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Sample records for ischemic stroke region

  1. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  2. Identification of ischemic regions in a rat model of stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Popp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigations following stroke first of all require information about the spatio-temporal dimension of the ischemic core as well as of perilesional and remote affected tissue. Here we systematically evaluated regions differently impaired by focal ischemia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wistar rats underwent a transient 30 or 120 min suture-occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO followed by various reperfusion times (2 h, 1 d, 7 d, 30 d or a permanent MCAO (1 d survival. Brains were characterized by TTC, thionine, and immunohistochemistry using MAP2, HSP72, and HSP27. TTC staining reliably identifies the infarct core at 1 d of reperfusion after 30 min MCAO and at all investigated times following 120 min and permanent MCAO. Nissl histology denotes the infarct core from 2 h up to 30 d after transient as well as permanent MCAO. Absent and attenuated MAP2 staining clearly identifies the infarct core and perilesional affected regions at all investigated times, respectively. HSP72 denotes perilesional areas in a limited post-ischemic time (1 d. HSP27 detects perilesional and remote impaired tissue from post-ischemic day 1 on. Furthermore a simultaneous expression of HSP72 and HSP27 in perilesional neurons was revealed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: TTC and Nissl staining can be applied to designate the infarct core. MAP2, HSP72, and HSP27 are excellent markers not only to identify perilesional and remote areas but also to discriminate affected neuronal and glial populations. Moreover markers vary in their confinement to different reperfusion times. The extent and consistency of infarcts increase with prolonged occlusion of the MCA. Therefore interindividual infarct dimension should be precisely assessed by the combined use of different markers as described in this study.

  3. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fit. Learn more Survivors Just Experienced a Stroke Stroke Recovery Caregivers and Family Careliving Guide Careliving Community Stroke Support Groups Online Education Healthcare Professionals Join Us ...

  4. Migration of neural stem cells to ischemic brain regions in ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiong; Li, Shan-Quan; Qiu, Yong-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Hao; Yin, Yu-Hua; Jia, Feng; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2013-09-27

    An established rat model of ischemic stroke, produced by temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R), was used in the evaluation of organ migration of intra-arterial (IA) transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs). Immediately after transplantation, ischemic rats (n=8) transplanted with either NSCs (MCAO/R+NSC group) or NSC growth medium (MCAO/R+medium group) exhibited neurological dysfunction but rats in a sham+NSCs group (n=5) did not. During the post-operative period, neurological function improved to a similar extent in both MCAO/R groups. At 10 and 14 days post-transplantation, neurological function in the MCAO/R+NSC group was superior to that in the MCAO/R+medium group (pcells had begun differentiating into neurons and astrocytes. Rat NSCs can migrate into the ischemic region, survive, and differentiate into astrocytes and neurons, and thereby potentially improve neurologic function after cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regional brain structural abnormality in ischemic stroke patients: a voxel-based morphometry study

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    Ping Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study used regional homogeneity analysis and found that activity in some brain areas of patients with ischemic stroke changed significantly. In the current study, we examined structural changes in these brain regions by taking structural magnetic resonance imaging scans of 11 ischemic stroke patients and 15 healthy participants, and analyzing the data using voxel-based morphometry. Compared with healthy participants, patients exhibited higher gray matter density in the left inferior occipital gyrus and right anterior white matter tract. In contrast, gray matter density in the right cerebellum, left precentral gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus was less in ischemic stroke patients. The changes of gray matter density in the middle frontal gyrus were negatively associated with the clinical rating scales of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (r = -0.609, P = 0.047 and the left middle temporal gyrus was negatively correlated with the clinical rating scales of the nervous functional deficiency scale (r = -0.737, P = 0.010. Our findings can objectively identify the functional abnormality in some brain regions of ischemic stroke patients.

