WorldWideScience

Sample records for isolated arizona alder

  1. Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida isolated from a human in Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birdsell Dawn N

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of tularemia and is classified as a select agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Currently four known subspecies of F. tularensis that differ in virulence and geographical distribution are recognized:tularensis (type A, holarctica (type B, mediasiatica, and novicida. Because of the Select Agent status and differences in virulence and geographical location, the molecular analysis of any clinical case of tularemia is of particular interest. We analyzed an unusual Francisella clinical isolate from a human infection in Arizona using multiple DNA-based approaches. Findings We report that the isolate is F. tularensis subsp. novicida, a subspecies that is rarely isolated. Conclusion The rarity of this novicida subspecies in clinical settings makes each case study important for our understanding of its role in disease and its genetic relationship with other F. tularensis subspecies.

  2. Research note: Salmonella enteritidis and Arizona hinshawii isolated from wild sandhill cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windingstad, R.M.; Trainer, D.O.; Duncan, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis serotype Rubislaw and Arizona hinshawii were isolated from cloacal swabs of 'healthy' live-trapped sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in Indiana and Wisconsin. These respective isolations were the first reported from wild sandhill cranes.

  3. Site curves for red alder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel M. Bishop; Floyd A. Johnson

    1958-01-01

    The increasing commercial importance of red alder (Alnus rubra) in the Pacific Northwest has created a demand for research on this species. Noting the lack of information on growth of alder, the Puget Sound Research Center Advisory Committee established a subcommittee in January 1956 to undertake construction of alder yield tables. Through the...

  4. Utilization and management of alder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David G. Briggs; Dean S. DeBell; William A. Atkinson

    1978-01-01

    In the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia, red alder often grows on forest lands following natural or man-caused disturbances. Frequently ignored as a pest or weed, many alder stands have developed to the point where important utilization and management questions are being asked. It is recognized that alder is a fast growing species, and that its rapid early growth...

  5. Assessment of inoculation methods for screening black alder resistance to Phytophthora ×alni

    OpenAIRE

    Husson, Claude; Druart, P.; Marcais, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Identification of resistance to Phytophthora xalni could provide the basis for a management strategy against alder decline in riparian ecosystems in Europe.[br/] This study aimed to test methods to evaluate the resistance of riparian alders to the disease, and to screen alder genotypes for resistance.[br/] Phytophthora xalni isolates were compared for their aggressiveness (lesion length on stem) and sporulation capacity (sporangia). While no difference in lesion lengths was found bet...

  6. Assessment of Alder Tree Bark Potential as a Renewable Source of Proanthocyanidins in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janceva Sarmīte

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to assess potential of alder tree bark as a renewable source of bioactive polyphenolic compounds, antioxidant properties of hydrophilic extracts and proanthocyanidins (PAC isolated from bark of two alder species (grey alder and black alder growing in Latvia have been examined employing two test systems, ABTS●+, DPPH● assays. In the tests the high free radical scavenging capacities of the PAC were demonstrated. The polyphenolic nature of the bark PAC opens the possibility of its application as food additive. The PAC has good potential as an antioxidant for mayonnaise.

  7. Risiko efter alder og promille

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Framke, Elisabeth; Kærup, Simon; Sørensen, Poul Lyk

    2012-01-01

    Den internationale forskningslitteratur har de sidste 50 år peget på, at alder og alkohol er store risikofaktorer for trafikuheld. Litteraturen har i den forbindelse peget på, at unges alder, manglede erfaring og alkoholforbrug, udgør væsentlige risikofaktorer for trafikuheld....

  8. Biofilm Formation and Morphotypes of Salmonella enterica subsp.arizonae Differs from Those of Other Salmonella enterica Subspecies in Isolates from Poultry Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, A; Fernandez-No, I C; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella serovars are responsible for foodborne diseases around the world. The ability to form biofilms allows microorganisms to survive in the environment. In this study, 73 Salmonella strains, belonging to four different subspecies, were isolated from poultry houses and foodstuffs and tested. Biofilm formation was measured at four different temperatures and two nutrient concentrations. Morphotypes and cellulose production were evaluated at three different temperatures. The presence of several genes related to biofilm production was also examined. All strains and subspecies of Salmonella had the ability to form biofilms, and 46.57% of strains produced biofilms under all conditions tested. Biofilm formation was strain dependent and varied according to the conditions. This is the first study to analyze biofilm formation in a wide number of Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae strains, and no direct relationship between the high prevalence of Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae strains and their ability to form biofilm was established. Morphotypes and cellulose production varied as the temperature changed, with 20°C being the optimum temperature for expression of the red, dry, and rough morphotype and cellulose. Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae, whose morphotype is poorly studied, only showed a smooth and white morphotype and lacked the csgD and gcpA genes that are implicated in biofilm production. Thus, Salmonella biofilm formation under different environmental conditions is a public health problem because it can survive and advance through the food chain to reach the consumer.

  9. Susceptibility of common alder (Alnus glutinosa) seeds and seedlings to Phytophthora alni and other Phytophthora species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, M. M.; Diez, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Phytophthora alni is a highly destructive host specific pathogen to alders (Alnus spp.) spreading all over Europe. Recently this pathogen has been reported to cause diseases in common alder (Alnus glutinosa) in Spain. Seeds and seedlings of A. glutinosa were tested in vitro for their susceptibility to alder Phytophthora and other Phytophthora species. Isolates of P. alni ssp. alni, P. cinnamomi, P. citrophthora, P. nicotianae and P. palmivora were used in the experiments. Seeds and seedlings were inoculated with a zoospore suspension and uniform mycelial blocks of agar of the Phytophthora species. Susceptibility was calculated in terms of pathogen virulence on seed germination and seedling mortality 42 and 67 days after inoculation respectively. Seed germination and seedling mortality rates varied differently among the isolates used. Results implied that common alder and its seeds and seedlings are at risk to be infected by P. alni. In addition, other Phytophthora species are able to infect this kind of material showing their relative host non-specificity. This is one important finding concerning alder regeneration in infected areas, and the possibility of disease spread on this plant material. (Author) 42 refs.

  10. Arizona TeleMedicine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Univ., Tucson. Coll. of Medicine.

    Designed to provide health services for American Indians living on rurally isolated reservations, the Arizona TeleMedicine Project proposes to link Phoenix and Tucson medical centers, via a statewide telecommunications system, with the Hopi, San Carlos Apache, Papago, Navajo, and White Mountain Apache reservations. Advisory boards are being…

  11. The Phytophthora species assemblage and diversity in riparian alder ecosystems of western Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Laura Lee; Sutton, Wendy; Reeser, Paul; Hansen, Everett M

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora species were systematically sampled, isolated, identified and compared for presence in streams, soil and roots of alder (Alnus species) dominated riparian ecosystems in western Oregon. We describe the species assemblage and evaluate Phytophthora diversity associated with alder. We recovered 1250 isolates of 20 Phytophthora species. Only three species were recovered from all substrates (streams, soil, alder roots): P. gonapodyides, the informally described "P. taxon Pgchlamydo", and P. siskiyouensis. P. alni ssp. uniformis along with five other species not previously recovered in Oregon forests are included in the assemblage: P.citricola s.l., P. gregata, P. gallica, P. nicotianae and P. parsiana. Phytophthora species diversity was greatest in downstream riparian locations. There was no significant difference in species diversity comparing soil and unwashed roots (the rhizosphere) to stream water. There was a difference between the predominating species from the rhizosphere compared to stream water. The most numerous species was the informally described "P. taxon Oaksoil", which was mainly recovered from, and most predominant in, stream water. The most common species from riparian forest soils and alder root systems was P. gonapodyides.

  12. An Appreciation of Berni Julian Alder

    CERN Document Server

    Hoover, William Graham

    2015-01-01

    Berni Julian Alder profoundly influenced my research career at the Livermore Laboratory and the Davis Campus' Teller Tech, beginning in 1962 and lasting for over fifty years. I very much appreciate the opportunity provided by his Ninetieth Birthday Celebration to review some of the many high spots along the way.

  13. Red alder: A bibliography with abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles F. Heebner; Mary Jane Bergener

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography lists 661 references to world literature through Hay 1978 containing information about red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.). Included are publications about its taxonomy, biology and silvics, chemical and physical information about its wood and fiber, studies on its nitrogen fixing properties, and reports on industrial uses and economic...

  14. SUPERSTITION WILDERNESS, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donald W.; Jinks, Jimmie E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic studies and mineral evaluations most of the Superstition Wilderness and adjoining areas are judged to have little promise for occurrence of mineral resources. However, two areas in an east-trending zone near the southern margin of the area, marked by spotty occurrences of mineralized rock, prospect pits, and a band of geochemical anomalies that coincides with aligned magnetic anomalies, are considered to have probable mineral-resource potential. This zone lies within about 6 mi of two productive mines in Arizona's great copper belt, and the trend of the zone is parallel to many of the significant mineralized structures of this belt. A small isolated uranium anomaly was found in the northeastern part of the wilderness, but no evidence of other energy resources, such as petroleum, coal, or geothermal, was found.

  15. A New Diels-Alder Type Adduct and a New Flavone from the Stem and Root Bark of Morus mongolica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie KANG; Ruo Yun CHEN; De Quan YU

    2005-01-01

    A new Diels-Alder type adduct mongolicin G (1) and a new flavone 5'-(1", 1"-dimethylallyl)-5,7,2',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (2) were isolated from the stem and root bark of Morus mongolica. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis and chiroptical methods.

  16. Sorocenols G and H, Anti-MRSA Oxygen Heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type Adducts from Sorocea muriculata Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a root extract of Sorocea muriculata led to the isolation and identification of two new oxygen heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type adducts, sorocenols G (1) and H (2), along with lupeol-3-(3'R-hydroxytetradecanoate) and oxyresveratrol. The structures of 1 and 2 were eluci...

  17. Enantio- and periselective nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narcis, Maurice J; Sprague, Daniel J; Captain, Burjor; Takenaka, Norito

    2012-12-14

    The periselective Diels-Alder reaction of 5-substituted pentamethylcyclopentadienes and nitroethylene has been realized by helical-chiral hydrogen bond donor catalysts. To our knowledge, this represents the first asymmetric catalytic nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction via activation of nitroalkene, and thus establishes its proof-of-principle.

  18. Arizona TeleMedicine Network: System Procurement Specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic Research Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    Providing general specifications and system descriptions for segments within the Arizona TeleMedicine Project (a telecommunication system designed to deliver health services to rurally isolated American Indians in Arizona), this document, when used with the appropriate route segment document, will completely describe the project's required…

  19. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Christopher (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Adzima, Brian J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  20. Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Dan

    1999-05-28

    The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

  1. Biological Durability of Oil Heat Treated Alder Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lacić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents preliminary results of the biological durability of oil heat treated (OHT alder wood (Alnus glutinosa against pure cultures of rot fungi (Postia placenta and Trametes versicolor in lab conditions. The modification was performed by heating of specimens immersed in soya oil. There were four heating regimes of different duration (6 and 10 hours at final temperature of 180 and 200 ºC. The increase in mass (MI caused by modification and mass loss of wood caused by fungal decay (ML were determined. In addition, the natural durability of alder wood was determined and compared to the natural durability of beech wood as the reference wood species. After modification of alder wood at 200 °C, MI was lower than after treatment at 180 °C. MI was also lower after 10 hours of treatment than after 6 hours of treatment. The results showed significantly increased biological durability of modified alder wood against both tested fungi. The effect of OHT on increasing the biological durability of alder wood was higher against the fungus P. placenta. It seems that the fungus T. versicolor favours the remained oil after modification causing higher mass loss. The results showed that alder wood, thermally modified in soya oil by testing regimens, is not suitable for applications in use classes 3-5.

  2. Chalcone-derived Diels-Alder adducts as NF-κB inhibitors from Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Thi Xuan Binh; Tran, Thi Hong Hanh; Dan, Thi Thuy Hang; Chau, Van Minh; Hoang, Thanh Huong; Nguyen, Tien Dat

    2012-01-01

    A bioassay-guided phytochemical fractionation of the methanol extract of the Morus alba root barks led to the isolation of two chalcone-derived Diels-Alder adducts (1 and 2). Their structures were elucidated as kuwanon J 2,4,10″-trimethyl ether (1) and kuwanon R (2) by means of spectroscopic methods. Both compounds strongly inhibited nuclear transcription factor.κB activity with the IC₅₀ values of 4.65 and 7.38 μM, respectively.

  3. Chemical constituents of Parmotrema lichexanthonicum Eliasaro and Alder: isolation, structure modification and evaluation of antibiotic and cytotoxic activities; Constituintes quimicos de Parmotrema lichexanthonicum Eliasaro and Adler: isolamento, modificacoes estruturais e avaliacao das atividades antibiotica e citotoxica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheletti, Ana C.; Beatriz, Adilson; Lima, Denis Pires de; Honda, Neli K. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: nkhonda@nin.ufms.br; Pessoa, Claudia do O; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de; Lotufo, Leticia Veras; Magalhaes, Hemerson Iury Ferreira [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia e Farmacologia; Carvalho, Nadia C.P. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Hospital Universitario. Lab. de Microbiologia

    2009-07-01

    From the lichen Parmotrema lichexantonicum were isolated the depsidone salazinic acid, the xanthone lichexanthone, and the depside atranorin. The two major compounds, salazinic acid and lichexanthone, were selected for structure modifications. Salazinic acid afforded O-alkyl salazinic acids, some of them potentially cytotoxic against tumor cell lines (HCT-8, SF-295 and MDA/ MB - 435). From lichexanthone were obtained norlichexanthone, 3-O-methylnorlichexanthone, 3-O-methyl-6-O-prenylnorlichexanthone, 3,6-di-O-prenyl-norlichexanthone, 3,6-bis[(3,3-dimethyloxyran-2-il)methoxy] -1-hydroxy-8-methyl-9H-xanten-9-one and 3,6-bis[3-(dimethylamine)propoxy]-1-hydroxy-8-methyl- 9H-xanten-9-one. The last compound was the most active against S. aureus. (author)

  4. Red Alder Basal Area, by Stream Reach, for the Pacific Northwest

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Red alder (Alnus rubra) are a common component of forests in Western Oregon and Washington. This file provides an estimate of red alder basal area in western Oregon...

  5. Arizona Geophysical Data Base

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, Ronald G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of digital data sets were compiled for input into a geophysical data base for a one degree quadrangle in Arizona. Using a Landsat digital mosaic as a base, information on topography, geology, gravity as well as Seasat radar imagery were registered. Example overlays and tabulations are performed.

  6. Arizona's School Asbestos Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charette, Mike L.

    1982-01-01

    The state of Arizona Department of Education operates a successful program to remove asbestos-containing building materials from schools, drawing from the expertise of the Department of Health Services, Bureau of Environmental Hygiene and Sanitation, Bureau of Waste Control, and eliciting cooperation of school officials. Includes an asbestos…

  7. Arizona Academic Standards: Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for kindergarten. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Kindergarten; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Readiness (Kindergarten); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Readiness…

  8. Chemical composition of lipophilic extractives from grey alder (Alnus incana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskars Bikovens

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the lipophilic extractives in the hexane extracts from grey alder bark, knotwood, and cones has been investigated by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The efficiency of two extraction methods was compared. The highest amount of lipophilic extractives (about 9% of o.d. material was observed in grey alder cone, while the lowest (about 3% was found in knotwood. The three different morphological parts of alder showed significant differences not only in the content but also in composition of extractives, namely fatty acids, triglycerides, and triterpenes. The main identified compounds were triterpenoids (lupen-3-one, lupeol, betulone, betulinol, and betulinic acid in bark, and triglycerides in cones. The major group in knotwood was free fatty acids (mainly linoleic acid, 18:2.

  9. The Virtual Arizona Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.; Davis, R.; Conway, F. M.; Bellasai, R.

    2012-12-01

    To commemorate the once-in-a-lifetime event of Arizona's hundredth birthday, the Centennial Commission and the Governor of Arizona envisioned a museum and companion website that would capture the state's history, celebrate its people, and embrace its future. Working with world-renowned museum designers, the state began to seek ideas from across Arizona to create plans for a journey of discovery through science and the humanities. The museum would introduce visitors to some of the people who nurtured the state through its early years and others who are innovating its tomorrows. Showcases would include the resources and experiences that shaped the state's history and are transforming its present day, highlighting the ingenuity that tamed the wild frontier and is envisioning Arizona's next frontiers through science and technology. The Arizona Experience (www.arizonaexperience.org) was initially intended to serve as the web presence for the physical museum, but as delays occurred with the physical museum, the site has quickly developed an identify of its own as an interactive, multimedia experience, reaching a wider audience with functions that would be difficult or expensive to produce in a museum. As leaders in scientific and technological innovation in the state, the Arizona Geological Survey was tasked with designing and creating the Arizona Experience site. The general themes remain the same; however, the site has added content and applications that are better suited to the online environment in order to create a rich, dynamic supplement to a physical museum experience. The website offers the features and displays of the future museum with the interactive nature and learning environment of the web. This provides an encyclopedic overview of the State of Arizona by subject matter experts in a manner that is free and open to the public and erases socio-economic, political, and physical boundaries. Over the Centennial Year of 2012 the site will release a new theme and

  10. Endophytic fungi associated with cacti in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Trichur S; Wittlinger, Sally K; Faeth, Stanley H

    2005-05-01

    21 cactus species occurring in various localities within Arizona were screened for the presence of fungal endophytes. 900 endophyte isolates belonging to 22 fungal species were isolated. Cylindropuntia fulgida had the maximum endophyte species diversity, while C. ramosissima harboured the maximum number of endophyte isolates. Alternaria sp., Aureobasidium pullulans, and Phoma spp. were isolated from several cactus species. The diversity of the endophyte assemblages was low and no host specificity among endophytes was observed. However, the frequencies of colonization of the few endophyte species recovered were high and comparable to those reported for tropical plant hosts. Species of Colletotrichum, Phomopsis, and Phyllosticta, which are commonly isolated as endophytes from plants of more mesic habitats, were absent from these cacti.

  11. High stereoselectivity on low temperature Diels-Alder reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Invernize Paulo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have found that some of the usually poor dienophiles (2-cycloenones can undergo Diels-Alder reaction at -78°C with unusually high stereoselectivity in the presence of niobium pentachloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. A remarkable difference in reaction rates for unsubstituted and α- or β-methyl substituted 2-cycloenones was also observed.

  12. Diels-Alder reactions of anthracenes with C-sulfonyldithioformates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sayed, I.; Ali, O.M.; Fischer, A.

    2003-01-01

    C-Sulfonyldithioformates (2) (R-1 = ArSO2, R 2 = ArS) readily add to anthracene and 9-methylanthracene (1) in a Diels-Alder fashion with formation of 9,10-dihydro-10,9-(epithiomethano)anthracenes (3) which in turn may suffer thermally induced elimination of arenesulfinic acid to yield the 9...

  13. Intramolecular inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reactions of pyrimidines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frissen, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis deals with the intramolecular inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction of pyrimidines. The main objective of the study was to investigate the synthetic applicability of this reaction and to get more insight in the electronic and steric effects which determine the reactivity of compou

  14. Geophysical lineaments of Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepley, L.K.

    1979-08-01

    Photolineaments seen on satellite images are usually expressions of deep crustal ruptures. However, photolineaments are omnipresent and an independent expression of regional discontinuities is needed to help rank the photolineaments. Published gravity and magnetic contour maps of Arizona were analyzed to produce a single geophysical lineament map to indicate trends of regional basement structures. This map shows that the southwestern quarter of Arizona is dominated by a NNW-ENE orthogonal system whereas the remainder of the state is gridded by a NW-NE system. North-south systems are present throughout the state, as are EW lineaments. Arizona is transected by the WNW Texas Strand, but other shorter systems trending in the Texas direction are found throughout the state south of the Strand. The major lineament systems as seen on Landsat, gravity, and magnetic maps correlate reasonably well with known geothermal manifestations. Many other systems are Precambrian, Paleozoic, and/or Mesozoic in age but appear to control the location of Quaternary volcanic systems.

  15. Kaljujooniste keskus Arizonas / Andres Kurg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurg, Andres, 1975-

    1998-01-01

    Arhitekt William Bruderi projekteeritud kaljujooniste uurimis- ja eksponeerimiskeskus Phoenixis, Arizonas säilitab kivijooniseid, mille autoriteks olid sealset piirkonda kuni 16. sajandini asustanud hohokamid

  16. Kaljujooniste keskus Arizonas / Andres Kurg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurg, Andres, 1975-

    1998-01-01

    Arhitekt William Bruderi projekteeritud kaljujooniste uurimis- ja eksponeerimiskeskus Phoenixis, Arizonas säilitab kivijooniseid, mille autoriteks olid sealset piirkonda kuni 16. sajandini asustanud hohokamid

  17. Libraries in Arizona: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in Arizona URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/arizona.html Libraries in Arizona ... Candy Lane Cottonwood, AZ 86326 928-639-6444 http://nahealth.com Flagstaff Flagstaff Medical Center John B. ...

  18. Arizona Measure of Academic Progress: Growth in Arizona Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David; Aportela, Anabel

    This document contains reports of school district results on the Arizona Measure of Academic Progress by school and grade level for the 1999-2000 school year. Lengthy tables present results for reading and mathematics showing the change in achievement between grades each year from grades 2 to 3 to grades 7 to 8. The Arizona Measure of Academic…

  19. Arizona Conserve Water Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This award-winning, 350-page, full-color book provides a thorough study of Arizona water resources from a water conservation perspective. Its background section contains maps, graphs, diagrams and photos that facilitate the teaching of 15 interactive, multi-disciplinary lessons to K-12 students. In addition, 10 Arizona case studies are highlighted…

  20. Ecoregions of Arizona (poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Glenn E.; Omernik, James M.; Johnson, Colleen Burch; Turner, Dale S.

    2014-01-01

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources; they are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The Arizona ecoregion map was compiled at a scale of 1:250,000. It revises and subdivides an earlier national ecoregion map that was originally compiled at a smaller scale. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and integrity. These phenomena include geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions. At level III, the continental United States contains 105 ecoregions and the conterminous United States has 85 ecoregions. Level IV is a further subdivision of level III ecoregions. Arizona contains arid deserts and canyonlands, semiarid shrub- and grass-covered plains, woodland- and shrubland-covered hills, lava fields and volcanic plateaus, forested mountains, glaciated

  1. Developing a prediction model for Armillaria solidipes in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W Hanna; M. L. Fairweather; J. D. Shaw; R. Mathiasen; C. Hoffman; E. Nelson; M. -S. Kim; A. L. Ross-Davis

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, a collaborative project was started to determine the distribution of Armillaria solidipes (= A. ostoyae) in Arizona. The methods and preliminary accomplishments of the 2010 and 2011 (ongoing) field surveys/collections are summarized. During the next phase of this project, surveys will be completed and remaining Armillaria isolates will be identified using DNA-...

  2. Arizona TeleMedicine Network: System Procurement Specifications, Phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic Research Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    Defining the system procurement specifications for a telecommunications system designed to provide health services to rurally isolated American Indians living on reservations in Arizona, this document presents detailed specifications for: (1) a complete communications facility; (2) a mobile health communications treatment and diagnosis unit; (3)…

  3. A facile avenue to conductive polymer brushes via cyclopentadiene-maleimide Diels-Alder ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yameen, Basit; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Preuss, Corinna M; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Trouillet, Vanessa; Rezek, Bohuslav; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2013-10-07

    Cyclopentadienyl end-capped poly(3-hexylthiophene) was employed to fabricate conductive surface tethered polymer brushes via a facile route based on cyclopentadiene-maleimide Diels-Alder ligation. The efficient nature of the Diels-Alder ligation was further combined with a biomimetic polydopamine-assisted functionalization of surfaces, making it an access route of choice for P3HT surface immobilization.

  4. Pork meat as a potential source of Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelopoulou, Grammato; Kritas, Spyridon; Govaris, Alexander; Burriel, Angeliki R

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae was isolated from 13 of 123 slaughtered pigs in central Greece. The samples cultured were feces, ileum tissue, mesenteric lymph nodes, and gallbladder swabs. A total of 74 isolates from 492 samples were identified as Salmonella spp. by use of standard laboratory culture media and two commercial micromethods and by use of a polyvalent slide agglutination test for the detection of O and H antigens. Among them were 19 (25.68%) suspected to be S. enterica subsp. arizonae according to analysis with standard laboratory culture media. Of those, 14 were identified as S. enterica subsp. arizonae by the API 20E (bioMérieux, France) and the Microgen GnA+B-ID (Microgen Bioproducts, Ltd., United Kingdom) identification systems. All the isolates were tested for resistance to 23 antimicrobials. Strains identified as S. enterica subsp. arizonae were resistant to 17 (70.8%) antibiotics. The highest proportions of resistance were observed for sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (71.4%), tetracycline (71.4%), ampicillin (64.3%), and amoxicillin (57.1%). Two isolates were resistant to aztreonam (7.1%) and tigecycline (7.1%), used only for the treatment of humans. Thus, pork meat may play a role in the transmission of antibiotic-resistant S. enterica subsp. arizonae to human consumers. This is the first report of S. enterica subsp. arizonae isolation from pigs.

  5. Barringer Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Barringer Crater, also known as 'Meteor Crater,' is a 1,300-meter (0.8 mile) diameter, 174-meter (570-feet) deep hole in the flat-lying desert sandstones 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) west of Winslow, Arizona. Since the 1890s geologic studies here played a leading role in developing an understanding of impact processes on the Earth, the moon and elsewhere in the solar system.This view was acquired by the Landsat 4 satellite on December 14, 1982. It shows the crater much as a lunar crater might appear through a telescope. Morning sun illumination is from the southeast (lower right). The prominent gully meandering across the scene is known as Canyon Diablo. It drains northward toward the Little Colorado River and eventually to the Grand Canyon. The Interstate 40 highway crosses and nearly parallels the northern edge of the scene.The ejecta blanket around the crater appears somewhat lighter than the surrounding terrain, perhaps in part due to its altered mineralogic content. However, foot traffic at this interesting site may have scarred and lightened the terrain too. Also, the roughened surface here catches the sunlight on the southerly slopes and protects a highly reflective patchy snow cover in shaded northerly slopes, further lightening the terrain as viewed from space on this date.

  6. Alder and the Golden Fleece: high diversity of Frankia and ectomycorrhizal fungi revealed from Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata roots close to a Tertiary and glacial refugium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Roy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Recent climatic history has strongly impacted plant populations, but little is known about its effect on microbes. Alders, which host few and specific symbionts, have high genetic diversity in glacial refugia. Here, we tested the prediction that communities of root symbionts survived in refugia with their host populations. We expected to detect endemic symbionts and a higher species richness in refugia as compared to recolonized areas. Methods We sampled ectomycorrhizal (EM root tips and the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia communities in eight sites colonized by Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata close to the Caucasus in Georgia. Three sites were located in the Colchis, one major Eurasian climatic refugia for Arcto-Tertiary flora and alders, and five sites were located in the recolonized zone. Endemic symbionts and plant ITS variants were detected by comparing sequences to published data from Europe and another Tertiary refugium, the Hyrcanian forest. Species richness and community structure were compared between sites from refugia and recolonized areas for each symbionts. Results For both symbionts, most MOTUs present in Georgia had been found previously elsewhere in Europe. Three endemic Frankia strains were detected in the Colchis vs two in the recolonized zone, and the five endemic EM fungi were detected only in the recolonized zone. Frankia species richness was higher in the Colchis while the contrary was observed for EM fungi. Moreover, the genetic diversity of one alder specialist Alnicola xanthophylla was particularly high in the recolonized zone. The EM communities occurring in the Colchis and the Hyrcanian forests shared closely related endemic species. Discussion The Colchis did not have the highest alpha diversity and more endemic species, suggesting that our hypothesis based on alder biogeography may not apply to alder’s symbionts. Our study in the Caucasus brings new clues to understand symbioses biogeography and

  7. Serologic survey for antibodies to canine distemper virus in collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) populations in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Ted H; Heffelfinger, James R; Olding, Ronald J; Wesche, Shannon Lynn; Reggiardo, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    In 1989, a disease outbreak was observed among collared peccaries (javelina, Tayassu tajacu) in southern Arizona (USA) and canine distemper virus (CDV) was isolated from affected animals. Subsequently, 364 sera were collected from hunter-harvested javelina over a 4 yr period (1993-96) and were tested for antibody to CDV. Neutralizing antibody to CDV was detected in 58% of the serum samples suggesting that CDV infection is probably enzootic in the collared peccary populations of southern Arizona.

  8. The Uneven Performance of Arizona's Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingos, Matthew M.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Arizona enrolls a larger share of its students in charter schools than any other state in the country, but no comprehensive examination exists of the impact of those schools on student achievement. Using student-level data covering all Arizona students from 2006 to 2012, we find that the performance of charter schools in Arizona in improving…

  9. Niobium Pentachloride Activation of Enone Derivatives: Diels-Alder and Conjugate Addition Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Valdo José da Silva

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Niobium pentachloride has proven to be a powerful activating agent for Diels-Alder or conjugate addition reactions of cycloenones. The Diels-Alder product was obtained only with an unsubstituted enone (cyclohexenone and the highly reactive diene cyclopentadiene; substituents in the b-position of enones seem to prevent Diels-Alder reaction: oxygenated substituents favor the formation of vinyl chlorides (ethyl ether or dichloromethane as solvents or enol ethers (ethyl acetate as solvent, while a methyl substituent prevents any kind of transformation with NbCl5. Less reactive dienes, furan and 2-methylfuran gave the conjugate addition products of the furan ring to the enone system.

  10. Boots on the Ground: Arizona

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-26

    In this podcast, we talk to CDC public health advisor Lisa Speissegger about her response efforts during the 2013 Arizona wildfires.  Created: 12/26/2013 by Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHPR).   Date Released: 12/26/2013.

  11. A Melioidosis Case in Arizona

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-03

    David Blaney, Medical Officer, Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch, discusses an unusual melioidosis case in Arizona.  Created: 10/3/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/5/2011.

  12. The effect of pressure on microwave-enhanced Diels-Alder reactions. A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaval, Nadya; Dehaen, Wim; Kappe, C Oliver; Van der Eycken, Erik

    2004-01-21

    It is demonstrated that microwave-assisted Diels-Alder reactions of substituted 2(1H)-pyrazinones with ethylene are significantly more effective utilizing pre-pressurized (up to 10 bar) reaction vessels.

  13. Domino Wittig Diels-Alder reaction: An expeditious entry into the AB ring system of furanosesquiterpenes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patre, R.E.; Gawas, S.; Sen, S.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Tilve, S.G.

    A domino Wittig Diels - Alder reaction has been employed in delineating a short and flexible synthetic stratagem for ready access to the AB ring system and the tricyclic framework of furanosesquiterpenes, such as the bioactive natural products...

  14. Salmon and alder as drivers of nutrient availability and lake productivity in southwestern Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We completed a four-year project to investigate the relative importance of nutrients derived from salmon and alder on lake productivity in southwestern Alaska. We...

  15. Comparative phytosocioogical investigation of subalpine alder thickets in southwestern Alaska and the North Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We present the first vegetation analysis of subalpine alder (Alnus viridis) thickets in southwestern Alaska. The data are primarily from mesic, hilly and mountainous...

  16. Regioselective Synthesis of C-3-Functionalized Quinolines via Hetero-Diels-Alder Cycloaddition of Azadienes with Terminal Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunthwal, Rakesh K; Patel, Monika; Verma, Akhilesh K

    2016-08-05

    A highly efficient metal and protection-free approach for the regioselective synthesis of C-3-functionalized quinolines from azadienes (in situ generated from 2-aminobenzyl alcohol) and terminal alkynes through [4 + 2] cycloaddition has been developed. An unprecedented reaction of 2-aminobenzyl alcohol with 1,3- and 1,4-diethynylbenzene provided the C-3 tolylquinolines via [4 + 2] HDA and oxidative decarboxylation. The -NH2 group directed mechanistic approach was well supported by the control experiments and deuterium-labeling studies and by isolating the azadiene intermediate. The reactivity and selectivity of unprotected azadiene in metal-free base-assisted hetero-Diels-Alder reaction is exploited to quickly assemble an important class of C-3-functionalized quinolines, which are difficult to access.

  17. SYCAMORE CANYON PRIMITIVE AREA, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Lyman C.; Raabe, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Sycamore Canyon Primitive Area, which occupies about 74 sq mi, lies about 24 mi southwest of Flagstaff, Arizona. To help evaluate the area for mineral resources, sediment samples were collected along Sycamore Creek and its tributaries. These were analyzed for traces of the ore metals without finding any local concentrations. In addition, a scintillometer was used to test rocks in the area without finding any abnormal radioactivity.

  18. Reactivity of N-Phenyl-1-Aza-2-Cyano-1,3-Butadienes in the Diels-Alder Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Nicholas J.; Motorina, Irina A.; Tran Huu Dau, Marie-Elise; Riche, Claude; Fowler, Frank W.; Grierson, David S.

    1996-05-31

    It is found that N-phenyl-2-cyano-1-azadiene 4, prepared via a two-step, one-pot, sequence from acrylanilide, undergoes efficient [4 + 2] cycloaddition with a complete range of electron rich, electron poor, and neutral dienophiles under remarkably mild thermal conditions (90-120 degrees C for 20-48 h). Regiospecific formation of the alpha-cycloadduct wherein the dienophile substituent is alpha to nitrogen is observed for vinyl ethers and styrene, whereas the Diels-Alder reactions with methyl acrylate and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) produce alpha/beta mixtures in which the alpha-cycloadduct is the major regioisomer (approximately 4-5:1). An essentially identical reaction pattern was observed in the Diels-Alder reaction of N-(p-methoxyphenyl)-2-cyano-1-azadiene 18 and the 4-methyl-substituted azadiene 27. For compound 19 derived from cycloaddition of 18 with ethyl vinyl ether, facile conversion to the dihydropyridine 21 through loss of EtOH on brief acid treatment was also noted. The 2,4-cis-disubstitution pattern confirmed by X-ray diffraction for the major cycloadduct 29 isolated from the reaction of 27 with styrene provides evidence for the endo mode of cycloaddition in the Diels-Alder reaction of N-phenyl(aryl)-2-cyano-1-azadienes. Calculation of the frontier orbital energies and coefficients, as well as the transition state geometries for the [4 + 2] cycloaddition of N-phenyl-2-cyano-1-azadiene 4 with methyl vinyl ether, styrene, and MVK were carried out at the RHF AM1 level (MOPAC, Version 5.0). The FMO treatment indicates that the reaction of 4 with methyl vinyl ether occurs under LUMO(diene) control, whereas in contrast, the corresponding cycloaddition with MVK occurs preferably under HOMO(diene) control. A high degree of asynchronicity is observed in the calculated transition states for reaction of 4 with the three representative dienophiles. In all cases the transition states leading to the alpha-cycloadducts are lower in energy than those giving the beta

  19. Modeling climate impact on an emerging disease, the Phytophthora alni-induced alder decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Jaime; Elegbede, Fabrice; Husson, Claude; Saintonge, François-Xavier; Marçais, Benoît

    2014-10-01

    Alder decline caused by Phytophthora alni is one of the most important emerging diseases in natural ecosystems in Europe, where it has threatened riparian ecosystems for the past 20 years. Environmental factors, such as mean site temperature and soil characteristics, play an important role in the occurrence of the disease. The objective of the present work was to model and forecast the effect of environment on the severity of alder Phytophthora outbreaks, and to determine whether recent climate change might explain the disease emergence. Two alder sites networks in NE and SW France were surveyed to assess the crown health of trees; the oomycete soil inoculum was also monitored in the NE network. The main factors explaining the temporal annual variation in alder crown decline or crown recovery were the mean previous winter and previous summer temperatures. Both low winter temperatures and high summer temperatures were unfavorable to the disease. Cold winters promoted tree recovery because of poor survival of the pathogen, while hot summer temperature limited the incidence of tree decline. An SIS model explaining the dynamics of the P. alni-induced alder decline was developed using the data of the NE site network and validated using the SW site network. This model was then used to simulate the frequency of declining alder over time with historical climate data. The last 40 years' weather conditions have been generally favorable to the establishment of the disease, indicating that others factors may be implicated in its emergence. The model, however, showed that the climate of SW France was much more favorable for the disease than that of the Northeast, because it seldom limited the overwintering of the pathogen. Depending on the European area, climate change could either enhance or decrease the severity of the alder decline.

  20. 76 FR 28079 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona... animal hair, 1 bag of sand, 1 lump of earth, 2 animal tails, 1 bundle of sticks, 2 carved wooden symbols...

  1. Net degradation of methyl mercury in alder swamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, Rose-Marie; Tjerngren, Ida; Drott, Andreas; Björn, Erik; Skyllberg, Ulf

    2012-12-18

    Wetlands are generally considered to be sources of methyl mercury (MeHg) in northern temperate landscapes. However, a recent input-output mass balance study during 2007-2010 revealed a black alder (Alnus glutinosa) swamp in southern Sweden to be a consistent and significant MeHg sink, with a 30-60% loss of MeHg. The soil pool of MeHg varied substantially between years, but it always decreased with distance from the stream inlet to the swamp. The soil MeHg pool was significantly lower in the downstream as compared to the upstream half of the swamp (0.66 and 1.34 ng MeHg g⁻¹ SOC⁻¹ annual average⁻¹, respectively, one-way ANOVA, p = 0.0006). In 2008 a significant decrease of %MeHg in soil was paralleled by a significant increase in potential demethylation rate constant (k(d), p landscape planning, and suggest that restored or preserved Alnus swamps may be used to mitigate MeHg produced in northern temperate landscapes.

  2. [Carbon storage and its allocation in mixed alder-cypress plantations at different age stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Bo; Liu, Shi-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Guo

    2008-07-01

    The 10-, 15-, 20- and 25-year-old mixed alder (Alnus cremastogyne)-cypress (Cupressus funebris) plantations and the 30-year-old pure cypress plantation succeeded from mixed alder-cypress plantation in the hilly area of central Sichuan Basin were chosen as test objects to study the dynamic changes and allocation patterns of their carbon storage. The results showed that the vegetation carbon storage in mixed alder-cypress plantations increased continually from the age stage of 10- to 30-year, and reached 52.40 t x hm(-2) at the age stage of 30-year. The vegetation carbon storage of arbor layer at each age stage was more than 85.59% of the total, and the soil carbon storage within 0-40 cm layer increased significantly (P 0.05). The carbon storage of the mixed alder-cypress plantations increased significantly from the age stage of 10- to 15-year, with the maximum (118.13 t x hm(-2)) at the age stage of 15-year, but declined from the age stage of 15- to 25-year while increased slightly from the age stage of 25- to 30-year. The proportion of vegetation carbon storage increased continually from the age stage of 10- to 30-year, whereas that of soil carbon storage was in adverse. Comparing with other types of plantations in China, mixed alder-cypress plantation had a lower storage of carbon.

  3. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Arizona and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. Arizona spp....

  4. Isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Frank Juul

    2011-01-01

    Næringsstoffet har i dette nummer sat fokus på ”velvære i vinterkulden”, ”indendørsaktiviteter” og ”fedtafgift”. I klummen vises det, at disse tre fokusområder, der for en umiddelbar betragtning måske nok synes noget uensartede, falder sammen i ét tema: Isolation!......Næringsstoffet har i dette nummer sat fokus på ”velvære i vinterkulden”, ”indendørsaktiviteter” og ”fedtafgift”. I klummen vises det, at disse tre fokusområder, der for en umiddelbar betragtning måske nok synes noget uensartede, falder sammen i ét tema: Isolation!...

  5. A study of the temperature dependent healing capabilities of new polymers based on Diels-Alder cycloaddition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kötteritzsch, J.; Hager, M.D.; Schubert, U.S.; Bose, R.K.; Garcia Espallargas, S.J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its thermal reversibility, the retro-Diels-Alder (RDA) reaction represents an appealing possibility to produce self-healing polymers with well-defined architectures and tunable properties [1]. However, the polymer architecture for which the Diels-Alder (DA) reaction can best be used to

  6. Arizona: In Search of the Displaced Homemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Doris

    The model described offers information about displaced homemakers that, while specific to Arizona, can provide a guide to persons in any state responsible for program planning. The report presents results of an Arizona Department of Education study which was conducted to: (1) identify the "displaced homemaker;" (2) define the need for services;…

  7. 78 FR 57923 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00029

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00029 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arizona dated 09/13/2013. Incident: Yarnell Hill Fire. Incident Period: 06/28/2013 through 07/10/2013. Effective Date:...

  8. 76 FR 42156 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arizona dated 07/11/2011. Incident: Monument Fire. Incident Period: 06/12/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  9. 76 FR 45644 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... is hereby amended to modify the incident description for this disaster from Monument Fire to Monument... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of disaster for the State of Arizona dated...

  10. Niobium(V) chloride as catalyst in Diels-Alder reaction of furan ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Deborah A. dos; Rodrigues, Ludmila R.; Arpini, Bruno H.; Lacerda Junior, Valdemar; Greco, Sandro J.; Santos, Reginaldo B. dos; Neto, Alvaro C.; Castro, Eustaquio V.R. de, E-mail: vljuniorqui@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Romao, Wanderson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFES), Vila Velha, ES (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    According to the relevant literature, the Diels-Alder reaction of furan without a catalyst can last several weeks and shows a low yield due to the diene’s low reactivity. The use of Lewis acid catalysts or high pressures is described as an effective method for improving the reaction yields. This paper describes our recent study on the use of niobium pentachloride as the catalyst in Diels-Alder reactions between furan and several reactive dienophiles, among which methyl acrylate showed good yields, especially at lower temperatures. Other dienophiles have shown lower yields because of problems such as byproduct formation and the high reversibility of the reaction. (author)

  11. Stereoselection in Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reactions of 2-Cyano-1-azadienes: Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Gidget C; Sizemore, Nicholas; Rychnovsky, Scott D

    2016-07-01

    Progress toward understanding the scope and diastereoselectivity of intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions using 2-cyano-1-azadienes is described herein. The resulting cyanoenamine products are underutilized intermediates in organic synthesis. Assembly of the Diels-Alder precursors was achieved using an improved imine condensation/oxidative cyanation protocol. By this method, several highly substituted indolizidine and quinolizidine architectures were constructed. Quantum mechanical DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level of theory were performed for these cyclizations and provide insights into the origins of the observed diastereoselectivities.

