stress are mitigated by an endogenous antioxidant enzyme network, but little is known about its response to high fat utilization. Our experiments used a multiplexed quantitative proteomics method to measure antioxidant enzyme expression in heart tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. This experiment showed a rapid and specific up-regulation of catalase protein, with subsequent assays showing increases in activity and mRNA. Catalase, traditionally considered a peroxisomal protein, was found to be present in cardiac mitochondria and significantly increased in content and activity during high fat feeding. These data, coupled with the fact that fatty acid oxidation enhances mitochondrial H2O2 production, suggest that a localized catalase increase is needed to consume excessive mitochondrial H2O2 produced by increased fat metabolism. To determine whether the catalase-specific response is a common feature of physiological conditions that increase blood triglycerides and fatty acid oxidation, we measured changes in antioxidant expression in fasted versus fed mice. Indeed, a similar specific catalase increase was observed in mice fasted for 24 h. Our findings suggest a fundamental metabolic process in which catalase expression is regulated to prevent damage while preserving an H2O2-mediated sensing of diet composition that appropriately adjusts insulin sensitivity in the short term as needed to prioritize lipid metabolism for complete utilization. PMID:23204527

  6. Association between ROS production, swelling and the respirasome integrity in cardiac mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sehwan; Javadov, Sabzali

    2017-09-15

    Although mitochondrial Ca 2+ overload and ROS production play a critical role in mitochondria-mediated cell death, a cause-effect relationship between them remains elusive. This study elucidated the crosstalk between mitochondrial swelling, ROS production, and electron transfer chain (ETC) supercomplexes in rat heart mitochondria in response to Ca 2+ and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBH), a lipid-soluble organic peroxide. Results showed that ROS production induced by TBH was significantly increased in the presence of Ca 2+ in a dose-dependent manner. TBH markedly inhibited the state 3 respiration rate with no effect on the mitochondrial swelling. Ca 2+ exerted a slight effect on mitochondrial respiration that was greatly aggravated by TBH. Analysis of supercomplexes revealed a minor difference in the presence of TBH and/or Ca 2+ . However, incubation of mitochondria in the presence of high Ca 2+ (1 mM) or inhibitors of ETC complexes (rotenone and antimycin A) induced disintegration of the main supercomplex, respirasome. Thus, PTP-dependent swelling of mitochondria solely depends on Ca 2+ but not ROS. TBH has no effect on the respirasome while Ca 2+ induces disintegration of the supercomplex only at a high concentration. Intactness of individual ETC complexes I and III is important for maintenance of the structural integrity of the respirasome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patient perceptions of experience with cardiac rehabilitation after isolated heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina B; Berg, Selina K; Sibilitz, Kirstine L

    2018-01-01

    in a cardiac rehabilitation programme, and none have analysed their experiences with it. AIMS: The purpose of this qualitative analysis was to gain insight into patients' experiences in cardiac rehabilitation, the CopenHeartVR trial. This trial specifically assesses patients undergoing isolated heart valve...... to take active personal responsibility for their health. Despite these benefits, participants experienced existential and psychological challenges and musculoskeletal problems. Participants also sought additional advice from healthcare professionals both inside and outside the healthcare system....... CONCLUSIONS: Even though the cardiac rehabilitation programme reduced insecurity and helped participants take active personal responsibility for their health, they experienced existential, psychological and physical challenges during recovery. The cardiac rehabilitation programme had several limitations...

  8. Hearts from mice fed a non-obesogenic high-fat diet exhibit changes in their oxidative state, calcium and mitochondria in parallel with increased susceptibility to reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohns, Ben; Pasdois, Philippe; Duggan, Simon; Bond, Andrew R; Heesom, Kate; Jackson, Christopher L; Angelini, Gianni D; Halestrap, Andrew P; Suleiman, M-Saadeh

    2014-01-01

    High-fat diet with obesity-associated co-morbidities triggers cardiac remodeling and renders the heart more vulnerable to ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the effect of high-fat diet without obesity and associated co-morbidities is presently unknown. To characterize a non-obese mouse model of high-fat diet, assess the vulnerability of hearts to reperfusion injury and to investigate cardiac cellular remodeling in relation to the mechanism(s) underlying reperfusion injury. Feeding C57BL/6J male mice high-fat diet for 20 weeks did not induce obesity, diabetes, cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac dysfunction, atherosclerosis or cardiac apoptosis. However, isolated perfused hearts from mice fed high-fat diet were more vulnerable to reperfusion injury than those from mice fed normal diet. In isolated cardiomyocytes, high-fat diet was associated with higher diastolic intracellular Ca2+ concentration and greater damage to isolated cardiomyocytes following simulated ischemia/reperfusion. High-fat diet was also associated with changes in mitochondrial morphology and expression of some related proteins but not mitochondrial respiration or reactive oxygen species turnover rates. Proteomics, western blot and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques revealed that high-fat diet led to less cardiac oxidative stress, higher catalase expression and significant changes in expression of putative components of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Inhibition of the mPTP conferred relatively more cardio-protection in the high-fat fed mice compared to normal diet. This study shows for the first time that high-fat diet, independent of obesity-induced co-morbidities, triggers changes in cardiac oxidative state, calcium handling and mitochondria which are likely to be responsible for increased vulnerability to cardiac insults.

  9. Doxorubicin Action on Mitochondria: Relevance to Osteosarcoma Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jo; Dass, Crispin R

    2018-01-01

    The mitochondria may very well determine the final commitment of the cell to death, particularly in times of energy stress. Cancer chemotherapeutics such as the anthracycline doxorubicin perturb mitochondrial structure and function in tumour cells, as evidenced in osteosarcoma, for which doxorubicin is used clinically as frontline therapy. This same mechanism of cell inhibition is also pertinent to doxorubicin's primary cause of side-effects, that to the cardiac tissue, culminating in such dire events as congestive heart failure. Reactive oxygen species are partly to blame for this effect on the mitochondria, which impact the electron transport chain. As this review highlights that, there is much more to be learnt about the mitochondria and how it is affected by such effective but toxic drugs as doxorubicin. Such information will aid researchers who search for cancer treatment able to preserve mitochondrial number and function in normal cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Fetal programming alters reactive oxygen species production in sheep cardiac mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergen, Nicholas H; Koppenhafer, Stacia L; Spitz, Douglas R; Volk, Kenneth A; Patel, Sonali S; Roghair, Robert D; Lamb, Fred S; Segar, Jeffrey L; Scholz, Thomas D

    2009-04-01

    Exposure to an adverse intrauterine environment is recognized as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease later in life. Although oxidative stress has been proposed as a mechanism for the fetal programming phenotype, the role of mitochondrial O(2)(*-) (superoxide radical) production has not been explored. To determine whether mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) production is altered by in utero programming, pregnant ewes were given a 48-h dexamethasone (dexamethasone-exposed, 0.28 mg.kg(-1) of body weight.day(-1)) or saline (control) infusion at 27-28 days gestation (term=145 days). Intact left ventricular mitochondria and freeze-thaw mitochondrial membranes were studied from offspring at 4-months of age. AmplexRed was used to measure H(2)O(2) production. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes Mn-SOD (manganese superoxide dismutase), GPx (glutathione peroxidase) and catalase were measured. Compared with controls, a significant increase in Complex I H(2)O(2) production was found in intact mitochondria from dexamethasone-exposed animals. The treatment differences in Complex I-driven H(2)O(2) production were not seen in mitochondrial membranes. Consistent changes in H(2)O(2) production from Complex III in programmed animals were not found. Despite the increase in H(2)O(2) production in intact mitochondria from programmed animals, dexamethasone exposure significantly increased mitochondrial catalase activity, whereas Mn-SOD and GPx activities were unchanged. The results of the present study point to an increase in the rate of release of H(2)O(2) from programmed mitochondria despite an increase in catalase activity. Greater mitochondrial H(2)O(2) release into the cell may play a role in the development of adult disease following exposure to an adverse intrauterine environment.

  11. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkedal Rikke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20°C in the absence and presence of creatine. Results Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. Conclusions The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that

  12. Persistent changes in the initial rate of pyruvate transport by isolated rat liver mitochondria after preincubation with adenine nucleotides and calcium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaartjes, W.J.; Breejen, J.N. den; Geelen, M.J.H.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1980-01-01

    1. Preincubation of isolated rat-liver mitochondria in the presence of adenine nucleotides or Ca2+ results in definite and persistent changes in the initial rate of pyruvate transport. 2. These changes in the rate of pyruvate transport are accompanied by equally persistent changes in the opposite

  13. Mitochondria from rat uterine smooth muscle possess ATP-sensitive potassium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga B. Vadzyuk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to detect ATP-sensitive K+ uptake in rat uterine smooth muscle mitochondria and to determine possible effects of its activation on mitochondrial physiology. By means of fluorescent technique with usage of K+-sensitive fluorescent probe PBFI (potassium-binding benzofuran isophthalate we showed that accumulation of K ions in isolated mitochondria from rat myometrium is sensitive to effectors of KATP-channel (ATP-sensitive K+-channel – ATP, diazoxide, glibenclamide and 5HD (5-hydroxydecanoate. Our data demonstrates that K+ uptake in isolated myometrium mitochondria results in a slight decrease in membrane potential, enhancement of generation of ROS (reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial swelling. Particularly, the addition of ATP into incubation medium led to a decrease in mitochondrial swelling and ROS production, and an increase in membrane potential. These effects were eliminated by diazoxide. If blockers of KATP-channel were added along with diazoxide, the effects of diazoxide were removed. So, we postulate the existence of KATP-channels in rat uterus mitochondria and assume that their functioning may regulate physiological conditions of mitochondria, such as matrix volume, ROS generation and polarization of mitochondrial membrane. Keywords: ATP-sensitive potassium channel, Diazoxide, 5-hydroxydecanoate, Myometrium, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial swelling, Mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS

  14. Protein S-glutathionylation lowers superoxide/hydrogen peroxide release from skeletal muscle mitochondria through modification of complex I and inhibition of pyruvate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Gill

    Full Text Available Protein S-glutathionylation is a reversible redox modification that regulates mitochondrial metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS production in liver and cardiac tissue. However, whether or not it controls ROS release from skeletal muscle mitochondria has not been explored. In the present study, we examined if chemically-induced protein S-glutathionylation could alter superoxide (O2●-/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 release from isolated muscle mitochondria. Disulfiram, a powerful chemical S-glutathionylation catalyst, was used to S-glutathionylate mitochondrial proteins and ascertain if it can alter ROS production. It was found that O2●-/H2O2 release rates from permeabilized muscle mitochondria decreased with increasing doses of disulfiram (100-500 μM. This effect was highest in mitochondria oxidizing succinate or palmitoyl-carnitine, where a ~80-90% decrease in the rate of ROS release was observed. Similar effects were detected in intact mitochondria respiring under state 4 conditions. Incubation of disulfiram-treated mitochondria with DTT (2 mM restored ROS release confirming that these effects were associated with protein S-glutathionylation. Disulfiram treatment also inhibited phosphorylating and proton leak-dependent respiration. Radiolabelled substrate uptake experiments demonstrated that disulfiram inhibited pyruvate import but had no effect on carnitine uptake. Immunoblot analysis of complex I revealed that it contained several protein S-glutathionylation targets including NDUSF1, a subunit required for NADH oxidation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that O2●-/H2O2 release from muscle mitochondria can be altered by protein S-glutathionylation. We attribute these changes to the protein S-glutathionylation complex I and inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier.

  15. Cardiac endothelial cells isolated from mouse heart - a novel model for radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelonek, K.; Walaszczyk, A.; Gabrys, D.; Pietrowska, M.; Widlak, P.; Kanthou, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is recognized as an important clinical problem in radiotherapy and radiation protection. However, only few radiobiological models relevant for assessment of cardiotoxic effects of ionizing radiation are available. Here we describe the isolation of mouse primary cardiac endothelial cells, a possible target for cardiotoxic effects of radiation. Cells isolated from hearts of juvenile mice were cultured and irradiated in vitro. In addition, cells isolated from hearts of locally irradiated adult animals (up to 6 days after irradiation) were tested. A dose-dependent formation of histone γH 2 A.X foci was observed after in vitro irradiation of cultured cells. However, such cells were resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis. Increased levels of actin stress fibres were observed in the cytoplasm of cardiac endothelial cells irradiated in vitro or isolated from irradiated animals. A high dose of 16 Gy did not increase permeability to Dextran in monolayers formed by endothelial cells. Up-regulated expression of Vcam1, Sele and Hsp70i genes was detected after irradiation in vitro and in cells isolated few days after irradiation in vivo. The increased level of actin stress fibres and enhanced expression of stress-response genes in irradiated endothelial cells are potentially involved in cardiotoxic effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  16. Possible role of non-bilayer lipids in the structure of mitochondria. A freeze-fracture electron microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venetie, R. van; Verkleij, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    The possible role of non-bilayer phospholipids on the structure of isolated rat liver mitochondria has been morphologically studied. Freshly isolated freeze-fractured mitochondria show smooth fracture faces with particles, representing the limiting membranes. The frequency and size of the particles

  17. Biosynthesis of agmatine in isolated mitochondria and perfused rat liver: studies with 15N-labelled arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    An important but unresolved question is whether mammalian mitochondria metabolize arginine to agmatine by the ADC (arginine decarboxylase) reaction. 15N-labelled arginine was used as a precursor to address this question and to determine the flux through the ADC reaction in isolated mitochondria obtained from rat liver. In addition, liver perfusion system was used to examine a possible action of insulin, glucagon or cAMP on a flux through the ADC reaction. In mitochondria and liver perfusion, 15N-labelled agmatine was generated from external 15N-labelled arginine. The production of 15N-labelled agmatine was time- and dose-dependent. The time-course of [U-15N4]agmatine formation from 2 mM [U-15N4]arginine was best fitted to a one-phase exponential curve with a production rate of approx. 29 pmol·min−1·(mg of protein)−1. Experiments with an increasing concentration (0– 40 mM) of [guanidino-15N2]arginine showed a Michaelis constant Km for arginine of 46 mM and a Vmax of 3.7 nmol·min−1·(mg of protein)−1 for flux through the ADC reaction. Experiments with broken mitochondria showed little changes in Vmax or Km values, suggesting that mitochondrial arginine uptake had little effect on the observed Vmax or Km values. Experiments with liver perfusion demonstrated that over 95% of the effluent agmatine was derived from perfusate [guanidino-15N2]arginine regardless of the experimental condition. However, the output of 15N-labelled agmatine (nmol·min−1·g−1) increased by approx. 2-fold (P<0.05) in perfusions with cAMP. The findings of the present study provide compelling evidence that mitochondrial ADC is present in the rat liver, and suggest that cAMP may stimulate flux through this pathway. PMID:15656789

  18. Late Ratchet syndrome involving isolated left ventricular lead dislodgement post-cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator generator change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Vern Hsen; Wong, Kelvin

    2018-04-01

    Lead dislodgement following cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) generator change is rare. We report a case including the postulate mechanism of an isolated left ventricular lead dislodgement 3 months after cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator pulse generator change.

  19. The effect of anthralin (dithranol) on mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlière, P; Dubertret, L; Sa e Melo, T; Salet, C; Fosse, M; Santus, R

    1985-05-01

    The short-term effect of topical application of anthralin (dithranol) on normal human skin was investigated by electron microscopy. Mitochondria appeared markedly damaged. By contrast other cellular structures, particularly the nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes were unchanged. In vitro experiments were therefore performed on isolated rat liver mitochondria and it was shown that anthralin acts as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. These results suggest that anthralin can inhibit the adenosine triphosphate supply in epidermal cells. This loss of energy supply in keratinocytes could explain, at least in part, the therapeutic efficiency of anthralin in psoriasis.

  20. Unique type of isolated cardiac valvular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reehana Salma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid deposition in heart is a common occurrence in systemic amyloidosis. But localised valvular amyloid deposits are very uncommon. It was only in 1922 that the cases of valvular amyloidosis were reported. Then in 1980, Goffin et al reported another type of valvular amyloidosis, which he called the dystrophic valvular amyloidosis. We report a case of aortic valve amyloidosis which is different from the yet described valvular amyloidosis. Case presentation A 72 years old gentleman underwent urgent aortic valve replacement. Intraoperatively, a lesion was found attached to the inferior surface of his bicuspid aortic valve. Histopathology examination of the valve revealed that the lesion contained amyloid deposits, identified as AL amyloidosis. The serum amyloid A protein (SAP scan was normal and showed no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. The ECG and echocardiogram were not consistent with cardiac amyloidosis. Conclusion Two major types of cardiac amyloidosis have been described in literature: primary-myelomatous type (occurs with systemic amyolidosis, and senile type(s. Recently, a localised cardiac dystrophic valvular amyloidosis has been described. In all previously reported cases, there was a strong association of localised valvular amyloidosis with calcific deposits. Ours is a unique case which differs from the previously reported cases of localised valvular amyloidosis. In this case, the lesion was not associated with any scar tissue. Also there was no calcific deposit found. This may well be a yet unknown type of isolated valvular amyloidosis.

  1. A deficiency of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF in Harlequin mouse heart mitochondria paradoxically reduces ROS generation during ischemia-reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun eChen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: AIF (apoptosis inducing factor is a flavin and NADH containing protein located within mitochondria required for optimal function of the respiratory chain. AIF may function as an antioxidant within mitochondria, yet when released from mitochondria it activates caspase-independent cell death. The Harlequin (Hq mouse has a markedly reduced content of AIF, providing an experimental model to query if the main role of AIF in the exacerbation of cell death is enhanced mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS or the activation of cell death programs. We asked if the ROS generation is altered in Hq heart mitochondria at baseline or following ischemia-reperfusion (IR.Methods: Buffer perfused mouse hearts underwent 30 min ischemia and 30 min reperfusion. Mitochondrial function including oxidative phosphorylation and H2O2 generation was measured. Immunoblotting was used to determine the contents of AIF and PAR [poly(ADP-ribose] in cell fractions.Results: There were no differences in the release of H2O2 between wild type (WT and Hq heart mitochondria at baseline. IR increased H2O2 generation from WT but not from Hq mitochondria compared to corresponding time controls. The complex I activity was decreased in WT but not in Hq mice following IR. The relocation of AIF from mitochondria to nucleus was increased in WT but not in Hq mice. IR activated PARP-1 only in WT mice. Cell injury was decreased in Hq mouse heart following in vitro IR.Conclusion: A deficiency of AIF within mitochondria does not increase ROS production during IR, indicating that AIF functions less as an antioxidant within mitochondria. The decreased cardiac injury in Hq mouse heart accompanied by less AIF translocation to the nucleus suggests that AIF relocation, rather than the AIF content within mitochondria, contributes to cardiac injury during IR.

  2. Are mitochondria a permanent source of reactive oxygen species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniek, K; Nohl, H

    2000-11-20

    The observation that in isolated mitochondria electrons may leak out of the respiratory chain to form superoxide radicals (O(2)(radical-)) has prompted the assumption that O(2)(radical-) formation is a compulsory by-product of respiration. Since mitochondrial O(2)(radical-) formation under homeostatic conditions could not be demonstrated in situ so far, conclusions drawn from isolated mitochondria must be considered with precaution. The present study reveals a link between electron deviation from the respiratory chain to oxygen and the coupling state in the presence of antimycin A. Another important factor is the analytical system applied for the detection of activated oxygen species. Due to the presence of superoxide dismutase in mitochondria, O(2)(radical-) release cannot be realistically determined in intact mitochondria. We therefore followed the release of the stable dismutation product H(2)O(2) by comparing most frequently used H(2)O(2) detection methods. The possible interaction of the detection systems with the respiratory chain was avoided by a recently developed method, which was compared with conventional methods. Irrespective of the methods applied, the substrates used for respiration and the state of respiration established, intact mitochondria could not be made to release H(2)O(2) from dismutating O(2)(radical-). Although regular mitochondrial respiration is unlikely to supply single electrons for O(2)(radical-) formation our study does not exclude the possibility of the respiratory chain becoming a radical source under certain conditions.

  3. Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Kasimova, Marina R.; Krab, Klaas

    2005-01-01

    Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria NAD(P)H has a central position in respiratory metabolism. It is produced by a large number of enzymes, e.g. the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, in the mitochondrial matrix and is oxidised by, amongst others, the respiratory chain. Most...... of this NAD(P)H appears to be bound to proteins, in fact free NAD(P)H – an important parameter in metabolic regulation - has never been observed in mitochondria. We have estimated free and bound NAD(P)H in isolated plant mitochondria under different metabolic conditions. The fluorescence spectra of free...... and bound NADH was determined and used to deconvolute fluorescence spectra of actively respiring mitochondria. Most of the mitochondrial NADH is bound in states 2 and 4. The amount of free NADH is lower but relatively constant even increasing a little in state 3 where it is about equal to bound NADH...

  4. Effects of 31 FDA approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors on isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Salminen, Alec; Yang, Xi; Luo, Yong; Wu, Qiangen; White, Matthew; Greenhaw, James; Ren, Lijun; Bryant, Matthew; Salminen, William; Papoian, Thomas; Mattes, William; Shi, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    The FDA has approved 31 small-molecule kinase inhibitors (KIs) for human use as of November 2016, with six having black box warnings for hepatotoxicity (BBW-H) in product labeling. The precise mechanisms and risk factors for KI-induced hepatotoxicity are poorly understood. Here, the 31 KIs were tested in isolated rat liver mitochondria, an in vitro system recently proposed to be a useful tool to predict drug-induced hepatotoxicity in humans. The KIs were incubated with mitochondria or submitochondrial particles at concentrations ranging from therapeutic maximal blood concentrations (Cmax) levels to 100-fold Cmax levels. Ten endpoints were measured, including oxygen consumption rate, inner membrane potential, cytochrome c release, swelling, reactive oxygen species, and individual respiratory chain complex (I-V) activities. Of the 31 KIs examined only three including sorafenib, regorafenib and pazopanib, all of which are hepatotoxic, caused significant mitochondrial toxicity at concentrations equal to the Cmax, indicating that mitochondrial toxicity likely contributes to the pathogenesis of hepatotoxicity associated with these KIs. At concentrations equal to 100-fold Cmax, 18 KIs were found to be toxic to mitochondria, and among six KIs with BBW-H, mitochondrial injury was induced by regorafenib, lapatinib, idelalisib, and pazopanib, but not ponatinib, or sunitinib. Mitochondrial liability at 100-fold Cmax had a positive predictive power (PPV) of 72% and negative predictive power (NPV) of 33% in predicting human KI hepatotoxicity as defined by product labeling, with the sensitivity and specificity being 62% and 44%, respectively. Similar predictive power was obtained using the criterion of Cmax ≥1.1 µM or daily dose ≥100 mg. Mitochondrial liability at 1-2.5-fold Cmax showed a 100% PPV and specificity, though the NPV and sensitivity were 32% and 14%, respectively. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into KI hepatotoxicity and indicate that

  5. In vitro assessment of cardiac performance after irradiation using an isolated working rat heart preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Laarse, A. van der; Ravels, F.J.M. van; Wermeskerken, A.-M. van; Verhoeve, H.R.; Graaf, B.W. de; Leer, J.W.H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on cardiac function was assessed using an isolated working rat heart preparation. The animals were given single doses of X-rays in the range 15-30 Gy to their hearts. Cardiac output (CO = aortic flow + coronary flow), heart weight and body weight were followed for a period of 10 months after treatment. Irradiation led to a decrease in cardiac function. This reduction was dose-dependent and progressive with time after treatment. The shape of the Frank-Starling curves constructed for irradiated hearts suggests a loss of contractile function of the myocardium. Coronary flow rates measured in 'working' hearts and in 'Langendorff' hearts were not significantly changed by the irradiation treatment. The isolated working rat heart preparation proved to be a simple and suitable animal model for the investigation of irradiation-induced cardiotoxicity. (author)

  6. Calculation of ion currents across the inner membrane of functionally intact mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Daniel A; Pavlov, Evgeny V

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial ion transport systems play a central role in cell physiology. Rates of Ca2+ and K+ transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane have been derived from the measurement of ion accumulation over time within functional isolated mitochondria or mitochondria of cultured cells. Alternatively, the electrical currents generated by ionic flux have been directly measured in purified and swollen mitochondrial samples (mitoplasts) or reconstituted channels, and typically range from 1 pA to several 100s pA. However, the direct electrophysiological approach necessarily requires extensive processing of the mitochondria prior to measurement, which can only be performed on isolated mitoplasts. To compare rates of mitochondrial ion transport measured in electrophysiological experiments to those measured in intact mitochondria and cells, we converted published rates of mitochondrial ion uptake into units of ionic current. We estimate that for monovalent ions, uptake by intact mitochondria at the rate of 1 nmol ∙ mg−1 protein ∙ min−1 is equivalent to 0.2 fA of current per whole single mitochondrion (0.4 fA for divalent ions). In intact mitochondria, estimated rates of electrogenic cation uptake are limited to 1–100 fA of integral current per single mitochondrion. These estimates are orders of magnitude lower than the currents through mitochondrial channels directly measured via patch-clamp or artificial lipid bilayer approaches. PMID:24037064

  7. Ripk3 induces mitochondrial apoptosis via inhibition of FUNDC1 mitophagy in cardiac IR injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ripk3-required necroptosis and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis are the predominant types of cell death that largely account for the development of cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI. Here, we explored the effect of Ripk3 on mitochondrial apoptosis. Compared with wild-type mice, the infarcted area in Ripk3-deficient (Ripk3-/- mice had a relatively low abundance of apoptotic cells. Moreover, the loss of Ripk3 protected the mitochondria against IRI and inhibited caspase9 apoptotic pathways. These protective effects of Ripk3 deficiency were relied on mitophagy activation. However, inhibition of mitophagy under Ripk3 deficiency enhanced cardiomyocyte and endothelia apoptosis, augmented infarcted area and induced microvascular dysfunction. Furthermore, ischemia activated mitophagy by modifying FUNDC1 dephosphorylation, which substantively engulfed mitochondria debris and cytochrome-c, thus blocking apoptosis signal. However, reperfusion injury elevated the expression of Ripk3 which disrupted FUNDC1 activation and abated mitophagy, increasing the likelihood of apoptosis. In summary, this study confirms the promotive effect of Ripk3 on mitochondria-mediated apoptosis via inhibition of FUNDC1-dependent mitophagy in cardiac IRI. These findings provide new insight into the roles of Ripk3-related necroptosis, mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and FUNDC1-required mitophagy in cardiac IRI.

  8. Mitochondria: more than just a powerhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Heidi M; Neuspiel, Margaret; Wasiak, Sylwia

    2006-07-25

    Pioneering biochemical studies have long forged the concept that the mitochondria are the 'energy powerhouse of the cell'. These studies, combined with the unique evolutionary origin of the mitochondria, led the way to decades of research focusing on the organelle as an essential, yet independent, functional component of the cell. Recently, however, our conceptual view of this isolated organelle has been profoundly altered with the discovery that mitochondria function within an integrated reticulum that is continually remodeled by both fusion and fission events. The identification of a number of proteins that regulate these activities is beginning to provide mechanistic details of mitochondrial membrane remodeling. However, the broader question remains regarding the underlying purpose of mitochondrial dynamics and the translation of these morphological transitions into altered functional output. One hypothesis has been that mitochondrial respiration and metabolism may be spatially and temporally regulated by the architecture and positioning of the organelle. Recent evidence supports and expands this idea by demonstrating that mitochondria are an integral part of multiple cell signaling cascades. Interestingly, proteins such as GTPases, kinases and phosphatases are involved in bi-directional communication between the mitochondrial reticulum and the rest of the cell. These proteins link mitochondrial function and dynamics to the regulation of metabolism, cell-cycle control, development, antiviral responses and cell death. In this review we will highlight the emerging evidence that provides molecular definition to mitochondria as a central platform in the execution of diverse cellular events.

  9. Expression of cardiac neural crest and heart genes isolated by modified differential display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsen, Brad J; Groebner, Nathan J; Frasier, Allison J; Lohr, Jamie L

    2003-08-01

    The invasion of the cardiac neural crest (CNC) into the outflow tract (OFT) and subsequent outflow tract septation are critical events during vertebrate heart development. We have performed four modified differential display screens in the chick embryo to identify genes that may be involved in CNC, OFT, secondary heart field, and heart development. The screens included differential display of RNA isolated from three different axial segments containing premigratory cranial neural crest cells; of RNA from distal outflow tract, proximal outflow tract, and atrioventricular tissue of embryonic chick hearts; and of RNA isolated from left and right cranial tissues, including the early heart fields. These screens have resulted in the identification of the five cDNA clones presented here, which are expressed in the cardiac neural crest, outflow tract and developing heart in patterns that are unique in heart development.

  10. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, C.; Kopeck, K.; Sceppa, E.

    1989-01-01

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with 32 P-γ-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of 35 S-adenosine thiotriphosphate

  11. Phosphorylation of formate dehydrogenase in potato tuber mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykova, N.V.; Stensballe, A.; Egsgaard, H.

    2003-01-01

    Two highly phosphorylated proteins were detected after two-dimensional (blue native/SDS-PAGE) gel electrophoretic separation of the matrix fraction isolated from potato tuber mitochondria. These two phosphoproteins were identified by mass spectrometry as formate dehydrogenase (FDH) and the E1alpha...

  12. Toxicity of polyhydroxylated fullerene to mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li-Yun [State Key Laboratory of Virology & Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (MOE), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Gao, Jia-Ling [Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China); Gao, Tian; Dong, Ping; Ma, Long; Jiang, Feng-Lei [State Key Laboratory of Virology & Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (MOE), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: yiliuchem@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology & Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (MOE), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Fullerenol-induced mitochondrial dysfunction was investigated at mitochondrial level. • Fullerenol disturbed mitochondrial inner membrane in polar protein regions. • Fullerenol affected the inner membrane and respiration chain of mitochondria. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered as a crucial mechanism of nanomaterial toxicity. Herein, we investigated the effects of polyhydroxylated fullerene (C{sub 60}(OH){sub 44}, fullerenol), a model carbon-based nanomaterial with high water solubility, on isolated mitochondria. Our study demonstrated that fullerenol enhanced the permeabilization of mitochondrial inner membrane to H{sup +} and K{sup +} and induced mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The fullerenol-induced swelling was dose-dependent and could be effectively inhibited by MPT inhibitors such as cyclosporin A (CsA), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ruthenium red (RR) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After treating the mitochondria with fullerenol, the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was found collapsed in a concentration-independent manner. The fluorescence anisotropy of hematoporphyrin (HP) changed significantly with the addition of fullerenol, while that of 1,6-diphenyl-hexatriene (DPH) changed slightly. Moreover, a decrease of respiration state 3 and increase of respiration state 4 were observed when mitochondria were energized with complex II substrate succinate. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provided direct evidence that fullerenol damaged the mitochondrial ultrastructure. The investigations can provide comprehensive information to elucidate the possible toxic mechanism of fullerenols at subcellular level.

  13. Endurance training increases the efficiency of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Koziel, Agnieszka; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Celichowski, Jan; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-10-01

    Endurance training enhances mitochondrial oxidative capacity, but its effect on mitochondria functioning is poorly understood. In the present study, the influence of an 8-week endurance training on the bioenergetic functioning of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria under different assay temperatures (25, 35, and 42 °C) was investigated. The study was performed on 24 adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats, which were randomly assigned to either a treadmill training group (n = 12) or a sedentary control group (n = 12). In skeletal muscles, endurance training stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity. In isolated mitochondria, endurance training increased the phosphorylation rate and elevated levels of coenzyme Q. Moreover, a decrease in mitochondrial uncoupling, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed after training, which could explain the increased reactive oxygen species production (in nonphosphorylating mitochondria) and enhanced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. At all studied temperatures, endurance training significantly augmented H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in nonphosphorylating mitochondria and decreased H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in phosphorylating mitochondria. Endurance training magnified the hyperthermia-induced increase in oxidative capacity and attenuated the hyperthermia-induced decline in oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species formation of nonphosphorylating mitochondria via proton leak enhancement. Thus, endurance training induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in muscle mitochondria that are important for cell signaling as well as for maintaining muscle energy homeostasis, especially at high temperatures.

  14. Novel distribution of calreticulin to cardiomyocyte mitochondria and its increase in a rat model of dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Wei, Jin, E-mail: weijindr@163.com [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Li, Yali [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Shan, Hu; Yan, Rui; Lin, Lin [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Zhang, Qiuhong [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Xue, Jiahong [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • Calreticulin can also be found in cardiomyocyte mitochondria. • The mitochondrial content of calreticulin is increased in DCM hearts. • Increased expression of mitochondrial CRT may induce mitochondrial damage. • Mitochondrial CRT may inhibit the phosphorylation of mitochondrial STAT3. - Abstract: Background: Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca{sup 2+}-binding chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum, can also be found in several other locations including the cytosol, nucleus, secretory granules, the outer side of the plasma membrane, and the extracellular matrix. Whether CRT is localized at mitochondria of cardiomyocytes and whether such localization is affected under DCM are still unclear. Methods and results: The DCM model was generated in rats by the daily oral administration of furazolidone for thirty weeks. Echocardiographic and hemodynamic studies demonstrated enlarged left ventricular dimensions and reduced systolic and diastolic function in DCM rats. Immuno-electron microscopy and Western blot showed that CRT was present in cardiomyocyte mitochondria and the mitochondrial content of CRT was increased in DCM hearts (P < 0.05). Morphometric analysis showed notable myocardial apoptosis and mitochondrial swelling with fractured or dissolved cristae in the DCM hearts. Compared with the control group, the mitochondrial membrane potential level of the freshly isolated cardiac mitochondria and the enzyme activities of cytochrome c oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in the model group were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), and the myocardial apoptosis index and the caspase activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3 were significantly increased (P < 0.05). Pearson linear correlation analysis showed that the mitochondrial content of CRT had negative correlations with the mitochondrial function, and a positive correlation with myocardial apoptosis index (P < 0.001). The protein expression level of cytochrome c and the phosphorylation activity of STAT3 in the

  15. The effect of amixin and agmatine on cytochrome c release from isolated mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Uspenska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs control permeability transition pore formation and cytochrome c release in the presence of apoptogenic factors. This study demonstrates that pharmacological agents amixin and agmatine affect mitochondrial nAChR functioning: they slightly suppress cytochrome c release from mouse brain and liver mitochondria stimulated with apoptogenic dose of Са2+ and prevent the effect of α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987. We conclude that mitochondria may be one of therapeutic targets of amixin and agmatine.

  16. Changes in oxidative properties of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana leaf mitochondria during development of Crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustin, P; Queiroz-Claret, C

    1985-06-01

    Kalanchoe blossfeldiana plants grown under long days (16 h light) exhibit a C3-type photosynthetic metabolism. Switching to short days (9 h light) leads to a gradual development of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). Under the latter conditions, dark CO2 fixation produces large amounts of malate. During the first hours of the day, malate is rapidly decarboxylated into pyruvate through the action of a cytosolic NADP(+)-or a mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme. Mitochondria were isolated from leaves of plants grown under long days or after treatment by an increasing number of short days. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as well as exogenous NADH and NADPH were readily oxidized by mitochondria isolated from the two types of plants. Glycine, known to be oxidized by C3-plant mitochondria, was still oxidized after CAM establishment. The experiments showed a marked parallelism in the increase of CAM level and the increase in substrate-oxidation capacity of the isolated mitochondria, particularly the capacity to oxidize malate in the presence of cyanide. These simultaneous variations in CAM level and in mitochondrial properties indicate that the mitochondrial NAD(+)-malic enzyme could account at least for a part of the oxidation of malate. The studies of whole-leaf respiration establish that mitochondria are implicated in malate degradation in vivo. Moreover, an increase in cyanide resistance of the leaf respiration has been observed during the first daylight hours, when malate was oxidized to pyruvate by cytosolic and mitochondrial malic enzymes.

  17. One-year high fat diet affects muscle-but not brain mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Tenna; Grunnet, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that few weeks of high fat (HF) diet may induce metabolic disturbances and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletalmuscle. However, little is known about the effects of long-term HF exposure and effects on brain mitochondria are unknown. Wistarrats were fed either chow (13E% fat......) or HF diet (60E% fat) for 1 year. The HF animals developed obesity, dyslipidemia, insulinresistance, and dysfunction of isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria: state 3 and state 4 were 30% to 50% increased (P .... Adding also succinate in state 3 resulted in ahigher substrate control ratio (SCR) with PC, but a lower SCR with pyruvate (P mitochondria from the same animal showed no changes with the substrates relevant...

  18. Polyhydroxybutyrate Targets Mammalian Mitochondria and Increases Permeability of Plasmalemmal and Mitochondrial Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elustondo, Pia A.; Angelova, Plamena R.; Kawalec, Michał; Michalak, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Pavlov, Evgeny V.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a polyester of 3-hydroxybutyric acid (HB) that is ubiquitously present in all organisms. In higher eukaryotes PHB is found in the length of 10 to 100 HB units and can be present in free form as well as in association with proteins and inorganic polyphosphate. It has been proposed that PHB can mediate ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes. We investigated the ability of PHB to interact with living cells and isolated mitochondria and the effects of these interactions on membrane ion transport. We performed experiments using a fluorescein derivative of PHB (fluo-PHB). We found that fluo-PHB preferentially accumulated inside the mitochondria of HeLa cells. Accumulation of fluo-PHB induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization. This membrane depolarization was significantly delayed by the inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore - Cyclosporin A. Further experiments using intact cells as well as isolated mitochondria confirmed that the effects of PHB directly linked to its ability to facilitate ion transport, including calcium, across the membranes. We conclude that PHB demonstrates ionophoretic properties in biological membranes and this effect is most profound in mitochondria due to the selective accumulation of the polymer in this organelle. PMID:24086638

  19. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and cardiac ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Gredilla, Ricardo

    According with different international organizations, cardiovascular diseases are becoming the first cause of death in western countries. Although exposure to different risk factors, particularly those related to lifestyle, contribute to the etiopathogenesis of cardiac disorders, the increase in average lifespan and aging are considered major determinants of cardiac diseases events. Mitochondria and oxidative stress have been pointed out as relevant factors both in heart aging and in the development of cardiac diseases such as heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. During aging, cellular processes related with mitochondrial function, such as bioenergetics, apoptosis and inflammation are altered leading to cardiac dysfunction. Increasing our knowledge about the mitochondrial mechanisms related with the aging process, will provide new strategies in order to improve this process, particularly the cardiovascular ones. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Pyruvate transport by thermogenic-tissue mitochondria.

    OpenAIRE

    Proudlove, M O; Beechey, R B; Moore, A L

    1987-01-01

    1. Mitochondria isolated from the thermogenic spadices of Arum maculatum and Sauromatum guttatum plants oxidized external NADH, succinate, citrate, malate, 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate without the need to add exogenous cofactors. 2. Oxidation of substrates was virtually all via the alternative oxidase, the cytochrome pathway constituting only 10-20% of the total activity, depending on the stage of spadix development. 3. During later stages of spadix development, pyruvate oxidation was enhanced...

  1. Impaired cardiac energy metabolism in embryos lacking adrenergic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Candice N.; Gidus, Sarah A.; Price, George F.; Peoples, Jessica N. R.

    2014-01-01

    As development proceeds from the embryonic to fetal stages, cardiac energy demands increase substantially, and oxidative phosphorylation of ADP to ATP in mitochondria becomes vital. Relatively little, however, is known about the signaling mechanisms regulating the transition from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism that occurs during the embryonic period. The main objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that adrenergic hormones provide critical stimulation of energy metabolism during embryonic/fetal development. We examined ATP and ADP concentrations in mouse embryos lacking adrenergic hormones due to targeted disruption of the essential dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh) gene. Embryonic ATP concentrations decreased dramatically, whereas ADP concentrations rose such that the ATP/ADP ratio in the adrenergic-deficient group was nearly 50-fold less than that found in littermate controls by embryonic day 11.5. We also found that cardiac extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates were significantly decreased, and mitochondria were significantly larger and more branched in adrenergic-deficient hearts. Notably, however, the mitochondria were intact with well-formed cristae, and there was no significant difference observed in mitochondrial membrane potential. Maternal administration of the adrenergic receptor agonists isoproterenol or l-phenylephrine significantly ameliorated the decreases in ATP observed in Dbh−/− embryos, suggesting that α- and β-adrenergic receptors were effective modulators of ATP concentrations in mouse embryos in vivo. These data demonstrate that adrenergic hormones stimulate cardiac energy metabolism during a critical period of embryonic development. PMID:25516547

  2. Impaired cardiac energy metabolism in embryos lacking adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Candice N; Gidus, Sarah A; Price, George F; Peoples, Jessica N R; Ebert, Steven N

    2015-03-01

    As development proceeds from the embryonic to fetal stages, cardiac energy demands increase substantially, and oxidative phosphorylation of ADP to ATP in mitochondria becomes vital. Relatively little, however, is known about the signaling mechanisms regulating the transition from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism that occurs during the embryonic period. The main objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that adrenergic hormones provide critical stimulation of energy metabolism during embryonic/fetal development. We examined ATP and ADP concentrations in mouse embryos lacking adrenergic hormones due to targeted disruption of the essential dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh) gene. Embryonic ATP concentrations decreased dramatically, whereas ADP concentrations rose such that the ATP/ADP ratio in the adrenergic-deficient group was nearly 50-fold less than that found in littermate controls by embryonic day 11.5. We also found that cardiac extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates were significantly decreased, and mitochondria were significantly larger and more branched in adrenergic-deficient hearts. Notably, however, the mitochondria were intact with well-formed cristae, and there was no significant difference observed in mitochondrial membrane potential. Maternal administration of the adrenergic receptor agonists isoproterenol or l-phenylephrine significantly ameliorated the decreases in ATP observed in Dbh-/- embryos, suggesting that α- and β-adrenergic receptors were effective modulators of ATP concentrations in mouse embryos in vivo. These data demonstrate that adrenergic hormones stimulate cardiac energy metabolism during a critical period of embryonic development. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Glutaredoxin-2 controls cardiac mitochondrial dynamics and energetics in mice, and protects against human cardiac pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges N. Kanaan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin 2 (GRX2, a mitochondrial glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase, is central to glutathione homeostasis and mitochondrial redox, which is crucial in highly metabolic tissues like the heart. Previous research showed that absence of Grx2, leads to impaired mitochondrial complex I function, hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in mice but the impact on mitochondrial structure and function in intact cardiomyocytes and in humans has not been explored. We hypothesized that Grx2 controls cardiac mitochondrial dynamics and function in cellular and mouse models, and that low expression is associated with human cardiac dysfunction. Here we show that Grx2 absence impairs mitochondrial fusion, ultrastructure and energetics in primary cardiomyocytes and cardiac tissue. Moreover, provision of the glutathione precursor, N-acetylcysteine (NAC to Grx2-/- mice did not restore glutathione redox or prevent impairments. Using genetic and histopathological data from the human Genotype-Tissue Expression consortium we demonstrate that low GRX2 is associated with fibrosis, hypertrophy, and infarct in the left ventricle. Altogether, GRX2 is important in the control of cardiac mitochondrial structure and function, and protects against human cardiac pathologies. Keywords: Human heart, Mitochondria, Oxidative stress, Redox, Cardiac metabolism, Cardiac hypertrophy

  4. Discovery of a new mitochondria permeability transition pore (mPTP) inhibitor based on gallic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, José; Oliveira, Catarina; Cagide, Fernando; Amorim, Ricardo; Garrido, Jorge; Borges, Fernanda; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2018-12-01

    Pharmacological interventions targeting mitochondria present several barriers for a complete efficacy. Therefore, a new mitochondriotropic antioxidant (AntiOxBEN 3 ) based on the dietary antioxidant gallic acid was developed. AntiOxBEN 3 accumulated several thousand-fold inside isolated rat liver mitochondria, without causing disruption of the oxidative phosphorylation apparatus, as seen by the unchanged respiratory control ratio, phosphorylation efficiency, and transmembrane electric potential. AntiOxBEN 3 showed also limited toxicity on human hepatocarcinoma cells. Moreover, AntiOxBEN 3 presented robust iron-chelation and antioxidant properties in both isolated liver mitochondria and cultured rat and human cell lines. Along with its low toxicity profile and high antioxidant activity, AntiOxBEN 3 strongly inhibited the calcium-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. From our data, AntiOxBEN 3 can be considered as a lead compound for the development of a new class of mPTP inhibitors and be used as mPTP de-sensitiser for basic research or clinical applications or emerge as a therapeutic application in mitochondria dysfunction-related disorders.

  5. Hyperthyroidism causes cardiac dysfunction by mitochondrial impairment and energy depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Sangeeta; Kar, Dipak; De, Kakali; Chander, Vivek; Bandyopadhyay, Arun

    2013-05-01

    This study elucidates the role of metabolic remodeling in cardiac dysfunction induced by hyperthyroidism. Cardiac hypertrophy, structural remodeling, and expression of the genes associated with fatty acid metabolism were examined in rats treated with triiodothyronine (T3) alone (8 μg/100 g body weight (BW), i.p.) for 15 days or along with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist bezafibrate (Bzf; 30 μg/100 g BW, oral) and were found to improve in the Bzf co-treated condition. Ultrastructure of mitochondria was damaged in T3-treated rat heart, which was prevented by Bzf co-administration. Hyperthyroidism-induced oxidative stress, reduction in cytochrome c oxidase activity, and myocardial ATP concentration were also significantly checked by Bzf. Heart function studied at different time points during the course of T3 treatment shows an initial improvement and then a gradual but progressive decline with time, which is prevented by Bzf co-treatment. In summary, the results demonstrate that hyperthyroidism inflicts structural and functional damage to mitochondria, leading to energy depletion and cardiac dysfunction.

  6. Hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 by renal mitochondria from rats of different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, M; Bulos, B; Takamoto, S; Sacktor, B

    1987-08-01

    The hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3) in kidney mitochondria from female rats of different ages was studied. The specific activity of 1 alpha-hydroxylase was highest in mitochondria isolated from the 2-month-old rat (0.47 pmol/10 min X mg protein), falling gradually with age to 0.17, 0.10, 0.07, and 0.06 pmol/10 min X mg protein in 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. The alteration in 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity with age was due to a change in the V'm of the system; the K'm for 25OHD3 was unchanged (3.9-4.0 microM). The specific activity of 24-hydroxylase was lowest in mitochondria isolated from the 2-month-old rat (8.2 pmol/10 min X mg protein), increasing to 37.8, 37.4, 38.2, and 55.7 pmol/10 min X mg protein in 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. The alteration in 24-hydroxylase activity with age was due to a change in the V'm of the system; the K'm value for 25OHD3 was unchanged (1.1-1.2 microM). The age-dependent decrease in 1 alpha-hydroxylase and concomitant increase in 24-hydroxylase activities observed in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of 2-, 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old rats could not be attributed to changes in the bioenergetic properties, i.e. the respiratory chain, of the mitochondria. The relative mitochondrial content of the kidney, however, probably decreased with age. These findings support the view that the kidneys of aged rats produce less 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 because of lower mitochondrial 1 alpha-hydroxylase specific activity and reduced number of mitochondria. This would be consistent with the lower levels of vitamin D hormone reported in the serum of senescent rats.

  7. Studies on the mechanism of pyrophosphate-mediated uptake of iron from transferrin by isolated rat-liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, K.; Romslo, I.; Bergen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    1. Respiring rat liver mitochondria accumulate iron released from transferrin by pyrophosphate. The amount of iron accumulated is 1-1.5 nmol mg protein -1 h -1 , or approximately 60% of the amount of iron mobilized from transferrin. 2. The uptake declines if respiration is inhibited, substrate is depleted, or the experiments are run under anaerobic conditions. Substrate, depletion and respiratory inhibitors are less inhibitory under anaerobic conditions. 3. More than 80% of the amount of iron accumulated by aerobic, actively respiring mitochondria can be chelated by bathophenanthroline sulphonate, and with deuteroporphyrin included, up to 30% of the amount of iron accumulated is recovered as deuteroheme. Iron accumulated by respiration-inhibited mitochondria under aerobic conditions is not available for heme synthesis. 4. With time the uptake of iron increases eightfold relative to the uptake of pyrophosphate. 5. The results are compatible with a model in which ferric iron is mobilized from transferrin by pyrophosphate, ferric iron pyrophosphate is bound to the mitochondria, iron is reduced, dissociates from pyrophosphate and is taken up by the mitochondria. Ferrous irons thus formed is available for heme synthesis. (orig.) [de

  8. Understanding the mechanism of direct electrochemistry of mitochondria-modified electrodes from yeast, potato and bovine sources at carbon paper electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroud, Fabien; Nicolo, Tera A.; Koepke, Sara J.; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2013-01-01

    Although mitochondria have been used for bio-electrochemistry for over 5 years, little is known about their direct electrochemistry mechanism. This paper focuses on developing a better understanding of the electron transfer mechanism of mitochondria from three different organisms at carbon electrodes. Yeast, potato and bovine mitochondria have been successfully isolated and immobilized onto Toray paper electrodes via vapor deposited silica. Organelle-modified electrodes were first characterized using cyclic voltammetry. Similar electrochemical signals were obtained for all organisms. Direct electron transfer was observed when a metabolite of the Krebs cycle was present in the buffer solution. Control experiments based on the immobilization of two electron carriers contained in mitochondria, cytochrome c and a quinone (coenzyme Q 10 ), tend to show the electron transfer mechanism to the carbon material comes from the quinone pool of the organelles. As quinones are known to be pH-dependent, we further investigated the response of the electrochemical signal of the three isolated mitochondria and the two electron carriers separately. The half wave potentials obtained from the organelles appeared to be pH-dependent and their variations are comparable to coenzyme Q 10 rather than cytochrome c. Finally, extraction of both the cytochrome c and the quinone pool from intact mitochondria was performed to validate our hypothesis that direct electrochemistry of mitochondria happens via the quinone pool. Electrochemistry of immobilized quinone-depleted mitochondria validated the hypothesis that the mitochondria are communicating with the electrodes through the quinone pool

  9. Identification of the site where the electron transfer chain of plant mitochondria is stimulated by electrostatic charge screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krab, K.; Wagner, M.J.; Wagner, A.M.; Moller, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    Modular kinetic analysis was used to determine the sites in plant mitochondria where charge-screening stimulates the rate of electron transfer from external NAD(P)H to oxygen. In mitochondria isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber callus, stimulation of the rate of oxygen uptake was

  10. Mitochondrial Ca2+ influx and efflux rates in guinea pig cardiac mitochondria: low and high affinity effects of cyclosporine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; Cortassa, Sonia; Winslow, Raimond L; O'Rourke, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Ca(2+) plays a central role in energy supply and demand matching in cardiomyocytes by transmitting changes in excitation-contraction coupling to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Matrix Ca(2+) is controlled primarily by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter and the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, influencing NADH production through Ca(2+)-sensitive dehydrogenases in the Krebs cycle. In addition to the well-accepted role of the Ca(2+)-triggered mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cell death, it has been proposed that the permeability transition pore might also contribute to physiological mitochondrial Ca(2+) release. Here we selectively measure Ca(2+) influx rate through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter and Ca(2+) efflux rates through Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)-independent pathways in isolated guinea pig heart mitochondria in the presence or absence of inhibitors of mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (CGP 37157) or the permeability transition pore (cyclosporine A). cyclosporine A suppressed the negative bioenergetic consequences (ΔΨ(m) loss, Ca(2+) release, NADH oxidation, swelling) of high extramitochondrial Ca(2+) additions, allowing mitochondria to tolerate total mitochondrial Ca(2+) loads of >400nmol/mg protein. For Ca(2+) pulses up to 15μM, Na(+)-independent Ca(2+) efflux through the permeability transition pore accounted for ~5% of the total Ca(2+) efflux rate compared to that mediated by the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (in 5mM Na(+)). Unexpectedly, we also observed that cyclosporine A inhibited mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-mediated Ca(2+) efflux at higher concentrations (IC(50)=2μM) than those required to inhibit the permeability transition pore, with a maximal inhibition of ~40% at 10μM cyclosporine A, while having no effect on the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter. The results suggest a possible alternative mechanism by which cyclosporine A could affect mitochondrial Ca(2+) load in cardiomyocytes, potentially

  11. Ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic with cardiac actions on isolated rat hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loipa Galán-Martínez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Ciprofloxacin is the most commonly used fluoroquinolone and is prescribed as the antibiotic of choice in the treatment of several microbial infections. Some clinical reports have suggested that ciprofloxacin may induce QT-interval prolongation and Torsades de Pointes arrhythmias. This drug is a weak inhibitor of a rapid component of the cardiac delayed rectifier potassium current IKr, but there are few electrophysiological data available to assess whether ciprofloxacin has the potency to provoke QT prolongation and subsequent Torsades de Pointes arrhythmias. Aims: To evaluate the effect of ciprofloxacin on the contractile and electrical activity of isolated rat hearts. Methods: The Langendorff technique was performed in rat hearts, and the effects of ciprofloxacin (0.001 – 100 μM were measured on the cardiac force of contraction and on the RR, QRS and QTc intervals. The arrhythmogenic potential and the ventricular fibrillation threshold were evaluated with ciprofloxacin. Results: Ciprofloxacin decreased the force of contraction of all hearts studied, in a concentration-dependent manner. The estimated IC50 for the inotropic negative effect was 0.15 ± 0.04 μM. Ciprofloxacin significantly prolonged the QRS complex, QTc and RR interval. Significant arrhythmic effects with ciprofloxacin were shown and the ventricular fibrillation threshold was decreased. Conclusions: These results suggest that ciprofloxacin exerted effects on cardiac Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels. The actions of ciprofloxacin require further studies at the cellular level. These conclusions may account for clinical data that have been reported previously.