  6. Regional brain structural abnormality in ischemic stroke patients:a voxel-based morphometry study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Wu; Lin Chen; Lin Bai; Juan Nie; San Zhang; Yan Xiong; Yu Bai; Can-xin Yin; Fan-rong Liang; Yu-mei Zhou; Fang Zeng; Zheng-jie Li; Lu Luo; Yong-xin Li; Wei Fan; Li-hua Qiu; Wei Qin

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study used regional homogeneity analysis and found that activity in some brain areas of patients with ischemic stroke changed signiifcantly. In the current study, we examined structural changes in these brain regions by taking structural magnetic resonance imaging scans of 11 ischemic stroke patients and 15 healthy participants, and analyzing the data using voxel-based morphometry. Compared with healthy participants, patients exhibited higher gray matter density in the left inferior occipital gyrus and right anterior white matter tract. In contrast, gray matter density in the right cerebellum, left precentral gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus was less in ischemic stroke patients. The changes of gray matter density in the middle frontal gyrus were negatively associated with the clin-ical rating scales of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (r = –0.609,P = 0.047) and the left middle temporal gyrus was negatively correlated with the clinical rating scales of the nervous functional deifciency scale (r = –0.737,P = 0.010). Our ifndings can objectively identify the functional abnormality in some brain regions of ischemic stroke patients.

  7. [Implementation of a regional system for the emergency care of acute ischemic stroke: Initial results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Oliveira, Miguel; Araújo, Fernando

    2014-06-01

    Implementing integrated systems for emergency care of patients with acute ischemic stroke helps reduce morbidity and mortality. We describe the process of organizing and implementing a regional system to cover around 3.7 million people and its main initial results. We performed a descriptive analysis of the implementation process and a retrospective analysis of the following parameters: number of patients prenotified by the pre-hospital system; number of times thrombolysis was performed; door-to-needle time; and functional assessment three months after stroke. The implementation process started in November 2005 and ended in December 2009, and included 11 health centers. There were 3574 prenotifications from the prehospital system. Thrombolysis was performed in 1142 patients. The percentage of patients receiving thrombolysis rose during the study period, with a maximum of 16%. Median door-to-needle time was 62 min in 2009. Functional recovery three months after stroke was total or near total in 50% of patients. The regional system implemented for emergency care of patients with acute ischemic stroke has led to health gains, with progressive improvements in patients' access to thrombolysis, and to greater equity in the health care system, thus helping to reduce mortality from cerebrovascular disease in Portugal. Our results, which are comparable with those of international studies, support the strategy adopted for implementation of this system. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Staykov, Dimitre; Schwab, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This short review focuses on recent practically relevant studies in stroke treatment and prevention and discusses their implications on clinical practice and future research, including 3 shortly published randomized controlled trials investigating interventional treatment in acute ischemic stroke (The Interventional Management of Stroke phase III trial [IMS III], Synthesis Expansion: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Intra-Arterial Versus Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and ...

  9. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-11-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG).

  10. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Let's Talk about Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Let's Talk About Ischemic Stroke Updated:Dec 9,2015 The majority of strokes ... Should I Limit Sodium? How Do I Understand "Nutrition Facts" Labels? How Can I Quit Smoking? How ...

  12. Blood Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jickling, Glen C; Sharp, Frank R

    2011-01-01

    .... Though many candidate blood based biomarkers for ischemic stroke have been identified, none are currently used in clinical practice. With further well designed study and careful validation, the development of blood biomarkers to improve the care of patients with ischemic stroke may be achieved.

  13. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  14. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  15. Pathogenic mechanisms following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnam, Seyed Esmaeil; Winlow, William; Farzaneh, Maryam; Farbood, Yaghoob; Moghaddam, Hadi Fathi

    2017-07-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and the leading cause of disability worldwide. Brain injury following stroke results from a complex series of pathophysiological events including excitotoxicity, oxidative and nitrative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Moreover, there is a mechanistic link between brain ischemia, innate and adaptive immune cells, intracranial atherosclerosis, and also the gut microbiota in modifying the cerebral responses to ischemic insult. There are very few treatments for stroke injuries, partly owing to an incomplete understanding of the diverse cellular and molecular changes that occur following ischemic stroke and that are responsible for neuronal death. Experimental discoveries have begun to define the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in stroke injury, leading to the development of numerous agents that target various injury pathways. In the present article, we review the underlying pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and reveal the intertwined pathways that are promising therapeutic targets.

  16. [Pregnancy and acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-05-15

    Pregnancy-related ischemic strokes play an important role in both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Changes in hemostaseology and hemodynamics as well as risk factors related to or independent from pregnancy contribute to the increased stroke-risk during gestation and the puerperium. Potential teratogenic effects make diagnostics, acute therapy and prevention challenging. Because randomized, controlled trials are not available, a multicenter registry of patients with gestational stroke would be desirable. Until definite guidelines emerge, management of acute ischemic stroke during pregnancy remains individual, involving experts and weighing the risks and benefits.