  12. Symmetry-enthalpy correlations in Diels-Alder reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvi-Arad, Inbal; Avnir, David

    2012-08-06

    Woodward-Hoffmann (WH) rules provide strict symmetry selection rules: when they are obeyed, a reaction proceeds; when they are not obeyed, there is no reaction. However, the voluminous experimental literature provides ample evidence that strict compliance to symmetry requirements is not an obstacle for a concerted reaction to proceed, and therefore the idea has developed that it is enough to have a certain degree of the required symmetry to have reactivity. Here we provide quantitative evidence of that link, and show that as one deviates from the desired symmetry, the enthalpy of activation increases, that is, we show that concerted reactions slow down the further they are from the ideal symmetry. Specifically, we study the deviation from mirror symmetry (evaluated with the continuous symmetry measure (CSM)) of the [4+2] carbon skeleton of the transition state of a series of twelve Diels-Alder reactions in seven different solvents (and in the gas phase), in which the dienes are butadiene, cyclopentadiene, cyclohexadiene, and cycloheptadiene; the dienophiles are the 1-, 1,1-, and 1,1,2-cyanoethylene derivatives; the solvents were chosen to sample a range of dielectric constants from heptane to ethanol. These components provide twenty-four symmetry-enthalpy DFT-calculated correlation lines (out of which only one case is a relatively mild exception) that show the general trend of increase in enthalpy as symmetry decreases. The various combinations between the dienophiles, cyanoethylenes, and solvents provide all kinds of sources for symmetry deviations; it is therefore remarkable that although the enthalpy of activation is dictated by various parameters, symmetry emerges as a primary parameter. In our analysis we also bisected this overall picture into solvent effects and geometry variation effects to evaluate under which conditions the electronic effects are more dominant than symmetry effects.

  13. Geothermal resources in Arizona: a bibliography. Circular 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography references all reports and maps generated by the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology and the Arizona Geothermal Commercialization Team of the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Arizona. To provide a more comprehensive listing of geothermal energy in Arizona, all available geothermal papers from other sources have been included. A total of 224 references are presented. (MHR)

  14. Arizona black rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis cerberus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    The Arizona black rattlesnake makes its home at higher elevations in Arizona and far western New Mexico. The snake's use of high-altitude habitat and its black coloration as an adult distinguishes it from other subspecies of the western rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis), which prefer lower elevations and range from tan to reddish in color as adults. These physical and habitat differences are also reflected in genetic differences that suggest that the Arizona black rattlesnake may be a new species of rattlesnake. Despite the species's limited range, basic biological information needed to make management decisions is lacking for most Arizona black rattlesnake populations. To address this need, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists conducted research on the species in Arizona national park units from 2003 to 2005. The research examined relative population abundance, movement patterns, range requirements, dietary habits, and winter and summer habitat. Research in Arizona national parks was made possible through the support of the Western National Parks Association, Tonto National Monument, and the USGS Science Internships for Workforce Diversity Program. Importantly, the park-based research was used to augment a long-term mark-recapture study of the species that has been conducted by USGS biologists at sites near Flagstaff, Arizona, since 1999. USGS researchers were the first to conduct extensive studies of this species in the wild.

  15. STRAWBERRY CRATER ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas. 9 refs.

  16. A Computational Experiment of the Endo versus Exo Preference in a Diels-Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Christopher N.; Woo, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and tested a computational laboratory that investigates an endo versus exo Diels-Alder cycloaddition. This laboratory employed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the cycloaddition of N-phenylmaleimide to furan. The endo and exo stereoisomers of the product were distinguished by building the two isomers in a…

  17. Arthropod fauna of rolled alder leaves in Washington State, United States of America (Insecta: Arachnida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alders, Alnus spp., growing on the eastern slopes and foothills of the Cascade Range in Washington State, are often infested with shelter-making (primarily leafrolling) Lepidoptera in the families Tortricidae, Gracillariidae, and Choreutidae. Over a 5 year survey period, 5,172 rolled leaves were ex...

  18. Lewis acid catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, S; Bertoncin, F; Engberts, JBFN

    1996-01-01

    Here we report the first detailed study of a Diels-Alder (DA) reaction that is catalyzed by Lewis acids in water. The effect of Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions as Lewis acid catalysts on the rate and endo-exo selectivity of the DA reaction between the bidentate dienophiles 3-phenyl-1-(2-pyridyl)-2-pr

  19. Tandem Mannich/Diels–Alder reactions for the synthesis of indole compound libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Petersen, Michael Åxman; Petersen, Rico;

    2016-01-01

    A tandem Mannich/Diels–Alder sequence for the synthesis of small-molecule libraries with an indolyl-octahydro-3a,6-epoxy-isoindole core structure is demonstrated in this study. Representative diversification examples based on this scaffold were performed, and a library is being produced within th...

  20. Surfactant-assisted specific-acid catalysis of Diels-Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, Egid B.; Engberts, Jan B. F. N.

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant-assisted specific-acid catalysis (SASAC) for Diets-Alder reactions of dienophiles 1 and 4 with cyclopentadiene 2 in aqueous media at 32 C was studied. This study showed that acidified anionic surfactants (pH 2) such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkylbenzene sulfonic acid (LA

  1. Stereoisomeric effects in thermo-remendable polymer networks based on diels-alder crosslink reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canadell, J.; Fischer, H.R.; With, G. de; Benthem, R.A.T.M. van

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis, the spectroscopic, and the thermal characterization of linear and crosslinked polymers as well as a number of corresponding model compounds, containing Diels-Alder adducts derived from furan and maleimide groups. The thermal reversibility (rDA, DA) of structurally

  2. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coope, T.S.; Turkenburg, D.H.; Fischer, H.R.; Luterbacher, R.; Bracht, H. van; Bond, I.P.

    2016-01-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side

  3. Solvent Effects in Asymmetric Hetero Diels-Alder and Ene Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Mogens; Jørgensen, Karl Anker

    1996-01-01

    The use of polar solvents such as nitromethane or 2-nitropropane leads to a significant improvement of the catalytic properties of a cationic copper-Lewis acid in the hetero Diels-Alder reaction of alkyl glyoxylates with dienes; The scope of a newly developed copper(II)-bisoxazoline catalyst...

  4. Lewis acid catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, S; Bertoncin, F; Engberts, JBFN

    1996-01-01

    Here we report the first detailed study of a Diels-Alder (DA) reaction that is catalyzed by Lewis acids in water. The effect of Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions as Lewis acid catalysts on the rate and endo-exo selectivity of the DA reaction between the bidentate dienophiles

  5. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, Egid B.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas

  6. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels-Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, E.B.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diells-Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas

  7. Stereoisomeric effects in thermo-remendable polymer networks based on diels-alder crosslink reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canadell, J.; Fischer, H.R.; With, G. de; Benthem, R.A.T.M. van

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis, the spectroscopic, and the thermal characterization of linear and crosslinked polymers as well as a number of corresponding model compounds, containing Diels-Alder adducts derived from furan and maleimide groups. The thermal reversibility (rDA, DA) of structurally

  8. Time and distance to clear wood in pruned red alder saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean S. DeBell; Constance A. Harrington; Barbara L. Gartner; Ryan. Singleton

    2006-01-01

    Pruning trials in young alder stands were sampled to evaluate response to pruning. Effects of pruning (1) live branches on different dates, and (2) dead branches with or without damaging the branch collar were assessed on trees pruned in 3- and 6-year-old plantations, respectively. Six years after pruning, stem sections were collected and dissected in the longitudinal-...

  9. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coope, T.S.; Turkenburg, D.H.; Fischer, H.R.; Luterbacher, R.; Bracht, H. van; Bond, I.P.

    2016-01-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major

  10. Biotransformation of a cage-like diels-alder adduct and derivatives by Mucor ramosissimus samutsevitsch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Felicia Megumi; Mena, Ana Elisa Maciel; Marques, Maria Rita; de Lima, Dênis Pires; Beatriz, Adilson

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the ability for biotransformation of the Diels-Alder adduct tricyclo[6.2.1.02,7]undeca-4,9-dien-3,6-dione (1) and two synthetic derivatives by the saprobe fungus Mucor ramosissimus Samutsevitsch. Products from oxidation, isomerization and, regioselective and enantioselective reduction were achieved. PMID:24031400

  11. Functionalization of organic semiconductor crystals via the Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualizza, Brittni A; Prasad, Srividya; Chiarelli, M Paul; Ciszek, Jacob W

    2013-05-18

    A surface adlayer is generated on organic single crystals (tetracene and rubrene) using the site specific Diels-Alder reaction and a series of vapor phase dienophiles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms adsorption on the surfaces of tetracene and rubrene and mass spectrometry demonstrates the reaction's applicability to a range of dienophiles.

  12. Synthesis of Novel Bisoxazoline Ligands for the Enantioselective Diels-Alder Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Hua BIAN; Jun LIU; Ming Ming YIN; Min WANG

    2006-01-01

    Four novel bisoxazoline ligands 8a-d were synthesized from (S)-amino alcohols and could be formed effective catalysts (up to 77% ee for endo isomer) with Cu(OTf)2 for enantioselective Diels-Alder addition. The facility of the reaction was dependent on the nature of the substituent R in the bisoxazoline ligand.

  13. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels-Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, E.B.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diells-Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas hy

  14. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, Egid B.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas hyd

  15. Diels-Alder Reactions in Water. Effects of Hydrophobicity and Hydrogen Bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Sijbren; Blokzijl, Wilfried; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    1994-01-01

    In order to check whether the activated complex for the Diels-Alder reactions of 5-substituted 1,4-naphthoquinones with cyclopentadiene is more polar in water than in other solvents, we have determined the substituent effects in seven different solvents. The substituent effects gradually decrease wi

  16. Recent applications of intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions to natural product synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, M.; Tanner, David Ackland

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review presents some recent examples of intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reactions as key complexity-generating steps in the total synthesis of structurally intricate natural products. The opportunities afforded by transannular (TADA) versions of the IMDA reaction in complex molecu...

  17. Mixed, short rotation culture of red alder and black cottonwood: growth, coppicing, nitrogen fixation, and allelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilman, P.; Stettler, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Alnus rubra seedlings were grown in a 1:1 mixture at a spacing of 1.2 x 1.2 m with 28 Populus clones (25 clones pf P. trichocarpa, 2 of P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa, and one P. deltoides x P. nigra) in a study established in W. Washington in March 1979. Trees were harvested at 4 yr old. At harvest, average heights were: pure Populus, 10.2 m; Populus in the mixed stand 11.0 m; and alder 8.4 m. Most Populus sprouted satisfactorily after harvest (6.6 shoots/plant when pure, 7.6 shoots/plant in the mixture), but alder sprouted poorly (3.6 shoots/plant). Above-ground biomass at harvest was 15.9 t/ha p.a. for the mixture and 16.7 t/ha p.a. for pure Populus, although the mixture had been more productive at 2 yr. Nitrogenase activity (nitrogen fixation as measured by acetylene reduction) of alder declines in the 4th season; competition was the most important factor influencing this decline. Soil N content had no effect on fixation. A pot study showed that ground Populus leaf and litter material inhibited the growth of red alder seedlings, although soil collected from Populus plots had no effect. Results indicated that allelopathy is probably a minor factor under field conditions, at most, and that growing mixed stands may, on balance, be beneficial. 20 references.

  18. Arizona Measure of Academic Progress: A First Look at Growth in Arizona Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David; Aportela, Anabel

    The Arizona Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) was developed using the Stanford 9 Achievement Test (SAT9) scores for the period from Spring 1998 to Spring 1999. The Research and Policy Division of the Arizona Department of Education matched students who took the SAT9 in Spring of 1998 and 1999. On average, 89% of students were matched per grade…

  19. Views from Inside a Pediatric Clinic: How Arizona's Political Climate Has Impacted Arizona's Youngest Latino Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Cheatham, Gregory A.; Gomez, Laura

    2013-01-01

    It is critical that we examine impacts that recent immigration policies such as SB1070 are having on Arizona's youngest Latino learners.The large number of Latinos under the age of five, and the impact that this upcoming generation of Latinos will have on all aspects of life in Arizona merits a closer look. In this qualitative study, we examined…

  20. 77 FR 25741 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona. History and Description of the Remains In 1930... individuals were identified. The three associated funerary objects are one ceramic bowl, one ceramic jar, and one ceramic pitcher. Queen Creek Ruin was a large habitation site that included trash mounds,...

  1. 78 FR 13889 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ...) to the Arizona Historical Society. In 1991, the object was transferred to the Arizona State Museum as... through identification by Hopi cultural specialists. Specific knowledge provided by the Society Priests of... by the Momngwit in the Hopi villages for the practice of the Hopi Religion. The Hopi...

  2. Diversity oriented approach to polycyclics via cross-enyne metathesis and Diels-Alder reaction as key steps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sambasivarao Kotha; Vittal Seema; Shaibal Banerjee; Mrityunjay Kumar Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclics containing biaryls have been prepared via application of cross-enyne metathesis and the Diels−Alder reaction. Here, ethylene and 1,5-hexadiene were used as a cross-metathesis partners to generate key diene intermediates.

  3. Synthetic studies on taxanes: A domino-enyne metathesis/Diels-Alder approach to the AB-ring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna P Kaliappan; Velayutham Ravikumar; Sandip A Pujari

    2008-01-01

    A domino enyne cross-metathesis/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction has been successfully used to synthesize a bicyclo[5.3.1] undecene, corresponding to AB-ring of taxol without the gem dimethyl group.

  4. Red alder trees distribution in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002 summarized for NHDPlus v2 catchments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the basal area of red alder trees within each incremental watershed delineated in...

  5. Asymmetric Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction of Chiral Imines with Danishefsky' s Diene Catalyzed by Yb(OTf) 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN, Chang- Tao; WANG, Long-Cheng; CHEN,Rui-Fang

    2001-01-01

    Rcaction of chirai imines with Danishefsky' s diene in the presence of a catalytic amount (20 mol% ) of ytterbium trffiate afforded the corresponding hetero Diels-Alder adducts with a moderate to good diastereoselectivity.

  6. Growth of Fullerene Fragments Using the Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction: First Step towards a C60 Synthesis by Dimerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio A. Alonso

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Density Functional Theory has been used to model the Diels-Alder reactions of the fullerene fragments triindenetriphenilene and pentacyclopentacorannulene with ethylene and 1,3-butadiene. The purpose is to prove the feasibility of using Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions to grow fullerene fragments step by step, and to dimerize fullerene fragments, as a way to obtain C60. The dienophile character of the fullerene fragments is dominant, and the reaction of butadiene with pentacyclopentacorannulene is favored.

  7. SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning (David) Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

    2005-09-30

    The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

  8. Inclusion property and Diels-Alder reaction of bis (diphenyl-phosphine oxide) butadiyne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Ming-Xia(李明霞); LI, Jin-Liang(李金亮); WANG, Yong-Mei(王永梅); MENG, Ji-Ben(孟继本)

    2000-01-01

    The host molecule, bis( diphenylphosphine oxide ) butadiyne (2), includes a variety of guests to form five complexes (2a-2e). In addition, the Diels-Alder reaction between 2 and anthracene gives 9, 9', 10, 10'-tetrahedron-9, 9', 10, 10'-bi-ethenoantracene- 11, 11'-bis ( diphenylphosphine oxide ) ( 3 )which is a potential di-π-methane reactant and can undergo photorearrangement.

  9. Acidification Sources in Red Alder and Douglas-Fir Soils -- Importance of Nitrification

    OpenAIRE

    Miegroet, Helga Van; Cole, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation, throughfall, forest floor, and soil leachate samples were monitored continuously in 1981 and 1982 in a N-poor Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] forest and a red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) forest growing adjacently on a glacial soil in western Washington. The purpose of the study was to quantify the relative importance of atmospheric vs. natural sources of H+ input to forest soil acidification, and to determine the role of N transformation processes in the overa...

  10. Diels−Alder Reactions of Acyclic 2-Azadienes: A Semiempirical Molecular Orbital Study

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa M. V. D. Pinho e Melo; Fausto, Rui; Gonsalves, António M. d'A. Rocha

    1998-01-01

    Molecular orbital calculations (AM1) have been performed to obtain the frontier orbitals' (HOMO and LUMO) energies and polarization of a series of acyclic 2-azadienes. The results are used to rationalize the reactivity of the compounds studied with both electron-rich and electron-deficient dienophiles as well as the observed regioselectivity of the corresponding Diels−Alder reactions. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo980090e

  11. Microwave-Mediated Hetero Diels-Alder reaction: Synthesis of biologically active compounds

    OpenAIRE

    D’Aurizio, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Heterocyclic compounds represent almost two-thirds of all the known organic compounds: they are widely distributed in nature and play a key role in a huge number of biologically important molecules including some of the most significant for human beings. A powerful tool for the synthesis of such compounds is the hetero Diels-Alder reaction (HDA), that involve a [4+2] cycloaddition reaction between heterodienes and suitable dienophiles. Among heterodienes to be used in such six-membered ...

  12. Ethnic Segregation in Arizona Charter Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey D. Cobb

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the criticisms of charter schools is their potential to further stratify schools along ethnic and class lines. This study addressed whether Arizona charter schools are more ethnically segregated than traditional public schools. In 1996-97, Arizona had nearly one in four of all charter schools in the United States. The analysis involved a series of comparisons between the ethnic compositions of adjacent charter and public schools in Arizona's most populated region and its rural towns. This methodology differed from the approach of many evaluations of charter schools and ethnic stratification in that it incorporated the use of geographic maps to compare schools' ethnic make-ups. The ethnic compositions of 55 urban and 57 rural charter schools were inspected relative to their traditional public school neighbors.

  13. March 2016 Arizona thoracic society ntoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The March 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 17 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Of note, Dr. Elijah Poulos drove from Flagstaff to attend the meeting. Dr. Rick Robbins gave a summary of ATS Hill Day and the possibility of collecting dues for the Arizona Thoracic Society along with American Thoracic Society dues. Dr. Robbins also presented the results of emailing the Table of Contents of the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care to the ATS members in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Nevada along with listing the contents in Inspirations the California Thoracic Society newsletter. The number of page views doubled over usual the following day. Dr. George Parides presented a short presentation on whether coccidioidomycosis nodules ...

  14. March 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was a special meeting. In conjunction with the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and the Arizona Respiratory Center the Eighteenth Annual Farness Lecture was held in the Sonntag Pavilion at St. Joseph's Hospital at 6 PM on Friday, April 4, 2014. The guest speaker was Antonio "Tony" Catanzaro, MD from the University of California San Diego and current president of the Cocci Study Group. There were 57 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and infectious disease communities. After opening remarks by Arizona Thoracic Society president, Lewis Wesselius (a former fellow under Dr. Catanzaro at UCSD, John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, gave a brief history of the Farness lecture before introducing Dr. Catanzaro. The lecture is named for Orin J. Farness, a Tucson physician, who was the first to report culture positive coccidioidomycosis (cocci or Valley Fever. ...

  15. Factors for converting hazelnut (Corylus avellana L) into black alder (Alnus glutinosa Yalt.) plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkaya, Ali; Durkaya, Birsen

    2009-07-01

    Hazelnut plantations, which are a major source of income for the villagers in the eastern Black sea region are notable to provide sufficient income to the villagers due to price fluctuations and sudden falls witnessed in recent years. Alternative investments in place of hazelnut cultivation are being investigated in order to prevent migration to urban areas and to increase the welfare of the rural population in the region. Black alder plantation investments have been assessed as one of the most essential alternative investment tools within the framework of the study Assessment was carried out by comparing expected possible net present values (NPV). Although value increase occurs 12-18 years later more income can be obtained through black alder than hazelnut plantation. In hazelnut plantations, the best NPV emerged in the lower zone. NPV was positive in the moderate zone but values were close to zero. In upper zone, positive NPV couldn't emerge. As a result, it was understood that black alder plantation investment is an effective alternative for hazelnut plantations.

  16. Light-induced hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition: a facile and selective photoclick reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2011-04-13

    2-Napthoquinone-3-methides (oNQMs) generated by efficient photodehydration (Φ=0.2) of 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol undergo facile hetero-Diels-Alder addition (k(D-A)∼ 4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) to electron-rich polarized olefins in an aqueous solution. The resulting photostable benzo[g]chromans are produced in high to quantitative yield. The unreacted oNQM is rapidly hydrated (k(H2O) ∼145 s(-1)) to regenerate the starting diol. This competition between hydration and cycloaddition makes oNQMs highly selective, since only vinyl ethers and enamines are reactive enough to form the Diels-Alder adduct in an aqueous solution; no cycloaddition was observed with other types of alkenes. To achieve photolabeling or photoligation of two substrates, one is derivatized with a vinyl ether moiety, while 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol is attached to the other via an appropriate linker. The light-induced Diels-Alder "click" strategy permits the formation of either a permanent or hydrolytically labile linkage. Rapid kinetics of this photoclick reaction (k=4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) is useful for time-resolved applications. The short lifetime (τ ∼7 ms in H(2)O) of the active form of the photoclick reagent prevents its migration from the site of irradiation, thus, allowing for spatial control of the ligation or labeling.

  17. Italian alder (Alnus cordata/Loisel./Desf. - new species for Allochtonous dendroflora of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobinac Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The foreign tree species, Alnus cordata/Loisel./Desf. (Italian alder, (Betulaceae/Loisel./Duby, not previously recorded in the dendroflora of Serbia, is described in this paper. Italian alder trees in an experimental plot in the area of Erdevik, aged 11 years, show good vitality and fast growth, and bear fruits since their 10th year. Tree heights are in range from 10.4 to 16.2 m, and diameters at the breast height range from14.6 to 34.9 cm. The morphological properties of leaves, fruiting organs (“cones” and male catkins are in concordance with the values in literature sources, although they show great variability. Since the time of plantation establishment, the absolute minimum air temperature in the nearby meteorological station of Sremska Mitrovica was -26.50C, so it can be assumed that the species is frost hardy. On the basis of the researched properties of Italian alder, it can be concluded that this species can be cultivated in Serbia as an ornamental in urban areas and as a fast growing species in forest plantations for biomass production. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 31041: Šumski zasadi u funkciji povećanja pošumljenosti Srbije

  18. A comparative study on plant diversity in alder (Alnus subcordata stands of natural and plantation areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEYED ALIAKBAR REZAEI TALESHI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diversity index is the useful criteria for evaluating sustainability of forest ecosystems. Current study carried out in Alder (Alnus subcordata C.A. Meyer stands that located in north forests of Iran. The aim of the study is express the plant diversity indices and positive role of the trees both natural and plantation forms. Data of Alder trees and associated species were recorded in sample plots which lay down in study area randomly. The abundance, density, percentage of frequency of each species was calculated by standard methods. The results of analysis revealed that, 47 species (21 trees and shrubs species and 26 herbaceous species were abundant in 80 sample plots both in natural and plantations Alder stands. Whilst the results showed that the number of species in natural area (44 species was more than plantation stands (37 species. Comparison of species distribution in different physiographical situation showed that some species such as Alnus subcordata, Parrotia persica, Rubus hyrcanus and Prunus sp. recorded in spread rang of physiographic variables as elevation, slopes and aspects. The biodiversity criteria as Shannon H’ and Simpsons D and 1/D indexes showed that they were more in natural stands than plantation areas.

  19. Geothermal resources in Arizona: a bibliography. Circular 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    All reports and maps generated by the Geothermal Project of the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology and the Arizona Geothermal Commercialization Team of the University of Arizona are listed. In order to provide a more comprehensive listing of geothermal papers from other sources have been included. There are 224 references in the bibliography. (MHR)

  20. Willow Fire Near Payson, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    On July 3, 2004, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite acquired this image of the Willow fire near Payson, Arizona. The image is being used by the United States Department of Agriculture's Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (RSAC). The image combines data from the visible and infrared wavelength regions to highlight: the burned areas in dark red; the active fires in red-orange; vegetation in green; and smoke in blue. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. Science Team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrated system and applying Earth System Science to improve prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards using the unique vantage point of space. Size: 34 by 41

  1. Can an Alder Disease Influence the Controls of Ecosystem Water Flux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrs-Richey, J. K.; Mulder, C. P.; Ruess, R. W.; Winton, L. M.; Stanosz, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    In Alaska, nitrogen-fixing shrubs (Alnus spp.) comprise a large component of the vegetation and are important for water and energy flux in the Alaskan tundra, the Interior boreal forest, and south-central Alaska. Recently there has been high incidence and severity of a canker disease on Alnus which alters small scale controls (e.g., leaves, branches) of water and carbon flux and may have ecosystem scale effects in severely diseased areas. The fungal pathogen, Valsa melanodiscus (anamorph =Cytospora umbrina), kills active xylem and phloem, causes long, girdling cankers on stems, and is frequently associated with stem mortality in the thin leaf alder (Alnus tenuifolia) and green alder (Alnus crispa). We are just beginning to understand how this canker disease affects the physiology of its host and the implications for water loss and carbon fixation. An inoculation experiment at the University of Alaska is currently being conducted on well-watered and water-limited green alders to: 1) monitor the response of the water transport system to infection and canker development; 2) assess the ability of colonized alders to adjust water use efficiency; and 3) measure the effect of canker development on photosynthesis. Only 4 weeks after inoculation, stems (3-5 mm diam.) with incipient cankers had an overall reduction in total daily water loss and up to 50 percent decrease in daily peak water loss. Stems with incipient cankers were also unable to attain the maximum photosynthetic rate of healthy stems, and had lower light saturation points and quantum efficiencies. Further quantification of these relationships is underway. This study, in combination with recent field measurements of sapflow, will allow us to estimate the impact of varying degrees of disease severity on stand-level water flux. Alders are a keystone species and are currently responding to climate change by expanding into the Alaska tundra, increasing abundance in northern Alaska, and migrating into river

  2. Lower Colorado River GRP Dams and Water Retention Structures, Arizona, 2012, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Location of dams and water retention structures as compiled from multiple sources by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ). The data are "sensitive"...

  3. Amphibian acoustic data from the Arizona 1, Pinenut, and Canyon breccia pipe uranium mines in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Jo E.; Hossack, Blake R.; Honeycutt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The data consists of a summary of amphibian acoustic recordings at Canyon, Arizona 1, and Pinenut mines near the Grand Canyon. USGS is currently conducting biological surveys associated with uranium mines on federal lands in Arizona. These surveys include determining the composition of the local amphibian community. Original raw acoustic recordings used to create this summary data table are archived at Columbia Environmental Research Center.

  4. Censorship and Arizona Schools: 1966-1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelson, Kenneth L.

    1969-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey of 277 secondary English teachers in 103 schools to determine the effect of censorship on English teaching in Arizona from 1966 to 1968. Listed are the numbers of teachers responding positively and negatively to each of 30 yes-or-no questions, revealing that 46.43% of the respondents had encountered…

  5. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome letters from…

  6. Coccidiodomycosis in Arizona 2007-2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-13

    This podcast looks at the impact of Coccidioidomycosis, or Valley Fever, in Arizona in 2007 and early 2008. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Tom Chiller discusses what researchers learned about this fungal disease.  Created: 10/13/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/27/2010.

  7. 50 CFR 32.22 - Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., T.11N, R 17W as posted. Exceptions: Arizona Wildlife Management Areas 16A and 44A. D. Sport Fishing..., all Service property in Brown Canyon, all Service property within 1/4 mile (.4 km) of refuge.... There is no bag limit. 2. Conditions A1 through A3, B2, and B3 apply. D. Sport Fishing. Cabeza...

  8. Agents of Culture in Rural Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Penny

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Art in Arizona Towns Project, through which rural community colleges sponsor three- to six-day visits/residencies by performing artists who perform, lecture, and conduct classes and workshops for schools and community groups. Discusses the project's benefits for the rural communities and the artists, and logistical and financial…

  9. July 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The July 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, July 23, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. It was decided to continue holding the meeting on the fourth Wednesday of the odd numbered months. Lewis Wesselius relayed a request from the Mayo Clinic regarding a survey on how physicians in Arizona treat Valley Fever. There were no objections to using our mailing list to send out the survey. Dr. Parides formed a committee to encourage younger clinicians to attend the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. Richard A. Robbins was chose as the Arizona Thoracic Society's nominee for clinician of the year. There were 3 case presentations: 1. George Parides presented a 58-year-old woman with a past medical history of cavitating coccidioidomycosis in both ...

  10. August 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/27/14 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A presentation was given by Julie Reid of the American Lung Association in Arizona on their Lung Force initiative. This is an initiative to make women more aware that lung cancer is the number 1 cause of cancer deaths in women. There will be a fund raising Lung Force Walk on November 15, 2014 in Phoenix. More information can be found at http://www.lungforce.org/walk-events or http://www.lung.org/associations/states/arizona/local-offices/phoenix/ or contact Julie Reid at JReid@Lung Arizona.org or (602 258-7505. A discussion was instigated by Dr. Parides on whether there is an increased risk of clinical Valley Fever in patients previously treated who begin therapy with biological therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. The ...

  11. Pyrrole PMOs, incorporating new N-heterocyclic compounds on an ethene-PMO through Diels–Alder reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, Dolores; De Canck, Els [Center for Ordered Materials, Organometallics and Catalysis, Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Jiménez-Sanchidrián, César [Department of Organic Chemistry, Nanochemistry and Fine Chemistry Research Institute (IUIQFN), Faculty of Sciences, University of Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, Marie Curie Building, Ctra. Nnal. IV, km 396, 14071 Córdoba (Spain); Romero-Salguero, Francisco J., E-mail: qo2rosaf@uco.es [Department of Organic Chemistry, Nanochemistry and Fine Chemistry Research Institute (IUIQFN), Faculty of Sciences, University of Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, Marie Curie Building, Ctra. Nnal. IV, km 396, 14071 Córdoba (Spain); Van Der Voort, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.vandervoort@ugent.be [Center for Ordered Materials, Organometallics and Catalysis, Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-11-14

    The ethenylene bridges on the walls of an ethenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica were successfully modified with a variety of pyrrole derivatives – pyrrole, methylpyrrole, dimethylpyrrole, trimethylpyrrole and 1-phenylpyrrole – through Diels–Alder reactions. X-ray diffraction measurements and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption analysis confirmed the preservation of the ordering and mesoporosity of the parent material as well as the decoration of the pores with the surface Diels–Alder adducts. Moreover, other techniques such as DRIFT, {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonances revealed the formation of the surface N-heterocyclic compounds at the parent ethenylene sites. - Highlights: • Chemical modification of the double bonds on an ethene-PMO through the Diels–Alder reaction. • A family of pyrrole derivatives act as dienes in the Diels–Alder reaction. • Well-ordering and mesoporosity are retained after the post-functionalization. • N-containing compounds on the surface of ethene-PMO are present after the Diels–Alder reaction.

  12. Biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogels to control release of dexamethasone through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry for adipose tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Zhang, Ziwei; Mao, Jiahui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Tan, Huaping, E-mail: hptan@njust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Hu, Xiaohong [School of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2015-11-01

    A robust synthetic strategy of biopolymer-based hydrogels has been developed where hyaluronic acid derivatives reacted through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry without the involvement of chemical catalysts, allowing for control and sustain release of dexamethasone. To conjugate the hydrogel, furan and maleimide functionalized hyaluronic acid were synthesized, respectively, as well as furan functionalized dexamethasone, for the covalent immobilization. Chemical structure, gelation time, morphologies, swelling kinetics, weight loss, compressive modulus and dexamethasone release of the hydrogel system in PBS at 37 °C were studied. The results demonstrated that the aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry provides an extremely selective reaction and proceeds with high efficiency for hydrogel conjugation and covalent immobilization of dexamethasone. Cell culture results showed that the dexamethasone immobilized hydrogel was noncytotoxic and preserved proliferation of entrapped human adipose-derived stem cells. This synthetic approach uniquely allows for the direct fabrication of biologically functionalized gel scaffolds with ideal structures for adipose tissue engineering, which provides a competitive alternative to conventional conjugation techniques such as copper mediated click chemistry. - Highlights: • A biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogel was crosslinked via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone was covalently immobilized into the hyaluronic acid hydrogel via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone could be released from the Diels–Alder hyaluronic acid hydrogel in a controlled fashion.

  13. Enantioselective Cu-II-Catalyzed Diels-Alder and Michael Addition Reactions in Water Using Bio-Inspired Triazacyclophane-Based Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, H. Bauke; Rosati, Fiora; Coquiere, David; Roelfes, Gerard; Liskamp, Rob M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A triazacyclophane (TAC) scaffold decorated with three histidine amino acid residues was used as a tridentate ligand in asymmetric copper(II)-catalysed Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions in water. Enantiomeric excesses up to 55% were obtained in Diels-Alder reactions using ligands in which t

  14. Solvent effects on a Diels-Alder reaction involving a cationic diene: Consequences of the absence of hydrogen-bond interactions for accelerations in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, Gerben K.; Wijnen, Jan W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the influence of hydrogen-bond interactions on the accelerations of Diels-Alder reactions in water and highly aqueous mixed solvent systems, second-order rate constants for the Diels-Alder reaction of acridizinium bromide (1a) with cyclopentadiene (CP) have been measured in aqueous

  15. Solvent effects on a Diels-Alder reaction involving a cationic diene : Consequences of the absence of hydrogen-bond interactions for accelerations in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, Gerben K. van der; Wijnen, Jan W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the influence of hydrogen-bond interactions on the accelerations of Diels-Alder reactions in water and highly aqueous mixed solvent systems, second-order rate constants for the Diels-Alder reaction of acridizinium bromide (1a) with cyclopentadiene (CP) have been measured in aqueous

  16. Enantioselective Cu-II-Catalyzed Diels-Alder and Michael Addition Reactions in Water Using Bio-Inspired Triazacyclophane-Based Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, H. Bauke; Rosati, Fiora; Coquiere, David; Roelfes, Gerard; Liskamp, Rob M. J.

    A triazacyclophane (TAC) scaffold decorated with three histidine amino acid residues was used as a tridentate ligand in asymmetric copper(II)-catalysed Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions in water. Enantiomeric excesses up to 55% were obtained in Diels-Alder reactions using ligands in which

  17. A new biopesticide from a local Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis (Xd3) against alder leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eski, Ardahan; Demir, İsmail; Sezen, Kazım; Demirbağ, Zihni

    2017-05-01

    Use of chemical pesticides in agriculture harms humans, non-target organisms and environments, and causes increase resistance against chemicals. In order to develop an effective bio-pesticide against coleopterans, particularly against Agelastica alni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) which is one of the serious pests of alder leaf and hazelnut, we tested the insecticidal effect of 21 Bacillus isolates against the larvae and adults of the pest. Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis-Xd3 (Btt-Xd3) showed the highest insecticidal effect based on screening tests. For toxin protein production and high sporulation of Xd3, the most suitable medium, pH and temperature conditions were determined as nutrient broth medium enriched with salts, pH 7 and 30 °C, respectively. Sporulated Btt-Xd3 in nutrient broth medium enriched with salts transferred to fermentation medium containing soybean flour, glucose and salts. After fermentation, the mixture was dried in a spray dryer, and spore count of the powder product was determined as 1.6 × 10(10) c.f.u. g(-1). Moisture content, suspensibility and wettability of the formulation were determined as 8.3, 86% and 21 s, respectively. Lethal concentrations (LC50) of formulated Btt-Xd3 were determined as 0.15 × 10(5) c.f.u. ml(-1) for larvae at laboratory conditions. LC50 values were also determined as 0.45 × 10(6) c.f.u. ml(-1) at the field condition on larval stage. Our results showed that a new bio-pesticide developed from B. thuringiensis tenebrionis (Xd3) (Btt-Xd3) may be valuable as a biological control agent for coleopteran pests.

  18. Insight on mendable resin made by combining Diels-Alder epoxy adducts with DGEBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Iacono, S.; Martone, A.; Filippone, G.; Acierno, D.; Zarrelli, M.; Giordano, M.; Amendola, E.

    2016-05-01

    Formation of micro-cracks is a critical problem in polymers and polymer composites during their service in structural applications. In this context, materials endowed with self-healing features would lead to the next polymers generation. In the present paper, an epoxy system integrating Diels-Alder epoxy adducts is investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis. The direct and retro D-A reaction have been studied by FTIR and specific absorption bands have been identified. Finally, mechanical tests have been performed on the system. The polymer is able to heal fracture and micro-cracks recovering its stiffness after a thermal treatment.

  19. Unsaturated aldehydes as alkene equivalents in the Diels-Alder reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarning, Esben; Madsen, Robert

    2008-01-01

    with no electron-withdrawing substituents. In this way, the aldehyde group serves as a traceless control element to direct the cycloaddition reaction. The Diels-Alder reactions are performed in a diglyme solution in the presence of a catalytic amount of boron trifluoride etherate. Subsequent quenching of the Lewis...... acid, addition of 0.3% of [Rh-(dppp)(2)Cl] and heating to reflux achieves the ensuing decarbonylation to afford the product cyclohexenes. Under these conditions, acrolein, crotonaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde have been reacted with a variety of 1,3-dienes to afford cyclohexenes in overall yields between...

  20. Correlation between carbon-carbon bond length and the ease of retro Diels-Alder reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sambasivarao Kotha; Shaibal Banerjee; Mobin Shaikh

    2014-09-01

    The bond length between C8-C9 in (1′R,4′S,4a′R,8a′S)-6′,7′-dimethyl-1′,4′,4a′,8a′-tetrahydrospiro [cyclopropane-1,9′-[1,4]methanonaphthalene]-5′,8′-dione is 1.571 (2) Å and between C7-C12 is 1.567 (2) Å which are longer than the corresponding bond length for saturated bicyclic systems (1.531-1.535Å). This paper reports the correlation between bond length and the ease of retro Diels−Alder reaction.

  1. Imino Diels-Alder Reaction Catalyzed by Iodine: Efficient Synthesis of Tetrahydroquinolines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Yun-Cheng; ZHANG, Jun-Min; DONG, Li-Ting; YAN, Ming

    2006-01-01

    Iodine was found to be an efficient catalyst for the imino Diels-Alder reaction of N-arylimine with enol ethers to provide tetrahydroquinolines in good yields. The influence of the loading of iodine, reaction solvent, the structure of imine and enol ethers was studied. One pot synthesis of tetrahydroquinolines from aldehyde, aniline and enol ethers catalyzed by iodine was also applicable and provided tetrahydroquinolines in comparable yields. Mild reaction conditions, facile experimental procedure, low price of iodine and good yield of products render this new method attractive for practical synthesis of many tetrahydroquinoline derivatives.

  2. 1-Azadienes as regio- and chemoselective dienophiles in aminocatalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Gu, Jing; Teng, Bin; Zhou, Qing-Qing; Li, Rui; Chen, Ying-Chun

    2013-12-20

    Electron-deficient 1-aza-1,3-butadienes containing a 1,2-benzoisothiazole-1,1-dioxide or 1,2,3-benzoxathiazine-2,2-dioxide motif act as regio- and chemoselective dienophiles in normal-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions with HOMO-raised trienamines, rather than typical 4π-participation in inverse-electron-demand versions. The enantioenriched cycloadducts could be efficiently converted to spiro or fused frameworks with high structural and stereogenic complexity by a sequential aza-benzoin reaction or other transformations.

  3. Enantio- and Periselective Nitroalkene Diels-Alder Reactions Catalyzed by Helical-Chiral Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhili Peng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helical-chiral double hydrogen bond donor catalysts promote the nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction in an enantio- and periselective manner. This represents the first asymmetric catalytic nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction via LUMO-lowering catalysis. To gain an insight into this new process, the substrate scope of our catalyst was investigated by exploiting readily available 5-substituted pentamethylcyclopentadienes. The catalyst was found to tolerate dienes with different steric demands as well as dienes substituted with heteroatoms. The synthetic utility of 5-substituted pentamethylcyclopentadienes is rather limited, and thus we have developed a three-step route to 1,4,5,5-tetrasubstituted cyclopentadienes from commercially available ketones.

  4. Assessment of a novel alder biorefinery concept to meet demands of economics feasibility, energy production and long term environmental sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tobias; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe

    2012-01-01

    A biorefinery concept based on alder tree plantations on degenerated or marginalized soils is developed to illustrate how it is possible to comply with indicators of economic feasibility, fossil fuel depletion concerns and long term sustainability issues. The biorefinery is based on grey alder (A...... system Energy Return on energy Invested 4.4, total system Exergy Return on exergy Invested 3.5, Net Energy Output 78 GJ/ha/year, Net Exergy Output 50 GJ/ha/year, Net carbon sequestration 0.8 ton CO2-eq/ha/year, Total product value 2030 euro/ha/year and Net Dry Matter Removal 90%....

  5. Enantio- and periselective nitroalkene Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by helical-chiral hydrogen bond donor catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhili; Narcis, Maurice J; Takenaka, Norito

    2013-08-19

    Helical-chiral double hydrogen bond donor catalysts promote the nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction in an enantio- and periselective manner. This represents the first asymmetric catalytic nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction via LUMO-lowering catalysis. To gain an insight into this new process, the substrate scope of our catalyst was investigated by exploiting readily available 5-substituted pentamethylcyclopentadienes. The catalyst was found to tolerate dienes with different steric demands as well as dienes substituted with heteroatoms. The synthetic utility of 5-substituted pentamethylcyclopentadienes is rather limited, and thus we have developed a three-step route to 1,4,5,5-tetrasubstituted cyclopentadienes from commercially available ketones.

  6. Assessment of a novel alder biorefinery concept to meet demands of economics feasibility, energy production and long term environmental sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tobias; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe

    2012-01-01

    A biorefinery concept based on alder tree plantations on degenerated or marginalized soils is developed to illustrate how it is possible to comply with indicators of economic feasibility, fossil fuel depletion concerns and long term sustainability issues. The biorefinery is based on grey alder...... system Energy Return on energy Invested 4.4, total system Exergy Return on exergy Invested 3.5, Net Energy Output 78 GJ/ha/year, Net Exergy Output 50 GJ/ha/year, Net carbon sequestration 0.8 ton CO2-eq/ha/year, Total product value 2030 euro/ha/year and Net Dry Matter Removal 90%....