  12. Ketogenesis in rat-liver mitochondria: Stimulation by palmityl-coenzyme A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaartjes, W.J.; Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1972-01-01

    It is well-known that the movement of adenine nucleotides (AdN) across the inner mitochondrial membrane is markedly decreased both by unsaturated and by saturated long-chain fatty acids. A similar effect is displayed by palmityl-CoA as demonstrated recently with isolated mitochondria of rat

  13. Zinc-dependent multi-conductance channel activity in mitochondria isolated from ischemic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Laura; Chachar, Mushtaque; Jover-Mengual, Teresa; Li, Hongmei; Jones, Adrienne; Yokota, Hidenori; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Flannery, Richard J; Miyawaki, Takahiro; Cho, Chang-Hoon; Polster, Brian M; Pypaert, Marc; Hardwick, J Marie; Sensi, Stefano L; Zukin, R Suzanne; Jonas, Elizabeth A

    2006-06-21

    Transient global ischemia is a neuronal insult that induces delayed cell death. A hallmark event in the early post-ischemic period is enhanced permeability of mitochondrial membranes. The precise mechanisms by which mitochondrial function is disrupted are, as yet, unclear. Here we show that global ischemia promotes alterations in mitochondrial membrane contact points, a rise in intramitochondrial Zn2+, and activation of large, multi-conductance channels in mitochondrial outer membranes by 1 h after insult. Mitochondrial channel activity was associated with enhanced protease activity and proteolytic cleavage of BCL-xL to generate its pro-death counterpart, deltaN-BCL-xL. The findings implicate deltaN-BCL-xL in large, multi-conductance channel activity. Consistent with this, large channel activity was mimicked by introduction of recombinant deltaN-BCL-xL to control mitochondria and blocked by introduction of a functional BCL-xL antibody to post-ischemic mitochondria via the patch pipette. Channel activity was also inhibited by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, indicative of a role for the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) of the outer mitochondrial membrane. In vivo administration of the membrane-impermeant Zn2+ chelator CaEDTA before ischemia or in vitro application of the membrane-permeant Zn2+ chelator tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine attenuated channel activity, suggesting a requirement for Zn2+. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which ischemic insults disrupt the functional integrity of the outer mitochondrial membrane and implicate deltaN-BCL-xL and VDAC in the large, Zn2+-dependent mitochondrial channels observed in post-ischemic hippocampal mitochondria.

  14. Effect of simvastatin on vascular tone in porcine coronary artery: Potential role of the mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almukhtar, H.; Garle, M.J.; Smith, P.A.; Roberts, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Statins induce acute vasorelaxation which may contribute to the overall benefits of statins in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying this relaxation is unknown. As statins have been shown to alter mitochondrial function, in this study we investigated the role of mitochondria in the relaxation to simvastatin. Relaxation of porcine coronary artery segments by statins was measured using isolated tissue baths. Mitochondrial activity was determined by measuring changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were determined in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells with Fluo-4 using standard epifluorescent imaging techniques. Simvastatin, but not pravastatin, produced a slow relaxation of the coronary artery, which was independent of the endothelium. The relaxation was attenuated by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (10 μM) and the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol (10 μM), or a combination of the two. The complex III inhibitor antimycin A (10 μM) produced a similar time-dependent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery, which was attenuated by rotenone. Changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence showed that simvastatin (10 μM) depolarized the membrane potential of mitochondria in both isolated mitochondria and intact blood vessels. Simvastatin and antimycin A both inhibited calcium-induced contractions in isolated blood vessels and calcium influx in smooth muscle cells and this inhibition was prevented by rotenone. In conclusion, simvastatin produces an endothelium-independent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery which is dependent, in part, upon effects on the mitochondria. The effects on the mitochondria may lead to a reduction in calcium influx and hence relaxation of the blood vessel. - Highlights: • Simvastatin produces a relaxation of the porcine coronary artery. • This relaxation is inhibited by mitochondrial complex inhibitors. • Simvastatin alters mitochondrial membrane potential

  15. Effect of simvastatin on vascular tone in porcine coronary artery: Potential role of the mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almukhtar, H.; Garle, M.J.; Smith, P.A.; Roberts, R.E., E-mail: richard.roberts@nottingham.ac.uk

    2016-08-15

    Statins induce acute vasorelaxation which may contribute to the overall benefits of statins in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying this relaxation is unknown. As statins have been shown to alter mitochondrial function, in this study we investigated the role of mitochondria in the relaxation to simvastatin. Relaxation of porcine coronary artery segments by statins was measured using isolated tissue baths. Mitochondrial activity was determined by measuring changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were determined in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells with Fluo-4 using standard epifluorescent imaging techniques. Simvastatin, but not pravastatin, produced a slow relaxation of the coronary artery, which was independent of the endothelium. The relaxation was attenuated by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (10 μM) and the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol (10 μM), or a combination of the two. The complex III inhibitor antimycin A (10 μM) produced a similar time-dependent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery, which was attenuated by rotenone. Changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence showed that simvastatin (10 μM) depolarized the membrane potential of mitochondria in both isolated mitochondria and intact blood vessels. Simvastatin and antimycin A both inhibited calcium-induced contractions in isolated blood vessels and calcium influx in smooth muscle cells and this inhibition was prevented by rotenone. In conclusion, simvastatin produces an endothelium-independent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery which is dependent, in part, upon effects on the mitochondria. The effects on the mitochondria may lead to a reduction in calcium influx and hence relaxation of the blood vessel. - Highlights: • Simvastatin produces a relaxation of the porcine coronary artery. • This relaxation is inhibited by mitochondrial complex inhibitors. • Simvastatin alters mitochondrial membrane potential

  16. Study of oxidative and phosphorylative activity in mitochondria from cereal seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plhak, F

    1973-01-01

    In the present paper the oxidative and phosphorylative activity of mitochondria isolated from rye, wheat, barley and corn seedlings are compared. Mitochondria from the shoots as well as from the roots of rye, wheat and corn oxidized succinate and in the presence of ATP or ADP exhibited the respiratory control which reached the values mostly of about 2. In the presence of ATP or ADP the decrease of inorganic phosphorus was contemporarily remarkable. The P/O ratio reached the values mostly of about 0.8 up to 1.0. The presence of ATP effected in some cases more favorable the respiratory control as well as the P/O ratio in comparison with ADP. With regard to the fact that a trapping hexokinase system was not added, the presence of endogenous hexokinase in mitochondria of experimental plants is presumed. The barley mitochondria exhibited the respiratory control as well, but instead of the decrease in inorganic phosphorus content in reaction mixture, an increase took place. It was caused by the presence of active ATP-ase which was not effectively inhibited by present NaF.

  17. Ca(2+-dependent regulation of the Ca(2+ concentration in the myometrium mitochondria. II. Ca(2+ effects on mitochondria membranes polarization and [Ca(2+](m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Babich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Ca2+ accumulation in the mitochondria undergoes complex regulation by Ca2+ itself. But the mechanisms of such regulation are still discussed. In this paper we have shown that Ca ions directly or indirectly regulate the level of myometrium mitochondria membranes polarization. The additions of 100 µM Ca2+ were accompanied by depolarization of the mitochondria membranes. The following experiments were designed to study the impact of Ca2+ on the myometrium mitochondria [Ca2+]m. Isolated myometrium mitochondria were preincubated without or with 10 μM Са2+ followed by 100 μM Са2+ addition. Experiments were conducted in three mediums: without ATP and Mg2+ (0-medium, in the presence of 3 mM Mg2+ (Mg-medium and 3 mM Mg2+ + 3 mM ATP (Mg,ATP-medium. It was shown that the effects of 10 μM Са2+ addition were different in different mediums, namely in 0- and Mg-medium the [Ca2+]m values increased, whereas in Mg,ATP-medium statistically reliable changes were not registered. Preincubation of mitochondria with 10 μM Са2+ did not affect the [Ca2+]m value after the addition of 100 μM Са2+. The [Ca2+]m values after 100 μM Са2+ addition were the same in 0- and Mg,ATP-mediums and somewhat lower in Mg-medium. Preliminary incubation of mitochondria with 10 μM Са2+ in 0- and Mg-mediums reduced changes of Fluo 4 normalized fluorescence values that were induced by 100 μM Са2+ additions, but in Mg,ATP-medium such differences were not recorded. It is concluded that Са2+ exchange in myometrium mitochondria is regulated by the concentration of Ca ions as in the external medium, so in the matrix of mitochondria. The medium composition had a significant impact on the [Са2+]m values in the absence of exogenous cation. It is suggested that light increase of [Са2+]m before the addition of 100 μM Са2+ may have a positive effect on the functional activity of the mitochondria.

  18. Evidence for two compartments of exchangeable calcium in isolated rat liver mitochondria obtained using a 45Ca exchange technique in the presence of magnesium, phosphate, and ATPase at 370C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barritt, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of calcium between isolated rat liver mitochondria and the extramitochondrial medium at 37 degrees C and in the presence of 2 mM inorganic phosphate, 3 mM ATP, 0.05 or 1.1 mM free magnesium and a calcium buffer, nitrilotriacetic acid, was investigated using a 45 Ca exchange technique. The amounts of 40 Ca in the mitochondria and medium were allowed to reach equilibrium before initiation of the measurement of 45 Ca exchange. At 0.05 mM free magnesium and initial extramitochondrial free calcium concentrations of between 0.15 and 0.5 microM, the mitochondria accumulated calcium until the extramitochondrial free calcium concentration was reduced to 0.15 microM. Control experiments showed that the mitochondria were stable under the incubation conditions employed. The 45 Ca exchange data were found to be consistent with a system in which two compartments of exchangeable calcium are associated with the mitochondria. Changes in the concentration of inorganic phosphate did not significantly affect the 45 Ca exchange curves, whereas an increase in the concentration of free magnesium inhibited exchange. The maximum rate of calcium outflow from the mitochondria was estimated to be 1.7 nmol/min per mg of protein, and the value of K0.5 for intramitochondrial exchangeable calcium to be about 1.6 nmol per mg of protein. Ruthenium Red decreased the fractional transfer rate for calcium inflow to the mitochondria while nupercaine affected principally the fractional transfer rates for the transfer of calcium between the two mitochondrial compartments. The use of the incubation conditions and 45 Ca exchange technique described in this report for studies of the effects of agents which may alter mitochondrial calcium uptake or release (e.g., the pre-treatment of cells with hormones) is briefly discussed

  19. Xanthurenic acid translocates proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins into mitochondria and impairs mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess Otto M

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthurenic acid is an endogenous molecule produced by tryptophan degradation, produced in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Its accumulation can be observed in aging-related diseases, e.g. senile cataract and infectious disease. We previously reported that xanthurenic acid provokes apoptosis, and now present a study of the response of mitochondria to xanthurenic acid. Results Xanthurenic acid at 10 or 20 μM in culture media of human aortic smooth muscle cells induces translocation of the proteins Bax, Bak, Bclxs, and Bad into mitochondria. In 20 μM xanthurenic acid, Bax is also translocated to the nucleus. In isolated mitochondria xanthurenic acid leads to Bax and Bclxs oligomerization, accumulation of Ca2+, and increased oxygen consumption. Conclusion Xanthurenic acid interacts directly with Bcl-2 family proteins, inducing mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis and impairing mitochondrial functions.

  20. Correlation between chloride flux via the mitochondria-rich cells and transepithelial water movement in isolated frog skin (Rana esculenta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone; chloride transport; electroosmosis; Frog skin; Intercalated cells; Local osmosis; Mitochondria-rich cells.......Antidiuretic hormone; chloride transport; electroosmosis; Frog skin; Intercalated cells; Local osmosis; Mitochondria-rich cells....

  1. The profound effects of microcystin on cardiac antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial function and cardiac toxicity in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Tong; Xie Ping; Liu Ying; Li Guangyu; Xiong Qian; Hao Le; Li Huiying

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from microcystin toxication have widely been attributed to hypovolemic shock due to hepatic interstitial hemorrhage, while some recent studies suggest that cardiogenic complication is also involved. So far, information on cardiotoxic effects of MC has been rare and the underlying mechanism is still puzzling. The present study examined toxic effects of microcystins on heart muscle of rats intravenously injected with extracted MC at two doses, 0.16LD 50 (14 μg MC-LReq kg -1 body weight) and 1LD 50 (87 μg MC-LReq kg -1 body weight). In the dead rats, both TTC staining and maximum elevations of troponin I levels confirmed myocardial infarction after MC exposure, besides a serious interstitial hemorrhage in liver. In the 1LD 50 dose group, the coincident falls in heart rate and blood pressure were related to mitochondria dysfunction in heart, while increases in creatine kinase and troponin I levels indicated cardiac cell injury. The corresponding pathological alterations were mainly characterized as loss of adherence between cardiac myocytes and swollen or ruptured mitochondria at the ultrastructural level. MC administration at a dose of 1LD 50 not only enhanced activities and up-regulated mRNA transcription levels of antioxidant enzymes, but also increased GSH content. At both doses, level of lipid peroxides increased obviously, suggesting serious oxidative stress in mitochondria. Simultaneously, complex I and III were significantly inhibited, indicating blocks in electron flow along the mitochondrial respiratory chain in heart. In conclusion, the findings of this study implicate a role for MC-induced cardiotoxicity as a potential factor that should be considered when evaluating the mechanisms of death associated with microcystin intoxication in Brazil

  2. Dextran strongly increases the Michaelis constants of oxidative phosphorylation and of mitochondrial creatine kinase in heart mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gellerich, F.N.; Laterveer, F.D.; Korzeniewski, B.; Zierz, S.; Nicolaij, K.

    1998-01-01

    Macromolecules restore the morphological changes which occur upon isolation of mitochondria in normally used isolation media. It was shown that in the presence of dextrans the permeability of mitochondrial outer membrane for adenine nucleotides decreases which may have considerable implications for

  3. Penetrating cation/fatty acid anion pair as a mitochondria-targeted protonophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Fedor F.; Severina, Inna I.; Antonenko, Yury N.; Rokitskaya, Tatiana I.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Mokhova, Elena N.; Vyssokikh, Mikhail Yu.; Pustovidko, Antonina V.; Markova, Olga V.; Yaguzhinsky, Lev S.; Korshunova, Galina A.; Sumbatyan, Nataliya V.; Skulachev, Maxim V.; Skulachev, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    A unique phenomenon of mitochondria-targeted protonophores is described. It consists in a transmembrane H+-conducting fatty acid cycling mediated by penetrating cations such as 10-(6’-plastoquinonyl)decyltriphenylphosphonium (SkQ1) or dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP). The phenomenon has been modeled by molecular dynamics and directly proved by experiments on bilayer planar phospholipid membrane, liposomes, isolated mitochondria, and yeast cells. In bilayer planar phospholipid membrane, the concerted action of penetrating cations and fatty acids is found to result in conversion of a pH gradient (ΔpH) to a membrane potential (Δψ) of the Nernstian value (about 60 mV Δψ at ΔpH = 1). A hydrophobic cation with localized charge (cetyltrimethylammonium) failed to substitute for hydrophobic cations with delocalized charge. In isolated mitochondria, SkQ1 and C12TPP, but not cetyltrimethylammonium, potentiated fatty acid-induced (i) uncoupling of respiration and phosphorylation, and (ii) inhibition of H2O2 formation. In intact yeast cells, C12TPP stimulated respiration regardless of the extracellular pH value, whereas a nontargeted protonophorous uncoupler (trifluoromethoxycarbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone) stimulated respiration at pH 5 but not at pH 3. Hydrophobic penetrating cations might be promising to treat obesity, senescence, and some kinds of cancer that require mitochondrial hyperpolarization. PMID:20080732

  4. Developmental changes of the sensitivity of cardiac and liver mitochondrial permeability transition pore to calcium load and oxidative stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drahota, Zdeněk; Milerová, Marie; Endlicher, R.; Rychtrmoc, D.; Červinková, Z.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, Suppl.1 (2012), S165-S172 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial permeability transition pore * cardiac mitochondria * liver mitochondria * oxidative stress * calcium load * rat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  5. Apoptotic role of TGF-β mediated by Smad4 mitochondria translocation and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lijuan; Qiu, Tao; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2011-07-01

    Smad4, originally isolated from the human chromosome 18q21, is a key factor in transducing the signals of the TGF-β superfamily of growth hormones and plays a pivotal role in mediating antimitogenic and proapoptotic effects of TGF-β, but the mechanisms by which Smad4 induces apoptosis are elusive. Here we report that Smad4 directly translocates to the mitochondria of apoptotic cells. Smad4 gene silencing by siRNA inhibits TGF-β-induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells and UV-induced apoptosis in PANC-1 cells. Cell fractionation assays demonstrated that a fraction of Smad4 translocates to mitochondria after long time TGF-β treatment or UV exposure, during which the cells were under apoptosis. Smad4 mitochondria translocation during apoptosis was also confirmed by fluorescence observation of Smad4 colocalization with MitoTracker Red. We searched for mitochondria proteins that have physical interactions with Smad4 using yeast two-hybrid screening approach. DNA sequence analysis identified 34 positive clones, five of which encoded subunits in mitochondria complex IV, i.e., one clone encoded cytochrome c oxidase COXII, three clones encoded COXIII and one clone encoded COXVb. Strong interaction between Smad4 with COXII, an important apoptosis regulator, was verified in yeast by β-gal activity assays and in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation assays. Further, mitochondrial portion of cells was isolated and the interaction between COXII and Smad4 in mitochondria upon TGF-β treatment or UV exposure was confirmed. Importantly, targeting Smad4 to mitochondria using import leader fusions enhanced TGF-β-induced apoptosis. Collectively, the results suggest that Smad4 promote apoptosis of the cells through its mitochondrial translocation and association with mitochondria protein COXII. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitochondria are the target organelle of differentiation-inducing factor-3, an anti-tumor agent isolated from Dictyostelium discoideum [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzuru Kubohara

    Full Text Available Differentiation-inducing factor-3 (DIF-3, found in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and its derivatives such as butoxy-DIF-3 (Bu-DIF-3 are potent anti-tumor agents. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the actions of DIF-3 remain to be elucidated. In this study, we synthesized a green fluorescent derivative of DIF-3, BODIPY-DIF-3, and a control fluorescent compound, Bu-BODIPY (butyl-BODIPY, and investigated how DIF-like molecules behave in human cervical cancer HeLa cells by using both fluorescence and electron microscopy. BODIPY-DIF-3 at 5-20 µ M suppressed cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, whereas Bu-BODIPY had minimal effect on cell growth. When cells were incubated with BODIPY-DIF-3 at 20 µM, it penetrated cell membranes within 0.5 h and localized mainly in mitochondria, while Bu-BODIPY did not stain the cells. Exposure of cells for 1-3 days to DIF-3, Bu-DIF-3, BODIPY-DIF-3, or CCCP (a mitochondrial uncoupler induced substantial mitochondrial swelling, suppressing cell growth. When added to isolated mitochondria, DIF-3, Bu-DIF-3, and BOIDPY-DIF-3, like CCCP, dose-dependently promoted the rate of oxygen consumption, but Bu-BODIPY did not. Our results suggest that these bioactive DIF-like molecules suppress cell growth, at least in part, by disturbing mitochondrial activity. This is the first report showing the cellular localization and behavior of DIF-like molecules in mammalian tumor cells.

  7. Inhibition of ATP synthesis by fenbufen and its conjugated metabolites in rat liver mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syed, Muzeeb; Skonberg, Christian; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2016-01-01

    in the drug induced liver injury (DILI) by fenbufen, the inhibitory effect of fenbufen and its conjugated metabolites on oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria was investigated. Fenbufen glucuronide (F-GlcA), fenbufen-N-acetyl cysteine-thioester (F-NAC) and fenbufen...... and fenbufen show any protective effect on fenbufen mediated inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Inclusion of NADPH in mitochondrial preparations with fenbufen did not modulate the inhibitory effects, suggesting no role of CYP mediated oxidative metabolites on the ATP synthesis in isolated mitochondria...

  8. Study of High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein (HS-CRP) After Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Patients Undergoing Isolated CABG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari Moghadam, Adel; Azizinejad, Saied

    2016-12-01

    Although cardiac rehabilitation is known as a tool to reduce the overall risk of cardiovascular complications, its specific role in the reduction of hs-CRP as a marker of inflammation and a proven marker of cardiovascular risk needs further investigation. The present study aims at elucidating the effects of a full course of conventional cardiac rehabilitation program for the period of eight weeks, on the levels of hs-CRP in patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass surgery. In this case study, 30 consecutive patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass surgery (isolated CABGS), and a full 8-week cardiac rehabilitation program in Tehran Heart Center, were investigated. A group of 30 similar patients, who enrolled in the same period of rehabilitation program but did not participate in practice, was considered as a control group. Serum levels of hs-CRP in both groups were measured retrospectively and in similar days before the start of rehabilitation program and at the end of it (or 8 weeks after initial registration for the control group). Levels of hs-CRP in the rehabilitation group and control group were 5.9 7.7 and 6.3 6.9 respectively before start of the program which was not statistically meaningful ( P -Value = 0.833). However, after the program, level of hs-CRP in the two tested groups changed to 2.3 5.1 and 5.7 6.1 respectively which showed a meaningful correlation ( P -Value = 0.023). These results also showed that decrease in hs-CRP level in the rehabilitated group but not in the control group was statistically meaningful (with P -Value of 0.037 and 0.0723 respectively). In patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery, participating in a full course of cardiac rehabilitation for 8 weeks has resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP levels as a marker of cardiovascular risk.

  9. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal β III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders

  10. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal beta III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  11. [Mitochondria inheritance in yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizikova, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the main mechanisms of mitochondria inheritance in yeast Saccharonmyces cerevisiae. The genetic mechanisms of functionally active mitochondria inheritance in eukaryotic cells is one of the most relevant in modem researches. A great number of genetic diseases are associated with mitochondria dysfunction. Plasticity of eukaryotic cell metabolism according to the environmental changes is ensured by adequate mitochondria functioning by means of ATP synthesis coordination, reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis regulation and is an important factor of cell adaptation to stress. Mitochondria participation in important for cell vitality processes masters the presence of accurate mechanisms of mitochondria functions regulation according to environment fluctuations. The mechanisms of mitochondria division and distribution are highly conserved. Baker yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal model object for mitochondria researches due to energetic metabolism lability, ability to switch over respiration to fermentation, and petite-positive phenotype. Correction of metabolism according to the environmental changes is necessary for cell vitality. The influence of respiratory, carbon, amino acid and phosphate metabolism on mitochondria functions was shown. As far as the mechanisms that stabilize functions of mitochondria and mtDNA are highly conserve, we can project yeast regularities on higher eukaryotes systems. This makes it possible to approximate understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of a great number of human diseases.

  12. Electron transfer and photophosphorylation in mitochondria of buckwheat after irradiation of seeds with. gamma. -rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, V A; Kurganova, L N; Gorlanova, T M [Gor' kovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1974-11-01

    Pre-sowing irradiation of seeds at 500 R activates the transfer of electrons by photosynthetic electron transfer path of isolated buchwheat chloroplasts in the ontogenesis and stimulates the conjugated photosynthetic phosphorilation. An increased content of NADPxH/sub 2/ is observed along with an elevated level of ATP production. Intensification of oxidative phosphorilation and growth of the P/O ratio of mitochondria has been shown in the ''irradiated'' plants, together with a concomitant increase of ATPhase activity in chloroplasts and mitochondria.

  13. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. BIOCHEMICAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL ASPECTS OF CA2+ TRANSPORT BY MITOCHONDRIA OF THE HEPATOPANCREAS OF THE BLUE CRAB CALLINECTES SAPIDUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Ho; Greenawalt, John W.; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1974-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus show up to 12-fold stimulation of respiration on addition of Ca2+, which is accompanied by Ca2+ accumulation (Ca2+:site = 1.9) and H+ ejection (H+:Ca2+ = 0.85). Sr2+ and Mn2+ are also accumulated; Mg2+ is not. A strongly hypertonic medium (383 mosM), Mg2+, and phosphate are required for maximal Ca2+ uptake. Ca2+ uptake takes precedence over oxidative phosphorylation of ADP for respiratory energy. Once Ca2+ is accumulated by the crab mitochondria, it is stable and only very slowly released, even by uncoupling agents. ATP hydrolysis also supports Ca2+ uptake. Respiration-inhibited crab hepatopancreas mitochondria show both high-affinity and low-affinity Ca2+-binding sites, which are inactive in the presence of uncoupling agents. Crab hepatopancreas mitochondria have an enormous capacity for accumulation of Ca2+, up to 5,500 ng-atoms Ca2+ per mg protein, with an equivalent amount of phosphate. Freshly isolated mitochondria contain very large amounts of Ca2+, Mg2+, phosphate, K+, and Na+; their high Ca2+ content is a reflection of the vary large amount of extra-mitochondrial Ca2+ in the whole tissue. Electron microscopy of crab mitochondria loaded with Ca2+ and phosphate showed large electron-dense deposits, presumably of precipitated calcium phosphate. They consisted of bundles of needle-like crystals, whereas Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria show only amorphous deposits of calcium phosphate under similar conditions. The very pronounced capacity of crab hepatopancreas mitochondria for transport of Ca2+ appears to be adapted to a role in the storage and release of Ca2+ during the molting cycle of this crustacean. PMID:4827906

  15. Reduced Right Ventricular Function Predicts Long-Term Cardiac Re-Hospitalization after Cardiac Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leela K Lella

    Full Text Available The significance of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF, independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and valve procedures remains unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the significance of abnormal RVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR, independent of LVEF in predicting outcomes of patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve surgery.From 2007 to 2009, 109 consecutive patients (mean age, 66 years; 38% female were referred for pre-operative CMR. Abnormal RVEF and LVEF were considered 30 days outcomes included, cardiac re-hospitalization, worsening congestive heart failure and mortality. Mean clinical follow up was 14 months.Forty-eight patients had reduced RVEF (mean 25% and 61 patients had normal RVEF (mean 50% (p<0.001. Fifty-four patients had reduced LVEF (mean 30% and 55 patients had normal LVEF (mean 59% (p<0.001. Patients with reduced RVEF had a higher incidence of long-term cardiac re-hospitalization vs. patients with normal RVEF (31% vs.13%, p<0.05. Abnormal RVEF was a predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization (HR 3.01 [CI 1.5-7.9], p<0.03. Reduced LVEF did not influence long-term cardiac re-hospitalization.Abnormal RVEF is a stronger predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization than abnormal LVEF in patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve procedures.

  16. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: the model of choice to study mitochondria from unicellular photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funes, Soledad; Franzén, Lars-Gunnar; González-Halphen, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism to study photosynthesis, cellular division, flagellar biogenesis, and, more recently, mitochondrial function. It has distinct advantages in comparison to higher plants because it is unicellular, haploid, and amenable to tetrad analysis, and its three genomes are subject to specific transformation. It also has the possibility to grow either photoautotrophically or heterotrophically on acetate, making the assembly of the photosynthetic machinery not essential for cell viability. Methods developed allow the isolation of C. reinhardtii mitochondria free of thylakoid contaminants. We review the general procedures used for the biochemical characterization of mitochondria from this green alga.

  17. Twinkle overexpression prevents cardiac rupture after myocardial infarction by alleviating impaired mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takahiro; Ikeda, Masataka; Ide, Tomomi; Fujino, Takeo; Matsuo, Yuka; Arai, Shinobu; Saku, Keita; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac rupture is a fatal complication after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the detailed mechanism underlying cardiac rupture after MI remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondria in the pathophysiology of cardiac rupture by analyzing Twinkle helicase overexpression mice (TW mice). Twinkle overexpression increased mtDNA copy number approximately twofold and ameliorated ischemic cardiomyopathy at day 28 after MI. Notably, Twinkle overexpression markedly prevented cardiac rupture and improved post-MI survival, accompanied by the suppression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the MI border area at day 5 after MI when cardiac rupture frequently occurs. Additionally, these cardioprotective effects of Twinkle overexpression were abolished in transgenic mice overexpressing mutant Twinkle with an in-frame duplication of amino acids 353-365, which resulted in no increases in mtDNA copy number. Furthermore, although apoptosis and oxidative stress were induced and mitochondria were damaged in the border area, these injuries were improved in TW mice. Further analysis revealed that mitochondrial biogenesis, including mtDNA copy number, transcription, and translation, was severely impaired in the border area at day 5 In contrast, Twinkle overexpression maintained mtDNA copy number and restored the impaired transcription and translation of mtDNA in the border area. These results demonstrated that Twinkle overexpression alleviated impaired mitochondrial biogenesis in the border area through maintained mtDNA copy number and thereby prevented cardiac rupture accompanied by the reduction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, and suppression of MMP activity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Hyperoxia decreases glycolytic capacity, glycolytic reserve and oxidative phosphorylation in MLE-12 cells and inhibits complex I and II function, but not complex IV in isolated mouse lung mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumuda C Das

    Full Text Available High levels of oxygen (hyperoxia are frequently used in critical care units and in conditions of respiratory insufficiencies in adults, as well as in infants. However, hyperoxia has been implicated in a number of pulmonary disorders including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Hyperoxia increases the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the mitochondria that could impair the function of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We analyzed lung mitochondrial function in hyperoxia using the XF24 analyzer (extracellular flux and optimized the assay for lung epithelial cells and mitochondria isolated from lungs of mice. Our data show that hyperoxia decreases basal oxygen consumption rate (OCR, spare respiratory capacity, maximal respiration and ATP turnover in MLE-12 cells. There was significant decrease in glycolytic capacity and glycolytic reserve in MLE-12 cells exposed to hyperoxia. Using mitochondria isolated from lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia or normoxia we have shown that hyperoxia decreased the basal, state 3 and state3 μ (respiration in an uncoupled state respirations. Further, using substrate or inhibitor of a specific complex we show that the OCR via complex I and II, but not complex IV was decreased, demonstrating that complexes I and II are specific targets of hyperoxia. Further, the activities of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase, NADH-DH and complex II (succinate dehydrogenase, SDH were decreased in hyperoxia, but the activity of complex IV (cytochrome oxidase, COX remains unchanged. Taken together, our study show that hyperoxia impairs glycolytic and mitochondrial energy metabolism in in tact cells, as well as in lungs of mice by selectively inactivating components of electron transport system.

  19. Ca2+ Transport by Mitochondria from L1210 Mouse Ascites Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, Baltazar; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1973-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from the ascites form of L1210 mouse leukemia cells readily accumulate Ca2+ from the suspending medium and eject H+ during oxidation of succinate in the presence of phosphate and Mg2+, with normal stoichiometry between Ca2+ uptake and electron transport. Ca2+ loads up to 1600 ng-atoms per mg of protein are attained. As is the case in mitochondria from normal tissues, Ca2+ uptake takes precedence over oxidative phosphorylation. However, Ca2+ transport by the L-1210 mitochondria is unusual in other respects, which may possibly have general significance in tumor cells. The apparent affinity of the L1210 mitochondria for Ca2+ in stimulation of oxygen uptake is about 3-fold greater than in normal liver mitochondria; moreover, the maximal rate of Ca2+ transport is also considerably higher. Furthermore, when Ca2+ pulses are added to L1210 mitochondria in the absence of phosphate or other permeant anions, much larger amounts of Ca2+ are bound and H+ ejected per atom of oxygen consumed than in the presence of phosphate; up to 7 Ca2+ ions are bound per pair of electrons passing each energy-conserving site of the electron-transport chain. Such “superstoichiometry” of Ca2+ uptake can be accounted for by two distinct types of respiration-dependent interaction of Ca2+ with the L1210 mitochondria. One is the stimulation of oxygen consumption, which is achieved by relatively low concentrations of Ca2+ (Km ≅ 8 μM) and is accompanied by binding of Ca2+ up to 40 ng-atoms per mg of protein. The second process, also dependent on electron transport, is the binding of further Ca2+ from the medium in exchange with previously stored membrane-bound protons, in which the affinity for Ca2+ is much lower (Km ≅ 120 μM). PMID:4515933

  20. Action of diclofenac on kidney mitochondria and cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Lin Eng; Vincent, Annette S.; Halliwell, Barry; Wong, Kim Ping

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial membrane potential measured in isolated rat kidney mitochondria and in digitonin-permeabilized MDCK type II cells pre-energized with succinate, glutamate, and/or malate was reduced by micromolar diclofenac dose-dependently. However, ATP biosynthesis from glutamate/malate was significantly more compromised compared to that from succinate. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle by diclofenac with a resultant decrease in the ability of mitochondria to generate NAD(P)H was demonstrated. Diclofenac however had no effect on the activities of NADH dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase. In conclusion, decreased NAD(P)H production due to an inhibition of the entry of malate and glutamate via the malate-aspartate shuttle explained the more pronounced decreased rate of ATP biosynthesis from glutamate and malate by diclofenac. This drug, therefore affects the bioavailability of two major respiratory complex I substrates which would normally contribute substantially to supplying the reducing equivalents for mitochondrial electron transport for generation of ATP in the renal cell

  1. Mitochondria in Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are autonomous cellular organelles that oversee a variety of functions such as metabolism, energy production, calcium buffering, and cell fate determination. Regulation of their morphology and diverse activities beyond energy production are being recognized as playing major roles in cellular health and dysfunction. This review is aimed at summarizing what is known regarding mitochondrial contributions to pathogenesis of lung diseases. Emphasis is given to understanding the importance of structural and functional aspects of mitochondria in both normal cellular function (based on knowledge from other cell types) and in development and modulation of lung diseases such as asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis and cancer. Emerging techniques that allow examination of mitochondria, and potential strategies to target mitochondria in the treatment of lung diseases are also discussed. PMID:23978003

  2. Correlation between Amitriptyline-Induced Cardiotoxic Effects and Cardiac S100b Protein in Isolated Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nil Hocaoğlu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amitriptyline is an important cause of mortality due to its cardiovascular toxicity. Aims: To investigate the changes in levels of cardiac S100b protein on amitriptyline-induced cardiotoxicity and also to examine the correlation between amitriptyline-induced cardiotoxic effects and cardiac S100b protein in an isolated rat heart model. Study Design: Animal experimentation, isolated heart model. Methods: After a stabilization period, isolated hearts were randomized to two groups (n=5 and n=7. In the control group, isolated hearts were subjected to an infusion of 5% dextrose for 60 minutes. In the amitriptyline group, 5.5×10-5 M amitriptyline was infused for 60 minutes to achieve amitriptyline toxicity. After the infusion period, heart tissues were removed for histological examination. Results: In comparison to control treatment, amitriptyline infusion decreased left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP, dp/dtmax and heart rate (HR and significantly prolonged QRS duration (p<0.05. The semiquantitative scores for S100b protein levels in amitriptyline-infused hearts were higher than in the control group (p<0.01. At the end of the experiment, in the amitriptyline-infused group, significant correlations were found between LVDP and S100b protein scores (r=-0.807, p=0.003 and between QRS duration and S100b protein scores (r=0.859, p=0.001. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the S100b protein may be a helpful indicator or biomarker in studying the cardiotoxic effects of amitriptyline.

  3. Novel localization of OCTN1, an organic cation/carnitine transporter, to mammalian mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Tein, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the β-oxidation of fatty acids. We report novel localization of the organic cation/carnitine transporter, OCTN1, to mitochondria. We made GFP- and RFP-human OCTN1 cDNA constructs and showed expression of hOCTN1 in several transfected mammalian cell lines. Immunostaining of GFP-hOCTN1 transfected cells with different intracellular markers and confocal fluorescent microscopy demonstrated mitochondrial expression of OCTN1. There was striking co-localization of an RFP-hOCTN1 fusion protein and a mitochondrial-GFP marker construct in transfected MEF-3T3 and no co-localization of GFP-hOCTN1 in transfected human skin fibroblasts with other intracellular markers. L-[ 3 H]Carnitine uptake in freshly isolated mitochondria of GFP-hOCTN1 transfected HepG2 demonstrated a K m of 422 μM and Western blot with an anti-GFP antibody identified the expected GFP-hOCTN1 fusion protein (90 kDa). We showed endogenous expression of native OCTN1 in HepG2 mitochondria with anti-GST-hOCTN1 antibody. Further, we definitively confirmed intact L-[ 3 H]carnitine uptake (K m 1324 μM), solely attributable to OCTN1, in isolated mitochondria of mutant human skin fibroblasts having <1% of carnitine acylcarnitine translocase activity (alternate mitochondrial carnitine transporter). This mitochondrial localization was confirmed by TEM of murine heart incubated with highly specific rabbit anti-GST-hOCTN1 antibody and immunogold labeled goat anti-rabbit antibody. This suggests an important yet different role for OCTN1 from other OCTN family members in intracellular carnitine homeostasis

  4. In vitro studies of the physical interactions between neurofilaments, microtubules and mitochondria isolated from the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Jean-François; Eyer, Joël; Weiss, Dieter G.; Lindén, Monica

    1991-05-01

    In order to explore the molecular nature and the regulation of dense cytomatrix which interconnects MT, NF and membranous organelles in neurons (9), the interactions between NF, MT and each of these cytoskelatal elements with brain mitochondria were investigated in vitro using biochemical and viophysical methods. From these studies, the following conclusions were drawn: 1- Pure NF form in vitro a highly viscous gel, dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the side arms of the NF-H and M subunits which might participate directly to the interactions since antibodies specific of these phosphorylated sites inhibited efficiently the NF gelation. This process is modulated by both ATP hydrolysis and soluble molecules from nervous tissue and it might reflect the highly controled organization of NF bundles in axons. 2- In contrast with NF, low viscosity levels were detected in MT suspensions. However, the occurrence of weak interactions between MT were deduced from studies with taxol, ATP, AMP-PNP and Mg ions, which affected the viscosity and the organization of MT in vitro, possibly through MAPs mediated interactions. 3- Mitochondria associated permanently in vitro to few MT through cross-bridges involving MAPs, which bind to specific sites on the outer membrane (17). In addition, brain mitochondria (and not liver mitochondria) interact with NF in an ATP-dependent manner, through thin cross-bridges possibly involving the NF-H and M subunits since these molecules, when purified, compete efficiently with MAPs for the binding to membrane sites. These results suggest the participation of structure MAPs and of NF-H and M subunits in the spatial organization MT and NF and in anchoring mitochondria to the cytomatrix.

  5. The Aging Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Theurey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a central event in many pathologies and contributes as well to age-related processes. However, distinguishing between primary mitochondrial dysfunction driving aging and a secondary mitochondrial impairment resulting from other cell alterations remains challenging. Indeed, even though mitochondria undeniably play a crucial role in aging pathways at the cellular and organismal level, the original hypothesis in which mitochondrial dysfunction and production of free radicals represent the main driving force of cell degeneration has been strongly challenged. In this review, we will first describe mitochondrial dysfunctions observed in aged tissue, and how these features have been linked to mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS–mediated cell damage and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations. We will also discuss the clues that led to consider mitochondria as the starting point in the aging process, and how recent research has showed that the mitochondria aging axis represents instead a more complex and multifactorial signaling pathway. New working hypothesis will be also presented in which mitochondria are considered at the center of a complex web of cell dysfunctions that eventually leads to cell senescence and death.

  6. Effects of Ca2+ on oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria from the thermogenic organ of marlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J; Block, B A

    1996-12-01

    Mitochondria from the muscle-derived thermogenic (heater) organ and oxidative red muscle of the blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) were studied in order to evaluate aspects of the mechanism of thermogenesis in heater tissue. We investigated whether short-term Ca(2+)-induced uncoupling of mitochondria contributes to the thermogenic cycle of the heater organ by enhancing the respiration rate. Specific electrodes were used to obtain simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption and Ca2+ fluxes on isolated mitochondria, and the effects of various concentrations of Ca2+ on respiration rates and the ADP phosphorylated/atomic oxygen consumed (P/O) ratio were examined. Addition of Ca2+ in excess of 10 mumol l-1 to respiring heater organ or red muscle mitochondria partially inhibited state 3 respiration and reduced the P/O ratio, indicating that the mitochondria were partially uncoupled. These effects were blocked by 2 mumol l-1 Ruthenium Red. In heater organ mitochondria, state 3 respiration rate and the P/O ratio were not significantly reduced by 1 mumol l-1 free Ca2+, a concentration likely to be near the maximum achieved in a stimulated cell. This indicates that transient increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration may not significantly reduce the P/O ratio of heater organ mitochondria. The activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase in heater organ mitochondria was stimulated by approximately 15% by Ca2+ concentrations between 0.2 and 1 mumol l-1. These results suggest that heater organ mitochondria are able to maintain a normal P/O ratio and should maintain ATP output during transient increases in Ca2+ concentration, supporting a model in which an ATP-consuming process drives thermogenesis. Activation of mitochondrial dehydrogenases by low levels of Ca2+ may also enhance respiration and contribute to thermogenesis.

  7. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mengwei [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Huang, Chenglin [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen100@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: weili_shen@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria.

  8. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Mengwei; Huang, Chenglin; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu; Chen, Hong; Shen, Weili

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria

  9. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mendizabal-Zubiaga

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1, where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and functional role of mtCB1 in three different striated muscles. Immunoelectron microscopy for CB1 was used in skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and rectus abdominis and myocardium from wild-type and CB1-KO mice. Functional assessments were performed in mitochondria purified from the heart of the mice and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption upon application of different acute delta-9-tetrahidrocannabinol (Δ9-THC concentrations (100 nM or 200 nM was monitored. About 26% of the mitochondrial profiles in gastrocnemius, 22% in the rectus abdominis and 17% in the myocardium expressed CB1. Furthermore, the proportion of mtCB1 versus total CB1 immunoparticles was about 60% in the gastrocnemius, 55% in the rectus abdominis and 78% in the myocardium. Importantly, the CB1 immunolabeling pattern disappeared in muscles of CB1-KO mice. Functionally, acute 100 nM or 200 nM THC treatment specifically decreased mitochondria coupled respiration between 12% and 15% in wild-type isolated mitochondria of myocardial muscles but no significant difference was noticed between THC treated and vehicle in mitochondria isolated from CB1-KO heart. Furthermore, gene expression of key enzymes involved in pyruvate synthesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and mitochondrial respiratory chain was evaluated in the striated muscle of CB1-WT and CB1-KO. CB1-KO showed an increase in the gene expression of Eno3, Pkm2, and Pdha1, suggesting an increased production of pyruvate. In contrast, no significant

  10. Exogenous ether lipids predominantly target mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuerschner, Lars; Richter, Doris; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Ether lipids are ubiquitous constituents of cellular membranes with no discrete cell biological function assigned yet. Using fluorescent polyene-ether lipids we analyzed their intracellular distribution in living cells by microscopy. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated high......, accumulated to mitochondria and induced morphological changes and cellular apoptosis. These data indicate that edelfosine could exert its pro-apoptotic power by targeting and damaging mitochondria and thereby inducing cellular apoptosis. In general, this study implies an important role of mitochondria...

  11. Mitochondria in neutrophil apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raam, B. J.; Verhoeven, A. J.; Kuijpers, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    Central in the regulation of the short life span of neutrophils are their mitochondria. These organelles hardly contribute to the energy status of neutrophils but play a vital role in the apoptotic process. Not only do the mitochondria contain cytotoxic proteins that are released during apoptosis

  12. A non-toxic fluorogenic dye for mitochondria labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junyan; Han, Myung Shin; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria, powerhouses of cells, are responsible for many critical cellular functions, such as cell energy metabolism, reactive oxygen species production, and apoptosis regulation. Monitoring mitochondria morphology in live cells temporally and spatially could help with the understanding of the mechanisms of mitochondrial functional regulation and the pathogenesis of mitochondria-related diseases. A novel non-cytotoxic fluorogenic compound, AcQCy7, was developed as a mitochondria-specific dye. AcQCy7 emitted no fluorescent signal outside of cells, but it became fluorescent after intracellular hydrolysis of the acetyl group. The hydrolyzed fluorescent product was well retained in mitochondria, enabling long-lasting fluorescence imaging of mitochondria without cell washing. A 2-day culture study using AcQCy7 showed no sign of cytotoxicity, whereas a commonly used mitochondria-staining probe, Mitochondria Tracker Green, caused significant cell death even at a much lower concentration. Apoptosis-causing mitochondria fission was monitored clearly in real time by AcQCy7. A simple add-and-read mitochondria specific dye AcQCy7 has been validated in various cell models. Bright mitochondria specific fluorescent signal in treated cells lasted several days without noticeable toxicity. The probe AcQCy7 has been proofed to be a non-toxic agent for long-term mitochondria imaging. © 2013.

  13. Enzymic synthesis of γ-coniceine in Conium maculatum chloroplasts and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M F

    1981-08-01

    Further studies of the transaminase responsible for the first committed step in alkaloid formation in Conium maculatum have shown the L-alanine: 5-ketooctanal transaminase to occur in both the mitochondria and chloroplast. Experiments suggest that these enzymes are the isoenzymes Transaminase A and B respectively previously isolated by the author. It is suggested that the chloroplast enzyme is normally responsible for alkaloid production.

  14. High glucose-induced Ca2+ overload and oxidative stress contribute to apoptosis of cardiac cells through mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kain, Vasundhara; Sitasawad, Sandhya L

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac cell apoptosis is the initiating factor of cardiac complications especially diabetic cardiomyopathy. Mitochondria are susceptible to the damaging effects of elevated glucose condition. Calcium overload and oxidative insult are the two mutually non-exclusive phenomena suggested to cause cardiac dysfunction. Here, we examined the effect of high-glucose induced calcium overload in calpain-1 mediated cardiac apoptosis in an in vitro setting. H9c2, rat ventricular myoblast cell line was treated with elevated glucose condition and the cellular consequences were studied. Intracellular calcium trafficking, ROS generation, calpain-1 activation and caspase-12 and caspase-9 pathway were studied using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. High-glucose treatment resulted in increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) which was mobilized to the mitochondria. Concomitant intra-mitochondrial calcium ([Ca2+]m) increase resulted in enhanced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. These events led to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Cardiomyocyte death exhibited several classical markers of apoptosis, including activation of caspases, appearance of annexin V on the outer plasma membrane, increased population of cells with sub-G0/G1 DNA content and nuclear condensation. Key findings include elucidation of cell signaling mechanism of high-glucose induced calcium-dependent cysteine protease calpain-1 activation, which triggers non-conventional caspases as alternate mode of cell death. This information increases the understanding of cardiac cell death under hyperglycemic condition and can possibly be extended for designing new therapeutic strategies for diabetic cardiomyopathy. The novel findings of the study reveal that high glucose induces apoptosis by both mitochondria-dependent and independent pathways via concomitant rise in intracellular calcium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Role for cER and Mmr1p in anchorage of mitochondria at sites of polarized surface growth in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayne, Theresa C; Zhou, Chun; Boldogh, Istvan R; Charalel, Joseph K; McFaline-Figueroa, José Ricardo; Thoms, Sven; Yang, Christine; Leung, Galen; McInnes, Joseph; Erdmann, Ralf; Pon, Liza A

    2011-12-06

    Mitochondria accumulate at neuronal and immunological synapses and yeast bud tips and associate with the ER during phospholipid biosynthesis, calcium homeostasis, and mitochondrial fission. Here we show that mitochondria are associated with cortical ER (cER) sheets underlying the plasma membrane in the bud tip and confirm that a deletion in YPT11, which inhibits cER accumulation in the bud tip, also inhibits bud tip anchorage of mitochondria. Time-lapse imaging reveals that mitochondria are anchored at specific sites in the bud tip. Mmr1p, a member of the DSL1 family of tethering proteins, localizes to punctate structures on opposing surfaces of mitochondria and cER sheets underlying the bud tip and is recovered with isolated mitochondria and ER. Deletion of MMR1 impairs bud tip anchorage of mitochondria without affecting mitochondrial velocity or cER distribution. Deletion of the phosphatase PTC1 results in increased Mmr1p phosphorylation, mislocalization of Mmr1p, defects in association of Mmr1p with mitochondria and ER, and defects in bud tip anchorage of mitochondria. These findings indicate that Mmr1p contributes to mitochondrial inheritance as a mediator of anchorage of mitochondria to cER sheets in the yeast bud tip and that Ptc1p regulates Mmr1p phosphorylation, localization, and function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The mitochondria-mediate apoptosis of Lepidopteran cells induced by azadirachtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfei Huang

    Full Text Available Mitochondria have been shown to play an important role in apoptosis using mammalian cell lines. However, this seems not to be the case in Drosophila, an insect model organism; thus more in-depth studies of insect cell apoptosis are necessary. In the present study, mitochondrial involvement during azadirachtin- and camptothecin-induced apoptosis in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells (isolated from Spodoptera frugiperda pupal ovarian tissue was investigated. The results showed that both azadirachtin and camptothecin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, activation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTPs and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP were observed very early during apoptosis and were followed subsequently by the release of cytochrome-c from the mitochondria. Furthermore, the results also revealed that the opening of MPTPs and the loss of MMP induced by azadirachtin could be significantly inhibited by the permeability transition pore (PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, which was used to identify the key role of mitochondria in the apoptosis of Sf9 cells. However, in camptothecin-treated Sf9 cells, CsA could not suppress the opening of MPTPs and the loss of MMP when apoptosis was induced. The data from caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity assays and detection of apoptosis by morphological observation and flow cytometry also uncovered the different effect of CsA on the two botanical apoptosis inducers. Although different mechanisms of apoptosis induction exist, our study revealed that mitochondria play a crucial role in insect cell line apoptosis.

  17. The mitochondria-mediate apoptosis of Lepidopteran cells induced by azadirachtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingfei; Lv, Chaojun; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria have been shown to play an important role in apoptosis using mammalian cell lines. However, this seems not to be the case in Drosophila, an insect model organism; thus more in-depth studies of insect cell apoptosis are necessary. In the present study, mitochondrial involvement during azadirachtin- and camptothecin-induced apoptosis in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells (isolated from Spodoptera frugiperda pupal ovarian tissue) was investigated. The results showed that both azadirachtin and camptothecin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, activation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTPs) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were observed very early during apoptosis and were followed subsequently by the release of cytochrome-c from the mitochondria. Furthermore, the results also revealed that the opening of MPTPs and the loss of MMP induced by azadirachtin could be significantly inhibited by the permeability transition pore (PTP) inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA), which was used to identify the key role of mitochondria in the apoptosis of Sf9 cells. However, in camptothecin-treated Sf9 cells, CsA could not suppress the opening of MPTPs and the loss of MMP when apoptosis was induced. The data from caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity assays and detection of apoptosis by morphological observation and flow cytometry also uncovered the different effect of CsA on the two botanical apoptosis inducers. Although different mechanisms of apoptosis induction exist, our study revealed that mitochondria play a crucial role in insect cell line apoptosis.

  18. Dynamic survey of mitochondria by ubiquitin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Henriques, Mafalda; Langer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin is a post-translational modifier with proteolytic and non-proteolytic roles in many biological processes. At mitochondria, it performs regulatory homeostatic functions and contributes to mitochondrial quality control. Ubiquitin is essential for mitochondrial fusion, regulates mitochondria-ER contacts, and participates in maternal mtDNA inheritance. Under stress, mitochondrial dysfunction induces ubiquitin-dependent responses that involve mitochondrial proteome remodeling and culminate in organelle removal by mitophagy. In addition, many ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms have been shown to regulate innate immune responses and xenophagy. Here, we review the emerging roles of ubiquitin at mitochondria. PMID:24569520

  19. Functional Mitochondria in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herst, Patries M; Rowe, Matthew R; Carson, Georgia M; Berridge, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    The ability to rapidly adapt cellular bioenergetic capabilities to meet rapidly changing environmental conditions is mandatory for normal cellular function and for cancer progression. Any loss of this adaptive response has the potential to compromise cellular function and render the cell more susceptible to external stressors such as oxidative stress, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, and hypoxia. Mitochondria play a vital role in bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways and can rapidly adjust to meet the metabolic needs of the cell. Increased demand is met by mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion of individual mitochondria into dynamic networks, whereas a decrease in demand results in the removal of superfluous mitochondria through fission and mitophagy. Effective communication between nucleus and mitochondria (mito-nuclear cross talk), involving the generation of different mitochondrial stress signals as well as the nuclear stress response pathways to deal with these stressors, maintains bioenergetic homeostasis under most conditions. However, when mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations accumulate and mito-nuclear cross talk falters, mitochondria fail to deliver critical functional outputs. Mutations in mtDNA have been implicated in neuromuscular and neurodegenerative mitochondriopathies and complex diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, gastrointestinal disorders, skin disorders, aging, and cancer. In some cases, drastic measures such as acquisition of new mitochondria from donor cells occurs to ensure cell survival. This review starts with a brief discussion of the evolutionary origin of mitochondria and summarizes how mutations in mtDNA lead to mitochondriopathies and other degenerative diseases. Mito-nuclear cross talk, including various stress signals generated by mitochondria and corresponding stress response pathways activated by the nucleus are summarized. We also introduce and discuss a small family of recently discovered hormone-like mitopeptides

  20. Effects of salicylic acid on post-ischaemic ventricular function and purine efflux in isolated mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Don; Gehr, Lynne; Karnes, H Thomas; Sica, Domenic; Gehr, Todd; Larus, Terri; Farthing, Christine; Xi, Lei

    2007-01-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Various plasma concentrations of aspirin and its predominant metabolite, salicylic acid, are required for its antiarthritic (1.5-2.5 mM), anti-inflammatory (0.5-5.0 mM) or antiplatelet (0.18-0.36 mM) actions. A recent study demonstrated the inhibitory effects of both aspirin and salicylic acid on oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthesis in isolated rat cardiac mitochondria in a dose-dependent manner (0-10 mM concentration range). In this context, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of salicylic acid on inosine efflux (a potential biomarker of acute cardiac ischaemia) as well as cardiac contractile function in the isolated mouse heart following 20 min of zero-flow global ischaemia. Inosine efflux was found at significantly higher concentrations in ischaemic hearts perfused with Krebs buffer fortified with 1.0 mM salicylic acid compared with those without salicylic acid (12575+/-3319 vs. 1437+/-348 ng ml(-1) min(-1), mean+/-SEM, n=6 per group, psalicylic acid potentiates 8.8-fold ATP nucleotide purine catabolism into its metabolites (e.g. inosine, hypoxanthine). Salicylic acid (0.1 or 1.0 mM) did not appreciably inhibit purine nucleoside phosphorylase (the enzyme converts inosine to hypoxanthine) suggesting the augmented inosine efflux was due to the salicylic acid effect on upstream elements of cellular respiration. Whereas post-ischaemic cardiac function was further depressed by 1.0 mM salicylic acid, perfusion with 0.1 mM salicylic acid led to a remarkable functional improvement despite moderately increased inosine efflux (2.7-fold). We conclude that inosine is a sensitive biomarker for detecting cardiac ischaemia and salicylic acid-induced effects on cellular respiration. However, the inosine efflux level appears to be a poor predictor of the individual post-ischaemic cardiac functional recovery in this ex vivo model.