  17. Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, J.; Luijckx, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decennium, thrombolytic therapy has changed the management of acute ischemic stroke. Randomized clinical studies have demonstrated that intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator improves functional outcomes. Recently the time window for intravenous thrombolysis has been

  18. Cryoglobulins in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, L. A.; Ayvazyan, V. A.; Boyajyan, A. S.

    Cryoglobulins (Cgs) are pathogenic immune complexes, non specific markers of the inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In this study we for the first time, revealed Cgs in the blood of ischemic stroke patients and analyze their composition.

  19. Swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camargo Remesso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate occurrences of swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke. METHOD: This was a retrospective study on 596 medical files. The inclusion criterion was that the patients needed to have been hospitalized with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke; the exclusion criteria were the presence of associated cardiac problems and hospital stay already more than 14 days. RESULTS: 50.5% were men and 49.5% women; mean age 65.3 years (SD=±11.7 (p<0.001. Among the risk factors, 79.4% had hypertension, 36.7% had diabetes (p<0.001 and 42.7% were smokers. 13.3% of the patients died. Swallowing disorders occurred in 19.6%, among whom 91.5% had mild difficulty and 8.5% had severe difficulty. 87.1% had spontaneous recovery after a mean of 2.4 months. A lesion in the brainstem region occurred in 6.8% (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Swallowing disorders occurred in almost 20% of the population and most of the difficulty in swallowing found was mild. The predictors for swallowing disorders were older age, diabetes mellitus and lesions in the brainstem region.

  20. Long-term survival and regeneration of neuronal and vasculature cells inside the core region after ischemic stroke in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Michael Qize; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Cao, Wenyuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Ling; Yu, Shan Ping

    2016-08-11

    Focal cerebral ischemia results in an ischemic core surrounded by the peri-infarct region (penumbra). Most research attention has been focused on penumbra while the pattern of cell fates inside the ischemic core is poorly defined. In the present investigation, we tested the hypothesis that, inside the ischemic core, some neuronal and vascular cells could survive the initial ischemic insult while regenerative niches might exist many days after stroke in the adult brain. Adult mice were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia induced by permanent occlusion of distal branches of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) plus transient ligations of bilateral common carotid artery (CCA). The ischemic insult uniformly reduced the local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) by 90%. Massive cell death occurred due to multiple mechanisms and a significant infarction was cultivated in the ischemic cortex 24 h later. Nevertheless, normal or even higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) persistently remained in the core tissue, some NeuN-positive and Glut-1/College IV-positive cells with intact ultrastructural features resided in the core 7-14 days post stroke. BrdU-positive but TUNEL-negative neuronal and endothelial cells were detected in the core where extensive extracellular matrix infrastructure developed. Meanwhile, GFAP-positive astrocytes accumulated in the penumbra and Iba-1-positive microglial/macrophages invaded the core several days after stroke. The long term survival of neuronal and vascular cells inside the ischemic core was also seen after a severe ischemic stroke induced by permanent embolic occlusion of the MCA. We demonstrate that a therapeutic intervention of pharmacological hypothermia could save neurons/endothelial cells inside the core. These data suggest that the ischemic core is an actively regulated brain region with residual and newly formed viable neuronal and vascular cells acutely and chronically after at

  1. Changes of resting cerebral activities in subacute ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to detect the difference in resting cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants, define the abnormal site, and provide new evidence for pathological mechanisms, clinical diagnosis, prognosis prediction and efficacy evaluation of ischemic stroke. At present, the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies focus on the motor dysfunction and the acute stage of ischemic stroke. This study recruited 15 right-handed ischemic stroke patients at subacute stage (15 days to 11.5 weeks and 15 age-matched healthy participants. A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan was performed on each subject to detect cerebral activity. Regional homogeneity analysis was used to investigate the difference in cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants. The results showed that the ischemic stroke patients had lower regional homogeneity in anterior cingulate and left cerebrum and higher regional homogeneity in cerebellum, left precuneus and left frontal lobe, compared with healthy participants. The experimental findings demonstrate that the areas in which regional homogeneity was different between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants are in the cerebellum, left precuneus, left triangle inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate. These locations, related to the motor, sensory and emotion areas, are likely potential targets for the neural regeneration of subacute ischemic stroke patients.