  7. Evaluation of geothermal cooling systems for Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    Arizona consumes nearly 50 percent more electricity during the peak summer season of May through part of October, due to the high cooling load met by electrical-driven air conditioning units. This study evaluates two geothermal-driven cooling systems that consume less electricity, namely, absorption cooling and heat pumps. Adsorption cooling requires a geothermal resource above 105{sup 0}C (220{sup 0}F) in order to operate at a reasonable efficiency and capacity. Geothermal resources at these temperatures or above are believed existing in the Phoenix and Tucson areas, but at such depths that geothermal-driven absorption systems have high capital investments. Such capital investments are uneconomical when paid out over only five months of operation each year, but become economical when cascaded with other geothermal uses. There may be other regions of the state, where geothermal resources exist at 105{sup 0}C (220{sup 0}F) or higher at much less depth, such as the Casa Grande/Coolidge or Hyder areas, which might be attractive locations for future plants of the high-technology industries. Geothermal assisted heat pumps have been shown in this study to be economical for nearly all areas of Arizona. They are more economical and reliable than air-to-air heat pumps. Such systems in Arizona depend upon a low-temperature geothermal resource in the narrow range of 15.5 to 26.6{sup 0}C (60 to 80{sup 0}F), and are widely available in Arizona. The state has over 3000 known (existing) thermal wells, out of a total of about 30,000 irrigation wells.

  8. November 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The November Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 11/20/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 26 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, nursing, radiology, and infectious disease communities. As per the last meeting a separate area for upcoming meetings has been created in the upper left hand corner of the home page on the SWJPCC website. A short presentation was made by Timothy Kuberski MD, Chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa Medical Center, entitled “Clinical Evidence for Coccidioidomycosis as an Etiology for Sarcoidosis”. Isaac Yourison, a medical student at the University of Arizona, will be working with Dr. Kuberski on his scholarly project. Mr. Yourison hypothesizes that certain patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis in Arizona really have coccidioidomycosis. It would be predicted that because of the immunosuppression, usually due to steroids, the sarcoidosis patients would eventually express the Coccidioides infection. The investigators will be …

  9. March 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There 11 attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, thoracic surgery and radiology communities. There was a discussion of supporting the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced into the Arizona State Legislature. The bill was assigned to the House Commerce Committee but was not scheduled for a hearing by the Chair-Representative, Jeff Wininger from Chandler. It seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced in the future and the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Three cases were presented: 1. Dr. Bridgett Ronan presented a 57-year-old man with cough and shortness of breath. His physical examination and spirometry were unremarkable. A thoracic CT scan showed large calcified and noncalcified pleural plaques and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. …

  10. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  11. February 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The February 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society was a dinner meeting sponsored by Select Specialty Hospital and held on Wednesday, 2/26/2014 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Gerald Swartzberg was presented a plaque as the Arizona Thoracic Society clinician of the year by George Parides (Figure 1. A discussion was held about having a wine tasting in San Diego at the ATS International Conference. Peter Wagner (Slurping Around with PDW has agreed to lead the conference. It was decided to extend invitations to the New Mexico, Colorado and California Thoracic Societies along with the Mayo Clinic. A question was raised about guideline development. It was felt that we should review the Infectious Disease Society of America Valley Fever guidelines and determine if the Arizona Thoracic Society might have something to contribute. Three cases were presented: Lewis ...

  12. University of Arizona Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Joseph; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2012-12-31

    Boiled down to its essentials, the grant’s purpose was to develop and demonstrate the viability of compressed air energy storage (CAES) for use in renewable energy development. While everyone agrees that energy storage is the key component to enable widespread adoption of renewable energy sources, the development of a viable scalable technology has been missing. The Department of Energy has focused on expanded battery research and improved forecasting, and the utilities have deployed renewable energy resources only to the extent of satisfying Renewable Portfolio Standards. The lack of dispatchability of solar and wind-based electricity generation has drastically increased the cost of operation with these components. It is now clear that energy storage coupled with accurate solar and wind forecasting make up the only combination that can succeed in dispatchable renewable energy resources. Conventional batteries scale linearly in size, so the price becomes a barrier for large systems. Flow batteries scale sub-linearly and promise to be useful if their performance can be shown to provide sufficient support for solar and wind-base electricity generation resources. Compressed air energy storage provides the most desirable answer in terms of scalability and performance in all areas except efficiency. With the support of the DOE, Tucson Electric Power and Science Foundation Arizona, the Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy (AzRISE) at the University of Arizona has had the opportunity to investigate CAES as a potential energy storage resource.

  13. September 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There was a discussion of the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced the last session in the Arizona State Legislature. Since it seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced, the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Dr. Rick Robbins announced that the SWJPCC has applied to be included in PubMed. In addition, Dr. Robbins was assigned the task of tracking down the campaign contributions to congressional members from the tobacco PAC before the next election. There were 7 case presentations: 1.\tAshley L. Garrett, MD, pulmonary fellow at Mayo, presented an elderly man with insulin-dependent diabetes who felt he …

  14. December 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Robbins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A breakfast meeting of the Arizona Thoracic Society and the Tucson winter lung series was held on Saturday, 12/14/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center Campus beginning at 8:30 AM. There were 31 in attendance. A lecture was presented by Joe G. N. "Skip" Garcia, MD, the senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. The title of Garcia’s talk was “Personalizing Medicine in Cardiopulmonary Disorders: The Post ACA Landscape”. Garcia began with reiterating that the Affordable Care Act (ACA, Obamacare is fact and could pose a threat to academic medical centers. However, he views the ACA as an opportunity to develop personalized medicine which grew from the human genome project. Examples cited included the genetic variability among patients in determining the dose of warfarin and bronchodilator response to beta agonists in asthma (1,2. Garcia’s laboratory has studied predominately 6 diseases including the …

  15. Salmonellosis in a free-ranging population of javelinas (Pecari tajacu) in south central Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shender, Lisa A; Glock, Robert D; Spraker, Terry R

    2009-10-01

    The javelina, or collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), is indigenous to Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas in the United States and ranges throughout Latin America. From June 2004 to April 2005, an estimated 105 javelinas died in a mortality event that occurred in Tucson, Arizona, and neighboring areas. Clinical signs observed in sick animals included emaciation, dehydration, lethargy, and diarrhea. In addition, some animals showed labored breathing and hind limb weakness. We necropsied 34 animals, and enteritis was the most frequent clinical sign, followed by colitis, pulmonary congestion, and pneumonia. The only consistent findings were isolations of Clostridium perfringens type A and multiple Salmonella serotypes. Although it is likely that these javelinas ultimately succumbed to salmonellosis, it is unclear whether other unidentified underlying factors were involved. This is the first reported case of widespread salmonellosis in free-ranging javelinas.

  16. New River and Phoenix City Streams, Arizona. Overall Master Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    State University , An Archeological Survey of the Cave Buttes Dam Alternative Site and Reservoir, Arizona, Anthropological Research Paper No. 8, by...Athletic fields will accommodate football, baseball, field hockey, and soccer games. Local interests will construct a bicyclists’ hostel and information...Arizona State University , An Archeological Survey of the Cave Buttes Dam All-’rnative Site and Reservoir, Arizona, Anthropological Research Paper No

  17. A reação de Diels-Alder no início do século vinte um The Diels-Alder reaction at the beginning of the twenty-first century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy John Brocksom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Diels-Alder reaction continues to be the premier method for the construction of complex organic molecules. In the last 10 years many developments have been introduced, and have led to increased utility of this reaction. In this review we present some of these novelties, which are of fundamental importance in organic synthesis.

  18. Life history attributes data for Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus) in Arizona 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus (commonly referred to as the Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow) occurs in the desert and plains grasslands of southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico, and northern Sonora, Mexico. Although a subspecies of conservation concern, this data was produced as part of the first intensive study of its life history and breeding ecology, providing baseline data and facilitating comparisons with other North American Grasshopper Sparrow subspecies. This study is described in the publication listed in the larger work citation of this metadata record. 

  19. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction. PMID:27731360

  20. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-10-12

    The Diels-Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction.

  1. Colour Changes Evaluation of Freshly Cut Alder Veneers Under the Influence of Indoor Sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Adela SALCA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental study concerning the colour changes occurred on the surfaces ofblack alder veneers (Alnus glutinosa, obtained from a freshly cut (not treated log, after their exposure tosunlight and darkness, for 1 and 3 months, under indoor conditions.A Chroma Meter Konika Minolta CR-410 device was used for colour measurement.The colorimetric coordinates were recorded before and after the exposure, according to ISO 7724-2.The results highlight a significant decrease of colour lightness, right after the first month of sunlight exposure.The a* and b* colour coordinates showed an increasing tendency with increasing exposure time, whichsignifies a colour darkening under sunlight radiation that penetrates the window glass. Colour differenceswere noticed right after the first month of sunlight exposure, while under darkness conditions, a relativecolour constancy was noticed, the colour changes being less pronounced, but yet perceptible by the humaneye.The study results complete the colorimetric database of veneers used in furniture industry, but theyalso contribute to the rehabilitation of black alder as a wood species with a real potential of use in furnitureindustry.

  2. Reconfigurable biodegradable shape-memory elastomers via Diels-Alder coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninh, Chi; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2013-07-08

    Synthetic biodegradable elastomers are a class of polymers that have demonstrated far-reaching utility as biomaterials for use in many medical applications. Biodegradable elastomers can be broadly classified into networks prepared by either step-growth or chain-growth polymerization. Each processing strategy affords distinct advantages in terms of capabilities and resulting properties of the network. This work describes the synthesis, processing, and characterization of cross-linked polyester networks based on Diels-Alder coupling reactions. Hyperbranched furan-modified polyester precursors based on poly(glycerol-co-sebacate) are coupled with bifunctional maleimide cross-linking agents. The chemical and thermomechanical properties of the elastomers are characterized at various stages of network formation. Experimental observations of gel formation are compared to theoretical predictions derived from Flory-Stockmayer relationships. This cross-linking strategy confers unique advantages in processing and properties including the ability to fabricate biodegradable reconfigurable covalent networks without additional catalysts or reaction byproducts. Reconfigurable biodegradable networks using Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions permit the fabrication of shape-memory polymers with complex permanent geometries. Biodegradable elastomers based on polyester networks with molecular reconfigurability achieve vastly expanded properties and processing capabilities for potential applications in medicine and beyond.

  3. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction.

  4. Scallopleaf sage (salvia vaseyi: Lamiaceae) discovered in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, J.W.; Felger, R.S.; Jansen, B.D.; Krausman, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    During the course of field work in Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, southwestern Arizona, in 2003, James Cain and Brian Jansen collected Salvia vaseyi, previously known only from the western edge of the Sonoran Desert in California and Baja California. Our findings indicate this shrub might be more widespread in southwestern Arizona mountains. Salvia vaseyi in Arizona seems to represent a relict population. There are other shrubby Salvia in Arizona, but S. vaseyi is the most xeric-mhabiting species and has the narrowest ecological and geographical range.

  5. 75 FR 28649 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... statewide issues; Presentation on the California Condor Reintroduction Program; State Director Updates on the BLM Arizona National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS), Water and Renewable Energy Strategies...

  6. Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

  7. Water in oil microemulsions as reaction media for a Diels-Alder reaction between N-ethylmaleimide and cyclopentadiene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, JBFN; Fernandez, E; Garcia-Rio, L; Leis, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between N-ethylmaleimide and cyclopentadiene in water/AOT/isooctane microemulsions, where AOT denotes sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, was studied. The rate of the reaction was found to be higher than that obtained in pure isooctane, irrespective of the particular mi

  8. Diels-Alder based, thermo-reversible cross-linked epoxies for use in self-healing composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkenburg, D.H.; Fischer, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    Epoxy resins are functionalized with Diels-Alder based thermo-reversible crosslinks to enable the fabrication of composites that are capable of multiple self-healing-repair processes. The key challenge in realizing a structural combination of conventional epoxy amine systems with furfuryl and maleim

  9. A 11-Steps Total Synthesis of Magellanine through a Gold(I)-Catalyzed Dehydro Diels-Alder Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Philippe; Bétournay, Geneviève; Barabé, Francis; Barriault, Louis

    2017-01-12

    We have developed an innovative strategy for the formation of angular carbocycles via a gold(I)-catalyzed dehydro Diels-Alder reaction. This transformation provides rapid access to a variety of complex angular cores in excellent diastereoselectivities and high yields. The usefulness of this Au(I) -catalyzed cycloaddition was further demonstrated by accomplishing a 11-steps total synthesis of (±)-magellanine.

  10. N,N-Diethyl-1-Tosyl-3-Indoleglyoxylamide as a Dienophile in Diels-Alder Reactions. Hyperbaric vs. Thermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Biolatto

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Under high pressure conditions, the Diels-Alder reaction involving N,N-diethyl-1-tosyl-3-indoleglyoxylamide and 1-(N-acetyl-N-propylamino-1,3-butadiene produces a highly functionalized intermediate for the synthesis of Indole Alkaloids, in shorter times and higher yields than under thermal conditions.

  11. Water in oil microemulsions as reaction media for a Diels-Alder reaction between N-ethylmaleimide and cyclopentadiene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, JBFN; Fernandez, E; Garcia-Rio, L; Leis, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between N-ethylmaleimide and cyclopentadiene in water/AOT/isooctane microemulsions, where AOT denotes sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, was studied. The rate of the reaction was found to be higher than that obtained in pure isooctane, irrespective of the particular

  12. Investigation of the possibility of functionalization of C20 fullerene by benzene via Diels-Alder reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadati, Seyyed Amir; Nami, Navabeh

    2016-10-01

    C20 fullerene, this novel species with all its pentagonal faces has displayed some unique operations in making fast pericyclic reactions. As an example, the high dienophile character of the C20 fullerene and the ability of this species in making an ultra-fast Diels-Alder reaction with 1,3-butadiene, has been recently reported. Moreover, new experimental reports claim that the C60 fullerene, one of the fullerene family, could make a Diels-Alder reaction with the central ring of anthracene and make the ring non-aromatic. These reports may encourage researchers to do more studies on the properties of this small carbon cage. To address this question, the present research has discussed all the reaction channels of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition of benzene molecule as a 1,3-diene with the C20 fullerene in order to answer this question: "Is C20fullerene able to make a Diels-Alder reaction with this molecule?".

  13. Preliminary assessment of growth and survival of green alder (Alnus viridis), a potential biological stabilizer on fly ash disposal sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcin Pietrzykowski; Wojciech Krzaklewski; Bartłomiej Wos´

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary assessment of seedling survival and growth of green alder (Alnus viridis (Chaix) DC. in Lam. & DC.) planted on fly ash disposal sites. This kind of post-industrial site is extremely hard to biologically stabilize without top-soiling. The experiment started with surface preparation using NPK start-up mineral fertilizer at 60–36–36 kg ha-1 followed by initial stabil-ization through hydro-seeding with biosolids (sewage sludge 4 Mg ha-1 dry mass) and a mixture of grasses (Dactylis glomerata L. and Lolium multiflorum Lam.) (200 kg ha-1). Subsequently, three-years-old green alder seedlings were planted in plots on two substrate variants:the control (directly on combustion waste) and plots with 3 dm3 lignite culm from a nearby mine introduced into the planting pit. Five years of preliminary monitoring show good survival seedling rates and growth parameters (height (h), average increase in height (△h), number of shoots (Lo) and leaf nitrogen supply in the fly ash disposal habitat. Treatment of the site with a combination of lignite culm in planting pits and preliminary surface preparation by hydro-seeding and mineral fertilization had the most positive effect on green alder seedling parameters. The results indicate that it is possible and beneficial to use green alder for biological stabilization on fly ash disposal sites.

  14. Biosynthesis inspired Diels-Alder route to pyridines: synthesis of the 2,3-dithiazolylpyridine core of the thiopeptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Christopher J; Hughes, Rachael A; Thompson, Stewart P; Alcaraz, Lilian

    2002-08-21

    Reaction of serine derived 1-alkoxy-2-azadienes with dehydroalanine derived dienophiles results in Diels-Alder reaction and aromatisation to give 2,3,6-trisubstituted pyridines, thereby establishing the viability of the proposed biosynthetic route to the pyridine ring of the thiopeptide antibiotics originally proposed by Bycroft and Gowland.

  15. Highly enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reaction of 1-azadienes with enecarbamates catalyzed by chiral phosphoric acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Long; Laurent, Gregory; Retailleau, Pascal; Folléas, Benoît; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Masson, Géraldine

    2013-10-11

    On demand: A highly enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of 6-amino- trisubstituted tetrahydropyridine compounds has been developed through the inverse-electron-demand aza-Diels-Alder reaction of N-aryl α,β-unsaturated ketimines with enecarbamates (E)-1. Chiral phosphoric acid catalysts achieve simultaneous activation of both the 1-azadiene and dienophile partners.

  16. Diversity-Oriented Approaches to Polycyclics and Bioinspired Molecules via the Diels-Alder Strategy: Green Chemistry, Synthetic Economy, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Chavan, Arjun S; Goyal, Deepti

    2015-05-11

    We describe diverse approaches to various dienes and their utilization in the Diels-Alder reaction to produce a variety of polycycles. The dienes covered here are prepared by simple alkylation reaction or via the Claisen rearrangement or by enyne metathesis of alkyne or enyne building blocks. Here, we have also included the Diels-Alder chemistry of dendralenes, a higher analog of cross-conjugated dienes. The present article is inclusive of o-xylylene derivatives that are generated in situ starting with benzosultine or benzosulfone derivatives. The Diels-Alder reaction of these dienes with various dienophiles gave diverse polycyclic systems and biologically important targets.

  17. Arizona Measure of Academic Progress: Third Annual Look at Growth in Arizona Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aportela, Anabel

    The 2001 results of Arizonas Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) mark the third annual release of this important school accountability tool. The 2001 MAP results are slightly different from the results of previous years in that they show the percent of students who achieve One Years Growth (OYG) and present results in a more accessible format. The…

  18. Examining Arizona's Policy Response Post "Flores v. Arizona" in Educating K-12 English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Gomez, Laura; Cisneros, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of Arizona's policy response in educating English language learners by conducting a narrative review. A critical Latina/o theory approach was used to analyze the data. This study reveals 5 salient policy responses: (a) severely limit bilingual education, (b) develop controversial funding solutions, (c) implement a…

  19. How Arizona's Dropout Crisis Affects Communities, Creates Economic Losses for the State of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    WestEd, 2014

    2014-01-01

    One-in-five of Arizona's youth did not complete high school and a similarly large proportion of the state's youth is disconnected from either work or education. These youth face higher risks of unemployment and economic insecurity and are more reliant on government supports. This situation, which fails to ensure that the state's youth are…

  20. 77 FR 25737 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    .... History and Description of the Cultural Items In 1930, cultural items were removed from Queen Creek Ruin... donated to the Arizona State Museum. The 30 unassociated funerary objects are 12 ceramic bowls, 8 ceramic jars, 1 ceramic ladle, 3 ceramic pitchers, 5 ceramic scoops, and 1 ceramic sherd. Queen Creek Ruin...

  1. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  2. Transformational Leadership and Teacher Motivation in Southwestern Arizona High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and teacher motivation in Southwestern Arizona high schools. Teachers in a school district in Southwestern Arizona comprised of high schools were surveyed using two instruments, Leithwood and Jantzi's (1998) The Leadership and Management of Schools in…

  3. 75 FR 3694 - Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... Media Licenses, LLC, proposing the allotment of FM Channel 281C3 at Peach Springs, Arizona. The reference coordinates for Channel 281C3 at Peach Springs are 35-33-46 NL and 113-27-12 WL. DATES:...

  4. 78 FR 25861 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... Springs, Arizona. (The symbol `` '' will be used to denote a channel reserved as a Tribal Allotment.) Channel 265A can be allotted at Peach Springs, consistent with the minimum distance...

  5. A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez Canche, Manuel S.; Moll, Luis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: In September 2007, the Arizona State Board of Education adopted the Structured English Immersion (SEI) model proposed by the Arizona English Language Learner (ELL) Task Force.During the 2008-2009 academic year, it required all school districts to implement the SEI model.The SEI program, best known as the 4-hour English Language…

  6. 7 CFR 1131.2 - Arizona marketing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Arizona marketing area. 1131.2 Section 1131.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order...

  7. WATER SYSTEM OPERATOR TRAINING FOR THE CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) is designed to bring about 1.5 million acre-feet of Colorado River water per year to Maricopa, Pima, and Pinal counties in Arizona. CAP carries water from Lake Havasu down to Tucson. The CAP canal system is a 336-mile long system of aqueducts, tunnels, pumping pla...

  8. Innovations in Arizona's Accountability Policies and Frameworks for Alternative Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessman, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This study presents Arizona's innovations in academic accountability policy and academic accountability frameworks for alternative schools. A timeline of statutes and regulations including the State Board of Education approved alternative school definition provides Arizona's context for alternative school accountability policy and frameworks.…

  9. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  10. Untangling the web...spiders in Arizona fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many kinds of arthropod natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) inhabit crop fields in Arizona and can have a large negative impact on several pest insect species that also infest these crops. Many different species of spiders are common in cotton, alfalfa and other crops in Arizona. Among the ...

  11. 76 FR 14048 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by... the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony and the Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah... sacred object/ object of cultural patrimony to the Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah...

  12. 78 FR 21412 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of unassociated... Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition of unassociated.... Architectural features, the mortuary program, ceramic types, and other items of material culture are...

  13. November 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Jud Tillinghast was nominated as the Arizona Thoracic Society physician of the year. Three cases were presented: 1. George Parides presented a case of a 70-year-old woman with a 3 areas of ground glass picked up incidentally on CT scan. She had some wheezing. A needle biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. The biopsy and radiologic pattern were consistent with adenocarcinoma in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Discussion centered around treatment. Most felt that if the areas could be removed that surgical resection was indicated (1. 2. Lewis Wesselius presented a 60-year-old man with Marfan's syndrome and a history of an aortic valve replacement on chronic ...

  14. Garcia resigns as Arizona university VP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Joe G.N. "Skip" Garcia resigned his administrative duties as senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. Garcia said he would devote his full attention as a professor at the UA College of Medicine-Tucson according to the Arizona Republic (1. "After much thought and reflection, I have decided that the time is right for me to take a step back and focus on my continually growing research commitments," Garcia said. "Please know that this decision was an exceptionally difficult one and not reached lightly, and that I am humbled by all of your support during my time as senior vice president." Garcia was hired in 2013 to oversee the university's medical schools in Phoenix and Tucson, as well as the schools of nursing, pharmacy and public health. Shortly after Garcia was hired, he reorganized UA health sciences, recruited a roster of academics and tightened oversight of …

  15. May 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 5/28/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A discussion was held regarding the Arizona Thoracic Society relationship with the American Lung Association. Several members volunteered to talk to the lung association regarding common ground to strengthen the relationship. The wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting was a big success. There were about 55 at the meeting. The tasting will probably be held again next year. At the ATS meeting data was presented that pirfenidone was effective in reducing the progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The data was published in the New England Journal of Medicine on 8/29/14 (1. Lewis Wesselius is one of the investigators enrolling patients in a phase ...

  16. June 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 6/25/14 at the Bio5 building on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 33 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Four cases were presented: Eric Chase presented a 68 year old incarcerated man shortness of breath, chest pain and productive cough. The patient was a poor historian. He was supposed to be receiving morphine for back pain but this had been held. He also had a 45 pound weight loss over the past year. His PMH was positive for COPD, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic back pain and hepatitis C. Past surgical history included a back operation and some sort of chest operation. On physical examination he was tachypneic, tachycardic and multiple scars over his neck ...

  17. January 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesselius LJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The January 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting (prime rib with case presentations. There was a good attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There was a discussion of supporting the Tobacco 21 bill which has been introduced into the Arizona State Legislature. There was unanimous support for this bill. Another bill to allow school nurses to administer an albuterol inhaler without a doctor’s prescription was also discussed but the members wanted more information. The new CDC Ventilator-Associated Events (VAE criteria were also discussed. Before endorsing or opposing the this as a measure, the members wished more information. It was decided that a decision on both would be postponed until discussed at the next meeting. Three cases were presented: 1. Dr. Lewis Wesselius from the Mayo Clinic …

  18. September 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/25/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. After a brief discussion, Gerry Swartzberg was selected as Arizona’s 2014 nominee for Clinician of the Year. There was 1 case presented: Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 67 year old woman with multiple pulmonary nodules. The largest was 1.2 cm CT scan. She had a fine needle aspiration of one of the nodules. The pathology revealed spindle-shaped cells which were synaptophysin + (also known as the major synaptic vesicle protein p38. Synaptophysin marks neuroendocrine tissue and on this basis the patient was diagnosed with multiple carcinoid tumors. Aguayo et al. (1 described six patients with diffuse hyperplasia and dysplasia of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, multiple carcinoid tumorlets, and peribronchiolar fibrosis …

  19. August 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The August Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/28/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. A brief discussion was held about the audio-visual aids available. It was generally agreed that our current projector is inadequate. Judd Tillinghast will inquire about using a hospital overhead projector. If that is not possible, it was agreed to purchase a new projector. Plans for telecasting the meeting between Phoenix and Tucson continue. A trial of a link between Shea and the University in Tucson failed. Once the link is successfully established, it is hoped that the meeting can be telecasted. There were 6 cases presented: 1. Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 10 year old boy with chronic dyspnea for > 4 yrs. He had growth retardation since age …

  20. October 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 10/24/2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, infectious disease, pathology, and radiology communities. An announcement was made that the Colorado Thoracic Society has accepted an invitation to partner with the Arizona and New Mexico Thoracic Societies in the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Discussions continue to be held regarding a combined Arizona Thoracic Society meeting with Tucson either in Casa Grande or electronically. Six cases were presented: Dr. Tim Kuberski, chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa Medical Center, presented a 48 year old female who had been ill for 2 weeks. A CT of the chest revealed a left lower lobe nodule and a CT of the abdomen showed hydronephrosis and a pelvic mass. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA was elevated. All turned out to be coccidioidomycosis on biopsy. CEA decreased …

  1. Photochemically Catalyzed Diels-Alder Reaction of Azadienes with 2,3-Dihydrofuran by 2, 4, 6-Triphenylpyrylium Salt: Synthesis of Styrylfuroquinoline Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZHANG; Yan Ping GUO; Li YANG; Zhong Li LIU

    2005-01-01

    Photochemically promoted Diels-Alder reactions of 1, 4-diaryl-1-azabutadienes with2,3-dihydrofuran were achieved by using 2, 4, 6-triphenylpyrylium tetrafluoroborate as catalyst to produce corresponding styrylfuroquinolines in high yield.

  2. Effect of Diels-Alder Reaction in C60-Tetracene Photovoltaic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudian, Andrew P; Jaskot, Matthew B; Lyiza, Christelle; Diercks, David R; Gorman, Brian P; Zimmerman, Jeramy D

    2016-10-12

    Developing organic photovoltaic materials systems requires a detailed understanding of the heterojunction interface, as it is the foundation for photovoltaic device performance. The bilayer fullerene/acene system is one of the most studied models for testing our understanding of this interface. We demonstrate that the fullerene and acene molecules chemically react at the heterojunction interface, creating a partial monolayer of a Diels-Alder cycloadduct species. Furthermore, we show that the reaction occurs during standard deposition conditions and that thermal annealing increases the concentration of the cycloadduct. The cycloaddition reaction reduces the number of sites available at the interface for charge transfer exciton recombination and decreases the charge transfer state reorganization energy, increasing the open circuit voltage. The submonolayer quantity of the cycloadduct renders it difficult to identify with conventional characterization techniques; we use atom probe tomography to overcome this limitation while also measuring the spatial distribution of each chemical species.

  3. The Role of Phytodiversity in Riparian Alder Forests in Supporting the Provision of Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariničová Patrícia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nature, ecosystems and biodiversity provide human society with many benefits known as ecosystem services. Functional diversity is an important aspect of biodiversity. In this paper, we applied inductive approach to the identification, mapping and evaluation of ecosystem services of the Aegopodio-Alnetum glutinosae community in Tribeč Mts. The results from 2015 show that the alder floodplain forest represents one of the most productive forest ecosystems with seasonal maximum production of 59.03 g m−2, species diversity of N0 = 40 and functional diversity of FD = 10. The forage potential of this community is medium, the melliferous potential is high and the therapeutic potential was estimated as extremely rich in medicinal plants. From the functional groups for providing ecosystem services, woody plants and hemicryptophytes play the most significant role.

  4. Description and identification of Alnus acuminata ectomycorrhizae from Argentinean alder stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritsch, Karin; Becerra, Alejandra; Põlme, Sergei; Tedersoo, Leho; Schloter, Michael; Agerer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the morphological and anatomical features of five unidentified ectomycorrhizal types of Alnus acuminata and to complement their identification based on ITS-rDNA sequence analysis. The combined approach of morphotyping and sequence analysis based on ITS sequence comparison with sequences contained in GenBank and the UNITE database let us assign three of the five field-collected ectomycorrhiza morphotypes to the tomentella-thelephora lineage that closely matched European and North American species. The sequencing results within Tomentella point toward alder specific clades within T. sublilacina, T. ellisii and T. stuposa sensu lato. The two other EcM morphotypes matched Lactarius omphaliiformis and a Russula sp. Better focused, concomitant fruit body surveys are needed for accurate identification of South American ectomycorrhizal fungi because of the evidence of cryptic speciation in both agaricoid and resupinate mycobionts.

  5. Combustion characteristics of red alder sawdust. Technical Progress Report No. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junge, D.C.

    1978-12-01

    Significant quantities of wood resdiue fuels are presently being used in industrial steam generating facilities. Recent studies indicate that substantial additional quantities of wood residue fuels are available for energy generation in the form of steam and/or electricity. A limited data base on the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels has resulted in the installation and operation of inefficient combustion systems for these fuels. This investigation of the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels was undertaken to provide a data base which could be used to optimize the combustion of such fuels. Optimization of the combustion process in industrial boilers serves to improve combustion efficiency and to reduce air pollutant emissions generated in the combustion process. Data are presented on the combustion characteristics of red alder sawdust.

  6. Reação de Diels-Alder assistida por micro-ondas

    OpenAIRE

    André, Simone Martins

    2014-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Química Farmacêutica Industrial, apresentada à Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Coimbra Este trabalho de investigação foi realizado, no período de Novembro de 2012 a Julho de 2013, no Departamento de Química da Universidade de Coimbra. O trabalho foi iniciado com a síntese de 3 Chalconas diferentes, com a finalidade de mais tarde virem a servir de intermediários na Reação de Diels-Alder. As Chalconas são compostos com uma estrutura caraterísti...

  7. A mechanochemical study of the effects of compression on a Diels-Alder reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sanjiv K.; Brown, Katie; Todde, Guido; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2016-08-01

    We examine the effects of compressive external forces on the mechanisms of the parent Diels-Alder (DA) reaction between butadiene and ethylene. Reaction pathways and transition states were calculated using the nudged elastic band method within a mechanochemical framework at the CASSCF(6,6)/6-31G**, as well as the B3LYP/6-311++G** levels of theory. Our results suggest that compressive hydrostatic pressure lowers the energy barrier for the parent DA reaction while suppressing the undesirable side reaction, thereby leading to a direct increase in the yield of cyclohexene. Compressive pressure also increases the exothermicity of the parent DA reaction, which would lead to increased temperatures in a reaction vessel and thereby indirectly increase the yield of cyclohexene. Our estimates indicate that the compression used in our study corresponds to a range of 68 MPa-1410 MPa.

  8. Synthesis of benzo- and naphthoquinonyl boronic acids: exploring the Diels-Alder reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veguillas, Marcos; Redondo, Maria C; García, Isabel; Ribagorda, María; Carreño, M Carmen

    2010-03-22

    Substituted 2-quinonyl boronic acids have been synthesised from 1,4-dimethoxy aromatic derivatives in two steps: regiocontrolled boronation and oxidative demethylation. The study of their dienophilic behaviour evidenced that the boron substituent significantly increases the reactivity and triggers an efficient domino process in which the Diels-Alder reaction was followed by a protodeboronation or dehydroboronation, depending on the substitution on both the quinone and diene partners. The boronic acid acts as a temporary controller, opening a direct access to trans-fused meta-regiosomeric adducts when 3-methyl-substituted 2-quinonyl boronic acids react with dienes with a substituent at C-1. A particularly valuable synthetic result was obtained in the reaction between 3,6-dimethyl-2-quinonyl boronic acid and piperylene under an oxygen atmosphere; trans-fused 8a-hydroxy-2,4a,8-trimethyl tetrahydronaphthoquinone was formed directly, in excellent yield and in a highly diastereoselective manner.

  9. Diels-Alder addition to H2O@C60 an electronic and structural study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveles, J. Ulises; Govinda, K. C.; Baruah, Tunna; Zope, Rajendra R.

    2017-10-01

    Exohedral reactivity of endohedral fullerenes has aroused a significant interest because of its potential applications. The present letter examines the effect of an entrapped single water molecule on the reactivity of C60. We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of a Diels-Alder reaction occurring at all non-identical bonds of free C60 and H2O@C60. Our calculations show that encapsulation of water does not have a significant effect on H2O@C60 reactivity compared to C60, as attested by the investigation of the reaction under several orientations of H2O inside C60. Reaction and activation energies indicate that [6,6] bonds are the most reactive sites.

  10. The inverse electron demand Diels-Alder click reaction in radiochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Thomas; Zeglis, Brian M

    2014-04-01

    The inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition between 1,2,4,5-tetrazines and strained alkene dienophiles is an emergent variety of catalyst-free 'click' chemistry that has the potential to have a transformational impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. The ligation is selective, rapid, high-yielding, clean, and bioorthogonal and, since its advent in 2008, has been employed in a wide variety of chemical settings. In radiochemistry, the reaction has proven particularly useful with (18)  F and has already been utilized to create a number of (18)  F-labeled agents, including the PARP1-targeting small molecule (18)  F-AZD2281, the αv β3 integrin-targeting peptide (18)  F-RGD, and the GLP-1-targeting peptide (18)  F-exendin. The inherent flexibility of the ligation has also been applied to the construction of radiometal-based probes, specifically the development of a modular strategy for the synthesis of radioimmunoconjugates that effectively eliminates variability in the construction of these agents. Further, the exceptional speed and biorthogonality of the reaction have made it especially promising in the realm of in vivo pretargeted imaging and therapy, and pretargeted imaging strategies based on the isotopes (111) In, (18)  F, and (64) Cu have already proven capable of producing images with high tumor contrast and low levels of uptake in background, nontarget organs. Ultimately, the characteristics of inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder click chemistry make it almost uniquely well-suited for radiochemistry, and although the field is young, this ligation has the potential to make a tremendous impact on the synthesis, development, and study of novel radiopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Nitroso-Diels-Alder Reaction of 1,3-Diene-1-carbamates Catalyzed by Chiral Phosphoric Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pous, Jonathan; Courant, Thibaut; Bernadat, Guillaume; Iorga, Bogdan I; Blanchard, Florent; Masson, Géraldine

    2015-09-23

    Chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric nitroso-Diels-Alder reaction of nitrosoarenes with carbamate-dienes afforded cis-3,6-disubstituted dihydro-1,2-oxazines in high yields with excellent regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivities. Interestingly, we observed that the catalyst is able not only to control the enantioselectivity but also to reverse the regioselectivity of the noncatalyzed nitroso-Diels-Alder reaction. The regiochemistry reversal and asynchronous concerted mechanism were confirmed by DFT calculations.

  12. Patterns of growth and mortality in the endangered Nichol's Turk's Head Cactus (Echinocactus horizonthalonius var. nicholii L. Benson; Cactaceae) in Southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. E. McIntosh; L. A. McDade; A. E. Boyd; P. D. Jenkins

    2007-01-01

    Nichol’s Turk’s Head Cactus (Echinocactus horizonthalonius var. nicholii L. Benson; Cactaceae) occurs in a few isolated populations in the Sonoran desert of southcentral Arizona (Pima and Pinal counties). The populations of this variety are disjunct from the more widespread variety that occurs in the Chihuahuan desert of Texas and...

  13. Nearshore temperature findings for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona: possible implications for native fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert P.; Vernieu, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the completion of Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in 1963, downstream water temperatures in the main channel of the Colorado River in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons are much colder in summer. This has negatively affected humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other native fish adapted to seasonally warm water, reducing main-channel spawning activity and impeding the growth and development of larval and juvenile fish. Recently published studies by U.S. Geological Survey scientists found that under certain conditions some isolated nearshore environments in Grand Canyon allow water to become separated from the main-channel current and to warm, providing refuge areas for the development of larval and juvenile fish.

  14. Field performance of Alnus cordata Loisel (Italian alder) inoculated with Frankia and VA-mycorrhizal strains in mine-spoil afforestation plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumini, E.; Bosco, M.; Puppi, G.; Isopi, R.; Frattegiani, M.; Burseti, E.; Favili, F.

    1994-05-01

    Mixed stands of {ital Alnus cordata}, {ital Eleagnus} spp. and broad leaf timber trees have been successfully used for reclamation of mine spoils in surface mined areas of central Italy. Trials showed that the use of mycorrhizal planting stock may improve the establishment of plants on mine spoils. Alder seeds were sown in pots filled with peat moss and lignite mine spoils and Fungal strains {ital Glomus mosscae} and {ital G. fasciculatum} were inoculated into the pots. A Frankia strain isolated from {ital A. cordata} was also tested. Plants were then outplanted after measuring shoot height and collar diameter. The planting was done in mid-January among commercial trees ({ital Quercus robur}, {ital Fraxinus oxyphilla}, and {ital Prunus avium}). Plants became highly nodulated in the pots. Mycorrhizal infection was about 30% on inoculate plants but did not occur on uninoculated plants. Aboveground biomass at out-planting was significantly greater in the Frankia inoculated plants. There was generally more N in plant leaves in the inoculate plants than in the uninoculated ones. Plant survival in the field after one winter was 83% on average. One year after planting, the inoculated plants were significantly bigger as were the Frankia inoculated plants. The combination of Frankia and Glomus was very effective (contrary to other studies).

  15. Biotransformation of a cage-like diels-alder adduct and derivatives by Mucor ramosissimus samutsevitsch Biotransformação de um aduto de diels-alder cage-like e derivados por Mucor ramosissimus samutsevitsch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Megumi Ito

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the ability for biotransformation of the Diels-Alder adduct tricyclo[6.2.1.0(2,7]undeca-4,9-dien-3,6-dione (1 and two synthetic derivatives by the saprobe fungus Mucor ramosissimus Samutsevitsch. Products from oxidation, isomerization and, regioselective and enantioselective reduction were achieved.Neste trabalho avaliou-se a capacidade de biotransformação do aduto de Diels-Alder triciclo[6.2.1.0(2-7]undeca-4,9-dien-3,6-diona (1 e dois derivados sintéticos pelo fungo sapróbio Mucor ramosissimus Samutsevitsch. Produtos de oxidação, isomerização e redução regiosseletiva e enantiosseletiva foram obtidos.

  16. A spatial model of potential jaguar habitat in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, J.R.; Averill-Murray, A.; van Pelt, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The jaguar (Panthera onca) is an endangered species that occasionally visits the southwestern United States from Mexico. The number of jaguar sightings per decade has declined over the last 100 years in Arizona, USA, raising conservation concerns for the species at a local and national level. In 1997, state, federal, and local governments with land-management responsibilities agreed to characterize and identify potential jaguar habitat in Arizona and New Mexico. Specifically, the objectives of our analysis were 2-fold: (1) characterize potential jaguar habitat in Arizona from historic sighting records and (2) create a statewide habitat suitability map. We used a Geographic Information System (GIS) to characterize potential jaguar habitat by overlaying historic jaguar sightings (25) on landscape and habitat features believed important (e.g., vegetation biomes and series, elevation, terrain ruggedness, proximity to perennial or intermittent water sources, human density). The amount of Arizona (%) identified as potential jaguar habitat ranged from 21% to 30% depending on the input variables. Most jaguar sightings were in scrub grasslands between 1,220 and 1,829-m elevation in southeastern Arizona, in intermediately to extremely rugged terrain, and within 10 km of a water source. Conservation efforts should focus on protecting the most suitable jaguar habitat in southeastern Arizona (i.e., Santa Cruz, Pima, Cochise, Pinal, Graham counties), travel corridors within and outside Arizona, and jaguar habitat in the Sierra Madres of Sonora, Mexico.

  17. Aquarious Mountain Area, Arizona: APossible HDR Prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, F.G.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1979-05-01

    Exploration for Hot Dry Rock (HDR) requires the ability to delineate areas of thermal enhancement. It is likely that some of these areas will exhibit various sorts of anomalous conditions such as seismic transmission delays, low seismic velocities, high attenuation of seismic waves, high electrical conductivity in the crust, and a relatively shallow depth to Curie point of Magnetization. The Aquarius Mountain area of northwest Arizona exhibits all of these anomalies. The area is also a regional Bouguer gravity low, which may indicate the presence of high silica type rocks that often have high rates of radioactive heat generation. The one deficiency of the area as a HDR prospect is the lack of a thermal insulating blanket.

  18. Expanding the scope of cyclopropene reporters for the detection of metabolically engineered glycoproteins by Diels–Alder reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Späte

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring glycoconjugates has been tremendously facilitated by the development of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. Recently, the inverse-electron-demand Diels–Alder reaction between methylcyclopropene tags and tetrazines has become a popular ligation reaction due to the small size and high reactivity of cyclopropene tags. Attaching the cyclopropene tag to mannosamine via a carbamate linkage has made the reaction even more efficient. Here, we expand the application of cyclopropene tags to N-acylgalactosamine and N-acylglucosamine derivatives enabling the visualization of mucin-type O-glycoproteins and O-GlcNAcylated proteins through Diels–Alder chemistry. Whereas the previously reported cyclopropene-labeled N-acylmannosamine derivative leads to significantly higher fluorescence staining of cell-surface glycoconjugates, the glucosamine derivative gave higher labeling efficiency with protein preparations containing also intracellular proteins.