  1. Pure myopathy with enlarged mitochondria associated to a new mutation in MTND2 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Zanolini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To date, only few mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-encoded ND2 subunit of Complex I have been reported, usually presenting a severe phenotype characterized by early onset encephalomyopathy and early death. In this report, we describe a new mutation in the MTND2 gene in a 21-year-old man with a mild myopathic phenotype characterized by exercise intolerance and increased plasma lactate at rest. Electromyography and brain NMR were normal, and no cardiac involvement was present. Muscle biopsy showed a massive presence of ragged red – COX-positive fibres, with enlarged mitochondria containing osmiophilic inclusions. Biochemical assays revealed a severe isolated complex I deficiency. We identified a novel, heteroplasmic mutation m.4831G>A in the MTND2 gene, causing the p.Gly121Asp substitution in the ND2 protein. The mutation was present in the 95% of mitochondrial genomes from patient's muscle tissue, at a lower level in cells from the urinary tract and at a lowest level in lymphocytes from patient's blood; the base substitution was absent in fibroblasts and in the tissues from proband's healthy mother and brother. The specific skeletal muscle tissue involvement can explain the childhood-onset and the relatively benign, exclusively myopathic course of the disease.

  2. Optogenetic control of mitochondrial metabolism and Ca2+ signaling by mitochondria-targeted opsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkatch, Tatiana; Greotti, Elisa; Baranauskas, Gytis; Pendin, Diana; Roy, Soumitra; Nita, Luliaoana I; Wettmarshausen, Jennifer; Prigge, Matthias; Yizhar, Ofer; Shirihai, Orian S; Fishman, Daniel; Hershfinkel, Michal; Fleidervish, Ilya A; Perocchi, Fabiana; Pozzan, Tullio; Sekler, Israel

    2017-06-27

    Key mitochondrial functions such as ATP production, Ca 2+ uptake and release, and substrate accumulation depend on the proton electrochemical gradient (ΔμH + ) across the inner membrane. Although several drugs can modulate ΔμH + , their effects are hardly reversible, and lack cellular specificity and spatial resolution. Although channelrhodopsins are widely used to modulate the plasma membrane potential of excitable cells, mitochondria have thus far eluded optogenetic control. Here we describe a toolkit of optometabolic constructs based on selective targeting of channelrhodopsins with distinct functional properties to the inner mitochondrial membrane of intact cells. We show that our strategy enables a light-dependent control of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m ) and coupled mitochondrial functions such as ATP synthesis by oxidative phosphorylation, Ca 2+ dynamics, and respiratory metabolism. By directly modulating Δψ m , the mitochondria-targeted opsins were used to control complex physiological processes such as spontaneous beats in cardiac myocytes and glucose-dependent ATP increase in pancreatic β-cells. Furthermore, our optometabolic tools allow modulation of mitochondrial functions in single cells and defined cell regions.

  3. Photothermal imaging of skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomimatsu, Toru; Miyazaki, Jun; Kano, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2017-06-01

    The morphology and topology of mitochondria provide useful information about the physiological function of skeletal muscle. Previous studies of skeletal muscle mitochondria are based on observation with transmission, scanning electron microscopy or fluorescence microscopy. In contrast, photothermal (PT) microscopy has advantages over the above commonly used microscopic techniques because of no requirement for complex sample preparation by fixation or fluorescent-dye staining. Here, we employed the PT technique using a simple diode laser to visualize skeletal muscle mitochondria in unstained and stained tissues. The fine mitochondrial network structures in muscle fibers could be imaged with the PT imaging system, even in unstained tissues. PT imaging of tissues stained with toluidine blue revealed the structures of subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria and the swelling behavior of mitochondria in damaged muscle fibers with sufficient image quality. PT image analyses based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) and Grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were performed to derive the characteristic size of mitochondria and to discriminate the image patterns of normal and damaged fibers.

  4. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation in ascites tumor mitochondria and cells by intramitochondrial Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobo, A; Lehninger, A L

    1980-03-25

    Accumulation of Ca2+ (+ phosphate) by respiring mitochondria from Ehrlich ascites or AS30-D hepatoma tumor cells inhibits subsequent phosphorylating respiration in response to ADP. The respiratory chain is still functional since a proton-conducting uncoupler produces a normal stimulation of electron transport. The inhibition of phosphorylating respiration is caused by intramitochondrial Ca2+ (+ phosphate). ATP + Mg2+ together, but not singly, prevents the inhibitory action of Ca2+. Neither AMP, GTP, GDP, nor any other nucleoside 5'-triphosphate or 5'-diphosphate could replace ATP in this effect. Phosphorylating respiration on NAD(NADP)-linked substrates was much more susceptible to the inhibitory effect of intramitochondrial Ca2+ than succinate-linked respiration. Significant inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation is given by the endogenous Ca2+ present in freshly isolated tumor mitochondria. The phosphorylating respiration of permeabilized Ehrlich ascites tumor cells is also inhibited by Ca2+ accumulated by the mitochondria in situ. Possible causes of the Ca2+-induced inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation are considered.

  5. Peroxisome-mitochondria interplay and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Michael; Costello, Joseph; Godinho, Luis F; Islinger, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Peroxisomes and mitochondria are ubiquitous, highly dynamic organelles with an oxidative type of metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Over the years, substantial evidence has been provided that peroxisomes and mitochondria exhibit a close functional interplay which impacts on human health and development. The so-called "peroxisome-mitochondria connection" includes metabolic cooperation in the degradation of fatty acids, a redox-sensitive relationship, an overlap in key components of the membrane fission machineries and cooperation in anti-viral signalling and defence. Furthermore, combined peroxisome-mitochondria disorders with defects in organelle division have been revealed. In this review, we present the latest progress in the emerging field of peroxisomal and mitochondrial interplay in mammals with a particular emphasis on cooperative fatty acid β-oxidation, redox interplay, organelle dynamics, cooperation in anti-viral signalling and the resulting implications for disease.

  6. Isolated Non-Compaction of the Left Ventricle in a Patient with New-Onset Heart Failure: Morphologic and Functional Evaluation with Cardiac Multidetector Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon [Soonchuhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Yeon [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Schoepf, U. Joseph [Medical University of South Carolina, SC (United States)

    2012-03-15

    We describe a case of new-onset heart failure in a patient in whom cardiac CT enabled the non-invasive diagnosis of isolated non-compaction and associated functional abnormalities of the left ventricle with the concomitant evaluation of coronary arteries. This case highlights the utility of cardiac CT for the morphological and functional evaluation of the heart as a single imaging modality.

  7. Photolabeling identifies an interaction between phosphatidylcholine and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gut2p) in yeast mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Marjolein J F W; van Voorst, Frank; Ploeger, Ginette E J

    2002-01-01

    In search of mitochondrial proteins interacting with phosphatidylcholine (PC), a photolabeling approach was applied, in which photoactivatable probes were incorporated into isolated yeast mitochondria. Only a limited number of proteins were labeled upon photoactivation, using either the PC analogue......-dependent mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. This was confirmed by the lack of specific labeling in mitochondria from a gut2 deletion strain. Only under conditions where the inner membrane was accessible to the probe, Gut2p was labeled by [125I]TID-PC, in parallel with increased labeling of the phosphate...

  8. Plasma Amino Acids Stimulate Uncoupled Respiration of Muscle Subsarcolemmal Mitochondria in Lean but Not Obese Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kras, Katon A; Hoffman, Nyssa; Roust, Lori R; Patel, Shivam H; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2017-12-01

    Obesity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. Increasing the plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations stimulates mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in lean individuals. To determine whether acute elevation in plasma AAs enhances muscle mitochondrial respiration and ATP production in subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in obese adults. Assessment of SS and IMF mitochondrial function during saline (i.e., control) and AA infusions. Eligible participants were healthy lean (body mass index, mass index >30 kg/m2; age 35 ± 3 years; n = 11) subjects. Single trial of saline infusion followed by AA infusion. SS and IMF mitochondria were isolated from muscle biopsies collected at the end of the saline and AA infusions. Mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. AA infusion increased adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated respiration and ATP production rates of SS mitochondria in the lean (P lean subjects only (P lean or obese subjects (P > 0.05). Increasing the plasma AA concentrations enhances the capacity for respiration and ATP production of muscle SS, but not IMF, mitochondria in lean individuals, in parallel with increases in uncoupled respiration. However, neither of these parameters increases in muscle SS or IMF mitochondria in obese individuals. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  9. Interaction theory of mammalian mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, K; Inoue, K; Hayashi, J

    2001-11-09

    We generated mice with deletion mutant mtDNA by its introduction from somatic cells into mouse zygotes. Expressions of disease phenotypes are limited to tissues expressing mitochondrial dysfunction. Considering that all these mice share the same nuclear background, these observations suggest that accumulation of the mutant mtDNA and resultant expressions of mitochondrial dysfunction are responsible for expression of disease phenotypes. On the other hand, mitochondrial dysfunction and expression of clinical abnormalities were not observed until the mutant mtDNA accumulated predominantly. This protection is due to the presence of extensive and continuous interaction between exogenous mitochondria from cybrids and recipient mitochondria from embryos. Thus, we would like to propose a new hypothesis on mitochondrial biogenesis, interaction theory of mitochondria: mammalian mitochondria exchange genetic contents, and thus lost the individuality and function as a single dynamic cellular unit. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Superoxide activates a GDP-sensitive proton conductance in skeletal muscle mitochondria from king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Darren A; Hanuise, Nicolas; Rey, Benjamin; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Duchamp, Claude; Brand, Martin D

    2003-12-26

    We present the partial nucleotide sequence of the avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) gene from king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus), showing that the protein is 88-92% identical to chicken (Gallus gallus), turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), and hummingbird (Eupetomena macroura). We show that superoxide activates the proton conductance of mitochondria isolated from king penguin skeletal muscle. GDP abolishes the superoxide-activated proton conductance, indicating that it is mediated via avUCP. In the absence of superoxide there is no GDP-sensitive component of the proton conductance from penguin muscle mitochondria demonstrating that avUCP plays no role in the basal proton leak.

  11. Functional Mitochondria in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patries M. Herst

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to rapidly adapt cellular bioenergetic capabilities to meet rapidly changing environmental conditions is mandatory for normal cellular function and for cancer progression. Any loss of this adaptive response has the potential to compromise cellular function and render the cell more susceptible to external stressors such as oxidative stress, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, and hypoxia. Mitochondria play a vital role in bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways and can rapidly adjust to meet the metabolic needs of the cell. Increased demand is met by mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion of individual mitochondria into dynamic networks, whereas a decrease in demand results in the removal of superfluous mitochondria through fission and mitophagy. Effective communication between nucleus and mitochondria (mito-nuclear cross talk, involving the generation of different mitochondrial stress signals as well as the nuclear stress response pathways to deal with these stressors, maintains bioenergetic homeostasis under most conditions. However, when mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations accumulate and mito-nuclear cross talk falters, mitochondria fail to deliver critical functional outputs. Mutations in mtDNA have been implicated in neuromuscular and neurodegenerative mitochondriopathies and complex diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, gastrointestinal disorders, skin disorders, aging, and cancer. In some cases, drastic measures such as acquisition of new mitochondria from donor cells occurs to ensure cell survival. This review starts with a brief discussion of the evolutionary origin of mitochondria and summarizes how mutations in mtDNA lead to mitochondriopathies and other degenerative diseases. Mito-nuclear cross talk, including various stress signals generated by mitochondria and corresponding stress response pathways activated by the nucleus are summarized. We also introduce and discuss a small family of recently discovered hormone

  12. Mitochondria in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, Jon Ambæk; Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of mitochondria was long considered to be production of cellular energy. However, as the understanding of mitochondria in disease is ever expanding, so is their additional function for a healthy organism. Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to a range of pathologies, including...... (SMRM) was titled "Mitochondria in Health and Disease". The conference was organized by Gayathri N, K Thangaraj, and KK Singh and was held at the National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences (NIMHANS) in Bangalore, India, from the 19th to 20th of December 2013. The meeting featured...

  13. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  14. Electronic microscopy evidence for mitochondria as targets for Cd/Se/Te-based quantum dot 705 toxicity in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hua Lin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The safety of quantum dots (QDs 705 was evaluated in this study. Mice were treated with QD705 (intravenous at a single dose of (40 pmol for 4, 12, 16, and 24 weeks. Effects of QD705 on kidneys were examined. While there was a lack of histopathology, reduction in renal functions was detected at 16 weeks. Electron microscopic examination revealed alterations in proximal convoluted tubule (PCT cell mitochondria at even much earlier time, including disorientation and reduction of mitochondrial number (early change, mitochondrial swelling, and later compensatory mitochondrial hypertrophy (enlargement mitochondria: giant mitochondria with hyperplastic inner cristae as well as mitochondrial hyperplasia (increase in mitochondrial biogenesis and numbers were observed. Such changes probably represent compensatory attempts of the mitochondria for functional loss or reduction of mitochondria in QD705 treated animals. Moreover, degeneration of mitochondria (myelin-figure and cytoplasmic membranous body formation and degradation of cytoplasmic materials (isolated cytoplasmic pockets of degenerated materials and focal cytoplasmic degradation also occurred in later time points (16–24 weeks. Such mitochondrial changes were not identical with those induced by pure cadmium. Taken together, we suggest that mitochondria appeared to be the target of QD705 toxicity and specific mitochondrial markers may be useful parameters for toxicity assessments of QDs or other metal-based nanomaterials.

  15. [Role of calcium ions in the mechanism of action of acetylcholine on energy metabolism in rat liver mitochondria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatamaniuk, M Z; Artym, V V; Kuka, O B; Doliba, M M; Shostakovs'ka, I V

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that administration of acetylcholine to animals (50 micrograms per 100 g of body weight) leads to the activation of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in the rat liver mitochondria under oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate; this effect depends on the concentration of calcium ions in the incubation medium of mitochondria. The rate of ADP-stimulated respiration of mitochondria of experimental animals reaches its maximum level under lower concentrations of Ca2+ than in the control animals. The results of investigation of dependence of acetyl choline effect on respiration of mitochondria on the concentration of alpha-ketoglutarate in calcium and calcium-free incubation medium have shown that the half-maximum effect of acetylcholine is observed in calcium medium at lower concentration of the substrate than in calcium-free medium. The latter indicates to the increase of affinity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase to alpha-ketoglutarate under these conditions. It is found out that acetylcholine (1.10(-8) M) increases the rate of ADP- and Ca(2+)-stimulated respiration of mitochondria of isolated perfused rat liver, while mutual effect of verapamyl and niphedipin removes this effect.

  16. Mitochondria and Neurotransmission: Evacuating the Synapse

    OpenAIRE

    Hollenbeck, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    An abundance of mitochondria has been the hallmark of synapses since their first ultrastructural description 50 years ago. Mitochondria have been shown to be essential for synaptic form and function in many systems, but until recently it has not been clear exactly what role(s) they play in neurotransmission. Now, evidence from the nervous system of Drosophila identifies the specific subcellular events that are most dependent upon nearby mitochondria.

  17. Evaluation of Cardiac Mitochondrial Function by a Nuclear Imaging Technique using Technetium-99m-MIBI Uptake Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in energy production for the cell. The proper function of a myocardial cell largely depends on the functional capacity of the mitochondria. Therefore it is necessary to establish a novel and reliable method for a non-invasive assessment of mitochondrial function and metabolism in humans. Although originally designed for evaluating myocardial perfusion, 99m Tc-MIBI can be also used to evaluate cardiac mitochondrial function. In a clinical study on ischemic heart disease, reverse redistribution of 99m Tc-MIBI was evident after direct percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The presence of increased washout of 99m Tc-MIBI was associated with the infarct-related artery and preserved left ventricular function. In non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, an increased washout rate of 99m Tc-MIBI, which correlated inversely with left ventricular ejection fraction, was observed in patients with congestive heart failure. Increased 99m Tc-MIBI washout was also observed in mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) and in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac mitochondrial function could be greatly beneficial in monitoring possible cardiotoxic drug use and in the evaluation of cardiac damage in clinical medicine

  18. Can foreign proteins imported into yeast mitochondria interfere with PIM1p protease and/or chaperone function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, A S; Kovaleva, I E; Novikova, L A; Isaeva, L V; Luzikov, V N

    1999-03-15

    When studying the fate of mammalian apocytochrome P450scc (apo-P450scc) imported in small amounts into isolated yeast mitochondria, we found that it undergoes degradation, this process being retarded if recipient mitochondria are preloaded in vivo (to about 0.2% of total organelle protein) with a fusion protein composed of mammalian adrenodoxin reductase and adrenodoxin (AdR-Ad); in parallel we observed aggregation of apo-P450scc. These effects suggest some overload of Pim1p protease and/or mtHsp70 system by AdR-Ad, as both of them are involved in the degradation of apo-P450scc (see Savel'ev et al. J. Biol. Chem. 273, 20596-20602, 1998). However, under the same conditions AdR-Ad was not able to impede the import of proteins into mitochondria and the development of the mitochondrial respiratory machinery in yeast, the processes requiring the mtHsp70 system and Pim1p, respectively. These data imply that chaperones and Pim1p protease prefer their natural targets in mitochondria to imported foreign proteins. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. A sodium-channel mutation causes isolated cardiac conduction disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. L.; Bink-Boelkens, M. T.; Bezzina, C. R.; Viswanathan, P. C.; Beaufort-Krol, G. C.; van Tintelen, P. J.; van den Berg, M. P.; Wilde, A. A.; Balser, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders slow the heart rhythm and cause disability in millions of people worldwide. Inherited mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the human cardiac sodium (Na+) channel, have been associated with rapid heart rhythms that occur suddenly and are life-threatening; however, a

  20. The role of mitochondria in protection of the heart by preconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halestrap, Andrew P.; Clarke, Samantha J.; Khaliulin, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A prolonged period of ischaemia followed by reperfusion irreversibly damages the heart. Such reperfusion injury (RI) involves opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) under the conditions of calcium overload and oxidative stress that accompany reperfusion. Protection from MPTP opening and hence RI can be mediated by ischaemic preconditioning (IP) where the prolonged ischaemic period is preceded by one or more brief (2–5 min) cycles of ischaemia and reperfusion. Following a brief overview of the molecular characterisation and regulation of the MPTP, the proposed mechanisms by which IP reduces pore opening are reviewed including the potential roles for reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein kinase cascades, and mitochondrial potassium channels. It is proposed that IP-mediated inhibition of MPTP opening at reperfusion does not involve direct phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins, but rather reflects diminished oxidative stress during prolonged ischaemia and reperfusion. This causes less oxidation of critical thiol groups on the MPTP that are known to sensitise pore opening to calcium. The mechanisms by which ROS levels are decreased in the IP hearts during prolonged ischaemia and reperfusion are not known, but appear to require activation of protein kinase Cε, either by receptor-mediated events or through transient increases in ROS during the IP protocol. Other signalling pathways may show cross-talk with this primary mechanism, but we suggest that a role for mitochondrial potassium channels is unlikely. The evidence for their activity in isolated mitochondria and cardiac myocytes is reviewed and the lack of specificity of the pharmacological agents used to implicate them in IP is noted. Some K+ channel openers uncouple mitochondria and others inhibit respiratory chain complexes, and their ability to produce ROS and precondition hearts is mimicked by bona fide uncouplers and respiratory chain inhibitors. IP may also provide continuing

  1. A sodium-channel mutation causes isolated cardiac conduction disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, HL; Bink-Boelkens, MTE; Bezzina, CR; Viswanathan, PC; Beaufort-Krol, GCM; van Tintelen, PJ; van den Berg, MP; Wilde, AAM; Balser, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders slow the heart rhythm and cause disability in millions of people worldwide. Inherited mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the human cardiac sodium (Na+) channel, have been associated with rapid heart rhythms that occur suddenly and are life-threatening(1-3); however, a

  2. Calcium regulates cell death in cancer: Roles of the mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Alberto; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Previati, Maurizio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    Until 1972, the term 'apoptosis' was used to differentiate the programmed cell death that naturally occurs in organismal development from the acute tissue death referred to as necrosis. Many studies on cell death and programmed cell death have been published and most are, at least to some degree, related to cancer. Some key proteins and molecular pathways implicated in cell death have been analyzed, whereas others are still being actively researched; therefore, an increasing number of cellular compartments and organelles are being implicated in cell death and cancer. Here, we discuss the mitochondria and subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria, the mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which have been identified as critical hubs in the regulation of cell death and tumor growth. MAMs-dependent calcium (Ca 2+ ) release from the ER allows selective Ca 2+ uptake by the mitochondria. The perturbation of Ca 2+ homeostasis in cancer cells is correlated with sustained cell proliferation and the inhibition of cell death through the modulation of Ca 2+ signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of S-type CMS maize mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to isolate mitochondrial genes easily, we have developed a new method to construct S-type CMS maize mitochondrial gene library by means of embedding mitochondria and enzymatic digesting mitochondria in situ, preparing mtDNA by electrophoresis, digesting LMP agarose with β-agarase, using BAC vector and electroporation. About 2 500 white clones of Mo17 CMS-J mitochondrial gene library were obtained with the average size of 18.24 kb, ranging from 5 to 40 kb, 63.6% inserts came from mitochondrial genome and represented 48 ′ mitochondrial genome equivalents. All the probes had detected the positive clones in the gene library. It is helpful to elucidating the maize mitochondrial genome structure and mechanism of S-type CMS, and may give some valuable reference to the construction of other plant mitochondrial genome library.

  4. Protonmotive force in muscle mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, D.A.; Haas, R.; Eguren, L.A.; Parks, J.K.; Eilert, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The protonmotive force (delta p) of muscle mitochondria was measured by estimating the distribution of 14C-labeled TPMP (trimethylphenylphosphonium iodide) and 14C-labeled acetate across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria. The matrix volume was simultaneously determined using 3H-labeled H2O and 3H-labeled mannitol and repeated drying to distinguish the label in these 2 compounds. Rapid separation of mitochondria from the incubation medium by centrifugation through silicone oil avoids the problems of potential anaerobic conditions associated with conventional centrifugation and large volumes of trapped media associated with filtration. The value for delta p (mean +/- SD) was 192+/- 26 mV in 30 determinations with rat muscle mitochondria during state 4. Measurement of oxygen consumption allowed calculation of membrane conductance (Cm,H+) which was 0.49 +/- 0.18 nmol of H+/min/mg protein/mV. The values for delta p and Cm,H+ are reported for a variety of experimental conditions and are consistent with Mitchell's chemiosmotic theory. Biopsy specimens obtained from human muscle gave state-4 delta p values of 197+/- 30 mV (n .5) and Cm,H+ values of 0.52 +/- 0.12 nmol of H+/min/mg/mV (n . 4). This delta p assay is the first described for coupled mammalian muscle mitochondria and will be useful in assessing membrane function

  5. Modeling of oxygen transport and cellular energetics explains observations on in vivo cardiac energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Beard

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations on the relationship between cardiac work rate and the levels of energy metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP, and phosphocreatine (CrP have not been satisfactorily explained by theoretical models of cardiac energy metabolism. Specifically, the in vivo stability of ATP, ADP, and CrP levels in response to changes in work and respiratory rate has eluded explanation. Here a previously developed model of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, which was developed based on data obtained from isolated cardiac mitochondria, is integrated with a spatially distributed model of oxygen transport in the myocardium to analyze data obtained from several laboratories over the past two decades. The model includes the components of the respiratory chain, the F0F1-ATPase, adenine nucleotide translocase, and the mitochondrial phosphate transporter at the mitochondrial level; adenylate kinase, creatine kinase, and ATP consumption in the cytoplasm; and oxygen transport between capillaries, interstitial fluid, and cardiomyocytes. The integrated model is able to reproduce experimental observations on ATP, ADP, CrP, and inorganic phosphate levels in canine hearts over a range of workload and during coronary hypoperfusion and predicts that cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate level is a key regulator of the rate of mitochondrial respiration at workloads for which the rate of cardiac oxygen consumption is less than or equal to approximately 12 mumol per minute per gram of tissue. At work rates corresponding to oxygen consumption higher than 12 mumol min(-1 g(-1, model predictions deviate from the experimental data, indicating that at high work rates, additional regulatory mechanisms that are not currently incorporated into the model may be important. Nevertheless, the integrated model explains metabolite levels observed at low to moderate workloads and the changes in metabolite levels and tissue oxygenation observed during graded

  6. Exogenous ether lipids predominantly target mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kuerschner

    Full Text Available Ether lipids are ubiquitous constituents of cellular membranes with no discrete cell biological function assigned yet. Using fluorescent polyene-ether lipids we analyzed their intracellular distribution in living cells by microscopy. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated high amounts of ether-phosphatidylcholine and ether-phosphatidylethanolamine. Both lipids were specifically labeled using the corresponding lyso-ether lipids, which we established as supreme precursors for lipid tagging. Polyfosine, a fluorescent analogue of the anti-neoplastic ether lipid edelfosine, accumulated to mitochondria and induced morphological changes and cellular apoptosis. These data indicate that edelfosine could exert its pro-apoptotic power by targeting and damaging mitochondria and thereby inducing cellular apoptosis. In general, this study implies an important role of mitochondria in ether lipid metabolism and intracellular ether lipid trafficking.

  7. Nicotine facilitates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor targeting to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to selective ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenska, Kateryna; Lykhmus, Olena; Gergalova, Galyna; Chernyshov, Volodymyr; Arias, Hugo R; Komisarenko, Sergiy; Skok, Maryna

    2017-08-24

    Several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes are expressed in mitochondria to regulate the internal pathway of apoptosis in ion channel-independent manner. However, the mechanisms of nAChR activation in mitochondria and targeting to mitochondria are still unknown. Nicotine has been shown to favor nAChR pentamer assembly, folding, and maturation on the way of biosynthesis. The idea of the present work was to determine whether nicotine affects the content, glycosylation, and function of mitochondrial nAChRs. Experiments were performed in isolated liver mitochondria from mice, that either consumed or not nicotine with the drinking water (200μL/L) for 7days. Mitochondria detergent lysates were studied by sandwich or lectin ELISA for the presence and carbohydrate composition of different nAChR subunits. Intact mitochondria were examined by flow cytometry for the binding of fluorescently labeled α-cobratoxin and were tested in functional assay of cytochrome c release under the effect of either Ca 2+ or wortmannin in the presence or absence of nAChR-selective ligands, including PNU-282987 (1nM), dihydro-β-erythroidine (DhβE, 1μM), PNU-120596 (0.3, 3, or 10μM) and desformylflustrabromine hydrochloride (dFBr, 0.001, 0.3, or 1μM). It was found that nicotine consumption increased the ratio of mitochondrial vs non-mitochondrial nAChRs in the liver, enhanced fucosylation of mitochondrial nAChRs, but prevented the binding of α-cobratoxin and the cytochrome c release-attenuating effects of nAChR-specific agonists, antagonists, or positive allosteric modulators. It is concluded that nicotine consumption in vivo favors nAChR glycosylation and trafficking to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to the effects of specific ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Uncoupling effect of palmitate is exacerbated in skeletal muscle mitochondria of sea-acclimatized king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2017-09-01

    In king penguin juveniles, the environmental transition from a terrestrial to a marine habitat, occurring at fledging, drastically stimulates lipid catabolism and the remodelling of muscle mitochondria to sustain extensive swimming activity and thermoregulation in the cold circumpolar oceans. However, the exact nature of these mechanisms remains only partially resolved. Here we investigated, in vitro, the uncoupling effect of increasing doses of fatty acids in pectoralis muscle intermyofibrillar mitochondria isolated, either from terrestrial never-immersed or experimentally cold water immersed pre-fledging king penguins or from sea-acclimatized fledged penguins. Mitochondria exhibited much greater palmitate-induced uncoupling respiration and higher maximal oxidative capacity after acclimatization to marine life. Such effects were not reproduced experimentally after repeated immersions in cold water, suggesting that the plasticity of mitochondrial characteristics may not be primarily driven by cold exposure per se but by other aspects of sea acclimatization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Isolation of Autolysosomes from Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuka, Chihiro; Inoue-Aono, Yuko; Moriyasu, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Autolysosomes are organelles that sequester and degrade a portion of the cytoplasm during autophagy. Although autophagosomes are short lived compared to other organelles such as mitochondria, plastids, and peroxisomes, many autolysosomes accumulate in tobacco BY-2 cells cultured under sucrose starvation conditions in the presence of a cysteine protease inhibitor. We here describe our methodology for isolating autolysosomes from BY-2 cells by conventional cell fractionation using a Percoll gradient. The autolysosome fraction separates clearly from fractions containing mitochondria and peroxisomes. It contains acid phosphatase, vacuolar H + -ATPase, and protease activity. Electron micrographs show that the fraction contains partially degraded cytoplasm seen in autolysosomes before isolation although an autolysosome structure is only partially preserved.

  10. Lactation Affects Isolated Mitochondria and Its Fatty Acid Composition but Has No Effect on Tissue Protein Oxidation, Lipid Peroxidation or DNA-Damage in Laboratory Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa G. Valencak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linking peak energy metabolism to lifespan and aging remains a major question especially when focusing on lactation in females. We studied, if and how lactation affects in vitro mitochondrial oxygen consumption and mitochondrial fatty acid composition. In addition, we assessed DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls to extrapolate on oxidative stress in mothers. As model system we used C57BL/6NCrl mice and exposed lactating females to two ambient temperatures (15 °C and 22 °C while they nursed their offspring until weaning. We found that state II and state IV respiration rates of liver mitochondria were significantly higher in the lactating animals than in non-lactating mice. Fatty acid composition of isolated liver and heart mitochondria differed between lactating and non-lactating mice with higher n-6, and lower n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the lactating females. Surprisingly, lactation did not affect protein carbonyls, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, nor did moderate cold exposure of 15 °C. We conclude that lactation increases rates of mitochondrial uncoupling and alters mitochondrial fatty acid composition thus supporting the “uncoupling to survive” hypothesis. Regarding oxidative stress, we found no impact of lactation and lower ambient temperature and contribute to growing evidence that there is no linear relationship between oxidative damage and lactation.

  11. The Toxicity Mechanisms of Action of Aβ25–35 in Isolated Rat Cardiac Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiru Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available β-Amyloid (Aβ is deposited in neurons and vascular cells of the brain and is characterized as a pathologic feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Recently studies have reported that there is an association between cardiovascular risk factors and AD, however the mechanism of this association is still uncertain. In this study we observed Aβ had an effect on cardiovascular cells. We represent as a major discovery that Aβ25–35 had toxicity on isolated rat cardiac myocytes by impacting the cytoskeleton assembly and causing ER stress, ultimately contributing to the apoptosis of the myocytes. Importantly, the activation of ER stress and subsequent cellular dysfunction and apoptosis by Aβ25–35 was regulated by the MAPK pathway, which could be prevented by inhibition of p38 via pharmacological inhibitors. It was noteworthy that Aβ25–35 played a critical role in cardiac myocytes, suggesting that Alzheimer’s disease (AD had a relation with the heart and understanding of these associations in future will help search for effective treatment strategies.

  12. Effects of Caloric Restriction on Cardiac Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Bioenergetics: Potential Role of Cardiac Sirtuins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Shinmura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology of aging has not been fully clarified, but the free radical theory of aging is one of the strongest aging theories proposed to date. The free radical theory has been expanded to the oxidative stress theory, in which mitochondria play a central role in the development of the aging process because of their critical roles in bioenergetics, oxidant production, and regulation of cell death. A decline in cardiac mitochondrial function associated with the accumulation of oxidative damage might be responsible, at least in part, for the decline in cardiac performance with age. In contrast, lifelong caloric restriction can attenuate functional decline with age, delay the onset of morbidity, and extend lifespan in various species. The effect of caloric restriction appears to be related to a reduction in cellular damage induced by reactive oxygen species. There is increasing evidence that sirtuins play an essential role in the reduction of mitochondrial oxidative stress during caloric restriction. We speculate that cardiac sirtuins attenuate the accumulation of oxidative damage associated with age by modifying specific mitochondrial proteins posttranscriptionally. Therefore, the distinct role of each sirtuin in the heart subjected to caloric restriction should be clarified to translate sirtuin biology into clinical practice.

  13. An analysis of the effects of Mn2+ on oxidative phosphorylation in liver, brain, and heart mitochondria using state 3 oxidation rate assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunter, Thomas E.; Gerstner, Brent; Lester, Tobias; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Malecki, Jon; Swarts, Steven G.; Brookes, Paul S.; Gavin, Claire E.; Gunter, Karlene K.

    2010-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity is partially mediated by reduced ATP production. We have used oxidation rate assays-a measure of ATP production-under rapid phosphorylation conditions to explore sites of Mn 2+ inhibition of ATP production in isolated liver, brain, and heart mitochondria. This approach has several advantages. First, the target tissue for Mn toxicity in the basal ganglia is energetically active and should be studied under rapid phosphorylation conditions. Second, Mn may inhibit metabolic steps which do not affect ATP production rate. This approach allows identification of inhibitions that decrease this rate. Third, mitochondria from different tissues contain different amounts of the components of the metabolic pathways potentially resulting in different patterns of ATP inhibition. Our results indicate that Mn 2+ inhibits ATP production with very different patterns in liver, brain, and heart mitochondria. The primary Mn 2+ inhibition site in liver and heart mitochondria, but not in brain mitochondria, is the F 1 F 0 ATP synthase. In mitochondria fueled by either succinate or glutamate + malate, ATP production is much more strongly inhibited in brain than in liver or heart mitochondria; moreover, Mn 2+ inhibits two independent sites in brain mitochondria. The primary site of Mn-induced inhibition of ATP production in brain mitochondria when succinate is substrate is either fumarase or complex II, while the likely site of the primary inhibition when glutamate plus malate are the substrates is either the glutamate/aspartate exchanger or aspartate aminotransferase.

  14. Phospholipid fatty acids in mitochondria and microsomes of wheat and rice seedling roots during aeration and anaerobiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkova, T.V.; Sinyutina, N.F.; Blyudzin, Yu.A.; Barskii, I.E.; Smetannikova, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    Mitochondrial and microsomal fractions were isolated from the roots after residence of wheat and rice seedlings under conditions of aeration or anaerobiosis and used to determine the percentage ratio of phospholipid fatty acids (PFA), their content, and the rate of incorporation of [2- 14 C]-acetate into them. In rice mitochondria under anaerobic influence, the ratio of unsaturated to saturated PFA was higher than the level that occurred in the control plants and PFA content remained close to the control level throughout the entire course of exposure. On the other hand, these indices declined in wheat mitochondria and microsomes of both plants. Anoxia also powerfully inhibited incorporation of labelled acetate into PFA of both membrane fractions in wheat and rice seedlings alike. Probably indicating adaptive reorganizations in composition of the main groups of PFA and inhibition of their decomposition in rice mitochondria, the obtained data are discussed in relation to greater resistance to temporary anaerobiosis in rice as compared with wheat

  15. Mitochondria and Mitochondrial ROS in Cancer: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuhui; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Hartwig, Werner; D'Haese, Jan G; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable for energy metabolism, apoptosis regulation, and cell signaling. Mitochondria in malignant cells differ structurally and functionally from those in normal cells and participate actively in metabolic reprogramming. Mitochondria in cancer cells are characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, which promotes cancer development by inducing genomic instability, modifying gene expression, and participating in signaling pathways. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA mutations caused by oxidative damage that impair the oxidative phosphorylation process will result in further mitochondrial ROS production, completing the "vicious cycle" between mitochondria, ROS, genomic instability, and cancer development. The multiple essential roles of mitochondria have been utilized for designing novel mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents. Selective drug delivery to mitochondria helps to increase specificity and reduce toxicity of these agents. In order to reduce mitochondrial ROS production, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can specifically accumulate in mitochondria by affiliating to a lipophilic penetrating cation and prevent mitochondria from oxidative damage. In consistence with the oncogenic role of ROS, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are found to be effective in cancer prevention and anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the role played by mitochondria in cancer development will help to reveal more therapeutic targets, and will help to increase the activity and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs. In this review we summarized the impact of mitochondria on cancer and gave summary about the possibilities to target mitochondria for anticancer therapies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2570-2581, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Intra- and Intercellular Quality Control Mechanisms of Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimitsu Kiriyama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function to generate ATP and also play important roles in cellular homeostasis, signaling, apoptosis, autophagy, and metabolism. The loss of mitochondrial function results in cell death and various types of diseases. Therefore, quality control of mitochondria via intra- and intercellular pathways is crucial. Intracellular quality control consists of biogenesis, fusion and fission, and degradation of mitochondria in the cell, whereas intercellular quality control involves tunneling nanotubes and extracellular vesicles. In this review, we outline the current knowledge on the intra- and intercellular quality control mechanisms of mitochondria.

  17. Bioenergetic and antiapoptotic properties of mitochondria from cultured human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Panov

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC, metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ. Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca²⁺ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca²⁺-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca²⁺. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia.

  18. On Cellular Darwinism: Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The significant role of mitochondria within cells is becoming increasingly clear. This letter uses the NKCS model of coupled fitness landscapes to explore aspects of organelle-nucleus coevolution. The phenomenon of mitochondrial diversity is allowed to emerge under a simple intracellular evolutionary process, including varying the relative rate of evolution by the organelle. It is shown how the conditions for the maintenance of more than one genetic variant of mitochondria are similar to those previously suggested as needed for the original symbiotic origins of the relationship using the NKCS model.

  19. Evolved changes in the intracellular distribution and physiology of muscle mitochondria in high-altitude native deer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sajeni; McClelland, Grant B; Scott, Graham R

    2017-07-15

    (but not intermyofibrillar) mitochondria, such that more mitochondria were situated near the cell membrane and adjacent to capillaries. Hypoxia acclimation had no significant effect on these population differences, but it did increase mitochondrial cristae surface densities of mitochondria in both populations. Hypoxia acclimation also altered the physiology of isolated mitochondria by affecting respiratory capacities and cytochrome c oxidase activities in population-specific manners. Chronic hypoxia decreased the release of reactive oxygen species by isolated mitochondria in both populations. There were subtle differences in O 2 kinetics between populations, with highlanders exhibiting increased mitochondrial O 2 affinity or catalytic efficiency in some conditions. Our results suggest that evolved changes in mitochondrial physiology in high-altitude natives are distinct from the effects of hypoxia acclimation, and probably provide a better indication of adaptive traits that improve performance and hypoxia resistance at high altitudes. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  20. Association of myocardial cell necrosis with experimental cardiac hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revis, N W; Cameron, A J.V.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy was induced in rabbits by injecting thyroxime or isoprenaline, or by surgically constricting the abdominal aorta. An increase in heart weight was associated with a change in the ratios of bound to free forms of five lysosomal enzymes, a change in serum creatine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase, and a change in the morphology of the myocardial cells. Isoprenaline treatment for 5 days induced a maximal change in heart weight, in the ratio of lysosomal enzymes, and in the serum enzymes. Thyroxine treatment was required for 15 days before maximal changes in heart weight, ratio, and serum enzymes were observed. In contrast, coarctation of the aorta caused a progressive change in heart weight, in the ratio of lysosomal enzymes, and in serum enzymes. These results suggest that necrosis of the myocardial cells does indeed accompany cardiac hypertrophy. It was further observed that autophagosomes, degenerating mitochondria in the myocardial cells during the induction of cardiac hypertrophy, and myofibril lysis were found, all of which confirms the suggestion of myocardial cell necrosis in the experimentally enlarged heart.

  1. [Generation of Superoxide Radicals by Complex III in Heart Mitochondria and Antioxidant Effect of Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes at Different Partial Pressure of Oxygen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudylina, A L; Ivanova, M V; Shumaev, K B; Ruuge, E K

    2016-01-01

    The EPR spin-trapping technique and EPR-oximetry were used to study generation of superoxide radicals in heart mitochondria isolated from Wistar rats under conditions of variable oxygen concentration. Lithium phthalocyanine and TEMPONE-15N-D16 were chosen to determine oxygen content in a gas-permeable capillary tube containing mitochondria. TIRON was used as a spin trap. We investigated the influence of different oxygen concentrations in incubation mixture and demonstrated that heart mitochondria can generate superoxide in complex III at different partial pressure of oxygen as well as under the conditions of deep hypoxia (partial pressure of oxygen, but the magnitude and kinetic characteristics of the effect depended on the concentration of the drug.

  2. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  3. Mitochondria and Endothelial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Matthew A.; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Vita, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to their role in other cell types with higher energy demands, mitochondria in endothelial cells primarily function in signaling cellular responses to environmental cues. This article provides an overview of key aspects of mitochondrial biology in endothelial cells, including subcellular location, biogenesis, dynamics, autophagy, ROS production and signaling, calcium homeostasis, regulated cell death, and heme biosynthesis. In each section, we introduce key concepts and then review studies showing the importance of that mechanism to endothelial control of vasomotor tone, angiogenesis, and inflammatory activation. We particularly highlight the small number of clinical and translational studies that have investigated each mechanism in human subjects. Finally, we review interventions that target different aspects of mitochondrial function and their effects on endothelial function. The ultimate goal of such research is the identification of new approaches for therapy. The reviewed studies make it clear that mitochondria are important in endothelial physiology and pathophysiology. A great deal of work will be needed, however, before mitochondria-directed therapies are available for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23580773

  4. The Role of Levosimendan in Patients with Decreased Left Ventricular Function Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Bozhinovska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The postoperative low cardiac output is one of the most important complications following cardiac surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The condition requires inotropic support to achieve adequate hemodynamic status and tissue perfusion. While catecholamines are utilised as a standard therapy in cardiac surgery, their use is limited due to increased oxygen consumption. Levosimendan is calcium sensitising inodilatator expressing positive inotropic effect by binding with cardiac troponin C without increasing oxygen demand. Furthermore, the drug opens potassium ATP (KATP channels in cardiac mitochondria and in the vascular muscle cells, showing cardioprotective and vasodilator properties, respectively. In the past decade, levosimendan demonstrated promising results in treating patients with reduced left ventricular function when administered in peri- or post- operative settings. In addition, pre-operative use of levosimendan in patients with severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction may reduce the requirements for postoperative inotropic support, mechanical support, duration of intensive care unit stay as well as hospital stay and a decrease in post-operative mortality. However, larger studies are needed to clarify clinical advantages of levosimendan versus conventional inotropes.

  5. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Cardiac Structural, Functional, and Mitochondrial Consequences of Diet-Induced Metabolic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlov, Aaron L; Elezaby, Aly; Qin, Fuzhong; Behring, Jessica B; Luptak, Ivan; Calamaras, Timothy D; Siwik, Deborah A; Miller, Edward J; Liesa, Marc; Shirihai, Orian S; Pimentel, David R; Cohen, Richard A; Bachschmid, Markus M; Colucci, Wilson S

    2016-01-11

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with metabolic heart disease (MHD). However, the mechanism by which ROS cause MHD is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial ROS are a key mediator of MHD. Mice fed a high-fat high-sucrose (HFHS) diet develop MHD with cardiac diastolic and mitochondrial dysfunction that is associated with oxidative posttranslational modifications of cardiac mitochondrial proteins. Transgenic mice that express catalase in mitochondria and wild-type mice were fed an HFHS or control diet for 4 months. Cardiac mitochondria from HFHS-fed wild-type mice had a 3-fold greater rate of H2O2 production (P=0.001 versus control diet fed), a 30% decrease in complex II substrate-driven oxygen consumption (P=0.006), 21% to 23% decreases in complex I and II substrate-driven ATP synthesis (P=0.01), and a 62% decrease in complex II activity (P=0.002). In transgenic mice that express catalase in mitochondria, all HFHS diet-induced mitochondrial abnormalities were ameliorated, as were left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. In HFHS-fed wild-type mice complex II substrate-driven ATP synthesis and activity were restored ex vivo by dithiothreitol (5 mmol/L), suggesting a role for reversible cysteine oxidative posttranslational modifications. In vitro site-directed mutation of complex II subunit B Cys100 or Cys103 to redox-insensitive serines prevented complex II dysfunction induced by ROS or high glucose/high palmitate in the medium. Mitochondrial ROS are pathogenic in MHD and contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction, at least in part, by causing oxidative posttranslational modifications of complex I and II proteins including reversible oxidative posttranslational modifications of complex II subunit B Cys100 and Cys103. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. Mechanisms of communication between mitochondria and lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Nuno; Fernández-Mosquera, Lorena; Yambire, King Faisal; Diogo, Cátia V

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondria and lysosomes have long been studied in the context of their classic functions: energy factory and recycle bin, respectively. In the last twenty years, it became evident that these organelles are much more than simple industrial units, and are indeed in charge of many of cellular processes. Both mitochondria and lysosomes are now recognized as far-reaching signaling platforms, regulating many key aspects of cell and tissue physiology. It has furthermore become clear that mitochondria and lysosomes impact each other. The mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between these organelles are only now starting to be addressed. In this review, we briefly summarize how mitochondria, lysosomes and the lysosome-related process of autophagy affect each other in physiology and pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Alteration in Circulating Metabolites During and After Heat Stress in the Conscious Rat: Potential Biomarkers of Exposure and Organ-specific Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-24

    purine metabolism associated with myocardial steatosis and down-regulation of adipose triglyceride In heart [45,46] Xylonate (nucleotide sugars, pentose...isolated cardiac mitochondria: a possible cause for hepatic -derived cardiomyopathies? Cardiovasc Toxicol 2005, 5(1):63–73. 55. Gao X, Fu L, Xiao M, Xu C

  8. The role of UCP 1 in production of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria isolated from brown adipose tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlasková, Andrea; Clarke, K.J.; Porter, R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1797, č. 8 (2010), s. 1470-1476 ISSN 0005-2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Mitochondria * Reactive oxygen species * Uncoupling protein 1 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.132, year: 2010

  9. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  10. Ascorbate Biosynthesis in Mitochondria Is Linked to the Electron Transport Chain between Complexes III and IV1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Carlos G.; Pastori, Gabriela M.; Foyer, Christine H.

    2000-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is synthesized from galactono-γ-lactone (GL) in plant tissues. An improved extraction procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation of membrane proteins from crude leaf homogenates yielded a simple, quick method for determining tissue activities of galactono-γ-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH). Total foliar ascorbate and GLDH activity decreased with leaf age. Subcellular fractionation experiments using marker enzymes demonstrated that 80% of the total GLDH activity was located on the inner mitochondrial membrane, and 20% in the microsomal fraction. Specific antibody raised against potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber GLDH recognized a 56-kD polypeptide in extracts from the mitochondrial membranes but failed to detect the equivalent polypeptide in microsomes. We demonstrate that isolated intact mitochondria synthesize ascorbate in the presence of GL. GL stimulated mitochondrial electron transport rates. The respiration inhibitor antimycin A stimulated ascorbate biosynthesis, while cyanide inhibited both respiration and ascorbate production. GL-dependent oxygen uptake was observed in isolated intact mitochondria. This evidence suggests that GLDH delivers electrons to the mitochondrial electron transport chain between complexes III and IV. PMID:10806250

  11. CA V is present in rat kidney mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodgson, S.J.; Contino, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Guinea pig liver mitochondria contain the unique carbonic anhydrase isozyme, CA V. Prior to sacrifice, 15 rats and 15 guinea pigs were either fed normal lab chow (group 1), starved 48 hours (group 2) or fed normal lab chow and given to drink only water with added HCl, pH 2.5 (group 3). Mitochondria were prepared from excised livers and kidneys. CA V activity of disrupted mitochondria was measured by 18 O-mass spectrometric technique at pH 7.4, 37 0 C, 25 mM NaHCO 3 . Mass spectrometric CA assays with intact kidney mitochondria localize CA V activity to the matrix, as was found for liver mitochondria. It has been shown in hepatocytes prepared from starved guinea pigs and rats that inhibition of CA V results in decreased rate of gluconeogenesis from pyruvate. These present results are in line with the published observation that rat kidneys are much more gluconeogenic than guinea pig, and that this is increased by starvation and acidosis

  12. Localization of mitochondria in living cells with rhodamine 123.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L V; Walsh, M L; Chen, L B

    1980-01-01

    The laser dye rhodamine 123 is shown to be a specific probe for the localization of mitochondria in living cells. By virtue of its selectivity for mitochondria and its fluorescent properties, the detectability of mitochondria stained with rhodamine 123 is significantly improved over that provided by conventional light microscopic techniques. With the use of rhodamine 123, it is possible to detect alterations in mitochondrial distribution following transformation by Rous sarcoma virus and changes in the shape and organization of mitochondria induced by colchicine treatment. Images PMID:6965798

  13. Intramuscular variation in mitochondrial functionality of beef ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suman, Surendranath P

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... Myoglobin is the sarcoplasmic heme protein responsible for meat color, ... formation was induced in the samples by submerging them in a solution of 0.3% sodium nitrite for 20 min at ..... Dependence on the electron transport chain. ... Myoglobin-enhanced oxygen delivery to isolated cardiac mitochondria.

  14. Effects of Gallic Acid and Cyclosporine A on Antioxidant Capacity and Cardiac Markers of Rat Isolated Heart After Ischemia/Reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Najmeh; Dianat, Mahin; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Myocardial infarction is one of the important causes of death during old ages. Gallic acid as an antioxidant or cyclosporine A (CsA) as inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) alone could prevent these complications to some extent, but their combination effect has not been investigated. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the combined effect of gallic acid and CsA on antioxidant capacity of isolated heart tissues during ischemia reperfusion. Materials and Methods: Eighty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to different groups: sham, control (Ca, received saline, 1 mL/kg); 3 groups were pretreated with gallic acid (G1a: 7.5, G2a: 15, G3a: 30 mg/kg) for 10 days, and the other 3 groups were pretreated with gallic acid and received CsA (0.2 µM) for 10 minutes before induction of ischemia and during the first 10 minutes of reperfusion (G1b, G2b and G3b) and the last group received CsA alone (Cb). After 10 days of pretreatment, the heart was isolated and transferred to the Langendorff apparatus and exposed to 30 minutes ischemia followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion. After that cardiac markers and antioxidant enzymes were assessed in cardiac tissues. Results: Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity increased and malondialdehyde (MDA) decreased in animals pretreated with gallic acid significantly. However, pretreatment with gallic acid followed by CsA during reperfusion improved the antioxidant capacity and cardiac marker enzymes and restored the lipid peroxidation more effective than gallic acid or CsA alone. Nevertheless, CsA did not change the cardiac marker enzymes significantly. Conclusions: Gallic acid and CsA combination improved antioxidant capacity and cell membrane integrity more than each one alone. Therefore, it can be a therapeutic approach to reduce the I/R injury. PMID:25068044

  15. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: Role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Shimoji, Manami; Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Sunakawa, Hajime; Aniya, Yoko

    2008-01-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase (MGST1) is activated by oxidative stress. Although MGST1 is found in mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1), there is no information about the oxidative activation of mtMGST1. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mtMGST1 also undergoes activation and about its function. When rats were treated with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), mtMGST1 activity was significantly increased, and the increased activity was reduced by the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol. In mitochondria from GalN/LPS-treated rats, disulfide-linked mtMGST1 dimer and mixed protein glutathione disulfides (glutathionylation) were detected. In addition, cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from GalN/LPS-treated rats was observed, and the release was inhibited by anti-MGST1 antibodies. Incubation of mitochondria from control rats with diamide and diamide plus GSH in vitro resulted in dimer- and mixed disulfide bond-mediated activation of mtMGST1, respectively. The activation of mtMGST1 by diamide plus GSH caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and the release was prevented by treatment with anti-MGST1 antibodies. In addition, diamide plus GSH treatment caused mitochondrial swelling accompanied by cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BKA), inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Furthermore, mtMGST1 activity was also inhibited by CsA and BKA. These results indicate that mtMGST1 is activated through mixed disulfide bond formation that contributes to cytochrome c release from mitochondria through the MPT pore

  16. Inhibitory effects of tiamulin on contractile and electrical responses in isolated thoracic aorta and cardiac muscle of guinea-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajyo, S; Hara, Y; Hirano, S; Agata, N; Shimizu, K; Urakawa, N

    1992-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of tiamulin, an antibiotic produced by Pleurotus mutilis, on contractile and electrical responses in isolated thoracic aorta and cardiac muscle of guinea-pigs was studied. In the thoracic aorta, tiamulin with an IC50 of 9.7 x 10(-6) M inhibited sustained contractions induced by isosmotically added 60 mM KCl. The inhibitory effect of tiamulin on a Ca(2+)-induced contraction in a depolarized muscle was competitively antagonized by raising external Ca2+ concentration. Bay K 8644 (10(-7) M) antagonized tiamulin's inhibition of the Ca(2+)-induced contraction. Tiamulin (2 x 10(-5) M) decreased the elevated cytoplasmic Ca2+ level measured by the fura 2 AM method in the depolarized muscle. In high K(+)-isoprenaline-treated left atria, tiamulin (2 x 10(-5)-2 x 10(-4) M) produced negative inotropic effects. On the other hand in the membrane action potential of papillary muscles, tiamulin (2 x 10(-6)-2 x 10(-4) M) produced decreases in action potential and durations and 2 x 10(-4) M tiamulin depressed the slow response action potential in depolarized muscles. Tiamulin produced prolongations of the PR interval in ECG, negative chrono- and inotropic effects, and an increase in perfusion flow in guinea-pig isolated and perfused hearts. These effects of tiamulin on the aorta or cardiac muscle were similar to those of verapamil and nifedipine. These results suggest that both the inhibitory action of tiamulin on the high K(+)-induced contraction in the aorta and the negative inotropic effect of tiamulin on the cardiac muscle are due to an inhibition of Ca2+ entry through the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels of cells of both these muscles.

  17. Even a Chronic Mild Hyperglycemia Affects Membrane Fluidity and Lipoperoxidation in Placental Mitochondria in Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-García, María del Consuelo; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; Martinez-Montes, Federico; Palomar-Morales, Martín; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    It is known the deleterious effects of diabetes on embryos, but the effects of diabetes on placenta and its mitochondria are still not well known. In this work we generated a mild hyperglycemia model in female wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 48 hours-old rats. The sexual maturity onset of the female rats was delayed around 6–7 weeks and at 16 weeks-old they were mated, and sacrificed at day 19th of pregnancy. In placental total tissue and isolated mitochondria, the fatty acids composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and lipoperoxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Membrane fluidity in mitochondria was measured with the excimer forming probe dipyrenylpropane and mitochondrial function was measured with a Clark-type electrode. The results show that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia increases lipoperoxidation and decreases mitochondrial function in placenta. Simultaneously, placental fatty acids metabolism in total tissue is modified but in a different way than in placental mitochondria. Whereas the chronic mild hyperglycemia induced a decrease in unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) in placental total tissue, the ratio increased in placental mitochondria. The measurements of membrane fluidity showed that fluidity of placenta mitochondrial membranes increased with hyperglycemia, showing consistency with the fatty acids composition through the U/S index. The thermotropic characteristics of mitochondrial membranes were changed, showing lower transition temperature and activation energies. All of these data together demonstrate that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy of early reproductive Wistar rats, generates an increment of lipoperoxidation, an increase of placental mitochondrial membrane fluidity apparently derived from changes in fatty acids composition and consequently, mitochondrial malfunction. PMID:26630275

  18. Integration of cardiac computed tomography into pulmonary vein isolation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, T.F.; Klemm, H.; Willems, S.; Koops, A.; Adam, G.; Begemann, P.G.; Nagel, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Detailed anatomic information of the left atrium is necessary for securely performing radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation-triggering ectopies in the pulmonary vein ostia. In this study the impact of a preinterventionally acquired cardiac computed tomography (CT) on pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) was assessed. Materials and methods: Examinations of 54 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation undergoing PVI were analyzed. In 27 patients a supplementary cardiac CT was obtained prior to PVI (CT group, 12 women, 15 men, 59.7 ± 9.9 years of age): 16 x 1.5 mm collimation, 0.2 pitch, 120 kV tube voltage, 400 effective mAs. The fluoroscopy time, effective dose and quantity of radiofrequency (RF) pulses of the following catheter ablation were compared to 27 patients undergoing stand-alone PVI (11 women, 16 men, 62.0 ± 9.9 years of age). Mann-Whitney tests served for statistical comparison. Results: CT datasets were successfully integrated into the ablation procedure of each patient in the CT group. The mean quantity of RF pulses was significantly lower in the CT group (22.1 ± 8.0 vs. 29.1 ± 11.9, p = 0.030), and a significant reduction of fluoroscopy time was found (41.8 ± 12.0 min vs. 51.2 ± 16.0 min, p = 0.005). Effective doses of the catheter ablation differed in an equivalent dimension but altogether not significantly (14.9 ± 10.0 mSv vs. 20.0 ± 16.0 mSv, p = 0.203). The mean additive effective dose of the cardiac CT was 85 ± 0.3 mSv. (orig.)