  2. Changes of resting cerebral activities in subacute ischemic stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Wu; Fang Zeng; Yong-xin Li; Bai-li Yu; Li-hua Qiu; Wei Qin; Ji Li; Yu-mei Zhou; Fan-rong Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the difference in resting cerebral activities between ischemic stroke pa-tients and healthy participants, deifne the abnormal site, and provide new evidence for pathological mechanisms, clinical diagnosis, prognosis prediction and efifcacy evaluation of ischemic stroke. At present, the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies focus on the motor dysfunc-tion and the acute stage of ischemic stroke. This study recruited 15 right-handed ischemic stroke patients at subacute stage (15 days to 11.5 weeks) and 15 age-matched healthy participants. A rest-ing-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan was performed on each subject to detect cerebral activity. Regional homogeneity analysis was used to investigate the difference in cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants. The results showed that the ischemic stroke patients had lower regional homogeneity in anterior cingulate and left cerebrum and higher regional homogeneity in cerebellum, left precuneus and left frontal lobe, compared with healthy participants. The experimental ifndings demonstrate that the areas in which regional homogeneity was different between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants are in the cerebellum, left precuneus, left triangle inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate. These locations, related to the motor, sensory and emotion areas, are likely po-tential targets for the neural regeneration of subacute ischemic stroke patients.

  3. Sex Hormones and Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Whether endogenous sex hormones are associated with ischemic stroke (IS) is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of endogenous sex hormones are associated with risk of IS in the general population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Adult men (n...

  4. Neuroprotection in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, Jacques; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus W; Elting, Jan Willem; Sulter, Geert; Vroomen, Patrick C; Luijckx, Gert Jan

    2005-01-01

    Neuroprotection of patients with acute ischemic stroke should start at the scene and continue in the ambulance with the assessment and treatment of the airway, breathing, circulation, body temperature, and blood glucose. The key goal in eligible patients should be fast vessel recanalization with int

  5. Trends and Regional Variation in Hospital Mortality, Length of Stay and Cost in Hospital of Ischemic Stroke Patients in Alberta Accompanying the Provincial Reorganization of Stroke Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohinmaa, Arto; Zheng, Yufei; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Klarenbach, Scott; Häkkinen, Unto; Nguyen, Thanh; Friesen, Dan; Ruseski, Jane; Kaul, Padma; Ariste, Ruolz; Jacobs, Philip

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the trends and regional variation of stroke hospital care in 30-day in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay (LOS), and 1-year total hospitalization cost after implementation of the Alberta Provincial Stroke Strategy. New ischemic stroke patients (N = 7632) admitted to Alberta acute care hospitals between 2006 and 2011 were followed for 1 year. We analyzed in-hospital mortality with logistic regression, LOS with negative binomial regression, and the hospital costs with generalized gamma model (log link). The risk-adjusted results were compared over years and between zones using observed/expected results. The risk-adjusted mortality rates decreased from 12.6% in 2006/2007 to 9.9% in 2010/2011. The regional variations in mortality decreased from 8.3% units in 2008/2009 to 5.6 in 2010/2011. The LOS of the first episode dropped significantly in 2010/2011 after a 4-year slight increase. The regional variation in LOS was 15.5 days in 2006/2007 and decreased to 10.9 days in 2010/2011. The 1-year hospitalization cost increased initially, and then kept on declining during the last 3 years. The South and Calgary zones had the lowest costs over the study period. However, this gap was diminishing. After implementation of the Alberta Provincial Stroke Strategy, both mortality and hospital costs demonstrated a decreasing trend during the later years of study. The LOS increased slightly during the first 4 years but had a significant drop at the last year. In general, the regional variations in all 3 indicators had a diminishing trend. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, R.R.; Borst, J.; Lucas, M.; Boers, A.M.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Roos, Y.B.; Walderveen, M.A. van; Jenniskens, S.F.M.; Zwam, W.H. van; Dippel, D.W.; Majoie, C.B.; Marquering, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to

  7. Ischemic stroke and incomplete infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Javier; Lassen, N A; Weiller, C

    1996-01-01

    The concept of selective vulnerability or selective loss o f individual neurons, with survival of glial and vascular elements as one of the consequences of a systemic ischemic-hypoxic insult (eg, transient cardiac arrest or severe hypotension), has been recognized for decades. In contrast, select......, selective neuronal death as one of the lesions that may develop in the brain after occluding an intracranial artery is an idea not readily acknowledged in the current medical literature dealing with human stroke....