  19. Assessment of a novel alder biorefinery concept to meet demands of economic feasibility, energy production and long term environmental sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tobias; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe

    2013-01-01

    A biorefinery concept based on alder tree plantations on degenerated soil is developed to comply with indicators of economic feasibility, fossil fuel depletion concerns, and long term sustainability issues. The potential performance of feedstock and biorefinery has been assessed through a literat......A biorefinery concept based on alder tree plantations on degenerated soil is developed to comply with indicators of economic feasibility, fossil fuel depletion concerns, and long term sustainability issues. The potential performance of feedstock and biorefinery has been assessed through...... degenerated soils. Integrating a biomass handling system, an LTCFB gasifier, a diarylheptanoids production chain, an anaerobic digestion facility, a slow pyrolysis unit, gas upgrading and various system integration units, the biorefinery could obtain the following production characteristics accounted...

  20. Revisiting the stability of endo/exo Diels-Alder adducts between cyclopentadiene and 1,4-benzoquinone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tormena, Claudio F. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica; Lacerda Junior, Valdemar [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Oliveira, Kleber T. de [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas

    2010-07-01

    In this work it is presented a detailed theoretical analysis of the relative stability of endo/exo Diels-Alder adducts formed by the reaction between cyclopentadiene (1) and 1,4-benzoquinone (2). The intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) showed the existence of only one transition state for the reaction studied, for both endo 3 and exo 4 adducts. The energies of both adducts were obtained at high level of theory (CBS-Q) confirming that the endo adduct is more stable than exo, which is in the opposite way to the observed in reactions that usually follow Alder's rule. An electronic structure analysis was performed through NBO methodology, indicating that the attractive delocalization interaction predominates over the steric repulsive interaction in the endo adducts. In summary, for the studied cycloaddition reaction the endo adduct is the thermodynamic and kinetic product, which can be also confirmed by experimental data mentioned in this work. (author)

  1. A Facile Approach of Diels-Alder Reaction in Imidazolium-based Ionic Liquids at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Liyana Sakinah Johari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A Diels-Alder reaction between anthracene and 1-p-tolyl-2,5-dione was conducted in imidazolium-based ionic liquids. Imidazolium cation was utilised with counter anions, [BF4] and [PF6], as the solvents to carry out the desired Diels-Alder reaction. In this work, the diene and dienophile were introduced into the ionic liquids for 72 hours at room temperature. The desired cycloadduct was prepared by a green chemistry procedure in high yield. The expected cycloadduct was characterized on the MS as well as FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Herein we report, only the [Bmim][BF4] ionic liquid gave the desired cycloadduct in 86 % yield compared to [Bmim][PF6].

  2. Enantioselective Diels-Alder reactions of carboxylic ester dienophiles catalysed by titanium-based chiral Lewis acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh K. Choughule

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A new titanium-based chiral Lewis acid 1 has been developed using (1R,2R-1,2-bis-(2-methoxyphenyl-ethane-1,2-diol as a chiral vicinal diol ligand. This chiral catalyst was found to exhibit uniformly high enantioselectivity towards carboxylic ester dienophiles in Diels-Alder reactions. The chiral vicinal ligand (1R,2R-1,2-bis-(2-methoxyphenyl-ethane-1,2-diol is inexpensive and is easily accessible.

  3. Visible-light induced isoindoles formation to trigger intermolecular Diels-Alder reactions in the presence of air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao; Zhen, Le; Cheng, Yong; Du, Hong-Jin; Zhao, Hui; Wen, Xiaoan; Kong, Ling-Yi; Xu, Qing-Long; Sun, Hongbin

    2015-06-05

    Visible-light induced isoindole formation triggered an intermolecular Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles such as acetylenedicarboxylate and maleimides in the presence of air. The reaction resulted in excellent diastereoselctivity and high yields under mild reaction conditions. This protocol provides an atom-economical, transition-metal-free (TM-free) and straightforward approach to structurally diverse bridged-ring heterocycles from easily accessible molecules.

  4. Kekulé-based Valence Bond Model.Ⅱ. Diels-Alder Reactivity of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA,Jing(马晶); LI,Shu-Hua(黎书华); JIANG,Yuan-Sheng(江元生)

    2002-01-01

    The Kekule-based valence bond ( VB ) method was employed to study the ground state properties of 52 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The reactivity indices defined upon our VB calculations were demonstrated to be capable of quantitatively interpreting the secnd order rate constants of the Diels-Alder reactions. The qualitative trends of the reactivities of many homologous series can be also explained based on the local aromaticity index defined in this work.

  5. Effects of fungal inocula and habitat conditions on alder and eucalyptus leaf litter decomposition in streams of northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Javier; Galán, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how fungal decomposer (aquatic hyphomycetes) communities colonizing alder and eucalyptus leaf litter respond to changes in habitat characteristics (transplantation experiment). We examined the breakdown of leaf materials and the associated fungal communities at two contrasting sites, a headwater stream (H) and a midreach (M). Agroforestry increased from headwater to midreach. One month after the start of experiments at both sites, some leaf samples from the midreach site were transplanted to the headwater site (M-H treatment). Although both sites showed similar dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, eucalyptus leaves initially incubated at the midreach site (M, M-H) increased their breakdown rate compared to those incubated along the experiment at the headwater site (H). Alder breakdown rate was not enhanced, suggesting that their consumption was not limited by nutrient availability. Sporulation rates clearly differed between leaf types (alder > eucalyptus) and streams (H > M), but no transplantation effect was detected. When comparing conidial assemblages after transplantation, an inoculum effect (persistence of early colonizing species) was clear in both leaf species. Substrate preference and shifts in the relative importance of some fungal species along the process were also observed. Overall, our results support the determining role of the initial conditioning phase on the whole litter breakdown process, highlighting the importance of intrinsic leaf characteristics and those of the incubation habitat.

  6. A new approach to the synthesis of monomers and polymers incorporating furan/maleimide Diels-Alder adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banella, Maria Barbara; Gioia, Claudio; Vannini, Micaela; Colonna, Martino; Celli, Annamaria; Gandini, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between furan and maleimide moieties is a well-known and widely used strategy to build bio-based macromolecular structures with peculiar properties. The furan-maleimide adducts are thermally reversible because they can be broken above about 120°C and recombined at lower temperatures. At the moment only the monomers exhibiting the furan or the maleimide moieties on their extremity are used in order to get linear or cross-linked polymeric structures. The innovative idea described here consists in using a monomer bearing two carboxylic acidic groups on its extremities and a furan-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct within its structure. This monomer can give rise to classical polycondensation reactions leading to polymers. These polymers (which are polyesters in the present case) can be broken at high temperatures in correspondence of the furane-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct leading to segments exhibiting furan or maleimide moieties at their extremities, which at lower temperature recombine leading to random or block copolymers.

  7. Well-defined Polymethylene-Based Co/Terpolymers by Combining Anthracene/Maleimide Diels-Alder Reaction with Polyhomologation

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-26

    A novel strategy towards well-defined polymethylene-based co/terpolymers, by combining anthracene/maleimide Diels-Alder reaction with polyhomologation, is presented. For the synthesis of diblock copolymers the following approach was applied: a) synthesis of α-anthracene-ω-hydroxy- polymethylene by polyhomologation using tri (9-anthracene-methyl propyl ether) borane as initiator, b) synthesis of furan-protected-maleimide-terminated poly (ε-caprolactone) or polyethylene glycol and c). Diels-Alder reaction between the anthracene and maleimide-terminated polymers. In the case of triblock terpolymers the α-anthracene-ω-hydroxy-polymethylene was used as macroinitiator for the ring-opening polymerization of D, L-lactide to afford an anthracene-terminated PM-b-PLA copolymer, followed by Diels-Alder reaction with furan-protected maleimide-terminated poly (ε-caprolactone) or polyethylene glycol to give the triblock terpolymers. All intermediate and final products were characterized by SEC, 1H NMR, UV-VIS spectroscopy and DSC.

  8. Red Alder-Conifer Stands in Alaska: An Example of Mixed Species Management to Enhance Structural and Biological Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Deal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There is worldwide interest in managing forests to improve biodiversity, enhance ecosystem services and assure long-term sustainability of forest resources. An increasingly important goal of forest management is to increase stand diversity and improve wildlife and aquatic habitat. Well-planned silvicultural systems containing a mixture of broadleaf-conifer species have potential to enhance stand diversity and provide other ecosystem services earlier than typical even-aged conifer plantations. Here, we use the example of mixed Sitka spruce/western hemlock and red alder in young, managed stands in southeast Alaska to achieve these goals. We briefly describe the silvics of Sitka spruce, western hemlock and red alder plantations as pure conifer stands or pure broadleaf stands. Then, we synthesize studies of mixed red alder-Sitka spruce/western hemlock stands in southeast Alaska and present their potential for improving stand structural complexity, biodiversity and other ecosystem services over pure conifer forests. Finally, we discuss some of the opportunities and potential tradeoffs for managing mixed broadleaf-conifer stands for providing a number of natural resources and the influence of these broadleaf-conifer forests on ecosystem linkages and processes.

  9. Design Paradigm Utilizing Reversible Diels-Alder Reactions to Enhance the Mechanical Properties of 3D Printed Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Joshua R; Appuhamillage, Gayan A; Thompson, Christina M; Voit, Walter; Smaldone, Ronald A

    2016-07-06

    A design paradigm is demonstrated that enables new functional 3D printed materials made by fused filament fabrication (FFF) utilizing a thermally reversible dynamic covalent Diels-Alder reaction to dramatically improve both strength and toughness via self-healing mechanisms. To achieve this, we used as a mending agent a partially cross-linked terpolymer consisting of furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) adducts that exhibit reversibility at temperatures typically used for FFF printing. When this mending agent is blended with commercially available polylactic acid (PLA) and printed, the resulting materials demonstrate an increase in the interfilament adhesion strength along the z-axis of up to 130%, with ultimate tensile strength increasing from 10 MPa in neat PLA to 24 MPa in fmDA-enhanced PLA. Toughness in the z-axis aligned prints increases by up to 460% from 0.05 MJ/m(3) for unmodified PLA to 0.28 MJ/m(3) for the remendable PLA. Importantly, it is demonstrated that a thermally reversible cross-linking paradigm based on the furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) reaction can be more broadly applied to engineer property enhancements and remending abilities to a host of other 3D printable materials with superior mechanical properties.

  10. Honeymoon Trail at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (honeytrl)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 1 arc that represents the Honeymoon Trail inside of Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The Honeymoon Trail was...

  11. Roads at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona 2006 (roads)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 30 arcs representing the roads in Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. Twenty-five of the road arcs were collected by a...

  12. Walkways at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_walkways)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 23 arcs representing the walkways (or sidewalks) at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The walkways were collected by...

  13. The Gates at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (gates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 7 points representing gates at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The gates were collected by a Trimble GeoXT GPS...

  14. The Tree Lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (treeline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 7 arcs representing the tree lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The tree lines were collected by a Trimble...

  15. Developing Swing-Bed Programs in Rural Arizona Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frank G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of six swing-bed programs in rural hospitals located in Arizona. Programs described illustrate the diversity across swing-bed sites and the need for an individualized hospital and community orientation. (Author)

  16. Contaminants in fish and wildlife of Lynx Lake, Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water, crayfish, and fish were collected at Lynx Creek and Lynx Lake, Arizona in 2004 and 2005. Granite Basin Lake was used as a reference site. Both sites...

  17. A Soil Moisture-Heat Based Early Establishment Model of Riparian White Alder (Alnus rhombifolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablkowski, P.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2013-12-01

    Establishment of fluvially dispersed seeds on accreted gravel-sand bars is limited by water availability in streams. Past establishment models have used the stream/water table recession rate, and maximum root growth rate to determine the elevation limit of seedling establishment. This approach neglects the role of the saturated-unsaturated vadose zone in providing water to recently germinated seedlings, the physical processes that determine the soil moisture content, and the effect moisture deficit has on seedling root growth. This study combines a soil moisture-heat budget and a seedling root growth model that responds to soil moisture availability to find the elevation limit of establishment of white alder (Alnus rhombifolia) on vertically accreted bars along the south fork Eel River in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, California. To establish successfully, seedling roots must maintain a connection with sufficient moisture to avoid water stress. This will depend on the elevation of the bar, the stream recession rate, the root growth rate, and the diurnal cycle of soil moisture. A one-dimensional moisture-heat budget of the top 15 centimeters of sediment was validated at two locations characterized by sand and clay-gravel textures respectively, using soil moisture and temperature measurements at 5, 10 and 15 cm, net radiation, air temperature, humidity, wind velocity and precipitation measured during spring-summer stream recession. Two patterns in soil water content were apparent: an average daily moisture decrease at each depth driven by stream/water table recession, and a diurnal pattern of isothermal liquid and vapour flux increasing soil water content in the upper 15 cm between 12:00 pm and 5:00 pm PDT. To determine seedling root growth rates, white alder seedlings were grown in growth chambers under a range of reduced matric potentials using polyethylene glycol. Root length measurements were made at 4 hour intervals and a quadratic equation was fit to the root

  18. 亚利桑那的爵士%Arizona Jazz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布雷德利·惠勒

    2008-01-01

    @@ The complexion and complexity of Tucson,Arizona's urban core is experiencing dynamic improvement at the hands of a socially minded architect who is also the developer.This southern Arizona community,(city population 518,956/metropolitan area population 946,362)Iocated 96 kilometers(60 miles)north of the Mexican border,is an island of civilization amid the"magnificent desolation"of the Desert Southwest.

  19. Evaluation of the Arizona health care cost-containment system

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    This article evaluates Arizona's alternative to the acute portion of Medicaid, the Arizona Health Care Cost-Containment System (AHCCCS), during its first 18 months of operation from October 1982 through March 1984. It focuses on the program's implementation and describes and evaluates the program's innovative features. The features of the program outlined in the original AHCCCS legislation included: Competitive bidding, prepaid capitation of providers, capitation of the State by the Health Ca...

  20. DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillerup, Joseph M.

    1980-09-08

    The DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project on Energy successfully completed a faculty development program. There were three phases of the program consisting of: a three week energy workshop for teachers, participation and cooperation with Students for Safe Energy in presentation of an Alternative Energy Festival at the University of Arizona, and workshops for teachers conducted at Flowing Wells School District. Each of these is described. Attendees are listed and a director's evaluation of the workshop is given.

  1. Dominance of multidrug resistant CC271 clones in macrolide-resistant streptococcus pneumoniae in Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowers Jolene R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae are rising around the world due to the spread of mobile genetic elements harboring mef(E and erm(B genes and post-vaccine clonal expansion of strains that carry them. Results Characterization of 592 clinical isolates collected in Arizona over a 10 year period shows 23.6% are macrolide resistant. The largest portion of the macrolide-resistant population, 52%, is dual mef(E/erm(B-positive. All dual-positive isolates are multidrug-resistant clonal lineages of Taiwan19F-14, mostly multilocus sequence type 320, carrying the recently described transposon Tn2010. The remainder of the macrolide resistant S. pneumoniae collection includes 31% mef(E-positive, and 9% erm(B-positive strains. Conclusions The dual-positive, multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae clones have likely expanded by switching to non-vaccine serotypes after the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine release, and their success limits therapy options. This upsurge could have a considerable clinical impact in Arizona.

  2. Cities, Towns and Villages, Point locations of cities and towns in Arizona., Published in 2006, Arizona State Land Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset as of 2006. It is described as 'Point locations of cities and towns in Arizona.'. Data by this publisher are often provided...

  3. Arizona geothermal institutional handbook: Arizona geothermal commercialization planning team, January 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malysa, L.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to assist in understanding the various procedures and requirements necessary for the development of geothermal energy in the State of Arizona. It contains the names of key persons and agencies who are directly or indirectly involved in the institutional process. A detailed assessment of all agencies and the role they play in geothermal energy development is provided. The handbook is divided into four sections: State and Local rules and regulations, the Federal rules and regulations, references, and a technical bibliography. (MHR)

  4. Reactions of hexadehydro-Diels-Alder benzynes with structurally complex multifunctional natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sean P.; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2017-06-01

    An important question in organic chemistry concerns the extent to which benzynes—one of the classical reactive intermediates in organic chemistry—can react in discriminating fashion with trapping reagents. In particular, whether these species can react selectively with substrates containing multiple functional groups and possible sites of reactivity has remained unanswered. Natural products comprise a palette of multifunctional compounds with which to address this question. Here, we show that benzynes produced by the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction react with many secondary metabolites with a preference for one among several pathways. Examples demonstrating such selectivity include reactions with: phenolics, through dearomatizing ortho-substitution; alkaloids, through Hofmann-type elimination; tropolone and furan, through cycloaddition; and alkaloids, through three-component fragmentation-coupling reactions. We also demonstrate that the cinchona alkaloids quinidine and quinine give rise to products (some in as few as three steps) that enable subsequent and rapid access to structurally diverse polyheterocyclic compounds. The results show that benzynes are quite discriminating in their reactivity—a trait perhaps not broadly enough appreciated.

  5. Soil Nitrogen Transformations and Availability in Upland Pine and Bottomland Alder Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Kyung Yoon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil nitrogen (N processes and inorganic N availability are closely coupled with ecosystem productivity and various ecological processes. Spatio-temporal variations and environmental effects on net N transformation rates and inorganic N concentrations in bulk soil and ion exchange resin were examined in an upland pine forest (UPF and a bottomland alder forest (BAF, which were expected to have distinguishing N properties. The annual net N mineralization rate and nitrification rate (kg N·ha−1·year−1 were within the ranges of 66.05–84.01 and 56.26–77.61 in the UPF and −17.22–72.24 and 23.98–98.74 in the BAF, respectively. In the BAF, which were assumed as N-rich conditions, the net N mineralization rate was suppressed under NH4+ accumulated soils and was independent from soil temperature. On the other hand, in the UPF, which represent moderately fertile N conditions, net N transformation rates and N availability were dependent to the generally known regulation by soil temperature and soil water content. Stand density might indirectly affect the N transformations, N availability, and ecosystem productivity through different soil moisture conditions. The differing patterns of different inorganic N indices provide useful insight into the N availability in each forest and potential applicability of ion exchange resin assay.

  6. Quantum chemical study of Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by Lewis acid activated oxazaborolidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ken; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-04-05

    The catalytic activity of Lewis acid activated oxazaborolidines in the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and methacrolein is investigated by using the DFT method. Oxazaborolidine is not able to coordinate to methacrolein in the absence of AlBr3 because the bonding stabilization is too small to cover the destabilization arising from the deformation of the two species. Accordingly, oxazaborolidine hardly catalyzes the cycloaddition by itself. The calculations show that the attachment of AlBr3 to the nitrogen atom of oxazaborolidine enhances the Lewis acidity of its boron center and enables it to coordinate to methacrolein. When the AlBr3-assisted oxazaborolidine is once coordinated, the catalytic activity originates mainly from the oxazaborolidine framework, and to a smaller extent from the attached AlBr3 part. The Lewis acid AlBr3 plays an additional role to facilitate the reaction by reducing the overlap repulsion between the diene and the dienophile. The attachment of AlBr3 to the oxygen atom, another Lewis basic site in oxazaborolidine, also gives a stable AlBr3-oxazaborolidine complex, but the reaction catalyzed by this complex is not preferred to that catalyzed by the complex in which AlBr3 is attached to the nitrogen atom. The electrophilicity of boron center in oxazaborolidine and those in the AlBr3-oxazaborolidine complexes are compared in terms of localized reactive orbitals.

  7. Random quaternary ammonium Diels-Alder poly(phenylene) copolymers for improved vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largier, Timothy D.; Cornelius, Chris J.

    2017-06-01

    This study analyzes the effect of quaternary ammonium homopolymer (AmPP) and ionic and non-ionic random unit copolymerization (AmPP-PP) of Diels-Alder poly(phenylene)s on electrochemical and transport properties, vanadium redox flow battery performance, and material stability. AmPP-PP materials were synthesized with IEC's up to 2.2 meq/g, displaying a carbonate form ion conductivity of 17.3 mS/cm and water uptake of 57.3%. Vanadium ion permeability studies revealed that the random copolymers possess superior charge carrier selectivity. For materials of comparable ion content, at 10 mA/cm2 the random copolymer displayed a 14% increase in coulombic efficiency (CE) corresponding to a 7% increase in energy efficiency. All quaternary ammonium materials displayed ex situ degradation in a 0.5 M V5+ + 5 M H2SO4 solution, with the rate of degradation appearing to increase with IEC. Preliminary studies reveal that the neutralizing counter-ion has a significant effect on VRB performance, proportional to changes in vanadium ion molecular diffusion.

  8. Diels-Alder Addition of Dicyclopentadiene with Cyclopentadiene in Polar Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiang-wen; JIANG Qiang; XIONG Zhong-qiang; ZOU Ji-jun; WANG Li; MI Zhen-tao

    2008-01-01

    Diels-Alder addition of dicyclopentadiene and cyclopentadiene in polar solvents has been studied to produce tricyclopentadiene(TCPD)that is a potential high-density fuel precursor.GC and MS analysis shows that the adducts contain two isomers,namely exo-and endo-TCPD.Theoretical simulation shows that although the transition state of endo-TCPD has a lower activation energy,exo-TCPD is thermodynamically preferred.Polar solvents can accelerate the reaction rate and improve the exo/endo ratio of TCPD because the transition state of exo-TCPD has a higher polarity than that of endo-TCPD.The solvent effect follows the order of polarity:benzyl methanol>cyclohexanone>toluene.The conversion rises when the temperature ranges from 120 to 150℃,but the selectivity of TCPD slightly decreases.Increasing the pressure Can improve the conversion but the exo/endo ratio of TCPD is unchanged.The apparent kinetics in different solvents was determined via nonlinear regression.The activation energies are 99.47,101.15,and 107.32 kJ/mol for benzyl methanol,cyclohexanone,and toluene,respectively.The optimal reaction conditions are as follows:benzyl methanol as solvent,temperature 150℃,and pressure 900kPa.After an 11-hour reaction,a conversion of 58.O%,a TCPD selectivity of 95.7%, and an exo/endo ratio of 1/5.3 has been obtained.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF NATURAL WEATHERING ON THE PROPERTIES OF HEAT-TREATED ALDER WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Yildiz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of natural weathering in ground contact on biological resistance, modulus of rupture, and color stability of heat-treated alder wood. Chemical composition of weathered wood was also studied by FTIR-ATR spectra. Wood stakes were heated at 150, 180, and 200°C for periods of 2, 6, and 10 hours, and the stakes were subsequently exposed to natural weathering and decay in a field area located in the north of Turkey for 3 years. The decay index of heat-treated stakes was lower than that of the controls. The weight loss prevention ratio had an increasing tendency with increasing treatment temperature and length of time. Depending on the treatment parameters, heat treatment reduced the modulus of rupture by up to 50%; however decay caused by soil micro-organisms gave rise to a greater loss of modulus of rupture than heat. Weathering processes caused remarkable color changes in the samples. FTIR-ATR spectra showed significant deformations and degradations in wood components, especially in the hemicelluloses of heat-treated samples. Degradation of hemicelluloses increased with an increase in heat temperature and exposure time.

  10. May 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on Wednesday, 5/15/2013 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, thoracic surgery, and radiology communities. Dr. George Parides will have served his 2 year tenure as Arizona Thoracic Society President by July, 2013. However, he will be unable to attend the June meeting and for this reason Presidential elections were held. Dr. Lewis Wesselius was nominated and unanimously elected as President. Three cases were presented:1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented the case of a 49 year old woman with a history of Valley Fever in 2009. She was a nonsmoker and had no other known medical diseases. However, she developed shortness of breath beginning earlier this year along with a cough productive of clear, jelly-like sputum. Her physical was normal. Pulmonary function testing revealed restrictive disease with significant improvements in the FEV1 and FVC …

  11. January 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesselius LJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Jud Tillinghast was presented a plaque in recognition of being chosen by his colleagues as the Arizona Thoracic Society Physician of the Year In 2014. Dr. Rajeev Saggar made a presentation entitled "Pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension: a unique phenotype". This presentation focused on new echocardiographic methods of assessing right ventricular (RV function and the pathophysiology of RV dysfunction. Dr. Saggar presented data from a paper he authored on parenteral treprostinil in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary artery hypertension which was published in Thorax (1. There were 2 case presentations, both from the Phoenix VA by Dr. Elijah Poulos: 1. A 65 year-old man presented with cough and chills. His past medical history included multiple myeloma treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy to spine and bone marrow transplant. He had a prior vertebroplasty. His symptoms did not improve with doxycycline. Computerized tomography angiography was done and showed areas of ...

  12. July 2016 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The July 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Prior to the case presentations, a discussion was held on 4 issues. First, Dr. Rick Robbins gave a summary of ATS Hill Day. During Hill Day a presentation was given by a representative from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Their web site lists tobacco company contributions to members of Congress on their web site. Dr. Gary Ewart from the ATS office in Washington gave a presentation on the Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act before Congress (aka the Cigar Bill which the ATS opposes. He noted that cosponsors for the bill included several Congressmen from Southwestern states. Dr. Robbins combined the two ...

  13. November 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes, alcoholism and tobacco abuse who has a history of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI with a residual thin-walled cavity in his right upper lobe (RUL. After quitting drinking and smoking and years of being asymptomatic, he presented with hemoptysis. Chest x-ray showed increasing density in the RUL. CT scan showed an intracavitary density in his previous cavity presumably a fungus ball. Sputum cultures are pending. Discussion followed on management of fungus balls. Bronchoscopy was recommended to view the bronchial anatomy to exclude other diagnosis as well ...

  14. Isotopic paleoecology of Clovis mammoths from Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Jessica Z.; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Ballenger, Jesse A. M.; Vance Haynes, C., Jr.

    2011-11-01

    The causes of megafaunal extinctions in North America have been widely debated but remain poorly understood. Mammoths (Mammuthus spp.) in the American Southwest were hunted by Clovis people during a period of rapid climate change, just before the regional onset of Younger Dryas cooling and mammoth extirpation. Thus, these mammoths may provide key insights into late Pleistocene extinction processes. Here we reconstruct the seasonal diet and climatic conditions experienced by mammoths in the San Pedro Valley of Arizona, using the carbon (13C/12C) and oxygen (18O/16O) isotope compositions of tooth enamel. These records suggest that Clovis mammoths experienced a warm, dry climate with sufficient summer rainfall to support seasonal C4 plant growth. Monsoon intensity may have been reduced relative to the preceding time period, but there is no isotopic evidence for severe drought. However, it is possible that the "Clovis drought", inferred from stratigraphic evidence, occurred suddenly at the end of the animals' lives and thus was not recorded in the enamel isotopic compositions. Unlike mammoths that lived before the Last Glacial Maximum, Clovis mammoths regularly increased C4 grass consumption during summer, probably seeking seasonally green grasslands farther from the river valley. This predictable seasonal behavior may have made mammoths easier to locate by Clovis hunters. Furthermore, Clovis mammoths probably had no previous experience of such sudden climatic change as is believed to have occurred at the time of their extinction.

  15. Isotopic paleoecology of Clovis mammoths from Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Jessica Z; Longstaffe, Fred J; Ballenger, Jesse A M; Haynes, C Vance

    2011-11-01

    The causes of megafaunal extinctions in North America have been widely debated but remain poorly understood. Mammoths (Mammuthus spp.) in the American Southwest were hunted by Clovis people during a period of rapid climate change, just before the regional onset of Younger Dryas cooling and mammoth extirpation. Thus, these mammoths may provide key insights into late Pleistocene extinction processes. Here we reconstruct the seasonal diet and climatic conditions experienced by mammoths in the San Pedro Valley of Arizona, using the carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and oxygen ((18)O/(16)O) isotope compositions of tooth enamel. These records suggest that Clovis mammoths experienced a warm, dry climate with sufficient summer rainfall to support seasonal C(4) plant growth. Monsoon intensity may have been reduced relative to the preceding time period, but there is no isotopic evidence for severe drought. However, it is possible that the "Clovis drought", inferred from stratigraphic evidence, occurred suddenly at the end of the animals' lives and thus was not recorded in the enamel isotopic compositions. Unlike mammoths that lived before the Last Glacial Maximum, Clovis mammoths regularly increased C(4) grass consumption during summer, probably seeking seasonally green grasslands farther from the river valley. This predictable seasonal behavior may have made mammoths easier to locate by Clovis hunters. Furthermore, Clovis mammoths probably had no previous experience of such sudden climatic change as is believed to have occurred at the time of their extinction.

  16. Erosion of ejecta at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, John A.; Schultz, Peter H.

    1993-01-01

    New methods for estimating erosion at Meteor Crater, Arizona, indicate that continuous ejecta deposits beyond 1/4-1/2 crater radii from the rim have been lowered less than 1 m on the average. This conclusion is based on the results of two approaches: coarsening of unweathered ejecta into surface lag deposits and calculation of the sediment budget within a drainage basin on the ejecta. Preserved ejecta morphologies beneath thin alluvium revealed by ground-penetrating radar provide qualitative support for the derived estimates. Although slightly greater erosion of less resistant ejecta locally has occurred, such deposits were limited in extent, particularly beyond 0.25R-0.5R from the present rim. Subtle but preserved primary ejecta features further support our estimate of minimal erosion of ejecta since the crater formed about 50,000 years ago. Unconsolidated deposits formed during other sudden extreme events exhibit similarly low erosion over the same time frame; the common factor is the presence of large fragments or large fragments in a matrix of finer debris. At Meteor Crater, fluvial and eolian processes remove surrounding fines leaving behind a surface lag of coarse-grained ejecta fragments that armor surfaces and slow vertical lowering.

  17. November 2016 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 17, 2016 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Two cases were presented: Dr. Lewis Wesselius presented a case of a 29-year-old man from India on a work visa who complained of right pleuritic pain. Chest x-ray showed a large right pleural effusion. CT scan confirmed the presence of effusion with minimal lung parenchyma changes or mediastinal adenopathy. Gold quantiferon was positive and coccidioidomycosis serology was negative. Thoracentesis showed a lymphocytic predominant effusion and adenosine deaminase was borderline high. No acid-fast bacilli (AFB were seen in the fluid. PCR for M. tuberculosis was negative. The pleural biopsy did show AFB and eventually grew M. tuberculosis. The patient was started on a 4 drug …

  18. September 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 9/26//2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 18 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology, and radiology communities.A discussion was held on Pending Premium Cigar Legislation HR. 1639 and S.1461, the "Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act of 2011”. This bill would exempt "premium cigars" from FDA oversight. The definition of premium cigars is so broad that candy flavored cigars, cigarillos and blunts would be exempted from FDA regulation. Teenage cigar smoking is increasing and this legislation may result in a further increase. The Arizona Thoracic Society is opposed to this bill. Dr. Robbins is to put a link on the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care website linking to the ATS website. This will enable members to contact their Congressmen opposing this legislation. A discussion was also held on a proposed combined Tucson/Phoenix …

  19. March 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The March 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 25, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, radiology and oncology communities. Dr. Richard Robbins made a presentation entitled "The History of Exhaled Nitric Oxide Measurement" focusing on the development of exhaled nitric oxide in the early 1990's. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Sandra Till, a third year pulmonary fellow at the Good Samaritan/VA program, presented an elderly man admitted to the Phoenix VA with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. His CT findings showed with centrilobular emphysema, bronchial edema, and scattered ground glass opacities. It was felt that the CT findings most likely represented a bronchiolitis from his exacerbation of COPD. 2. Richard Robbins presented a 49 year old man with a ...

  20. Traditional cultural use as a tool for inferring biogeography and provenance: a case study involving painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and Hopi Native American culture in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; LaRue, Charles T.; Drost, Charles A.; Arundel, Terence R.

    2014-01-01

    Inferring the natural distribution and native status of organisms is complicated by the role of ancient and modern humans in utilization and translocation. Archaeological data and traditional cultural use provide tools for resolving these issues. Although the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) has a transcontinental range in the United States, populations in the Desert Southwest are scattered and isolated. This pattern may be related to the fragmentation of a more continuous distribution as a result of climate change after the Pleistocene, or translocation by Native Americans who used turtles for food and ceremonial purposes. Because of these conflicting or potentially confounded possibilities, the distribution and status of C. picta as a native species in the state of Arizona has been questioned in the herpetological literature. We present evidence of a population that once occurred in the vicinity of Winslow, Arizona, far from current remnant populations on the upper Little Colorado River. Members of the Native American Hopi tribe are known to have hunted turtles for ceremonial purposes in this area as far back as AD 1290 and possibly earlier. Remains of C. picta are known from several pueblos in the vicinity including Homol'ovi, Awatovi, and Walpi. Given the great age of records for C. picta in Arizona and the concordance of its fragmented and isolated distribution with other reptiles in the region, we conclude that painted turtles are part of the native fauna of Arizona.

  1. Diastereoselective Diels–Alder Reactions of N-Sulfonyl-1-aza-1,3-butadienes With Optically Active Enol Ethers: An Asymmetric Variant of the 1-Azadiene Diels–Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ryan C.; Pfeiffer, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    The first detailed study of a room temperature asymmetric Diels–Alder reaction of N-sulfonyl-1-aza-1,3-butadienes enlisting a series of nineteen enol ethers bearing chiral auxilaries is reported with many providing highly diastereoselective (endo and facial diastereoselection) reactions largely the result of an exquisitely organized [4 + 2] cycloaddition transition state. Three new, readily accessible, and previously unexplored auxilaries (18a, 19a and 37a) rationally emerged from the studies and provide remarkable selectivities (for 19a and 37a: 49:1 endo:exo and 48:1 facial selectivity) that promise to be useful in systems beyond those detailed. PMID:16492042

  2. History of digital radiology at the University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capp, M. Paul; Roehrig, Hans; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2014-09-01

    In the early 60s, the Arizona Board of Regents recruited a national committee, all outside the state of Arizona, and asked them two questions: 1. Is it time for the state of Arizona to begin its first medical school? 2. If affirmative, where should the medical school be located? The committee spent two years evaluating the question and returned the following answers: 1. Yes, the state has the population and resources to begin its first medical school. 2. It should be located at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The primary reason for recommending the U of A was its strong base and commitment to research. To avoid state politics the Arizona Board of Regents had previously decided to accept whatever recommendations came from the neutral national committee and these, word for word, would be sent to the state legislature. There was much political discussion. The legislature finally affirmed the recommendations of the board of regents and the medical school was then located at the U of A.

  3. PN velocity beneath Western New Mexico and Eastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksha, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The experiment involved observing Pn arrivals on an areal array of 7 seismic stations located in the transition zone and along the Jemez lineament. Explosions in coal and copper mines in New Mexico and Arizona were used as energy sources as well as military detonations at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, Yuma, Arizona, and the Nevada Test Site. Very preliminary results suggest a Pn velocity of 7.94 km/s (with a fairly large uncertainty) beneath the study area. The Pn delay times, which can be converted to estimates of crustal thickness given knowledge of the velocity structure of the crust increase both to the north and east of Springerville, Arizona. As a constraint on the velocity of Pn, researchers analyzed the reversed refraction line GNOME-HARDHAT which passes through Springerville oriented NW to SE. This analysis resulted in a Pn velocity of 7.9-8.0 km/s for the transition zone. These preliminary results suggest that a normal Pn velocity might persist even though the crust thins (from north to south) by 15 km along the length of the Arizona-New Mexico border. If the upper mantle is currently hot anywhere in western New Mexico or eastern Arizona then the dimensions of the heat source (or sources) might be small compared to the intra-station distances of the seismic arrays used to estimate the velocity of Pn.

  4. Integrated solid waste management of Scottsdale, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the city of Scottsdale, Arizona, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may per-form manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of MSW in Scottsdale; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

  5. Measuring IPM Impacts in California and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, J. J.; Baur, M. E.; Elliott, S. F.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is a method of reducing economic, human health, and environmental risks from pests and pest management strategies. There are questions about the long-term success of IPM programs in relation to continued use of pesticides in agriculture. Total pounds of pesticides applied is a mis-measure of the impact of IPM in agriculture. A more complete measurement of the long-term impact of IPM includes consideration of changes in agricultural production practices and productivity, toxicity of the pesticides used, risks from human exposure to pesticides, and environmental sampling for pesticides in air and water resources. In recent decades, agricultural IPM programs have evolved to address invasive pests, shifts in endemic pest pressures, reductions in pest damage tolerance in markets, and increases in crop yields. Additionally, pesticide use data from Arizona and California revealed reduced use of pesticides in some toxicity categories but increased use of pesticides in a couple of categories. Data from federal and California programs that monitored pesticide residue on food have documented low pesticide risk to consumers. Environmental monitoring programs documented decreased pesticide levels in surface water resources in agricultural watersheds in the western United States and low levels of pesticides in air resources in agricultural areas in California. The focus of IPM assessment should be on reducing economic, human health, and environmental risks, not on pounds of pesticides applied. More broadly, IPM programs have evolved to address changes in pests and agricultural production systems while continuing to reduce human health and environmental risk from pesticides. PMID:27812396

  6. Can We Use Tree Rings of Black Alder to Reconstruct Lake Levels? A Case Study for the Mecklenburg Lake District, Northeastern Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst van der Maaten

    Full Text Available In this study, we explore the potential to reconstruct lake-level (and groundwater fluctuations from tree-ring chronologies of black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. for three study lakes in the Mecklenburg Lake District, northeastern Germany. As gauging records for lakes in this region are generally short, long-term reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations could provide valuable information on past hydrological conditions, which, in turn, are useful to assess dynamics of climate and landscape evolution. We selected black alder as our study species as alder typically thrives as riparian vegetation along lakeshores. For the study lakes, we tested whether a regional signal in lake-level fluctuations and in the growth of alder exists that could be used for long-term regional hydrological reconstructions, but found that local (i.e. site-specific signals in lake level and tree-ring chronologies prevailed. Hence, we built lake/groundwater-level reconstruction models for the three study lakes individually. Two sets of models were considered based on (1 local tree-ring series of black alder, and (2 site-specific Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Indices (SPEI. Although the SPEI-based models performed statistically well, we critically reflect on the reliability of these reconstructions, as SPEI cannot account for human influence. Tree-ring based reconstruction models, on the other hand, performed poor. Combined, our results suggest that, for our study area, long-term regional reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations that consider both recent and ancient (e.g., archaeological wood of black alder seem extremely challenging, if not impossible.

  7. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, John P.; Pool, Donald R.; Konieczki, A. D.; Carpenter, Michael C.

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods. Résumé Des effondrements en forme d'entonnoir se sont produits sur et près d'exploitations agricoles de Pima (Arizona). Ces entonnoirs apparaissent dans les alluvions le long de la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz ; ils ont rendu ces terrains dangereux et inexploitables pour l'agriculture. Plus de 1700 entonnoirs existent dans la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz et sont groupés en deux bandes orientées nord-nord-ouest, approximativement parallèles à la rivière et aux autres chenaux de la plaine d'inondation. Un volume de sédiments estim

  8. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Katrina L.; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P.; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  9. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina L Callender

    Full Text Available Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI, and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas, metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude and mineralization (five-fold. Genomic techniques proved useful in

  10. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Arizona. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Arizona.

  12. Public Land Survey (Township, Range, and Section) for northern Arizona, including Grand Canyon National Park.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This ALRIS (Arizona Land Resource Information System) coverage contains Public Land Survey gridding and labels for Townships, Ranges, and Sections for Northern Arizona

  13. Tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR. An easy entry to linear bicyclic scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Miró

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR has been carried out. It involves conjugated ketones, esters or amides bearing a remote olefin and aromatic alkynes as the starting materials. The overall process enables the preparation of a small family of linear bicyclic scaffolds in a very simple manner with moderate to good levels of diastereoselectivity. This methodology constitutes one of the few examples that employ olefins differently than ethylene in tandem CEYM–IMDAR protocols.

  14. Theoretical Study on Regioselectivity of the Diels-Alder Reaction between 1,8-Dichloroanthracene and Acrolein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujeeb A. Sultan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of the regioselectivity of the Diels-Alder reaction between 1,8-dichloroanthracene and acrolein is performed using DFT at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory. The FMO analysis, global and local reactivity indices confirmed the reported experimental results. Potential energy surface analysis showed that the cycloadditions (CAs favor the formation of the anti product. These results are in good agreement with the reported results obtained experimentally where the anti is the major product.

  15. Diels-Alder Reactions of α-Amido Acrylates with N-Cbz-1,2-dihydropyridine and Cyclopentadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Hossay; Frampton, Christopher S; Spivey, Alan C

    2016-10-21

    Thermal Diels-Alder reactions of α-amido acrylates with N-Cbz-1,2-dihydropyridine and cyclopentadiene have been explored to investigate the factors influencing the endo/exo selectivity. For the dihydropyridine, steric factors allowed the diastereoselectivity to be modulated to favor either endo- or exo-ester adducts. For cyclopentadiene, the endo-ester adducts were favored regardless of steric perturbation, although catalysis by bulky Lewis acids increased the proportion of exo-ester adducts in some cases. These Lewis acids were incompatible with the dihydropyridine diene as they induced its decomposition.

  16. Synthesis of 3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H-ones via microwave-activated inverse electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Fadel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Substituted 3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H-ones have been synthesized with the inverse electron-demand Diels–Alder reaction from 1,2,4-triazines bearing an acylamino group with a terminal alkyne side chain. Alkynes were first subjected to the Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction with aryl halides, the product of which then underwent an intramolecular inverse electron-demand Diels–Alder reaction to yield 5-aryl-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H-ones by an efficient synthetic route.