  19. Correlation between myocardial malate/aspartate shuttle activity and EAAT1 protein expression in hyper- and hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralphe, J Carter; Bedell, Kurt; Segar, Jeffrey L; Scholz, Thomas D

    2005-05-01

    In the heart, elevated thyroid hormone leads to upregulation of metabolic pathways associated with energy production and development of hypertrophy. The malate/aspartate shuttle, which transfers cytosolic-reducing equivalents into the cardiac mitochondria, is increased 33% in hyperthyroid rats. Within the shuttle, the aspartate-glutamate carrier is rate limiting. The excitatory amino acid transporter type 1 (EAAT1) functions as a glutamate carrier in the malate/aspartate shuttle. In this study, we hypothesize that EAAT1 is regulated by thyroid hormone. Adult rats were injected with triiodothyronine (T3) or saline over a period of 8-9 days or provided with propylthiouracil (PTU) in their drinking water for 2 mo. Steady-state mRNA levels of EAAT1 and aralar1 and citrin (both cardiac mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate transporters) were determined by Northern blot analysis and normalized to 18S rRNA. A spectrophotometric assay of maximal malate/aspartate shuttle activity was performed on isolated cardiac mitochondria from PTU-treated and control animals. Protein lysates from mitochondria were separated by SDS-PAGE and probed with a human anti-EAAT1 IgG. Compared with control, EAAT1 mRNA levels (arbitrary units) were increased nearly threefold in T3-treated (3.1 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.2; P Hyperthyroidism in rats is related to an increase in cardiac expression of EAAT1 mRNA and protein. The 49% increase in EAAT1 mitochondrial protein level shows that malate/aspartate shuttle activity increased in hyperthyroid rat cardiac mitochondria. Although hypothyroidism resulted in a decrease in EAAT1 mRNA, neither the EAAT1 protein level nor shuttle activity was affected. EAAT1 regulation by thyroid hormone may facilitate increased metabolic demands of the cardiomyocyte during hyperthyroidism and impact cardiac function in hyperthyroidism.

  20. Binding of host-selective toxin analogs to mitochondria from normal and Texas male sterile cytoplasm maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantzen, K.A.; Daly, J.M.; Knoche, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    Tritium-labeled toxin analogs were prepared by reduction with NaB 3 H 4 of either the toxin from Helminthosporium maydis race T or a toxin component from Phyllosticta maydis. These reduced analogs had high radiochemical specific activities, high biological activities, and plant specificities identical to the native toxins. A filtration assay was developed to test the binding of these labeled analogs to isolated mitochondria. Binding was not energy dependent nor was there measurable matrical uptake. The analogs were shown to be lipophilic, a characteristic which gave rise to considerable nondisplaceable binding. Under conditions limiting nondisplaceable binding, the displaceable binding was shown to be linear with respect to toxin concentration and unsaturable. No significant differences were observed in the binding characteristics between the mitochondria from normal and male-sterile (Texas) cytoplasm maize. The findings suggest that, at physiologically relevant concentrations, these toxin analogs permeate the membranes of susceptible and resistant mitochondria alike. The lack of demonstrable specific binding does not rule out the involvement of a classical receptor site but does indicate that other kinds of molecular interactions may be involved in the mechanisms for toxicity and specificity

  1. Desmin common mutation is associated with multi-systemic disease manifestations and depletion of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMcCormick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Desmin (DES is a major muscle scaffolding protein that also functions to anchor mitochondria. Pathogenic DES mutations, however, have not previously been recognized as a cause of multi-systemic mitochondrial disease. Here, we describe a 45-year-old man who presented to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Mitochondrial-Genetics Diagnostic Clinic for evaluation of progressive cardiac, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, and mood disorders. Muscle biopsy at age 45 was remarkable for cytoplasmic bodies, as well as ragged red fibers and SDH positive/COX negative fibers that were suggestive of a mitochondrial myopathy. Muscle also showed significant reductions in mitochondrial content (16% of control mean for citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA (35% of control mean. His family history was significant for cardiac conduction defects and myopathy in multiple maternal relatives. Multiple single gene and panel-based sequencing studies were unrevealing. Whole exome sequencing identified a known pathogenic p.S13F mutation in DES that had previously been associated with desmin-related myopathy. Desmin-related myopathy is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by right ventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and arrhythmias. However, neuropathy, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and depletion of both mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA have not previously been widely recognized in this disorder. Recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in desmin-related myopathy clarifies the basis for the multi-systemic manifestations, as are typical of primary mitochondrial disorders. Understanding the mitochondrial pathophysiology of desmin-related myopathy highlights the possibility of new therapies for the otherwise untreatable and often fatal class of disease. We postulate that drug treatments aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis or reducing oxidative stress may be effective therapies to ameliorate the effects of desmin

  2. Interorganelle Communication between Mitochondria and the Endolysosomal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Soto-Heredero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The function of mitochondria and lysosomes has classically been studied separately. However, evidence has now emerged of intense crosstalk between these two organelles, such that the activity or stress status of one organelle may affect the other. Direct physical contacts between mitochondria and the endolysosomal compartment have been reported as a rapid means of interorganelle communication, mediating lipid or other metabolite exchange. Moreover, mitochondrial derived vesicles can traffic obsolete mitochondrial proteins into the endolysosomal system for their degradation or secretion to the extracellular milieu as exosomes, representing an additional mitochondrial quality control mechanism that connects mitochondria and lysosomes independently of autophagosome formation. Here, we present what is currently known about the functional and physical communication between mitochondria and lysosomes or lysosome-related organelles, and their role in sustaining cellular homeostasis.

  3. Toxic effects of carvacrol, caryophyllene oxide, and ascaridole from essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides on mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzote, Lianet; Stamberg, Werner; Staniek, Katrin; Gille, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Chenopodium ambrosioides have been used for centuries in the Americas as a popular remedy for parasitic diseases. The essential oil of this plant possesses anthelmintic activity and is still used in some regions to treat parasitosis and leishmaniasis. However, the Chenopodium oil caused also some fatalities, leading to its commercial disuse. In this work, we studied the mechanism of toxicity of the essential oil and its major pure ingredients (carvacrol, caryophyllene oxide, and ascaridole, which was synthesized from α-terpinene) with respect to mammalian cells and mitochondria. We observed that all products, but especially caryophyllene oxide, inhibited the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This effect for carvacrol and caryophyllene oxide was mediated via direct complex I inhibition. Without Fe 2+ , ascaridole was less toxic to mammalian mitochondria than other major ingredients. However, evidence on the formation of carbon-centered radicals in the presence of Fe 2+ was obtained by ESR spin-trapping. Furthermore, it was shown that Fe 2+ potentiated the toxicity of ascaridole on oxidative phosphorylation of rat liver mitochondria. The increase of the α-tocopherol quinone/α-tocopherol ratio under these conditions indicated the initiation of lipid peroxidation by Fe 2+ -mediated ascaridole cleavage. Further ESR spin-trapping experiments demonstrated that in addition to Fe 2+ , reduced hemin, but not mitochondrial cytochrome c can activate ascaridole, explaining why ascaridole in peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice exhibited a higher toxicity than in isolated mitochondria.

  4. Oxidation and reduction of pyridine nucleotides in alamethicin-permeabilized plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, F.I.; Michalecka, A.M.; Møller, I.M.

    2004-01-01

    method to permearbilize mitochondria and study the highly branched electron-transport chain in potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) and pea leaf (Pisum sativum) mitochondria. We show that AlaM permeabilized the inner membrane of plant mitochondria to NAD(P)H, allowing the quantification of internal NAD......M-treated mitochondria was much higher than what has been previously measured by other techniques. Our results also show a difference in substrate specificities for complex I in mitochondria as compared with inside-out submitochondrial particles. AlaM facilitated the passage of cofactors to and from the mitochondrial...... environment not only in plant mitochondria but also in other membrane-enclosed compartments, such as intact cells, chloroplasts and peroxisomes....

  5. The genome and transcriptome of perennial ryegrass mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Md. Shofiqul; Studer, Bruno; Byrne, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is one of the most important forage and turf grass species of temperate regions worldwide. Its mitochondrial genome is inherited maternally and contains genes that can influence traits of agricultural importance. Moreover, the DNA sequence...... and annotation of the complete mitochondrial genome from perennial ryegrass. Results: Intact mitochondria from perennial ryegrass leaves were isolated and used for mtDNA extraction. The mitochondrial genome was sequenced to a 167-fold coverage using the Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform, and assembled...... of mitochondrial genomes has been established and compared for a large number of species in order to characterize evolutionary relationships.Therefore, it is crucial to understand the organization of the mitochondrial genome and how it varies between and within species. Here, we report the first de novo assembly...

  6. A survey of the interaction of calcium ions with mitochondria from different tissues and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1971-01-01

    A survey was made of the capacity of mitochondria isolated from a number of different tissues and species to accumulate Ca2+ from the suspending medium during electron transport. The species examined included the rat, mouse, rabbit, hamster, guinea pig, cow, chicken, turtle, blowfly, yeast and Neurospora crassa. The tissues examined included vertebrate liver, kidney, brain, heart, spleen, thyroid and adrenal cortex, and the flight muscle of the blowfly. The mitochondria from all vertebrate tissues examined showed: (a) stimulation of State 4 respiration by added Ca2+ (Ca2+/~ activation ratio about 2.0), accompanied by accumulation of Ca2+ and ejection of H+, with a H+/Ca2+ ratio about 1.0; (b) a requirement of phosphate for accumulation of large amounts of Ca2+; (c) respiration-independent high-affinity binding sites for Ca2+; (d) endogenous Ca2+, which is largely released by uncoupling agents. However, mitochondria from yeast and blowfly flight muscle are unable to accumulate Ca2+ in a respiration-dependent process and possess no high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites. These findings support the view that the high-affinity sites represent the ligand-binding sites of a specific Ca2+ `permease' or transport system in the membrane. The relatively high affinity for Ca2+, which equals or exceeds the affinity for ADP, and the generally uniform characteristics of Ca2+ transport in all the vertebrate mitochondria tested strongly suggest that respiration-linked Ca2+ accumulation plays a general and fundamental role in vertebrate cell physiology. PMID:5129264

  7. Alamethicin permeabilizes the plasma membrane and mitochondria but not the tonoplast in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) suspension cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matic, S.; Geisler, D.A.; Møller, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    remained intact, as indicated by an unaffected tonoplast proton gradient. Low-flux permeabilization of plasma membranes and mitochondria at moderate AlaM concentrations was reversible and did not affect cell vigour. Higher AlaM concentrations induced cell death. After the addition of catalase that removes...... concentrations. Possible uses and limitations of this method for plant cell research are discussed.......The ion channel-forming peptide AlaM (alamethicin) is known to permeabilize isolated mitochondria as well as animal cells. When intact tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) Bright Yellow-2 cells were treated with AlaM, the cells became permeable for low-molecular-mass molecules as shown by induced leakage...

  8. Detection and characterisation of multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1) in human mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, E A; Burchill, S A

    2012-03-13

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1) can lead to multidrug resistance. In this study, we describe for the first time the expression of mitochondrial MRP-1 in untreated human normal and cancer cells and tissues. MRP-1 expression and subcellular localisation in normal and cancer cells and tissues was examined by differential centrifugation and western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy. Viable mitochondria were isolated and MRP-1 efflux activity measured using the calcein-AM functional assay. MRP-1 expression was increased using retroviral infection and specific overexpression confirmed by RNA array. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion and annexin V-propidium iodide labelling of cells. MRP-1 was detected in the mitochondria of cancer and normal cells and tissues. The efflux activity of mitochondrial MRP-1 was more efficient (55-64%) than that of plasma membrane MRP-1 (11-22%; PMRP-1 expression resulted in a preferential increase in mitochondrial MRP-1, suggesting selective targeting to this organelle. Treatment with a non-lethal concentration of doxorubicin (0.85 nM, 8 h) increased mitochondrial and plasma membrane MRP-1, increasing resistance to MRP-1 substrates. For the first time, we have identified MRP-1 with efflux activity in human mitochondria. Mitochondrial MRP-1 may be an exciting new therapeutic target where historically MRP-1 inhibitor strategies have limited clinical success.

  9. Squalene Modulates Radiation-Induced Structural, Ultrastructural And Biochemical Changes In Cardiac Muscles Of Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REZK, R.G.; YACOUB, S.F.; ABDEL AZIZ, N.

    2009-01-01

    The failing heart represents an enormous clinical problem and is a major cause of death throughout the world. Hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress have been shown to contribute to heart failure. Squalene is a remarkable bioactive substance that belongs to a class of antioxidants called isoprenoids, which neutralize the harmful effect of excessive free radicals production in the body.The present study was designed to determine the possible protective effect of squalene against oxidative cardiac muscle damage induced by gamma irradiation.Rats were treated daily by gavage with 0.4 ml/kg squalene for 42 days before whole body gamma irradiation at a dose of 4 Gy and continued until animals were sacrificed 3 days post irradiation.Histological examination of cardiac muscles sections by using light and electron microscopes showed that exposure of rats to ionizing radiation has provoked a severe architecture damage such as necrotic nuclei, nuclei located at the periphery, alteration in chromatin distribution, ruptured cell and mitochondrial membranes, cristae of mitochondria disappeared, sticking mitochondria and ruptured myofibers. Structural and ultra-structural changes were associated with severe oxidative stress. Significant increase of lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde) (MDA) along with reduction in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalse (CAT), and glutathione content (GSH), were recorded.Treatment of rats with squalene has significantly attenuated the radiation-induced oxidative damage and histopathological changes in cardiac muscle which was substantiated by a significant amelioration in the activity of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and aspartate transaminase (AST). Furthermore, administration of squalene to rats has adjusted the radiation-induced increase in plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). Based on these results, it

  10. Terpenoids Isolated From the Shoot of Plectranthus hadiensis Induces Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Cells Via the Mitochondria-Dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Darsan B; Gopalakrishnan, V K

    2015-01-01

    The plant Plectranthus hadiensis is a rich source of many bioactive phytochemicals, especially terpenoids. The terpenoid fraction was isolated and phytochemical characterization was done using GC-MS. The aim of the present study was to find out the antiproliferative activity and the mechanism of cell death induction by the terpenoid fraction on human colon cancer cells (HCT-15). MTT assay was performed with different concentrations of the fraction (10, 20, and 50 µg/mL) to obtain IC50 value for 24 h to induce cell death. The induction of apoptosis were studied by Hoechst staining, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, Comet assay, DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activity assays. The mechanism of apoptosis induction was studied by expression analysis of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and proapoptotic Bax using RT-PCR and also by Western blot analysis of proteins involved in the apoptotic pathway. The terpenoid fraction induced significant morphological changes and DNA fragmentation in the cells. Positive Hoechst staining and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining indicated apoptosis induction by the fraction. DNA fragmentation, which is a characteristic feature of apoptosis, was also observed. Upregulation of caspase-3 activity and proapoptotic Bax, and the downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and COX-2 confirmed that the apoptosis induction was via the mitochondria-dependent pathway.

  11. Transport of N-acetylglutamate in rat-liver mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A. J.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Wanders, R. J.; Lof, C.

    1982-01-01

    The permeability properties of the rat-liver mitochondrial membrane for N-acetylglutamate, the activator of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (ammonia), were studied. 1. Transport of N-acetylglutamate into the mitochondria was only observed in partially or fully de-energized mitochondria and when the

  12. Methylene blue improves mitochondrial respiration and decreases oxidative stress in a substrate-dependent manner in diabetic rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duicu, Oana M; Privistirescu, Andreea; Wolf, Adrian; Petruş, Alexandra; Dănilă, Maria D; Raţiu, Corina D; Muntean, Danina M; Sturza, Adrian

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy has been systematically associated with compromised mitochondrial energetics and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that underlie its progression to heart failure. Methylene blue is a redox drug with reported protective effects mainly on brain mitochondria. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute administration of methylene blue on mitochondrial respiration, H 2 O 2 production, and calcium sensitivity in rat heart mitochondria isolated from healthy and 2 months (streptozotocin-induced) diabetic rats. Mitochondrial respiratory function was assessed by high-resolution respirometry. H 2 O 2 production and calcium retention capacity were measured spectrofluorimetrically. The addition of methylene blue (0.1 μmol·L -1 ) elicited an increase in oxygen consumption of mitochondria energized with complex I and II substrates in both normal and diseased mitochondria. Interestingly, methylene blue elicited a significant increase in H 2 O 2 release in the presence of complex I substrates (glutamate and malate), but had an opposite effect in mitochondria energized with complex II substrate (succinate). No changes in the calcium retention capacity of healthy or diabetic mitochondria were found in the presence of methylene blue. In conclusion, in cardiac mitochondria isolated from diabetic and nondiabetic rat hearts, methylene blue improved respiratory function and elicited a dichotomic, substrate-dependent effect on ROS production.

  13. Reciprocal enhancement of uptake and toxicity of cadmium and calcium in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiele, Reginald C.; Stevens, Don; Kamunde, Collins

    2010-01-01

    The interactive effects of cadmium (Cd) and calcium (Ca) on energy metabolism in rainbow trout liver mitochondria were studied to test the prediction that Ca would protect against Cd-induced mitochondrial liability. Isolated rainbow trout liver mitochondria were energized with malate and glutamate and exposed to increasing concentrations (5-100 μM) of Cd and Ca singly and in combination at 15 o C. Accumulation of Cd and Ca in the mitochondria and mitochondrial respiration (oxygen consumption) rates were measured. Additionally, un-energized mitochondria were incubated with low doses (1 μM) of Cd and Ca singly and in combination, with time-course measurements of cation accumulation/binding and oxygen consumption rates. In energized actively phosphorylating mitochondria, the uptake rates of both Cd and Ca were dose-dependent and enhanced when administered concurrently. Upon low-dose incubation, Cd accumulation was rapid and peaked in 5 min, while no appreciable uptake of Ca occurred. Functionally, the resting (state 4, ADP-limited) respiration rate was not affected in the dose-response exposure, but it decreased remarkably on low-dose incubation. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated respiration (state 3) rate was impaired dose-dependently with maximal inhibitions (at the highest dose, 100 μM) of 32, 64 and 73% for Ca, Cd, and combined exposures, respectively. The combined effects of Ca and Cd suggested synergistic (more than additive) action and partial additivity of effects at low and higher doses of the two cations, respectively. Moreover, on a molar basis, Cd was twice as toxic as Ca to rainbow trout liver mitochondria and when combined, approximately 90% of the effects were attributable to Cd. The coupling efficiency, as measured by respiratory control ratio (RCR) and phosphorylation efficiency, measured as ADP/O ratio, both decreased as the exposure dosage and duration increased. In addition, Cd and Ca exposure decreased mitochondrial proton leak (state 4

  14. Pathology of radiation pancarditis. Cardiac lesions in thirty-four autopsy cases of malignant tumors following radiation therapy to a portion of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, S; Yamamoto, M; Kawaguchi, Y; Shirasawa, K; Toyoda, H [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1977-12-01

    Morphological features of the heart were studied on 34 autopsy cases of malignant tumors treated with x-ray or telecobalt irradiation to the cardiac region. Clinically, 8 cases among 11 with abnormal electrocardiograms had sinus tachycardia. On chest x-ray film, an extension of the median shadow was found in 5 among 26 cases with pericarditis. Histologically, the irradiated heart showed sinus-like capillary dilation in the myocardium and had features of pancarditis; pericarditis fibrinosa, interstitial edema between muscle fibers, myolysis or necrosis, and endocardial edema with slight inflammatory cell infiltration. Radiation pericarditis most often occurred in the case of esophageal carcinoma. Those changes throughout the cardiac wall seem to be directly induced by radiation in addition to circulatory disturbances. Electron-microscopically, there were interesting changes in the mitochondria of cardiac muscles; proliferation and aggregation, fusion of the unit membrane, and an appearance of giant mitochondria up to 3.8 ..mu.. in diameter. In the frequency and extent of both glycoprotein degeneration and myocardial fibrosis, there were no differences between 34 examined and 22 control cases. Fibrosis in the irradiated heart, however, tended to occur in the myocardium just beneath the radiation pericarditis, should be taken into consideration especially in radiotherapeutic cases of esophageal carcinoma.

  15. Functional characterization of mitochondria in neutrophils: a role restricted to apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maianski, N. A.; Geissler, J.; Srinivasula, S. M.; Alnemri, E. S.; Roos, D.; Kuijpers, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondria are known to combine life-supporting functions with participation in apoptosis by controlling caspase activity. Here, we report that in human blood neutrophils the mitochondria are different, because they preserve mainly death-mediating abilities. Neutrophil mitochondria hardly

  16. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) metabolism and cardiac arrhythmias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giffin, D.M.; Man, R.Y.K.; Arthur, G.; Choy, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of LPC in the production of cardiac arrhythmias in isolated mammalian hearts has been well-documented. Cardiac arrhythmias are initiated by the accumulation of the lysolipid in the cardiac membrane. When isolated rat hearts were perfused in 10 μM LPC for 10 min, severe arrhythmias were observed in all experiments. In isolated guinea pig hearts that were perfused under identical conditions, the development of severe arrhythmias was never observed, and mild arrhythmias were produced in less than 50% of the hearts used. When the hearts of both species were perfused with [ 14 C-palmitate]-LPC, the labellings found in the microsomal fractions (expressed in mg protein) were similar. However, a higher amount of labelled LPC (2-fold) was found in rat heart microsomes, whereas a higher amount of labelled fatty acid was located in the guinea pig heart microsomes. Determination of lysophospholipase activities in these microsomal fractions revealed that the specific activity of the enzyme was much higher in the guinea pig heart than the rat heart. The authors conclude that the differential effect of LPC-induced arrhythmias between the rat and guinea pig heart may be a direct result of the lysophospholipase activities in these hearts. The ability to catabolize LPC more rapidly in the guinea pig heart may decrease the accumulation of LPC in the membrane, and hence, reduce the production of arrhythmias

  17. THE ISLAMIC ETHICS OF MITOCHONDRIA TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Iman Bouzenita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Biotechnology has opened a new chapter with the advent of mitochondria transplantation for cell-based therapy. Mitochondrial transplantation was successfully led to birth; however, cytoplasmic transplantation has caused apprehension, since the mixing of human ooplasm from two different maternal sources may generate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA heteroplasmy in the offspring. Islamic legal verdicts on human cloning and somatic cell transfer have been overweighing explicit as to its prohibition, due to the change of creation, mixing of lineage and other evaluations. Is mitochondria transplantation equivalent to human cloning in that genetic information is proliferated and does it, therefore, take the same legal rule? Are there possible benefits (masalih for medical treatment that may render mitochondria transplantation permissible, or are possible harms (mafasid overweighing? Or is it a completely different procedure, taking a different rule? The paper will investigate into these questions and discuss the dimensions of Islamic ethics on the issue.

  18. Evidence for loss of mitochondria in Microsporidia from a mitochondrial-type HSP70 in Nosema locustae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germot, A; Philippe, H; Le Guyader, H

    1997-08-01

    In molecular phylogenies based on ribosomal RNA, three amitochondriate protist lineages, Microsporidia, Metamonada (including diplomonads) and Parabasala (including trichomonads), are the earliest offshoots of the eukaryotic tree. As an explantation for the lack of mitochondria in these organisms, the hypothesis that they have diverged before the mitochondrial endosymbiosis is preferred to the less parsimonious hypothesis of several independent losses of the organelle. Nevertheless, if they had descended from mitochondrion-containing ancestors, it may be possible to find in their nuclear DNA genes that derive from the endosymbiont which gave rise to mitochondria. Based on similar evidence, secondary losses of mitochondria have recently been suggested for Entamoeba histolytica and for Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we have isolated a gene encoding a chaperone protein (HSP70, 70 kDa heat shock protein) from the microspordian Nosema locustae. In phylogenetic trees, this HSP70 was located within a group of sequences that in other lineages is targetted to the mitochondrial compartment, itself included in the proteobacterial clade. In addition, the N. locustae protein contained the GDAW(V) motif shared by mitochondrial and proteobacterial sequences, with only one conservative substitution. Moreover, microsporidia, a phylum which was assumed to emerge close to the base of the eukaryotic tree, appears as the sister-group of fungi in the HSP70 phylogeny, in agreement with some ultrastructural characters and phylogenies based on alpha- and beta-tubulins. Loss of mitochondria, now demonstrated for several amitochondriate groups, indicates that the common ancestor of all the extant eukaryotic species could have been a mitochondriate eukaryote.

  19. The destiny of Ca(2+) released by mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ayako; Kim, Bongju; Matsuoka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) is known to regulate diverse cellular functions, for example energy production and cell death, by modulating mitochondrial dehydrogenases, inducing production of reactive oxygen species, and opening mitochondrial permeability transition pores. In addition to the action of Ca(2+) within mitochondria, Ca(2+) released from mitochondria is also important in a variety of cellular functions. In the last 5 years, the molecules responsible for mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics have been identified: a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), a mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCLX), and a candidate for a mitochondrial H(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (Letm1). In this review, we focus on the mitochondrial Ca(2+) release system, and discuss its physiological and pathophysiological significance. Accumulating evidence suggests that the mitochondrial Ca(2+) release system is not only crucial in maintaining mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis but also participates in the Ca(2+) crosstalk between mitochondria and the plasma membrane and between mitochondria and the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  20. Improving oocyte quality by transfer of autologous mitochondria from fully grown oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine Gry; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2017-01-01

    options using autologous mitochondria to potentially augment pregnancy potential in ART. Autologous transfer of mitochondria from the patient's own germline cells has attracted much attention as a possible new treatment to revitalize deficient oocytes. IVF births have been reported after transfer...... of oogonial precursor cell-derived mitochondria; however, the source and quality of the mitochondria are still unclear. In contrast, fully grown oocytes are loaded with mitochondria which have passed the genetic bottleneck and are likely to be of high quality. An increased supply of such oocytes could...... with high quality mitochondria can be obtained from natural or stimulated ovaries and potentially be used to improve both quality and quantity of oocytes available for fertility treatment....

  1. [Importance of preservation of biophysical organization of isolated mitochondria for revealing physiological regulation of their functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, M V; Khunderiakova, N V; Kondrashova, M N

    2011-01-01

    A method has been elaborated that preserves the mitochondrial-reticular network in lymphocytes in composition to the physiological one. Physiologicalby the immobilization of a blood smear on glass and its subsequent incubation in a medium closeresponses of respiration to excitation in the ition of early responses of ions. The recogn organism are well pronounced on these preparat mitochondria to pathogenic agents in the organism is a timely problem of basic and medicinal e- investigations since they play a leading role in the development of pathological states.

  2. WHITE PANICLE3, a Novel Nucleus-Encoded Mitochondrial Protein, Is Essential for Proper Development and Maintenance of Chloroplasts and Mitochondria in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchang Li

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria and chloroplasts are interacting organelles that play important roles in plant development. In addition to a small number proteins encoded by their own genomes, the majority of mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins are encoded in the cell nucleus and imported into the organelle. As a consequence, coordination between mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the nucleus is of crucial importance to plant cells. Variegated mutants are chloroplast-defective mutants and are considered to be ideal models for studying the intercommunication between these organelles. Here, we report the isolation of WHITE PANICLE3 (WP3, a nuclear gene involved in variegation, from a naturally occurring white panicle rice mutant. Disrupted expression of WP3 in the mutant leads to severe developmental defects in both chloroplasts and mitochondria, and consequently causes the appearance of white-striped leaves and white panicles in the mutant plants. Further investigation showed that WP3 encodes a protein most likely targeted to mitochondria and is specifically expressed in rice panicles. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the recessive white-panicle phenotype in the wp3 mutant is inherited in a typical Mendelian manner, while the white-striped leaf phenotype in wp3 is maternally inherited. Our data collectively suggest that the nucleus-encoded mitochondrial protein, WP3, plays an essential role in the regulation of chloroplast development in rice panicles by maintaining functional mitochondria. Therefore, the wp3 mutant is an excellent model in which to explore the communication between the nucleus, mitochondria, and chloroplasts in plant cells.

  3. Neurosteroids: oligodendrocyte mitochondria convert cholesterol to pregnenolone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Z.Y.; Bourreau, E.; Jung-Testas, I.; Robel, P.; Baulieu, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte mitochondria from 21-day-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were incubated with 100 nM [ 3 H]cholesterol. It yielded [ 3 H]pregnenolone at a rate of 2.5 +/- 0.7 and 5-[ 3 H]pregnene-3β,20α-diol at a rate of 2.5 +/- 1.1 pmol per mg of protein per hr. Cultures of glial cells from 19- to 21-day-old fetuses (a mixed population of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) were incubated for 24 hr with [ 3 H]mevalonolactone. [ 3 H]Cholesterol, [ 3 H]pregnenolone, and 5-[ 3 H]pregnene-3β,20α-diol were characterized in cellular extracts. The formation of the 3 H-labeled steroids was increased by dibutyryl cAMP (0.2 mM) added to the culture medium. The active cholesterol side-chain cleavage mechanism, recently suggested immunohistochemically and already observed in cultures of C6 glioma cells, reinforces the concept of neurosteroids applied to Δ 5 -3β-hydroxysteroids previously isolated from brain

  4. Bacterial infection increases risk of carcinogenesis by targeting mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A.B.; Desler, Claus; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-01-01

    pathways, and compares the impact of the bacterial alteration of mitochondrial function to that of cancer. Bacterial virulence factors have been demonstrated to induce mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and to modulate DNA repair pathways of the mitochondria. Furthermore, virulence factors can induce...... or impair the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. The effect of bacterial targeting of mitochondria is analogous to behavior of mitochondria in a wide array of tumours, and this strongly suggests that mitochondrial targeting of bacteria is a risk factor for carcinogenesis....

  5. The rapid mode of calcium uptake into heart mitochondria (RaM): comparison to RaM in liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntinas, L; Gunter, K K; Sparagna, G C; Gunter, T E

    2001-04-02

    A mechanism of Ca(2+) uptake, capable of sequestering significant amounts of Ca(2+) from cytosolic Ca(2+) pulses, has previously been identified in liver mitochondria. This mechanism, the Rapid Mode of Ca(2+) uptake (RaM), was shown to sequester Ca(2+) very rapidly at the beginning of each pulse in a sequence [Sparagna et al. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 27510-27515]. The existence and properties of RaM in heart mitochondria, however, are unknown and are the basis for this study. We show that RaM functions in heart mitochondria with some of the characteristics of RaM in liver, but its activation and inhibition are quite different. It is feasible that these differences represent different physiological adaptations in these two tissues. In both tissues, RaM is highly conductive at the beginning of a Ca(2+) pulse, but is inhibited by the rising [Ca(2+)] of the pulse itself. In heart mitochondria, the time required at low [Ca(2+)] to reestablish high Ca(2+) conductivity via RaM i.e. the 'resetting time' of RaM is much longer than in liver. RaM in liver mitochondria is strongly activated by spermine, activated by ATP or GTP and unaffected by ADP and AMP. In heart, RaM is activated much less strongly by spermine and unaffected by ATP or GTP. RaM in heart is strongly inhibited by AMP and has a biphasic response to ADP; it is activated at low concentrations and inhibited at high concentrations. Finally, an hypothesis consistent with the data and characteristics of liver and heart is presented to explain how RaM may function to control the rate of oxidative phosphorylation in each tissue. Under this hypothesis, RaM functions to create a brief, high free Ca(2+) concentration inside mitochondria which may activate intramitochondrial metabolic reactions with relatively small amounts of Ca(2+) uptake. This hypothesis is consistent with the view that intramitochondrial [Ca(2+)] may be used to control the rate of ADP phosphorylation in such a way as to minimize the probability of

  6. Clinical islet isolation and transplantation outcomes with deceased cardiac death donors are similar to neurological determination of death donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Axel; Kin, Tatsuya; O'Gorman, Doug; Livingstone, Scott; Bigam, David; Kneteman, Norman; Senior, Peter; Shapiro, A M James

    2016-01-01

    In islet transplantation, deceased cardiac death (DCD) donation has been identified as a potential extended source. There are currently no studies comparing outcomes between these categories, and our goal was to compare islet isolation success rates and transplantation outcomes between DCD and neurological determination of death (NDD) donors. Islet isolations from 15 DCD and 418 NDD were performed in our centre between September 2008 and September 2014. Donor variables, islet yields, metabolic function of isolated isled and insulin requirements at 1-month post-transplant were compared. Compared to NDD, pancreata from DCD were more often procured locally and donors required less vasopressive support (P islet yields were similar between NDD and DCD (576 vs. 608 × 10(3) islet equivalent, P = 0.628 and 386 vs. 379, P = 0.881, respectively). The metabolic function was similar between NDD and DCD, as well as the mean decrease in insulin requirement at 1-month post-transplantation (NDD: 64.82%; DCD: 60.17% reduction, P = 0.517). These results support the broader use of DCD pancreata for islet isolation. A much larger DCD islet experience will be required to truly determine noninferiority of both short- and long-term outcomes. © 2015 Steunstichting ESOT.

  7. Do the mitochondria of malaria parasites behave like the phoenix after return in the mosquito? Regeneration of degenerated mitochondria is required for successful Plasmodium infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongaerts, Ger

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are energy generators in eukaryotic organisms like man and the pathogenic malaria parasites, the Plasmodium spp. From the moment a mosquito-mediated malaria infection occurs in man the parasite multiplies profusely, but eventually the oxygen supply becomes the limiting factor in this process. Consequently, the parasite will increasingly generate energy (and lactic acid) from sugar fermentation. Simultaneously, the cristate structure of Plasmodium mitochondria degenerates and becomes acristate. The degenerated acristate mitochondria of mammalian Plasmodium parasites seem to be able to revitalise by transforming to cristate mitochondria inside the oxygen-rich mosquito, like the rebirth of the old phoenix. In this way the infectivity of the parasite is revitalised.

  8. Melatonin as a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant: one of evolution's best ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun Xian; Jou, Mei Jie; Galano, Annia; Xu, Bing

    2017-11-01

    Melatonin is an ancient antioxidant. After its initial development in bacteria, it has been retained throughout evolution such that it may be or may have been present in every species that have existed. Even though it has been maintained throughout evolution during the diversification of species, melatonin's chemical structure has never changed; thus, the melatonin present in currently living humans is identical to that present in cyanobacteria that have existed on Earth for billions of years. Melatonin in the systemic circulation of mammals quickly disappears from the blood presumably due to its uptake by cells, particularly when they are under high oxidative stress conditions. The measurement of the subcellular distribution of melatonin has shown that the concentration of this indole in the mitochondria greatly exceeds that in the blood. Melatonin presumably enters mitochondria through oligopeptide transporters, PEPT1, and PEPT2. Thus, melatonin is specifically targeted to the mitochondria where it seems to function as an apex antioxidant. In addition to being taken up from the circulation, melatonin may be produced in the mitochondria as well. During evolution, mitochondria likely originated when melatonin-forming bacteria were engulfed as food by ancestral prokaryotes. Over time, engulfed bacteria evolved into mitochondria; this is known as the endosymbiotic theory of the origin of mitochondria. When they did so, the mitochondria retained the ability to synthesize melatonin. Thus, melatonin is not only taken up by mitochondria but these organelles, in addition to many other functions, also probably produce melatonin as well. Melatonin's high concentrations and multiple actions as an antioxidant provide potent antioxidant protection to these organelles which are exposed to abundant free radicals.

  9. Mitochondria-targeted nutraceuticals in sports medicine: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2017-01-01

    Since mitochondria have been recognized as the cells' key organelles involved in the energy utilization during exercise, targeting the organelle with specifically designed compounds (mitochondria-targeted nutraceuticals, MTNs) may have a great promise in the prevention and treatment of heavy exercise-related mitochondrial dysfunction. In vitro studies suggested that MTNs have antioxidant effects at the molecular level, and might boost mitochondrial biogenesis and organelle bioenergetics, with both processes are known to positively affect exercise performance and recovery. However, while there are a number of different MTNs evaluated for a potential benefit as a therapy for mitochondria-related diseases and conditions, only few human studies evaluated the possible impact of novel MTNs in the field of sports medicine. This mini review summarizes recent research findings regarding the efficacy of different mitochondria-targeted nutritional agents, emphasizing their roles in sports medicine.

  10. The fate of paternal mitochondria in marmoset pre-implantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetjens, C M; Wesselmann, R

    2008-06-01

    Sperm-derived mitochondria are integrated into the oocyte at fertilization but seem to vanish during the early cleavage phase. The developmental potential of pre-implantation embryos seems to be closely related to their ability to induce degeneration of these mitochondria, but the mechanisms underlying their loss of function are not yet understood. This study focuses on the fate of paternal mitochondria in pre-implantation embryos. Stimulation, collection and in vitro culture of oocytes from Callithrix jacchus, allows the study of the destiny of paternal mitochondria by utilizing immunostaining of pre-implantation embryos, fluorescence and laserscanning microscopy. Live pre-implantation embryos were stained with a fluorescence indicator reflecting mitochondrial membrane potential. Evidence indicating the loss of mitochondrial function was not found nor that apoptosis pathways were involved in the disappearance of paternally derived mitochondria. These findings may have implications for mitochondrially inherited diseases and could lead to new strategies for improving assisted reproduction.

  11. Short-Term Caloric Restriction Suppresses Cardiac Oxidative Stress and Hypertrophy Caused by Chronic Pressure Overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobara, Miyuki; Furumori-Yukiya, Akiko; Kitamura, Miho; Matsumura, Mihoko; Ohigashi, Makoto; Toba, Hiroe; Nakata, Tetsuo

    2015-08-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) prevents senescent changes, in which reactive oxygen species (ROS) have a critical role. Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We examined whether CR alters cardiac redox state and hypertrophy from chronic pressure overload. Male c57BL6 mice were subjected to ascending aortic constriction (AAC) with ad libitum caloric intake (AL + AAC group) or 40% restricted caloric intake (CR + AAC group). CR was initiated 2 weeks before AAC and was continued for 4 weeks. Two weeks after constriction, AAC increased LV wall thickness, impaired transmitral flow velocity, and augmented myocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis, in association with enhancement of BNP and collagen III expressions in the AL + AAC group. In the AL + AAC group, oxidative stress in cardiac tissue and mitochondria were enhanced, and NADPH oxidase activity and mitochondrial ROS production were elevated. These changes were significantly attenuated in the CR + AAC group. Additionally, in antioxidant systems, myocardial glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were enhanced in the CR + AAC group. Chronic pressure overload increased cardiac oxidative damage, in association with cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Short-term CR suppressed oxidative stress and improved cardiac function, suggesting that short-term CR could be a useful strategy to prevent pressure overload-induced cardiac injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondria in anthropology and forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Tomasz; Rogalla, Urszula

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria's role in crucial metabolic pathways is probably the first answer which comes to our minds for the question: what do these tiny organelles serve for? However, specific features of their DNA made them extremely useful also in the field of anthropology and forensics. MtDNA analyses became a milestone in the complex task of unraveling earliest human migrations. Evidence provided by these experiments left no doubts on modern humans origins pointing to Africa being our cradle. It also contributed to interpretation of putative ways of our dispersal around Asia and Americas thousands years ago. On the other hand, analysis of mtDNA is well established and valuable tool in forensic genetics. When other definitely more popular markers give no answer on identity, it is the time to employ information carried by mitochondria. This chapter summarizes not only current reports on the role of mitochondria in forensics and reconstruction of modern humans phylogeny, but also calls one's attention to a broad range of difficulties and constraints associated with mtDNA analyses.

  13. Role of mitochondria in parvovirus pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna Nykky

    Full Text Available Proper functioning of the mitochondria is crucial for the survival of the cell. Viruses are able to interfere with mitochondrial functions as they infect the host cell. Parvoviruses are known to induce apoptosis in infected cells, but the role of the mitochondria in parvovirus induced cytopathy is only partially known. Here we demonstrate with confocal and electron microscopy that canine parvovirus (CPV associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane from the onset of infection. During viral entry a transient depolarization of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and increase in ROS level was detected. Subsequently, mitochondrial homeostasis was normalized shortly, as detected by repolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and decrease of ROS. Indeed, activation of cell survival signalling through ERK1/2 cascade was observed early in CPV infected cells. At 12 hours post infection, concurrent with the expression of viral non-structural protein 1, damage to the mitochondrial structure and depolarization of its membrane were apparent. Results of this study provide additional insight of parvovirus pathology and also more general information of virus-mitochondria association.

  14. Biochemistry and biology: heart-to-heart to investigate cardiac progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Isotta; Forte, Elvira; Angelini, Francesco; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Cardiac regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving field, with promising future developments for effective personalized treatments. Several stem/progenitor cells are candidates for cardiac cell therapy, and emerging evidence suggests how multiple metabolic and biochemical pathways strictly regulate their fate and renewal. In this review, we will explore a selection of areas of common interest for biology and biochemistry concerning stem/progenitor cells, and in particular cardiac progenitor cells. Numerous regulatory mechanisms have been identified that link stem cell signaling and functions to the modulation of metabolic pathways, and vice versa. Pharmacological treatments and culture requirements may be exploited to modulate stem cell pluripotency and self-renewal, possibly boosting their regenerative potential for cell therapy. Mitochondria and their many related metabolites and messengers, such as oxygen, ROS, calcium and glucose, have a crucial role in regulating stem cell fate and the balance of their functions, together with many metabolic enzymes. Furthermore, protein biochemistry and proteomics can provide precious clues on the definition of different progenitor cell populations, their physiology and their autocrine/paracrine regulatory/signaling networks. Interdisciplinary approaches between biology and biochemistry can provide productive insights on stem/progenitor cells, allowing the development of novel strategies and protocols for effective cardiac cell therapy clinical translation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolation and Properties of Intact Chromoplasts from Tomato Fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Norio, Iwatsuki; Ryuichi, Moriyama; Tadashi, Asahi; Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Nagoya University; Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Nagoya University; Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Nagoya University

    1984-01-01

    Intact chromoplasts were isolated from tomato fruits at different ripening stages by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The isolated chromoplast fractions were contaminated very little by other organelles, although the fraction from fully ripened fruits contained some mitochondria and microbodies. As the transformation of chloroplasts to chromoplasts proceeded, the density of the plastids decreased from 1.096 to 1.075g・cm^ and the decrease was related to a decrease in chlorophyll and an...

  16. A novel fission-independent role of dynamin-related protein 1 in cardiac mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Wang, Pei; Bisetto, Sara; Yoon, Yisang; Chen, Quan; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Wang, Wang

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria in adult cardiomyocytes exhibit static morphology and infrequent dynamic changes, despite the high abundance of fission and fusion regulatory proteins in the heart. Previous reports have indicated that fusion proteins may bear functions beyond morphology regulation. Here, we investigated the role of fission protein, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), on mitochondrial respiration regulation in adult cardiomyocytes. By using genetic or pharmacological approaches, we manipulated the activity or protein level of fission and fusion proteins and found they mildly influenced mitochondrial morphology in adult rodent cardiomyocytes, which is in contrast to their significant effect in H9C2 cardiac myoblasts. Intriguingly, inhibiting endogenous DRP1 by dominant-negative DRP1 mutation (K38A), shRNA, or Mdivi-1 suppressed maximal respiration and respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria from adult mouse heart or in adult cardiomyocytes from rat. Meanwhile, basal respiration was increased due to increased proton leak. Facilitating mitofusin-mediated fusion by S3 compound, however, failed to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in adult cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, DRP1 inhibition did not affect the maximal activity of individual respiratory chain complexes or the assembly of supercomplexes. Knocking out cyclophilin D, a regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), abolished the effect of DRP1 inhibition on respiration. Finally, DRP1 inhibition decreased transient mPTP-mediated mitochondrial flashes, delayed laser-induced mPTP opening and suppressed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results uncover a novel non-canonical function of the fission protein, DRP1 in maintaining or positively stimulating mitochondrial respiration, bioenergetics and ROS signalling in adult cardiomyocyte, which is likely independent of morphological changes. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The

  17. Exercise training in Tgαq*44 mice during the progression of chronic heart failure: cardiac vs. peripheral (soleus muscle) impairments to oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Bruno; Majerczak, Joanna; Bardi, Eleonora; Buso, Alessia; Comelli, Marina; Chlopicki, Stefan; Guzik, Magdalena; Mavelli, Irene; Nieckarz, Zenon; Salvadego, Desy; Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Skórka, Tomasz; Bottinelli, Roberto; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2017-08-01

    Cardiac function, skeletal (soleus) muscle oxidative metabolism, and the effects of exercise training were evaluated in a transgenic murine model (Tgα q *44) of chronic heart failure during the critical period between the occurrence of an impairment of cardiac function and the stage at which overt cardiac failure ensues (i.e., from 10 to 12 mo of age). Forty-eight Tgα q *44 mice and 43 wild-type FVB controls were randomly assigned to control groups and to groups undergoing 2 mo of intense exercise training (spontaneous running on an instrumented wheel). In mice evaluated at the beginning and at the end of training we determined: exercise performance (mean distance covered daily on the wheel); cardiac function in vivo (by magnetic resonance imaging); soleus mitochondrial respiration ex vivo (by high-resolution respirometry); muscle phenotype [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content; citrate synthase (CS) activity]; and variables related to the energy status of muscle fibers [ratio of phosphorylated 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to unphosphorylated AMPK] and mitochondrial biogenesis and function [peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor-γ coactivator-α (PGC-1α)]. In the untrained Tgα q *44 mice functional impairments of exercise performance, cardiac function, and soleus muscle mitochondrial respiration were observed. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was related to the function of complex I of the respiratory chain, and it was not associated with differences in CS activity, MHC isoforms, p-AMPK/AMPK, and PGC-1α levels. Exercise training improved exercise performance and cardiac function, but it did not affect mitochondrial respiration, even in the presence of an increased percentage of type 1 MHC isoforms. Factors "upstream" of mitochondria were likely mainly responsible for the improved exercise performance. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Functional impairments in exercise performance, cardiac function, and soleus muscle mitochondrial respiration

  18. Isolation and functional aspects of free luteal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luborsky, J.L.; Berhrman, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of luteal cell isolation employ enzymatic treatment of luteal tissue with collagenase and deoxyribonuclease. Additional enzymes such as hyaluronidase or Pronase are also used in some instances. Isolated luteal cells retain the morphological characteristics of steroid secreting cells after isolation. They contain mitochondria, variable amounts of lipid droplets, and an extensive smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Isolated luteal cells have been used in numerous studies to examine the regulation of steriodogenesis by luteinizing hormone (LH). LH receptor binding studies were employed to quantitate specific properties of hormone-receptor interaction in relation to cellular function. Binding of [ 125 I]LH to bovine luteal cells and membranes was compared and it was concluded that the enzymatic treatment used to isolate cells did not change the LH receptor binding kinetics

  19. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  20. Fluoxetine and the mitochondria: A review of the toxicological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto

    2016-09-06

    Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)) is used as an antidepressant by modulating the levels of serotonin in the synaptic cleft. Nevertheless, fluoxetine also induces undesirable effects, such as anxiety, sexual dysfunction, sleep disturbances, and gastrointestinal impairments. Fluoxetine has been viewed as an agent that may interfere with cell fate by triggering apoptosis. On the other hand, fluoxetine intake has been associated with increased cancer risk. Nonetheless, data remain contradictory and no conclusions were taken. Several studies demonstrated that fluoxetine interacts with mitochondria triggering apoptosis and/or altering mitochondrial function by modulating the activity of respiratory chain components and enzymes of the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, fluoxetine affects mitochondria-related redox parameters in different experimental models. In this review, data demonstrating the effects of fluoxetine upon mammalian mitochondria are described and discussed, as well as several unsolved questions in this field of research are addressed. A separate section deals with future needs regarding the research involving the impact of fluoxetine treatment upon mitochondria and mitochondria-related signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondria-Associated Membranes As Networking Platforms and Regulators of Cancer Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Livia Sassano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The tight cross talk between two essential organelles of the cell, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria, is spatially and functionally regulated by specific microdomains known as the mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs. MAMs are hot spots of Ca2+ transfer between the ER and mitochondria, and emerging data indicate their vital role in the regulation of fundamental physiological processes, chief among them mitochondria bioenergetics, proteostasis, cell death, and autophagy. Moreover, and perhaps not surprisingly, it has become clear that signaling events regulated at the ER–mitochondria intersection regulate key processes in oncogenesis and in the response of cancer cells to therapeutics. ER–mitochondria appositions have been shown to dynamically recruit oncogenes and tumor suppressors, modulating their activity and protein complex formation, adapt the bioenergetic demand of cancer cells and to regulate cell death pathways and redox signaling in cancer cells. In this review, we discuss some emerging players of the ER–mitochondria contact sites in mammalian cells, the key processes they regulate and recent evidence highlighting the role of MAMs in shaping cell-autonomous and non-autonomous signals that regulate cancer growth.

  2. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Heterogeneity and the Isolation of Immature and Committed Cells for Cardiac Remodeling and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Boheler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells represent one promising source for cell replacement therapy in heart, but differentiating embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs are highly heterogeneous and show a variety of maturation states. In this study, we employed an ESC clonal line that contains a cardiac-restricted ncx1 promoter-driven puromycin resistance cassette together with a mass culture system to isolate ESC-CMs that display traits characteristic of very immature CMs. The cells display properties of proliferation, CM-restricted markers, reduced mitochondrial mass, and hypoxia-resistance. Following transplantation into rodent hearts, bioluminescence imaging revealed that immature cells, but not more mature CMs, survived for at least one month following injection. These data and comparisons with more mature cells lead us to conclude that immature hypoxia resistant ESC-CMs can be isolated in mass in vitro and, following injection into heart, form grafts that may mediate long-term recovery of global and regional myocardial contractile function following infarction.

  3. Mitochondria, Energetics, Epigenetics, and Cellular Responses to Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Kimberly; Worth, Leroy; Haugen, Astrid C.; Meyer, Joel N.; Domann, Frederick E.; Van Houten, Bennett; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Bultman, Scott J.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Begley, Thomas J.; Sobol, Robert W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Ideker, Trey; Santos, Janine H.; Copeland, William C.; Tice, Raymond R.; Balshaw, David M.; Tyson, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cells respond to environmental stressors through several key pathways, including response to reactive oxygen species (ROS), nutrient and ATP sensing, DNA damage response (DDR), and epigenetic alterations. Mitochondria play a central role in these pathways not only through energetics and ATP production but also through metabolites generated in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as mitochondria–nuclear signaling related to mitochondria morphology, biogenesis, fission/fusion, mitophagy, apoptosis, and epigenetic regulation. Objectives: We investigated the concept of bidirectional interactions between mitochondria and cellular pathways in response to environmental stress with a focus on epigenetic regulation, and we examined DNA repair and DDR pathways as examples of biological processes that respond to exogenous insults through changes in homeostasis and altered mitochondrial function. Methods: The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences sponsored the Workshop on Mitochondria, Energetics, Epigenetics, Environment, and DNA Damage Response on 25–26 March 2013. Here, we summarize key points and ideas emerging from this meeting. Discussion: A more comprehensive understanding of signaling mechanisms (cross-talk) between the mitochondria and nucleus is central to elucidating the integration of mitochondrial functions with other cellular response pathways in modulating the effects of environmental agents. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of mitochondrial functions in epigenetic regulation and DDR with environmental stress. Development and application of novel technologies, enhanced experimental models, and a systems-type research approach will help to discern how environmentally induced mitochondrial dysfunction affects key mechanistic pathways. Conclusions: Understanding mitochondria–cell signaling will provide insight into individual responses to environmental hazards, improving prediction of hazard and susceptibility to

  4. Reoperation for bleeding in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Rauer, Line Juul; Mortensen, Poul Erik

    2012-01-01

    after cardiac surgery was low ejection fraction, high EuroSCORE, procedures other than isolated CABG, elongated time on ECC, low body mass index, diabetes mellitus and preoperatively elevated s-creatinine. Reoperated patients significantly had a greater increase in postoperative s-creatinine and higher...