  8. PTEN degradation after ischemic stroke: a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Huang, R; Chen, Z; Yan, L-J; Simpkins, J W; Yang, S-H

    2014-08-22

    Tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is highly expressed in neurons and PTEN inhibition has been reported to be neuroprotective against ischemic stroke in experimental models. On the other hand, PTEN deletion has been shown to lead to cognitive impairment. In the current study, we examined the expression and functions of PTEN in an ischemic stroke rodent model. We found rapid S-nitrosylation and degradation of PTEN after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PTEN degradation leads to activation of Akt. PTEN partial deletion or PTEN inhibition increased the expression of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) γ2 subunit and enhanced GABAA receptor current. After cerebral ischemia, increased expression of GABAAR γ2 subunit was observed in the ischemia region and the penumbra area. We also observed PTEN loss in astrocytes after cerebral ischemia. Astrocytic PTEN partial knockout increased astrocyte activation and exacerbated ischemic damage. We speculated that ischemic stroke induced neuronal PTEN degradation, hence enhanced GABAA receptor-medicated neuronal activity inhibition which could attenuate excitotoxicity and provide neuroprotection during the acute phase after stroke, while inhibiting long-term functional recovery and contributing to vascular cognitive impairment after stroke. On the other hand, ischemic stroke induced astrocytic PTEN loss and enhanced ischemic damage and astrogliosis. Taken together, our study indicates that ischemic stroke induces rapid PTEN degradation in both neurons and astrocytes which play both protective and detrimental action in a spatiotemporal- and cell-type-dependent manner. Our study provides critical insight for targeting PTEN signaling pathway for stroke treatment.

  9. Bacterial pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Fu Chen

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion: Pneumonia after acute ischemic stroke is a severe complication. Once stroke-related pneumonia develops, neurologic assessment, CURB-65 score, and shock can be used to predict the ultimate prognosis.

  10. Cost and Outcome in Pediatric Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, William; Huang, Haijuan; Seiber, Eric; Lo, Warren

    2015-10-01

    The cost of childhood stroke receives little notice. The authors examined potential drivers of cost and outcome to test whether (1) neonatal strokes cost less than childhood strokes, (2) associated diseases influence cost, (3) arterial ischemic stroke is more costly than sinovenous thrombosis, and (4) cost correlates with outcome. The authors reviewed records of 111 children who sustained arterial ischemic stroke or sinovenous thrombosis between 2005 and 2010 to identify costs for the following year. They assessed outcomes in 46 with the Recovery and Recurrence Questionnaire and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Neonatal strokes cost less than childhood stroke. Strokes associated with congenital heart disease or vasculopathy cost the most, while perinatal or idiopathic strokes cost the least. Higher costs are correlated with worse impairment and poorer quality of life. Stroke etiology significantly influences the cost of pediatric stroke. Future cost-benefit studies must consider etiology when estimating the incremental costs associated with stroke.

  11. Genetically determined coagulation disorders in ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.J. van Goor (Marie-Louise)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the research described in this thesis was to investigate the role of genetically determined coagulation disorders in ischemic stroke. We therefore performed several retrospective studies and one prospective case-control study of patients with recent ischemic stroke (the COCOS

  12. Multimodal MR examination in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzapesa, D.M.; Petruzzellis, M.; Lucivero, V.; Prontera, M.; Tinelli, A.; Sancilio, M.; Carella, A.; Federico, F. [University of Bari, Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, Bari (Italy)