  17. Substituent Effects on Regioselectivity of the Diels-Alder Reactions: Reactions of 10-Allyl-1,8-dichloroanthracene with 2-Chloroacrylonitrile, 1-Cyanovinyl Acetate and Phenyl Vinyl Sulfone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujeeb A. Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diels-Alder reaction of 10-allyl-1,8-dichloroanthracene (3 with 2-chloroacrylonitrile (4 and 1-cyanovinyl acetate (5 gives exclusively the ortho isomer while its reaction with phenyl vinyl sulfone (10 yields a mixture of two isomeric adducts with priority to ortho isomer. The reactions proceeded under microwave condition in xylene. Configurations of these isomers have been assigned with the help of NMR spectra. The results indicated that the steric effect is dominating toward the isomer regioselectivity in the Diels-Alder reaction of the present compounds.

  18. Organic matter contribution to soil fertility improvement and maintenance in red Alder (Alnus rubra) silvopastoral systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronnie M. Mmolotsi; Zewge Teklehaimanot

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to quantify fine roots and roots nodules over the four seasons in forestry and agroforestry alder (Alnus rubra) stands in North Wales. Soil samples collected in each season were excavated at three sampling points (0.30 m, 0.57 m and 1.00 m distance from the base of each tree) from nine trees of the agroforestry and forestry plots. Result showed that the density of live fine root had significant differences in between seasons and treatments (P < 0.001). The mean weight density of live fine root over the four seasons in agroforestry and forestry was 0.27±0.01 kg·m-3 and 0.54±0.03 kg·m-3, respectively. Weight density of dead root in each system remained constant throughout the year. The mean weight density of dead root was also significantly different (P < 0.01) between forestry and agroforestry systems. Weight density of live and dead root nodule was both constant throughout the year and between the different sampling distances. The mean weight densities of live and dead root nodule over the four seasons were 0.09±0.03 kg·m-3 and 0.05±0.03 kg·m-3 in agroforestry and 0.08±0.02 kg·m-3 and 0.03±0.01 kg·m-3 in the forestry plots, respectively.

  19. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, and the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males.

  20. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  1. Population status and population genetics of northern leopard frogs in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theimer, Tad C.; Drost, Charles A.; O'Donnell, Ryan P.; Mock, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing isolation of populations by habitat fragmentation threatens the persistence of many species, both from stochastic loss of small isolated populations, and from inbreeding effects in populations that have become genetically isolated. In the southwestern United States, amphibian habitat is naturally patchy in occurrence because of the prevailing aridity of the region. Streams, rivers, and other wetlands are important both as habitat and as corridors that connect populations. However, populations of some species have become more fragmented and isolated by habitat degradation and loss. Northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) have experienced serious declines in the Southwest. We conducted an extensive survey across the known range of northern leopard frogs in Arizona to determine the current distribution and abundance of the species. From a range that once spanned much of the northern and central part of the State, northern leopard frogs have been reduced to three or four widely separated populations, near Lyman Lake in east-central Arizona, in the Stoneman Lake area south of Flagstaff, along Truxton Wash near Peach Springs, and a population of uncertain extent on Navajo Nation lands. The Lyman Lake and Truxton Wash populations are small and extremely isolated. The Stoneman Lake population, however, is an extensive metapopulation spread across several stream drainages, including numerous ponds, wetlands, and artificial tanks. This is the only population in Arizona that is increasing in extent and numbers, but there is concern about the apparent introduction of nonnative genetic stock from eastern North America into this area. We analyzed genetic diversity within and genetic divergence among populations of northern leopard frogs, across both extant and recently extirpated populations in Arizona. We also analyzed mitochondrial DNA to place these populations into a larger phylogenetic framework and to determine whether any populations contained genetic material

  2. On the Effectiveness of SB1070 in Arizona

    OpenAIRE

    Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes; Fernando Antonio Lozano

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of Arizona’s omnibus immigration law SB1070, which made it a misdemeanor crime for an alien to not carry proper documentation and asked police to determine the immigration status of any person suspected of being an illegal alien during a lawful stop. We find that SB1070’s enactment coincided with the stalling to slight recovery of the share of non-citizen Hispanics in Arizona three years after the enactment of an employment verification mandate to all empl...

  3. Lysine-iron agar in the detection of Arizona cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDWARDS, P R; FIFE, M A

    1961-11-01

    A lysine-iron agar is described and recommended for the detection of Arizona strains which ferment lactose rapidly. Black colonies which appear on bismuth sulfite agar should be transferred to the medium. Salmonellae and Arizona cultures produce a distinctive reaction since they are the only recognized groups of enteric bacteria which regularly produce lysine decarboxylase rapidly and form large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Use of the medium is particularly recommended in the examination of specimens from enteric infections in which shigellae and salmonellae are not detected.

  4. Arizona Likely Voter Survey on Proposed Legislation to Enhance School Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenski, Margaret C.

    2005-01-01

    This report contains the results of a telephone survey of 602 likely Arizona voters on various measures to enhance school choice in Arizona. This research was conducted by Arizona Opinion of Tucson for The Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation of Indianapolis. All fieldwork was conducted on March 23-26, and 28-29, 2005 by DataCall Inc. of…

  5. State of Outrage: Immigrant-Related Legislation and Education in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeanne M.; Williams, Tiffany R.

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010, Arizona made national headlines when Governor Jan Brewer signed SB 1070, the "Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act" which was aimed at deterring illegal immigration to Arizona. SB 1070 is the most prominent of a series of laws and other state policies targeting immigrants in Arizona that date back to the…

  6. 3D View of Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Grand Canyon is one of North America's most spectacular geologic features. Carved primarily by the Colorado River over the past six million years, the canyon sports vertical drops of 5,000 feet and spans a 445-kilometer-long stretch of Arizona desert. The strata along the steep walls of the canyon form a record of geologic time from the Paleozoic Era (250 million years ago) to the Precambrian (1.7 billion years ago).The above view was acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard the Terra spacecraft. Visible and near infrared data were combined to form an image that simulates the natural colors of water and vegetation. Rock colors, however, are not accurate. The image data were combined with elevation data to produce this perspective view, with no vertical exaggeration, looking from above the South Rim up Bright Angel Canyon towards the North Rim. The light lines on the plateau at lower right are the roads around the Canyon View Information Plaza. The Bright Angel Trail, which reaches the Colorado in 11.3 kilometers, can be seen dropping into the canyon over Plateau Point at bottom center. The blue and black areas on the North Rim indicate a forest fire that was smoldering as the data were acquired on May 12, 2000.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as

  7. Biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogels to control release of dexamethasone through aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry for adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Zhang, Ziwei; Mao, Jiahui; Tan, Huaping; Hu, Xiaohong

    2015-11-01

    A robust synthetic strategy of biopolymer-based hydrogels has been developed where hyaluronic acid derivatives reacted through aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry without the involvement of chemical catalysts, allowing for control and sustain release of dexamethasone. To conjugate the hydrogel, furan and maleimide functionalized hyaluronic acid were synthesized, respectively, as well as furan functionalized dexamethasone, for the covalent immobilization. Chemical structure, gelation time, morphologies, swelling kinetics, weight loss, compressive modulus and dexamethasone release of the hydrogel system in PBS at 37°C were studied. The results demonstrated that the aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry provides an extremely selective reaction and proceeds with high efficiency for hydrogel conjugation and covalent immobilization of dexamethasone. Cell culture results showed that the dexamethasone immobilized hydrogel was noncytotoxic and preserved proliferation of entrapped human adipose-derived stem cells. This synthetic approach uniquely allows for the direct fabrication of biologically functionalized gel scaffolds with ideal structures for adipose tissue engineering, which provides a competitive alternative to conventional conjugation techniques such as copper mediated click chemistry. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. An interpenetrating HA/G/CS biomimic hydrogel via Diels-Alder click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Zeng, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2013-08-14

    In order to mimic the natural cartilage extracellular matrix, a novel biological degradable interpenetrating network hydrogel was synthesized from the gelatin (G), hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) by Diels-Alder "click" chemistry. HA was modified with furylamine and G was modified with furancarboxylic acid respectively. (1)H NMR spectra and elemental analysis showed that the substitution degrees of HA-furan and G-furan were 71.5% and 44.5%. Then the hydrogels were finally synthesized by cross-linking furan-modified HA and G derivatives with dimaleimide poly(ethylene glycol) (MAL-PEG-MAL). The mechanical and degradation properties of the hydrogels could be tuned simply through varying the molar ratio between furan and maleimide. Rheological, mechanical and degradation studies demonstrated that the Diels-Alder "click" chemistry is an efficient method for preparing high performance biological interpenetrating hydrogels. This biomimic hydrogel with improved mechanical properties could have great potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic hyaluronic acid nanospheres via aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry to deliver dexamethasone for adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yang; Fan, Ming; Chen, Huinan; Miao, Yuting; Xing, Lian; Jiang, Bohong; Cheng, Qifan; Liu, Dongwei; Bao, Weikang; Qian, Bin; Wang, Jionglu; Xing, Xiaodong; Tan, Huaping; Ling, Zhonghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-11-15

    Biopolymer-based nanospheres have great potential in the field of drug delivery and tissue regenerative medicine. In this work, we present a flexible way to conjugate a magnetic hyaluronic acid (HA) nanosphere system that are capable of vectoring delivery of adipogenic factor, e.g. dexamethasone, for adipose tissue engineering. Conjugation of nanospheres was established by aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry between furan and maleimide of HA derivatives. Simultaneously, a furan functionalized dexamethasone peptide, GQPGK, was synthesized and covalently immobilized into the nanospheres. The magnetic HA nanospheres were fabricated by encapsulating super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which exhibited quick magnetic sensitivity. The aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry made nanospheres high binding efficiency of dexamethasone, and the vectoring delivery of dexamethasone could be easily controlled by a external magnetic field. The potential application of the magnetic HA nanospheres on vectoring delivery of adipogenic factor was confirmed by co-culture of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). In vitro cytotoxicity tests demonstrated that incorporation of dexamethasone into magnetic HA nanospheres showed high efficiency to promote ASCs viabilities, in particular under a magnetic field, which suggested a promising future for adipose regeneration applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lateral extension of π conjugation along the bay regions of bisanthene through a diels-alder cycloaddition reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jinling

    2011-11-14

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions at the bay regions of bisanthene (1) with dienophiles such as 1,4-naphthoquinone have been investigated. The products were submitted to nucleophilic addition followed by reductive aromatization reactions to afford the laterally extended bisanthene derivatives 2 and 3. Attempted synthesis of a larger expanded bisanthene 4 revealed an unexpected hydrogenation reaction at the last reductive aromatization step. Unusual Michael addition was observed on quinone 14, which was obtained by Diels-Alder reaction between 1 and 1,4-anthraquinone. Compounds 1-3 exhibited near-infrared (NIR) absorption and emission with high-to-moderate fluorescent quantum yields. Their structures and absorption spectra were studied by density function theory and non-planar twisted structures were calculated for 2 and 3. All compounds showed amphoteric redox behavior with multiple oxidation/reduction waves. Oxidative titration with SbCl 5 gave stable radical cations, and the process was followed by UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopic measurements. Their photostability was measured and correlated to their different geometries and electronic structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The evolution and age of populations of Scaphinotus petersi Roeschke on Arizona Sky Islands (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Cychrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ober

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Populations of the ground beetle Scaphinotus petersi are isolated in subalpine conifer forest habitats on mountain ranges or Sky Islands in southeastern Arizona. Previous work on this species has suggested these populations have been isolated since the last post-glacial maximum times as warming caused this cool adapted species to retreat to high elevations. To test this hypothesis, we inferred the phylogeny from mitochondrial DNA sequence data from several Arizona Sky Island populations of S. petersi and estimated the divergence time of the currently isolated populations. We found two major clades of S. petersi, an eastern clade and a western group. Our results indicated most mountain ranges form clades except the Huachucas, which are polyphyletic and the Santa Catalinas, which are paraphyletic. We estimated the Pinaleño population is much older than the last glacial maximum, but the Huachuca and Pinal populations may have been fragmented from the Santa Catalina population since the post-glacial maximum times.

  12. Post occupancy survey of the Arizona LEED NC population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Hugo Dixon

    Existing green building literature has not provided conclusive performance results for energy efficiency, water efficiency and the utilization and proper management of green building features. The few existing energy performance studies had not represented a significant portion of a population, were not random samples, did not included many structures from hot and dry climates and had generated heavily debated results. This thesis examines the fifty-three buildings comprising the Arizona Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED NC) building population and in doing so hypothesizes that Arizona's LEED NC buildings achieve expected energy and water performance and exhibit various energy efficiency correlations. The thesis also establishes a baseline understanding of Arizona's LEED NC population characteristics. Data collection efforts were successful for all desired deliverables with the exception of water performance metrics. Energy analysis results rejected the energy efficiency hypotheses by returning greater energy use intensities than the non-LEED national building stock as well as the design and baseline energy use simulations. The energy correlation analysis returned statistically significant results for a single system attribute and several managerial attributes. The results suggest that the LEED NC rating system requires immediate reevaluation to ensure future green building success in Arizona.

  13. Comparison studies of ozone precursors in Phoenix, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Guyton, J.; Lee, C.P. [Arizona Dept. of Environmental Quality, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Parmar, S. [Atmospheric Analysis and Consulting Co., Ventura, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper will present the comparison of the ozone precursors monitoring program for Phoenix, Arizona during 1992 and 1993. Specific details and methodologies will be presented involving collection of air samples and analysis of speciated measurements for reactive VOC and carbonyl precursors responsible for ozone formation. Quality control and quality assurance techniques will also be discussed.

  14. Arizona State's Origins Project Starts with a Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    For 12 hours at Arizona State University, a sold-out crowd of 3,000 people gave a group of famous scientists a pop-star welcome, cheering their remarks and lining up for autographs after a day full of discussion about black holes, string theory, and evolutionary biology. At a time when program cuts and faculty layoffs dominate the headlines of…

  15. Developing a Distributed Computing Architecture at Arizona State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armann, Neil; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of Arizona State University's computing architecture, designed to ensure that all new distributed computing pieces will work together, is described. Aspects discussed include the business rationale, the general architectural approach, characteristics and objectives of the architecture, specific services, and impact on the university…

  16. "Salmonella arizona" Infections in Latinos Associated with Rattlesnake Folk Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Stephen H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Conducted a case-control study to determine the magnitude of the problem of Latino patients who ingested rattlesnake capsules and then developed serious "Salmonella arizona" infections. Eighty-two percent of infected Latinos in 1986-87 who were questioned reported ingesting snake capsules. Discusses the association of ingesting snake…

  17. An exploration possibility at the Arizona mine, Pershing County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R.E.; Tatlock, Donald Bruce

    1963-01-01

    At the Arizona mine in Pershing County, Nevada, a block of ground that may contain significant bodies of silver ore at a shallow depth .appears to have been very inadequately explored during early mining activity. The block approximates in arcal extent

  18. Implementing Structured English Immersion in Arizona: Benefits, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez Canche, Manuel S.; Moll, Luis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Arizona's most recent English Language Learner (ELL) legislation, starting in the school year 2008-2009, requires all such students be educated through a specific Structured English Immersion (SEI) model: the 4-hour English Language Development (ELD) block. The basic premise behind this particular model is that ELL students…

  19. Language Ideologies of Arizona Voters, Language Managers, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons-Doolan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Arizona is the site of many explicit language policies as well as ongoing scholarly discussions of related language ideologies--beliefs about the role of language in society. This study adds a critical piece to the investigation of the role of ideologies in language policy processes by thoroughly documenting language ideologies expressed by a…

  20. Language Ideologies of Arizona Voters, Language Managers, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons-Doolan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Arizona is the site of many explicit language policies as well as ongoing scholarly discussions of related language ideologies--beliefs about the role of language in society. This study adds a critical piece to the investigation of the role of ideologies in language policy processes by thoroughly documenting language ideologies expressed by a…

  1. Neoliberalism and the Battle over Ethnic Studies in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Sandra K.; Joseph, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    On May 14, 2010, Sandra K. Soto was the faculty convocation speaker for the University of Arizona College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. To a significant extent, she congratulated the parents and graduates and flattered the graduates by crediting them with having learned both skills and information, and urging graduates to make use of their…

  2. Arizona TeleMedicine Network: Engineering Master Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic Research Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    As the planning document for establishing a statewide health communications system initially servicing the Papago, San Carlos and White Mountain Apache, Navajo, and Hopi reservations, this document prescribes the communications services to be provided by the Arizona TeleMedicine Network. Specifications include: (1) communications services for each…

  3. Language Policy and Bilingual Education in Arizona and Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric J.; Johnson, David Cassels

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the bilingual/language education policies of Arizona and Washington to show that state-level language policy plays a critical role in shaping the appropriation of federal language policy [No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), Title III] and how different state-level language policies impact the district level of policy…

  4. 75 FR 7518 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... public comment period will be provided at 11:30 a.m. on March 18, 2010, for any interested publics who... Green Valley, Arizona. The FS is proposing to make this property available to the public as an overnight... will consist of a summer rate of $110.00 per day without water/$140.00 per day with water, and a...

  5. A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez-Canche, Manuel; Moll, Luis C.

    2010-01-01

    In this study a representative sample of 880 elementary and secondary teachers currently teaching in 33 schools across the state of Arizona were asked about their perceptions of how their ELL students were faring under current instructional policies for ELL students. Teachers were surveyed during the Spring of 2010. Overall findings show that most…

  6. 78 FR 26739 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... filed by S and H Broadcasting, LLC, proposing the substitution of Channel 228C2 for vacant Channel 286C2... Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa...

  7. "Democratic" Collaboration for School Turnaround in Southern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the democratic nature of collaboration and related principal influences in one successful Southern Arizona elementary school in a changing demographic and border context in the US Southwest and where the principal did not share the same ethnic identity/cultural background.…

  8. Prevalence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in desert bighorn sheep in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice-Allen, Anne E.; Luedtke, Clint J.; Overstreet, Matthew; Cain, James W.; Stephenson, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the potential for an epizootic of pneumonia to result from either natural immigration or translocation, we compared the seroprevalence to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in several populations of desert bighorn sheep in Arizona. We collected blood samples and nasal or oropharyngeal swabs from 124 desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) from 6 populations in Arizona in 2009 and 2010. M. ovipneumoniae organisms were detected by PCR in 22%, whereas antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae were detected in 47% of tested bighorn sheep. Mycoplasma antibodies were not found in 2 of 6 populations, indicating some bighorn sheep populations in Arizona are naïve to this bacterium. In contrast, others had seroprevalence rates up to 80%. We were able to compare seroprevalence rates and titers over time in 9 individuals (7 individuals included in the 124 bighorn sheep sampled in 2009 and 2010, and 2 individuals originally captured in 2006). Antibody titers persisted for 12 months in individuals from the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge (n = 7) while antibody titers appeared to decline in the Kanab Creek population (n = 2). M. ovipneumoniae is present or has been present in several, but not all, populations of bighorn sheep in Arizona. The results demonstrate the importance of routine health testing for future translocation efforts to reduce disease risk for naive populations.

  9. In-depth evaluation of the cycloaddition--retro-Diels--Alder reaction for in vivo targeting with [(111)In]-DTPA-RGD conjugates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, P.; Meeuwissen, S.A.; Berkel, S.S. van; Oyen, W.J.G.; Delft, F.L. van; Rutjes, F.P.J.T.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The spontaneous copper-free tandem 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition-retro-Diels-Alder (tandem crDA) reaction between cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Phe-Orn(N(3)) [c(RGDfX)] and oxanorbornadiene-DTPA (o-DTPA) or methyloxanorbornadiene-DTPA (mo-DTPA) into two DTPA-c(RGDfX) regioisomers is characterized.

  10. The Synthesis of "N"-Benzyl-2-Azanorbornene via Aqueous Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction: An Undergraduate Project in Organic Synthesis and Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Xavier; Delaude, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of "N"-benzyl-2-azanorbornene via aqueous hetero Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and benzyliminium chloride formed in situ from benzylamine hydrochloride and formaldehyde is described. Characterization of the product was achieved by IR and NMR spectroscopies. The spectral data acquired are thoroughly discussed. Numerous…

  11. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  12. Diels-Alder Cycloadditions: A MORE Experiment in the Organic Laboratory Including a Diene Identification Exercise Involving NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Roosevelt; Severin, Ashika; Balfour, Miguel; Nettles, Columbus

    2005-01-01

    Two Diels-Alder reactions are described that are suitable for a MORE (microwave-induced organic reaction enhanced) experiment in the organic chemistry laboratory course. A second experiment in which the splitting patterns of the vinyl protons in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two MORE adducts are used in conjunction with molecular…

  13. Synthesis of {alpha}- and {beta}-lapachone derivatives from hetero diels-alder trapping of alkyl and aryl o-quinone methides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fernando de C. da; Ferreira, Sabrina B.; Ferreira, Vitor F. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica], e-mail: cegvito@vm.uff.br; Kaiser, Carlos R.; Pinto, Angelo C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Methylene and aryl o-quinone methides (o-QMs) generated by Knoevenagel condensation of 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone with formaldehyde and arylaldehydes, undergo facile hetero Diels-Alder reaction with some substituted styrenes (as dienophiles) in aqueous ethanol media providing derivatives of {alpha}- and {beta}-lapachone (author)

  14. Synthesis of 2-azaanthracenes via a sequential Sonogashira coupling/alkynyl imine-allenyl imine isomerization/aza-Diels-Alder/elimination-aromatization reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Yang, Xiongfa; Hua, Xilin; Deng, Yuan; Lai, Guoqiao

    2011-02-04

    An interesting sequential Sonogashira coupling/alkynyl imine-allenyl imine isomerization/aza-Diels-Alder/elimination-aromatization reaction, providing a facile synthesis of substituted 2-azaanthracenes from 1,6-diynes and imidoyl chlorides, is reported. The easy procedure accessing the products efficiently from readily available starting materials may imply a potential synthetic application.

  15. Synthesis of furo[3,2-c ]- and pyrano[ 3,2-c ] quinolines by lanthanide triflate catalyzed imino-Diels-Alder reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA, Yun(马云); QIAN, Chang-Tao(钱长涛); SUN, Jie(孙杰); XIE, Mei-Hua(谢美华)

    2000-01-01

    Imino Diels-Alder reaction of imines witth 2,3-dihydrofuran or 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran proceeded smothly in the presence of a catalytic amount (0.5 mol %) of ytterbium triflate to afford furo[3,2-c]- and pyrano[3,2-c] quinolines conveniently in high yield.

  16. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  17. A hetero retro Diels-Alder reaction in aqueous solution : A dramatic water-induced increase of the equilibrium constant and inhibition of cycloreversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, J.W; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1997-01-01

    The adduct of the Diels-Alder reaction of nitrosobenzene with cyclopentadiene is not stable in solution. The equilibrium constant for the reaction depends strongly on the medium and water induces a spectacular shift to the adduct. Comparison with the bimolecular addition of nitrosobenzene to 1,3-cyc

  18. Illustrating the Utility of X-Ray Crystallography for Structure Elucidation through a Tandem Aldol Condensation/Diels-Alder Reaction Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Giang T.; Kubo, Tomohiro; Young, Victor G., Jr.; Kautzky, Jacob A.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Two introductory organic chemistry laboratory experiments are described based on the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,3,4,5-tetraphenylcyclopentadienone, which is synthesized prior to or in a one-pot reaction, with styrene. Students are presented with three possible products, the "endo" and "exo" diastereomers and the decarbonylated…

  19. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  20. The Synthesis of "N"-Benzyl-2-Azanorbornene via Aqueous Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction: An Undergraduate Project in Organic Synthesis and Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Xavier; Delaude, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of "N"-benzyl-2-azanorbornene via aqueous hetero Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and benzyliminium chloride formed in situ from benzylamine hydrochloride and formaldehyde is described. Characterization of the product was achieved by IR and NMR spectroscopies. The spectral data acquired are thoroughly discussed. Numerous…

  1. Diels-Alder hydrogels with enhanced stability: First step toward controlled release of bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Susanne; Gregoritza, Manuel; Messmann, Viktoria; Hammer, Nadine; Goepferich, Achim M; Brandl, Ferdinand P

    2015-10-01

    Eight-armed PEG was functionalized with furyl and maleimide groups (8armPEG20k-Fur and 8armPEG20k-Mal); degradable hydrogels were obtained by cross-linking via Diels-Alder chemistry. To increase the stability to degradation, the macromonomers were modified by introducing a hydrophobic 6-aminohexanoic acid spacer between PEG and the reactive end-groups (8armPEG20k-Ahx-Fur and 8armPEG20k-Ahx-Mal). In an alternative approach, the number of reactive groups per macromonomer was increased by branching the terminal ends of eight-armed PEG with lysine (Lys) and Ahx residues (8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx-Fur2 and 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx-Mal2). The hydrolytic resistance of the synthesized macromonomers was determined by UV spectroscopy; the obtained hydrogels were characterized by rheology and degradation studies. The degradation time of 5% (w/v) 8armPEG20k-Ahx hydrogels (28days) was twice as long as the degradation time of 5% (w/v) 8armPEG20k hydrogels (14days); this is explained by increased hydrolytic resistance of the maleimide group. Using dendritic 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx macromonomers substantially increased the stability of the resulting hydrogels; degradation of 5% (w/v) 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx hydrogels occurred after 34 weeks. 8armPEG20k hydrogels had the largest mesh size of all tested hydrogels, while hydrogels made from dendritic 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx macromonomers showed the smallest value. To evaluate their potential for the controlled release of therapeutic antibodies, the hydrogels were loaded with bevacizumab. The incorporated bevacizumab was released over 10 days (8armPEG20k) and 42days (8armPEG20k-Ahx), respectively; release from 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx hydrogels was not completed after 105 days. In summary, we believe that 8armPEG20k-Ahx or 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx hydrogels could serve as controlled release system for therapeutic antibodies such as bevacizumab.

  2. The University of Arizona College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture,Tucson,Arizona%亚和桑那大学的建筑和景观设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布拉得利·韦勒

    2008-01-01

    @@ A textbook illustration of modern, sustainable, site specific and symbolically iconographic architecture stands as an addition to the renowned University of Arizona College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture.

  3. Judicial Performance Review in Arizona: A Critical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca White Berch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Judicial performance evaluations are a relatively new tool for assessing judges and providing information to voters to help them determine whether to retain judges in contested or retention elections. Arizona implemented its judicial evaluation program about 20 years ago, and since that time, the state has continually strived to improve its process. The result is that today Arizona has one of the most progressive and comprehensive judicial performance evaluation programs in the United States. This article takes a critical look at the strengths and weaknesses of Arizona’s program, keeping in mind two key values that the system seeks to protect: judicial accountability and judicial independence. Las evaluaciones del rendimiento judicial son una herramienta relativamente nueva para evaluar a los jueces y ofrecer información a los votantes, que les ayude a decidir si quieren reelegir a los jueces en las elecciones. Arizona implementó su programa de evaluación judicial hace unos 20 años, y desde ese momento, el Estado se ha esforzado continuamente en mejorar el proceso. El resultado es que hoy en día, Arizona tiene uno de los programas de evaluación del rendimiento judicial más progresistas e integrales de los Estados Unidos. Este artículo ofrece una mirada crítica a las fortalezas y debilidades del programa de Arizona, teniendo en cuenta dos valores clave que el sistema trata de proteger: la responsabilidad judicial y la independencia judicial. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2533868

  4. Examining Arizona's Policy Response Post "Flores v. Arizona" in Educating K-12 English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Gomez, Laura; Cisneros, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of Arizona's policy response in educating English language learners by conducting a narrative review. A critical Latina/o theory approach was used to analyze the data. This study reveals 5 salient policy responses: (a) severely limit bilingual education, (b) develop controversial funding solutions, (c)…

  5. Comparative use of riparian corridors and oases by migrating birds in southeast Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skagen, S.K.; Melcher, C.P.; Howe, W.H.; Knopf, F.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of cottonwood-willow riparian corridors and isolated oases to land birds migrating across southeastern Arizona was evaluated during four spring migrations, 1989 to 1994, based on patterns of species richness, relative abundance, density, and body condition of birds. We surveyed birds in 13 study sites ranging in size and connectivity from small isolated patches to extensive riparian forest, sampled vegetation and insects, and captured birds in mistnets. The continuous band of riparian vegetation along the San Pedro River does not appear to be functioning as a corridor for many migrating species, although it may for a few, namely Yellow-breasted Chats (Icteria virens), Summer Tanagers (Piranga rubra), and Northern Rough-winged Swallows (Steldigopteryx serripennis), which account for fewer than 10% of the individuals migrating through the area. Small, isolated oases hosted more avian species than the corridor sites, and the relative abundances of most migrating birds did not differ between sites relative to size-connectivity. There were few differences in between-year variability in the relative abundances of migrating birds between corridor and oasis sites. Between-year variability decreased with overall abundance of species and was greater for species with breeding ranges that centered north of 50??N latitude. Body condition of birds did not differ relative to the size-connectivity of the capture site, but individuals of species with more northerly breeding ranges had more body fat than species that breed nearby. Peak migration densities of several bird species far exceeded breeding densities reported for the San Pedro River, suggesting that large components of these species were en route migrants. Peak densities of Yellow Warblers (Dendroica petechia) reached 48.0 birds/ha, of Wilson's Warblers (Wilsonia pusilla) 33.7 birds/ha, and of Yellow-rumped Warblers (D. coronata) 30.1 birds/ha. Riparian vegetation is limited in extent in the

  6. Microwave-assisted Diels-Alder reaction of 1,3,3-trimethyl-2-vinyl-1-cyclohexene with chromones An expeditious approach to analogues of the puupehenone group of marine diterpenoids and kampanols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramana, M. M.V; Kamble, Rajesh M

    2010-01-01

    A rapid assembly of the tetracyclic core of marine diterpenoids related to puupehenone and kampanols by a Diels-Alder reaction of 1,3,3-trimethyl-2-vinyl-1-cyclohexene with chromones under microwave...

  7. A domino Knoevenagel hetero-Diels-Alder reaction for the synthesis of polycyclic chromene derivatives and evaluation of their cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B V Subba; Divya, Baddula; Swain, Manisha; Rao, T Prabhakar; Yadav, J S; Vishnu Vardhan, M V P S

    2012-03-01

    A novel octahydrochromeno[4,3-a]xanthen-1(2H)-one derivatives has been prepared using 10mol% dl-proline in ethanol via a domino Knoevenagel hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of alkene-tethered chromene-3-carboxaldehyde with cyclic 1,3-diketones. This is not only the first example on the preparation of highly diastereoselective pentacyclic chromene derivatives from alkene appended chromene-3-carboxaldehyde in one-pot process at ambient temperature but also preliminary evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of these chromene derivatives. Some of these compounds are found to exhibit potent cytotoxicity against two carcinoma cell lines A549 and B-16. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Combustion characteristics of red alder bark. Technical progress report No. 6, September 16, 1977--Septermber 15, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junge, D.C.

    1978-12-01

    Significant quantities of wood residue fuels are presently being used in industrial steam generating facilities. Recent studies indicate that substantial additional quantities of wood residue fuels are available for energy generation in the form of steam and/or electricity. A limited data base on the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels has resulted in the installation and operation of inefficient combustion systems for these fuels. This investigation of the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels was undertaken to provide a data base which could be used to optimize the combustion of such fuels. Optimization of the combustion process in industrial boilers serves to improve combustion efficiency and to reduce air pollutant emissions generated in he combustion process. Data are presented on the combustion characteristics of red alder bark.

  9. Visible-Light-Irradiated Graphitic Carbon Nitride Photocatalyzed Diels-Alder Reactions with Dioxygen as Sustainable Mediator for Photoinduced Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yubao; Antonietti, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Photocatalytic Diels-Alder (D-A) reactions with electron rich olefins are realized by graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) under visible-light irradiation and aerobic conditions. This heterogeneous photoredox reaction system is highly efficient, and the apparent quantum yield reaches a remarkable value of 47 % for the model reaction. Dioxygen plays a critical role as electron mediator, which is distinct from the previous reports in the homogeneous Ru(II) complex photoredox system. Moreover, the reaction intermediate vinylcyclobutane is captured and monitored during the reaction, serving as a direct evidence for the proposed reaction mechanism. The cycloaddition process is thereby determined to be the combination of direct [4+2] cycloaddition and [2+2] cycloaddition followed by photocatalytic rearrangement of the vinylcyclobutane intermediate. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated o-Quinodimethane Intermediates: An Alternative Route to Photocured Polymer Film Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Daniel S.; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Smith, Dee Dee; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Photolysis of o-methylphenyl ketones generates bis-o-quinodimethane intermediates that can be trapped in situ by dienophiles through Diels-Alder cycloadditions. This well-known photochemical process is applied to a series of six new photoreactive monomers containing bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone) functionalities combined with diacrylate and triacrylate ester monomers for the development of acrylic ester copolymer blends. Irradiation of cyclohexanone solutions of the bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone)s and acrylate esters produce thin polymer films. Solid state 13C NMR data indicated 47- 100% reaction of the bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone)s, depending on experimental conditions, to yield the desired products. DSC and TGA analyses were performed to determine the glass transition temperature, T,, and onset of decomposition, Td, of the resulting polymer films. A statistical Design of Experiments approach was used to obtain a systematic understanding of the effects of experimental variables on the extent of polymerization and the final polymer properties.

  11. Discovery of TNF inhibitors from a DNA-encoded chemical library based on diels-alder cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Fabian; Zhang, Yixin; Scheuermann, Jörg; Schäfer, Juliane; Bühlmann, Peter; Neri, Dario

    2009-10-30

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries are promising tools for the discovery of ligands toward protein targets of pharmaceutical relevance. DNA-encoded small molecules can be enriched in affinity-based selections and their unique DNA "barcode" allows the amplification and identification by high-throughput sequencing. We describe selection experiments using a DNA-encoded 4000-compound library generated by Diels-Alder cycloadditions. High-throughput sequencing enabled the identification and relative quantification of library members before and after selection. Sequence enrichment profiles corresponding to the "bar-coded" library members were validated by affinity measurements of single compounds. We were able to affinity mature trypsin inhibitors and identify a series of albumin binders for the conjugation of pharmaceuticals. Furthermore, we discovered a ligand for the antiapoptotic Bcl-xL protein and a class of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binders that completely inhibited TNF-mediated killing of L-M fibroblasts in vitro.

  12. Solid lipid nanoparticles affect microbial colonization and enzymatic activity throughout the decomposition of alder leaves in freshwater microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, A C; Mendes, R J; Castro, P G; Silva, A M

    2017-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are used as carriers for drug delivery, and are high biocompatible and designed to endure in the host organism. Despite its current industrial production is low, many of these substances are available on the market, and much more are in the production pipeline. As a result, many of them will end in aquatic systems raising the question whether they can pose a risk to aquatic biota and the associated ecological processes. Microbial decomposers of plant litter, play a key role in forested streams being responsible for the energy flow between terrestrial and aquatic environments. Here, we investigated the effects of SLNs on alder leaf litter decomposition by aquatic microbes. Alder leaves were immersed in a stream of Northeast Portugal to allow microbial colonization before being exposed in microcosms of two types of SLNs at two concentrations for 42 days. Results showed that rates of leaf decomposition decreased with exposure to SLNs. Bacterial biomass was not inhibited by SLNs, and cultivable fungi densities remained constant (SLN-A) or increased (SLN-C) compared with control microcosms. The type and concentration of SLNs influenced differently the leaf colonization by fungi as well as fungal sporulation rate. These effects were accompanied by changes in the community extraenzymatic profile: the activities of alkaline phosphatase, acidic phosphatase, Naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase (P cycle) and lipases increased in the SLNs microcosms. This study provided the first evidence of the adverse effects of the release of SLNs to streams on leaf litter decomposition. Those effects seem to depend on the composition and concentration of SLNs, as well on the microbial target group, or enzyme. Thus, prior to massive industrial production of these nanomaterials, some measures should be taken to avoid environmental impact affecting the microbial communities responsible for detritus decomposition.

  13. B(C6F5)3: A New Class of Strong and Bulky Lewis Acid for Exo-Selective Intermolecular Diels-Alder Reactions of Unreactive Acyclic Dienes with α,β-Enals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-Hui; Jiang, Bing; Meng, Fei-Fan; Xu, Yun-He; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2015-09-18

    Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 catalyzed the Diels-Alder reactions of multisubstituted open-chain dienes and α,β-enals to afford the desired products with high exo-selectivities are reported. The substituent effect of the dienes and dienophiles on the product's stereoselectivity was thoroughly investigated, and it was found that most of the desired exo-Diels-Alder products could be obtained in good yields and with high exo-stereoselectivities.

  14. Floods of October 1977 in southern Arizona and March 1978 in central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Byron Neil; Eychaner, James H.

    1984-01-01

    Major floods occurred in October 1977 and March 1978 in Arizona. As much as 14 inches of rain fell during October 6-9, 1977, over the mountains of southern Arizona and northern Mexico resulting in the highest discharge since at least 1892 on the Santa Cruz River upstream from Tucson. The flood inundated areas as much as 4 miles wide, covered at least 16,000 acres of farmland, and caused $15.2 million in damage. Residential losses occurred at Nogales, Amado, Green Valley, and Sahuarita. Severe erosional damage occurred along the Santa Cruz River, Agua Fria Canyon, Potrero Creek, and many small drainages in the Sonoita Creek basin. The peak discharge in Agua Fria Canyon was the highest since before 1900. Less severe flooding occurred along the San Pedro River and the Gila River downstream from the San Pedro. Widespread rainfall of 3 to 6 inches and 9 to 14 inches in some areas in the central mountains during February 27 to March 3, 1978, caused the highest discharge since 1920 on the Salt River in Phoenix and resulted in three deaths. Flooding along the Salt and Gila Rivers and several lesser streams caused statewide damage totaling $65.9 million, of which about $37 million occurred in Maricopa County. Nine counties were declared disaster areas. During the flood of March 1978, moderate peak discharges and unusually high volumes of runoff occurred on tributaries to the Salt and Verde Rivers upstream from a system of reservoirs. Flood magnitudes were greater at the main-stem gaging stations than on the tributaries. The peak discharge into Theodore Roosevelt Lake, which was 21 percent full at the start of the flood, was about 155,000 cubic feet per second, the largest known from 1890 to 1978. The reservoirs stored large quantities of water and greatly reduced the magnitude of the flood. The peak discharge of the Salt River was 125,000 cubic feet per second below Granite Reef Dam and 122,000 cubic feet per second at Phoenix. Discharges in excess of 100,000 cubic feet per

  15. The Public Health Impact of Coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Richard F.; Rutherford, George W.; Tsang, Clarisse A.; Erhart, Laura M.; McCotter, Orion; Anderson, Shoana M.; Komatsu, Kenneth; Tabnak, Farzaneh; Vugia, Duc J.; Yang, Ying; Galgiani, John N.

    2011-01-01

    The numbers of reported cases of coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California have risen dramatically over the past decade, with a 97.8% and 91.1% increase in incidence rates from 2001 to 2006 in the two states, respectively. Of those cases with reported race/ethnicity information, Black/African Americans in Arizona and Hispanics and African/Americans in California experienced a disproportionately higher frequency of disease compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Lack of early diagnosis continues to be a problem, particularly in suspect community-acquired pneumonia, underscoring the need for more rapid and sensitive tests. Similarly, the inability of currently available therapeutics to reduce the duration and morbidity of this disease underscores the need for improved therapeutics and a preventive vaccine. PMID:21695034

  16. Student research in criticality safety at the University of Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief progress report on four University of Arizona student projects is given. Improvements were made in simulations of power pulses in aqueous solutions, including the TWODANT model. TWODANT calculations were performed to investigate the effect of assembly shape on the expansion coefficient of reactivity for solutions. Preliminary calculations were made of critical heights for the Los Alamos SHEBA assembly. Calculations to support French experiments to measure temperature coefficients of dilute plutonium solutions confirmed feasibility.

  17. A Comprehensive Fusion Liaison Officer Program: The Arizona Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    TLO) Program has become an institution that is relied upon by pm1icipant jurisdictions for intelligence and information sharing between federal, state...vetted-out partners throughout the public safety community to assist jurisdictions in addressing many high-risk events and incidents. In the...State University of New York College (Cortland), 1990 M.A., Northern Arizona University , 1999 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the

  18. Arizona Education Tax Credit and Hidden Considerations of Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Michele S. Moses

    2000-01-01

    The current debate over market-based ideas for educational reform is examined, focusing specifically on the recent movement toward education tax credits. Viewing the Arizona education tax credit law as a voucher plan in sheep's clothing, I argue that the concept of justice underlying the law is a crucial issue largely missing from the school choice debate. I question the libertarian conception of justice assumed by voucher and tax credit advocates, and argue instead that a contemporary libera...

  19. Professional Development Through The University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Nieberding, Megan N.; Austin, Carmen; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club creates a unique environment for undergraduates to accomplish goals early in their academic career. The club provides research opportunities with advisors, graduate students, and projects organized by fellow undergraduates. Undergraduates that work side-by-side develop strong working relationships which keeps students interested in astronomy and enables them to thrive in their studies and research. Club members are encouraged to attend and present their research at professional conferences where they are exposed early to the scientific research community, learn about internship and REU opportunities, and get information about graduate programs. In addition to preparing undergraduates to thrive in their academic career, the club also offers outreach opportunities for members to actively educate the southern Arizona community. Members of the club design and create many of their outreach materials including 3D models of our local stellar neighborhood and astronomical objects. Astronomy Club has had a positive impact on its members, the Department of Astronomy, and the southern Arizona community for the past seven years. The club continues to strive to improve undergraduate retention and prepare students for their future careers.

  20. Highly Regio- and Stereoselective Diels-Alder Cycloadditions via Two-Step and Multicomponent Reactions Promoted by Infrared Irradiation under Solvent-Free Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Delgado

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Infrared irradiation promoted the Diels-Alder cycloadditions of exo-2-oxazolidinone dienes 1–3 with the Knoevenagel adducts 4–6, as dienophiles, leading to the synthesis of new 3,5-diphenyltetrahydrobenzo[d]oxazol-2-one derivatives (7, 9, 11 and 13–17, under solvent-free conditions. These cycloadditions were performed with good regio- and stereoselectivity, favoring the para-endo cycloadducts. We also evaluated the one-pot three-component reaction of active methylene compounds 20, benzaldehydes 21 and exo-2-oxazolidinone diene 2 under the same reaction conditions. A cascade Knoevenagel condensation/Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction was observed, resulting in the final adducts 13–16 in similar yields. These procedures are environmentally benign, because no solvent and no catalyst were employed in these processes. The regioselectivity of these reactions was rationalized by Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO calculations.