  5. Examination of the Effects of Heterogeneous Organization of RyR Clusters, Myofibrils and Mitochondria on Ca2+ Release Patterns in Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Rajagopal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatio-temporal dynamics of intracellular calcium, [Ca2+]i, regulate the contractile function of cardiac muscle cells. Measuring [Ca2+]i flux is central to the study of mechanisms that underlie both normal cardiac function and calcium-dependent etiologies in heart disease. However, current imaging techniques are limited in the spatial resolution to which changes in [Ca2+]i can be detected. Using spatial point process statistics techniques we developed a novel method to simulate the spatial distribution of RyR clusters, which act as the major mediators of contractile Ca2+ release, upon a physiologically-realistic cellular landscape composed of tightly-packed mitochondria and myofibrils. We applied this method to computationally combine confocal-scale (~ 200 nm data of RyR clusters with 3D electron microscopy data (~ 30 nm of myofibrils and mitochondria, both collected from adult rat left ventricular myocytes. Using this hybrid-scale spatial model, we simulated reaction-diffusion of [Ca2+]i during the rising phase of the transient (first 30 ms after initiation. At 30 ms, the average peak of the simulated [Ca2+]i transient and of the simulated fluorescence intensity signal, F/F0, reached values similar to that found in the literature ([Ca2+]i ≈1 μM; F/F0≈5.5. However, our model predicted the variation in [Ca2+]i to be between 0.3 and 12.7 μM (~3 to 100 fold from resting value of 0.1 μM and the corresponding F/F0 signal ranging from 3 to 9.5. We demonstrate in this study that: (i heterogeneities in the [Ca2+]i transient are due not only to heterogeneous distribution and clustering of mitochondria; (ii but also to heterogeneous local densities of RyR clusters. Further, we show that: (iii these structure-induced heterogeneities in [Ca2+]i can appear in line scan data. Finally, using our unique method for generating RyR cluster distributions, we demonstrate the robustness in the [Ca2+]i transient to differences in RyR cluster distributions

  6. Global outbreak of severe Mycobacterium chimaera disease after cardiac surgery: a molecular epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ingen, Jakko; Kohl, Thomas A; Kranzer, Katharina; Hasse, Barbara; Keller, Peter M; Katarzyna Szafrańska, Anna; Hillemann, Doris; Chand, Meera; Schreiber, Peter Werner; Sommerstein, Rami; Berger, Christoph; Genoni, Michele; Rüegg, Christian; Troillet, Nicolas; Widmer, Andreas F; Becker, Sören L; Herrmann, Mathias; Eckmanns, Tim; Haller, Sebastian; Höller, Christiane; Debast, Sylvia B; Wolfhagen, Maurice J; Hopman, Joost; Kluytmans, Jan; Langelaar, Merel; Notermans, Daan W; Ten Oever, Jaap; van den Barselaar, Peter; Vonk, Alexander B A; Vos, Margreet C; Ahmed, Nada; Brown, Timothy; Crook, Derrick; Lamagni, Theresa; Phin, Nick; Smith, E Grace; Zambon, Maria; Serr, Annerose; Götting, Tim; Ebner, Winfried; Thürmer, Alexander; Utpatel, Christian; Spröer, Cathrin; Bunk, Boyke; Nübel, Ulrich; Bloemberg, Guido V; Böttger, Erik C; Niemann, Stefan; Wagner, Dirk; Sax, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    Since 2013, over 100 cases of Mycobacterium chimaera prosthetic valve endocarditis and disseminated disease were notified in Europe and the USA, linked to contaminated heater-cooler units (HCUs) used during cardiac surgery. We did a molecular epidemiological investigation to establish the source of these patients' disease. We included 24 M chimaera isolates from 21 cardiac surgery-related patients in Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK, 218 M chimaera isolates from various types of HCUs in hospitals, from LivaNova (formerly Sorin; London, UK) and Maquet (Rastatt, Germany) brand HCU production sites, and unrelated environmental sources and patients, as well as eight Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates. Isolates were analysed by next-generation whole-genome sequencing using Illumina and Pacific Biosciences technologies, and compared with published M chimaera genomes. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole-genome sequencing of 250 isolates revealed two major M chimaera groups. Cardiac surgery-related patient isolates were all classified into group 1, in which all, except one, formed a distinct subgroup. This subgroup also comprised isolates from 11 cardiac surgery-related patients reported from the USA, most isolates from LivaNova HCUs, and one from their production site. Isolates from other HCUs and unrelated patients were more widely distributed in the phylogenetic tree. HCU contamination with M chimaera at the LivaNova factory seems a likely source for cardiothoracic surgery-related severe M chimaera infections diagnosed in Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, the UK, the USA, and Australia. Protective measures and heightened clinician awareness are essential to guarantee patient safety. Partly funded by the EU Horizon 2020 programme, its FP7 programme, the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, and National Institute of Health Research Oxford Health Protection

  7. Protein oxidation in plant mitochondria as a stress indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, I.M.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2004-01-01

    oxidation of cysteine and methionine side chains is an important mechanism for regulating enzyme activity. Mitochondria from both mammalian and plant tissues contain a number of oxidised proteins, but the relative abundance of these post-translationally modified forms is as yet unknown......, as are the consequences of the modification for the properties and turnover time of the proteins. Specific proteins appear to be particularly vulnerable to oxidative carbonylation in the matrix of plant mitochondria; these include several enzymes of the Krebs cycle, glycine decarboxylase, superoxide dismutase and heat...... shock proteins. Plant mitochondria contain a number of different proteases, but their role in removing oxidatively damaged proteins is, as yet, unclear....

  8. Pathology of mitochondria in MELAS syndrome: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felczak, Paulina; Lewandowska, Eliza; Stępniak, Iwona; Ołdak, Monika; Pollak, Agnieszka; Lechowicz, Urszula; Pasennik, Elżbieta; Stępień, Tomasz; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa

    Ultrastructural changes in skeletal muscle biopsy in a 24-year-old female patient with clinically suspected mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome are presented. We observed proliferation and/or pleomorphism of mitochondria in skeletal muscle and smooth muscle cells of arterioles, as well as in pericytes of capillaries. Paracrystalline inclusions were found only in damaged mitochondria of skeletal muscle. Genetic testing revealed a point mutation in A3243G tRNALeu(UUR) typical for MELAS syndrome. We conclude that differentiated pathological changes of mitochondria in the studied types of cells may be associated with the different energy requirements of these cells.

  9. Chatty Mitochondria: Keeping Balance in Cellular Protein Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topf, Ulrike; Wrobel, Lidia; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional cellular organelles that host many biochemical pathways including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Defective mitochondria pose a threat to cellular homeostasis and compensatory responses exist to curtail the source of stress and/or its consequences. The mitochondrial proteome comprises proteins encoded by the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Disturbances in protein homeostasis may originate from mistargeting of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins. Defective protein import and accumulation of mistargeted proteins leads to stress that triggers translation alterations and proteasomal activation. These cytosolic pathways are complementary to the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) that aims to increase the capacity of protein quality control mechanisms inside mitochondria. They constitute putative targets for interventions aimed at increasing the fitness, stress resistance, and longevity of cells and organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of functionally important amino acid residues in the mitochondria targeting sequence of Hepatitis B virus X protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Sai Kam; Ho, Sai Fan; Tsui, Kwok Wing; Fung, Kwok Pui; Waye, M.Y. Mary

    2008-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been strongly associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the X protein (HBx) is thought to mediate the cellular changes associated with carcinogenesis. Recently, isolation of the hepatitis B virus integrants from HCC tissue by others have established the fact that the X gene is often truncated at its C-terminus. Expression of the GFP fusion proteins of HBx and its truncation mutants with a GFP tag in human liver cell-lines in this study revealed that the C-terminus of HBx is indispensable for its specific localization in the mitochondria. A crucial region of seven amino acids at the C-terminus has been mapped out in which the cysteine residue at position 115 serves as the most important residue for the subcellular localization. When cysteine 115 of HBx is mutated to alanine the mitochondria targeting property of HBx is abrogated

  11. On the Mechanism(s of Membrane Permeability Transition in Liver Mitochondria of Lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: Insights from Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Belyaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L. during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring. To further elucidate the mechanism(s of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd2+ and Ca2+ plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca2+ plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated “winter” mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd2+ did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd2+ enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the “winter” mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd2+ or Ca2+ plus Pi in the “winter” mitochondria were only weakly (if so sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent. Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the “spring” lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd2+ produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed.

  12. Lactate oxidation in human skeletal muscle mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Robert A; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Nordsborg, Nikolai B

    2013-01-01

    of four separate and specific substrate titration protocols, the respirometric analysis revealed that mitochondria were capable of oxidizing lactate in the absence of exogenous LDH. The titration of lactate and NAD(+) into the respiration medium stimulated respiration (P = 0.003). The addition...... of exogenous LDH failed to increase lactate-stimulated respiration (P = 1.0). The results further demonstrate that human skeletal muscle mitochondria cannot directly oxidize lactate within the mitochondrial matrix. Alternately, these data support previous claims that lactate is converted to pyruvate within...

  13. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (Nnt) links the substrate requirement in brain mitochondria for hydrogen peroxide removal to the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopert, Pamela; Patel, Manisha

    2014-05-30

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are implicated in the etiology of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson disease. Mitochondria are known to be net producers of ROS, but recently we have shown that brain mitochondria can consume mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a respiration-dependent manner predominantly by the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system. Here, we sought to determine the mechanism linking mitochondrial respiration with H2O2 catabolism in brain mitochondria and dopaminergic cells. We hypothesized that nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (Nnt), which utilizes the proton gradient to generate NADPH from NADH and NADP(+), provides the link between mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 detoxification through the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system. Pharmacological inhibition of Nnt in isolated brain mitochondria significantly decreased their ability to consume H2O2 in the presence, but not absence, of respiration substrates. Nnt inhibition in liver mitochondria, which do not require substrates to detoxify H2O2, had no effect. Pharmacological inhibition or lentiviral knockdown of Nnt in N27 dopaminergic cells (a) decreased H2O2 catabolism, (b) decreased NADPH and increased NADP(+) levels, and (c) decreased basal, spare, and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. Nnt-deficient cells possessed higher levels of oxidized mitochondrial Prx, which rendered them more susceptible to steady-state increases in H2O2 and cell death following exposure to subtoxic levels of paraquat. These data implicate Nnt as the critical link between the metabolic and H2O2 antioxidant function in brain mitochondria and suggests Nnt as a potential therapeutic target to improve the redox balance in conditions of oxidative stress associated with neurodegenerative diseases. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Nanopreparations for mitochondria targeting drug delivery system: Current strategies and future prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjie Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are a novel and promising therapeutic target for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of a lot of human diseases such as cancer, metabolic diseases and neurodegenerative disease. Owing to the mitochondrial special bilayer structure and highly negative potential nature, therapeutic molecules have multiple difficulties in reaching mitochondria. To overcome multiple barriers for targeting mitochondria, the researchers developed various pharmaceutical preparations such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and inorganic nanoparticles modified by mitochondriotropic moieties like dequalinium (DQA, triphenylphosphonium (TPP, mitochondrial penetrating peptides (MPPs and mitochondrial protein import machinery that allow specific targeting. The targeted formulations exhibited enhanced pharmacological effect and better therapeutic effect than their untargeted counterpart both in vitro and in vivo. Nanocarriers may be used for bio-therapeutic delivery into specific mitochondria that possess a great potential treatment of mitochondria related diseases.

  15. Cardiopulmonary manifestations of isolated pulmonary valve infective endocarditis demonstrated with cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passen, Edward; Feng, Zekun

    2015-01-01

    Right-sided infective endocarditis involving the pulmonary valve is rare. This pictorial essay discusses the use and findings of cardiac CT combined with delayed chest CT and noncontrast chest CT of pulmonary valve endocarditis. Cardiac CT is able to show the full spectrum of right-sided endocarditis cardiopulmonary features including manifestations that cannot be demonstrated by echocardiography. Copyright © 2015 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure of cells chloroplasts and mitochondria of cotton leaves following gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslanova, S V [AN Uzbekskoj SSR, Tashkent. Inst. Ehksperimental' noj Biologii Rastenij

    1975-01-01

    The article investigates the structural changes in the plastides and mitochondria of cotton leaf cells after irradiation. Cotton seeds that had been moistened for 24 hours were irradiated by a gamma source with a dose of 10 kR (intensity: 19 R/s.). For the study of the plastides and mitochondria of the leaf cells samples were taken in the cotyledonous leaf and flowering phases of the cotton. The cells of the cotton leaf mesophillum in the standard consists of chloroplast with developed interior structures. Study of the ultrastructure of the cells of the mesophilic tissue of the cotyledonous leaf in irradiated cotton plants showed that the chloroplastide membranes are not damaged. A change in the form of the chloroplasts, an accumulation of starch and plastic substances in the chloroplasts, and a reduction in the number of inter-grain bonds were noted. It was discovered that gamma irradiation produces an excessive build-up of starch in the chloroplasts. The mitochondria are often located close to the plastides. The optical density is typical of the matrix of the mitochondria in non-irradiated plants. After cotton seeds that have sprouted are irradiated with a dose of 10 kR in the cotyledonous leaf phase, part of the mitochondria swells. The matrix becomes more transparent, and the number of chrysts decreases. Part of the mitochondria remains intact. The optical density and internal membranes of the mitochondria remain the same as in the control group. The disturbances of the chloroplast and the mitochondria are also observed in the budding and flowering phases (under conditions of a natural day). It was noted that a shortened day facilitated to some extent a normalization of metabolism, and this produced in turn a normal development of the chloroplasts, leaf mitochondria and ATF generation, which reduces the final biological effect of the radiation.

  17. Biotin carboxylases in mitochondria and the cytosol from skeletal and cardiac muscle as detected by avidin binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkeby, S.; Moe, D.; Bøg-Hansen, T. C.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Biotin carboxylases in mammalian cells are regulatory enzymes in lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis. In this study, endogenous biotin in skeletal and cardiac muscle was detected using avidin conjugated with alkaline phosphatase and applied in high concentrations to muscle sections. The avidin binding

  18. Role of MDCT angiography in the preoperative evaluation of anomalous pulmonary venous connection associated with complex cardiac abnormality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingzhe; Wu Qingyu; Xu Yufeng; Bai Yan; Liu Zhibo; Li Hongyin; Zhu Jiemin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT in patients with APVC associated with complex cardiac abnormality. Materials and methods: The clinical and imaging data of 39 patients with APVC confirmed by surgery were retrospectively reviewed. According to accompanied cardiac malformations, patients with APVC were classified as isolated and complex group. Using surgical findings as the reference standard, diagnostic agreement of MDCT, TTE (transthoracic echocardiography) and cardiac catheterization for detection of APVC were calculated. Results: At surgery, 27 patients were considered as complex APVCs. MDCT correctly diagnosed APVC in all patients and the diagnostic agreements between MDCT and surgery were both 100% in isolated and complex groups. All 5 APVCs which could not be detected at cardiac catheterization were in complex group, and the diagnostic agreements were 100% and 76.2% in isolated and complex groups, respectively. At TTE, eight of nine disagreed patients were complex cases. The diagnostic agreements of TTE were 91.7% and 66.7% in isolated and complex groups, respectively. The dysmorphic pulmonary veins were identified in 11 patients by MDCT. Conclusions: MDCT is superior to catheterization and TTE in evaluation of APVC associated with complex cardiac defects.

  19. Glutathione and Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicent eRibas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH is the main nonprotein thiol in cells whose functions are dependent on the redox-active thiol of its cysteine moiety that serves as a cofactor for a number of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. While synthesized exclusively in the cytosol from its constituent amino acids, GSH is distributed in different compartments, including mitochondria where its concentration in the matrix equals that of the cytosol. This feature and its negative charge at physiological pH imply the existence of specific carriers to import GSH from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix, where it plays a key role in defense against respiration-induced reactive oxygen species and in the detoxification of lipid hydroperoxides and electrophiles. Moreover, as mitochondria play a central strategic role in the activation and mode of cell death, mitochondrial GSH has been shown to critically regulate the level of sensitization to secondary hits that induce mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and release of proteins confined in the intermembrane space that once in the cytosol engage the molecular machinery of cell death. In this review, we summarize recent data on the regulation of mitochondrial GSH and its role in cell death and prevalent human diseases, such as cancer, fatty liver disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

  20. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative modifications of root mitochondria during senescence of above-ground parts of Arabidopis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanello, Diego Darío; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Guiamet, Juan José

    2017-05-01

    This work studied modifications experienced by root mitochondria during whole plant senescence or under light deprivation, using Arabidopsis thaliana plants with YFP tagged to mitochondria. During post-bolting development, root respiratory activity started to decline after aboveground organs (i.e., rosette leaves) had senesced. This suggests that carbohydrate starvation may induce root senescence. Similarly, darkening the whole plant induced a decrease in respiration of roots. This was partially due to a decrease in the number of total mitochondria (YFP-labelled mitochondria) and most probably to a decrease in the quantity of mitochondria with a developed inner membrane potential (ΔΨm, i.e., Mitotracker red- labelled mitochondria). Also, the lower amount of mitochondria with ΔΨm compared to YFP-labelled mitochondria at 10d of whole darkened plant, suggests the presence of mitochondria in a "standby state". The experiments also suggest that small mitochondria made the main contribution to the respiratory activity that was lost during root senescence. Sugar supplementation partially restored the respiration of mitochondria after 10d of whole plant dark treatment. These results suggest that root senescence is triggered by carbohydrate starvation, with loss of ΔΨm mitochondria and changes in mitochondrial size distribution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) extract on respiratory chain system activity in rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzyszyn, Z; Czerny, B; Myśliwiec, Z; Pawlik, A; Droździk, M

    2010-06-01

    The effect of artichoke extract on mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) activity in isolated rat liver mitochondria (including reaction kinetics) was studied. The effect of the extract on the activity of isolated cytochrome oxidase was also studied. Extract in the range of 0.68-2.72 microg/ml demonstrated potent and concentration-dependent inhibitory activity. Concentrations > or =5.4 microg/ml entirely inhibited MRC activity. The succinate oxidase system (MRC complexes II-IV) was the most potently inhibited, its activity at an extract concentration of 1.36 microg/ml being reduced by 63.3% compared with the control (p artichoke extracts may rely in part on the effects of their active compounds on the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain system.

  3. Mature Erythrocytes of Iguana iguana (Squamata, Iguanidae) Possess Functional Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Giuseppina; Campello, Silvia; Corrado, Mauro; Di Giambattista, Livia; Cirotti, Claudia; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Gentile, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy analyses of Iguana iguana blood preparations revealed the presence of mitochondria within erythrocytes with well-structured cristae. Fluorescence microscopy analyses upon incubation with phalloidin-FITC, Hoechst 33342 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm)-sensitive probe MitoTracker Red indicated that mitochondria i) widely occur in erythrocytes, ii) are polarized, and iii) seem to be preferentially confined at a "perinuclear" region, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The analysis of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption showed that red blood cells retain the capability to consume oxygen, thereby providing compelling evidence that mitochondria of Iguana erythrocytes are functional and capable to perform oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. Bcl-2 prevents loss of mitochondria in CCCP-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, Aniek O. de; Heuvel, Lambert P. van den; Dijkman, Henry B.P.M.; Abreu, Ronney A. de; Birkenkamp, Kim U.; Witte, Theo de; Reijden, Bert A. van der; Smeitink, Jan A.M.; Jansen, Joop H.

    2004-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis at the level of mitochondria. To examine the mechanism of Bcl-2 function, we investigated the effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) on two hematopoietic cell lines and Bcl-2 overexpressing transfectants. CCCP directly interferes with mitochondrial function and induces apoptosis. We show that Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis and that the antiapoptotic effect of Bcl-2 takes place upstream of caspase activation and nuclear changes associated with apoptosis, since these were markedly inhibited in cells overexpressing Bcl-2. Bcl-2 does not prevent the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential nor the alterations in cellular ATP content induced by CCCP in FL5.12 and Jurkat cells. A higher number of mitochondria was observed in untreated Bcl-2 transfected cells compared to parental cells, as shown by electron microscopy. Exposure to CCCP induced a dramatic decrease in the number of mitochondria and severely disrupted mitochondrial ultrastructure, with apparent swelling and loss of cristae in parental cells. Bcl-2 clearly diminished the disruption of mitochondrial structure and preserved a higher number of mitochondria. These data suggest that CCCP induces apoptosis by structural disruption of mitochondria and that Bcl-2 prevents apoptosis and mitochondrial degeneration by preserving mitochondrial integrity

  5. Bcl-2 prevents loss of mitochondria in CCCP-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Aniek O; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Dijkman, Henry B P M; de Abreu, Ronney A; Birkenkamp, Kim U; de Witte, Theo; van der Reijden, Bert A; Smeitink, Jan A M; Jansen, Joop H

    2004-10-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis at the level of mitochondria. To examine the mechanism of Bcl-2 function, we investigated the effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) on two hematopoietic cell lines and Bcl-2 overexpressing transfectants. CCCP directly interferes with mitochondrial function and induces apoptosis. We show that Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis and that the antiapoptotic effect of Bcl-2 takes place upstream of caspase activation and nuclear changes associated with apoptosis, since these were markedly inhibited in cells overexpressing Bcl-2. Bcl-2 does not prevent the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential nor the alterations in cellular ATP content induced by CCCP in FL5.12 and Jurkat cells. A higher number of mitochondria was observed in untreated Bcl-2 transfected cells compared to parental cells, as shown by electron microscopy. Exposure to CCCP induced a dramatic decrease in the number of mitochondria and severely disrupted mitochondrial ultrastructure, with apparent swelling and loss of cristae in parental cells. Bcl-2 clearly diminished the disruption of mitochondrial structure and preserved a higher number of mitochondria. These data suggest that CCCP induces apoptosis by structural disruption of mitochondria and that Bcl-2 prevents apoptosis and mitochondrial degeneration by preserving mitochondrial integrity.

  6. Integrative Cardiac Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    primary cardiac arrest. Circulation. 1998;97(2):155Y160. 8. Sesso HD, Lee IM, Gaziano JM, Rexrode KM, Glynn RJ, Buring JE. Maternal and paternal ...to signal transduction, inflammation, and host–pathogen interactions .27 Whole blood RNA isolation systems such as PAXgene accurately capture in vivo...the effect of healthy behaviors on leukocyte function and leukocyte–endothelium interactions that are important for cardiovascular health

  7. Psychological Stress and Mitochondria: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; McEwen, Bruce S

    Mitochondria are multifunctional life-sustaining organelles that represent a potential intersection point between psychosocial experiences and biological stress responses. This article provides a systematic review of the effects of psychological stress on mitochondrial structure and function. A systematic review of the literature investigating the effects of psychological stress on mitochondrial function was conducted. The review focused on experimentally controlled studies allowing us to draw causal inference about the effect of induced psychological stress on mitochondria. A total of 23 studies met the inclusion criteria. All studies involved male laboratory animals, and most demonstrated that acute and chronic stressors influenced specific facets of mitochondrial function, particularly within the brain. Nineteen studies showed significant adverse effects of psychological stress on mitochondria and four found increases in function or size after stress. In humans, only six observational studies were available, none with experimental designs, and most only measured biological markers that do not directly reflect mitochondrial function, such as mitochondrial DNA copy number. Overall, evidence supports the notion that acute and chronic stressors influence various aspects of mitochondrial biology, and that chronic stress exposure can lead to molecular and functional recalibrations among mitochondria. Limitations of current animal and human studies are discussed. Maladaptive mitochondrial changes that characterize this subcellular state of stress are termed mitochondrial allostatic load. Prospective studies with sensitive measures of specific mitochondrial outcomes will be needed to establish the link between psychosocial stressors, emotional states, the resulting neuroendocrine and immune processes, and mitochondrial energetics relevant to mind-body research in humans.

  8. Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang) inhibits Fe2+-citrate-induced lipoperoxidation in isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo Andreu, Gilberto; Delgado, René; Velho, Jesus; Inada, Natalia M; Curti, Carlos; Vercesi, Anibal E

    2005-05-01

    The extract of Mangifera indica L. (Vimang) is able to prevent iron mediated mitochondrial damage by means of oxidation of reduced transition metals required for the production of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals and direct free radical scavenging activity. In this study we report for the first time the iron-complexing ability of Vimang as a primary mechanism for protection of rat liver mitochondria against Fe2+ -citrate-induced lipoperoxidation. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and antimycin A-insensitive oxygen consumption were used as quantitative measures of lipoperoxidation. Vimang at 10 microM mangiferin concentration equivalent induced near-full protection against 50 microM Fe2+ -citrate-induced mitochondrial swelling and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi). The IC50 value for Vimang protection against Fe2+ -citrate-induced mitochondrial TBARS formation (7.89+/-1.19 microM) was around 10 times lower than that for tert-butylhydroperoxide mitochondrial induction of TBARS formation. The extract also inhibited the iron citrate induction of mitochondrial antimycin A-insensitive oxygen consumption, stimulated oxygen consumption due to Fe2+ autoxidation and prevented Fe3+ ascorbate reduction. The extracted polyphenolic compound, mainly mangiferin, could form a complex with Fe2+, accelerating Fe2+ oxidation and the formation of more stable Fe3+ -polyphenol complexes, unable to participate in Fenton-type reactions and lipoperoxidation propagation phase. The strong DPPH radical scavenging activity with an apparent IC50 of 2.45+/-0.08 microM suggests that besides its iron-complexing capacity, Vimang could also protect mitochondria from Fe2+ -citrate lipoperoxidation through direct free radical scavenging ability, mainly lipoperoxyl and alcoxyl radicals, acting as both a chain-breaking and iron-complexing antioxidant. These results are of pharmacological relevance since Vimang could be a potential candidate for antioxidant therapy in

  9. Effects of Various Kynurenine Metabolites on Respiratory Parameters of Rat Brain, Liver and Heart Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Baran*

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that the endogenous glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid dose-dependently and significantly affected rat heart mitochondria. Now we have investigated the effects of L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine and kynurenic, anthranilic, 3-hydroxyanthranilic, xanthurenic and quinolinic acids on respiratory parameters (ie, state 2, state 3, respiratory control index (RC and ADP/oxygen ratio in brain, liver and heart mitochondria of adult rats. Mitochondria were incubated with glutamate/malate (5 mM or succinate (10 mM and in the presence of L-tryptophan metabolites (1 mM or in the absence, as control. Kynurenic and anthranilic acids significantly reduced RC values of heart mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Xanthurenic acid significantly reduced RC values of brain mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Furthermore, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid decreased RC values of brain, liver and heart mitochondria using glutamate/malate. In the presence of succinate, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid affected RC values of brain mitochondria, whereas in liver and heart mitochondria only 3-hydroxykynurenine lowered RC values significantly. Furthermore, lowered ADP/oxygen ratios were observed in brain mitochondria in the presence of succinate with 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, and to a lesser extent with glutamate/malate. In addition, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid significantly lowered the ADP/oxygen ratio in heart mitochondria exposed to glutamate/malate, while in the liver mitochondria only a mild reduction was found. Tests of the influence of L-tryptophan and its metabolites on complex I in liver mitochondria showed that only 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and L-kynurenine led to a significant acceleration of NADH-driven complex I activities. The data indicate that L-tryptophan metabolites had different effects on brain, liver

  10. BioMEMS for mitochondria medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaraj, Divya

    A BioMEMS device to study cell-mitochondrial physiological functionalities was developed. The pathogenesis of many diseases including obesity, diabetes and heart failure as well as aging has been linked to functional defects of mitochondria. The synthesis of Adenosine Tri Phosphate (ATP) is determined by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. Therefore, electrical characterization by E-fields with complementary chemical testing was used here. The BioMEMS device was fabricated as an SU-8 based microfluidic system with gold electrodes on SiO2/Si wafers for electromagnetic interrogation. Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) were incorporated for proton studies important in the electron transport chain, together with monitoring Na+, K+ and Ca++ ions for ion channel studies. ISFETs are chemically sensitive Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices and their threshold voltage is directly proportional to the electrolytic H+ ion variation. These ISFETs (sensitivity ˜55 mV/pH for H+) were further realized as specific ion sensitive Chemical Field Effect Transistors (CHEMFETs) by depositing a specific ion sensitive membrane on the gate. Electrodes for dielectric spectroscopy studies of mitochondria were designed as 2- and 4-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range. In addition, to limit polarization effects, a 4-electrode set-up with unique meshed pickup electrodes (7.5x7.5 mum2 loops with 4 mum wires) was fabricated. Sensitivity of impedance spectroscopy to membrane potential changes was confirmed by studying the influence of uncouplers and glucose on mitochondria. An electrical model was developed for the mitochondrial sample, and its frequency response correlated with impedance spectroscopy experiments of sarcolemmal mitochondria. Using the mesh electrode structure, we obtained a reduction of 83.28% in impedance at 200 Hz. COMSOL

  11. Mitochondria morphologic changes and metabolic effects of rat hippocampus after microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Li; Peng Ruiyun; Gao Yabing; Wang Shuiming; Wang Lifeng; Dong Qi; Xu Xinping; Ma Junjie

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of microwave on mitochondria morphologic and metabolism of rat hippocampus. Methods: 30 male rats were exposed to microwave with the average power density of 30 mW/cm 2 . Rats were sacrificed at 6 h, 1 d, 3 d and 7 d after irradiation. Electron microscope, enzymatic activity staining and spectrophotometer were used to study ultrastructure change of hippocampus mitochondria and activity of ATPase, SDH and MAO. Mitochondrial ATP, ADP and AMP contents were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: At 6 h after microwave radiation, the sizes and shapes of hippocampus mitochondria were abnormal and the injury of mitochondria was aggravated at 1 and 3 d after radiation. The mitochondria presented swell, cavitation including disorder, shortness and decrease of crest. The activity of SDH and content of ATP were decreased at 6 h, most serious at 3 d(P<0.01), and recovered at 7 d after radiation. The activity of ATPase and MAO increased notably at 1 d and 3 d after radiation (P<0.01). Conclusions: Microwave can damage the structure and function of mitochondria in rat hippocampus, and cause the energy metabolism of enzyme disorder. (authors)

  12. Doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria as a model system for studying germ line formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Milani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI of mitochondria occurs when both mothers and fathers are capable of transmitting mitochondria to their offspring, in contrast to the typical Strictly Maternal Inheritance (SMI. DUI was found in some bivalve molluscs, in which two mitochondrial genomes are inherited, one through eggs, the other through sperm. During male embryo development, spermatozoon mitochondria aggregate in proximity of the first cleavage furrow and end up in the primordial germ cells, while they are dispersed in female embryos. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used MitoTracker, microtubule staining and transmission electron microscopy to examine the mechanisms of this unusual distribution of sperm mitochondria in the DUI species Ruditapes philippinarum. Our results suggest that in male embryos the midbody deriving from the mitotic spindle of the first division concurs in positioning the aggregate of sperm mitochondria. Furthermore, an immunocytochemical analysis showed that the germ line determinant Vasa segregates close to the first cleavage furrow. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In DUI male embryos, spermatozoon mitochondria aggregate in a stable area on the animal-vegetal axis: in organisms with spiral segmentation this zone is not involved in cleavage, so the aggregation is maintained. Moreover, sperm mitochondria reach the same embryonic area in which also germ plasm is transferred. In 2-blastomere embryos, the segregation of sperm mitochondria in the same region with Vasa suggests their contribution in male germ line formation. In DUI male embryos, M-type mitochondria must be recognized by egg factors to be actively transferred in the germ line, where they become dominant replacing the Balbiani body mitochondria. The typical features of germ line assembly point to a common biological mechanism shared by DUI and SMI organisms. Although the molecular dynamics of the segregation of sperm mitochondria in DUI species are unknown

  13. SEGMENTATION OF MITOCHONDRIA IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IMAGES USING ALGEBRAIC CURVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark H; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been used to generate large volumes of data with enough details for understanding the complex structure of the nervous system. However, automatic techniques are required to segment cells and intracellular structures in these multi-terabyte datasets and make anatomical analysis possible on a large scale. We propose a fully automated method that exploits both shape information and regional statistics to segment irregularly shaped intracellular structures such as mitochondria in electron microscopy (EM) images. The main idea is to use algebraic curves to extract shape features together with texture features from image patches. Then, these powerful features are used to learn a random forest classifier, which can predict mitochondria locations precisely. Finally, the algebraic curves together with regional information are used to segment the mitochondria at the predicted locations. We demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms in segmentation of mitochondria in EM images.

  14. Mitochondria mediate septin cage assembly to promote autophagy of Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Andrea; Krokowski, Sina; Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Buranyi, Stephen; Pfanzelter, Julia; Galea, Dieter; Willis, Alexandra; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; Hollinshead, Michael; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Way, Michael; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Septins, cytoskeletal proteins with well-characterised roles in cytokinesis, form cage-like structures around cytosolic Shigella flexneri and promote their targeting to autophagosomes. However, the processes underlying septin cage assembly, and whether they influence S. flexneri proliferation, remain to be established. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the septin cages inhibit S. flexneri proliferation. To study mechanisms of septin cage assembly, we used proteomics and found mitochondrial proteins associate with septins in S. flexneri-infected cells. Strikingly, mitochondria associated with S. flexneri promote septin assembly into cages that entrap bacteria for autophagy. We demonstrate that the cytosolic GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) interacts with septins to enhance mitochondrial fission. To avoid autophagy, actin-polymerising Shigella fragment mitochondria to escape from septin caging. Our results demonstrate a role for mitochondria in anti-Shigella autophagy and uncover a fundamental link between septin assembly and mitochondria. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  15. Cardiac Morphology and Function, and Blood Gas Transport in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer eAl-Samir

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have studied cardiac and respiratory functions of aquaporin- 1-deficient mice by the Pressure-Volume-loop technique and by blood gas analysis. In addition, the morphological properties of the animals’ hearts were analysed. In anesthesia under maximal dobutamine stimulation, the mice exhibit a moderately elevated heart rate of < 600 min-1 and an O2 consumption of ~0.6 ml/min/g, which is about twice the basal rate. In this state, which is similar to the resting state of the conscious animal, all cardiac functions including stroke volume and cardiac output exhibited resting values and were identical between deficient and wildtype animals. Likewise, pulmonary and peripheral exchange of O2 and CO2 were normal. In contrast, several morphological parameters of the heart tissue of deficient mice were altered: 1 left ventricular wall thickness was reduced by 12%, 2 left ventricular mass, normalized to tibia length, was reduced by 10-20%, 3 cardiac muscle fiber cross sectional area was decreased by 17%, and 4 capillary density was diminished by 10%. As the P-V-loop technique yielded normal end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes, the deficient hearts are characterized by thin ventricular walls in combination with normal intraventricular volumes. The aquaporin-1-deficient heart thus seems to be at a disadvantage compared to the wildtype heart by a reduced left-ventricular wall thickness and an increased diffusion distance between blood capillaries and muscle mitochondria. While under the present quasi-resting conditions these morphological alterations have no consequences for cardiac function, we expect that the deficient hearts will show a reduced maximal cardiac output.

  16. High-fat feeding in cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARdelta knockout mice leads to cardiac overexpression of lipid metabolic genes but fails to rescue cardiac phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuquan; Cheng, Lihong; Qin, Qianhong; Liu, Jian; Lo, Woo-kuen; Brako, Lowrence A; Yang, Qinglin

    2009-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta) is an essential determinant of basal myocardial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and bioenergetics. We wished to determine whether increased lipid loading affects the PPARdelta deficient heart in transcriptional regulation of FAO and in the development of cardiac pathology. Cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARdelta knockout (CR-PPARdelta(-/-)) and control (alpha-MyHC-Cre) mice were subjected to 48 h of fasting and to a long-term maintenance on a (28 weeks) high-fat diet (HFD). The expression of key FAO proteins in heart was examined. Serum lipid profiles, cardiac pathology, and changes of various transduction signaling pathways were also examined. Mice subjected to fasting exhibited upregulated transcript expression of FAO genes in the CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts. Moreover, long-term HFD in CR-PPARdelta(-/-) mice induced a strikingly greater transcriptional response. After HFD, genes encoding key FAO enzymes were expressed remarkably more in CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts than in those of control mice. Despite the marked rise of FAO gene expression, corresponding protein expression remained low in the CR-PPARdelta(-/-) heart, accompanied by abnormalities in sarcomere structures and mitochondria that were similar to those of CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts with regular chow feeding. The CR-PPARdelta(-/-) mice displayed increased expression of PPARgamma co-activator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PPARalpha in the heart with deactivated Akt and p42/44 MAPK signaling in response to HFD. We conclude that PPARdelta is an essential determinant of myocardial FAO. Increased lipid intake activates cardiac expression of FAO genes via PPARalpha/PGC-1alpha pathway, albeit it is not sufficient to improve cardiac pathology due to PPARdelta deficiency.

  17. Mature Erythrocytes of Iguana iguana (Squamata, Iguanidae Possess Functional Mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Di Giacomo

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy analyses of Iguana iguana blood preparations revealed the presence of mitochondria within erythrocytes with well-structured cristae. Fluorescence microscopy analyses upon incubation with phalloidin-FITC, Hoechst 33342 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm-sensitive probe MitoTracker Red indicated that mitochondria i widely occur in erythrocytes, ii are polarized, and iii seem to be preferentially confined at a "perinuclear" region, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The analysis of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption showed that red blood cells retain the capability to consume oxygen, thereby providing compelling evidence that mitochondria of Iguana erythrocytes are functional and capable to perform oxidative phosphorylation.

  18. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies.

  19. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Michiko [Cellular Stress Signaling Unit, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Hayashi, Teruo, E-mail: thayashi@mail.nih.gov [Cellular Stress Signaling Unit, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Su, Tsung-Ping, E-mail: tsu@intra.nida.nih.gov [Cellular Pathobiology Section, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM-mitochondria association is unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP{sub 3} receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (M{beta}C) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas M{beta}C saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. {sup 14}C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with M{beta}C decreases the level of de novo synthesized {sup 14}C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of

  20. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Michiko; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. ► The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM–mitochondria association is unknown. ► The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. ► Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP 3 receptor-mediated Ca 2+ influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas MβC saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. 14 C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with MβC decreases the level of de novo synthesized 14 C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of 14 C-phosphatidylethanolamine (PtEt). Apparently, cholesterol depletion increased the PtSer transport from MAMs to mitochondria. Our

  1. Reduction of age-associated pathology in old mice by overexpression of catalase in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuting, Piper M; Linford, Nancy J; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Emond, M J; Morton, John F; Martin, George M; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Ladiges, Warren C

    2008-08-01

    We describe the effects of mitochondrially targeted catalase (MCAT) expression on end-of-life pathology in mice using detailed semiquantitative histopathological evaluation. We previously reported that the median and maximum life spans of MCAT mice were extended relative to those of wild-type littermates. We now report that MCAT expression is associated with reduced malignant nonhematopoietic tumor burden, reduced cardiac lesions, and a trend toward reduced systemic inflammation, with no effect on hematopoietic neoplasia or glomerulonephropathy. Combined disease burden and comorbidity are also reduced, and MCAT expression is not associated with any detrimental clinical effects. The results suggest that oxidative damage is involved in aging of C57BL/6J mice via modulation of a subset of age-associated lesions. Antioxidant interventions targeting mitochondria may therefore be a viable strategy for prevention or postponement of some age-associated diseases. The variability of the MCAT effect across tissues, however, illustrates the importance of developing semiquantitative histopathology for assessment of comorbidity in life-span studies.

  2. Identification of oxidised proteins in the matrix of rice leaf mitochondria by immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.K.; Askerlund, P.; Bykova, N.V.

    2004-01-01

    .2 mM CuSO4 for 10 min at room temperature). The oxidised proteins in both samples were tagged with dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNP), which forms a covalent bond with carbonyl groups. The DNP-tagged proteins were immunoprecipitated using anti-DNP antibodies and digested with trypsin. The mixture...... of peptides was analysed by nano-HPLC coupled online to an ESI-Quad-TOF mass spectrometer. The peptides were separated by stepwise ion exchange chromatography followed by reverse phase chromatography (2D-LC), and analysed by MS/MS. Proteins were identified by un-interpreted fragment ion database searches...... blots showed that neither the isolation of mitochondria, nor their subfractionation introduced carbonyl groups. We therefore conclude that a number of proteins are oxidised in the matrix of rice leaf mitochondria in vivo and further identify a group of proteins that are particularly susceptible to mild...

  3. Cardiac troponins--Translational biomarkers in cardiology: Theory and practice of cardiac troponin high-sensitivity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamcova, Michaela; Popelova-Lencova, Olga; Jirkovsky, Eduard; Simko, Fedor; Gersl, Vladimir; Sterba, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tn is a unique translational biomarker in cardiology whose potential has not been diminished in the new era of high sensitive assays. cTns can be valuable markers in cardiac diseases as well as in infectious diseases and respiratory diseases. Furthermore, the role of cTns is growing in the routine evaluation of cardioxicity and in determining the efficacy/safety ratio of novel cardioprotective strategies in clinical settings. cTns can detect myocardial injury not only in a wide spectrum of laboratory animals in experimental studies in vivo, but also in isolated heart models or cardiomyocytes in vitro. The crucial issue regarding the cross-species usage of cardiac troponin investigation remains the choice of cardiac troponin testing. This review summarizes the recent proteomic data on aminoacid sequences of cTnT and cTnI in various species, as well as selected analytical characteristics of human cardiac troponin high-sensitivity assays. Due to the highly phylogenetically conserved structure of troponins, the same bioindicator can be investigated using the same method in both clinical and experimental cardiology, thus contributing to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases as well as to increased effectiveness of troponin use in clinical practice. Measuring cardiac troponins using commercially available human high-sensitivity cardiac troponin tests with convenient antibodies selected on the basis of adequate proteomic knowledge can solve many issues which would otherwise be difficult to address in clinical settings for various ethical and practical reasons. Our survey could help elaborate the practical guidelines for optimizing the choice of cTns assay in cardiology. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. F1F0-ATP synthase from bovine heart mitochondria: development of the purification of a monodisperse oligomycin-sensitive ATPase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lutter, R; Saraste, M; van Walraven, H S; Runswick, M J; Finel, M; Deatherage, J F; Walker, J E

    1993-01-01

    A new procedure for the isolation of ATP synthase from bovine mitochondria has been developed, with the primary objective of producing enzyme suitable for crystallization trials. Proteins were extracted from mitochondrial membranes with dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside, and the ATP synthase was purified from the extract in the presence of the same detergent by a combination of ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography and ammonium sulphate precipitation. This simple and rapid procedure yields 20...

  5. PEGylated anticancer-carbon nanotubes complex targeting mitochondria of lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Lee, Jong Yeon; Hong, Jeong Hee; Khang, Dongwoo

    2017-11-01

    Although activating apoptosis in cancer cells by targeting the mitochondria is an effective strategy for cancer therapy, insufficient targeting of the mitochondria in cancer cells restricts the availability in clinical treatment. Here, we report on a polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube (CNT)-ABT737 nanodrug that improves the mitochondrial targeting of lung cancer cells. The polyethylene glycol-coated CNT-ABT737 nanodrug internalized into the early endosomes via macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in advance of early endosomal escape and delivered into the mitochondria. Cytosol release of the nanodrug led to apoptosis of lung cancer cells by abruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, inducing Bcl-2-mediated apoptosis and generating intracellular reactive oxygen species. As such, this study provides an effective strategy for increasing the anti-lung cancer efficacy by increasing mitochondria accumulation rate of cytosol released anticancer nanodrugs.

  6. Response of skeletal muscle mitochondria to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppeler, Hans; Vogt, Michael; Weibel, Ewald R; Flück, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This review explores the current concepts relating the structural and functional modifications of skeletal muscle mitochondria to the molecular mechanisms activated when organisms are exposed to a hypoxic environment. In contrast to earlier assumptions it is now established that permanent or long-term exposure to severe environmental hypoxia decreases the mitochondrial content of muscle fibres. Oxidative muscle metabolism is shifted towards a higher reliance on carbohydrates as a fuel, and intramyocellular lipid substrate stores are reduced. Moreover, in muscle cells of mountaineers returning from the Himalayas, we find accumulations of lipofuscin, believed to be a mitochondrial degradation product. Low mitochondrial contents are also observed in high-altitude natives such as Sherpas. In these subjects high-altitude performance seems to be improved by better coupling between ATP demand and supply pathways as well as better metabolite homeostasis. The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has been identified as a master regulator for the expression of genes involved in the hypoxia response, such as genes coding for glucose transporters, glycolytic enzymes and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). HIF-1 achieves this by binding to hypoxia response elements in the promoter regions of these genes, whereby the increase of HIF-1 in hypoxia is the consequence of a reduced degradation of its dominant subunit HIF-1a. A further mechanism that seems implicated in the hypoxia response of muscle mitochondria is related to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria during oxidative phosphorylation. How exactly ROS interfere with HIF-1a as well as MAP kinase and other signalling pathways is debated. The current evidence suggests that mitochondria themselves could be important players in oxygen sensing.

  7. Mitochondria in aging cell differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuše

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2016), s. 1287-1288 ISSN 1945-4589 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mitochondria * cell differentiation * retrograde signaling Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.867, year: 2016

  8. Ion transport by mitochondria-rich cells in toad skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Ussing, H H; Spring, K R

    1987-01-01

    The optical sectioning video imaging technique was used for measurements of the volume of mitochondria-rich (m.r.) cells of the isolated epithelium of toad skin. Under short-circuit conditions, cell volume decreased by about 14% in response to bilateral exposure to Cl-free (gluconate substitution....... Unilateral exposure to a Cl-free solution did not prevent ouabain-induced cell swelling. It is concluded that m.r. cells have an amiloride-blockable Na conductance in the apical membrane, a ouabain-sensitive Na pump in the basolateral membrane, and a passive Cl permeability in both membranes. From...... the initial rate of ouabain-induced cell volume increase the active Na current carried by a single m.r. cell was estimated to be 9.9 +/- 1.3 pA. Voltage clamping of the preparation in the physiological range of potentials (0 to -100 mV, serosa grounded) resulted in a cell volume increase with a time course...

  9. Varying effects of calcium on the oxidation of palmitate and alpha-ketoglutarate in isolated rat liver mitochondria incubated in KCl-based and sucrose-based media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrebaek, B; Dolva, K; Singh, B

    1984-01-01

    Isolated mitochondria from rat liver were incubated in the presence of [U-14C]palmitate, ATP, CoA, carnitine, EGTA (ethylene glycol bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N'-tetraacetic acid) and varying amounts of calcium. When a KC1-based incubation medium was used, the oxidation of palmitate was inhibited when the concentration of free calcium was increased from about 0.1-10 microM. When a sucrose-based incubation medium was used, the basal rate of palmitate oxidation was about half of that observed with the KC1-medium and calcium had a stimulatory effect. With the KC1-medium the rate of oxygen consumption was inhibited by calcium with alpha-ketoglutarate as well as palmitate as the respiratory substrate. No inhibitory effect of calcium was observed with succinate or beta-hydroxybutyrate. With the KC1-medium and with alpha-ketoglutarate as the respiratory substrate, state 3 respiration but not state 4 respiration was inhibited by calcium. When the sucrose-medium was used, state 3 respiration was first inhibited by calcium, but this inhibition was gradually relieved and the respiratory rate finally became higher than it was before calcium addition.

  10. [Organization of mitochondria in the growing hyphae of Neurospora crassa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, T V; Boĭtsova, L Iu; Golyshev, S A; Popinako, A V

    2013-01-01

    In vivo fluorescent labeling of mitochondria in Neurospora crassa showed the concentration of filamentous mitochondria within 30 μm of apex in growing hyphae. These mitochondrial assemblies propagated forward with the elongation of hyphae, split and segregated as the growing tip bifurcated and formed de novo when new branches formed farther away from the apex. The efficiency of the mitochondria concentration in the apical 30 μm zone is related to the growth rate and identical in hyphae cultivated in glucose- and sorbitol-containing media. The obtained data are discussed in connection with the behavior of microtubules in growing hyphae as well as with the electric heterogeneity of N. crassa hyphal apex described previously.

  11. RECQL4 localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial DNA integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croteau, Deborah L; Rossi, Marie L; Canugovi, Chandrika

    2012-01-01

    in premature aging. There is no information about whether any of the RecQ helicases play roles in mitochondrial biogenesis, which is strongly implicated in the aging process. Here, we used microscopy to visualize RECQL4 in mitochondria. Fractionation of human and mouse cells also showed that RECQL4 was present...... in mitochondria. Q-PCR amplification of mitochondrial DNA demonstrated that mtDNA damage accumulated in RECQL4-deficient cells. Microarray analysis suggested that mitochondrial bioenergetic pathways might be affected in RTS. Measurements of mitochondrial bioenergetics showed a reduction in the mitochondrial......Q helicase to be found in both human and mouse mitochondria, and the loss of RECQL4 alters mitochondrial integrity....

  12. Rejuvenating cellular respiration for optimizing respiratory function: targeting mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anurag; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2016-01-15

    Altered bioenergetics with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and degradation of epithelial function are key aspects of pathogenesis in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This motif is not unique to obstructive airway disease, reported in related airway diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and parenchymal diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Similarly, mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular endothelium or skeletal muscles contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and systemic manifestations of lung disease. In experimental models of COPD or asthma, the use of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ, has substantially improved mitochondrial health and restored respiratory function. Modulation of noncoding RNA or protein regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, or degradation has been found to be effective in models of fibrosis, emphysema, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension. Transfer of healthy mitochondria to epithelial cells has been associated with remarkable therapeutic efficacy in models of acute lung injury and asthma. Together, these form a 3R model--repair, reprogramming, and replacement--for mitochondria-targeted therapies in lung disease. This review highlights the key role of mitochondrial function in lung health and disease, with a focus on asthma and COPD, and provides an overview of mitochondria-targeted strategies for rejuvenating cellular respiration and optimizing respiratory function in lung diseases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Cardiac macrophages adopt profibrotic/M2 phenotype in infarcted hearts: Role of urokinase plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Signe; Helterline, Deri; Asbe, Laura; Dupras, Sarah; Minami, Elina; Farris, Stephen; Stempien-Otero, April

    2017-07-01

    Macrophages (mac) that over-express urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) adopt a profibrotic M2 phenotype in the heart in association with cardiac fibrosis. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac macs are M2 polarized in infarcted mouse and human hearts and that polarization is dependent on mac-derived uPA. Studies were performed using uninjured (UI) or infarcted (MI) hearts of uPA overexpressing (SR-uPA), uPA null, or nontransgenic littermate (Ntg) mice. At 7days post-infarction, cardiac mac were isolated, RNA extracted and M2 markers Arg1, YM1, and Fizz1 measured with qrtPCR. Histologic analysis for cardiac fibrosis, mac and myofibroblasts was performed at the same time-point. Cardiac macs were also isolated from Ntg hearts and RNA collected after primary isolation or culture with vehicle, IL-4 or plasmin and M2 marker expression measured. Cardiac tissue and blood was collected from humans with ischemic heart disease. Expression of M2 marker CD206 and M1 marker TNFalpha was measured. Macs from WT mice had increased expression of Arg1 and Ym1 following MI (41.3±6.5 and 70.3±36, fold change vs UI, n=8, Padopt a M2 phenotype in association with fibrosis. Plasmin can induce an M2 phenotype in cardiac macs. However, M2 activation can occur in the heart in vivo in the absence of uPA indicating that alternative pathways to activate plasmin are present in the heart. Excess uPA promotes increased fibroblast density potentially via potentiating fibroblast migration or proliferation. Altering macrophage phenotype in the heart is a potential target to modify cardiac fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Immobilization of Mitochondria on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    poly-L-lysine has also been reported for immobilization of yeast mitochondria. Coating was performed by repetitive washing of cover slips with 0.02...of Poly-L-lysine Applications of PLL PLL is a production of bacterial fermentation and is used as a food preservative. In biology, PLL is used in

  15. Carvedilol-mediated antioxidant protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiac mitochondrial toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Paulo J.; Bjork, James A.; Santos, Maria S.; Leino, Richard L.; Froberg, M. Kent; Moreno, Antonio J.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2004-01-01

    The cardiotoxicity associated with doxorubicin (DOX) therapy limits the total cumulative dose and therapeutic success of active anticancer chemotherapy. Cardiac mitochondria are implicated as primary targets for DOX toxicity, which is believed to be mediated by the generation of highly reactive free radical species of oxygen from complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study was to determine if the protection demonstrated by carvedilol (CV), a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist with strong antioxidant properties, against DOX-induced mitochondrial-mediated cardiomyopathy [Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 185 (2002) 218] is attributable to its antioxidant properties or its β-adrenergic receptor antagonism. Our results confirm that DOX induces oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and histopathological lesions in the cardiac tissue, all of which are inhibited by carvedilol. In contrast, atenolol (AT), a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist lacking antioxidant properties, preserved phosphate energy charge but failed to protect against any of the indexes of DOX-induced oxidative mitochondrial toxicity. We therefore conclude that the cardioprotective effects of carvedilol against DOX-induced mitochondrial cardiotoxicity are due to its inherent antioxidant activity and not to its β-adrenergic receptor antagonism

  16. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P.; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-12-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole.

  17. Role of mitochondria in modulation of spontaneous Ca2+ waves in freshly dispersed interstitial cells of Cajal from the rabbit urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, Gerard P; Bradley, Eamonn; Thornbury, Keith D; McHale, Noel G; Hollywood, Mark A

    2008-10-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) isolated from the rabbit urethra exhibit pacemaker activity that results from spontaneous Ca(2+) waves. The purpose of this study was to investigate if this activity was influenced by Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria. Spontaneous Ca(2+) waves were recorded using a Nipkow spinning disk confocal microscope and spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential with the electron transport chain inhibitors rotenone (10 microm) and antimycin A (5 microm) abolished Ca(2+) waves and increased basal Ca(2+) levels. Similar results were achieved when mitochondria membrane potential was collapsed using the protonophores FCCP (0.2 microm) and CCCP (1 microm). Spontaneous Ca(2+) waves were not inhibited by the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin (1 microm), suggesting that these effects were not attributable to an effect on ATP levels. STICs recorded under voltage clamp at -60 mV were also inhibited by CCCP and antimycin A. Dialysis of cells with the mitochondrial uniporter inhibitor RU360 (10 microm) also inhibited STICS. Stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria using the plant flavonoid kaempferol (10 microm) induced a series of propagating Ca(2+) waves. The kaempferol-induced activity was inhibited by application of caffeine (10 mm) or removal of extracellular Ca(2+), but was not significantly affected by the IP(3) receptor blocker 2-APB (100 microm). These data suggest that spontaneous Ca(2+) waves in urethral ICC are regulated by buffering of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) by mitochondria.

  18. Fluoroacetylcarnitine: metabolism and metabolic effects in mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, J; Davis, E J

    1973-01-01

    The metabolism and metabolic effects of fluoroacetylcarnitine have been investigated. Carnitineacetyltransferase transfers the fluoro-acetyl group of fluoroacetylcarnitine nearly as rapidly to CoA as the acetyl group of acetylcarnitine. Fluorocitrate is then formed by citrate synthase, but this second reaction is relatively slow. The fluorocitrate formed intramitochondrially inhibits the metabolism of citrate. In heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria the accumulated citrate inhibits citrate synthesis and the ..beta..-oxidation of fatty acids. Free acetate is formed, presumably because accumulated acetyl-CoA is hydrolyzed. In liver mitochondria the accumulation of citrate leads to a relatively increased rate of ketogenesis. Increased ketogenesis is obtained also upon the addition of citrate to the reaction mixture.