    2006-04-15

    In recent years, combined diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with perfusion imaging (PI) has become an important investigational tool in the acute phase of ischemic stroke, as it may differentiate reversible from irreversible brain tissue damage. We consecutively examined 20 subjects within 12 h of stroke onset using a multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) examination consisting of DWI, mean transit time (MTT) as PI parameter, and MR angiography (MRA). T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) on day 7 were also acquired in order to obtain final infarct volume. The following MR parameters were considered: volumetric measures of lesion growth and MTT abnormalities, quantification of regional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and visual inspection of MRA findings. Our results showed: (1) an acute DWI lesion was not predictive of lesion growth and the DWI abnormality did not represent the irreversibly infarcted tissue; (2) ADC values in the ischemic penumbra could not predict tissue at risk; (3) the DWI-PI mismatch did not predict lesion growth, and the PI abnormality overestimated the amount of tissue at risk; and (4) patients with proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion had greater initial and final infarct volumes. This study did not demonstrate the prognostic value of a multimodal MR approach in early ischemic stroke; MRA alone provided predictive information about the volumetric evolution of the lesion. (orig.)

  13. The Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Stephen S

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular basis for the genetic risk of ischemic stroke is likely to be multigenic and influenced by environmental factors. Several small case-control studies have suggested associations between ischemic stroke and polymorphisms of genes that code for coagulation cascade proteins and platelet receptors. Our aim is to investigate potential associations between hemostatic gene polymorphisms and ischemic stroke, with particular emphasis on detailed characterization of the phenotype. Methods/Design The Ischemic Stroke Genetic Study is a prospective, multicenter genetic association study in adults with recent first-ever ischemic stroke confirmed with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Patients are evaluated at academic medical centers in the United States and compared with sex- and age-matched controls. Stroke subtypes are determined by central blinded adjudication using standardized, validated mechanistic and syndromic classification systems. The panel of genes to be tested for polymorphisms includes β-fibrinogen and platelet glycoprotein Ia, Iba, and IIb/IIIa. Immortalized cell lines are created to allow for time- and cost-efficient testing of additional candidate genes in the future. Discussion The study is designed to minimize survival bias and to allow for exploring associations between specific polymorphisms and individual subtypes of ischemic stroke. The data set will also permit the study of genetic determinants of stroke outcome. Having cell lines will permit testing of future candidate risk factor genes.

  14. Autonomic dysfunction in acute ischemic stroke : An underexplored therapeutic area?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, Sylvie; De Vos, Aurelie; De Keyser, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Impaired autonomic function, characterized by a predominance of sympathetic activity, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This review describes methods to measure autonomic dysfunction in stroke patients. It summarizes a potential relationship between ischemic stroke-associated

  15. Morbidity predictors in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panicker J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although ischemic CVA is one of the leading causes for death and disability, parameters for predicting long-term outcome in such patients have not been clearly delineated, especially in the Indian context. Methods: A prospective hospital-based study of 105 patients of ischemic stroke, focal neurological deficits and functional score was assessed and the C-reactive protein level (CRP was measured. A follow-up was done at 5 days and at 6 months and outcome variable was the functional status at 6 months using Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Accordingly, patients were grouped into 3 - Barthel Index < 41: Severely disabled, Barthel Index 41-60: Moderately disabled and Barthel Index > 60: Mildly disabled. Results: At admission, if upper limb power was less than Medical Research Council (MRC grade 4, or aphasia was present or CRP assay was positive, then at 6 months, these patients most likely belonged to the severely disabled group. If upper limb or lower limb power was greater than MRC grade 3 or there was no aphasia or conjugate gaze deviation or CRP assay was negative, these patients most likely belonged to the mildly disabled group at 6 months. Follow-up rate was 86%. Conclusion: Patients can be stratified according to the predicted prognosis. The treatment and rehabilitation can be properly planned and strictly adhered to in patients predicted to have worse prognosis.