  1. Origins of the Unfavorable Activation and Reaction Energies of 1-Azadiene Heterocycles Compared to 2-Azadiene Heterocycles in Diels-Alder Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, Jason S; Martin, Blanton N; Houk, K N

    2017-02-17

    The reactivities of butadiene, cyclopentadiene, furan, thiophene, pyrrole, and their 1-aza- and 2-aza-derivatives in Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and fumaronitrile were investigated with density functional theory (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p)). The activation free energies for the Diels-Alder reactions of cyclic 1-azadienes are 10-14 kcal mol(-1) higher than those of cyclic 2-azadienes, and the reaction free energies are 17-20 kcal mol(-1) more endergonic. The distortion/interaction model shows that the increased activation energies of cyclic 1-azadienes originate from increased transition state distortion energies and unfavorable interaction energies, arising from addition to the nitrogen terminus of the C═N bond.

  2. Asymmetric NHC-catalyzed aza-Diels-Alder reactions: Highly enantioselective route to α-amino acid derivatives and DFT calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Limin

    2014-08-01

    A facile N-heterocyclic carbene catalytic enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reaction of oxodiazenes with α-chloroaldehydes as dienophile precursors is reported, with excellent enantioselectivity (ee > 99%) and excellent yield (up to 93%). DFT study showed that cis-TSa, formed from a top face approach of oxodiazene to cis-IIa, is the most favorable transition state and is consistent with the experimental observations. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  3. Elucidation of the Chemo- and Regioselectivity of Polar Diels-Alder Reactions involving Thiophene-1, 1-Dioxides Using DFT-Based Reactivity Indexes

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the global electrophilicity indexes of some substituted thiophene-1,1- dioxides shows that these species act as potential electrophiles in polar Diels – Alder reactions with diene systems. The chemo- and regioselectivity of these cycloadditions are rationalized using local electrophilicity and local nucleophilicity indexes recently proposed by Domingo's group [Domingo, L. R.; Aurell, M. J.; Perez, P.; Contreras, R. Quantitative Characterization of the Local Electrophilicity of...

  4. Combining Organocatalysis and Lanthanide Catalysis: A Sequential One-Pot Quadruple Reaction Sequence/Hetero-Diels-Alder Asymmetric Synthesis of Functionalized Tricycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dochain, Simon; Vetica, Fabrizio; Puttreddy, Rakesh; Rissanen, Kari; Enders, Dieter

    2016-12-23

    A stereoselective one-pot synthesis of functionalized complex tricyclic polyethers has been achieved using the combination of secondary amine and lanthanide catalysis. This one-pot quadruple reaction/Hetero-Diels-Alder sequence gave good yields (per step) as well as excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Furthermore, the particular combination of lanthanide complexes with organocatalysis is one of the first examples described for sequential catalysis. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. New and Concise Syntheses of the Bicyclic Oxamazin Core Using an Intramolecular Nitroso Diels-Alder Reaction and Ring-Closing Olefin Metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kyle D.; Carosso, Serena

    2013-01-01

    Herein two new and concise synthetic approaches for making an unsaturated bicyclic oxamazin core are reported. The first involves the use of an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction to form both of the fused rings in one step. The second approach incorporates ring-closing olefin metathesis in the final step to form the second fused ring of the core. The scope of the second approach was also expanded further to afford larger ringed bicyclic systems. PMID:23276301

  6. New and concise syntheses of the bicyclic oxamazin core using an intramolecular nitroso Diels-Alder reaction and ring-closing olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kyle D; Carosso, Serena; Miller, Marvin J

    2013-01-18

    Herein two new and concise synthetic approaches for making an unsaturated bicyclic oxamazin core are reported. The first involves the use of an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction to form both of the fused rings in one step. The second approach incorporates ring-closing olefin metathesis in the final step to form the second fused ring of the core. The scope of the second approach was also expanded further to afford larger ringed bicyclic systems.

  7. Synthesis of aza polycyclic compounds derived from pyrrolidine, indolizidine, and indole via intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloadditions of neutral 2-azadienes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Francisco; Alonso, Concepción; Amezua, Patricia; Rubiales, Gloria

    2002-03-22

    A method for the preparation of novel oxaza and diaza polycyclic 9-oxa-4-azaphenanthrene, 5H-pyrido[2,3-a]pyrrolizine, 5H,6H-pyrido[3,2-g]indolizine, and 5H,6H-indeno[2,1-a]indole is described, based on tandem reactions: aza-Wittig reaction of N-vinylic phosphazenes with functionalized aldehydes and an intramolecular aza-Diels-Alder reaction.

  8. Simultaneous analysis of 70 pesticides using HPlc/MS/MS: a comparison of the multiresidue method of Klein and Alder and the QuEChERS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Melanie; Speer, Karl; Stuke, Sven; Schmeer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Since 2003, two new multipesticide residue methods for screening crops for a large number of pesticides, developed by Klein and Alder and Anastassiades et al. (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe; QuEChERS), have been published. Our intention was to compare these two important methods on the basis of their extraction efficiency, reproducibility, ruggedness, ease of use, and speed. In total, 70 pesticides belonging to numerous different substance classes were analyzed at two concentration levels by applying both methods, using five different representative matrixes. In the case of the QuEChERS method, the results of the three sample preparation steps (crude extract, extract after SPE, and extract after SPE and acidification) were compared with each other and with the results obtained with the Klein and Alder method. The extraction efficiencies of the QuEChERS method were far higher, and the sample preparation was much quicker when the last two steps were omitted. In most cases, the extraction efficiencies after the first step were approximately 100%. With extraction efficiencies of mostly less than 70%, the Klein and Alder method did not compare favorably. Some analytes caused problems during evaluation, mostly due to matrix influences.

  9. Synthesis of small molecules with high scaffold diversity: exploitation of metathesis cascades in combination with inter- and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary-Steele, Catherine; Pedersen, Palle J; James, Thomas; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Leach, Stuart; Hayes, Jerome; Nelson, Adam

    2010-08-16

    Our knowledge of the biological relevance of regions of chemical space is shaped, in large part, by the synthetic accessibility of small molecules. Historically, however, chemists have explored chemical space in an exceptionally uneven and unsystematic way. We have previously demonstrated that metathesis cascade chemistry may be harnessed to yield small molecule collections with high scaffold diversity. Here, we describe the extent to which inter- and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions, when used in conjunction with metathesis cascades, can extend the range of molecular scaffolds that are accessible. A range of metathesis substrates was prepared from combinations of two or three building blocks. Metathesis cascades were exploited to "reprogram" the molecular scaffolds. In many cases, the metathesis products were 1,3-dienes, which were potential substrates for either inter- or intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions. The synthesis and functionalisation of the products was often facilitated by fluorous tagging, for example by using a "safety-catch" linker that we have developed. It was demonstrated that, in certain cases, Diels-Alder reactions could extend the range of molecular scaffolds that may be prepared by using metathesis cascade reactions.

  10. Enhancing Surveillance for Arboviral Infections in the Arizona Border Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCotter, Orion; Vanskike, Frank; Ernst, Kacey; Komatsu, Ken; Margolis, Harold; Waterman, Stephen; Tippit, Laura; Tomashek, Kay; Wertheimer, Anne; Montiel, Sonia; Golenko, Catherine; Hunsperger, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To enhance arboviral surveillance and laboratory capacity to establish a surveillance baseline for the emerging threat of Dengue fever in the Arizona-Mexico border region. Introduction West Nile Virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are both arboviruses which are transmitted to humans by an infected mosquito bite during blood-meal feeding. The clinical presentations of non-neuroinvasive WNV and dengue fever are similar, and symptoms may include acute onset of high fever, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, nausea, vomiting, and often a maculopapular rash. More serious manifestations of these viruses include fatal encephalitis and meningitis in WNV patients and fatal hemorrhagic disease in dengue patients. Over the last decade, WNV has spread rapidly across North America, reaching Arizona in 2004, and has become a significant cause of human illness since that time. Even though dengue has been described as primarily a disease of the tropics and sub-tropical areas, there is a small but significant risk for dengue outbreaks in the continental United States as evidenced by surveillance efforts in Texas that identified local dengue transmission in 2005. In recent years, outbreaks of dengue have occurred in Mexico border states, most notably Sonora in 2010. That same year, Arizona had the highest incidence of WNV cases in the U.S. including number of neuroinvasive disease cases, total cases, and number of deaths per state. The emergence of DENV and WNV as important public health problems maybe have been due to non-effective mosquito control, global demographic changes (urbanization and population growth), increased air travel, and inadequate surveillance. Methods Vector mapping: Mapping techniques will be utilized to visually depict Aedes aegypti populations captured from previous seasonal public health environmental vector trapping programs. Laboratory capacity: Multi-state laboratory training by CDC Dengue Branch was held in October 2012. Surveillance: The WNV cases

  11. The migration response to the Legal Arizona Workers Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mark; Wright, Richard; Townley, Matthew; Copeland, Kristy

    2014-08-01

    The 2008 Legal Arizona Workers Act (LAWA) requires all public and private employers to authenticate the legal status of their workers using the federal employment verification system known as E-Verify. With LAWA, Arizona became the first state to have a universal mandate for employment verification. While LAWA targets unauthorized workers, most of whom are Latino immigrants, other groups could experience LAWA's effects, such as those who share households with undocumented workers. In addition, employers may seek to minimize their risk of LAWA penalties by not hiring those who appear to them as more likely to be unauthorized, such as naturalized Latino immigrants and US-born Latinos. Existing research has found a reduction in foreign-born Latino employment and population in response to LAWA. This paper asks a different question: have groups that are most likely to be affected by the law migrated to other states? We find a significant and sustained increase in the internal outmigration rate from Arizona of foreign-born, noncitizen Latinos - the group most likely to include the unauthorized - after the passage of LAWA. There was no significant LAWA internal migration response by foreign-born Latino citizens. US-born Latinos showed some signs of a LAWA-induced internal migration response after the law went into effect, but it is not sustained. The results indicate that local and state immigration policy can alter the settlement geography of the foreign born. This leads us to speculate about how immigrant settlement may adjust in the coming years to the intersecting geographies of post-recession economic opportunity and tiered immigration policies.

  12. Arizona Geology Trip - February 25-28, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gretchen A.; Ross, Amy J.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of hardware developers, crew, mission planners, and headquarters personnel traveled to Gila Bend, Arizona, in February 2008 for a CxP Lunar Surface Systems Team geology experience. Participating in this field trip were the CxP Space Suit System (EC5) leads: Thomas (PLSS) and Ross (PGS), who presented the activities and findings learned from being in the field during this KC. As for the design of a new spacesuit system, this allowed the engineers to understand the demands this type of activity will have on NASA's hardware, systems, and planning efforts. The engineers also experienced the methods and tools required for lunar surface activity.

  13. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Elastic simulations and Arizona mine test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic seismic simulations and field data tests are used to validate the theory of a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM). For nearfield elastic simulation, the SSTM results show superresolution to be better than λ/8 if the only scattered data are used as input data. If the direct P and S waves are muted then the resolution of the scatterer locations are within about λ/5. Seismic data collected in an Arizona tunnel showed a superresolution limit of at least λ/19. These test results are consistent with the theory of the SSTM and suggest that the SSTM can be a tool used by geophysicists as a probe for near-field scatterers.

  14. Determination of channel change for selected streams, Maricopa County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capesius, Joseph P.; Lehman, Ted W.

    2002-01-01

    In Maricopa County, Arizona, 10 sites on seven streams were studied to determine the lateral and vertical change of the channel. Channel change was studied over time scales ranging from individual floods to decades using cross-section surveys, discharge measurements, changes in the point of zero flow, and repeat photography. All of the channels showed some change in cross-section area or hydraulic radius over the time scales studied, but the direction and mag-nitude of change varied considerably from one flow, or series of flows, to another. The documentation of cross-section geometry for streams in Maricopa County for long-term monitoring was begun in this study.

  15. Examining the Validity of the Arizona English Language Learners Assessment Cut Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Ida Rose

    2012-01-01

    The Arizona English Language Learners Assessment (AZELLA) is used by the Arizona Department of Education to determine which children should receive English support services. AZELLA results are used to determine if children are either proficient in English or have English language skills in one of four non-proficient categories (pre-emergent,…

  16. 75 FR 64681 - Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Continuance Referendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 983 Pistachios Grown in California..., Arizona, and New Mexico pistachio producers to determine whether they favor continuance of the marketing order regulating the handling of pistachios grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico. DATES:...

  17. 75 FR 11554 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their... between the sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony and the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah.... Repatriation of the sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony to the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New...

  18. Consequences of Arizona's Immigration Policy on Social Capital among Mexican Mothers with Unauthorized Immigration Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Padilla, Brian; Valentine, Jessa Lewis

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the consequences of increasingly restrictive immigration policies on social capital among Mexican mothers with unauthorized immigrant status in Arizona. Three focus groups conducted in Arizona explore how mothers' experiences with immigration policies have affected their neighborhood, community, and family ties. Focus group…

  19. Arizona's School to Work System. Site Visit Reports (1996-97).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegrift, Judith A.; Larson, Elizabeth Hunt

    This document profiles the following 13 regional partnerships that together constitute Arizona's school-to-work (STW) system: Cochise STW Partnership; Coconino County STW Partnership; Eastern Arizona STW Partnership; East Valley STW Initiative; Mohave Workforce Development Partnership; Northeast Valley School to Work Consortium; Northland School…

  20. 77 FR 65875 - Adequacy of Arizona Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... AGENCY Adequacy of Arizona Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection... determination to approve a modification to Arizona's municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) permit program to... characters, or any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses. Docket: All documents in the...

  1. 76 FR 22363 - Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain Restoration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Forest Service Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain... forested conditions on and surrounding Bill Williams Mountain by reducing hazardous fuels and moving... approximately 4 miles south-southwest of the city of Williams, Arizona. The Proposed Action includes...

  2. Dreamy Draw Dam - Master Plan and Feature Design, New River and Phoenix City Streams, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    and New and Apr. 1983 Agua Fria River below the Arizona Canal Diversion Channel Part 5 - Arizona Canal Diversion Dec. 1983 Channel (including Cave...basin and can be tapped for potable water for recreation use. Electric lines are located approximately 2 miles from the basin at 19th Street and Northern

  3. 76 FR 42155 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00017 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00017 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Arizona, dated 07/11/2011. Incident: Wallow Fire. Incident Period: 05/29/2011...

  4. Forgotten History: Mexican American School Segregation in Arizona from 1900-1951

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeanne M.

    2008-01-01

    This article documents the efforts by Mexican Americans to challenge school segregation in Arizona in the first half of the twentieth century. As in Texas and California, although state law never formally mandated the segregation of Mexican American students, school districts in Arizona often established separate "Mexican Schools" for…

  5. The Achievement Progress of English Learner Students in Arizona. REL 2015-098

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Eric; Tran, Loan; Huang, Min; Yu, Airong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the learning trajectories of the growing numbers of English learner students in Arizona, especially those who struggle to pass state English language arts and math content tests. This study followed three cohorts of English learner students in Arizona (kindergarten, grade 3, and grade 6) over six school…

  6. SOUTHWESTERN STATES DEVELOPMENTAL PROJECT RELATING TO EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF ADULT AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS. THE ARIZONA REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOORE, HAROLD E.; SCHUFLETOWSKI, CHARLES

    A STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF MIGRANTS WAS CONDUCTED FROM SEPTEMBER THROUGH DECEMBER, 1964, IN ARIZONA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS. THIS REPORT, CONCERNED WITH THE ARIZONA STUDY, IDENTIFIED THE MOST COMPLICATED PROBLEM AS THE LACK OF A COORDINATED ATTACK ON MIGRANT SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, HEALTH, AND EDUCATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS BY LOCAL, STATE, AND…

  7. A Return to the "Mexican Room": The Segregation of Arizona's English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Patricia; Orfield, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the research on the impact of segregation on Latino and English Language Learner (ELL) students, including new empirical research conducted in Arizona. It also reviews court decisions regarding students' rights to be integrated with their mainstream peers, and provides data on the increasing segregation of Arizona's Latino and…

  8. Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Donna E.

    2006-01-01

    "Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators" presents a set of baseline measurements that gauge how well a statewide system of school readiness supports is addressing issues that affect Arizona children's readiness for school. The Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measure the system, rather…

  9. A Cultural Resources Site Inventory at Painted Rock Reservoir, Maricopa County, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    sherds" present (Teague and Baldwin 1978:31). It was postulated that site PRS-5 may represent residual artifactual material from site AZ Z:2:2. The... Agua Fria River Valley, Arizona. Arizona State University Anthropological Researach Paper, No. 7. Tempe. -88- 70-I3772 A CULTURAL RESOURCES SITE

  10. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit, Yuma Border Patrol, Yuma, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, A. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCullough, J. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations at the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona. The retrofit was documented to better understand LED technology performance in high-temperature environments.

  11. Assessment of selected inorganic constituents in streams in the Central Arizona Basins Study Area, Arizona and northern Mexico, through 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anning, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentrations from data collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment and other U.S. Geological Survey water-quality programs were analyzed to (1) assess water quality, (2) determine natural and human factors affecting water quality, and (3) compute stream loads for the surface-water resources in the Central Arizona Basins study area. Stream temperature, pH, dissolved-oxygen concentration and percent saturation, and dissolved-solids, suspended-sediment, and nutrient concentration data collected at 41 stream-water quality monitoring stations through water year 1998 were used in this assessment. Water-quality standards applicable to the stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentration data for the stations investigated in this study generally were met, although there were some exceedences. In a few samples from the White River, the Black River, and the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam, the pH in reaches designated as a domestic drinking water source was higher than the State of Arizona standard. More than half of the samples from the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam and almost all of the samples from the stations on the Central Arizona Project Canal?two of the three most important surface-water sources used for drinking water in the Central Arizona Basins study area?exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level for dissolved solids. Two reach-specific standards for nutrients established by the State of Arizona were exceeded many times: (1) the annual mean concentration of total phosphorus was exceeded during several years at stations on the main stems of the Salt and Verde Rivers, and (2) the annual mean concentration of total nitrogen was exceeded during several years at the Salt River near Roosevelt and at the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam. Stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentrations were related to

  12. Patterns of Student Mobility among English Language Learner Students in Arizona Public Schools. Issues & Answers. REL 2010-No. 093

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Anthony B.; Bae, Soung; Huang, Min

    2010-01-01

    Using data from an Arizona Department of Education dataset that includes all students enrolled at an Arizona public school at any time during 2004/05-2007/08, this study looks at three types of student mobility: students who transferred between public schools in Arizona, students who had breaks in enrollment of at least 19 days, and students…

  13. Patterns of Student Mobility among English Language Learner Students in Arizona Public Schools. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2010-No. 093

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Anthony B.; Bae, Soung; Huang, Min

    2010-01-01

    Using data from an Arizona Department of Education dataset that includes all students enrolled at an Arizona public school at any time during 2004/05-2007/08, this study looks at three types of student mobility: students who transferred between public schools in Arizona, students who had breaks in enrollment of at least 19 days, and students…

  14. Ground-Water, Surface-Water, and Water-Chemistry Data, Black Mesa Area, Northeastern Arizona--2004-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-27

    upper part of the upper Triassic Chinle Formation and the lower Jurassic Wingate Sandstone, northwestern New Mexico and northeastern Arizona, in...Director, Arizona Water Science Center U.S. Geological Survey, 520 N. Park Avenue, Suite 221 Tucson, Arizona 85719 http://az.water.usgs.gov OFR

  15. Water-quality assessment of the Central Arizona Basins, Arizona and northern Mexico; environmental setting and overview of water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordy, Gail E.; Rees, Julie A.; Edmonds, Robert J.; Gebler, Joseph B.; Wirt, Laurie; Gellenbeck, Dorinda J.; Anning, David W.

    1998-01-01

    The Central Arizona Basins study area in central and southern Arizona and northern Mexico is one of 60 study units that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program. The purpose of this report is to describe the physical, chemical, and environmental characteristics that may affect water quality in the Central Arizona Basins study area and present an overview of water quality. Covering 34,700 square miles, the study area is characterized by generally north to northwestward-trending mountain ranges separated by broad, gently sloping alluvial valleys. Most of the perennial rivers and streams are in the northern part of the study area. Rivers and streams in the south are predominantly intermittent or ephemeral and flow in response to precipitation such as summer thunderstorms. Effluent-dependent streams do provide perennial flow in some reaches. The major aquifers in the study area are in the basin-fill deposits that may be as much as 12,000 feet thick. The 1990 population in the study area was about 3.45 million, and about 61 percent of the total was in Maricopa County (Phoenix and surrounding cities). Extensive population growth over the past decade has resulted in a twofold increase in urban land areas and increased municipal water use; however, agriculture remains the major water use. Seventy-three percent of all water with drawn in the study area during 1990 was used for agricultural purposes. The largest rivers in the study area-the Gila, Salt, and Verde-are perennial near their headwaters but become intermittent downstream because of impoundments and artificial diversions. As a result, the Central Arizona Basins study area is unique compared to less arid basins because the mean surface-water outflow is only 528 cubic feet per second from a total drainage area of 49,650 square miles. Peak flows in the northern part of the study area are the result of snowmelt runoff; whereas, summer thunderstorms account for the peak flows in

  16. Aquatic hyphomycete communities associated with decomposing alder leaf litter in reference headwater streams of the Basque Country (northern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2012-08-01

    The community of aquatic hyphomycetes associated with decomposing alder leaf litter was studied during autumn-winter in nine headwater reference streams of the Basque Country (northern Spain). In order to study the spatial variability in composition and community structure, three streams from each of three different river basins were compared. The colonization dynamics and community changes throughout the decomposition process were also followed in three of the rivers (one per basin). The taxonomic richness and community structure of these fungi varied among rivers, including similar streams of a given watershed. However, neither species diversity nor total abundance was statistically related to environmental variables. Only the conidial production of two of the species, Flagellospora curvula and Lunulospora curvula appeared to be enhanced by nitrate availability in the water. The taxonomic richness and the reproductive activity (sporulation rate) were positively related to the leaf litter decomposition rate. The changes in conidial production along the process were similar for all the streams and helped explain leaf litter quality dynamics.

  17. THE DIELS-ALDER-REACTION WITH INVERSE-ELECTRON-DEMAND - A REVIEW OF AN EFFICIENT & ATTRACTIVE CLICK-REACTION CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Braun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Here, we review the development of prospective image processing systems in molecular diagnostics and of pharmacologically active ingredients for patient-specific therapeutic approaches. These projects require not only high demands on quality, safety, and specificity but also, rapid, efficient and irreversible ligation routes during the synthesis of future pharmaceuticals. The Diels-Alder ligation reaction with inverse electron demand (DARinv is an eligible technology not restricted to medical applications, but valuable in selective modification by functionalization of polymers, organic and inorganic surfaces and micro arrays. Additionally, the DARinv technology is considered as an attractive strategy-platform for efficient syntheses of promising pharmacologically active components and derivatives of natural molecules with an optimized therapeutic index. We like to encourage scientists working with the brilliant concept of Sharpless’s “Click chemistry”, to intensify their research with this valuable DARinv technology able to open the door for regioselective, stereospecific, and bioorthogonal exigent syntheses of substances of highest quality inconceivable so far.

  18. Self-healable interfaces based on thermo-reversible Diels-Alder reactions in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Duchet, J; Gérard, J F

    2014-09-15

    Thermo-reversible Diels-Alder (DA) bonds formed between maleimide and furan groups have been used to generate an interphase between carbon fiber surface and an epoxy matrix leading to the ability of interfacial self-healing in carbon:epoxy composite materials. The maleimide groups were grafted on an untreated T700 carbon fiber from a three step surface treatment: (i) nitric acid oxidization, (ii) tetraethylenepentamine amination, and (iii) bismaleimide grafting. The furan groups were introduced in the reactive epoxy system from furfuryl glycidyl ether. The interface between untreated carbon fiber and epoxy matrix was considered as a reference. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) was evaluated by single fiber micro-debonding test. The debonding force was shown to have a linear dependence with embedded length. The highest healing efficiency calculated from the debonding force was found to be about 82% more compared to the value for the reference interface. All the interphases designed with reversible DA bonds have a repeatable self-healing ability. As after the fourth healing, they can recover a relatively high healing efficiency (58% for the interphase formed by T700-BMI which is oxidized for 60 min during the first treatment step).

  19. Face-selective Diels-Alder reactions between unsymmetrical cyclohexadienes and symmetric trans-dienophile: an experimental and computational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Saswati; Yadav, Somnath; Banerjee, Srirupa; Patil, Mahendra P; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2008-01-18

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the Diels-Alder reactions between 2-trimethylsiloxy-1,3-cyclohexadienes (2-11) and (E)-1,4-diphenylbut-2-ene-1,4-dione (1) is reported. Two diastereomeric products, 5-endo-6-exo- (nx) and 5-exo-6-endo- (xn) dibenzoyl derivatives, are possible with symmetric trans-dienophile (1). While in many cases 5-endo-6-exo product is preferred over the corresponding 5-exo-6-endo product, the product ratio nx:xn is found to vary with the position of substituents on the diene. The density functional theory studies with the mPW1PW91/6-31G* as well as the B3LYP/6-31G* levels reveal that the electrostatic repulsion between the oxygen lone pairs on the diene and the dienophile is critical to the observed product selectivities. The optimized transition state geometries though appeared to involve secondary orbital interactions, careful examination of the frontier Kohn-Sham orbitals as well as calculations with the natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses confirm the absence of SOI in these transition states. In the case of methyl-substituted dienes, a cumulative effect of steric and electrostatic interactions between the diene and the dienophile is found to be the controlling element toward the observed selectivity.

  20. Surface patterning with natural and synthetic polymers via an inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction employing microcontact chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roling, Oliver; Mardyukov, Artur; Lamping, Sebastian; Vonhören, Benjamin; Rinnen, Stefan; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Studer, Armido; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-10-21

    Bioorthogonal ligation methods are the focus of current research due to their versatile applications in biotechnology and materials science for post-functionalization and immobilization of biomolecules. Recently, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (iEDDA) reactions employing 1,2,4,5-tetrazines as electron deficient dienes emerged as powerful tools in this field. We adapted iEDDA in microcontact chemistry (μCC) in order to create enhanced surface functions. μCC is a straightforward soft-lithography technique which enables fast and large area patterning with high pattern resolutions. In this work, tetrazine functionalized surfaces were reacted with carbohydrates conjugated with norbornene or cyclooctyne acting as strained electron rich dienophiles employing μCC. It was possible to create monofunctional as well as bifunctional substrates which were specifically addressable by proteins. Furthermore we structured glass supported alkene terminated self-assembled monolayers with a tetrazine conjugated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator enabling surface grafted polymerizations of poly(methylacrylate) brushes. The success of the surface initiated iEDDA via μCC as well as the functionalization with natural and synthetic polymers was verified via fluorescence and optical microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

  1. N-(furfural) chitosan hydrogels based on Diels-Alder cycloadditions and application as microspheres for controlled drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Herrera, Marcelino; Gandini, Alessandro; Goycoolea, Francisco M; Jacobsen, Neil E; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Recillas-Mota, Maricarmen; Argüelles-Monal, Waldo M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, chitosan was chemically modified by reductive amination in a two-step process. The synthesis of N-(furfural) chitosan (FC) was confirmed by FT-IR and (1)H NMR analysis, and the degrees of substitution were estimated as 8.3 and 23.8%. The cross-linkable system of bismaleimide (BM) and FC shows that FC shared properties of furan-maleimide chemistry. This system produced non-reversible hydrogel networks by Diels-Alder cycloadditions at 85 °C. The system composed of BM and FC (23.8% substitution) generated stronger hydrogel networks than those of FC with an 8.3% degree of substitution. Moreover, the FC-BM system was able to produce hydrogel microspheres. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed the surface of the microspheres to be non-porous with small protuberances. In water, the microspheres swelled, increasing their volume by 30%. Finally, microspheres loaded with methylene blue were able to release the dye gradually, obeying second-order kinetics for times less than 600 min. This behavior suggests that diffusion is governed by the relaxation of polymer chains in the swelled state, thus facilitating drug release outside the microspheres.

  2. Segmented linear shape memory polyurethanes with thermoreversible Diels-Alder coupling: Effects of polycaprolactone molecular weight and diisocyanate type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cs. Lakatos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Segmented linear polyurethanes (PUs containing Diels-Alder (DA adduct were synthesized in toluene solution from poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL, Mn = 10, 25 and 50 kg/mol, diisocyanate (methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI, 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI, 1,6-hexamethylenediisocyanate, (HDI, furfurylamine (FA and bismaleimide (BMI. The order of the segments in the PUs was -PCL-MDI-FA-BMI-. The PUs were characterized by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC, different spectroscopic (1H-NMR, attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared, AT-FTIR, thermal and mechanical analysis (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, dynamical mechanical analysis, DMA. The DA and retro-DA reactions were identified by 1H-NMR for both the synthesized PU and the coupling components (i.e. FA and BMI. Tensile mechanical and shape memory (SM properties of the PUs were also determined. The DA coupling in the PU was improved by heat treatment above the melting temperature (Tm of PCL. DMA traces showed a plateau-like region above Tm of PCL confirming the presence of a physical network the netpoints of which are given by the hard segments including the DA couplers. This feature suggested good SM behavior that was confirmed both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  3. Alder, Nitrogen, and Lake Ecology: Terrestrial-Aquatic Linkages in the Postglacial History of Lone Spruce Pond, Southwestern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Yarrow; Kaufman, Darrell S.

    2017-01-01

    Diatoms, combined with a multiproxy study of lake sediments (organic matter, N, δ15N, δ13C, biogenic silica, grain size, Cladocera and chironomids, Alnus pollen) from Lone Spruce Pond, Alaska detail the late-glacial to Holocene history of the lake and its response to regional climate and landscape change over the last 14.5 cal ka BP. We show that the immigration of alder (Alnus viridis) in the early Holocene marks the rise of available reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the lake as well as the establishment of a primarily planktonic diatom community. The later establishment of diatom Discostella stelligera is coupled to a rise of sedimentary δ15N, indicating diminished competition for this nutrient. This terrestrial-aquatic linkage demonstrates how profoundly vegetation may affect soil geochemistry, lake development, and lake ecology over millennial timescales. Furthermore, the response of the diatom community to strengthened stratification and N levels in the past confirms the sensitivity of planktonic diatom communities to changing thermal and nutrient regimes. These past ecosystem dynamics serve as an analogue for the nature of threshold-type ecological responses to current climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (Nr) deposition, but also for the larger changes we should anticipate under future climate, pollution, and vegetation succession scenarios in high-latitude and high-elevation regions. PMID:28076393

  4. Constraints to the possible alternatives from Arizona agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    The problems plaguing Arizona agriculture are outlined including the primary factors of declining groundwater supplies and increasing costs of energy to pump irrigation water. Two alternatives are suggested. The first alternative is to reduce or stabilize energy costs, an event that the authors acknowledge as being rather unlikely. Pumping costs using various fuels during the period 1891 to 1978 are reviewed. The second alternative involves developing cultivation techniques for drought-resistant plants native to arid regions, plants which have economic potential. Most of these plants would require little irrigation under cultivation and could substitute for cash crops being cultivated under heavy irrigation in Arizona. Four of these plants native to arid regions in the United States are discussed in some detail. Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) is a known rubber producer. Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) produces a liquid wax similar to the oil of the sperm whale, an endangered species. The gopher plant (Euphorbia lathyrus) is a potential producer of petrochemical feedstock for use as an energy source. Finally the buffalo gourd (Cucurbita foetidissima) is a possible source of food for both humans and livestock.

  5. Nesting habitat and productivity of Swainson's Hawks in southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Catherine; Boal, Clint W.; DeStefano, Stephen; Hobbs, Royden J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied Swainson's Hawks (Buteo swainsoni) in southeastern Arizona to assess the status of the local breeding population. Nest success (≥1 young fledged) was 44.4% in 1999 with an average of 1.43 ± 0.09 (SE) young produced per successful pair. Productivity was similar in 2000, with 58.2% nesting success and 1.83 ± 0.09 fledglings per successful pair. Mesquite (Prosopis velutina) and cottonwood (Populus fremontii) accounted for >50% of 167 nest trees. Nest trees were taller than surrounding trees and random trees, and overall there was more vegetative cover at nest sites than random sites. This apparent requirement for cover around nest sites could be important for management of the species in Arizona. However, any need for cover at nest sites must be balanced with the need for open areas for foraging. Density of nesting Swainson's Hawks was higher in agriculture than in grasslands and desert scrub. Breeding pairs had similar success in agricultural and nonagricultural areas, but the effect of rapid and widespread land-use change on breeding distribution and productivity continues to be a concern throughout the range of the species.

  6. Assessment of Vulnerability to Coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Kathryn C.; Benedict, Kaitlin; McCotter, Orion Z.; Bell, Jesse E.

    2017-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection endemic to the southwestern United States, particularly Arizona and California. Its incidence has increased, potentially due in part to the effects of changing climatic variables on fungal growth and spore dissemination. This study aims to quantify the county-level vulnerability to coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California and to assess the relationships between population vulnerability and climate variability. The variables representing exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity were combined to calculate county level vulnerability indices. Three methods were used: (1) principal components analysis; (2) quartile weighting; and (3) percentile weighting. Two sets of indices, “unsupervised” and “supervised”, were created. Each index was correlated with coccidioidomycosis incidence data from 2000–2014. The supervised percentile index had the highest correlation; it was then correlated with variability measures for temperature, precipitation, and drought. The supervised percentile index was significantly correlated (p coccidioidomycosis incidence in both states. Moderate, positive significant associations (p coccidioidomycosis is associated with climate variability. PMID:28644403

  7. Arizona Twin Project: a focus on early resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Clifford, Sierra; McDonald, Kristy; O'Brien, T Caitlin; Valiente, Carlos

    2013-02-01

    The Arizona Twin Project is an ongoing longitudinal study designed to elucidate the genetic and environmental influences underlying the development of early competence and resilience to common mental and physical health problems during infancy and childhood. Participants are a sample of 600 twins (25% Hispanic) recruited from birth records in the state of Arizona, United States. Primary caregivers were interviewed on twins' development and early social environments when twins were 12 and 30 months of age. Measures include indices of prenatal and obstetrical risk coded from hospital medical records, as well as primary caregiver-report questionnaires assessing multiple indicators of environmental risk and resilience (e.g., parental warmth and control, family and social support), twins' developmental maturity, temperament, health, behavior problems, and competencies. Preliminary findings highlight the importance of the early environment for infant and toddler health and well-being, both directly and as a moderator of genetic influences. Future directions include a third longitudinal assessment in middle childhood examining daily bidirectional relations between sleep, health behaviors, stress, and mood.

  8. Home range characteristics of Mexican Spotted Owls in the Rincon Mountains, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David W.; Van Riper, Charpes III

    2014-01-01

    We studied a small isolated population of Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) from 1996–1997 in the Rincon Mountains of Saguaro National Park, southeastern Arizona, USA. All mixed-conifer and pine-oak forest patches in the park were surveyed for Spotted Owls, and we located, captured, and radio-tagged 10 adult birds representing five mated pairs. Using radio-telemetry, we examined owl home range characteristics, roost habitat, and monitored reproduction within these five territories. Breeding season (Mar–Sep) home range size for 10 adult owls (95% adaptive kernel isopleths) averaged 267 ha (±207 SD), and varied widely among owls (range 34–652 ha). Mean home range size for owl pairs was 478 ha (±417 ha SD), and ranged from 70–1,160 ha. Owls that produced young used smaller home ranges than owls that had no young. Six habitat variables differed significantly between roost and random sites, including: percent canopy cover, number of trees, number of vegetation layers, average height of trees, average diameter of trees, and tree basal area. Radio-marked owls remained in their territories following small prescribed management fires within those territories, exhibiting no proximate effects to the presence of prescribed fire.

  9. Turbid releases from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, following rainfall-runoff events of September 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, Richard A.; Vernieu, William

    2017-01-01

    Glen Canyon Dam is a large dam on the Colorado River in Arizona. In September 2013, it released turbid water following intense thunderstorms in the surrounding area. Turbidity was >15 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) for multiple days and >30 NTU at its peak. These unprecedented turbid releases impaired downstream fishing activity and motivated a rapid-response field excursion. At 5 locations upstream from the dam, temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a, and turbidity were measured in vertical profiles. Local streamflow and rainfall records were retrieved, and turbidity and specific conductance data in dam releases were evaluated. Profiling was conducted to determine possible sources of turbidity from 3 tributaries nearest the dam, Navajo, Antelope, and Wahweap creeks, which entered Lake Powell as interflows during this study. We discuss 4 key conditions that must have been met for tributaries to influence turbidity of dam releases: tributary flows must have reached the dam, tributary flows must have been laden with sediment, inflow currents must have been near the depth of dam withdrawals, and the settling velocity of particles must have been slow. We isolate 2 key uncertainties that reservoir managers should resolve in future similar studies: the reach of tributary water into the reservoir thalweg and the distribution of particle size of suspended sediment. These uncertainties leave the source of the turbidity ambiguous, although an important role for Wahweap Creek is possible. The unique combination of limnological factors we describe implies that turbid releases at Glen Canyon Dam will continue to be rare.

  10. Settlement of the USS Arizona, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carkin, Brad A.; Kayen, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the National Park Service Submerged Resources Center, undertook investigations at the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in 2002, 2003, and 2005 to characterize geological factors affecting the deterioration and movement of the hull of the USS Arizona. Since sinking on the morning of December 7, 1941, the hull of the USS Arizona has been slowly but steadily disappearing below the surface of Pearl Harbor. Continuous sediment coring at three of four locations around the hull of the Arizona was only partially successful, but it was sufficient to identify a varied sedimentary substrate beneath the hull. A boring near the stern reveals a thick, continuous sequence of soft, gray clay to the bottom of the boring. In contrast, borings near the bow and starboard side, below about 5 meters subbottom depth, indicate the presence of very stiff, brown clay and coral debris and an absence of soft clay. Multisensor core logger scanning of the recovered cores distinguishes the lower density of the soft, gray clay at the stern from the higher density of the stiff, brown clays and coral debris at the bow and starboard side. Uniaxial consolidation testing of the soft gray clay indicates a normally consolidated sequence, whereas the stiff, brown clay and coral debris are overconsolidated. Profiles of shear wave velocity vs. depth obtained through spectral analysis of interface wave testing around the perimeter of the hull in 2005 identified areas of higher velocity, stiffer sediment at the bow and starboard side, which correspond to the dense, stiff clay recovered near the bow and starboard borings. Low shear-wave velocities at the port midship and quarter of the hull correlate with the lower density, softer sediment recovered from the boring at the stern. Cross sections of the subbottom of the Memorial combine results from the sediment borings and geophysical surveys and depict a wedge of soft clay unconformably overlying

  11. [Allergic seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis without indigenous pollen sensitization: the example of the Arizona cypress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taramarcaz, Philip; Hauser, Conrad

    2002-01-01

    A 37-year old man from Lithuania presented with the typical symptoms of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis that appeared in spring this and the year preceding presentation. Skin prick tests for aeroallergens indigenous in Switzerland were all negative. A detailed history revealed that the patient was working in a building of a United Nation's agency surrounded by a park with numerous cypresses of Arizona trees. A skin prick test for pollens from Cupressus arizona was strongly positive, supporting the diagnosis of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis to pollens from this tree. Allergy to pollens from C. arizona is a widely prevalent as winter pollinosis in subtropical and Mediterranean areas but is exceptional in the continental and alpine climates of Switzerland. Five cases of C. arizona pollinosis have been diagnosed in the last 3 years in Geneva. It is notoriously difficult to diagnose cypressus pollen allergy, mainly because of the poor quality of in vivo and in vitro available tests. Horticulture with non-indigenous plants is responsible for pollinosis from C. arizona in Switzerland. The specialists in countries in which pollinosis from C. arizona is not endemic, need to be aware of arboriculture with non-indigenous plants, as well as the possibility of allergy to C. arizona.

  12. Spatial digital database for the tectonic map of Southeast Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    map by Drewes, Harald; digital database by Fields, Robert A.; Hirschberg, Douglas M.; Bolm, Karen S.

    2002-01-01

    A spatial database was created for Drewes' (1980) tectonic map of southeast Arizona: this database supercedes Drewes and others (2001, ver. 1.0). Staff and a contractor at the U.S. Geological Survey in Tucson, Arizona completed an interim digital geologic map database for the east part of the map in 2001, made revisions to the previously released digital data for the west part of the map (Drewes and others, 2001, ver. 1.0), merged data files for the east and west parts, and added additional data not previously captured. Digital base map data files (such as topography, roads, towns, rivers and lakes) are not included: they may be obtained from a variety of commercial and government sources. This digital geospatial database is one of many being created by the U.S. Geological Survey as an ongoing effort to provide geologic information in a geographic information system (GIS) for use in spatial analysis. The resulting digital geologic map database can be queried in many ways to produce a variety of geologic maps and derivative products. Because Drewes' (1980) map sheets include additional text and graphics that were not included in this report, scanned images of his maps (i1109_e.jpg, i1109_w.jpg) are included as a courtesy to the reader. This database should not be used or displayed at any scale larger than 1:125,000 (for example, 1:100,000 or 1:24,000). The digital geologic map plot files (i1109_e.pdf and i1109_w.pdf) that are provided herein are representations of the database (see Appendix A). The map area is located in southeastern Arizona (fig. 1). This report describes the map units (from Drewes, 1980), the methods used to convert the geologic map data into a digital format, the ArcInfo GIS file structures and relationships, and explains how to download the digital files from the U.S. Geological Survey public access World Wide Web site on the Internet. The manuscript and digital data review by Helen Kayser (Information Systems Support, Inc.) is greatly

  13. Asymmetric Sequential Aza-Diels-Alder and O-Michael Addition: Efficient Construction of Chiral Hydropyrano[2,3-b]pyridines%Asymmetric Sequential Aza-Diels-Alder and O-Michael Addition: Efficient Construction of Chiral Hydropyrano[2,3-b]pyridines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹祥; 圊清清; 董琳; 陈应春

    2012-01-01

    An asymmetric aza-Diels-Alder and O-Michael addition sequence has been developed to construct chiral hy- dropyrano[2,3-b]pyridine derivatives with good yields and excellent stereoselectivity, by starting with N-Ts-l-aza- 1,3-butadienes and aliphatic aldehydes tethered to an α,β-unsaturated ketone motif. A tandem O-Michael addition reaction was completed via acid catalysis.