  19. Obesity-exposed oocytes accumulate and transmit damaged mitochondria due to an inability to activate mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoures, Anna L; Saben, Jessica; Drury, Andrea; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Modi, Zeel; Zhang, Wendy; Moley, Kelle H

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondria are the most prominent organelle in the oocyte. Somatic cells maintain a healthy population of mitochondria by degrading damaged mitochondria via mitophagy, a specialized autophagy pathway. However, evidence from previous work investigating the more general macroautophagy pathway in oocytes suggests that mitophagy may not be active in the oocyte. This would leave the vast numbers of mitochondria - poised to be inherited by the offspring - vulnerable to damage. Here we test the hypothesis that inactive mitophagy in the oocyte underlies maternal transmission of dysfunctional mitochondria. To determine whether oocytes can complete mitophagy, we used either CCCP or AntimycinA to depolarize mitochondria and trigger mitophagy. After depolarization, we did not detect co-localization of mitochondria with autophagosomes and mitochondrial DNA copy number remained unchanged, indicating the non-functional mitochondrial population was not removed. To investigate the impact of an absence of mitophagy in oocytes with damaged mitochondria on offspring mitochondrial function, we utilized in vitro fertilization of high fat high sugar (HF/HS)-exposed oocytes, which have lower mitochondrial membrane potential and damaged mitochondria. Here, we demonstrate that blastocysts generated from HF/HS oocytes have decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, lower metabolites involved in ATP generation, and accumulation of PINK1, a mitophagy marker protein. This mitochondrial phenotype in the blastocyst mirrors the phenotype we show in HF/HS exposed oocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that the mechanisms governing oocyte mitophagy are fundamentally distinct from those governing somatic cell mitophagy and that the absence of mitophagy in the setting of HF/HS exposure contributes to the oocyte-to-blastocyst transmission of dysfunctional mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Involvement of S6K1 in mitochondria function and structure in HeLa cells.

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    Park, Jisoo; Tran, Quangdon; Mun, Kisun; Masuda, Kouhei; Kwon, So Hee; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Thomas, George; Park, Jongsun

    2016-12-01

    The major biological function of mitochondria is to generate cellular energy through oxidative phosphorylation. Apart from cellular respiration, mitochondria also play a key role in signaling processes, including aging and cancer metabolism. It has been shown that S6K1-knockout mice are resistant to obesity due to enhanced beta-oxidation, with an increased number of large mitochondria. Therefore, in this report, the possible involvement of S6K1 in regulating mitochondria dynamics and function has been investigated in stable lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells. Interestingly, S6K1-stably depleted HeLa cells showed phenotypical changes in mitochondria morphology. This observation was further confirmed by detailed image analysis of mitochondria shape. Corresponding molecular changes were also observed in these cells, such as the induction of mitochondrial fission proteins (Drp1 and Fis1). Oxygen consumption is elevated in S6K1-depeleted HeLa cells and FL5.12 cells. In addition, S6K1 depletion leads to enhancement of ATP production in cytoplasm and mitochondria. However, the relative ratio of mitochondrial ATP to cytoplasmic ATP is actually decreased in lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells compared to control cells. Lastly, induction of mitophagy was found in lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells with corresponding changes of mitochondria shape on electron microscope analysis. Taken together, our results indicate that S6K1 is involved in the regulation of mitochondria morphology and function in HeLa cells. This study will provide novel insights into S6K1 function in mitochondria-mediated cellular signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Connecting Mitochondria, Metabolism, and Stem Cell Fate

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    Wanet, Anaïs; Arnould, Thierry; Najimi, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    As sites of cellular respiration and energy production, mitochondria play a central role in cell metabolism. Cell differentiation is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and activity and with a metabolic shift toward increased oxidative phosphorylation activity. The opposite occurs during reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. Studies have provided evidence of mitochondrial and metabolic changes during the differentiation of both embryonic and somatic (or adult) stem cells (SSCs), such as hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and tissue-specific progenitor cells. We thus propose to consider those mitochondrial and metabolic changes as hallmarks of differentiation processes. We review how mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and function are directly involved in embryonic and SSC differentiation and how metabolic and sensing pathways connect mitochondria and metabolism with cell fate and pluripotency. Understanding the basis of the crosstalk between mitochondria and cell fate is of critical importance, given the promising application of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In addition to the development of novel strategies to improve the in vitro lineage-directed differentiation of stem cells, understanding the molecular basis of this interplay could lead to the identification of novel targets to improve the treatment of degenerative diseases. PMID:26134242

  2. Cardiac hyporesponsiveness in severe sepsis is associated with nitric oxide-dependent activation of G protein receptor kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Secco, Daniela; DalBó, Silvia; Lautherbach, Natalia E S; Gava, Fábio N; Celes, Mara R N; Benedet, Patricia O; Souza, Adriana H; Akinaga, Juliana; Lima, Vanessa; Silva, Katiussia P; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo A; Rossi, Marcos A; Kettelhut, Isis C; Pupo, André S; Cunha, Fernando Q; Assreuy, Jamil

    2017-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoform 2 (GRK2) has a critical role in physiological and pharmacological responses to endogenous and exogenous substances. Sepsis causes an important cardiovascular dysfunction in which nitric oxide (NO) has a relevant role. The present study aimed to assess the putative effect of inducible NO synthase (NOS2)-derived NO on the activity of GRK2 in the context of septic cardiac dysfunction. C57BL/6 mice were submitted to severe septic injury by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Heart function was assessed by isolated and perfused heart, echocardiography, and β-adrenergic receptor binding. GRK2 was determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis in the heart and isolated cardiac myocytes. Sepsis increased NOS2 expression in the heart, increased plasma nitrite + nitrate levels, and reduced isoproterenol-induced isolated ventricle contraction, whole heart tension development, and β-adrenergic receptor density. Treatment with 1400W or with GRK2 inhibitor prevented CLP-induced cardiac hyporesponsiveness 12 and 24 h after CLP. Increased labeling of total and phosphorylated GRK2 was detected in hearts after CLP. With treatment of 1400W or in hearts taken from septic NOS2 knockout mice, the activation of GRK2 was reduced. 1400W or GRK2 inhibitor reduced mortality, improved echocardiographic cardiac parameters, and prevented organ damage. Therefore, during sepsis, NOS2-derived NO increases GRK2, which leads to a reduction in β-adrenergic receptor density, contributing to the heart dysfunction. Isolated cardiac myocyte data indicate that NO acts through the soluble guanylyl cyclase/cGMP/PKG pathway. GRK2 inhibition may be a potential therapeutic target in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The main novelty presented here is to show that septic shock induces cardiac hyporesponsiveness to isoproterenol by a mechanism dependent on nitric oxide and mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoform 2. Therefore

  3. Mitochondria: An Organelle of Bacterial Origin Controlling Inflammation

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    Alain Meyer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a cellular and molecular response to infection and/or tissues injury. While a suited inflammatory response in intensity and time allows for killing pathogens, clearing necrotic tissue, and healing injury; an excessive inflammatory response drives various diseases in which inflammation and tissues damages/stress self-sustain each other. Microbes have been poorly implied in non-resolving inflammation, emphasizing the importance of endogenous regulation of inflammation. Mitochondria have been historically identified as the main source of cellular energy, by coupling the oxidation of fatty acids and pyruvate with the production of high amount of adenosine triphosphate by the electron transport chain. Mitochondria are also the main source of reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, research in the last decade has highlighted that since its integration in eukaryote cells, this organelle of bacterial origin has not only been tolerated by immunity, but has also been placed as a central regulator of cell defense. In intact cells, mitochondria regulate cell responses to critical innate immune receptors engagement. Downstream intracellular signaling pathways interact with mitochondrial proteins and are tuned by mitochondrial functioning. Moreover, upon cell stress or damages, mitochondrial components are released into the cytoplasm or the extra cellular milieu, where they act as danger signals when recognized by innate immune receptors. Finally, by regulating the energetic state of immunological synapse between dendritic cells and lymphocytes, mitochondria regulate the inflammation fate toward immunotolerance or immunogenicity. As dysregulations of these processes have been recently involved in various diseases, the identification of the underlying mechanisms might open new avenues to modulate inflammation.

  4. Isolation of Synaptosomes, Synaptic Plasma Membranes, and Synaptic Junctional Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Mary L; Jiang, Lei; Michaelis, Elias K

    2017-01-01

    Isolation of synaptic nerve terminals or synaptosomes provides an opportunity to study the process of neurotransmission at many levels and with a variety of approaches. For example, structural features of the synaptic terminals and the organelles within them, such as synaptic vesicles and mitochondria, have been elucidated with electron microscopy. The postsynaptic membranes are joined to the presynaptic "active zone" of transmitter release through cell adhesion molecules and remain attached throughout the isolation of synaptosomes. These "post synaptic densities" or "PSDs" contain the receptors for the transmitters released from the nerve terminals and can easily be seen with electron microscopy. Biochemical and cell biological studies with synaptosomes have revealed which proteins and lipids are most actively involved in synaptic release of neurotransmitters. The functional properties of the nerve terminals, such as responses to depolarization and the uptake or release of signaling molecules, have also been characterized through the use of fluorescent dyes, tagged transmitters, and transporter substrates. In addition, isolated synaptosomes can serve as the starting material for the isolation of relatively pure synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) that are devoid of organelles from the internal environment of the nerve terminal, such as mitochondria and synaptic vesicles. The isolated SPMs can reseal and form vesicular structures in which transport of ions such as sodium and calcium, as well as solutes such as neurotransmitters can be studied. The PSDs also remain associated with the presynaptic membranes during isolation of SPM fractions, making it possible to isolate the synaptic junctional complexes (SJCs) devoid of the rest of the plasma membranes of the nerve terminals and postsynaptic membrane components. Isolated SJCs can be used to identify the proteins that constitute this highly specialized region of neurons. In this chapter, we describe the steps involved

  5. Sites of reactive oxygen species generation by mitochondria oxidizing different substrates

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    Casey L. Quinlan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial radical production is important in redox signaling, aging and disease, but the relative contributions of different production sites are poorly understood. We analyzed the rates of superoxide/H2O2 production from different defined sites in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidizing a variety of conventional substrates in the absence of added inhibitors: succinate; glycerol 3-phosphate; palmitoylcarnitine plus carnitine; or glutamate plus malate. In all cases, the sum of the estimated rates accounted fully for the measured overall rates. There were two striking results. First, the overall rates differed by an order of magnitude between substrates. Second, the relative contribution of each site was very different with different substrates. During succinate oxidation, most of the superoxide production was from the site of quinone reduction in complex I (site IQ, with small contributions from the flavin site in complex I (site IF and the quinol oxidation site in complex III (site IIIQo. However, with glutamate plus malate as substrate, site IQ made little or no contribution, and production was shared between site IF, site IIIQo and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. With palmitoylcarnitine as substrate, the flavin site in complex II (site IIF was a major contributor (together with sites IF and IIIQo, and with glycerol 3-phosphate as substrate, five different sites all contributed, including glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the relative and absolute contributions of specific sites to the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria depend very strongly on the substrates being oxidized, and the same is likely true in cells and in vivo.

  6. RNA Editing in Plant Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Wissinger, Bernd; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1989-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of genomic and complementary DNA clones from several mitochondrial genes in the higher plant Oenothera revealed nucleotide sequence divergences between the genomic and the messenger RNA-derived sequences. These sequence alterations could be most easily explained by specific post-transcriptional nucleotide modifications. Most of the nucleotide exchanges in coding regions lead to altered codons in the mRNA that specify amino acids better conserved in evolution than those encoded by the genomic DNA. Several instances show that the genomic arginine codon CGG is edited in the mRNA to the tryptophan codon TGG in amino acid positions that are highly conserved as tryptophan in the homologous proteins of other species. This editing suggests that the standard genetic code is used in plant mitochondria and resolves the frequent coincidence of CGG codons and tryptophan in different plant species. The apparently frequent and non-species-specific equivalency of CGG and TGG codons in particular suggests that RNA editing is a common feature of all higher plant mitochondria.

  7. Mitochondria and ageing: role in heart, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boengler, Kerstin; Kosiol, Maik; Mayr, Manuel; Schulz, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Age is the most important risk factor for most diseases. Mitochondria play a central role in bioenergetics and metabolism. In addition, several lines of evidence indicate the impact of mitochondria in lifespan determination and ageing. The best‐known hypothesis to explain ageing is the free radical theory, which proposes that cells, organs, and organisms age because they accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage over time. Mitochondria play a central role as the principle source of intracellular ROS, which are mainly formed at the level of complex I and III of the respiratory chain. Dysfunctional mitochondria generating less ATP have been observed in various aged organs. Mitochondrial dysfunction comprises different features including reduced mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial morphology, reduced activity of the complexes of the electron transport chain, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and increased ROS formation. Furthermore, abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control or defects in mitochondrial dynamics have also been linked to senescence. Among the tissues affected by mitochondrial dysfunction are those with a high‐energy demand and thus high mitochondrial content. Therefore, the present review focuses on the impact of mitochondria in the ageing process of heart and skeletal muscle. In this article, we review different aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction and discuss potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function. Finally, novel aspects of adipose tissue biology and their involvement in the ageing process are discussed. PMID:28432755

  8. Dual peptide conjugation strategy for improved cellular uptake and mitochondria targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ran; Zhang, Pengcheng; Cheetham, Andrew G; Walston, Jeremy; Abadir, Peter; Cui, Honggang

    2015-01-21

    Mitochondria are critical regulators of cellular function and survival. Delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents into mitochondria is a challenging task in modern pharmacology because the molecule to be delivered needs to first overcome the cell membrane barrier and then be able to actively target the intracellular organelle. Current strategy of conjugating either a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) or a subcellular targeting sequence to the molecule of interest only has limited success. We report here a dual peptide conjugation strategy to achieve effective delivery of a non-membrane-penetrating dye 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM) into mitochondria through the incorporation of both a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) and a CPP into one conjugated molecule. Notably, circular dichroism studies reveal that the combined use of α-helix and PPII-like secondary structures has an unexpected, synergistic contribution to the internalization of the conjugate. Our results suggest that although the use of positively charged MTS peptide allows for improved targeting of mitochondria, with MTS alone it showed poor cellular uptake. With further covalent linkage of the MTS-5-FAM conjugate to a CPP sequence (R8), the dually conjugated molecule was found to show both improved cellular uptake and effective mitochondria targeting. We believe these results offer important insight into the rational design of peptide conjugates for intracellular delivery.

  9. Attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury by sevoflurane postconditioning involves protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta activation in isolated rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Neng-Xin; Yao, Yun-Tai; Shi, Chun-Xia; Li, Li-Huan

    2010-12-01

    Volatile anesthetic ischemic postconditioning reduces infarct size following ischemia/reperfusion. Whether phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) is causal for cardioprotection by postconditioning is controversial. We therefore investigated the impact of PKB/Akt and GSK3β in isolated perfused rat hearts subjected to 40 min of ischemia followed by 1 h of reperfusion. 2.0% sevoflurane (1.0 minimum alveolar concentration) was administered at the onset of reperfusion in 15 min as postconditioning. Western blot analysis was used to determine phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and its downstream target GSK3β after 1 h of reperfusion. Mitochondrial and cytosolic content of cytochrome C checked by western blot served as a marker for mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. Sevoflurane postconditioning significantly improved functional cardiac recovery and decreased infarct size in isolated rat hearts. Compared with unprotected hearts, sevoflurane postconditioning-induced phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and GSK3β were significantly increased. Increase of cytochrome C in mitochondria and decrease of it in cytosol is significant when compared with unprotected ones which have reversal effects on cytochrome C. The current study presents evidence that sevoflurane-induced cardioprotection at the onset of reperfusion are partly through activation of PKB/Akt and GSK3β.

  10. Rapid efflux of Ca2+ from heart mitochondria in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercesi, A; Lehninger, A L

    1984-01-13

    Inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) in the intracellular concentration range causes rapid efflux of Ca2+ from rat heart mitochondria oxidizing pyruvate + malate in a low Na+ medium. Half-maximal rates of Ca2+ efflux were given by 20 microM PPi. During and after PPi-stimulated Ca2+ efflux the mitochondria retain their structural integrity and complete respiratory control. Carboxyatractyloside inhibits PPi-stimulated Ca2+ efflux, indicating PPi must enter the matrix in order to promote Ca2+ efflux. Heart mitochondria have a much higher affinity for PPi uptake and PPi-induced Ca2+ efflux than liver mitochondria.

  11. Identification of nitric oxide in mitochondria of myometrium cell

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    Danylovych Yu. V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To demonstrate the possibility of NO synthesis in intact myocytes of uterus. Methods. Confocal scanning microscopy method, NO-sensitive fluorescent probe DAF-FM, MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos. Results. The basal production of NO in intact myocytes was shown using DAF-FM. Incubation of myocytes with NO donor – sodium nitroprusside (SNP – led to an increase of the DAF-FM-T fluorescent signal. On the contrary, the addition of NO-synthase inhibitor – N-nitro-L-arginine (NA – results in the reduction of fluorescent intensity. It was demonstrated colocalizition of specific probe for mitochondria MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos and NO-sensitive dye DAF-FM. Conclusions. For the first time it has been demonstrated the presence of NO in smooth muscle cell mitochondria using laser confocal microscopy, NO-sensitive probe DAF-FM and specific marker of the functionally active mitochondria MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos.

  12. Effect of temperature on fatty acid metabolism in skeletal muscle mitochondria of untrained and endurance-trained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Koziel, Agnieszka; Broniarek, Izabela; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Ogrodna, Karolina; Majerczak, Joanna; Celichowski, Jan; Szkutnik, Zbigniew; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effects of various assay temperatures, representing hypothermia (25°C), normothermia (35°C), and hyperthermia (42°C), on the oxidation of lipid-derived fuels in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria of untrained and endurance-trained rats. Adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats were assigned to a training group (rats trained on a treadmill for 8 weeks) or a sedentary control group. In skeletal muscle mitochondria of both control and trained rats, an increase in the assay temperature from 25°C to 42°C was accompanied by a consistent increase in the oxidation of palmitoylcarnitine and glycerol-3-phosphate. Moreover, endurance training increased mitochondrial capacity to oxidize the lipid-derived fuels at all studied temperatures. The endurance training-induced increase in mitochondrial capacity to oxidize fatty acids was accompanied by an enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis, as shown by the elevated expression levels of Nrf2, PGC1α, and mitochondrial marker and by the elevated expression levels of mitochondrial proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty acid transporter CD36, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADS). We conclude that hyperthermia enhances but hypothermia attenuates the rate of the oxidation of fatty acids and glycerol-3-phosphate in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria isolated from both untrained and trained rats. Moreover, our results indicate that endurance training up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis markers, lipid-sustained oxidative capacity, and CD36 and CPT1A proteins involved in fatty acid transport, possibly via PGC1α and Nrf2 signaling pathways.

  13. Arctigenin, a natural compound, activates AMP-activated protein kinase via inhibition of mitochondria complex I and ameliorates metabolic disorders in ob/ob mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S-L; Yu, R-T; Gong, J; Feng, Y; Dai, Y-L; Hu, F; Hu, Y-H; Tao, Y-D; Leng, Y

    2012-05-01

    Arctigenin is a natural compound that had never been previously demonstrated to have a glucose-lowering effect. Here it was found to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and the mechanism by which this occurred, as well as the effects on glucose and lipid metabolism were investigated. 2-Deoxyglucose uptake and AMPK phosphorylation were examined in L6 myotubes and isolated skeletal muscle. Gluconeogenesis and lipid synthesis were evaluated in rat primary hepatocytes. The acute and chronic effects of arctigenin on metabolic abnormalities were observed in C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using the J-aggregate-forming dye, JC-1. Analysis of respiration of L6 myotubes or isolated mitochondria was conducted in a channel oxygen system. Arctigenin increased AMPK phosphorylation and stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes and isolated skeletal muscles. In primary hepatocytes, it decreased gluconeogenesis and lipid synthesis. The enhancement of glucose uptake and suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipid synthesis by arctigenin were prevented by blockade of AMPK activation. The respiration of L6 myotubes or isolated mitochondria was inhibited by arctigenin with a specific effect on respiratory complex I. A single oral dose of arctigenin reduced gluconeogenesis in C57BL/6J mice. Chronic oral administration of arctigenin lowered blood glucose and improved lipid metabolism in ob/ob mice. This study demonstrates a new role for arctigenin as a potent indirect activator of AMPK via inhibition of respiratory complex I, with beneficial effects on metabolic disorders in ob/ob mice. This highlights the potential value of arctigenin as a possible treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Role of mitochondria-associated hexokinase II in cancer cell death induced by 3-Bromopyruvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Weiqin; Huang, Peng

    2009-01-01

    Summary It has long been observed that cancer cells rely more on glycolysis to generate ATP and actively use certain glycolytic metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Hexokinase II (HKII) is a key glycolytic enzyme that plays a role in the regulation of the mitochondria-initiated apoptotic cell death. As a potent inhibitor of hexokinase, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is known to inhibit cancer cell energy metabolism and trigger cell death, supposedly through depletion of cellular ATP. The current study showed that 3-BrPA caused a covalent modification of HKII protein and directly triggered its dissociation from mitochondria, leading to a specific release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to cytosol and eventual cell death. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between HKII and AIF. Using a competitive peptide of HKII, we showed that the dissociation of hexokinase II from mitochondria alone could cause apoptotic cell death, especially in the mitochondria-deficient ρ0 cells that highly express HKII. Interestingly, the dissociation of HKII itself did no directly affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Our study suggests that the physical association between HKII and AIF is important for the normal localization of AIF in the mitochondria, and disruption of this protein complex by 3-BrPA leads to their release from the mitochondria and eventual cell death. PMID:19285479

  15. Vimang (Mangifera indica L. extract) induces permeability transition in isolated mitochondria, closely reproducing the effect of mangiferin, Vimang's main component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Dorta, Daniel Junqueira; Delgado, René; Cavalheiro, Renata A; Santos, Antonio C; Vercesi, Anibal E; Curti, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) is a Ca(2+)-dependent, cyclosporin A (CsA)-sensitive, non-selective inner membrane permeabilization process. It is often associated with apoptotic cell death, and is induced by a wide range of agents or conditions, usually involving reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we demonstrated that Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang), in the presence of 20 microM Ca(2+), induces MPT in isolated rat liver mitochondria, assessed as CsA-sensitive mitochondrial swelling, closely reproducing the same effect of mangiferin, the main component of the extract, as well as MPT-linked processes like oxidation of membrane protein thiols, mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation and Ca(2+) release from organelles. The flavonoid catechin, the second main component of Vimang, also induces MPT, although to a lesser extent; the minor, but still representative Vimang extract components, gallic and benzoic acids, show respectively, low and high MPT inducing abilities. Nevertheless, following exposure to H(2)O(2)/horseradish peroxidase, the visible spectra of these compounds does not present the same changes previously reported for mangiferin. It is concluded that Vimang-induced MPT closely reproduces mangiferin effects, and proposed that this xanthone is the main agent responsible for the extract's MPT inducing ability, by the action on mitochondrial membrane protein thiols of products arising as a consequence of the mangiferin's antioxidant activity. While this effect would oppose the beneficial effect of Vimang's antioxidant activity, it could nevertheless benefit cells exposed to over-production of ROS as occurring in cancer cells, in which triggering of MPT-mediated apoptosis may represent an important defense mechanism to their host.

  16. Milestones and recent discoveries on cell death mediated by mitochondria and their interactions with biologically active amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancara, Silvia; Ohkubo, Shinji; Artico, Marco; Ciccariello, Mauro; Manente, Sabrina; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Toninello, Antonio; Agostinelli, Enzo

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondria represent cell "powerhouses," being involved in energy transduction from the electrochemical gradient to ATP synthesis. The morphology of their cell types may change, according to various metabolic processes or osmotic pressure. A new morphology of the inner membrane and mitochondrial cristae, significantly different from the previous one, has been proposed for the inner membrane and mitochondrial cristae, based on the technique of electron tomography. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport (the transporter has been isolated) generates reactive oxygen species and induces the mitochondrial permeability transition of both inner and outer mitochondrial membranes, leading to induction of necrosis and apoptosis. In the mitochondria of several cell types (liver, kidney, and heart), mitochondrial oxidative stress is an essential step in the induction of cell death, although not in brain, in which the phenomenon is caused by a different mechanism. Mitochondrial permeability transition drives both apoptosis and necrosis, whereas mitochondrial outer membrane permeability is characteristic of apoptosis. Adenine nucleotide translocase remains the most important component involved in membrane permeability, with the opening of the transition pore, although other proteins, such as ATP synthase or phosphate carriers, have been proposed. Intrinsic cell death is triggered by the release from mitochondria of proteic factors, such as cytochrome c, apoptosis inducing factor, and Smac/DIABLO, with the activation of caspases upon mitochondrial permeability transition or mitochondrial outer membrane permeability induction. Mitochondrial permeability transition induces the permeability of the inner membrane in sites in contact with the outer membrane; mitochondrial outer membrane permeability forms channels on the outer membrane by means of various stimuli involving Bcl-2 family proteins. The biologically active amines, spermine, and agmatine, have specific functions on mitochondria

  17. Biochemistry, proteomics and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Foged Havelund

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria fulfill some basic roles in all plant cells. They supply the cell with energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents (NAD(PH and they provide the cell with intermediates for a range of biosynthetic pathways. In addition to this, mitochondria contribute to a number of specialized functions depending on the tissue and cell type, as well as environmental conditions. We will here review the biochemistry and proteomics of mitochondria from non-green cells and organs, which differ from those of photosynthetic organs in a number of respects. We will briefly cover purification of mitochondria and general biochemical properties such as oxidative phosphorylation. We will then mention a few adaptive properties in response to water stress, seed maturation and germination and the ability to function under hypoxic conditions. The discussion will mainly focus on Arabidopsis cell cultures, etiolated germinating rice seedlings and potato tubers as model plants. It will cover the general proteome as well as the posttranslational modification protein phosphorylation. To date 64 phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins with a total of 103 phosphorylation sites have been identified.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria are required for optimal attractiveness to Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiabor, Kelly M.; Quan, Allison S.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    While screening a large collection of wild and laboratory yeast strains for their ability to attract Drosophila melanogaster adults, we noticed a large difference in fly preference for two nearly isogenic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, BY4741 and BY4742. Using standard genetic analyses, we tracked the preference difference to the lack of mitochondria in the BY4742 strain used in the initial experiment. We used gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy to examine the volatile compounds produced by BY4741 and the mitochondria-deficient BY4742, and found that they differed significantly. We observed that several ethyl esters are present at much higher levels in strains with mitochondria, even in fermentative conditions. We found that nitrogen levels in the substrate affect the production of these compounds, and that they are produced at the highest level by strains with mitochondria when fermenting natural fruit substrates. Collectively these observations demonstrate that core metabolic processes mediate the interaction between yeasts and insect vectors, and highlight the importance mitochondrial functions in yeast ecology. PMID:25462617

  19. Tissue specific phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins isolated from rat liver, heart muscle, and skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Steffen; León, Ileana R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    -specific phosphorylation sites were identified in tissue-specific enzymes such as those encoded by HMGCS2, BDH1, PCK2, CPS1, and OTC in liver mitochondria, and CKMT2 and CPT1B in heart and skeletal muscle. Kinase prediction showed an important role for PKA and PKC in all tissues but also for proline-directed kinases......Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in a variety of biological processes is increasingly being recognized and may contribute to the differences in function and energy demands observed in mitochondria from different tissues such as liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. Here, we used a combination...... of TiO2 phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC-MS/MS on isolated mitochondria to investigate the tissue-specific mitochondrial phosphoproteomes of rat liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. In total, we identified 899 phosphorylation sites in 354 different mitochondrial proteins including...

  20. Longstanding Hyperthyroidism Is Associated with Normal or Enhanced Intrinsic Cardiomyocyte Function despite Decline in Global Cardiac Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redetzke, Rebecca A.; Gerdes, A. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play a pivotal role in cardiac homeostasis. TH imbalances alter cardiac performance and ultimately cause cardiac dysfunction. Although short-term hyperthyroidism typically leads to heightened left ventricular (LV) contractility and improved hemodynamic parameters, chronic hyperthyroidism is associated with deleterious cardiac consequences including increased risk of arrhythmia, impaired cardiac reserve and exercise capacity, myocardial remodeling, and occasionally heart failure. To evaluate the long-term consequences of chronic hyperthyroidism on LV remodeling and function, we examined LV isolated myocyte function, chamber function, and whole tissue remodeling in a hamster model. Three-month-old F1b hamsters were randomized to control or 10 months TH treatment (0.1% grade I desiccated TH). LV chamber remodeling and function was assessed by echocardiography at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 months of treatment. After 10 months, terminal cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and LV hemodynamics. Hyperthyroid hamsters exhibited significant cardiac hypertrophy and deleterious cardiac remodeling characterized by myocyte lengthening, chamber dilatation, decreased relative wall thickness, increased wall stress, and increased LV interstitial fibrotic deposition. Importantly, hyperthyroid hamsters demonstrated significant LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Despite the aforementioned remodeling and global cardiac decline, individual isolated cardiac myocytes from chronically hyperthyroid hamsters had enhanced function when compared with myocytes from untreated age-matched controls. Thus, it appears that long-term hyperthyroidism may impair global LV function, at least in part by increasing interstitial ventricular fibrosis, in spite of normal or enhanced intrinsic cardiomyocyte function. PMID:23056390

  1. Longstanding hyperthyroidism is associated with normal or enhanced intrinsic cardiomyocyte function despite decline in global cardiac function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Y Weltman

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones (THs play a pivotal role in cardiac homeostasis. TH imbalances alter cardiac performance and ultimately cause cardiac dysfunction. Although short-term hyperthyroidism typically leads to heightened left ventricular (LV contractility and improved hemodynamic parameters, chronic hyperthyroidism is associated with deleterious cardiac consequences including increased risk of arrhythmia, impaired cardiac reserve and exercise capacity, myocardial remodeling, and occasionally heart failure. To evaluate the long-term consequences of chronic hyperthyroidism on LV remodeling and function, we examined LV isolated myocyte function, chamber function, and whole tissue remodeling in a hamster model. Three-month-old F1b hamsters were randomized to control or 10 months TH treatment (0.1% grade I desiccated TH. LV chamber remodeling and function was assessed by echocardiography at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 months of treatment. After 10 months, terminal cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and LV hemodynamics. Hyperthyroid hamsters exhibited significant cardiac hypertrophy and deleterious cardiac remodeling characterized by myocyte lengthening, chamber dilatation, decreased relative wall thickness, increased wall stress, and increased LV interstitial fibrotic deposition. Importantly, hyperthyroid hamsters demonstrated significant LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Despite the aforementioned remodeling and global cardiac decline, individual isolated cardiac myocytes from chronically hyperthyroid hamsters had enhanced function when compared with myocytes from untreated age-matched controls. Thus, it appears that long-term hyperthyroidism may impair global LV function, at least in part by increasing interstitial ventricular fibrosis, in spite of normal or enhanced intrinsic cardiomyocyte function.

  2. Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila, Alfonso F; Zamorano, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Cancer disease is inherent to, and widespread among, metazoans. Yet, some of the hallmarks of cancer such as uncontrolled cell proliferation, lack of apoptosis, hypoxia, fermentative metabolism and free cell motility (metastasis) are akin to a prokaryotic lifestyle, suggesting a link between cancer disease and evolution. In this hypothesis paper, we propose that cancer cells represent a phenotypic reversion to the earliest stage of eukaryotic evolution. This reversion is triggered by the dysregulation of the mitochondria due to cumulative oxidative damage to mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. As a result, the phenotype of normal, differentiated cells gradually reverts to the phenotype of a facultative anaerobic, heterotrophic cell optimized for survival and proliferation in hypoxic environments. This phenotype matches the phenotype of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that resulted from the endosymbiosis between an α-proteobacteria (which later became the mitochondria) and an archaebacteria. As such, the evolution of cancer within one individual can be viewed as a recapitulation of the evolution of the eukaryotic cell from fully differentiated cells to LECA. This evolutionary model of cancer is compatible with the current understanding of the disease, and explains the evolutionary basis for most of the hallmarks of cancer, as well as the link between the disease and aging. It could also open new avenues for treatment directed at reestablishing the synergy between the mitochondria and the cancerous cell. (paper)

  3. Polyamine conjugation of curcumin analogues toward the discovery of mitochondria-directed neuroprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Elena; Bergamini, Christian; Fato, Romana; Tarozzi, Andrea; Bains, Sandip; Motterlini, Roberto; Cavalli, Andrea; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Minarini, Anna; Hrelia, Patrizia; Lenaz, Giorgio; Rosini, Michela; Melchiorre, Carlo

    2010-10-14

    Mitochondria-directed antioxidants 2-5 were designed by conjugating curcumin congeners with different polyamine motifs as vehicle tools. The conjugates emerged as efficient antioxidants in mitochondria and fibroblasts and also exerted a protecting role through heme oxygenase-1 activation. Notably, the insertion of a polyamine function into the curcumin-like moiety allowed an efficient intracellular uptake and mitochondria targeting. It also resulted in a significant decrease in the cytotoxicity effects. 2-5 are therefore promising molecules for neuroprotectant lead discovery.

  4. Erythroid precursors from patients with low-risk myelodysplasia demonstrate ultrastructural features of enhanced autophagy of mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwerzijl, E. J.; Pol, H-W D.; Blom, N. R.; van der Want, J. J. L.; de Wolf, J. Thm; Vellenga, E.

    Recent studies in erythroid cells have shown that autophagy is an important process for the physiological clearance of mitochondria during terminal differentiation. However, autophagy also plays an important role in removing damaged and dysfunctional mitochondria. Defective mitochondria and impaired

  5. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Slawski, Diana; Bhandary, Sujatha P; Saranteas, Theodosios; Kaminiotis, Eva; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement) and non-complex (isolated CABG) cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk of complications and blood transfusion requirement. It becomes difficult to demonstrate the association between transfusions and mortality because of the fact that most patients undergoing cardiac surgery are also critically ill. Transfusion rates remain high despite the advances in perioperative blood conservation, such as the intraoperative use of cell saver in cardiac surgery. Some recent prospective studies have suggested that the use of blood products, even in low-risk patients, may adversely affect clinical outcomes. In light of this information, we reviewed the literature to assess the clinical outcomes in terms of 30-day and 1-year morbidity and mortality in transfused patients who underwent uncomplicated CABG surgery.

  6. Thioredoxin-2 (TRX-2) is an essential gene regulating mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toru; Hosoi, Fumihito; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Nakamura, Hajime; Masutani, Hiroshi; Ueda, Shugo; Nishiyama, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi; Wada, Hiromi; Spyrou, Giannis; Yodoi, Junji

    2002-04-02

    Thioredoxin-2 (Trx-2) is a mitochondria-specific member of the thioredoxin superfamily. Mitochondria have a crucial role in the signal transduction for apoptosis. To investigate the biological significance of Trx-2, we cloned chicken TRX-2 cDNA and generated clones of the conditional Trx-2-deficient cells using chicken B-cell line, DT40. Here we show that TRX-2 is an essential gene and that Trx-2-deficient cells undergo apoptosis upon repression of the TRX-2 transgene, showing an accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cytochrome c is released from mitochondria, while caspase-9 and caspase-3, but not caspase-8, are activated upon inhibition of the TRX-2 transgene. In addition, Trx-2 and cytochrome c are co-immunoprecipitated in an in vitro assay. These results suggest that mitochondrial Trx-2 is essential for cell viability, playing a crucial role in the scavenging ROS in mitochondria and regulating the mitochondrial apoptosis signaling pathway.

  7. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos E Arias-Morales; Nicoleta Stoicea; Alicia A Gonzalez-Zacarias; Diana Slawski; Sujatha P. Bhandary; Theodosios Saranteas; Eva Kaminiotis; Thomas J Papadimos

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement) and non-complex (isolated CABG) cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk...

  8. Two-Photon Probes for Lysosomes and Mitochondria: Simultaneous Detection of Lysosomes and Mitochondria in Live Tissues by Dual-Color Two-Photon Microscopy Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chang Su; Hong, Seung Taek; Ryu, Seong Shick; Kang, Dong Eun; Cho, Bong Rae

    2015-10-01

    Novel two-photon (TP) probes were developed for lysosomes (PLT-yellow) and mitochondria (BMT-blue and PMT-yellow). These probes emitted strong TP-excited fluorescence in cells at widely separated wavelength regions and displayed high organelle selectivity, good cell permeability, low cytotoxicity, and pH insensitivity. The BMT-blue and PLT-yellow probes could be utilized to detect lysosomes and mitochondria simultaneously in live tissues by using dual-color two-photon microscopy, with minimum interference from each other. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Ovarian ageing: the role of mitochondria in oocytes and follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May-Panloup, Pascale; Boucret, Lisa; Chao de la Barca, Juan-Manuel; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Ferré-L'Hotellier, Véronique; Morinière, Catherine; Descamps, Philippe; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    There is a great inter-individual variability of ovarian ageing, and almost 20% of patients consulting for infertility show signs of premature ovarian ageing. This feature, taken together with delayed childbearing in modern society, leads to the emergence of age-related ovarian dysfunction concomitantly with the desire for pregnancy. Assisted reproductive technology is frequently inefficacious in cases of ovarian ageing, thus raising the economic, medical and societal costs of the procedures. Ovarian ageing is characterized by quantitative and qualitative alteration of the ovarian oocyte reserve. Mitochondria play a central role in follicular atresia and could be the main target of the ooplasmic factors determining oocyte quality adversely affected by ageing. Indeed, the oocyte is the richest cell of the body in mitochondria and depends largely on these organelles to acquire competence for fertilization and early embryonic development. Moreover, the oocyte ensures the uniparental transmission and stability of the mitochondrial genome across the generations. This review focuses on the role played by mitochondria in ovarian ageing and on the possible consequences over the generations. PubMed was used to search the MEDLINE database for peer-reviewed original articles and reviews concerning mitochondria and ovarian ageing, in animal and human species. Searches were performed using keywords belonging to three groups: 'mitochondria' or 'mitochondrial DNA'; 'ovarian reserve', 'oocyte', 'ovary' or 'cumulus cells'; and 'ageing' or 'ovarian ageing'. These keywords were combined with other search phrases relevant to the topic. References from these articles were used to obtain additional articles. There is a close relationship, in mammalian models and humans, between mitochondria and the decline of oocyte quality with ageing. Qualitatively, ageing-related mitochondrial (mt) DNA instability, which leads to the accumulation of mtDNA mutations in the oocyte, plays a key role in

  10. Probing cytochrome c in living mitochondria with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda A.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.; Goodilin, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    Selective study of the electron transport chain components in living mitochondria is essential for fundamental biophysical research and for the development of new medical diagnostic methods. However, many important details of inter- and intramembrane mitochondrial processes have remained in shadow...... due to the lack of non-invasive techniques. Here we suggest a novel label-free approach based on the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to monitor the redox state and conformation of cytochrome c in the electron transport chain in living mitochondria. We demonstrate that SERS spectra of living...... mitochondria placed on hierarchically structured silver-ring substrates provide exclusive information about cytochrome c behavior under modulation of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, proton gradient and the activity of ATP-synthetase. Mathematical simulation explains the observed enhancement of Raman...

  11. Erythroid cell mitochondria receive endosomal iron by a "kiss-and-run" mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Amel; Roshan, Tariq M; Kahawita, Tanya M; Mason, Anne B; Sheftel, Alex D; Ponka, Prem

    2016-12-01

    In erythroid cells, more than 90% of transferrin-derived iron enters mitochondria where ferrochelatase inserts Fe 2+ into protoporphyrin IX. However, the path of iron from endosomes to mitochondrial ferrochelatase remains elusive. The prevailing opinion is that, after its export from endosomes, the redox-active metal spreads into the cytosol and mysteriously finds its way into mitochondria through passive diffusion. In contrast, this study supports the hypothesis that the highly efficient transport of iron toward ferrochelatase in erythroid cells requires a direct interaction between transferrin-endosomes and mitochondria (the "kiss-and-run" hypothesis). Using a novel method (flow sub-cytometry), we analyze lysates of reticulocytes after labeling these organelles with different fluorophores. We have identified a double-labeled population definitively representing endosomes interacting with mitochondria, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Moreover, we conclude that this endosome-mitochondrion association is reversible, since a "chase" with unlabeled holotransferrin causes a time-dependent decrease in the size of the double-labeled population. Importantly, the dissociation of endosomes from mitochondria does not occur in the absence of holotransferrin. Additionally, mutated recombinant holotransferrin, that cannot release iron, significantly decreases the uptake of 59 Fe by reticulocytes and diminishes 59 Fe incorporation into heme. This suggests that endosomes, which are unable to provide iron to mitochondria, cause a "traffic jam" leading to decreased endocytosis of holotransferrin. Altogether, our results suggest that a molecular mechanism exists to coordinate the iron status of endosomal transferrin with its trafficking. Besides its contribution to the field of iron metabolism, this study provides evidence for a new intracellular trafficking pathway of organelles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A conserved endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex (EMC facilitates phospholipid transfer from the ER to mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Lahiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane biogenesis and lipid metabolism require phospholipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to mitochondria. Transfer is thought to occur at regions of close contact of these organelles and to be nonvesicular, but the mechanism is not known. Here we used a novel genetic screen in S. cerevisiae to identify mutants with defects in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. We show that a strain missing multiple components of the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC has decreased phosphatidylserine (PS transfer from the ER to mitochondria. Mitochondria from this strain have significantly reduced levels of PS and its derivative phosphatidylethanolamine (PE. Cells lacking EMC proteins and the ER-mitochondria tethering complex called ERMES (the ER-mitochondria encounter structure are inviable, suggesting that the EMC also functions as a tether. These defects are corrected by expression of an engineered ER-mitochondrial tethering protein that artificially tethers the ER to mitochondria. EMC mutants have a significant reduction in the amount of ER tethered to mitochondria even though ERMES remained intact in these mutants, suggesting that the EMC performs an additional tethering function to ERMES. We find that all Emc proteins interact with the mitochondrial translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex protein Tom5 and this interaction is important for PS transfer and cell growth, suggesting that the EMC forms a tether by associating with the TOM complex. Together, our findings support that the EMC tethers ER to mitochondria, which is required for phospholipid synthesis and cell growth.

  13. EFFECT OF ACTIVE ACCUMULATION OF CALCIUM AND PHOSPHATE IONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawalt, John W.; Rossi, Carlo S.; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1964-01-01

    Rat liver mitochondria allowed to accumulate maximal amounts of Ca++ and HPO4 = ions from the suspending medium in vitro during respiration have a considerably higher specific gravity than normal mitochondria and may be easily separated from the latter by isopycnic centrifugation in density gradients of sucrose or cesium chloride. When the mitochondria are allowed to accumulate less than maximal amounts of Ca++ and HPO4 = from the medium, they have intermediate specific gravities which are roughly proportional to their content of calcium phosphate. Maximally "loaded" mitochondria are relatively homogeneous with respect to specific gravity. Correlated biochemical and electron microscopic studies show that Ca++-loaded mitochondria contain numerous dense granules, of which some 85 per cent are over 500 A in diameter. These granules are electron-opaque not only following fixation and staining with heavy metal reagents, but also following fixation with formaldehyde, demonstrating that the characteristic granules in Ca++-loaded mitochondria have intrinsic electron-opacity. The dense granules are almost always located within the inner compartment of the mitochondria and not in the space between the inner and outer membranes. They are frequently located at or near the cristae and they often show electron-transparent "cores." Such granules appear to be made up of clusters of smaller dense particles, but preliminary x-ray diffraction analysis and electron diffraction studies have revealed no evidence of crystallinity in the deposits. The electron-opaque granules decrease in number when the Ca++-loaded mitochondria are incubated with 2,4-dinitrophenol; simultaneously there is discharge of Ca++ and phosphate from the mitochondria into the medium. PMID:14228516

  14. Isolation and expansion of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Trine; Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Lund, Pia

    2011-01-01

    For treatment of cardiac failure with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, several clinical trials are ongoing. However, more attention is gathering on the use of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs). This paper describes the optimization of isolation and propagation of ASCs for subseq......For treatment of cardiac failure with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, several clinical trials are ongoing. However, more attention is gathering on the use of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs). This paper describes the optimization of isolation and propagation of ASCs...

  15. Natural selection of mitochondria during somatic lifetime promotes healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodell, Anders; Rasmussen, Lene J; Bergersen, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis during life-time challenges both eliminates disadvantageous properties and drives adaptive selection of advantageous phenotypic variations. Intermittent fission and fusion of mitochondria provide specific targets for health promotion by brief temporal...... stressors, interspersed with periods of recovery and biogenesis. For mitochondria, the mechanisms of selection, variability, and heritability, are complicated by interaction of two independent genomes, including the multiple copies of DNA in each mitochondrion, as well as the shared nuclear genome of each...

  16. Mitochondrial function in engineered cardiac tissues is regulated by extracellular matrix elasticity and tissue alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra-Leite, Davi M; Andres, Allen M; Petersen, Andrew P; Ariyasinghe, Nethika R; Cho, Nathan; Lee, Jezell A; Gottlieb, Roberta A; McCain, Megan L

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondria in cardiac myocytes are critical for generating ATP to meet the high metabolic demands associated with sarcomere shortening. Distinct remodeling of mitochondrial structure and function occur in cardiac myocytes in both developmental and pathological settings. However, the factors that underlie these changes are poorly understood. Because remodeling of tissue architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity are also hallmarks of ventricular development and disease, we hypothesize that these environmental factors regulate mitochondrial function in cardiac myocytes. To test this, we developed a new procedure to transfer tunable polydimethylsiloxane disks microcontact-printed with fibronectin into cell culture microplates. We cultured Sprague-Dawley neonatal rat ventricular myocytes within the wells, which consistently formed tissues following the printed fibronectin, and measured oxygen consumption rate using a Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer. Our data indicate that parameters associated with baseline metabolism are predominantly regulated by ECM elasticity, whereas the ability of tissues to adapt to metabolic stress is regulated by both ECM elasticity and tissue alignment. Furthermore, bioenergetic health index, which reflects both the positive and negative aspects of oxygen consumption, was highest in aligned tissues on the most rigid substrate, suggesting that overall mitochondrial function is regulated by both ECM elasticity and tissue alignment. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial function is regulated by both ECM elasticity and myofibril architecture in cardiac myocytes. This provides novel insight into how extracellular cues impact mitochondrial function in the context of cardiac development and disease. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology has been developed to measure O 2 consumption rates in engineered cardiac tissues with independent control over tissue alignment and matrix elasticity. This led to the findings that matrix

  17. Regulation of valine and. alpha. -ketoisocaproate metabolism in rat kidney mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.H.; Harper, A.E. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1988-10-01

    Activities of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) aminotransferase (BCAT) and {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) were assayed in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of rats. Rates of transamination of valine and oxidation of keto acids {alpha}-ketoisocaproate (KIC) or {alpha}-ketoisovalerate (KIV) were estimated using radioactive tracers of the appropriate substrate from amounts of {sup 14}C-labeled products formed. Because of the high mitochondrial BCAT activity, an amino acceptor for BCAT, {alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}-KG) or KIC, was added to the assay medium when valine was the substrate. Rates of valine transamination and subsequent oxidation of the KIV formed were determined with 0.5 mM {alpha}-KG as the amino acceptor; these rates were 5- to 50-fold those without added {alpha}-KG. Rates of CO{sub 2} evolution from valine also increased when KIC was present; however, with KIC concentrations above 0.2 mM, rates of CO{sub 2} evolution from valine declined although rates of transamination continued to rise. When 0.05 mM KIC was added to the assay medium, oxidation of KIC was suppressed by inclusion of valine or glutamate in the medium. When valine was present KIC was not oxidized preferentially, presumably because it was also serving as an amino acceptor for BCAT. These results indicate that as the supply of amino acceptor, {alpha}-KG or KIC, is increased in mitochondria not only is the rate of valine transamination stimulated but also the rate of oxidation of the KIV formed from valine. Thus the rate of oxidation of BCAA can be controlled by factors that influence the rate and direction of BCAA transamination and, thereby, the supply of substrate for BCKD.

  18. Regulation of valine and α-ketoisocaproate metabolism in rat kidney mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.H.; Harper, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    Activities of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) aminotransferase (BCAT) and α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) were assayed in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of rats. Rates of transamination of valine and oxidation of keto acids α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) or α-ketoisovalerate (KIV) were estimated using radioactive tracers of the appropriate substrate from amounts of 14 C-labeled products formed. Because of the high mitochondrial BCAT activity, an amino acceptor for BCAT, α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) or KIC, was added to the assay medium when valine was the substrate. Rates of valine transamination and subsequent oxidation of the KIV formed were determined with 0.5 mM α-KG as the amino acceptor; these rates were 5- to 50-fold those without added α-KG. Rates of CO 2 evolution from valine also increased when KIC was present; however, with KIC concentrations above 0.2 mM, rates of CO 2 evolution from valine declined although rates of transamination continued to rise. When 0.05 mM KIC was added to the assay medium, oxidation of KIC was suppressed by inclusion of valine or glutamate in the medium. When valine was present KIC was not oxidized preferentially, presumably because it was also serving as an amino acceptor for BCAT. These results indicate that as the supply of amino acceptor, α-KG or KIC, is increased in mitochondria not only is the rate of valine transamination stimulated but also the rate of oxidation of the KIV formed from valine. Thus the rate of oxidation of BCAA can be controlled by factors that influence the rate and direction of BCAA transamination and, thereby, the supply of substrate for BCKD

  19. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  20. Effects of exercise training and exhaustion on 45Ca uptake by rat skeletal muscle mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, H.W.; Leslie, S.W.; Combs, A.B.; Tate, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticular 45 Ca 2+ uptake and Ca 2+ -ATPase activity were determined in skeletal muscle from exercise trained and non-trained rats at rest or following short-term exhaustive exercise. In trained rats exercised to exhaustion, mitochondrial 45 Ca 2+ uptake was significantly depressed when compared to non-trained rats at rest. Ca 2+ -ATPase activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum from trained rats exercised to exhaustion was significantly increased as compared to trained rats at rest. These data suggest that the disruptive influence of Ca 2+ accumulation in mitochondria isolated following exhaustive exercise may be diminished as a result of training

  1. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  2. Mitochondria in biology and medicine--2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2014-01-01

    as biomarkers for the diseases and most important, it opens the possibility of a treatment or a cure for a disease. "Mitochondria in Biology and Medicine" was the title of the second annual conference of Society of Mitochondrial Research and Medicine-India. The conference was organized by Rana P. Singh, Keshav...

  3. Biochemistry of Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Koc

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are energy source of cells. They have external and internal membranes, cristas and matrix. External membranes consist of specialized transport proteins. They have monoamine oxidase and citokrome-c reductase which both play role in KREBS cycle as catalyst and many enzymes which are necessary for phospholipid and phosphoric acid synthesis. Enzymes of electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation are located in the internal membranes. Also, here, there are transport systems for specific substances, such as ATP, ADP, P1, pyruvate, succinate, malate, citrate, and -ketoglutarate . Matrix; having gel-like consistency, contains a large number of enzymes. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(0.100: 1-13

  4. Viral degradasome hijacks mitochondria to suppress innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Ramansu; Majumdar, Tanmay; Dhar, Jayeeta; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Bandyopadhyay, Sudip K; Verbovetskaya, Valentina; Sen, Ganes C; Barik, Sailen

    2013-01-01

    The balance between the innate immunity of the host and the ability of a pathogen to evade it strongly influences pathogenesis and virulence. The two nonstructural (NS) proteins, NS1 and NS2, of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are critically required for RSV virulence. Together, they strongly suppress the type I interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity of the host cells by degrading or inhibiting multiple cellular factors required for either IFN induction or response pathways, including RIG-I, IRF3, IRF7, TBK1 and STAT2. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of a large and heterogeneous degradative complex assembled by the NS proteins, which we named “NS-degradasome” (NSD). The NSD is roughly ∼300-750 kD in size, and its degradative activity was enhanced by the addition of purified mitochondria in vitro. Inside the cell, the majority of the NS proteins and the substrates of the NSD translocated to the mitochondria upon RSV infection. Genetic and pharmacological evidence shows that optimal suppression of innate immunity requires mitochondrial MAVS and mitochondrial motility. Together, we propose a novel paradigm in which the mitochondria, known to be important for the innate immune activation of the host, are also important for viral suppression of the innate immunity. PMID:23877405

  5. Modeling population dynamics of mitochondria in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornick, Kellianne; Das, Moumita

    Mitochondria are organelles located inside eukaryotic cells and are essential for several key cellular processes such as energy (ATP) production, cell signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis. All organisms are believed to have low levels of variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and alterations in mtDNA are connected to a range of human health conditions, including epilepsy, heart failure, Parkinsons disease, diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. Therefore, understanding how changes in mtDNA accumulate over time and are correlated to changes in mitochondrial function and cell properties can have a profound impact on our understanding of cell physiology and the origins of some diseases. Motivated by this, we develop and study a mathematical model to determine which cellular parameters have the largest impact on mtDNA population dynamics. The model consists of coupled ODEs to describe subpopulations of healthy and dysfunctional mitochondria subject to mitochondrial fission, fusion, autophagy, and mutation. We study the time evolution and stability of each sub-population under specific selection biases and pressures by tuning specific terms in our model. Our results may provide insights into how sub-populations of mitochondria survive and evolve under different selection pressures. This work was supported by a Grant from the Moore Foundation.

  6. Effect of temperature on fatty acid metabolism in skeletal muscle mitochondria of untrained and endurance-trained rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy A Zoladz

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of various assay temperatures, representing hypothermia (25°C, normothermia (35°C, and hyperthermia (42°C, on the oxidation of lipid-derived fuels in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria of untrained and endurance-trained rats. Adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats were assigned to a training group (rats trained on a treadmill for 8 weeks or a sedentary control group. In skeletal muscle mitochondria of both control and trained rats, an increase in the assay temperature from 25°C to 42°C was accompanied by a consistent increase in the oxidation of palmitoylcarnitine and glycerol-3-phosphate. Moreover, endurance training increased mitochondrial capacity to oxidize the lipid-derived fuels at all studied temperatures. The endurance training-induced increase in mitochondrial capacity to oxidize fatty acids was accompanied by an enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis, as shown by the elevated expression levels of Nrf2, PGC1α, and mitochondrial marker and by the elevated expression levels of mitochondrial proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty acid transporter CD36, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A, and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADS. We conclude that hyperthermia enhances but hypothermia attenuates the rate of the oxidation of fatty acids and glycerol-3-phosphate in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria isolated from both untrained and trained rats. Moreover, our results indicate that endurance training up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis markers, lipid-sustained oxidative capacity, and CD36 and CPT1A proteins involved in fatty acid transport, possibly via PGC1α and Nrf2 signaling pathways.