  16. Modifiable risk factors for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Gianoulakis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death after cardiac disease and cancer in the developed countries. In patients older than 65 years old, ischemic stroke is one of the main causes of disability. They are also responsible for approximately 4.5 million deaths each year globally.The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the modifiable risk factors related to the development of ischemic stroke.The method οf this study included bibliographic research from both reviews and researches from literature, mainly of the last 8 years. The words used in pub med data base, referred to the modifiable risk factors related to the development of ischemic stroke.Results: In the majority of research studies, responsible risk factors for ischemic stroke are classified according to their ability of modification, in modifiable and non–modifiable risk factors. Some of the modifiable risk factors have been fully documented whereas some others need further research. The main modifiable risk factor is hypertension because on the one hand it promotes atherosclerosis and, on the other hand, leads to deteriorative changes and constrictions of small brain vessels. Atrial fibrillation is the most significant risk factor for ischemic stroke, since it is responsible for more than 50% of thromboembolic cases. Also, patients with diabetes mellitus are in higher risk for developing ischemic stroke compared to healthy population, whereas the danger is increasing in insuline-depented individuals. Increase of lipids in blood and disorders of cholesterol are responsible for atherosclerosis in coronary vessels and carotid. More in detail, carotid stenosis >50% in individuals over than 65 years old consist a significant risk factor for ischemic stroke. Though, the relation of smoking to ischemic stroke is still not fully understood, however smokers are in high risk for developing ischemic stroke for the reason that smoking is significantly related to

  17. Acute antithrombotic treatment of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderazi, Yazan J; Grotta, James C

    2014-05-01

    Antithrombotic medication is a cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke treatment and secondary prevention. The efficacy of thrombolysis with alteplase in acute stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. This safe and costeffective therapy has transformed the practice of stroke care and has led to subsequent trials of other antithrombotic medications for treatment of ischemic stroke in the acute phase. These antithrombotics include thrombolytic, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents. While, no other medication has yet demonstrated adequate efficacy, our current and evolving understanding of infarct expansion, ischemic penumbra, collateral circulation and the blood brain barrier is allowing testing of antithrombotic medications tailored to individual patient pathophysiology in clinical trials. This understanding accompanies developments in neuroimaging and organization of stroke care that allow for wide-spread recruitment in these trials. Alteplase remains the mainstay treatment of arterial acute ischemic stroke; however, anticoagulation is the standard therapy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Antithrombotic use in acute stroke, arterial and venous, has demonstrated efficacy but leaves many questions unanswered. This patient population is a fertile ground for novel research, especially as it relates to; combination antithrombotic therapy, combination of pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis, and the transition to secondary prevention. Here we review the current antithrombotics in the acute phase of ischemic stroke highlighting the evidence-base and areas of uncertainty.

  18. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Schnohr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that low plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with increased risk of symptomatic ischemic stroke in the general population. METHODS: We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10,170 individuals from the general population, the Copenhagen...... City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events. RESULTS: Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations...... were associated with stepwise increasing risk of ischemic stroke both as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories and as a function of clinical categories of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p for trend ≤ 2 × 10(-3) ). In a Cox regression model comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D...

  19. Paradoxical centrally increased diffusivity in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stence, Nicholas V.; Mirsky, David M.; Deoni, Sean C.L. [University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Armstrong-Wells, Jennifer [University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) and OB/GYN, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Restricted diffusion on acute MRI is the diagnostic standard for perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. In a subset of children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke, primarily those with large infarct volumes, we noted a core of centrally increased diffusivity with a periphery of restricted diffusion. Given the paradoxical diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) appearance observed in some children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke, we sought to determine its significance and hypothesized that: (1) centrally increased diffusivity is associated with larger infarcts in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke and (2) this tissue is irreversibly injured (infarcted). We reviewed all perinatal arterial ischemic stroke cases in a prospective cohort study from Aug. 1, 2000, to Jan. 1, 2012. Infarct volumes were measured by drawing regions of interest around the periphery of the area of restricted diffusion on DWI. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare means between groups. Of 25 eligible cases, centrally increased diffusivity was seen in 4 (16%). Cases with centrally increased diffusivity had larger average infarct volumes (mean 117,182 mm{sup 3} vs. 36,995 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.008), higher average apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the infarct core (1,679 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 611 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s, P < 0.0001), and higher ADC ratio (1.2 vs. 0.5, P < 0.0001). At last clinical follow-up, children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke and centrally increased diffusivity were more often treated for ongoing seizures (75% vs. 0%; P < 0.001) than those without. Centrally increased diffusivity was associated with larger stroke volume and the involved tissue was confirmed to be infarcted on follow-up imaging. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual appearance of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke in order to avoid underestimating infarct volume or making an incorrect early diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Critical care in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, M; Jacobs, T; Morgenstern, L