  14. Awareness and implementation of tobacco dependence treatment guidelines in Arizona: Healthcare Systems Survey 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menke J Michael

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents findings from the Tobacco Control in Arizona Healthcare Systems Survey, conducted in 2000. The purpose of the survey was to assess the status of Arizona healthcare systems' awareness and implementation of tobacco cessation and prevention measures. Methods The 20-item survey was developed by The University of Arizona HealthCare Partnership in collaboration with the Arizona Department of Health Services Bureau of Tobacco Education and Prevention. It was mailed to representatives of Arizona's 40 healthcare systems, including commercial and Medicare managed care organizations, "managed Medicaid" organizations, Veterans Affairs Health Care Systems, and Indian Health Service Medical Centers. Thirty-three healthcare systems (83% completed the survey. Results The majority of healthcare systems reported awareness of at least one tobacco cessation and prevention clinical practice guideline, but only one third reported full guideline implementation. While a majority covered some form of behavioral therapy, less than half reported covering tobacco treatment medications. "Managed Medicaid" organizations administered through the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System were significantly less likely to offer coverage for behavioral therapy and less likely to cover pharmacotherapy than were their non-Medicaid counterparts in managed care, Veterans Affairs Health Care Systems and Indian Health Service Medical Centers. Conclusion Arizona healthcare system coverage for tobacco cessation in the year 2000 was comparable to national survey findings of the same year. The findings that only 10% of "Managed Medicaid" organizations covered tobacco treatment medication and were significantly less likely to cover behavioral therapy were important given the nearly double smoking prevalence among Medicaid patients. Throughout the years of the program, the strategic plan of the Arizona Department of Health Services Bureau of Tobacco

  15. NEUTRALIZATION OF ACIDIC GROUND WATER NEAR GLOBE, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eychaner, James H.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; ,

    1985-01-01

    Highly acidic contaminated water is moving through a shallow aquifer and interacting with streams near Globe, Arizona. Dissolved concentrations reach 3,000 mg/L iron, 150 mg/L copper, and 16,400 mg/L total dissloved solids; pH is as low as 3. 6. Samples from 16 PVC-cased observation wells include uncontaminated, contaminated, transition, and neutralized waters. Chemical reaction with sediments and mixing with uncontaminated water neutralizes the acidic water. The reactions form a transition zone where gypsum replaces calcite and most metals precipitate. Ferric hydroxide also precipitates if sufficient oxygen is available. Abundant gypsum crystals and ferric hydroxide coatings have been recovered from well cuttings. Large sulfate concentrations produce sulfate complexes with many metals that inhibit removal of metals from solution.

  16. Arizona Education Tax Credit and Hidden Considerations of Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele S. Moses

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The current debate over market-based ideas for educational reform is examined, focusing specifically on the recent movement toward education tax credits. Viewing the Arizona education tax credit law as a voucher plan in sheep's clothing, I argue that the concept of justice underlying the law is a crucial issue largely missing from the school choice debate. I question the libertarian conception of justice assumed by voucher and tax credit advocates, and argue instead that a contemporary liberal democratic conception of justice ought to undergird attempts at school reform. A call for educators and policymakers to concentrate energies on efforts to help needy students rather than on efforts to channel tax dollars toward self- interested ends concludes the article.

  17. National uranium resource evaluation: Clifton Quadrangle, Arizona and New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D L; Foster, M

    1982-05-01

    The Clifton Quadrangle, Arizona and New Mexico, was evaluated to identify environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. The evaluation used criteria formulated for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Evidence for the evaluation was based on surface studies, hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, and aerial radiometric surveys. The quadrangle encompasses parts of three physiographic provinces: the Colorado Plateau, the transition zone, and the Basin and Range. The one environment determined, during the present study, to be favorable for uranium deposits is the Whitewater Creek member of the Cooney tuff, which is favorable for magmatic-hydrothermal uranium deposits on the west side of the Bursum caldera. No other areas were favorable for uranium deposits in sandstone, limestone, volcanogenic, igneous, or metamorphic environments. The subsurface is unevaluated because of lack of information, as are areas where access is a constraint.

  18. The occurrence of Naegleria fowleri in recreational waters in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes, Laura Y; Choate, Brittany L; Gerba, Charles P; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-09-19

    Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba found in waters in warmer regions that causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a rare but almost universally fatal disease. The goal of this project was to assess the occurrence of N. fowleri and other thermophilic amoebae in 33 recreational surface waters across Arizona to determine if their presence could be correlated with seasonal or other environmental factors. First, 1-L grab samples were collected over two years and analyzed using polymerase chain reaction and amoebae viability. Seasonality was observed, with N. fowleri and thermophilic amoebae (20% and 30%, respectively) being detected more often in the winter and spring combined than in the summer and fall combined (7.9% and 9.5%, respectively). The spring and fall both had an average temperature of 18°C, yet had different occurrence data (18.2% versus 5.9% for N. fowleri, respectively; 27.3% versus 0% for viable amoebae, respectively). These results are in stark contrast to previous studies in which N. fowleri has been found almost exclusively during warmer months. Over the two-year study, N. fowleri was detected in six and thermophilic amoebae in eight of the 33 recreational water bodies. Five of these were lakes near Phoenix that tested positive for N. fowleri and thermophilic amoebae over multiple seasons. These lakes differed significantly (P ≤ 0.05) from the other 28 surface waters, with a lower average temperature in the spring, a higher temperature in the fall, a higher pH and turbidity in the summer, and a lower electro-conductivity in the spring. They also had lower Escherichia coli and heterotrophic bacteria levels during colder months. Future N. fowleri monitoring in Arizona should focus on these five lakes to further elucidate the factors that contribute to the low occurrence of this amoeba in the summer or which might explain why these lakes appear to be reservoirs for the organism.

  19. Spatial and temporal interactions of sympatric mountain lions in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Kerry L.; Krausman, Paul R.; Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Culver, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Spatial and temporal interactions among individual members of populations can have direct applications to habitat management of mountain lions (Puma concolor). Our objectives were to evaluate home range overlap and spatial/temporal use of overlap zones (OZ) of mountain lions in Arizona. We incorporated spatial data with genetic analyses to assess relatedness between mountain lions with overlapping home ranges. We recorded the space use patterns of 29 radio-collared mountain lions in Arizona from August 2005 to August 2008. We genotyped 28 mountain lions and estimated the degree of relatedness among individuals. For 26 pairs of temporally overlapping mountain lions, 18 overlapped spatially and temporally and eight had corresponding genetic information. Home range overlap ranged from 1.18% to 46.38% (x̄=2443, SE = 2.96). Male–male pairs were located within 1 km of each other on average, 0.04% of the time, whereas male–female pairs on average were 3.0%. Two male–male pairs exhibited symmetrical spatial avoidance and two symmetrical spatial attractions to the OZ. We observed simultaneous temporal attraction in three male–male pairs and four male–female pairs. Individuals from Tucson were slightly related to one another within the population (n = 13, mean R = 0.0373 ± 0.0151) whereas lions from Payson (n = 6, mean R = -0.0079 ± 0.0356) and Prescott (n = 9, mean R = -0.0242 ± 0.0452) were not as related. Overall, males were less related to other males (n = 20, mean R = -0.0495 ± 0.0161) than females were related to other females (n = 8, mean R = 0.0015 ± 0.0839). Genetic distance was positively correlated with geographic distance (r2 = 0.22, P = 0.001). Spatial requirements and interactions influence social behavior and can play a role in determining population density.

  20. Centro Valley Phoenix, Arizona – (EE.UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welton Becket y Asociados, Arquitectos e ingenieros

    1974-10-01

    Full Text Available This office building is the administrative Centre for the National Valley Bank, Arizona. Being 155 m in height it is at present the highest building in the state. The construction consists of three towers, respectively 35, 37 and 39 storeys high, connected by means of a subterranean passage with an 8-storeyed parking building with a capacity of 1,700 vehicles. The first structure is of concrete in its nucleus and is enclosed by curtain walls which gives it a surface with extraordinary reflections. The entire parking building is of unfaced concrete. The bank occupies the floors 3-12, floor 36 and 38 and the remaining premises are for rent.Este edificio de oficinas es la central administrativa de la banca Valley National, de Arizona. Con 155 m de altura es, actualmente, el más alto del estado. Consta de tres torres de 35,37 y 39 plantas, adosadas y enlazadas, mediante un paso subterráneo, a un bloque de aparcamiento con ocho alturas y capacidad para 1.700 automóviles. El primero tiene estructura de hormigón en su núcleo central de comunicación vertical y cerramientos de muro-cortina, lo que le confiere una fisonomía brillante y reflectante de gran espectacularidad. El aparcamiento es todo él de hormigón visto. La banca ocupa las plantas 3 a 12, la 36 y la 38, destinándose el resto a alquiler.

  1. Astrobiology at Arizona State University: An Overview of Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jack

    2005-01-01

    During our five years as an NAI charter member, Arizona State University sponsored a broadly-based program of research and training in Astrobiology to address the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Solar System. With such a large, diverse and active team, it is not possible in a reasonable space, to cover all details of progress made over the entire five years. The following paragraphs provide an overview update of the specific research areas pursued by the Arizona State University (ASU) Astrobiology team at the end of Year 5 and at the end of the 4 month and subsequent no cost month extensions. for a more detailed review, the reader is referred to the individual annual reports (and Executive Summaries) submitted to the NAI at the end of each of our five years of membership. Appended in electronic form is our complete publication record for all five years, plus a tabulation of undergraduates, graduate students and post-docs supported by our program during this time. The overarching theme of ASU s Astrobiology program was "Exploring the Living Universe: Studies of the Origin, Evolution and Distribution of Life in the Solar System". The NAi-funded research effort was organized under three basic sub- themes: 1. Origins of the Basic Building Blocks of Life. 2. Early Biosphere Evolution. and 3. Exploring for Life in the Solar System. These sub-theme areas were in turn, subdivided into Co-lead research modules. In the paragraphs that follow, accomplishments for individual research modules are briefly outlined, and the key participants presented in tabular form. As noted, publications for each module are appended in hard copy and digital formats, under the name(s) of lead co-Is.

  2. Theoretical Study of Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction of Thiazole and Isothiazol with Thiophene-2,5-dione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saeed Reza Emamian; Jamileh Nabavi; Fatemeh Shams; Ehsan Zahedi

    2011-01-01

    DFT methods have been used to study the hetero Diels-Alder reaction of thiazole and isothiazole with thiophen-2,5-dione.The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated.The relative stabilities of the transition structures corresponding to the endo/exo stereoisomers have been rationalized on the basis of the secondary molecular orbital interactions.NBO analysis was carried out to calculate the synchronicity index.It was shown that all reactions are synchronous.A HOMO-LUMO energy gap shows both reactions are normal electron demand.

  3. A conceptual DFT approach towards analysing feasibility of the intramolecular cycloaddition Diels-Alder reaction of triene amide in Lewis acid catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABDELILAH BENALLOU; HABIB EL ALAOUI EL ABDALLAOUI; HOCINE GARMES

    2016-09-01

    The effect of Lewis acid catalysts, TiCl₄ and Et₂AlCl on the intramolecular cycloaddition Diels- Alder (IMDA) reaction of triene-amide have been studied theoretically using the DFT (Density Functional Theory) at the 6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The results obtained using the polar model of Domingo, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity indices and thermochemistry computations, demonstrate that these catalysts are coordinated with more nucleophilic atoms of diene fragment (nitrogen and oxygen of amide group). These catalysts affect negatively the feasibility of the reaction as well as the physico-chemical parameters of the IMDA reaction of triene-amide.

  4. Modification of carbon fiber / epoxy matrix interphase in a composite material : Design of a self-healing interphase by introducing thermally reversible Diels-Alder adducts

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A thermally self-healable carbon/epoxy interphase was designed based on Diels-Alder (D-A) thermally reversible covalent bonds. The D-A modified interphase was formed between maleimide groups grafted on carbon fiber surface and furan groups introduced into epoxy network. The self-healing ability was characterized by a micromechanical approach using the micro-droplet debonding test. In this work, carbon fiber surface underwent a three-step treatment to graft maleimide groups, including HNO3 oxi...

  5. Synthesis of Pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrimidine Enantiomers via Domino Ring-Closure followed by Retro Diels-Alder Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Beáta; Palkó, Márta; Haukka, Matti; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2017-04-13

    From 2-aminonorbornene hydroxamic acids, a simple and efficient method for the preparation of pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrimidine enantiomers is reported. The synthesis is based on domino ring-closure followed by microwave-induced retro Diels-Alder (RDA) protocols, where the chirality of the desired products is transferred from norbornene derivatives. The stereochemistry of the synthesized compounds was proven by X-ray crystallography. The absolute configuration of the product is determined by the configuration of the starting amino hydroxamic acid.

  6. Synthesis of new series of 5,6-dihydro-4H-1,2-oxazines via hetero Diels-Alder reaction and evaluation of antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, M K; Rai, K M L; Gaonkar, S L; Raveesha, K A; Satish, S

    2009-01-01

    A new series of 5,6-dihydro-4H-1,2-oxazines were synthesized via hetero Diels-Alder reaction of alpha-nitrosoolefins with alkenes. alpha-Nitrosoolefins were generated from ketoximes by the action of chloramine-T. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized with IR, NMR, elemental analysis and screened for their antimicrobial activity; they exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity. The minimal inhibitory concentration of the compounds was in the range of 10-35 microg ml(-1) for bacteria and 10-40 microg ml(-1) for fungi.

  7. Químio-, régio- e estereosseletividades das reações de Diels-Alder de para-benzoquinonas: um estudo teórico

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Moraes Servilha

    2014-01-01

    Neste trabalho foram propostos alguns estudos teóricos computacionas sobre a reatividade de para-benzoquinonas e seus derivados em reações de Diels-Alder. Estes estudos foram realizados visando complementar os correspondentes estudos experimentais em andamento no nosso laboratório. As reações de Diels-Alder entre as carbometóxi-para-benzoquinonas 16, 17 e 19 e o ciclopentadieno (2) forneceram cicloadutos do tipo A-endo, ao passo que, para a reação envolvendo 18, o produto formado foi do tipo ...

  8. Short Rotation Woody Crops Program. Quarterly progress report, March 1-May 31, 1985. [Sycamore, alders, black locust, larch, poplars, saltbush

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Perlack, R.D.; Wenzel, C.R.; Trimble, J.L.; Ranney, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report covers the progress of the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP) during the third quarter of fiscal year 1985. This report summarizes ORNL management activities, technical activities at ORNL and subcontract institutions, and the technology transfer that is occurring as a result of subcontractor and ORNL activities. Third-year results of a nutrient utilization study confirmed that there were no benefits to quarterly fertilization with urea nitrogen. Testing of one prototype short-rotation intensive culture harvester was conducted on a sycamore plantation on Scott Paper Company land in southern Alabama. Coppice yields of European black alder reported by Iowa State University indicate potential productivity of about 7.2 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/ if the best trees are selected. Coppice yields were more than double first-rotation yields. About 31,000 black locust and larch trees were established in 12 genetic tests at 4 sites in Michigan. Seedling rotation productivity rates of 4-year-old hybrid poplar, based on harvest data, were reported by Pennsylvania State University. Rates varied from 4.8 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/ to 10.7 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/, depending on site, management strategy, and planting year. An efficient method for in vitro micropropagation of elite genotypes of fourwing saltbush was developed by Plant Resources Institute. A new study to evaluate yield/density relationships was established by the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. Dissertation research on the crown geometry of plantation-grown American sycamore was completed.

  9. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: Yavapai College, Chino Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Yavapai College of Chino Valley, Arizona. These college students built a Building America Builders Challenge house that achieved the remarkably low HERS score of -3 and achieved a tight building envelope.

  10. EPA Recognizes University of Arizona for Efforts to Reduce Wasted Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency presented the University of Arizona with an award for outstanding efforts in food recovery. The students, food service staff and university leaders, along with the Tohono O'odham Nation

  11. Roads, Routes, Streets and Trails of Grand Canyon National Park and Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — 'Pstreets' is a coverage adapted by the Park, from the ALRIS (Arizona Land Resource Information System) coverage 'streets'. Various road maintenance/usage...

  12. Utilities:Other:Telephone Lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (Utilities.gdb:Other:telephone)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represent telephone lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The utility pipelines were collected by a Trimble GeoXT GPS unit with...

  13. The Arizona Universities Library Consortium patron-driven e-book model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Richardson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Building on Arizona State University's patron-driven acquisitions (PDA initiative in 2009, the Arizona Universities Library Consortium, in partnership with the Ingram Content Group, created a cooperative patron-driven model to acquire electronic books (e-books. The model provides the opportunity for faculty and students at the universities governed by the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR to access a core of e-books made accessible through resource discovery services and online catalogs. These books are available for significantly less than a single ABOR university would expend for the same materials. The patron-driven model described is one of many evolving models in digital scholarship, and, although the Arizona Universities Library Consortium reports a successful experience, patron-driven models pose questions to stakeholders in the academic publishing industry.

  14. 76 FR 9694 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Northeastern Arizona and Colorado Appropriated Fund...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... because of the organizational relationship and geographic proximity of these two parks, we recommend that... Arizona and Southern Colorado wage areas. Regulatory Flexibility Act I certify that these regulations...

  15. Utilities:Other:Utilities at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (Utilities.gdb:Other:utilpnt_other)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents various types of utilities, not including water- and power-related utilities, at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The utilities...

  16. Nat'l Register: Historic District Boundary at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_histdist)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of one polygon that represents the historic district at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona as listed on the National...

  17. The Rim Trail at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_trail)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 4 arcs representing The Rim Trail at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The Rim Trail was collected by a Trimble...

  18. The Visitor Picnic Area at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pcncarea)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 1 polygon representing the picnic area for visitors at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The picnic area was...

  19. Riparian vegetation classification of the Colorado River Corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona, 2013—Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are classification maps of total riparian vegetation along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon from Glen Canyon Dam to Pearce Ferry in Arizona. The data...

  20. The boundary of Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_bndry)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 1 polygon representing the park boundary for Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. This GIS dataset is not a legal...

  1. Geodetic Markers at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_geomrkrs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 7 points representing known coordinates on the earth's surface at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. One geodetic...

  2. 77 FR 58962 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Arizona; Nogales PM10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    .... Census Bureau 2010) and Nogales, Mexico had 212,533 inhabitants (Instituto Nacional de Estadistica... meteorological data, and through its analyses, Arizona found that the Ambos Nogales area's meteorology and...

  3. Historic District Cultural Landscape Boundary at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (histland)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of one polygon that represents the historic district cultural landscape at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona as surveyed...

  4. 78 FR 48413 - Foreign-Trade Zone 75-Phoenix, Arizona, Authorization of Production Activity, Orbital Sciences...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ..., Orbital Sciences Corporation, (Satellites and Spacecraft Launch Vehicles); Gilbert, Arizona On April 2... to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Orbital Sciences Corporation, within Site 10, in... Secretary. BILLING CODE 3510-DS-P...

  5. The Springs at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_springs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 5 points representing the springs, natural and man-made, at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The springs were...

  6. Environmental contaminants in sediment and fish of Mineral Creek and the Middle Gila River, Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The lower reaches of Mineral Creek, a tributary to the Gila River in Pinal County, Arizona, were thought to be polluted by discharges from ASARCO Ray Mine located...

  7. Contaminants in fish and birds of Watson Lake, Arizona 2000-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A wood treatment facility located on Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe land near Prescott, Arizona released pentachlorophenol (PCP), arsenic, and chromium into the...

  8. Utilities:Power:Underground Powerlines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (Utilities.gdb:Power:powerln)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents the powerlines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The utility pipelines were collected by a Trimble GeoXT GPS unit with...

  9. The Flood Control Ditch at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_ditch)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of one arc representing the flood control ditch at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The flood control ditch collected...

  10. Utilities:Water:Water Tanks at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (Utilities.gdb:Water:tanks)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents tanks at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. It consists of 2 polygons representing the Tunnel Spring Division Tank and the 1/2...

  11. 77 FR 21911 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Arizona; Prevention of Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... Air Pollution Emergency Episodes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... of Arizona to address the requirements regarding air pollution emergency episodes in Clean Air Act... air pollution emergency episodes and adequate contingency plans to implement such authority...

  12. First report of the white pine blister rust pathogen, Cronartium ribicola, in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. L. Fairweather; Brian Geils

    2011-01-01

    White pine blister rust, caused by Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch., was found on southwestern white pine (Pinus flexilis James var. reflexa Engelm., synonym P. strobiformis Engelm.) near Hawley Lake, Arizona (Apache County, White Mountains, 34.024°N, 109.776°W, elevation 2,357 m) in April 2009. Although white pines in the Southwest (Arizona and New Mexico) have been...

  13. Evaluation of Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, 1984-85

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    In this article, we describe the evaluation of the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS), Arizona's alternative to the acute care portion of Medicaid. We provide an assessment of implementation of the program's innovative features during its second 18 months of operation, from April 1984 through September 1985. Included in the evaluation are assessments of the administration of the program, provider relations, eligibility, enrollment and marketing, information systems, quality ...

  14. Survival and growth for pubescent birch, pendula birch and common alder growing on farmland areas; Oeverlevnad och tillvaext hos glasbjoerk, vaartbjoerk och klibbal planterade paa aakermark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Tord

    2000-07-01

    Pendula birches (Betula pendula Roth) and pubescent birches (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were planted on former farmland. Before planting, the ground was harrowed or the ground was sprayed with terbuthylazine. Tree shelters were used as protection against weeds, voles and wild habitat. Birches treated with terbuthylazine showed the lowest survival. Birches growing in tree shelters were tallest and those growing on spots treated with terbuthylazine were smallest. The diameter at 0.1 m did not differ in a statistically significant way between the treatments. In another experiment with different herbicides, common alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) and pendula birch (Betula pendula Roth) were planted on former farmland that had been treated with glyphosate, terbuthylazine and propyzamide or after ground had been harrowed or not treated. In the study on herbicide-treated plants, birch had the highest plant survival. Mostly, species treated with glyphosate were thicker than species treated in other ways. Both species appeared sensitive to terbuthylazine, but not to glyphosate. Birch was not sensitive for propyzamide in opposite to alder. Some practical recommendations concerning afforestation of former farmland, especially weeding, are given.

  15. On the Diels-Alder approach to solely biomass-derived polyethylene terephthalate (PET): conversion of 2,5-dimethylfuran and acrolein into p-xylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiramizu, Mika; Toste, F Dean

    2011-10-24

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is a polymeric material with high global demand. Conventionally, PET is produced from fossil-fuel-based materials. Herein, we explored the feasibility of a sustainable method for PET production by using solely bio-renewable resources. Specifically, 2,5-dimethylfuran (derived from lignocellulosic biomass through 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural) and acrolein (produced from glycerol, a side product of biodiesel production) were converted into the key intermediate p-xylene (a precursor of terephthalic acid). This synthesis consists of a sequential Diels-Alder reaction, oxidation, dehydration, and decarboxylation. In particular, the pivotal first step, the Diels-Alder reaction, was studied in detail to provide useful kinetic and thermodynamic data. Although it was found that this reaction requires low temperature to proceed efficiently, which presents a limitation on economic feasibility on an industrial scale, the concept was realized and bio-derived p-xylene was obtained in 34% overall yield over four steps. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Regioselective Inverse Electron Demand Diels-Alder Reactions of N-Acyl 6-Amino-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, Dale L.; Schaum, Robert P.; Garbaccio, Robert M.

    1998-09-04

    The regioselective inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reactions of 6-[(tert-butyloxycarbonyl)amino]-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (2), 6-(acetylamino)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (3), and 6-(benzyloxycarbonyl)amino-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (4) are disclosed. All three underwent regioselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition with electron-rich dienophiles to form the corresponding functionalized 1,2-diazines in excellent yields. An order of reactivity with electron-rich dienophiles was observed with both 2 and 3 being more reactive than 3,6-bis(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (1, i.e. 3 > 2 > 1), and both 3 and 4 were shown to be more robust than 2 at the higher temperatures necessary for [4 + 2] cycloaddition with less reactive dienophiles. The cycloaddition regioselectivity is consistent with the polarization of the diene and the ability of the methylthio group to stabilize a partial negative charge at C-3, and the N-acylamino group to stabilize a partial positive charge at C-6. While intermolecular reactions of unactivated alkynes either did not proceed or required high temperatures and long reaction times, intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions utilizing tethered unactivated acetylenes led to five- and six-membered bicyclic 1,2-diazines under mild conditions.

  17. 台湾桤木无丝分裂与细胞多核现象研究%On Amitosis and Multinucleated Phenomenon of Taiwan Alder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卫娅; 易鼎杰; 汪卫星; 唐佳佳; 梁国鲁; 张宏

    2012-01-01

    利用去壁低渗-火焰干燥法在台湾桤木根尖细胞中观察到除有丝分裂外,还存在无丝分裂和细胞多核现象.在进行无丝分裂的根尖细胞核中,不发生染色质凝集,不形成可见的染色体,整个过程中核膜保持完整.其无丝分裂产生形状、大小相似的子核,形成了不同类型的多核细胞.%Amitosis is a special cell division compared with mitosis. In addition to mitosis, there is amitosis and multinucleated cells phenomena observed in root tip cells of Taiwan alder by means of wall degradation hypotonic-flame drying. It don't occurs chromatin condensation and forms visible chromosomes during mitosis in Taiwan alder root tip nuclei. Nuclear membrane maintains integrity in the entire process, and the nuclear division produces the similar shape and size nuclei, resulting in the formation of different types of multinucleated cells.

  18. A theoretical investigation on the regioselectivity of the intramolecular hetero Diels-Alder and 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of 2-vinyloxybenzaldehyde derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzehloueian Mahshid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports a systematic computational analysis of the two possible pathways, fused and bridged, for an intramolecular hetero Diels-Alder (IMHDA and an intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (IMDCA of 2-vinyloxybenzaldehyde derivatives. The potential energy surface analysis for both reactions is in agreement with experimental observations. The activation energies associated with the two regioisomeric channels in IMHDA reaction show that the bridged product is favored, although in IMDCA, the most stable TS results the fused product. The global electronic properties of fragments within each molecule were studied to discuss the reactivity patterns and charge transfer direction in the intramolecular processes. The asynchronicity of the bond formation and aromaticity of the optimized TSs in the Diels-Alder reaction as well as cycloaddition reaction were evaluated. Finally, 1H NMR chemical shifts of the possible regioisomers have been calculated using the GIAO method which of the most stable products are in agreement with the experimental data in the both reaction.

  19. Inverse Electron Demand Diels–Alder Reactions of 1,2,3-Triazines: Pronounced Substituent Effects on Reactivity and Cycloaddition Scope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erin D.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic study of the inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions of 1,2,3-triazines is disclosed, including an examination of the impact of a C5 substituent. Such substituents were found to exhibit a remarkable impact on the cycloaddition reactivity of the 1,2,3-triazine without altering, and perhaps even enhancing, the intrinsic cycloaddition regioselectivity. The study revealed that not only may the reactivity be predictably modulated by a C5 substituent (R = CO2Me > Ph > H), but that the impact is of a magnitude to convert 1,2,3-triazine (1) and its modest cycloaddition scope into a heterocyclic azadiene system with a reaction scope that portends extensive synthetic utility, expanding the range of participating dienophiles. Significantly, the studies define a now powerful additional heterocyclic azadiene, complementary to the isomeric 1,2,4-triazines and 1,3,5-triazines, capable of dependable participation in inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions, extending the number of complementary heterocyclic ring systems accessible with implementation of the methodology. PMID:21736324

  20. Synthesis and Properties of Trehalose-Based Flexible Polymers Prepared from Difurfurylidene Trehalose and Maleimide- Terminated Oligo(dimethylsiloxane by Diels-Alder Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Shibata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Difurfurylidene trehalose (DFTreh was synthesized from trehalose and furfural by an acetalization reaction. Maleimide-terminated dimethylsiloxane oligomers (DMS-BMI were synthesized from amine-terminated dimethylsiloxane oligomers by condensation with maleic anhydride. Three types of DMS-BMI with different length were prepared. Trehalose-based polymers were synthesized by Diels-Alder reaction of DFTreh and DMS-BMI. The reaction proceeded at 40~70 °C to produce a polymer with a maximum weight average molecular weight of ~19,000. The thermal degradation temperature increased with the increase of the length of the oligo(dimethylsiloxane units. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC measurements revealed the glass transition temperature (Tg of the polymer at -130~-120 °C, and no distinct Tg not observed above room temperature in the DSC measurement. The polymer products are not liquid at room temperature, and solid films can be obtained by casting from solution, implying a phase-separated structure made up of soft and hard segments. The phase-separated structure was confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM study. The DSC curve of the polymer showed a broad endothermic peak at 110~160 °C, suggesting that a retro-Diels-Alder reaction occurred. When a N,N-dimethylformamide solution of the polymer was kept at 100 °C and the resulting solution was analyzed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, the molecular weight decreased and monomers appeared.

  1. A "white elephant" in the library: a case study on loss of space from the Arizona Health Sciences Library at the University of Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiburger, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The Arizona Health Sciences Library is housed in a 4-story building that serves 4 University of Arizona colleges in Tucson. In October 2005, the dean of the college of medicine informed the library director that one floor of the library had to be converted to open classroom space by June 2006. Library staff planned and participated in the conversion of the space. Twenty thousand seven hundred square feet of library space (34% of public space in the building) was used briefly for large classes but is now rarely used. The space is now largely open and contains a variety of moveable seating and tables not suited for quiet study.

  2. A “white elephant” in the library: a case study on loss of space from the Arizona Health Sciences Library at the University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiburger, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The Arizona Health Sciences Library is housed in a 4-story building that serves 4 University of Arizona colleges in Tucson. In October 2005, the dean of the college of medicine informed the library director that one floor of the library had to be converted to open classroom space by June 2006. Library staff planned and participated in the conversion of the space. Twenty thousand seven hundred square feet of library space (34% of public space in the building) was used briefly for large classes but is now rarely used. The space is now largely open and contains a variety of moveable seating and tables not suited for quiet study. PMID:20098650

  3. Characterization of ribosomal DNA (rDNA in Drosophila arizonae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Tovar

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal DNA (rDNA is a multigenic family composed of one or more clusters of repeating units (RU. Each unit consists of highly conserved sequences codifying 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes intercalated with poorly conserved regulatory sequences between species. In this work, we analyzed the rDNA of Drosophila arizonae, a member of the mulleri complex (Repleta group. Using genomic restriction patterns, cloning and mapping of some representative rDNA fragments, we were able to construct a representative restriction map. RU in this species are 13.5-14 kb long, restriction sites are completely conserved compared with other drosophilids and the rDNA has an R1 retrotransposable element in some RU. We were unable to detect R2 elements in this species.O DNA ribossômico (rDNA é uma família multigênica composta de um ou mais aglomerados de unidades de repetição (RU. Cada unidade consiste de seqüências altamente conservadas que codificam os rRNAs 18S, 5.8S e 28S, intercaladas com seqüências regulatórias pouco conservadas entre as espécies. Neste trabalho analisamos o rDNA de Drosophila arizonae, um membro do complexo mulleri (grupo Repleta. Usando padrões de restrição genômicos, clonagem e mapeamento de alguns fragmentos de rDNA representativos, estabelecemos um mapa de restrição do rDNA representativo desta espécie. Neste drosofilídeo, a RU tem um tamanho médio de 13.5-14 kb e os sítios de restrição estão completamente conservados com relação a outras drosófilas. Além disto, este rDNA possui um elemento transponível tipo R1 presente em algumas unidades. Neste trabalho não tivemos evidências da presença de elementos R2 no rDNA desta espécie.

  4. Atmospheric rivers and cool season extreme precipitation events in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Fernandez, Erick Reinaldo

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are important contributors to cool season precipitation in the Southwestern US, and in some cases can lead to extreme hydrometeorological events in the region. We performed a climatological analysis and identified two predominant types of ARs that affect the central mountainous region in Arizona: Type 1 ARs originate in the tropics near Hawaii (central Pacific) and enhance their moisture in the midlatitudes, with maximum moisture transport over the ocean at low-levels of the troposphere. On the other hand, moisture in Type 2 ARs has a more direct tropical origin and meridional orientation with maximum moisture transfer at mid-levels. We then analyze future projections of Southwest ARs in a suite of global and regional climate models used in the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), to evaluate projected future changes in the frequency and intensity of ARs under warmer global climate conditions. We find a consistent and clear intensification of the water vapor transport associated with the ARs that impinge upon Arizona and adjacent regions, however, the response of AR-related precipitation intensity to increased moisture flux and column-integrated water vapor is weak and no robust variations are projected either by the global or the regional NARCCAP models. To evaluate the effect of horizontal resolution and improve our physical understanding of these results, we numerically simulated a historical AR event using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at a 3-km resolution. We then performed a pseudo-global warming experiment by modifying the lateral and lower boundary conditions to reflect possible changes in future ARs (as projected by the ensemble of global model simulations used for NARCCAP). Interestingly we find that despite higher specific humidity, some regions still receive less rainfall in the warming climate experiments - partially due to changes in thermodynamics, but primarily due to AR

  5. Design of cross-linked semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone)-based networks with one-way and two-way shape-memory properties through Diels-Alder reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raquez, Jean-Marie; Vanderstappen, Sophie; Meyer, Franck; Verge, Pierre; Alexandre, Michael; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Jérôme, Christine; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-08-29

    Cross-linked poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-based polyesterurethane (PUR) systems have been synthesized through Diels-Alder reactions by reactive extrusion. The Diels-Alder and retro-Diels-Alder reactions proved to be useful for enhancing the molecular motion of PCL-based systems, and therefore their crystallization ability, in the design of cross-linked semicrystalline polymers with one-way and two-way shape-memory properties. Successive reactions between α,ω-diol PCL (PCL(2) ), furfuryl alcohol, and methylene diphenyl 4,4'-diisocyanate straightforwardly afforded the α,ω-furfuryl PCL-based PUR systems, and subsequent Diels-Alder reactions with N,N-phenylenedimaleimide afforded the thermoreversible cycloadducts. The cross-linking density could be modulated by partially replacing PCL-diol with PCL-tetraol. Interestingly, the resulting PUR systems proved to be semicrystalline cross-linked polymers, the melting temperature of which (close to 45 °C) represented the switching temperature for their shape-memory properties. Qualitative and quantitative measurements demonstrated that these PUR systems exhibited one-way and two-way shape-memory properties depending on their cross-linking density.

  6. Substituent effects on an inverse electron demand hetero Diels-Alder reaction in aqueous solution and organic solvents : Cycloaddition of substituted styrenes to di(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, Jan W.; Zavarise, Silvia; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Charton, Marvin

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of the Diels-Alder reactions of di(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (1) with substituted styrenes 2 was investigated in aqueous media and in organic solvents. The second-order rate constants ofthis reaction increase dramatically in water-rich media. A decrease in pH accelerates the aqueous

  7. 用反Diels-Alder反应合成天然产物%Natural Products Synthesis by Retro- Diels- Alder Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志煜; 褚新阶; 何菱; 谢益农; 赵联运

    1997-01-01

    Stereospecific introduction of functionalities and substituents on the cyclopentenone ring in the rigid molecule tricyclo [ 5.2.1.02,6] decadineone 1 followed by Retro - Diels - Alder reaction produced the cyclopentenone derivatives 6,7,14,22 and 29, which were converted into chromomoric acid C-I 2, D-I 3, F 4, B 7, 18 invictolide and 6 - epiinvictolide 19 as well as a key intermediate 30for further synthesis of macrocyclic pyrrolizidine alkaloid merenskine 27.%天然产物全合成主要在于发展有效的方法以组成碳骨架和立体控制引入必须的官能团.本文利用刚性分子三环癸二烯酮(1)为原料,立体控制地引入取代基及官能团组成目标分子所需的碳骨架及官能团后进行反Diels-Alder反应释放出取代环戊烯酮,从而进一步合成目标分子克罗莫酸C-I 2,D-I 3,F 4,B 7,蚊皇识别信息索18,6-表蚊皇识别信息素19以及经30获得的32,后者是全合成大环内酯生物碱27的关键中间体.用酶催化反应不对称乙酰化内消旋二醇24c得光学活性单乙酯24d(81%产率,98.3%对映体过量值).24d经过官能团转换可得(+)及(-)1,从(-)1用相似的反应合成了光学活性蚁皇识别信息素(18).

  8. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, E.A.; Monroe, S.A.; Springer, A.E.; Blasch, K.W.; Bills, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration.

  9. Chondrichthyans from the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Naco Formation of central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D.K.; Irmis, R.B.; Hansen, M.C.; Olson, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Teeth, spines, and dermal denticles of chondrichthyans are reported from the Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Naco Formation of central Arizona. The most common elements are crushing teeth of the cochliodont Deltodus angularis, less common are teeth of D. sublaevis, Venustodus leidyi, Lagarodus angustus, "Cladodus" occidentalis, Petalodus ohioensis, Orodus sp., and Hybodontoidea. Fin spines of Acondylacanthus sp., Amelacanthus sp., and Physonemus sp., and the dermal denticle Petrodus patelliformis are also present. The material of Venustodus leidyi shows for the first time that this animal was heterodont, having arched anterior teeth with a v-shaped profile grading posteriorly into lower crescentic, and finally flattened teeth. Lagarodus angustus is shown to have at least three tooth morphotypes, and a new tooth arrangement is proposed in which small anterior teeth are replaced posteriorly by large crushing teeth arranged in whorls. This fauna is similar to others in New Mexico, Colorado, and Ohio and constitutes a western extension of such faunas in North America. In addition, the presence of Deltodus sublaevis and Lagarodus angustus documents a range extension from a known European distribution, reinforcing the cosmopolitan nature of chondrichthyan faunas at this time. ?? 2004 by the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

  10. The University of Arizona program in solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    The University of Arizona program is aimed at introducing scientific rigor to the predictability and quality assurance of composite solid propellants. Two separate approaches are followed: to use the modern analytical techniques to experimentally study carefully controlled propellant batches to discern trends in mixing, casting, and cure; and to examine a vast bank of data, that has fairly detailed information on the ingredients, processing, and rocket firing results. The experimental and analytical work is described briefly. The principle findings were that: (1) pre- (dry) blending of the coarse and fine ammonium perchlorate can significantly improve the uniformity of mixing; (2) the Fourier transformed IR spectra of the uncured and cured polymer have valuable data on the state of the fuel; (3) there are considerable non-uniformities in the propellant slurry composition near the solid surfaces (blades, walls) compared to the bulk slurry; and (4) in situ measurements of slurry viscosity continuously during mixing can give a good indication of the state of the slurry. Several important observations in the study of the data bank are discussed.

  11. Distance from Construction Site and Risk for Coccidioidomycosis, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hui H.; Ruiz, Yvette; Duffy, Stacy; Heinrich, Beth E.; Lake, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioides spp. fungi, which are present in soil in the southwestern United States, can become airborne when the soil is disrupted, and humans who inhale the spores can become infected. In 2012, our institution in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA, began a building project requiring extensive excavation of soil. One year after construction began, we compared the acquisition of coccidioidomycosis in employees working adjacent to the construction site (campus A) with that of employees working 13 miles away (campus B). Initial testing indicated prior occult coccidioidal infection in 20 (11.4%) of 176 campus A employees and in 19 (13.6%) of 140 campus B employees (p = 0.55). At the 1-year follow-up, 3 (2.5%) of 120 employees from campus A and 8 (8.9%) of 90 from campus B had flow cytometric evidence of new coccidioidal infection (p = 0.04). The rate of coccidioidal acquisition differed significantly between campuses, but was not higher on the campus with construction. PMID:25148473

  12. Subsidence characterization and modeling for engineered facilities in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, M. L.; Fergason, K. C.; Panda, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    Several engineered facilities located on deep alluvial basins in southern Arizona, including flood retention structures (FRS) and a coal ash disposal facility, have been impacted by up to as much as 1.8 m of differential land subsidence and associated earth fissuring. Compressible basin alluvium depths are as deep as about 300 m, and historic groundwater level declines due to pumping range from 60 to more than 100 m at these facilities. Addressing earth fissure-inducing ground strain has required alluvium modulus characterization to support finite element modeling. The authors have developed Percolation Theory-based methodologies to use effective stress and generalized geo-material types to estimate alluvium modulus as a function of alluvium lithology, depth and groundwater level. Alluvial material modulus behavior may be characterized as high modulus gravel-dominated, low modulus sand-dominated, or very low modulus fines-dominated (silts and clays) alluvium. Applied at specific aquifer stress points, such as significant pumping wells, this parameter characterization and quantification facilitates subsidence magnitude modeling at its' sources. Modeled subsidence is then propagated over time across the basin from the source(s) using a time delay exponential decay function similar to the soil mechanics consolidation coefficient, only applied laterally. This approach has expanded subsidence modeling capabilities on scales of engineered facilities of less than 2 to more than 15 km.