  7. Protective effects of isorhynchophylline on cardiac arrhythmias in rats and guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Runtao; Dong, Guo; Yu, Jiangbo; Wang, Xu; Fu, Songbin; Yang, Shusen

    2011-09-01

    As one important constituent extracted from a traditional Chinese medicine, Uncaria Rhynchophylla Miq Jacks, isorhynchophylline has been used to treat hypertension, epilepsy, headache, and other illnesses. Whether isorhynchophylline protects hearts against cardiac arrhythmias is still incompletely investigated. This study was therefore aimed to examine the preventive effects of isorhynchophylline on heart arrhythmias in guinea pigs and rats and then explore their electrophysiological mechanisms. In vivo, ouabain and calcium chloride were used to establish experimental arrhythmic models in guinea pigs and rats. In vitro, the whole-cell patch-lamp technique was used to study the effect of isorhynchophylline on action potential duration and calcium channels in acutely isolated guinea pig and rat cardiomyocytes. The dose of ouabain required to induce cardiac arrhythmias was much larger in guinea pigs administered with isorhynchophylline. Additionally, the onset time of cardiac arrhythmias induced by calcium chloride was prolonged, and the duration was shortened in rats pretreated with isorhynchophylline. The further study showed that isorhynchophylline could significantly decrease action potential duration and inhibit calcium currents in isolated guinea pig and rat cardiomyocytes in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, isorhynchophylline played a remarkably preventive role in cardiac arrhythmias through the inhibition of calcium currents in rats and guinea pigs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Cardiovascular Disease, Mitochondria, and Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated that mitochondria play an important role in the cardiovascular system and mutations of mitochondrial DNA affect coronary artery disease, resulting in hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cardiomyopathy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular disease, but it is not yet clear how TCM affects mitochondrial function. By reviewing the interactions between the cardiovascular system, mitochondrial DNA, and TCM, we show that cardiovascular disease is negatively affected by mutations in mitochondrial DNA and that TCM can be used to treat cardiovascular disease by regulating the structure and function of mitochondria via increases in mitochondrial electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, modulation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, and decreases in mitochondrial ROS. However further research is still required to identify the mechanism by which TCM affects CVD and modifies mitochondrial DNA.

  9. New nanocomposites for SERS studies of living cells and mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarycheva, A. S.; Brazhe, N. A.; Baizhumanov, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    A great enhancement in Raman scattering (SERS) from heme-containing submembrane biomolecules inside intact erythrocytes and functional mitochondria is demonstrated for the first time using silver–silica beads prepared using a new method involving aerosol pyrolysis with aqueous diamminesilver...... molecules. The SERS spectra of functional mitochondria are sensitive to the activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, thus making the method a novel label-free approach to monitor the redox state and conformation of cytochromes in their natural cell environment. The developed nanocomposites...

  10. Biochemistry, proteomics, and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper; Thelen, Jay J.; Møller, Ian Max

    2013-01-01

    of mitochondria and general biochemical properties such as oxidative phosphorylation. We will then mention a few adaptive properties in response to water stress, seed maturation and germination and the ability to function under hypoxic conditions. The discussion will mainly focus on Arabidopsis cell cultures......Mitochondria fulfill some basic roles in all plant cells. They supply the cell with energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents (NAD(P)H) and they provide the cell with intermediates for a range of biosynthetic pathways. In addition to this, mitochondria contribute to a number of specialized......, etiolated germinating rice seedlings and potato tubers as model plants. It will cover the general proteome as well as the posttranslational modification protein phosphorylation. To date 64 phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins with a total of 103 phosphorylation sites have been identified....

  11. DISC1 Modulates Neuronal Stress Responses by Gate-Keeping ER-Mitochondria Ca2+ Transfer through the MAM

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    Sung Jin Park

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A wide range of Ca2+-mediated functions are enabled by the dynamic properties of Ca2+, all of which are dependent on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria. Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1 is a scaffold protein that is involved in the function of intracellular organelles and is linked to cognitive and emotional deficits. Here, we demonstrate that DISC1 localizes to the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM. At the MAM, DISC1 interacts with IP3R1 and downregulates its ligand binding, modulating ER-mitochondria Ca2+ transfer through the MAM. The disrupted regulation of Ca2+ transfer caused by DISC1 dysfunction leads to abnormal Ca2+ accumulation in mitochondria following oxidative stress, which impairs mitochondrial functions. DISC1 dysfunction alters corticosterone-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation in an oxidative stress-dependent manner. Together, these findings link stress-associated neural stimuli with intracellular ER-mitochondria Ca2+ crosstalk via DISC1, providing mechanistic insight into how environmental risk factors can be interpreted by intracellular pathways under the control of genetic components in neurons. : Park et al. show that DISC1 regulates ER-mitochondria Ca2+ transfer through mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM. DISC1 dysfunction at MAM increases ER-mitochondria Ca2+ transfer during oxidative stress and excessive amounts of corticosterone, which impairs mitochondrial function. Keywords: DISC1, MAM, mitochondria, Ca2+, IP3R1, oxidative stress

  12. Visual light effects on mitochondria: The potential implications in relation to glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Neville N; Núñez-Álvarez, Claudia; Del Olmo-Aguado, Susana; Merrayo-Lloves, Jesús

    2017-09-01

    Light of different wave-lengths have the potential to interact with four major mitochondrial protein complexes that are involved in the generation of ATP. Neurones of the central nervous system have an absolute dependence on mitochondrial generated ATP. Laboratory studies show that short-wave or blue light (400-480nm) that impinges on the retina affect flavin and cytochrome constituents associated with mitochondria to decrease the rate of ATP formation, stimulate ROS and results in cell death. This suggests that blue light could potentially have a negative influence on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) mitochondria that are abundant and not shielded by macular pigments as occurs for photoreceptor mitochondria. This might be of significance in glaucoma where it is likely that RGC mitochondria are already affected and therefore be more susceptible to blue light. Thus simply filtering out some natural blue light from entering the eye might be beneficial for the treatment of glaucoma. Long-wave or red light (650-800nm) affects mitochondrial complex IV or cytochrome oxidase to increase the rate of formation of ATP and ROS causing the generation of a number of beneficial factors. Significantly, laboratory studies show that increasing the normal amount of natural red light reaching rat RGC mitochondria in situ, subjected to ischemia, proved to be beneficial. A challenge now is to test whether extra red light delivered to the human retina can slow-down RGC loss in glaucoma. Such a methodology has also the advantage of being non-invasive. One very exciting possibility might be in the production of a lens where solar UV light is convertes to add to the amount of natural red light entering the eye. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Aspirin Induces Apoptosis through Release of Cytochrome c from Mitochondria

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    Katja C. Zimmermann

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID reduce the risk for cancer, due to their anti proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects. A critical pathway for apoptosis involves the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, which then interacts with Apaf-1 to activate caspase proteases that orchestrate cell death. In this study we found that treatment of a human cancer cell line with aspirin induced caspase activation and the apoptotic cell morphology, which was blocked by the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying this apoptotic event showed that aspirin induces translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and triggers release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. The release of cytochrome c from mitochondria was inhibited by overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cells that lack Apaf-1 were resistant to aspirin-induced apoptosis. These data provide evidence that the release of cytochrome c is an important part of the apoptotic mechanism of aspirin.

  14. Respiration and substrate transport rates as well as reactive oxygen species production distinguish mitochondria from brain and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusdon, Aaron M; Fernandez-Bueno, Gabriel A; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie; Fernandez, Jenelle; Chen, Jing; Mathews, Clayton E

    2015-09-10

    Aberrant mitochondrial function, including excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human diseases. The use of mitochondrial inhibitors to ascertain the sites in the electron transport chain (ETC) resulting in altered ROS production can be an important tool. However, the response of mouse mitochondria to ETC inhibitors has not been thoroughly assessed. Here we set out to characterize the differences in phenotypic response to ETC inhibitors between the more energetically demanding brain mitochondria and less energetically demanding liver mitochondria in commonly utilized C57BL/6J mice. We show that in contrast to brain mitochondria, inhibiting distally within complex I or within complex III does not increase liver mitochondrial ROS production supported by complex I substrates, and liver mitochondrial ROS production supported by complex II substrates occurred primarily independent of membrane potential. Complex I, II, and III enzymatic activities and membrane potential were equivalent between liver and brain and responded to ETC. inhibitors similarly. Brain mitochondria exhibited an approximately two-fold increase in complex I and II supported respiration compared with liver mitochondria while exhibiting similar responses to inhibitors. Elevated NADH transport and heightened complex II-III coupled activity accounted for increased complex I and II supported respiration, respectively in brain mitochondria. We conclude that important mechanistic differences exist between mouse liver and brain mitochondria and that mouse mitochondria exhibit phenotypic differences compared with mitochondria from other species.

  15. Academic season does not influence cardiac surgical outcomes at US Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapar, Damien J; Bhamidipati, Castigliano M; Mery, Carlos M; Stukenborg, George J; Lau, Christine L; Kron, Irving L; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the influence of academic season on outcomes in select surgical populations. However, the influence of academic season has not been evaluated nationwide in cardiac surgery. We hypothesized that cardiac surgical outcomes were not significantly influenced by time of year at both cardiothoracic teaching hospitals and non-cardiothoracic teaching hospitals nationwide. From 2003 to 2007, a weighted 1,614,394 cardiac operations were evaluated using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Patients undergoing cardiac operations at cardiothoracic teaching and non-cardiothoracic teaching hospitals were identified using the Association of American Medical College's Graduate Medical Education Tracking System. Hierarchic multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the effect of academic quarter on risk-adjusted outcomes. Mean patient age was 65.9 ± 10.9 years. Women accounted for 32.8% of patients. Isolated coronary artery bypass grafting was the most common operation performed (64.7%), followed by isolated valve replacement (19.3%). The overall incidence of operative mortality and composite postoperative complication rate were 2.9% and 27.9%, respectively. After accounting for potentially confounding risk factors, timing of operation by academic quarter did not independently increase risk-adjusted mortality (p = 0.12) or morbidity (p = 0.24) at academic medical centers. Risk-adjusted mortality and morbidity for cardiac operations were not associated with time of year in the US at teaching and nonteaching hospitals. Patients should be reassured of the safety of performance of cardiac operations at academic medical centers throughout a given academic year. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitochondria targeted peptides protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lichuan; Zhao, Kesheng; Calingasan, Noel Y; Luo, Guoxiong; Szeto, Hazel H; Beal, M Flint

    2009-09-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage play a role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). A number of antioxidants have been effective in animal models of PD. We have developed a family of mitochondria-targeted peptides that can protect against mitochondrial swelling and apoptosis (SS peptides). In this study, we examined the ability of two peptides, SS-31 and SS-20, to protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity in mice. SS-31 produced dose-dependent complete protection against loss of dopamine and its metabolites in striatum, as well as loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. SS-20, which does not possess intrinsic ability in scavenging reactive oxygen species, also demonstrated significant neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons of MPTP-treated mice. Both SS-31 and SS-20 were very potent (nM) in preventing MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium)-induced cell death in cultured dopamine cells (SN4741). Studies with isolated mitochondria showed that both SS-31 and SS-20 prevented MPP+-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and ATP production, and mitochondrial swelling. These findings provide strong evidence that these neuroprotective peptides, which target both mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage, are a promising approach for the treatment of PD.

  17. Oxidative metabolism of 5-o-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid), a bioactive natural product, by metalloporphyrin and rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Michel D; Martins, Patrícia R; dos Santos, Pierre A; Bortocan, Renato; Iamamoto, Y; Lopes, Norberto P

    2005-09-01

    Synthetic metalloporphyrins, in the presence of monooxygen donors, are known to mimic the various reactions of cytochrome P450 enzymes systems in the oxidation and oxygenation of various drugs and biologically active compounds. This paper reports an HPLC-MS-MS investigation of chlorogenic acid (CGA) oxidation by iodosylbenzene using iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride as catalyst. The oxidation products have been detected by sequential MS analyses. In addition, CGA was submitted to an in vitro metabolism assay employing isolated rat liver mitochondria. The single oxidized product obtained from mitochondrial metabolism corresponds to the major product formed by the metalloporphyrin-catalyzed reaction. These results indicate that biomimetic oxidation reactions, in addition to in vitro metabolism assays employing isolated organs/organelles, could replace some in vivo metabolism studies, thus minimizing the problems related to the use of a large number of living animals in experimental research.

  18. Analysis of the behavior of mitochondria in the ovaries of the earthworm Dendrobaena veneta Rosa 1839.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Faron

    Full Text Available We examined six types of cells that form the ovary of the earthworm Dendrobena veneta ogonia, prooocytes, vitellogenic oocytes, trophocytes, fully grown postvitellogenic oocytes and somatic cells of the gonad. The quantitative stereological method revealed a much higher "volume density" of mitochondria in all of the types of germ-line cells except for the somatic cells. Fluorescent vital stain JC-1, however, showed a much higher oxidative activity of mitochondria in the somatic cells than in the germ-line cells. The distribution of active and inactive mitochondria within the studied cells was assessed using the computer program ImageJ. The analysis showed a higher luminosity of inactive mitochondria in all of the types of germ-line cells and a higher luminosity of active mitochondria in somatic cells. The OXPHOS activity was found in somatic cells mitochondria and in the peripheral mitochondria of the vitellogenic oocytes. The detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS revealed a differentiated distribution of ROS in the different cell types. The amount of ROS substances was lower in somatic cells than in younger germ-line cells. The ROS level was also low in the cytoplasm of fully grown postwitellogenic oocytes. The distribution of the MnSOD enzyme that protects mitochondria against destructive role of ROS substances was high in the oogonia and in prooocytes and it was very high in vitellogenic and postvitellogenic oocytes. However, a much lower level of this protective enzyme was observed in the trophocytes and the lowest level was found in the cytoplasm of somatic cells. The lower mitochondrial activity and higher level of MnSOD activity in germ-line cells when compared to somatic cells testifies to the necessity of the organisms to protect the mitochondria of oocytes against the destructive role of the ROS that are produced during oxidative phosphorylation. The protection of the mitochondria in oocytes is essential for the transfer of healthy

  19. The dynamic regulation of NAD metabolism in mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Liana Roberts; Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular powerhouses that produce ATP and carry out diverse functions for cellular energy metabolism. While the maintenance of an optimal NAD/NADH ratio is essential for mitochondrial function, it has recently become apparent that the maintenance of the mitochondrial NAD pool also has critical importance. The biosynthesis, transport, and catabolism of NAD and its key intermediates play an important role in the regulation of NAD-consuming mediators, such as sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases, and CD38/157 ectoenzymes, in intra- and extracellular compartments. Mitochondrial NAD biosynthesis is also modulated in response to nutritional and environmental stimuli. In this article, we discuss this dynamic regulation of NAD metabolism in mitochondria to shed light on the intimate connection between NAD and mitochondrial function. PMID:22819213

  20. The Rise of Mitochondria in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; Wallace, Douglas C; Burelle, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Once considered exclusively the cell's powerhouse, mitochondria are now recognized to perform multiple essential cellular functions beyond energy production, impacting most areas of cell biology and medicine. Since the emergence of molecular biology and the discovery of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA defects in the 1980's, research advances have revealed a number of common human diseases which share an underlying pathogenesis involving mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria undergo function-defining dynamic shape changes, communicate with each other, regulate gene expression within the nucleus, modulate synaptic transmission within the brain, release molecules that contribute to oncogenic transformation and trigger inflammatory responses systemically, and influence the regulation of complex physiological systems. Novel “mitopathogenic” mechanisms are thus being uncovered across a number of medical disciplines including genetics, oncology, neurology, immunology, and critical care medicine. Increasing knowledge of the bioenergetic aspects of human disease has provided new opportunities for diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and in connecting various domains of medicine. In this article, we overview specific aspects of mitochondrial biology that have contributed to – and likely will continue to enhance the progress of modern medicine. PMID:27423788

  1. In vivo imaging reveals mitophagy independence in the maintenance of axonal mitochondria during normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu; Wang, Haiqiong; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Qingyao; Zhang, Shuang; Deng, Yuanping; Fang, Yanshan

    2017-10-01

    Mitophagy is thought to be a critical mitochondrial quality control mechanism in neurons and has been extensively studied in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. However, little is known about how mitochondria are maintained in the lengthy neuronal axons in the context of physiological aging. Here, we utilized the unique Drosophila wing nerve model and in vivo imaging to rigorously profile changes in axonal mitochondria during aging. We revealed that mitochondria became fragmented and accumulated in aged axons. However, lack of Pink1 or Parkin did not lead to the accumulation of axonal mitochondria or axonal degeneration. Further, unlike in in vitro cultured neurons, we found that mitophagy rarely occurred in intact axons in vivo, even in aged animals. Furthermore, blocking overall mitophagy by knockdown of the core autophagy genes Atg12 or Atg17 had little effect on the turnover of axonal mitochondria or axonal integrity, suggesting that mitophagy is not required for axonal maintenance; this is regardless of whether the mitophagy is PINK1-Parkin dependent or independent. In contrast, downregulation of mitochondrial fission-fusion genes caused age-dependent axonal degeneration. Moreover, Opa1 expression in the fly head was significantly decreased with age, which may underlie the accumulation of fragmented mitochondria in aged axons. Finally, we showed that adult-onset, neuronal downregulation of the fission-fusion, but not mitophagy genes, dramatically accelerated features of aging. We propose that axonal mitochondria are maintained independently of mitophagy and that mitophagy-independent mechanisms such as fission-fusion may be central to the maintenance of axonal mitochondria and neural integrity during normal aging. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Melatonin, mitochondria, and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Zmijewski, Michal A; Semak, Igor; Kim, Tae-Kang; Janjetovic, Zorica; Slominski, Radomir M; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2017-11-01

    The skin being a protective barrier between external and internal (body) environments has the sensory and adaptive capacity to maintain local and global body homeostasis in response to noxious factors. An important part of the skin response to stress is its ability for melatonin synthesis and subsequent metabolism through the indolic and kynuric pathways. Indeed, melatonin and its metabolites have emerged as indispensable for physiological skin functions and for effective protection of a cutaneous homeostasis from hostile environmental factors. Moreover, they attenuate the pathological processes including carcinogenesis and other hyperproliferative/inflammatory conditions. Interestingly, mitochondria appear to be a central hub of melatonin metabolism in the skin cells. Furthermore, substantial evidence has accumulated on the protective role of the melatonin against ultraviolet radiation and the attendant mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin and its metabolites appear to have a modulatory impact on mitochondrion redox and bioenergetic homeostasis, as well as the anti-apoptotic effects. Of note, some metabolites exhibit even greater impact than melatonin alone. Herein, we emphasize that melatonin-mitochondria axis would control integumental functions designed to protect local and perhaps global homeostasis. Given the phylogenetic origin and primordial actions of melatonin, we propose that the melatonin-related mitochondrial functions represent an evolutionary conserved mechanism involved in cellular adaptive response to skin injury and repair.

  3. Phospholipase activity in rat liver mitochondria studied by the use of endogenous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstad, P

    1966-09-01

    The hydrolysis of endogenous phosphatidyl ethanolamine and lecithin in rat liver mitochondria has been studied by using mitochondria from rats injected with ethanolamine-1,2-(14)C or choline-1,2-(14)C. A phospholipase A-like enzyme has been demonstrated, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of one fatty acid ester linkage in phosphatidyl ethanolamine and lecithin. Phosphatidyl ethanolamine is hydrolyzed in preference to lecithin and the main reaction products are free fatty acids and lysophosphatidyl ethanolamine. The further breakdown of lysophospholipids appears to be limited in mitochondria, which indicates that lysophospholipase activity is mainly located extramitochondrially. The enzymic system is greatly stimulated by calcium ions, and also slightly by magnesium ions, while EDTA inhibits it almost completely. These findings are discussed in relation to previous observations on the effect of calcium and of EDTA on the functions of mitochondria. The possible function of the mitochondrial phospholipase for the formation of phospholipids with special fatty acids at the alpha- and -position is discussed.

  4. A biophysical model of the mitochondrial respiratory system and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Beard

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A computational model for the mitochondrial respiratory chain that appropriately balances mass, charge, and free energy transduction is introduced and analyzed based on a previously published set of data measured on isolated cardiac mitochondria. The basic components included in the model are the reactions at complexes I, III, and IV of the electron transport system, ATP synthesis at F1F0 ATPase, substrate transporters including adenine nucleotide translocase and the phosphate-hydrogen co-transporter, and cation fluxes across the inner membrane including fluxes through the K+/H+ antiporter and passive H+ and K+ permeation. Estimation of 16 adjustable parameter values is based on fitting model simulations to nine independent data curves. The identified model is further validated by comparison to additional datasets measured from mitochondria isolated from rat heart and liver and observed at low oxygen concentration. To obtain reasonable fits to the available data, it is necessary to incorporate inorganic-phosphate-dependent activation of the dehydrogenase activity and the electron transport system. Specifically, it is shown that a model incorporating phosphate-dependent activation of complex III is able to reasonably reproduce the observed data. The resulting validated and verified model provides a foundation for building larger and more complex systems models and investigating complex physiological and pathophysiological interactions in cardiac energetics.

  5. A Biophysical Model of the Mitochondrial Respiratory System and Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A computational model for the mitochondrial respiratory chain that appropriately balances mass, charge, and free energy transduction is introduced and analyzed based on a previously published set of data measured on isolated cardiac mitochondria. The basic components included in the model are the reactions at complexes I, III, and IV of the electron transport system, ATP synthesis at F(1F(0 ATPase, substrate transporters including adenine nucleotide translocase and the phosphate-hydrogen co-transporter, and cation fluxes across the inner membrane including fluxes through the K/H antiporter and passive H and K permeation. Estimation of 16 adjustable parameter values is based on fitting model simulations to nine independent data curves. The identified model is further validated by comparison to additional datasets measured from mitochondria isolated from rat heart and liver and observed at low oxygen concentration. To obtain reasonable fits to the available data, it is necessary to incorporate inorganic-phosphate-dependent activation of the dehydrogenase activity and the electron transport system. Specifically, it is shown that a model incorporating phosphate-dependent activation of complex III is able to reasonably reproduce the observed data. The resulting validated and verified model provides a foundation for building larger and more complex systems models and investigating complex physiological and pathophysiological interactions in cardiac energetics.

  6. Glucagon effects on the membrane potential and calcium uptake rate of rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingrove, D.E.; Amatruda, J.M.; Gunter, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    It has been widely reported that the in vivo administration of glucagon to rats results in the stimulation of calcium influx in subsequently isolated liver mitochondria. The mechanism of this effect is investigated through simultaneous measurements of calcium uptake rate and mitochondrial membrane potential. This allows the measurement of the calcium uniporter conductance independent of hormonal effects on electron transport or respiration. Two experimental approaches are used. The first involves measuring the uptake of 40-50 nmol of Ca 2+ /mg of mitochondrial protein with the calcium dye antipyrylazo III; the second uses 45 Ca 2+ to follow uptake in the presence of 0.5 to 1.5 μM free calcium, buffered with HEDTA. In both cases a tetraphenyl phosphonium electrode is used to follow membrane potential, and membrane potential is varied using either malonate or butylmalonate in the presence of rotenone. The relative merits of these two approaches are discussed. The conductance of the calcium uniporter is found not to be stimulated by glucagon pretreatment. Also, the relative glucagon stimulation of both calcium influx and membrane potential is found to increase with increasing malonate concentration. These results imply that there is no direct stimulation of calcium uptake into liver mitochondria following glucagon treatment. The results are consistent with a glucagon stimulation of substrate transport, substrate oxidation, or a stimulation of electron transport resulting in an increased membrane potential and secondary stimulation of calcium uptake

  7. Ca(2+)-dependent nonspecific permeability of the inner membrane of liver mitochondria in the guinea fowl (Numida meleagris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedernikov, Aleksander A; Dubinin, Mikhail V; Zabiakin, Vladimir A; Samartsev, Victor N

    2015-06-01

    This comparative study presents the results of the induction of Ca(2+)-dependent nonspecific permeability of the inner membrane (pore opening) of rat and guinea fowl liver mitochondria by mechanisms that are both sensitive and insensitive to cyclosporin A (CsA). It was established that energized rat and guinea fowl liver mitochondria incubated with 1 mM of inorganic phosphate (Pi) are capable of swelling upon addition of at least 125 and 875 nmol of CaCl2 per 1 mg protein, respectively. Under these conditions, the Ca(2+) release from the mitochondria of these animals and a drop in Δψ are observed. All of these processes are inhibited by 1 μM of CsA. FCCP, causing organelle de-energization, induces pore opening in rat and guinea fowl liver mitochondria upon addition of 45 и 625 nmol of CaCl2 per 1 mg protein, respectively. These results suggest the existence of a CsA-sensitive mechanism for the induction of Ca(2+)-dependent pores in guinea fowl liver mitochondria, which has been reported in rat liver mitochondria. However, guinea fowl liver mitochondria have a significantly greater resistance to Ca(2+) as a pore inducer compared to rat liver mitochondria. It was found that the addition of α,ω-hexadecanedioic acid (HDA) to rat and guinea fowl liver mitochondria incubated with CsA and loaded with Ca(2+) causes organelle swelling and Ca(2+) release from the matrix. It is assumed that in contrast to the CsA-sensitive pore, the CsA-insensitive pore induced by HDA in the inner membrane of guinea fowl liver mitochondria, as well as in rat liver mitochondria, is lipid in nature.

  8. Diabetes-Induced Dysfunction of Mitochondria and Stem Cells in Skeletal Muscle and the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Shin; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common metabolic diseases spread all over the world, which results in hyperglycemia caused by the breakdown of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. Diabetes has been reported to disrupt the functions and dynamics of mitochondria, which play a fundamental role in regulating metabolic pathways and are crucial to maintain appropriate energy balance. Similar to mitochondria, the functions and the abilities of stem cells are attenuated under diabetic condition in several tissues. In recent years, several studies have suggested that the regulation of mitochondria functions and dynamics is critical for the precise differentiation of stem cells. Importantly, physical exercise is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration by improving the functions of both mitochondria and stem cells. In the present review, we provide an overview of the diabetic alterations of mitochondria and stem cells and the preventive effects of physical exercise on diabetes, focused on skeletal muscle and the nervous system. We propose physical exercise as a countermeasure for the dysfunction of mitochondria and stem cells in several target tissues under diabetes complication and to improve the physiological function of patients with diabetes, resulting in their quality of life being maintained. PMID:29036909

  9. Up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein in cold-acclimated and hyperthyroid ducklings prevents reactive oxygen species production by skeletal muscle mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servais Stéphane

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although identified in several bird species, the biological role of the avian homolog of mammalian uncoupling proteins (avUCP remains extensively debated. In the present study, the functional properties of isolated mitochondria were examined in physiological or pharmacological situations that induce large changes in avUCP expression in duckling skeletal muscle. Results The abundance of avUCP mRNA, as detected by RT-PCR in gastrocnemius muscle but not in the liver, was markedly increased by cold acclimation (CA or pharmacological hyperthyroidism but was down-regulated by hypothyroidism. Activators of UCPs, such as superoxide with low doses of fatty acids, stimulated a GDP-sensitive proton conductance across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria from CA or hyperthyroid ducklings. The stimulation was much weaker in controls and not observed in hypothyroid ducklings or in any liver mitochondrial preparations. The production of endogenous mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS was much lower in muscle mitochondria from CA and hyperthyroid ducklings than in the control or hypothyroid groups. The addition of GDP markedly increased the mitochondrial ROS production of CA or hyperthyroid birds up to, or above, the level of control or hypothyroid ducklings. Differences in ROS production among groups could not be attributed to changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase. Conclusion This work provides the first functional in vitro evidence that avian UCP regulates mitochondrial ROS production in situations of enhanced metabolic activity.

  10. Up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein in cold-acclimated and hyperthyroid ducklings prevents reactive oxygen species production by skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Belouze, Maud; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Desplanches, Dominique; Sibille, Brigitte; Servais, Stéphane; Duchamp, Claude

    2010-04-28

    Although identified in several bird species, the biological role of the avian homolog of mammalian uncoupling proteins (avUCP) remains extensively debated. In the present study, the functional properties of isolated mitochondria were examined in physiological or pharmacological situations that induce large changes in avUCP expression in duckling skeletal muscle. The abundance of avUCP mRNA, as detected by RT-PCR in gastrocnemius muscle but not in the liver, was markedly increased by cold acclimation (CA) or pharmacological hyperthyroidism but was down-regulated by hypothyroidism. Activators of UCPs, such as superoxide with low doses of fatty acids, stimulated a GDP-sensitive proton conductance across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria from CA or hyperthyroid ducklings. The stimulation was much weaker in controls and not observed in hypothyroid ducklings or in any liver mitochondrial preparations. The production of endogenous mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was much lower in muscle mitochondria from CA and hyperthyroid ducklings than in the control or hypothyroid groups. The addition of GDP markedly increased the mitochondrial ROS production of CA or hyperthyroid birds up to, or above, the level of control or hypothyroid ducklings. Differences in ROS production among groups could not be attributed to changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase). This work provides the first functional in vitro evidence that avian UCP regulates mitochondrial ROS production in situations of enhanced metabolic activity.

  11. Pentoxifylline Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling Induced by Tobacco Smoke Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minicucci, Marcos; Oliveira, Fernando; Santos, Priscila; Polegato, Bertha; Roscani, Meliza; Fernandes, Ana Angelica; Lustosa, Beatriz; Paiva, Sergio; Zornoff, Leonardo; Azevedo, Paula, E-mail: paulasa@fmb.unesp.br [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Tobacco smoke exposure is an important risk factor for cardiac remodeling. Under this condition, inflammation, oxidative stress, energy metabolism abnormalities, apoptosis, and hypertrophy are present. Pentoxifylline has anti‑inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-thrombotic and anti-proliferative properties. The present study tested the hypothesis that pentoxifylline would attenuate cardiac remodeling induced by smoking. Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: Control (C), Pentoxifylline (PX), Tobacco Smoke (TS), and PX-TS. After two months, echocardiography, invasive blood pressure measurement, biochemical, and histological studies were performed. The groups were compared by two-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. TS increased left atrium diameter and area, which was attenuated by PX. In the isolated heart study, TS lowered the positive derivate (+dp/dt), and this was attenuated by PX. The antioxidants enzyme superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased in the TS group; PX recovered these activities. TS increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and decreased 3-hydroxyacyl Coenzyme A dehydrogenases (OH-DHA) and citrate synthase (CS). PX attenuated LDH, 3-OH-DHA and CS alterations in TS-PX group. TS increased IL-10, ICAM-1, and caspase-3. PX did not influence these variables. TS induced cardiac remodeling, associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and changed energy metabolism. PX attenuated cardiac remodeling by reducing oxidative stress and improving cardiac bioenergetics, but did not act upon cardiac cytokines and apoptosis.

  12. A Powerful Mitochondria-Targeted Iron Chelator Affords High Photoprotection against Solar Ultraviolet A Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reelfs, Olivier; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hider, Robert C; Pourzand, Charareh

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are the principal destination for labile iron, making these organelles particularly susceptible to oxidative damage on exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA, 320-400 nm), the oxidizing component of sunlight. The labile iron-mediated oxidative damage caused by UVA to mitochondria leads to necrotic cell death via adenosine triphosphate depletion. Therefore, targeted removal of mitochondrial labile iron via highly specific tools from these organelles may be an effective approach to protect the skin cells against the harmful effects of UVA. In this work, we designed a mitochondria-targeted hexadentate (tricatechol-based) iron chelator linked to mitochondria-homing SS-like peptides. The photoprotective potential of this compound against UVA-induced oxidative damage and cell death was evaluated in cultured primary skin fibroblasts. Our results show that this compound provides unprecedented protection against UVA-induced mitochondrial damage, adenosine triphosphate depletion, and the ensuing necrotic cell death in skin fibroblasts, and this effect is fully related to its potent iron-chelating property in the organelle. This mitochondria-targeted iron chelator has therefore promising potential for skin photoprotection against the deleterious effects of the UVA component of sunlight. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mitochondria-meditated pathways of organ failure upon inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Kozlov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Liver failure induced by systemic inflammatory response (SIRS is often associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but the mechanism linking SIRS and mitochondria-mediated liver failure is still a matter of discussion. Current hypotheses suggest that causative events could be a drop in ATP synthesis, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore, specific changes in mitochondrial morphology, impaired Ca2+ uptake, generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS, turnover of mitochondria and imbalance in electron supply to the respiratory chain. The aim of this review is to critically analyze existing hypotheses, in order to highlight the most promising research lines helping to prevent liver failure induced by SIRS. Evaluation of the literature shows that there is no consistent support that impaired Ca++ metabolism, electron transport chain function and ultrastructure of mitochondria substantially contribute to liver failure. Moreover, our analysis suggests that the drop in ATP levels has protective rather than a deleterious character. Recent data suggest that the most critical mitochondrial event occurring upon SIRS is the release of mtROS in cytoplasm, which can activate two specific intracellular signaling cascades. The first is the mtROS-mediated activation of NADPH-oxidase in liver macrophages and endothelial cells; the second is the acceleration of the expression of inflammatory genes in hepatocytes. The signaling action of mtROS is strictly controlled in mitochondria at three points, (i at the site of ROS generation at complex I, (ii the site of mtROS release in cytoplasm via permeability transition pore, and (iii interaction with specific kinases in cytoplasm. The systems controlling mtROS-signaling include pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide, Ca2+ and NADPH-oxidase. Analysis of the literature suggests that further research should be focused on the impact of mtROS on organ failure induced by inflammation

  14. Gamma radiation effect on the mitochondria ultrastructure in different radiosensitive types of cotton plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslanov, S V

    1973-01-01

    When germinated seeds are irradiated with a dose of 10 krad, the mitochondrial ultrastructure is disrupted in the early-ripening 1306-DV and the late-ripening S-1622 varieties of the cotton-plant. The mitochondria exhibited swelling, breakdown of internal structure and vacuolation. In the S-1622 variety the mitochondria shrink owing to their small number and larger size and to the smaller number of cristae. Changes in the ultrafine organization of mitochondria lead to inhibition of carbohydrate oxidation through the Krebs cycle and intensification of oxidation through the pentosophosphate cycle.

  15. Tumor cell phenotype is sustained by selective MAPK oxidation in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Galli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are major cellular sources of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2, the production of which is modulated by oxygen availability and the mitochondrial energy state. An increase of steady-state cell H(2O(2 concentration is able to control the transition from proliferating to quiescent phenotypes and to signal the end of proliferation; in tumor cells thereby, low H(2O(2 due to defective mitochondrial metabolism can contribute to sustain proliferation. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs orchestrate signal transduction and recent data indicate that are present in mitochondria and regulated by the redox state. On these bases, we investigated the mechanistic connection of tumor mitochondrial dysfunction, H(2O(2 yield, and activation of MAPKs in LP07 murine tumor cells with confocal microscopy, in vivo imaging and directed mutagenesis. Two redox conditions were examined: low 1 microM H(2O(2 increased cell proliferation in ERK1/2-dependent manner whereas high 50 microM H(2O(2 arrested cell cycle by p38 and JNK1/2 activation. Regarding the experimental conditions as a three-compartment model (mitochondria, cytosol, and nuclei, the different responses depended on MAPKs preferential traffic to mitochondria, where a selective activation of either ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 by co-localized upstream kinases (MAPKKs facilitated their further passage to nuclei. As assessed by mass spectra, MAPKs activation and efficient binding to cognate MAPKKs resulted from oxidation of conserved ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 cysteine domains to sulfinic and sulfonic acids at a definite H(2O(2 level. Like this, high H(2O(2 or directed mutation of redox-sensitive ERK2 Cys(214 impeded binding to MEK1/2, caused ERK2 retention in mitochondria and restricted shuttle to nuclei. It is surmised that selective cysteine oxidations adjust the electrostatic forces that participate in a particular MAPK-MAPKK interaction. Considering that tumor mitochondria are dysfunctional, their inability to

  16. [Cardiac tamponade and myocarditis in Churg-Strauss syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baili, L; Aydi, Z; Soussi, G; Ben Dhaou B, B; Zidi, A; Berraies, A; Boussema, F; Kammoun, S; Hamzaoui, A; Kraiem, S; Ben Miled M'rad, K; Rokbani, L

    2014-09-01

    The successive occurrence of pericardial tamponade and myocarditis during a Churg-Strauss syndrome is exceptionally described. We report a patient in whom pericardial tamponade and myocarditis were the presenting manifestation of a Churg-Strauss syndrome. A 58-year-old woman was admitted because of alteration of the clinical status with eosinophilia. One month ago, she was hospitalized for a pericardial tamponade treated by pericardial drainage. Acute myocarditis was diagnosed on chest pain during the second hospitalization. The etiologic inquiry ended in the diagnosis of Churg-Strauss complicated with a double cardiac involvement. A good response of clinical and biological anomalies was obtained after corticosteroid and immunosuppressive treatment. Isolated or multiple involvements of cardiac tunics should lead to make diagnosis of systemic vasculitis. A complete initial assessment and a close observation of the patients followed for Churg-Strauss syndrome is imperative to detect a cardiac achievement and set up an early treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteome Analysis of Subsarcolemmal Cardiomyocyte Mitochondria: A Comparison of Different Analytical Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giorgianni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are complex organelles that play critical roles in diverse aspects of cellular function. Heart disease and a number of other pathologies are associated with perturbations in the molecular machinery of the mitochondria. Therefore, comprehensive, unbiased examination of the mitochondrial proteome represents a powerful approach toward system-level insights into disease mechanisms. A crucial aspect in proteomics studies is design of bioanalytical strategies that maximize coverage of the complex repertoire of mitochondrial proteins. In this study, we evaluated the performance of gel-based and gel-free multidimensional platforms for profiling of the proteome in subsarcolemmal mitochondria harvested from rat heart. We compared three different multidimensional proteome fractionation platforms: polymeric reversed-phase liquid chromatography at high pH (PLRP, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, and isoelectric focusing (IEF separations combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, and bioinformatics for protein identification. Across all three platforms, a total of 1043 proteins were identified. Among the three bioanalytical strategies, SDS-PAGE followed by LC-MS/MS provided the best coverage of the mitochondrial proteome. With this platform, 890 proteins with diverse physicochemical characteristics were identified; the mitochondrial protein panel encompassed proteins with various functional roles including bioenergetics, protein import, and mitochondrial fusion. Taken together, results of this study provide a large-scale view of the proteome in subsarcolemmal mitochondria from the rat heart, and aid in the selection of optimal bioanalytical platforms for differential protein expression profiling of mitochondria in health and disease.

  18. Cardiac regeneration therapy: connections to cardiac physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Naofumi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    Without heart transplantation, a large number of patients with failing hearts worldwide face poor outcomes. By means of cardiomyocyte regeneration, cardiac regeneration therapy is emerging with great promise as a means for restoring loss of cardiac function. However, the limited success of clinical trials using bone marrow-derived cells and myoblasts with heterogeneous constituents, transplanted at a wide range of cell doses, has led to disagreement on the efficacy of cell therapy. It is therefore essential to reevaluate the evidence for the efficacy of cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy, focusing on targets, materials, and methodologies. Meanwhile, the revolutionary innovation of cardiac regeneration therapy is sorely needed to help the millions of people who suffer heart failure from acquired loss of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac regeneration has been used only in limited species or as a developing process in the rodent heart; now, the possibility of cardiomyocyte turnover in the human heart is being revisited. In the pursuit of this concept, the use of cardiac stem/progenitor stem cells in the cardiac niche must be focused to usher in a second era of cardiac regeneration therapy for the severely injured heart. In addition, tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming will advance the next era of treatment that will enable current cell-based therapy to progress to "real" cardiac regeneration therapy. Although many barriers remain, the prevention of refractory heart failure through cardiac regeneration is now becoming a realistic possibility.

  19. Prenatal Detection of Cardiac Anomalies in Fetuses with Single Umbilical Artery: Diagnostic Accuracy Comparison of Maternal-Fetal-Medicine and Pediatric Cardiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilir Tasha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine agreement of cardiac anomalies between maternal fetal medicine (MFM physicians and pediatric cardiologists (PC in fetuses with single umbilical artery (SUA. Methods. A retrospective review of all fetuses with SUA between 1999 and 2008. Subjects were studied by MFM and PC, delivered at our institution, and had confirmation of SUA and cardiac anomaly by antenatal and neonatal PC follow-up. Subjects were divided into four groups: isolated SUA, SUA and isolated cardiac anomaly, SUA and multiple anomalies without heart anomalies, and SUA and multiple malformations including cardiac anomaly. Results. 39,942 cases were studied between 1999 and 2008. In 376 of 39,942 cases (0.94%, SUA was diagnosed. Only 182 (48.4% met inclusion criteria. Cardiac anomalies were found in 21% (38/182. Agreement between MFM physicians and PC in all groups combined was 94% (171/182 (95% CI [89.2, 96.8]. MFM physicians overdiagnosed cardiac anomalies in 4.4% (8/182. MFM physicians and PC failed to antenatally diagnose cardiac anomaly in the same two cases. Conclusions. Good agreement was noted between MFM physicians and PC in our institution. Studies performed antenatally by MFM physicians and PC are less likely to uncover the entire spectrum of cardiac abnormalities and thus neonatal follow-up is suggested.

  20. Aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the mitochondria of mouse hepatocytes as revealed by microscopic radioautography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Tetsuji [Shinshu University, Matsumoto (Japan). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology

    2007-07-01

    This mini-review reports aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the mitochondria of mouse hepatocytes. We have observed the macromolecular synthesis, such as DNA, RNA and proteins, in the mitochondria of various mammalian cells by means of electron microscopic radioautography technique developed in our laboratory. The number of mitochondria per cell, number of labeled mitochondria per cell with 3H-thymidine, 3H-uridine and 3H-leucine, precursors for DNA, RNA and proteins, respectively, were counted and the labeling indices at various ages, from fetal to postnatal early days and several months to 1 and 2 years in senescence, were calculated, which showed variations due to aging. (author)

  1. Glutaredoxin-2 is required to control oxidative phosphorylation in cardiac muscle by mediating deglutathionylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Xuan, Jian Ying; McBride, Skye; Maharsy, Wael; Thorn, Stephanie; Holterman, Chet E; Kennedy, Christopher R J; Rippstein, Peter; deKemp, Robert; da Silva, Jean; Nemer, Mona; Lou, Marjorie; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2014-05-23

    Glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) modulates the activity of several mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue by catalyzing deglutathionylation reactions. However, it remains uncertain whether Grx2 is required to control mitochondrial ATP output in heart. Here, we report that Grx2 plays a vital role modulating mitochondrial energetics and heart physiology by mediating the deglutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins. Deletion of Grx2 (Grx2(-/-)) decreased ATP production by complex I-linked substrates to half that in wild type (WT) mitochondria. Decreased respiration was associated with increased complex I glutathionylation diminishing its activity. Tissue glucose uptake was concomitantly increased. Mitochondrial ATP output and complex I activity could be recovered by restoring the redox environment to that favoring the deglutathionylated states of proteins. Grx2(-/-) hearts also developed left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, and mice became hypertensive. Mitochondrial energetics from Grx2 heterozygotes (Grx2(+/-)) were also dysfunctional, and hearts were hypertrophic. Intriguingly, Grx2(+/-) mice were far less hypertensive than Grx2(-/-) mice. Thus, Grx2 plays a vital role in modulating mitochondrial metabolism in cardiac muscle, and Grx2 deficiency leads to pathology. As mitochondrial ATP production was restored by the addition of reductants, these findings may be relevant to novel redox-related therapies in cardiac disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. [Acetylcholine activation of alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation in liver mitochondria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostakovskaia, I V; Doliba, N M; Gordiĭ, S K; Babskiĭ, A M; Kondrashova, M N

    1986-01-01

    Activation of alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation in the rat liver mitochondria takes place 15 and 30 min after intraperitoneal injection of acetyl choline. This mediator in doses of 25, 50 and 100 micrograms per 100 g of body weight causes a pronounced stimulation of phosphorylation respiration rate and calcium capacity of mitochondria with alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation. Acetyl choline is found to have a moderate inhibitory action on oxidation of lower (physiological) concentrations of succinate. Its stimulating action on alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation is associated with activation of M-cholinoreceptors; atropine, a choline-blocker, removes completely this effect. It is supposed that alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate are included into the composition of two reciprocal hormonal-substrate nucleotide systems.

  3. Direct Effects of (−-Epicatechin and Procyanidin B2 on the Respiration of Rat Heart Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia M. Kopustinskiene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonol (−-epicatechin and its derived dimer procyanidin B2, present in high amounts in cocoa products, have been shown to exert beneficial effects on the heart and cardiovascular system; however, their mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. We studied effects of (−-epicatechin and procyanidin B2 on the oxidative phosphorylation of isolated rat heart mitochondria. (−-Epicatechin and procyanidin B2 had stimulating effect (up to 30% compared to control on substrate-driven (State 2 mitochondrial respiration. Their effect was dependent on the respiratory substrates used. (−-Epicatechin at higher concentrations (from 0.27 µg/mL significantly decreased (up to 15% substrate- and ADP-driven (State 3 mitochondrial respiration in case of pyruvate and malate oxidation only. Procyanidin B2 (0.7–17.9 ng/mL inhibited State 3 respiration rate up to 19%, the most profound effect being expressed with succinate as the substrate. (−-Epicatechin at concentrations of 0.23 µg/mL and 0.46 µg/mL prevented loss of the cytochrome c from mitochondria when substrate was succinate, supporting the evidence of membrane stabilizing properties of this flavonol. Thus, both (−-epicatechin and procyanidin B2 directly influenced mitochondrial functions and the observed effects could help to explain cardiometabolic risk reduction ascribed to the consumption of modest amounts of cocoa products.

  4. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes allow adaptation of mitochondrial metabolism to glucose availability in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurey, Pierre; Tubbs, Emily; Vial, Guillaume; Jacquemetton, Julien; Bendridi, Nadia; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Le Romancer, Muriel; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAM) play a key role in mitochondrial dynamics and function and in hepatic insulin action. Whereas mitochondria are important regulators of energy metabolism, the nutritional regulation of MAM in the liver and its role in the adaptation of mitochondria physiology to nutrient availability are unknown. In this study, we found that the fasted to postprandial transition reduced the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact points in mouse liver. Screening of potential hormonal/metabolic signals revealed glucose as the main nutritional regulator of hepatic MAM integrity both in vitro and in vivo Glucose reduced organelle interactions through the pentose phosphate-protein phosphatase 2A (PP-PP2A) pathway, induced mitochondria fission, and impaired respiration. Blocking MAM reduction counteracted glucose-induced mitochondrial alterations. Furthermore, disruption of MAM integrity mimicked effects of glucose on mitochondria dynamics and function. This glucose-sensing system is deficient in the liver of insulin-resistant ob/ob and cyclophilin D-KO mice, both characterized by chronic disruption of MAM integrity, mitochondrial fission, and altered mitochondrial respiration. These data indicate that MAM contribute to the hepatic glucose-sensing system, allowing regulation of mitochondria dynamics and function during nutritional transition. Chronic disruption of MAM may participate in hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Citrate and succinate uptake by potato mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, D.W.; Laties, G.G.

    1979-01-01

    Potato mitochondria, in the absence of respiration, have a very low capacity for uptake by exchange with endogenous anions, taking up only 2.4 nanomoles citrate and 2.0 nanomoles succinate per milligram protein. Maximum citrate uptake of over 17 nanomoles per milligram protein occurs in the presence of inorganic phosphate, a dicarboxylic acid, and an external energy source (NADH), conditions where net anion accumulation proceeds, mediated by the interlinking of the inorganic phosphate, dicarboxylate, and tricarboxylate carriers. Maximum succinate uptake in the absence of respiratory inhibitors requires only added inorganic phosphate. Compounds which inhibit respiration (antimycin), the exchange carriers (mersalyl and benzylmalonate), or the establishment of the membrane proton motive force (uncouplers) reduce substrate accumulation. A potent inhibitor of the citrate carrier in animal mitochondria, 1,2,3-benzenetricarboxylic acid, does not inhibit citrate uptake in potato mitochondria. Citrate uptake is reduced by concurrent ADP phosphorylation and this reduction is sensitive to oligomycin. The initiation of state 3 after a 3-minute substrate state results in a reduction of the steady-state of citrate uptake by approximately 50%. Accumulation of succinate initially is inhibited by increasing sucrose concentration in the reaction medium from 50 to 400 millimolar. Limited substrate uptake is one of the factors responsible for the often observed depressed initial state 3 respiration rates in many mitochondrial preparations. Since nonlimiting levels of substrate in the matrix cannot be attained by energy-independent exchange, a dependence on respiration for adequate uptake results. Substrate limitation therefore occurs in the matrix for the period of time needed for energy-dependent accumulation of nonlimiting levels

  6. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  8. Cellular characterization of human dermal fibroblasts, focus on mitochondria and maple syrup urine disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Guerra, Paula

    and functions are expressed in HDFs’ culture environment. Studies of molecular disease mechanisms often point to the involvement of mitochondria. Mitochondria are involved in the regulation of cell cycle and programmed cell death as well as cellular stress responses because they are the main producers...

  9. EST analysis on pig mitochondria reveal novel expression differences between developmental and adult tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Cirera, Susanna; Gilchrist, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mitochondria are involved in many basic functions in cells of vertebrates, and can be considered the power generator of the cell. Though the mitochondria have been extensively studied there appear to be only few expression studies of mitochondrial genes involving a large number...

  10. Mitochondria: Target organelles for estrogen action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Chmielewska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens belong to a group of sex hormones, which have been shown to act in multidirectional way. Estrogenic effects are mediated by two types of intracellular receptors: estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1 and estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2. There are two basic mechanisms of estrogen action: 1 classical-genomic, in which the ligand-receptor complex acts as a transcriptional factor and 2 a nongenomic one, which is still not fully understood, but has been seen to lead to distinct biological effects, depending on tissue and ligand type. It is postulated that nongenomic effects may be associated with membrane signaling and the presence of classical nuclear receptors within the cell membrane. Estrogens act in a multidirectional way also within cell organelles. It is assumed that there is a mechanism which manages the migration of ESR into the mitochondrial membrane, wherein the exogenous estrogen affect the morphology of mitochondria. Estrogen, through its receptor, can directly modulate mitochondrial gene expression. Moreover, by regulating the level of reactive oxygen species, estrogens affect the biology of mitochondria. The considerations presented in this paper indicate the pleiotropic effects of estrogens, which represent a multidirectional pathway of signal transduction.

  11. Amyloid-β triggers the release of neuronal hexokinase 1 from mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo M Saraiva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain accumulation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and oxidative stress underlie neuronal dysfunction and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Hexokinase (HK, a key glycolytic enzyme, plays important pro-survival roles, reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and preventing apoptosis in neurons and other cell types. Brain isozyme HKI is mainly associated with mitochondria and HK release from mitochondria causes a significant decrease in enzyme activity and triggers oxidative damage. We here investigated the relationship between Aβ-induced oxidative stress and HK activity. We found that Aβ triggered HKI detachment from mitochondria decreasing HKI activity in cortical neurons. Aβ oligomers further impair energy metabolism by decreasing neuronal ATP levels. Aβ-induced HKI cellular redistribution was accompanied by excessive ROS generation and neuronal death. 2-deoxyglucose blocked Aβ-induced oxidative stress and neuronal death. Results suggest that Aβ-induced cellular redistribution and inactivation of neuronal HKI play important roles in oxidative stress and neurodegeneration in AD.

  12. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. → Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. → Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. → Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  13. Preparation of human cardiac anti-myosin: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, H.; Souza, I.T.T.

    1990-01-01

    The present communication is a review of the physicochemical characterization and immunological properties of myosin isolated from the cardiac muscle, the production of monoclonal antibody anti-myosin, the radiolabeling of this antibody and its applications as radiopharmaceuticals to imaging myocardial infarcts. The classical example of radioimmunologic diagnosis of non malignant tissues is the detection of myocardial infarction by radiolabeled antibodies to myosin. (author)

  14. Right atrial tamponade complicating cardiac operation: clinical, hemodynamic, and scintigraphic correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, T.; Gray, R.; Chaux, A.; Lee, M.; De Robertis, M.; Berman, D.; Matloff, J.

    1982-01-01

    Persistent bleeding into the pericardial space in the early hours after cardiac operation not uncommonly results in cardiac tamponade. Single chamber tamponade also might be expected, since in this setting the pericardium frequently contains firm blood clots localized to the area of active bleeding. However, this complication has received very little attention in the surgical literature. We are therefore providing documentation that isolated right atrial tamponade can occur as a complication of cardiac operation and that there exists a potential for misdiagnosis and hence incorrect treatment of this condition. Right atrial tamponade may be recognized by a combination of low cardiac output, low blood pressure, prominent neck veins, right atrial pressure in excess of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and a poor response to plasma volume expansion. Findings on chest roentgenogram and gated wall motion scintigraphy may be highly suggestive. This review should serve to increase awareness of this complication and to provide some helpful diagnostic clues

  15. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  16. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-12-08

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. © 2016 Authors.

  17. Mitochondrial genetic background modulates bioenergetics and susceptibility to acute cardiac volume overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Zelickson, Blake R; Johnson, Larry W; Moellering, Douglas R; Westbrook, David G; Pompilius, Melissa; Sammy, Melissa J; Johnson, Michelle; Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J; Cao, Xuemei; Bradley, Wayne E; Zhang, Jinju; Wei, Chih-Chang; Chacko, Balu; Schurr, Theodore G; Kesterson, Robert A; Dell'italia, Louis J; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Welch, Danny R; Ballinger, Scott W

    2013-10-15

    Dysfunctional bioenergetics has emerged as a key feature in many chronic pathologies such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This has led to the mitochondrial paradigm in which it has been proposed that mtDNA sequence variation contributes to disease susceptibility. In the present study we show a novel animal model of mtDNA polymorphisms, the MNX (mitochondrial-nuclear exchange) mouse, in which the mtDNA from the C3H/HeN mouse has been inserted on to the C57/BL6 nuclear background and vice versa to test this concept. Our data show a major contribution of the C57/BL6 mtDNA to the susceptibility to the pathological stress of cardiac volume overload which is independent of the nuclear background. Mitochondria harbouring the C57/BL6J mtDNA generate more ROS (reactive oxygen species) and have a higher mitochondrial membrane potential relative to those with C3H/HeN mtDNA, independent of nuclear background. We propose this is the primary mechanism associated with increased bioenergetic dysfunction in response to volume overload. In summary, these studies support the 'mitochondrial paradigm' for the development of disease susceptibility, and show that the mtDNA modulates cellular bioenergetics, mitochondrial ROS generation and susceptibility to cardiac stress.

  18. Translocation of iron from lysosomes to mitochondria during acetaminophen-induced hepatocellular injury: Protection by starch-desferal and minocycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangting; Kholmukhamedov, Andaleb; Lindsey, Christopher C; Beeson, Craig C; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Lemasters, John J

    2016-08-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes hepatotoxicity involving mitochondrial dysfunction and the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Iron is a critical catalyst for ROS formation, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Previous studies show that APAP disrupts lysosomes, which release ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) into the cytosol to trigger the MPT and cell killing. Here, our aim was to investigate whether iron released from lysosomes after APAP is then taken up into mitochondria via the mitochondrial electrogenic Ca(2+), Fe(2+) uniporter (MCFU) to cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Hepatocytes were isolated from fasted male C57BL/6 mice. Necrotic cell killing was assessed by propidium iodide fluorimetry. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) was visualized by confocal microscopy of rhodamine 123 (Rh123) and tetramethylrhodamine methylester (TMRM). Chelatable Fe(2+) was monitored by quenching of calcein (cytosol) and mitoferrofluor (MFF, mitochondria). ROS generation was monitored by confocal microscopy of MitoSox Red and plate reader fluorimetry of chloromethyldihydrodichlorofluorescein diacetate (cmH2DCF-DA). Administered 1h before APAP (10mM), the lysosomally targeted iron chelator, starch-desferal (1mM), and the MCFU inhibitors, Ru360 (100nM) and minocycline (4µM), decreased cell killing from 83% to 41%, 57% and 53%, respectively, after 10h. Progressive quenching of calcein and MFF began after ~4h, signifying increased cytosolic and mitochondrial chelatable Fe(2+). Mitochondria then depolarized after ~10h. Dipyridyl, a membrane-permeable iron chelator, dequenched calcein and MFF fluorescence after APAP. Starch-desferal, but not Ru360 and minocycline, suppressed cytosolic calcein quenching, whereas starch-desferal, Ru360 and minocycline all suppressed mitochondrial MFF quenching and mitochondrial depolarization. Starch-desferal, Ru360 and minocycline also each decreased ROS formation. Moreover

  19. Far red/near infrared light-induced protection against cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury remains intact under diabetic conditions and is independent of nitric oxide synthase

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    Agnes eKeszler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Far red/near-infrared light (NIR promotes a wide range of biological effects including tissue protection but whether and how NIR is capable of acutely protecting myocardium against ischemia and reperfusion injury in vivo is not fully elucidated. Our previous work indicates that NIR exposure immediately before and during early reperfusion protects the myocardium against infarction through mechanisms that are nitric oxide (NO-dependent. Here we tested the hypothesis that NIR elicits protection in a diabetic mouse model where other cardioprotective interventions such as pre- and postconditioning fail, and that the protection is independent of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. NIR reduced infarct size dose dependently. Importantly, NIR-induced protection was preserved in a diabetic mouse model (db/db and during acute hyperglycemia, as well as in endothelial NOS-/- mice and in wild type mice treated with NOS inhibitor L-NAME. In in vitro experiments NIR light liberates NO from nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO and nitrosyl myoglobin (MbNO in a wavelength (660-830 nm and dose-dependent manner. Irradiation at 660 nm yields the highest release of NO, while at longer wavelengths a dramatic decrease of NO release can be observed. Similar wavelength dependence was observed for the protection of mice against cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury in vivo. NIR-induced NO release from deoxymyoglobin in the presence of nitrite mildly inhibits respiration of isolated mitochondria after hypoxia. In summary, NIR applied during reperfusion protects the myocardium against infarction in an NO dependent, but NOS-independent mechanisms, whereby mitochondria may be a target of NO released by NIR, leading to reduced reactive oxygen species generation during reperfusion. This unique mechanism preserves protection even during diabetes where other protective strategies fail.

  20. Characterization of DNA-binding proteins from pea mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzack, F.A.; Dombrowski, S.; Brennicke, A.

    1998-01-01

    We studied transcription initiation in the mitochondria of higher plants, with particular respect to promoter structures. Conserved elements of these promoters have been successfully identified by in vitro transcription systems in different species, whereas the involved protein components are still...

  1. Halogenated anaesthetics and cardiac protection in cardiac and non-cardiac anaesthesia

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    Landoni Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile anaesthetic agents have direct protective properties against ischemic myocardial damage. The implementation of these properties during clinical anaesthesia can provide an additional tool in the treatment or prevention, or both, of ischemic cardiac dysfunction in the perioperative period. A recent meta-analysis showed that desflurane and sevoflurane reduce postoperative mortality and incidence of myocardial infarction following cardiac surgery, with significant advantages in terms of postoperative cardiac troponin release, need for inotrope support, time on mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit and overall hospital stay. Multicentre, randomised clinical trials had previously demonstrated that the use of desflurane can reduce the postoperative release of cardiac troponin I, the need for inotropic support, and the number of patients requiring prolonged hospitalisation following coronary artery bypass graft surgery either with and without cardiopulmonary bypass. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines recommend volatile anaesthetic agents during non-cardiac surgery for the maintenance of general anaesthesia in patients at risk for myocardial infarction. Nonetheless, e vidence in non-coronary surgical settings is contradictory and will be reviewed in this paper together with the mechanisms of cardiac protection by volatile agents.

  2. Capillary electrophoretic analysis reveals subcellular binding between individual mitochondria and cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostal, Vratislav; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between the cytoskeleton and mitochondria are essential for normal cellular function. An assessment of such interactions is commonly based on bulk analysis of mitochondrial and cytoskeletal markers present in a given sample, which assumes complete binding between these two organelle types. Such measurements are biased because they rarely account for non-bound ‘free’ subcellular species. Here we report on the use of capillary electrophoresis with dual laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) to identify, classify, count and quantify properties of individual binding events of mitochondria and cytoskeleton. Mitochondria were fluorescently labeled with DsRed2 while F-actin, a major cytoskeletal component, was fluorescently labeled with Alexa488-phalloidin. In a typical subcellular fraction of L6 myoblasts, 79% of mitochondrial events did not have detectable levels of F-actin, while the rest had on average ~2 zeptomole F-actin, which theoretically represents a ~ 2.5-μm long network of actin filaments per event. Trypsin treatment of L6 subcellular fractions prior to analysis decreased the fraction of mitochondrial events with detectable levels of F-actin, which is expected from digestion of cytoskeletal proteins on the surface of mitochondria. The electrophoretic mobility distributions of the individual events were also used to further distinguish between cytoskeleton-bound from cytoskeleton-free mitochondrial events. The CE-LIF approach described here could be further developed to explore cytoskeleton interactions with other subcellular structures, the effects of cytoskeleton destabilizing drugs, and the progression of viral infections. PMID:21309532

  3. Biochemical and Ultrastructural Cardiac Changes Induced by High-Fat Diet in Female and Male Prepubertal Rabbits

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    Dina Sibouakaz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Early weight gain induced by high-fat diet has been identified as a predictor for cardiac disease, one of the most serious public health problems. Our goal is to study the influence of a HFD on biochemical, oxidant stress parameters, and the cardiac ultrastructure in both male and female prepubertal models. Experiments were carried on 24 prepubertal New Zealand white rabbits, randomly assigned to male and female control (MC and FC, resp. or HFD (MHFD and FHFD, resp. groups (n=6 for 3 months. Body and heart weights and some biochemical and oxidative stress parameters such as lipids, calcium, CKMB, MDA, uric acid, ascorbic acid, and AOA are evaluated in plasma and the left ventricle. Under HFD effect, plasma parameters, such as lipids (TL, PL, and LDL-C, MDA, and CK-MB, increase more significantly in male than in female groups, when AA decreases. Some cardiac parameters such as TG and UA increase, when AA and AOA decrease; these variations are more significant in FHFD. In both male and female rabbits, HFD caused changes in heart ultrastructure, junctional complexes, mitochondria size and form, and so on. Early HFD feeding induced overweight, oxidative stress, and metabolic alterations in plasma and the heart of prepubertal rabbits, whereas lipotoxicity has especially a negative impact on male plasma but affects more the female heart ultrastructure.

  4. Raman probing of lipids, proteins, and mitochondria in skeletal myocytes: a case study on obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda A.; Nikelshparg, Evelina I.; Prats, Clara

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to assess simultaneously lipid composition in lipid droplets, the redox state of cytochromes, and the relative amount of [Fe–S] clusters in the electron transport chain in the mitochondria of skeletal myocytes by means of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Mitochondria...... technique allows to estimate qualitatively the relative amount of cholesterol and unsaturated lipids, ordering of lipid phase in lipid droplets, changes in the redox state of c-type and b-type cytochromes, and the relative amount of [Fe–S] clusters in the mitochondria of intact myocytes. The proposed...

  5. Total excitation of the isolated human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durrer, D.; Dam, R.Th. van; Freud, G.E.; Janse, M.J.; Meijler, F.L.; Arzbaecher, R.C.

    To obtain information conceming the time course and instantaneous distribution of the excitatory process of the normal human healt, studies were made on isolated human hearts from seven individuals who died from various cerebral conditions, but who had no history of cardiac disease. Measurements

  6. Isolated transient aphasia at emergency presentation is associated with a high rate of cardioembolic embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Jason K; Perry, Jeffrey J; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Stotts, Grant; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Worster, Andrew; Emond, Marcel; Sutherland, Jane; Stiell, Ian G; Sharma, Mukul

    2015-11-01

    A cardiac source is often implicated in strokes where the deficit includes aphasia. However, less is known about the etiology of isolated aphasia during transient ischemic attack (TIA). Our objective was to determine whether patients with isolated aphasia are likely to have a cardioembolic etiology for their TIA. We prospectively studied a cohort of TIA patients in eight tertiary-care emergency departments. Patients with isolated aphasia were identified by the treating physician at the time of emergency department presentation. Patients with dysarthria (i.e., a phonation disturbance) were not included. Potential cardiac sources for embolism were defined as atrial fibrillation on history, electrocardiogram, Holter monitor, atrial fibrillation on echocardiography, or thrombus on echocardiography. Of the 2,360 TIA patients identified, 1,155 had neurological deficits at the time of the emergency physician assessment and were included in this analysis, and 41 had isolated aphasia as their only neurological deficit. Patients with isolated aphasia were older (73.9±10.0 v. 67.2±14.5 years; p=0.003), more likely to have a history of heart failure (9.8% v. 2.6%; p=0.027), and were twice as likely to have any cardiac source of embolism (22.0% v. 10.6%; p=0.037). Isolated aphasia is associated with a high rate of cardioembolic sources of embolism after TIA. Emergency patients with isolated aphasia diagnosed with a TIA warrant a rapid and thorough assessment for a cardioembolic source.

  7. Successful linking of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database to social security data to examine survival after cardiac operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Edwards, Fred H; Shahian, David M; Prager, Richard L; Wright, Cameron D; Puskas, John D; Morales, David L S; Gammie, James S; Sanchez, Juan A; Haan, Constance K; Badhwar, Vinay; George, Kristopher M; O'Brien, Sean M; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Sheng, Shubin; Peterson, Eric D; Shewan, Cynthia M; Feehan, Kelly M; Han, Jane M; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Williams, William G; Mayer, John E; Chitwood, W Randolph; Murray, Gordon F; Grover, Frederick L

    2011-07-01

    Long-term evaluation of cardiothoracic surgical outcomes is a major goal of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). Linking the STS Database to the Social Security Death Master File (SSDMF) allows for the verification of "life status." This study demonstrates the feasibility of linking the STS Database to the SSDMF and examines longitudinal survival after cardiac operations. For all operations in the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database performed in 2008 in patients with an available Social Security Number, the SSDMF was searched for a matching Social Security Number. Survival probabilities at 30 days and 1 year were estimated for nine common operations. A Social Security Number was available for 101,188 patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting, 12,336 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement, and 6,085 patients undergoing isolated mitral valve operations. One-year survival for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting was 88.9% (6,529 of 7,344) with all vein grafts, 95.2% (84,696 of 88,966) with a single mammary artery graft, 97.4% (4,422 of 4,540) with bilateral mammary artery grafts, and 95.6% (7,543 of 7,890) with all arterial grafts. One-year survival was 92.4% (11,398 of 12,336) for isolated aortic valve replacement (95.6% [2,109 of 2,206] with mechanical prosthesis and 91.7% [9,289 of 10,130] with biologic prosthesis), 86.5% (2,312 of 2,674) for isolated mitral valve replacement (91.7% [923 of 1,006] with mechanical prosthesis and 83.3% [1,389 of 1,668] with biologic prosthesis), and 96.0% (3,275 of 3,411) for isolated mitral valve repair. Successful linkage to the SSDMF has substantially increased the power of the STS Database. These longitudinal survival data from this large multi-institutional study provide reassurance about the durability and long-term benefits of cardiac operations and constitute a contemporary benchmark for survival after cardiac operations. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by

  8. Preserved cardiac function despite marked impairment of cAMP generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Hua Gao

    Full Text Available So many clinical trials of positive inotropes have failed, that it is now axiomatic that agents that increase cAMP are deleterious to the failing heart. An alternative strategy is to alter myocardial Ca(2+ handling or myofilament response to Ca(2+ using agents that do not affect cAMP. Although left ventricular (LV function is tightly linked to adenylyl cyclase (AC activity, the beneficial effects of AC may be independent of cAMP and instead stem from effects on Ca(2+ handling. Here we ask whether an AC mutant molecule that reduces LV cAMP production would have favorable effects on LV function through its effects on Ca(2+ handling alone.We generated transgenic mice with cardiac-directed expression of an AC6 mutant (AC6mut. Cardiac myocytes showed impaired cAMP production in response to isoproterenol (74% reduction; p<0.001, but LV size and function were normal. Isolated hearts showed preserved LV function in response to isoproterenol stimulation. AC6mut expression was associated with increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ uptake and the EC50 for SERCA2a activation was reduced. Cardiac myocytes isolated from AC6mut mice showed increased amplitude of Ca(2+ transients in response to isoproterenol (p = 0.0001. AC6mut expression also was associated with increased expression of LV S100A1 (p = 0.03 and reduced expression of phospholamban protein (p = 0.01.LV AC mutant expression is associated with normal cardiac function despite impaired cAMP generation. The mechanism appears to be through effects on Ca(2+ handling - effects that occur despite diminished cAMP.

  9. Oroxylin A, but Not Vasopressin, Ameliorates Cardiac Dysfunction of Endotoxemic Rats

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    Chin-Hung Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mortality in septic patients with myocardial dysfunction is higher than those without it. Beneficial effects of flavonoid oroxylin A (Oro-A on endotoxemic hearts were evaluated and compared with that of arginine vasopressin (AVP which is used to reverse hypotension in septic patients. Endotoxemia in rats was induced by one-injection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS, 10 mg/kg, i.p., and hearts were isolated 5-hrs or 16-hrs later. Isolated hearts with constant-pressure or constant-flow mode were examined by Langendorff technique. Rate and force of contractions of isolated atrial and ventricular strips were examined by tissue myography. Isolated endotoxemic hearts were characterized by decreased or increased coronary flow (CF in LPS-treated-for-5hr and LPS-treated-for-16-hr groups, respectively, with decreased inotropy in both groups. Oro-A-perfusion ameliorated while AVP-perfusion worsened the decreased CF and inotropy in both preparations. Oro-A and AVP, however, did not affect diminished force or rate of contraction of atrial and ventricular strips of endotoxemic hearts. Oro-A-induced CF increase was not affected following coronary endothelium-denudation with saponin. These results suggest that Oro-A ameliorates LPS-depressed cardiac functions by increasing CF, leading to positive inotropy. In contrast, AVP aggravates cardiac dysfunction by decreasing CF. Oro-A is a potentially useful candidate for treating endotoxemia complicated with myocardial dysfunction.

  10. Effect of myocardial perfusion and metabolic interventions on cardiac kinetics of phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) I 123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reske, S.N.; Schoen, S.; Schmitt, W.; Knopp, R.; Winkler, C.; Machulla, H.J.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of regional myocardial perfusion and flow-independent adrenergic stimulation, as well as lactate-mediated inhibition of cardiac lipolysis, on cardiac IPPA uptake and metabolism was examined in canine hearts (flow studies) and in the isolated perfused Langendorff rat heart (metabolic interventions). In both normal and ischaemic myocardium, local perfusion is a major determinant of cardiac IPPA uptake. In pacing-induced hyperaemia, the strict flow-dependence of cardiac IPPA uptake is not preserved. Adrenergic stimulation raises the rate of oxidation of both palmitic acid /sup 14/C and IPPA. This change is reflected by increased metabolite production released into the perfusate and radioactivity clearance recorded externally. Lactate in high concentrations exerts the opposite effect on cardiac free fatty acid oxidation. IPPA is stored in this condition preferentially in tissue phospholipids and triglycerides.

  11. Effect of myocardial perfusion and metabolic interventions on cardiac kinetics of phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) I 123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reske, S.N.; Schoen, S.; Schmitt, W.; Knopp, R.; Winkler, C.; Machulla, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of regional myocardial perfusion and flow-independent adrenergic stimulation, as well as lactate-mediated inhibition of cardiac lipolysis, on cardiac IPPA uptake and metabolism was examined in canine hearts (flow studies) and in the isolated perfused Langendorff rat heart (metabolic interventions). In both normal and ischaemic myocardium, local perfusion is a major determinant of cardiac IPPA uptake. In pacing-induced hyperaemia, the strict flow-dependence of cardiac IPPA uptake is not preserved. Adrenergic stimulation raises the rate of oxidation of both palmitic acid 14 C and IPPA. This change is reflected by increased metabolite production released into the perfusate and radioactivity clearance recorded externally. Lactate in high concentrations exerts the opposite effect on cardiac free fatty acid oxidation. IPPA is stored in this condition preferentially in tissue phospholipids and triglycerides. (orig.)

  12. Mitochondria as a Possible Place for Initial Stages of Steroid Biosynthesis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena K. Shematorova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of thorough comparison of steroidogenic systems of plants and animals, transgenic plants of Solanaceae family expressing CYP11A1 cDNA encoding cytochrome P450SCC of mammalian mitochondria were further analysed. Positive effect of CYP11A1 on resistance of the transgenic tobacco plants to the infection by fungal phytopathogene Botrytis cinerea was for the first time detected. Subtle changes in mitochondria of the transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants expressing mammalian CYP11A1 cDNA were demonstrated by transmissive electron microscopy. The main components of the electron transfer chain of plant mitochondria were for the first time cloned and characterized. It was established that plants from the Solanacea family (tomato, tobacco and potato contain two different genes with similar exon-intron structures (all contain 8 exons encoding mitochondrial type ferredoxins (MFDX, and one gene for mitochondrial ferredoxin reductase (MFDXR. The results obtained point out on profound relatedness of electron transfer chains of P450-dependent monooxygenases in mammalian and plant mitochondria and support our previous findings about functional compatability of steroidogenic systems of Plantae and Animalia.

  13. Quantitative control of mitochondria transfer between live single cells using a microfluidic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Wada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative control of mitochondria transfer between live cells is a promising approach for genetic manipulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA because single mitochondrion transfer to a mtDNA-less (ρ0 cell potentially leads to homoplasmy of mtDNA. In this paper, we describe a method for quantitative control of mitochondria transfer between live single cells. For this purpose, we fabricated novel microfluidic devices having cell paring structures with a 4.1, 5.6 or 10.0 μm-length microtunnel. When cells were fused through a microtunnel using the Sendai virus envelope-based method, a strictured cytoplasmic connection was achieved with a length corresponding to that of the microtunnel. Elongation of the cytoplasmic connection led to a decrease in mitochondria transfer to the fusion partner. Moreover, some cell pairs that fused through a 10.0 μm-length microtunnel showed single mitochondrion transfer. Fused cells were spontaneously disconnected from each other when they were recovered in a normal culture medium. These results suggest that our cell fusion method can perform quantitative control of mitochondria transfer that includes a single mitochondrion transfer.

  14. Rab9-dependent autophagy is required for the IGF-IIR triggering mitophagy to eliminate damaged mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Chiang, Shu-Fen; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Jing-Ying; Lin, Ding-Yu; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2018-03-25

    Mitochondria dysfunction is the major characteristic of mitophagy, which is essential in mitochondrial quality control. However, excessive mitophagy contributes to cell death in a number of diseases, including ischemic stroke and hepatotoxicity. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and its receptor (IGF-IIR) play vital roles in the development of heart failure during hypertension. We found that IGF-II triggers IGF-IIR receptor activation, causing mitochondria dysfunction, resulting in mitophagy, and cardiomyocyte cell death. These results indicated that IGF-IIR activation triggers mitochondria fragmentation, leading to autophagosome formation, and loss of mitochondria content. These results are associated with Parkin-dependent mitophagy. Additionally, autophagic proteins Atg5, and Atg7 deficiency did not suppress IGF-IIR-induced mitophagy. However, Rab9 knockdown reduced mitophagy and maintained mitochondrial function. These constitutive mitophagies through IGF-IIR activation trigger mitochondria loss and mitochondrial ROS accumulation for cardiomyocyte viability decrease. Together, our results indicate that IGF-IIR predominantly induces mitophagy through the Rab9-dependent alternative autophagy. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Hypoxic-induced stress protein expression in rat cardiac myocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, G.; Geoghegan, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Mammalian stress proteins can be induced in cells and tissues exposed to a variety of conditions including hyperthermia and diminished O 2 supply. The authors have previously shown that the expression of three stress proteins (71, 85, and 95 kDa) was induced in cardiac tissue from mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. The expression of mRNAs coding for the 85 and 95 kDa proteins increase with time of exposure to hypoxia, while the mRNA coding for the 71 kDa protein is transiently induced. The authors extended these studies to investigate the expression of stress proteins in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Freshly prepared myocytes were exposed to control, hypoxic, anoxic, or heat-shock environments for up to 16 h. The proteins were then labeled for 6 hours with [ 35 S]methionine. Analysis of the solubilized proteins by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography showed that there was a 6-fold increase in synthesis of the 85 kDa protein upon exposure to hypoxia but not heat-shock conditions. The 71 kDa protein was present at high levels in both control and treated myocyte protein preparations, and presumably had been induced during the isolation procedure. Total RNA isolated from intact rat heart and isolated myocytes was compared by cell-free translation analysis and showed induction of RNAs coding for several stress proteins in the myocyte preparation. The induced proteins at 85 and 95 kDa have molecular weights similar to reported cell stress and/or glucose-regulated proteins

  16. Monoamine oxidase-dependent endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria dysfunction and mast cell degranulation lead to adverse cardiac remodeling in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshwal, Soni; Forkink, Marleen; Hu, Chou-Hui; Buonincontri, Guido; Antonucci, Salvatore; Di Sante, Moises; Murphy, Michael P; Paolocci, Nazareno; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Krieg, Thomas; Di Lisa, Fabio; Kaludercic, Nina

    2018-02-19

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors ameliorate contractile function in diabetic animals, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Equally elusive is the interplay between the cardiomyocyte alterations induced by hyperglycemia and the accompanying inflammation. Here we show that exposure of primary cardiomyocytes to high glucose and pro-inflammatory stimuli leads to MAO-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species that causes permeability transition pore opening and mitochondrial dysfunction. These events occur upstream of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and are abolished by the MAO inhibitor pargyline, highlighting the role of these flavoenzymes in the ER/mitochondria cross-talk. In vivo, streptozotocin administration to mice induced oxidative changes and ER stress in the heart, events that were abolished by pargyline. Moreover, MAO inhibition prevented both mast cell degranulation and altered collagen deposition, thereby normalizing diastolic function. Taken together, these results elucidate the mechanisms underlying MAO-induced damage in diabetic cardiomyopathy and provide novel evidence for the role of MAOs in inflammation and inter-organelle communication. MAO inhibitors may be considered as a therapeutic option for diabetic complications as well as for other disorders in which mast cell degranulation is a dominant phenomenon.

  17. Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study

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    Fatima Dumas Cintra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective: To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of São Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA® S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart® system. Results: A total of 767 participants (461 men with a mean age of 42.00 ± 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001. After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion: Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample.

  18. The Rice Mitochondria Proteome and its Response During Development and to the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobai eHuang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is both a major crop species and the key model grass for molecular and physiological research. Mitochondria are important in rice, as in all crops, as the main source of ATP for cell maintenance and growth. However, the practical significance of understanding the function of mitochondria in rice is increased by the widespread farming practice of using hybrids to boost rice production. This relies on cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS lines with abortive pollen caused by dysfunctional mitochondria. We provide an overview of what is known about the mitochondrial proteome of rice seedlings. To date, more than 320 proteins have been identified in purified rice mitochondria using mass spectrometry. The insights from this work include a broad understanding of the major subunits of mitochondrial respiratory complexes and TCA cycle enzymes, carbon and nitrogen metabolism enzymes as well as details of the supporting machinery for biogenesis and the subset of stress-responsive mitochondrial proteins. Many proteins with unknown functions have also been found in rice mitochondria. Proteomic analysis has also revealed the features of rice mitochondrial protein presequences required for mitochondrial targeting, as well as cleavage site features for processing of precursors after import. Changes in the abundance of rice mitochondrial proteins in response to different stresses, especially anoxia and light, are summarized. Future research on quantitative analysis of the rice mitochondrial proteomes at the spatial and developmental level, its response to environmental stresses and recent advances in understanding of basis of rice CMS systems are highlighted.

  19. The energy blockers 3-bromopyruvate and lonidamine: effects on bioenergetics of brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchioni, Lara; Davidescu, Magdalena; Roberti, Rita; Corazzi, Lanfranco

    2014-10-01

    Tumor cells favor abnormal energy production via aerobic glycolysis and show resistance to apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction. The differences between normal and cancer cells in their energy metabolism provide a biochemical basis for developing new therapeutic strategies. The energy blocker 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) can eradicate liver cancer in animals without associated toxicity, and is a potent anticancer towards glioblastoma cells. Since mitochondria are 3BP targets, in this work the effects of 3BP on the bioenergetics of normal rat brain mitochondria were investigated in vitro, in comparison with the anticancer agent lonidamine (LND). Whereas LND impaired oxygen consumption dependent on any complex of the respiratory chain, 3BP was inhibitory to malate/pyruvate and succinate (Complexes I and II), but preserved respiration from glycerol-3-phosphate and ascorbate (Complex IV). Accordingly, although electron flow along the respiratory chain and ATP levels were decreased by 3BP in malate/pyruvate- and succinate-fed mitochondria, they were not significantly influenced from glycerol-3-phosphate- or ascorbate-fed mitochondria. LND produced a decrease in electron flow from all substrates tested. No ROS were produced from any substrate, with the exception of 3BP-induced H(2)O(2) release from succinate, which suggests an antimycin-like action of 3BP as an inhibitor of Complex III. We can conclude that 3BP does not abolish completely respiration and ATP synthesis in brain mitochondria, and has a limited effect on ROS production, confirming that this drug may have limited harmful effects on normal cells.

  20. Hypoxia-induced decrease of UCP3 gene expression in rat heart parallels metabolic gene switching but fails to affect mitochondrial respiratory coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essop, M Faadiel; Razeghi, Peter; McLeod, Chris; Young, Martin E; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Sack, Michael N

    2004-02-06

    Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins 2 and 3 (UCP2 and UCP3) are postulated to contribute to antioxidant defense, nutrient partitioning, and energy efficiency in the heart. To distinguish isotype function in response to metabolic stress we measured cardiac mitochondrial function and cardiac UCP gene expression following chronic hypobaric hypoxia. Isolated mitochondrial O(2) consumption and ATP synthesis rate were reduced but respiratory coupling was unchanged compared to normoxic groups. Concurrently, left ventricular UCP3 mRNA levels were significantly decreased with hypoxia (pheart as opposed to uncoupling of mitochondria. Moreover, the divergent hypoxia-induced regulation of UCP2 and UCP3 supports distinct mitochondrial regulatory functions of these inner mitochondrial membrane proteins in the heart in response to metabolic stress.

  1. Respiration and phosphorylation in liver and kidney mitochondria of rats exposed to high-energy gamma and beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhoreva, S I; Vetlugina, N S

    1973-01-01

    The effect of whole-body irradiation with ..gamma.. rays (radiation source /sup 60/Co) at 40 rad and ..beta.. rays (source, a linear accelerator, electron energy 25 MeV) at 43 rad on oxidative phosphorylation in liver and kidney mitochondria was studied in rats. Gamma radiation gradually slowed the esterification of phosphate and respiratory rate during the oxidation of succinate in the liver and kidney mitochondria. The decrease was largest on day 15 after irradiation. However, the P/O ratio did not decrease by more than 10 to 12 percent. Despite the oxidation of glutamate in the mitochondria, respiration, phosphate consumption, and P/O ratio scarcely changed. Irradiation with electrons slowed the rate of oxidation of succinate and glutamate in liver mitochondria within 3 to 7 days. Phosphate consumption decreased at the same time so that the P/O ratio remained unchanged. Beta irradiation had virtually no effect on liver mitochondria. There is a discussion of the mechanism of action of high-energy radiation on the phosphorylation system of the mitochondria.

  2. Empagliflozin Prevents Worsening of Cardiac Function in an Experimental Model of Pressure Overload-Induced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikole J. Byrne, BSc

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine whether the sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin improved heart failure (HF outcomes in nondiabetic mice. The EMPA-REG OUTCOME (Empagliflozin, Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients trial demonstrated that empagliflozin markedly prevented HF and cardiovascular death in subjects with diabetes. However, despite ongoing clinical trials in HF patients without type 2 diabetes, there are no objective and translational data to support an effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on cardiac structure and function, particularly in the absence of diabetes and in the setting of established HF. Male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to either sham or transverse aortic constriction surgery to induce HF. Following surgery, mice that progressed to HF received either vehicle or empagliflozin for 2 weeks. Cardiac function was then assessed in vivo using echocardiography and ex vivo using isolated working hearts. Although vehicle-treated HF mice experienced a progressive worsening of cardiac function over the 2-week treatment period, this decline was blunted in empagliflozin-treated HF mice. Treatment allocation to empagliflozin resulted in an improvement in cardiac systolic function, with no significant changes in cardiac remodeling or diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, isolated hearts from HF mice treated with empagliflozin displayed significantly improved ex vivo cardiac function compared to those in vehicle-treated controls. Empagliflozin treatment of nondiabetic mice with established HF blunts the decline in cardiac function both in vivo and ex vivo, independent of diabetes. These data provide important basic and translational clues to support the evaluation of SGLT2 inhibitors as a treatment strategy in a broad range of patients with established HF.

  3. Subcellular localization-dependent decrements in skeletal muscle glycogen and mitochondria content following short-term disuse in young and old men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Suetta, Charlotte; Hvid, Lars G

    2010-01-01

    of disuse and aging on human skeletal muscle glycogen and mitochondria content in subsarcolemmal (SS), intermyofibrillar (IMF), and intramyofibrillar (intra) localizations. Five young (∼23 yr) and five old (∼66 yr) recreationally active men had their quadriceps muscle immobilized for 2 wk by whole leg...... unchanged. A localization-dependent decrease (P = 0.03) in mitochondria content following immobilization was found in both age groups, where SS mitochondria decreased by 33% (P = 0.02), superficial IMF mitochondria decreased by 20% (P = 0.05), and central IMF mitochondria remained unchanged. In conclusion......Previous studies have shown that skeletal muscle glycogen and mitochondria are distributed in distinct subcellular localizations, but the role and regulation of these subcellular localizations are unclear. In the present study, we used transmission electron microscopy to investigate the effect...

  4. Aprataxin localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-01-01

    aborted ligation reactions. We report herein that aprataxin localizes to mitochondria in human cells and we identify an N-terminal amino acid sequence that targets certain isoforms of the protein to this intracellular compartment. We also show that transcripts encoding this unique N-terminal stretch...

  5. Long-term inhibition of cyclophilin D results in intracellular translocation of calcein AM from mitochondria to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohe, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Asuka; Gotoh, Marina; Tanaka, Kotaro; Ohta, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Cyclophilin D is a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase localized in the mitochondrial matrix. Although its effects on mitochondrial characteristics have been well studied, its relation to the uptake of molecules by mitochondria remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated the effects of cyclophilin D on the intracellular translocation of calcein AM. Following addition of calcein AM to control cells or cells overexpressing wild-type cyclophilin D, calcein fluorescence was observed in mitochondria. However, long-term inhibition of cyclophilin D in these cells altered the localization of calcein fluorescence from mitochondria to lysosomes without changing mitochondrial esterase activity. In addition, depletion of glucose from the medium recovered calcein localization from lysosomes to mitochondria. This is the first demonstration of the effects of cyclophilin D on the intracellular translocation of molecules other than proteins and suggests that cyclophilin D may modify mitochondrial features by inducing the translocation of molecules to the mitochondria through the mechanism associated with cellular energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  7. Transient Features in Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Differentially Modulate Mitochondria and Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen J.; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Sain, Nova M.; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Xiao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0–80 kV/cm) and short (15 ns) or long (150 ns) rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm). Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. PMID:23284682

  8. A mitochondria-targeted mass spectrometry probe to detect glyoxals: implications for diabetes☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Logan, Angela; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Chacko, Balu; Johnson, Michelle S.; Huang, Guang W.; Rogatti, Sebastian; Prime, Tracy A.; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Fearnley, Ian M.; Larsen, Lesley; Larsen, David S.; Menger, Katja E.; Collins, Yvonne; James, Andrew M.; Kumar, G.D. Kishore; Hartley, Richard C.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The glycation of protein and nucleic acids that occurs as a consequence of hyperglycemia disrupts cell function and contributes to many pathologies, including those associated with diabetes and aging. Intracellular glycation occurs after the generation of the reactive 1,2-dicarbonyls methylglyoxal and glyoxal, and disruption of mitochondrial function is associated with hyperglycemia. However, the contribution of these reactive dicarbonyls to mitochondrial damage in pathology is unclear owing to uncertainties about their levels within mitochondria in cells and in vivo. To address this we have developed a mitochondria-targeted reagent (MitoG) designed to assess the levels of mitochondrial dicarbonyls within cells. MitoG comprises a lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cationic function, which directs the molecules to mitochondria within cells, and an o-phenylenediamine moiety that reacts with dicarbonyls to give distinctive and stable products. The extent of accumulation of these diagnostic heterocyclic products can be readily and sensitively quantified by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, enabling changes to be determined. Using the MitoG-based analysis we assessed the formation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in response to hyperglycemia in cells in culture and in the Akita mouse model of diabetes in vivo. These findings indicated that the levels of methylglyoxal and glyoxal within mitochondria increase during hyperglycemia both in cells and in vivo, suggesting that they can contribute to the pathological mitochondrial dysfunction that occurs in diabetes and aging. PMID:24316194

  9. Mitochondria are critical for BDNF-mediated Synaptic and Vascular plasticity of Hippocampus following Repeated Electroconvulsive Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Ardalan, Maryam; Elfving, Betina

    2018-01-01

    for the clinical efficacy obtained from a rapid antidepressant response. Here, we investigated the relationship between, synaptic changes and concomitant non-neuronal changes in microvasculature and mitochondria, and it relationship to Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level changes after repeated...... of synapses and mitochondria, and the length of microvessels in the hippocampus. The BDNF protein levels were quantified with immunohistochemistry. Results: In untreated controls, a lower number of synapses and mitochondria were accompanied by shorter microvessels of the hippocampus in "depressive" phenotype...... (FSL) compared to the "non-depressed" phenotype (FRL). ECS administration significantly increased the number of synapses and mitochondria, and length of microvessels both in FSL-ECS and FRL-ECS rats. In addition, the amount of BDNF protein was significantly increased in FSL and FRL rats after ECS...

  10. Overexpression of Sarcoendoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase 2a Promotes Cardiac Sympathetic Neurotransmission via Abnormal Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria Ca2+ Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Julia; Herring, Neil; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Kun; Li, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Reduced cardiomyocyte excitation–contraction coupling and downregulation of the SERCA2a (sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a) is associated with heart failure. This has led to viral transgene upregulation of SERCA2a in cardiomyocytes as a treatment. We hypothesized that SERCA2a gene therapy expressed under a similar promiscuous cytomegalovirus promoter could also affect the cardiac sympathetic neural axis and promote sympathoexcitation. Stellate neurons were isolated from 90 to 120 g male, Sprague–Dawley, Wistar Kyoto, and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Neurons were infected with Ad-mCherry or Ad-mCherry-hATP2Aa (SERCA2a). Intracellular Ca2+ changes were measured using fura-2AM in response to KCl, caffeine, thapsigargin, and carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazine to mobilize intracellular Ca2+ stores. The effect of SERCA2a on neurotransmitter release was measured using [3H]-norepinephrine overflow from 340 to 360 g Sprague–Dawley rat atria in response to right stellate ganglia stimulation. Upregulation of SERCA2a resulted in greater neurotransmitter release in response to stellate stimulation compared with control (empty: 98.7±20.5 cpm, n=7; SERCA: 186.5±28.41 cpm, n=8; Pneurons, SERCA2a overexpression facilitated greater depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients (empty: 0.64±0.03 au, n=57; SERCA: 0.75±0.03 au, n=68; Pneurons resulted in increased neurotransmission and increased Ca2+ loading into intracellular stores. Whether the increased Ca2+ transient and neurotransmission after SERCA2A overexpression contributes to enhanced sympathoexcitation in heart failure patients remains to be determined. PMID:28223472

  11. Mitochondria in biology and medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2012-01-01

    pathologies (Luft, 1994). Since 1959, the understanding of mitochondrial cytopathies has evolved immensely and mitochondrial cytopathies are now known to be the largest group of metabolic diseases and to be resulting in a wide variety of pathologies. "Mitochondria in Biology and Medicine" was the title...... of the first annual conference of Society of Mitochondrial Research and Medicine - India. The conference was organized by A. S. Sreedhar, Keshav Singh and Kumarasamy Thangaraj, and was held at The Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) Hyderabad, India, during 9-10 December 2011. The conference...

  12. [ATP-synthetase activity, respiration and cytochromes of rat heart mitochondria in aging and hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeshko, V V; Kaliman, P A; Belostotskaia, L I; Uchitel', A A

    1982-04-01

    The ATP-synthetase activity, the rate of oxygen uptake under different metabolic conditions, the tightness of coupling of respiration to oxidative phosphorylation and the cytochrome contents in heart mitochondria of rats from different age groups were studied under normal conditions and in hyperthyroidism. It was found that heart mitochondria of aged animals did not practically differ in terms of their functional activity from those of the young animals. Administration of thyroxin to the animals from all age groups produced no significant effects on the state of mitochondria, increasing the rate of ATP synthesis on alpha-glycerophosphate, which was especially well-pronounced in aged animals, and the cytochrome content in 1-month-old rats.

  13. Sca-1+ cardiosphere-derived cells are enriched for Isl1-expressing cardiac precursors and improve cardiac function after myocardial injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqin Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endogenous cardiac progenitor cells are a promising option for cell-therapy for myocardial infarction (MI. However, obtaining adequate numbers of cardiac progenitors after MI remains a challenge. Cardiospheres (CSs have been proposed to have cardiac regenerative properties; however, their cellular composition and how they may be influenced by the tissue milieu remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Using "middle aged" mice as CSs donors, we found that acute MI induced a dramatic increase in the number of CSs in a mouse model of MI, and this increase was attenuated back to baseline over time. We also observed that CSs from post-MI hearts engrafted in ischemic myocardium induced angiogenesis and restored cardiac function. To determine the role of Sca-1(+CD45(- cells within CSs, we cloned these from single cell isolates. Expression of Islet-1 (Isl1 in Sca-1(+CD45(- cells from CSs was 3-fold higher than in whole CSs. Cloned Sca-1(+CD45(- cells had the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in vitro. We also observed that cloned cells engrafted in ischemic myocardium induced angiogenesis, differentiated into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and improved cardiac function in post-MI hearts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies demonstrate that cloned Sca-1(+CD45(- cells derived from CSs from infarcted "middle aged" hearts are enriched for second heart field (i.e., Isl-1(+ precursors that give rise to both myocardial and vascular tissues, and may be an appropriate source of progenitor cells for autologous cell-therapy post-MI.

  14. Lyme carditis with isolated left bundle branch block and myocarditis successfully treated with oral doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Elyasi, Maekal; Singh, Prince; Jimada, Ismail

    2018-01-01

    Lyme disease may present with a variety of cardiac manifestations ranging from first degree to third degree heart block. Cardiac involvement with Lyme disease may be asymptomatic, or symptomatic. Atrioventrical conduction abnormalities are the most common manifestation of Lyme carditis. Less common, are alternating right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left bundle branch block (LBBB). We present an interesting case of a young male whose main manifestation of Lyme carditis was isolated LBBB. He also had mild Lyme myocarditis. The patient was successfully treated with oral doxycycline, and his isolated LBBB and myocarditis rapidly resolved.

  15. Protection by 6-aminonicotinamide against oxidative stress in cardiac cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Sigurdardottir, Kristin Sigridur; Treiman, Marek

    2006-01-01

    necrosis following global ischemia in an isolated rat heart, apparently by limiting the oxidative injury component. We therefore explored the antioxidative potential of 6AN in a model using H9C2(2-1) rat cardiac myoblasts exposed to H2O2 stress. Dependent on the specific protocol, 6AN pretreatment for 6...

  16. Membrane potential of mitochondria from the liver of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.; Kaminin, A.N.; Elfimova, I.A.; Akoev, I.G.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the membrane potential of rat liver mitochondria 1 hour after irradiation with 800 R dose showed a decrease of its value. The potential decreased against the background of the activation of the generating mechanisms (the electron transport chain and ATP-ases). During energization of the membranes by the electron transport chain similar effect has been observed with different oxidation substrates (NAD linked substrates and succinate). It suggests that similar causative factors are at the basis of the changes observed. It is quite possible that the increase in the rate of both mitochondria respiration and ATP hydrolysis after the irradiation of animals was a consequence of the radiation-induced decrease in the potential value. (author)

  17. Tissue specific structural variations of mitochondria of fish ectoparasite Argulus bengalensis Ramakrishna, 1951 (Crustacea: Branchiura: Functional implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Banerjee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the fine structure of some classical and six variant mitochondria from different tissues viz. proboscis gland, spinal gland, ovary, testis, and muscle of a fish ectoparasite, Argulus bengalensis. In the proboscis gland and spinal gland, mitochondria are protected within vesicle to preserve their structure and activity from exposure to glandular synthesis for its parasitic mode of feeding. In the oocytes, mitochondria are larger and cylindrical in appearance. Oocyte mitochondria are highly dynamic and exhibit frequent fission and fusion. Those are clustered in the cytoplasm of previtellogenic oocytes which prepare for different synthetic activities for successful reproductive investment. In contrast, mitochondrial abundance is less in the male gametic lineage. The spermatocytes and the nurse cells in the testis have an unusual type of mitochondria, nebenkern which is formed by the fusions of number of mitochondria. A completely different type of mitochondrion is discovered in the flagellum of the spermatozoa. It is provided with fifteen numbers of singlet microtubules at its outer periphery which is a salient feature of the flagellum of this Branchiuran genus. This unique mitochondrion uses the microtubule tract for its movement to distribute energy efficiently along the axoneme. Such mitochondrion and microtubular association provide evidence in favor of phylogenetic relationship between Argulus and pentastomid Raillietiella. In striated muscle of thoracic appendages, mitochondria maintain tight junctions with the endoplasmic reticulum and remain in close apposition of the myofibrils which helps in Ca2+ uptake for stimulating continuous muscular activity required for ventilation of respiratory structures of the parasites.

  18. Chronic stress and coping among cardiac surgeons: a single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Spiliopoulos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac surgeons stress may impair their quality of life and professional practice. Objective: To assess perceived chronic stress and coping strategies among cardiac surgeons. Methods: Twenty-two cardiac surgeons answered two self-assessment questionnaires, the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress and the German SGV for coping strategies. Results: Participants mean age was 40±14.1 years and 13 were male; eight were senior physicians and 14 were residents. Mean values for the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress were within the normal range. Unexperienced physicians had significantly higher levels of dissatisfaction at work, lack of social recognition, and isolation (P<0.05. Coping strategies such as play down, distraction from situation, and substitutional satisfaction were also significantly more frequent among unexperienced surgeons. "Negative" stress-coping strategies occur more often in experienced than in younger colleagues (P=0.029. Female surgeons felt more exposed to overwork (P=0.04 and social stress (P=0.03. Conclusion: Cardiac surgeons show a tendency to high perception of chronic stress phenomena and vulnerability for negative coping strategies.

  19. Role of imaging in evaluation of sudden cardiac death risk in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Jeffrey B; Ommen, Steve R

    2015-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heritable cardiomyopathy and is associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD) - an uncommon but devastating clinical outcome. This review is designed to assess the role of imaging in established risk factor assessment and its role in emerging SCD risk stratification. Recent publications have highlighted the crucial role of imaging in HCM SCD risk stratification. Left ventricular hypertrophy assessment remains the key imaging determinant of risk. Data continue to emerge on the role of systolic dysfunction, apical aneurysms, left atrial enlargement and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction as markers of risk. Quantitative assessment of delayed myocardial enhancement and T1 mapping on cardiac MRI continue to evolve. Recent multicenter trials have allowed multivariate SCD risk assessment in large HCM cohorts. Given aggregate risk with presence of multiple risk factors, a single parameter should not be used in isolation to determine implantable cardiac defibrillator candidacy. Use of all available imaging data, including cardiac magnetic resonance tissue characterization, allows a comprehensive approach to SCD stratification and implantable cardiac defibrillator decision-making.

  20. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E Arias-Morales

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement and non-complex (isolated CABG cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk of complications and blood transfusion requirement. It becomes difficult to demonstrate the association between transfusions and mortality because of the fact that most patients undergoing cardiac surgery are also critically ill. Transfusion rates remain high despite the advances in perioperative blood conservation, such as the intraoperative use of cell saver in cardiac surgery. Some recent prospective studies have suggested that the use of blood products, even in low-risk patients, may adversely affect clinical outcomes. In light of this information, we reviewed the literature to assess the clinical outcomes in terms of 30-day and 1-year morbidity and mortality in transfused patients who underwent uncomplicated CABG surgery.

  1. Mitochondria as Pharmacological Targets: The Discovery of Novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When food intake chronically exceeds the body's energy need, an efficient metabolism results in the storage of the excess energy as fat. Mitochondria are the main centre for energy production in eukaryotic cells. Mitochondrial proton cycling is responsible for a significant proportion of basal or standard metabolic rate, ...

  2. GENE TRANSFER IN TOBACCO MITOCHONDRIA IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katyshev A.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Earlier, we had showed that isolated mitochondria from different organisms can import DNA. Exploiting this mechanism, we assessed the possibility of genes transfer in tobacco mitochondria in vitro and in vivo. Whereas homologous recombination is a rare occasion in higher plant nuclei, recombination between the large direct repeats in plant mitochondrial genome generates its multipartite structure. Following transfection of isolated organelles with constructs composed of a partial gfp gene flanked by mitochondrial DNA fragments, we showed the homologous recombination of imported DNA with the resident DNA and the integration of the reporter gene. The recombination yielded an insertion of a continuous exogenous DNA fragment including the gfp sequence and at least the 0.5 kb of the flanking sequence on each side. Using of transfection constructs carrying multiple sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA could be suitable for insertion of a target gene into any region of the mitochondrial genome, which turns this approach to be of a general and methodical importance. Usually mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS level is under strict control of the antioxidant system including the Mn-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD. MnSOD is presented in multiple forms encoded by several genes in plants. Possibly, this enzyme, beside its catalytic function, fulfills as well some unknown biochemical functions. Thus, one of maize SOD enzymes (SOD3.4 could bind with mitochondrial DNA. Another SOD form (SOD3.1 is located in close proximity to mitochondrial respiratory complexes, where ROS are generated. To study possible physiological functions of this enzyme, we cloned the maize SOD3.1 gene. Compared to the SOD3.4, this enzyme didn't demonstrate DNA-binding activity. At the same time, SOD3.1 didn't show non-specific DNA-hydrolyzing activity as Cu/ZnSOD does. It means that this enzyme might have some DNA protective function. We made NtPcob-sod3.1-IGR

  3. Ultrastructural changes in the isolated rat kidney induced by conjugated bilirubin and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, J L; Billing, B H; Huang, S N

    1976-10-01

    The effects of bilirubin and bile acids on the ultrastructure of proximal renal tubules have been studied using an isolated rat kidney preparation, perfused with a protein-free dextran medium. Control kidneys perfused for 1 h had a normal glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow; the ultrastructure of proximal tubular cells was well preserved, with normal mitochondria, nuclear and plasma membranes, and microvilli of the brush border. When conjugated bilirubin, prepared from human hepatic bile, was added to the perfusion medium (5-0-7-5 mg/100 ml), marked alterations were observed in some cells, particularly with regard to the mitochondria and plasma membranes. These changes were greatly diminished by the inclusion of bovine albumin in the medium, indicating that the unbound fraction was primarily responsible for the tubular damage. The addition of taurocholate (450 muM), taurochenodeoxycholate (550 muM) or taurolithocholate (250 muM, bound to albumin) also produced plasma membrane changes, but only slight abnormalities were seen in the mitochondria and other structures. These ultrastructural observations support the concept that the elevated plasma levels of conjugated bilirubin and to a lesser extent bile acids are related to the renal failure associated with obstructive jaundice.

  4. Formation and utilization of acetoin, an unusual product of pyruvate metabolism by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-07-15

    [14C]Pyruvate was rapidly non-oxidatively decarboxylated by Ehrlich tumor mitochondria at a rate of 40 nmol/min/mg of protein in the presence or absence of ADP. A search for decarboxylation products led to significant amounts of acetoin formed when Ehrlich tumor mitochondria were incubated with 1 mM [14C] pyruvate in the presence of ATP. Added acetoin to aerobic tumor mitochondria was rapidly utilized in the presence of ATP at a rate of 65 nmol/min/mg of protein. Citrate has been found as a product of acetoin utilization and was exported from the tumor mitochondria. Acetoin has been found in the ascitic liquid of Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor-bearing animals. These unusual reactions were not observed in control rat liver mitochondria.

  5. Deficiency of methionine sulfoxide reductase A causes cellular dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in cardiac myocytes under physical and oxidative stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, Changlong; Li, Yuejin; Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Guozhen; Kreymerman, Alexander; Prentice, Howard; Weissbach, Herbert; Huang, Xupei

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Deficiency of MsrA in the heart renders myocardial cells more sensitive to oxidative stress. → Mitochondrial damage happens in the heart lacking MsrA. → More protein oxidation in myocardial cells lacking MsrA. → MsrA protects the heart against oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an enzyme that reverses oxidation of methionine in proteins. Using a MsrA gene knockout (MsrA -/- ) mouse model, we have investigated the role of MsrA in the heart. Our data indicate that cellular contractility and cardiac function are not significantly changed in MsrA -/- mice if the hearts are not stressed. However, the cellular contractility, when stressed using a higher stimulation frequency (2 Hz), is significantly reduced in MsrA -/- cardiac myocytes. MsrA -/- cardiac myocytes also show a significant decrease in contractility after oxidative stress using H 2 O 2 . Corresponding changes in Ca 2+ transients are observed in MsrA -/- cardiomyocytes treated with 2 Hz stimulation or with H 2 O 2 . Electron microscope analyses reveal a dramatic morphological change of mitochondria in MsrA -/- mouse hearts. Further biochemical measurements indicate that protein oxidation levels in MsrA -/- mouse hearts are significantly higher than those in wild type controls. Our study demonstrates that the lack of MsrA in cardiac myocytes reduces myocardial cell's capability against stress stimulations resulting in a cellular dysfunction in the heart.

  6. Misfolded SOD1 associated with motor neuron mitochondria alters mitochondrial shape and distribution prior to clinical onset.

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    Christine Vande Velde

    Full Text Available Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are causative for inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A proportion of SOD1 mutant protein is misfolded onto the cytoplasmic face of mitochondria in one or more spinal cord cell types. By construction of mice in which mitochondrially targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein is selectively expressed in motor neurons, we demonstrate that axonal mitochondria of motor neurons are primary in vivo targets for misfolded SOD1. Mutant SOD1 alters axonal mitochondrial morphology and distribution, with dismutase active SOD1 causing mitochondrial clustering at the proximal side of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures within motor axons and dismutase inactive SOD1 producing aberrantly elongated axonal mitochondria beginning pre-symptomatically and increasing in severity as disease progresses. Somal mitochondria are altered by mutant SOD1, with loss of the characteristic cylindrical, networked morphology and its replacement by a less elongated, more spherical shape. These data indicate that mutant SOD1 binding to mitochondria disrupts normal mitochondrial distribution and size homeostasis as early pathogenic features of SOD1 mutant-mediated ALS.

  7. Mitochondria, Energy and Cancer: The Relationship with Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Michael J.; Rosario-Pérez, Glorivee; Guzmán, Angélica M.; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R.; Duconge, Jorge; Lavergne, Julio; Fernandez, Nadia; Ortiz, Norma; Quintero, Ana; Mikirova, Nina; Riordan, Neil H.; Ricart, Carlos M.

    2012-01-01

    Ascorbic Acid (AA) has been used in the prevention and treatment of cancer with reported effectiveness. Mitochondria may be one of the principal targets of ascorbate's cellular activity and it may play an important role in the development and progression of cancer. Mitochondria, besides generating adenosine triphosphate (ATP), has a role in apoptosis regulation and in the production of regulatory oxidative species that may be relevant in gene expression. At higher concentrations AA may increase ATP production by increasing mitochondrial electron flux, also may induce apoptotic cell death in tumor cell lines, probably via its pro-oxidant action In contrast, at lower concentrations AA displays antioxidant properties that may prevent the activation of oxidant-induced apoptosis. These concentration dependent activities of ascorbate may explain in part the seemingly contradictory results that have been reported previously. PMID:23565030

  8. Inhibition of cardiac sodium currents by toluene exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Silvia L; Orta-Salazar, Gerardo; Gauthereau, Marcia Y; Millan-Perez Peña, Lourdes; Salinas-Stefanón, Eduardo M

    2003-01-01

    Toluene is an industrial solvent widely used as a drug of abuse, which can produce sudden sniffing death due to cardiac arrhythmias. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that toluene inhibits cardiac sodium channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes transfected with Nav1.5 cDNA and in isolated rat ventricular myocytes. In oocytes, toluene inhib