  13. Molecular detection of airborne Coccidioides in Tucson, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Nancy A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Barker, Bridget M.; Loparev, Vladimir N.; Litvintseva, Anastasia P.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the soil-dwelling fungus Coccidioides is essential for the prevention of Valley fever, a disease primarily caused by inhalation of the arthroconidia. Methods for collecting and detectingCoccidioides in soil samples are currently in use by several laboratories; however, a method utilizing current air sampling technologies has not been formally demonstrated for the capture of airborne arthroconidia. In this study, we collected air/dust samples at two sites (Site A and Site B) in the endemic region of Tucson, Arizona, and tested a variety of air samplers and membrane matrices. We then employed a single-tube nested qPCR assay for molecular detection. At both sites, numerous soil samples (n = 10 at Site A and n = 24 at Site B) were collected and Coccidioides was detected in two samples (20%) at Site A and in eight samples (33%) at Site B. Of the 25 air/dust samples collected at both sites using five different air sampling methods, we detected Coccidioides in three samples from site B. All three samples were collected using a high-volume sampler with glass-fiber filters. In this report, we describe these methods and propose the use of these air sampling and molecular detection strategies for environmental surveillance of Coccidioides.

  14. Soil compaction vulnerability at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert H.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Carmichael, Shinji; Esque, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Compaction vulnerability of different types of soils by hikers and vehicles is poorly known, particularly for soils of arid and semiarid regions. Engineering analyses have long shown that poorly sorted soils (for example, sandy loams) compact to high densities, whereas well-sorted soils (for example, eolian sand) do not compact, and high gravel content may reduce compaction. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (ORPI) in southwestern Arizona, is affected greatly by illicit activities associated with the United States–Mexico border, and has many soils that resource managers consider to be highly vulnerable to compaction. Using geospatial soils data for ORPI, compaction vulnerability was estimated qualitatively based on the amount of gravel and the degree of sorting of sand and finer particles. To test this qualitative assessment, soil samples were collected from 48 sites across all soil map units, and undisturbed bulk densities were measured. A scoring system was used to create a vulnerability index for soils on the basis of particle-size sorting, soil properties derived from Proctor compaction analyses, and the field undisturbed bulk densities. The results of the laboratory analyses indicated that the qualitative assessments of soil compaction vulnerability underestimated the area of high vulnerability soils by 73 percent. The results showed that compaction vulnerability of desert soils, such as those at ORPI, can be quantified using laboratory tests and evaluated using geographic information system analyses, providing a management tool that managers potentially could use to inform decisions about activities that reduce this type of soil disruption in protected areas.

  15. Socioeconomic impact of photovoltaic power at Schuchulik, Arizona. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, D.; Garrett, B.G.; Chrisman, C.

    1980-10-01

    Schuchuli, a small remote village on the Papago Indian Reservation in southwest Arizona, is 27 kilometers (17 miles) from the nearest available utility power. In some respects, Schuchuli resembles many of the rural villages in other parts of the world. For example, it's relatively small in size (about 60 residents), composed of a number of extended family groupings, and remotely situated relative to major population centers (190 km, or 120 miles, from Tucson). Its lack of conventional power is due to the prohibitive cost of supplying a small electrical load with a long-distance distribution line. Furthermore, alternate energy sources are expensive and place a burden on the resources of the villagers. On December 16, 1978, as part of a federally funded project, a solar cell power system was put into operation at Schuchuli. The system powers the village water pump, lighting for homes ad other village buildings, family refrigerators and a communal washing machine and sewing machine. The project, managed for the US Department of Energy by the NASA Lewis Research Center, provided for a one-year socio-economic study to assess the impact of a relatively small amount of electricity on the basic living environment of the villagers. The results of that study are presented, including village history, group life, energy use in general and the use of the photovoltaic-powered appliances. No significant impacts due to the photovoltaic power system were observed.

  16. Arizona Public Service - Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-12-01

    Hydrogen has promise to be the fuel of the future. Its use as a chemical reagent and as a rocket propellant has grown to over eight million metric tons per year in the United States. Although use of hydrogen is abundant, it has not been used extensively as a transportation fuel. To assess the viability of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the viability of producing hydrogen using off-peak electric energy, Pinnacle West Capital Corporation (PNW) and its electric utility subsidiary, Arizona Public Service (APS) designed, constructed, and operates a hydrogen and compressed natural gas fueling station—the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant. This report summarizes the design of the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and presents lessons learned from its design and construction. Electric Transportation Applications prepared this report under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  17. Evaluation of geothermal energy in Arizona. Arizona geothermal planning/commercialization team. Quarterly topical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Mancini, F.; Goldstone, L.A.; Malysa, L.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reviewed on the following: area development plans, evaluation of geothermal applications, continued evaluation of geothermal resources, engineering and economic analyses, technical assistance in the state of Arizona, the impact of various growth patterns upon geothermal energy development, and the outreach program. (MHR)

  18. The Conservation Nexus: Valuing Interdependent Water and Energy Savings in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, M.; Bartos, M.

    2013-12-01

    Energy and water resources are intrinsically linked, yet they are managed separately--even in the water-scarce American southwest. This study develops a spatially-explicit model of water-energy interdependencies in Arizona, and assesses the potential for co-beneficial conservation programs. Arizona consumes 2.8% of its water demand for thermoelectric power and 8% of its electricity demand for water infrastructure--roughly twice the national average. The interdependent benefits of investments in 7 conservation strategies are assessed. Deployment of irrigation retrofits and new reclaimed water facilities dominate potential water savings, while residential and commercial HVAC improvements dominate energy savings. Water conservation policies have the potential to reduce statewide electricity demand by 1.0-2.9%, satisfying 5-14% of mandated energy-efficiency goals. Likewise, adoption of energy-efficiency measures and renewable generation portfolios can reduce non-agricultural water demand by 2.0-2.6%. These co-benefits of conservation investments are typically not included in conservation plans or benefit-cost analyses. Residential water conservation measures produce significant water and energy savings, but are generally not cost-effective at current water prices. An evaluation of the true cost of water in Arizona would allow future water and energy savings to be compared objectively, and would help policymakers allocate scarce resources to the highest-value conservation measures. Water Transfers between Water Cycle Components in Arizona in 2008 Cumulative embedded energy in water cycle components in Arizona in 2008

  19. Aquifer test at well SMW-1 near Moenkopi, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Rob; Bills, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    The Hopi villages of Lower Moencopi and Upper Moenkopi are on the Hopi Indian Reservation south of Tuba City in northern Arizona. These adjacent Hopi villages, located west and north of the confluence of Pasture Canyon Wash and Moenkopi Wash, are dependent on groundwater withdrawals from three wells that penetrate the N aquifer and from two springs that discharge from the N aquifer. The N aquifer is the principal aquifer in this region of northern Arizona and is composed of thick beds of sandstone between less permeable layers of siltstone and mudstone. The fine-grained character of the N aquifer inhibits rapid movement of water and large yields to wells; however, the aquifer is moderately productive at yields generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the study area. In recent years, the water level has declined in the three public-supply wells and the flow from the springs has decreased, causing concern that the current water supply will not be able to accommodate peak demand and allow for residential and economic growth. In addition to the challenge imposed by declining groundwater levels, the water-supply wells and springs are located about 2 miles downgradient from the Tuba City Landfill site where studies are ongoing to determine if uranium and other metals in groundwater beneath the landfill are higher than regional concentrations in the N aquifer. In August 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Hopi Tribe, conducted an aquifer test on well SMW-1, designed to help the Hopi Tribe determine the potential yield and water quality of the N aquifer south of Moenkopi Wash as a possible source of additional water supply. Well SMW-1 was drilled south of Moenkopi Wash to a depth of 760 feet below land surface before being backfilled and cased to about 300 feet. The well penetrates, in descending order, the Navajo Sandstone and the Kayenta Formation, both units of the N aquifer. The pre-test water level in the well was 99.15 feet below land

  20. The development of renewable resources at Arizona public service company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herb Hayden, P.E. [Arizona Public Service Company, (United states)

    1995-12-31

    Arizona Public Service (APS) has been pursuing the development of solar energy for many years, through feasibility studies, solar monitoring, photovoltaics testing, demonstration projects, and internal applications of solar. Key examples are our comparative testing of photovoltaics (PV) at our Solar Test And Research (STAR) Center, the construction of a 225 kW grid-connected PV system, about 20 kW of rooftop PV systems at several customers properties, our participation in the development of Solar Central Receiver technology, and two recent studies on the value of solar in centralized and distributed generation. The costs and performance of solar technologies has been steadily improving, and there are current needs for energy services in APS service territory which cannot be economically served by power line extensions. These off-grid demands provide an opportunity for the initial application of solar for customer service, which can expand as costs are further reduced. It is expected that with continued development support, the costs of solar will decrease to a level which will be competitive in certain grid-connected applications before 2000. Recently, APS established a goal of installing 12 megawatts of solar by 2000 in applications that are cost-effective or can be made cost effective, for the economic and environmental benefit of our customers and shareholders. In order to achieve this goal, APS will develop cooperative working relationships with suppliers and other utilities that have a similar interest in the cost-effective use of solar energy for customer service. [Espanol] Servicios Publicos de Arizona (APS) ha proseguido el desarrollo de la energia solar desde hace muchos anos a traves de estudios de factibilidad, monitoreo solar, prueba de equipos fotovoltaicos, proyectos de demostracion y aplicaciones internas de energia solar. Son ejemplos importantes nuestras pruebas comparativas de fotovoltaicos (PV) en nuestro Centro de Pruebas e Investigaciones

  1. Climate Variation at Flagstaff, Arizona - 1950 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereford, Richard

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Much scientific research demonstrates the existence of recent climate variation, particularly global warming. Climate prediction models forecast that climate will change; it will become warmer, droughts will increase in number and severity, and extreme climate events will recur often?desiccating aridity, extremely wet, unusually warm, or even frigid at times. However, the global models apply to average conditions in large grids approximately 150 miles on an edge (Thorpe, 2005), and how or whether specific areas within a grid are affected is unclear. Flagstaff's climate is mentioned in the context of global change, but information is lacking on the amount and trend of changes in precipitation, snowfall, and temperature. The purpose of this report is to understand what may be happening to Flagstaff's climate by reviewing local climate history. Flagstaff is in north-central Arizona south of San Francisco Mountain, which reaches 12,633 feet, the highest in Arizona (fig. 1). At 6,900 feet, surrounded by ponderosa pine forest, Flagstaff enjoys a four-season climate; winter-daytime temperatures are cool, averaging 45 degrees (Fahrenheit). Summer-daytime temperatures are comfortable, averaging 80 degrees, which is pleasant compared with nearby low-elevation deserts. Flagstaff?s precipitation averages 22-inches per year with a range of 9 to 39 inches. Snowfall occurs each season, averaging 97 inches annually. This report, written for the non-technical reader, interprets climate variation at Flagstaff as observed at the National Weather Service (NWS) station at Pulliam Field (or Airport), a first-order weather station staffed by meteorologists (Staudenmaier and others, 2007). The station is on a flat-topped ridge surrounded by forest 5-miles south of Flagstaff at an elevation of 7,003 feet. Data used in this analysis are daily measurements of precipitation (including snowfall) and temperature (maximum and minimum) covering the period from 1950, when the station

  2. Radionuclide measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry at Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Zabel, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past years, Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TAMS) has become established as an important method for radionuclide analysis. In the Arizona system the accelerator is operated at a thermal voltage of 1.8MV for C-14 analysis, and 1.6 to 2MV for Be-10. Samples are inserted into a cesium sputter ion source in solid form. Negative ions sputtered from the target are accelerated to about 25kV, and the injection magnet selects ions of a particular mass. Ions of the 3+ charge state, having an energy of about 9MeV are selected by an electrostatic deflector, surviving ions pass through two magnets, where only ions of the desired mass-energy product are selected. The final detector is a combination ionization chamber to measure energy loss (and hence, Z), and a silicon surface-barrier detector which measures residual energy. After counting the trace iosotope for a fixed time, the injected ions are switched to the major isotope used for normalization. These ions are deflected into a Faraday cup after the first high-energy magnet. Repeated measurements of the isotope ratio of both sample and standards results in a measurement of the concentration of the radionuclide. Recent improvements in sample preparation for C-14 make preparation of high-beam current graphite targets directly from CO2 feasible. Except for some measurements of standards and backgrounds for Be-10 measurements to date have been on C-14. Although most results have been in archaeology and quaternary geology, studies have been expanded to include cosmogenic C-14 in meteorites. The data obtained so far tend to confirm the antiquity of Antarctic meteorites from the Allan Hills site. Data on three samples of Yamato meteorites gave terrestrial ages of between about 3 and 22 thousand years.

  3. Preparing Physics and Chemistry Teachers at the University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2006-04-01

    Beginning in 2000, science majors at the University of Arizona who wish to teach in middle or high schools have enrolled in the College of Science Teacher Preparation Program (CoS TPP). Students in the program take General Education courses, content courses, and science pedagogy courses that make them eligible for teacher certification. Students can remain in their science degree programs, and take the required science pedagogy courses, or they can enroll in a BS in Science Education degree that includes the pedagogy courses, with concentrations available in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics. Science educators from six different departments, two permanent Adjunct Instructors, and two Teachers in Residence teach the program's courses. (One of the Teachers in Residence is supported by the PhysTEC project.) Most of the pedagogy courses include field experiences in area science classrooms; the program works with some 115 mentor teachers from throughout the Tucson area, who host preservice teachers in their field experiences. In the first six years of the program, 14 program graduates have been chemistry and physics teachers. This compares to a total of six chemistry and physics teachers produced by the College of Education program in the four years preceding the creation of the CoS TPP. In this presentation, I will describe the unique features of the courses that prospective chemistry and physics teachers take and the field experiences in which they participate. In addition, I will describe how PhysTEC-supplied resources have been used to improve the program, and the ways in which we are assessing the program's success.

  4. Solar-driven membrane distillation demonstration in Leupp, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravisankar, Vishnu Arvind; Seaman, Robert; Mirchandani, Sera; Arnold, Robert G; Ela, Wendell P

    2016-03-01

    The Navajo Nation is the largest and one of the driest Native American reservations in the US. The population in the Navajo Nation is sporadically distributed over a very large area making it extremely ineffective to connect homes to a centralized water supply system. Owing to this population distribution and the multi decadal drought prevailing in the region, over 40% of the 300,000 people living on Navajo Tribal Lands lack access to running potable water. For many people the only alternative is hauling water from filling stations, resulting in economic hardship and limited supply. A solution to this problem is a de-centralized off-grid water source. The University of Arizona and US Bureau of Reclamation's Solar Membrane Distillation (SMD), stand-alone, pilot desalination system on the Navajo Reservation will provide an off-grid source of potable water; the pilot will serve as a proximal water source, ease the financial hardships caused by the drought, and provide a model for low-cost water treatment systems in arid tribal lands. Bench-scale experiments and an earlier field prototype plant showed viable operation of a solar heated, membrane distillation (MD) system, but further optimization is required. The objectives of the Navajo pilot study are to i) demonstrate integration of solar collectors and membrane distillation, ii) optimize operational parameters, iii) demonstrate and monitor technology performance during extended duration operation, and iv) facilitate independent system operation by the Navajo Water Resources Department, including hand-over of a comprehensive operations manual for implementation of subsequent SMD systems. The Navajo SMD system is designed as a perennial installation that includes remote communication of research data and full automation for remote, unmanned operation.

  5. Machine Learning to Assess Grassland Productivity in Southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Campos, G. E.; Heilman, P.; Armendariz, G.; Moser, E.; Archer, V.; Vaughan, R.

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary results of machine learning (ML) techniques modeling the combined effects of climate, management, and inherent potential on productivity of grazed semi-arid grasslands in southeastern Arizona. Our goal is to support public land managers determine if agency management policies are meeting objectives and where to focus attention. Monitoring in the field is becoming more and more limited in space and time. Remotely sensed data cover the entire allotments and go back in time, but do not consider the key issue of species composition. By estimating expected vegetative production as a function of site potential and climatic inputs, management skill can be assessed through time, across individual allotments, and between allotments. Here we present the use of Random Forest (RF) as the main ML technique, in this case for the purpose of regression. Our response variable is the maximum annual NDVI, a surrogate for grassland productivity, as generated by the Google Earth Engine cloud computing platform based on Landsat 5, 7, and 8 datasets. PRISM 33-year normal precipitation (1980-2013) was resampled to the Landsat scale. In addition, the GRIDMET climate dataset was the source for the calculation of the annual SPEI (Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index), a drought index. We also included information about landscape position, aspect, streams, ponds, roads and fire disturbances as part of the modeling process. Our results show that in terms of variable importance, the 33-year normal precipitation, along with SPEI, are the most important features affecting grasslands productivity within the study area. The RF approach was compared to a linear regression model with the same variables. The linear model resulted in an r2 = 0.41, whereas RF showed a significant improvement with an r2 = 0.79. We continue refining the model by comparison with aerial photography and to include grazing intensity and infrastructure from units/allotments to assess the

  6. Coccidioidomycosis incidence in Arizona predicted by seasonal precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Tamerius

    Full Text Available The environmental mechanisms that determine the inter-annual and seasonal variability in incidence of coccidioidomycosis are unclear. In this study, we use Arizona coccidioidomycosis case data for 1995-2006 to generate a timeseries of monthly estimates of exposure rates in Maricopa County, AZ and Pima County, AZ. We reveal a seasonal autocorrelation structure for exposure rates in both Maricopa County and Pima County which indicates that exposure rates are strongly related from the fall to the spring. An abrupt end to this autocorrelation relationship occurs near the the onset of the summer precipitation season and increasing exposure rates related to the subsequent season. The identification of the autocorrelation structure enabled us to construct a "primary" exposure season that spans August-March and a "secondary" season that spans April-June which are then used in subsequent analyses. We show that October-December precipitation is positively associated with rates of exposure for the primary exposure season in both Maricopa County (R = 0.72, p = 0.012 and Pima County (R = 0.69, p = 0.019. In addition, exposure rates during the primary exposure seasons are negatively associated with concurrent precipitation in Maricopa (R = -0.79, p = 0.004 and Pima (R = -0.64, p = 0.019, possibly due to reduced spore dispersion. These associations enabled the generation of models to estimate exposure rates for the primary exposure season. The models explain 69% (p = 0.009 and 54% (p = 0.045 of the variance in the study period for Maricopa and Pima counties, respectively. We did not find any significant predictors for exposure rates during the secondary season. This study builds on previous studies examining the causes of temporal fluctuations in coccidioidomycosis, and corroborates the "grow and blow" hypothesis.

  7. Community Background Reports: Three Boarding Schools (Phoenix Indian School, Phoenix, Arizona; Theodore Roosevelt School, Fort Apache, Arizona; Chemawa Indian School, Salem, Oregon). National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 15, Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, Ralph E.; And Others

    Three Bureau of Indian Affairs off-reservation boarding schools (Phoenix Indian School in Phoenix, Arizona; Theodore Roosevelt School in Fort Apache, Arizona; and Chemawa Indian School in Salem, Oregon) are the subjects for this report, which is a part of the National Study of American Indian Education. Brief descriptions of the physical plant,…

  8. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 105 Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Mark A. [Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Portland, OR (United States)

    2002-08-22

    Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and 115kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 7/17. Corridor width varies. The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 30 miles of access roads will be cleared using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Tower sites will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposal.

  9. Novel Synthesis of Highly Phenyl-Substituted Spirobifluorene and Carbazole Derivatives Through Diels-Alder Reaction for Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Hyun Nam; Jung, Sung Hyun; Park, Ho Cheol; Lee, Chang June; Park, Jong Wook

    We synthesized and characterized novel highly phenyl-substituted spirobifluorene and carbazole derivatives such as 3,6-bis[(2,3,4,5-tetraphenyl)phenyl]-9-ethylcarbazole (BTPEC); 3,6-bis(7,10-diphenyl-fluoranthene)-9-ethylcarbazole (BDFEC); 2,7-Bis[(2,3,4,5-tetraphenyl)phenyl]-9,9‧-spirobifluorene (BTPSF); and 3,6-bis(7,10-diphenyl-fluo-ran-thene)-9,9‧-spirobifluorene (BDFSF), through Diels-Alder reaction. BDFEC showed sky blue PL spectrum at 481 nm and BTPSF showed ultra-violet PL spectrum at 374 nm in chloroform solution. Also BTPEC and BDFSF exhibited PL spectrum at around the UV region, 390 and 467 nm.

  10. Diels-Alder reactions using 4,7-dioxygenated indanones as dienophiles for regioselective construction of oxygenated 2,3-dihydrobenz[f]indenone skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Regioselective construction of 4,8,9-trioxygenated 2,3-dihydrobenz[f]indenones, key intermediates for the synthesis of kinamycin antibiotics, was achieved via Diels-Alder reactions (DAR using 4,7-dioxygenated indanone-type compounds as dienophiles. Reaction of indanetrione with 1-methoxybutadiene gave a 1 : 1 mixture of undesired 4,5,9-trioxygenated 2,3-dihydrobenz[f]indenone and [4.4.3]propellane. The addition of Lewis acid did not affect the product ratio, whereas the use of the 6-bromoindanetrione exclusively afforded the latter propellane. On the other hand, DAR of benzyne derived from bromoindan and furan gave 5,8-epoxy-2,3-dihydrobenz[f]indene, which was subjected to acid-induced ring opening to give 2,3-dihydrobenz[f]indenone with undesired 4,5,9-trioxy functions.

  11. SPECIES RICHNESS AND INDICES OF ABUNDANCE OF MEDIUM-SIZED MAMMALS IN ANDEAN FOREST AND REFORESTATIONS WITH ANDEAN ALDER: A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÁNCHEZ FRANCISCO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the species richness and two indices of abundance of medium-sizedmammals in areas with Andean forest and Andean alder (Alnus acuminatareforestations in a reserve at the Central Andes of Colombia. Since reforested areashave a less complex habitat structure and lower plant diversity than native forests, wepredicted that they have lower richness of mammals than areas with Andean forest.We obtained the indices of abundance from direct contacts in transects and from theuse of track stations. Our results suggest that, indeed, areas with Andean forest hada higher richness of mammals than reforestations, but this pattern may be modifiedby anthropogenic factors. We found no differences between the indices of abundanceof the squirrel, Sciurus granatensis, in the two forest types. In contrast, the coatiswere recorded more frequently in the reforestations than in areas with Andean forestat the reserve.

  12. Functional species traits of carabid beetles living in two riparian alder forests of the Sila plateau subject to different disturbance factors (Coleoptera: Carabidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mazzei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied carabid beetle assemblages found in riparian black alder forests in the Sila plateau (Southern Apennines. These carabid assemblages are characterized by a high incidence of endemic small-sized, low dispersal, highly stenotopic (hygrophilic, and trophycally specialized species. To evaluate the influence of anthropogenic disturbance on these insects, we compared carabid assemblage of an old undisturbed forest (65-170y, wilderness landscape with that of a younger, partly grazed stand (40-60y, cropland landscape. The carabid assemblage of the disturbed stand was characterized by a higher number of species, but showed a lower incidence of zoophagous specialists and brachypterous beetles, with many species probably coming from an adjacent cropland. However, the disturbed stand maintains almost 80% of the core species found in the older forest, which suggests that these insects are not particularly sensitive to disturbance factors represented by periodic wood harvesting and extensive cattle grazing.

  13. Multifunctional Hydrogel with Good Structure Integrity, Self-Healing, and Tissue-Adhesive Property Formed by Combining Diels-Alder Click Reaction and Acylhydrazone Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Du, Jie; Wang, Gang; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-04

    Hydrogel, as a good cartilage tissue-engineered scaffold, not only has to possess robust mechanical property but also has to have an intrinsic self-healing property to integrate itself or the surrounding host cartilage. In this work a double cross-linked network (DN) was designed and prepared by combining Diels-Alder click reaction and acylhydrazone bond. The DA reaction maintained the hydrogel's structural integrity and mechanical strength in physiological environment, while the dynamic covalent acylhydrazone bond resulted in hydrogel's self-healing property and controlled the on-off switch of network cross-link density. At the same time, the aldehyde groups contained in hydrogel further promote good integration of the hydrogel to surrounding tissue based on aldehyde-amine Schiff-base reaction. This kind of hydrogel has good structural integrity, autonomous self-healing, and tissue-adhesive property and simultaneously will have a good application in tissue engineering and tissue repair field.

  14. Water temperatures in select nearshore environments of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, during the Low Steady Summer Flow experiment of 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernieu, William S.; Anderson, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Water releases from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, are the primary determinant of streamflow, sediment transport, water quality, and aquatic and riparian habitat availability in the Colorado River downstream of the dam in Grand Canyon. The presence and operation of the dam have transformed the seasonally warm Colorado River into a consistently cold river because of hypolimnetic, or deep-water, releases from the penstock withdrawal structures on the dam. These releases have substantially altered the thermal regime of the downstream riverine environment. This, in turn, has affected the biota of the river corridor, particularly native and nonnative fish communities and the aquatic food web. In the spring and summer of 2000, a Low Steady Summer Flow experiment was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Reclamation to evaluate the effects of the experimental flow on physical and biological resources of the Colorado River ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam to Lake Mead on the Arizona-Nevada border. This report describes the water temperatures collected during the experimental flow from 14 nearshore sites in the river corridor in Grand Canyon to assess the effects of steady releases on the thermal dynamics of nearshore environments. These nearshore areas are characterized by low-velocity flows with some degree of isolation from the higher velocity flows in the main channel and are hypothesized to be important rearing environments for young native fish. Water-temperature measurements were made at 14 sites, ranging from backwater to open-channel environments. Warming during daylight hours, relative to main-channel temperatures, was measured at all sites in relation to the amount of isolation from the main-channel current. Boat traffic, amount of direct solar radiation, and degree of isolation from the main-channel current appear to be the primary factors affecting the differential warming of the nearshore environment.

  15. Solvent effects in acid-catalyzed dehydration of the Diels-Alder cycloadduct between 2,5-dimethylfuran and maleic anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati-fard, Taha; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Doren, Douglas J.

    2017-03-01

    Dehydration of the cycloadduct produced from the Diels-Alder reaction between 2,5-dimethylfuran and maleic anhydride to 3,6-dimethylphthalic anhydride exemplifies an important step in producing platform chemicals from biomass. The mechanisms of dehydration and catalytic effects of Lewis and Brønsted acids are investigated with density functional theory. The uncatalyzed reaction has a very high activation barrier (68.7 kcal/mol) in the gas phase and it is not significantly affected by solvation. With a Lewis acid catalyst, modeled as an alkali ion, the activation barriers are reduced, but intermediates are also stabilized. The net effect in vacuum is that the energetic span, or apparent activation energy of the catalytic cycle, is 77.9 kcal/mol, even higher than the barrier in the uncatalyzed case. In solution, however, the energetic span is reduced by as much as 20 kcal/mol, due to differences in the solvation energy of the transition states and intermediates. In the case of a Brønsted acid catalyst, modeled as a proton, the gas phase transition state energies are reduced even more than in the Lewis acid case, and there is no strong stabilization of the intermediates. The energetic span in vacuum is only 13.8 kcal/mol and is reduced even further in solution. Brønsted acid catalysis appears to be the preferred mechanism for dehydration of this cycloadduct. Since the Diels-Alder reaction that produced the molecule has previously been shown to be catalyzed by Brønsted acids, this suggests that a single catalyst could be used to accelerate both steps.

  16. Effect on tumor necrosis factor-α production and antioxidant ability of black alder, as factors related to its anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores

    2012-06-01

    Alders exhibit several uses in different areas and also offer some nutritional and medicinal values. The bark and leaves from black alder [Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn] are used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory processes and other health disorders. This study assessed if an extract of A. glutinosa stem bark exhibits some biological properties linked to improving the inflammatory state, which could partly justify its ethnopharmacological use. Therefore, various aspects of antioxidant activity as well as the effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production were evaluated. The phytochemical study revealed the presence of terpenes, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, and anthraquinones (by high-performance thin-layer chromatography). The betulinic acid content in the extract, determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (validated method), was 0.72±0.027%. In addition, high amounts for total phenols as well as flavonoids were determined. The extract exhibited a 2,2'-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity similar to that of ascorbic acid and had a significant effect on superoxide anion scavenging, superior to that of ascorbic acid. It was also able to protect HeLa cells from induced oxidative stress. In the TNF-α assay, levels of this citokine were depressed by the extract in HL-60 cells. To test the effect of the extract on cell proliferation, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed. According to the results, the antioxidant properties displayed by the extract of A. glutinosa stem bark, together with the effect on TNF-α levels, suggest that these activities, linked to a successful reduction in inflammatory processes, may support, in part, its ethnopharmacological use.

  17. 77 FR 13376 - Notice of License Termination for the University of Arizona Research Reactor, License No. R-52

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... COMMISSION Notice of License Termination for the University of Arizona Research Reactor, License No. R-52 The... No. R-52, for the University of Arizona Research Reactor (UARR). The NRC has terminated the license... released for unrestricted use. Therefore, Facility Operating License No. R-52 is terminated. For...

  18. Do the AZELLA Cut Scores Meet the Standards? A Validation Review of Arizona English Language Learner Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Ida Rose

    2010-01-01

    The Arizona English Language Learners Assessment (AZELLA) is used by the Arizona Department of Education to determine which children should receive English support services. AZELLA results are used to determine if children are either proficient in English or have English language skills in one of four pre-proficient categories (pre-emergent,…

  19. 78 FR 65963 - Foreign-Trade Zone 277-Western Maricopa County, Arizona; Schoeller Arca Systems, Inc. (Plastic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 277--Western Maricopa County, Arizona; Schoeller Arca Systems, Inc. (Plastic Containers Production); Goodyear, Arizona On June 13, 2013, the Greater Maricopa...

  20. School District Administrative Costs, Regional Series, and Telecommunications. Special Study. Report to the Arizona Legislature by the Auditor General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    The Arizona Office of the Auditor General conducted a study of Arizona school district administrative costs, regional services, and telecommunications. In the area of administrative costs, the study found that larger, unified districts were more cost effective in terms of district administrative costs per student and students per administrator.…

  1. 75 FR 39244 - Arizona Public Service Company, Sequent Energy Management, L.P.; Notice of Joint Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Arizona Public Service Company, Sequent Energy Management, L.P.; Notice of... notice that on June 25, 2010, Arizona Public Service Company and Sequent Energy Management, L.P....

  2. Negotiating between Restrictive Language Policies and Complex Teaching Conditions: A Case Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinney, Erin; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how Arizona's teachers of English learners negotiate between restrictive language policies and complex teaching conditions. This case study explores how middle school teachers in an urban school district make sense of the 4-hour English language development block, Arizona's recent English-only policy. Findings indicate that…

  3. Ideologies of the Press in Regard to English Language Learners: A Case Study of Two Newspapers in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Carriedo, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The media in general and newspapers in particular have a powerful influence on the formation of public attitudes in society. This study aimed at identifying and analyzing the ideologies of two newspapers in Arizona in regard to English language learners. Using discourse analysis, 90 texts published by "The Arizona Republic" and the…

  4. 77 FR 35285 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Arizona; Attainment Plan for 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Arizona; Attainment Plan for 1997 8-Hour... approving a state implementation plan (SIP) revision submitted by the State of Arizona on June 13, 2007, to demonstrate attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) in the Phoenix...

  5. The Need for Speed: A Critical Discourse Analysis of the Reclassification of English Language Learners in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, Alisa G.; Kaplan, Suzanne E.; Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Several states, including Arizona, have enacted English-only legislation, within the past decade, impacting the schooling of students who are identified as English language learner (ELLS). As a result, ELLS in Arizona are assigned to a prescriptive program--apart from their fluent English-speaking peers--for 4 h a day, during a time "not…

  6. 77 FR 75609 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority; Foreign-Trade Zone 277; Suntech Arizona, Inc. (Solar Panel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval for Manufacturing Authority; Foreign-Trade Zone 277; Suntech Arizona, Inc. (Solar Panel Manufacturing); Goodyear, AZ Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones... requested manufacturing authority on behalf of Suntech Arizona, Inc., within FTZ 277, in Goodyear,...

  7. 77 FR 49863 - Pacific Imperial Railroad, Inc.-Change in Operator Exemption-Rail Line of San Diego and Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... San Diego and Arizona Eastern Railway Company Pacific Imperial Railroad, Inc. (PIR), a noncarrier, has... is owned by San Diego and Arizona Eastern Railway Company (SD&AE). The agreement provides for a... Line to PIR, with the consent of SD&AE, its parent, San Diego Metropolitan Transit Development Board...

  8. 78 FR 4981 - Pacific Imperial Railroad, Inc.-Change in Operator Exemption-Rail Line of San Diego and Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... San Diego and Arizona Eastern Railway Company Pacific Imperial Railroad, Inc. (PIR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to change operators from San Diego & Imperial... Diego and Arizona Eastern Railway Company (SD&AE). The change in operators for the line is being...

  9. New Flea and Tick Records for Mountain Lions in Southwestern Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Krausman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of ectoparasite ecology in wild felid populations is limited in free-ranging species and in regions such as Arizona. As part of a larger study, we collected ectoparasites from 4 radio-collared mountain lions (Puma concolor in Tucson, Arizona (32.189N -110.881E between January 2006 and December 2007. Ectoparasites were identified as Pulex, a genus of flea not commonly reported on mountain lions. The tick was a nymph of Argas (Alveonasus cooleyi, a species about which little is known.

  10. Taxing the Establishment Clause: —Revolutionary Decision of the Arizona Supreme Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G. Welner

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the nature and implications of a 1999 decision of the Arizona Supreme Court, upholding the constitutionality of a state tax credit statute. The statute offers a $500 tax credit to taxpayers who donate money to non-profit organizations which, in turn, donate the money in grants to students in order to help defray the costs of attending private and parochial schools. The author concludes that the Arizona decision elevates cleverness in devising a statutory scheme above the substance of long-established constitutional doctrine.

  11. Hydrogeology of McMullen Valley, west-central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The geohydrology of McMullen Valley, west-central Arizona, was investigated using geologic, geophysical, and hydrologic data and a numerical model of the groundwater system. Interpretation of geologic and geophysical information indicates that the main structure of McMullen Valley is a syncline that has been normal faulted on the southeast side. Basin fill that accumulated in the structural depression during late Miocene to Pleistocene time is the main aquifer and is divided into upper and lower units on the basis of lithologic information. The upper unit is a thin layer of coarse-grained sediments and generally is not saturated. The lower unit is 3,000 to 4,000 ft thick, includes a fine-grained facies in the upper 1,000 ft, and is the main source of water. The fine-grained facies is found in the southwest half of the basin and is further divided into upper and lower parts. The lower part of the fine-grained facies has: a higher percentage of silt and clay than the upper part, contains evaporites, does not yield water to wells, and separates the aquifer into shallow and deep systems. A numerical model was used to analyze the groundwater system for both steady-state and transient conditions. The transient model was used to analyze system response to pumping stress. The transient system is one of storage depletion, and water level declines are controlled by pumping and specific yield distributions. Water level declines are also influenced by hydraulic properties and areal extent of the fine-grained facies. Significant water level declines may extend to aquifer boundaries in most of the basin; in one area, impermeable boundary greatly influences declines. The location of the nearby boundary was estimated through gravity data modeling. Several hydrologic components, including hydraulic properties and areal extent of the fine-grained facies , storage properties, and aquifer boundaries, need better definition in order to develop a more accurate model of the groundwater

  12. A Long Pleistocene Paleoclimate Record from Stoneman Lake, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, P. J.; Anderson, R. S.; Brown, E. T.; Werne, J. P.; Jimenez-Moreno, G.; Toney, J. L.; Garcia, D.; Garrett, H. L.; Dunbar, N. W.

    2015-12-01

    Long continuous lake sediment cores provide enormous potential for interpreting climate change. In the American Southwest, long records are revolutionizing our understanding of megadroughts, which have occurred in the past and will most certainly occur in the future with rapidly changing climate. One site with the potential to study ancient megadroughts is Stoneman Lake, central Arizona, whose basin is a circular depression formed by a collapse in late Tertiary volcanics. The lake is spring fed, most recently alternating between a marsh and a lake, with water levels having fluctuated by > 3 meters over the last 25 years. Its small closed drainage basin (ca. 2.5 km2) with one small inflowing stream is key to the sensitivity of the record. Two parallel lacustrine sediment cores (70 m and 30 m deep) were recovered in October of 2014. Our preliminary chronology includes 8 AMS dates in the upper 7 m and two distinct tephras at 30.8 m depth and 36.3 m depth. Radiocarbon dates show a 2.7-m-thick Holocene section, and then a low Pleistocene SAR with an age of 11,000 cal yr B.P. at ~2.8 m to an age of 46,500 cal yr B.P. at 4.2 m depth. We estimate that the 70-m deep hole will provide a climate record back to ~1.3 million years ago. Of particular interest are the interglacials that serve as good analogs for future climate including MIS 11 and MIS 19. Initial core description includes MS, bulk density and high-resolution images. Holocene sediments are characterized by massive, dark organic rich silty clays with no distinct lamination. Sediments from the Last Glacial Maximum are well-laminated, light brown silty clays with few organics present. The distinctive laminations probably represent a very deep lake and therefore a wet cold climate, also verified by pollen data. There are several repeated intervals of laminated sediments deeper in the core that may represent older glacial maxima. Future work will include detailed pollen, plant macrofossil and charcoal analysis

  13. Origins of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Hartmann, William K.

    2014-11-01

    The roots of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) extend deep into the rich fabric of G. P. Kuiper’s view of the Earth as a planet and planetary systems as expected companions to most stars, as well as the post-war emergent technology of infrared detectors suitable for astronomy. These concepts and events began with Kuiper’s theoretical work at Yerkes Observatory on the origin of the Solar System, his discovery of two planetary satellites and observational work with his near-infrared spectrometer on the then-new McDonald 82-inch telescope in the mid- to late-1940s. A grant for the production of a photographic atlas of the Moon in the mid-1950s enabled him to assemble the best existing images of the Moon and acquire new photographs. This brought E. A. Whitaker and D. W. G. Arthur to Yerkes. Others who joined in the lunar work were geologist Carl S. Huzzen and grad student E. P. Moore, as well as undergrad summer students A. B. Binder and D. P. Cruikshank (both in 1958). The Atlas was published in 1959, and work began on an orthographic lunar atlas. Kuiper’s view of planetary science as an interdisciplinary enterprise encompassing astronomy, geology, and atmospheric physics inspired his vision of a research institution and an academic curriculum tuned to the combination of all the scientific disciplines embraced in a comprehensive study of the planets. Arrangements were made with the University of Arizona (UA) to establish LPL in affiliation with the widely recognized Inst. of Atmospheric Physics. Kuiper moved to the UA in late 1960, taking the lunar experts, graduate student T. C. Owen (planetary atmospheres), and associate B. M. Middlehurst along. G. van Biesbroeck also joined the migration to Tucson; Binder and Cruikshank followed along as new grad students. Astronomy grad student W. K. Hartmann came into the academic program at UA and the research group at LPL in 1961. Senior faculty affiliating with LPL in the earliest years were T. Gehrels, A. B

  14. Theoretical Evaluation of the Global and Local Electrophilicity Patterns to Characterize Hetero Diels-Alder Cycloaddition in the Synthesis of Isoxazolo[4,5-e](1,2,3,4-tetrazine)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHARMA,Pratibha; KUMAR,Ashok; SINGH,Jitendra; SAHU,Vinita

    2009-01-01

    A series of substituted dienophiles 1-10 and three 1,2-diazadienes namely D-1, D-2, D-3 were chosen to understand the reactivity and selectivity of Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The global and local electrophilicity patterns have been evaluated on a series of cycloaddition reactions to assess the reaction pathways (NDAC/IEDDAC) using the absolute scale of electrophilicity proposed by Parr et aL Regional electrophilicity at the active sites of the re-agents involved in Diels-Alder processes has been described on a quantitative basis using local or regional electro-philicity index I.e. Fukui function. Good qualitative/quantitative comparison was found between molecular energy gaps and global electronic parameters, which has been employed to assess the cycloaddition pathways successfully.

  15. Route to Renewable PET: Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Diels–Alder and Dehydrative Aromatization Reactions Between Ethylene and Biomass-Derived Furans Catalyzed by Lewis Acid Molecular Sieves

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Silica molecular sieves that have the zeolite beta topology and contain framework Lewis acid centers (e.g., Zr-β, Sn-β) are useful catalysts in the Diels–Alder and dehydrative aromatization reactions between ethylene and various renewable furans for the production of biobased terephthalic acid precursors. Here, the main side products in the synthesis of methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzene carboxylate that are obtained by reacting ethylene with methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)-furan-2-carboxylate are iden...

  16. Host plant resistance in melon (Cucumis melo L.) to sweetpotato whitefly in California and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetpotato whitefly (MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci; SPWF) feeding severely impacts fall season melon yield and quality in the lower deserts of California and Arizona. Melon accessions PI 313970 and TGR 1551 (PI 482420) have been reported to exhibit host plant resistance (HPR) to SPWF. Pot...

  17. Host plant resistance in melon to sweetpotato whitefly in California and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetpotato whitefly biotype B (MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci; SPWF) feeding severely impacts fall season melon (Cucumis melo L.) yield and quality in the lower deserts of California and Arizona. Melon accessions PI 313970 and TGR 1551 (PI 482420) have been reported to exhibit host plant r...

  18. Migrant Programs in the Southwestern States -- Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    Part of the "Comprehensive National Survey of Migrant Programs" series, this directory was prepared for use by agencies working with migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the Southwestern states of Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The directory lists programs, services, and resources available to migrants in these states.…

  19. State Education Policy Formation: The Case of Arizona's English Language Learner Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    This historical case study focuses on policy making at the state level by analyzing the development of a new policy for English language learners (ELLs) in Arizona. "New institutionalism" is used as a framework, with political culture and educational regimes acting as environmental factors affecting state policy choices. Key events occurred…

  20. 78 FR 46141 - Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality State Implementation Plans; Arizona; Regional Haze and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... NO X mean or refer to nitrogen oxides. (20) The initials NP mean or refer to National Park. (21) The...); Chemical Lime Nelson Plant (Nelson Lime Plant) Kilns 1 and 2; Arizona Public Service West Phoenix Power Plant (West Phoenix Power Plant) Combined Cycle Units 1 through 3; CalPortland Rillito Cement...