    2017-01-01

    Most ischemic strokes are managed on the ward or on designated stroke units. A significant proportion of patients with ischemic stroke require more specialized care. Several studies have shown improved outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke when neurocritical care services are available. Features of acute ischemic stroke patients requiring intensive care unit-level care include airway or respiratory compromise; large cerebral or cerebellar hemisphere infarction with swelling; infarction with symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation; infarction complicated by seizures; and a large proportion of patients require close management of blood pressure after thrombolytics. In this chapter, we discuss aspects of acute ischemic stroke care that are of particular relevance to a neurointensivist, covering neuropathology, neurodiagnostics and imaging, blood pressure management, glycemic control, temperature management, and the selection and timing of antithrombotics. We also focus on the care of patients who have received intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Complex clinical decision making in decompressive hemicraniectomy for hemispheric infarction and urgent management of basilar artery thrombosis are specifically addressed. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Anticoagulant Therapy In Ischemic Stroke Or TIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Mehrvar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death  . Anticoagulants   have been used to treat patients with acute ischemic stroke for many years. Despite their widespread use, the usefulness of emergency anticoagulation is a subject of debate. Disagreements exist about the best agent to administer, the route of administration, the use of a bolus dose to start treatment, the level of anticoagulation required, and the duration of treatment. There are 2 types of anticoagulants: Parenteral and oral. Heparin is an anticoagulant that used parenteral. Oral anticoagulants are including Warfarin and new anticoagulants such as Dabigatrn,Rivaroxaban ,Apixaban and other newer drugs. In patients with noncardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA antiplatelet agents are treatment of choice and preferred to anticoagulants. In cardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA with high risk of reembolization  anticoagulants  are considered as preferred treatment.  Warfarin, apixaban10mg/d ,Rivaroxaban20mg/d, and dabigatran 150 mg/d are all indicated for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with nonvalvular AF, whether paroxysmal or permanent.Also anticoagulant therapy is recommended for ischemic stroke or TIA patients in the setting of acute MI, atrial or ventricular thrombosis or dilated and restricted cardiomyopathy. Some valvular heart diseases are other indication for anticoagulant therapy in ischemic stroke or TIA patients. Ischemic  Stroke or TIA in patients with Cerebral vein thrombosis and  known hypercoagulable state specially anti phospholipid antibody syndrome are other indications for anticoagulant treatment.

  2. Atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Frost, Lars; Eagle, Kim A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation among patients with stroke is not fully clarified. We compared patient characteristics, including severity of stroke and comorbidity, quality of in-hospital care...... and outcomes in a cohort of first-time ischemic stroke patients with and without atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Based on linkage of public medical databases, we did a population-based follow-up study among 3,849 stroke patients from the County of Aarhus, Denmark admitted in the period of 2003......-2007 and prospectively registered in the Danish National Indicator Project. RESULTS: Atrial fibrillation was associated with an adverse prognostic profile but not with an overall poorer quality of in-hospital care. Patients with atrial fibrillation had a longer total length of stay (median: 15 vs 9 days), and were...

  3. Etiologic Ischemic Stroke Phenotypes in the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D.; Chapman, Sherita N.; Cole, John W.; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P.; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Labovitz, Daniel L.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S.; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of etiologic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Methods Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major etiologic groups without weighting towards the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16,954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded re-adjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. Results The distribution of etiologic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (pstroke etiology (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (kappa 0.72, 95%CI:0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (kappa 0.73, 95%CI:0.70-0.75). Conclusions This study demonstrates that etiologic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a stroke patient does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. PMID:25378430

  4. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  5. Pediatric ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Mohandas, Surath

    2014-10-01

    Dengue infection is an important arboviral infection in southeast Asia, especially in India. Neurological manifestations of dengue are increasingly recognized. We report an ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis in an 8-year-old child. We present a girl with a short febrile illness followed by episodic severe headache, with gradually progressive hemiparesis and visual impairment. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple infarctions in the anterior and posterior circulation. The magnetic resonance angiogram revealed irregular narrowing of bilateral middle cerebral arteries, right anterior cerebral artery, left posterior cerebral, and bilateral vertebral arteries suggestive of vasculitis. Her dengue serology was strongly positive for immunoglobulin M with 68.9 panbio units. The rest of the evaluation for pediatric stroke was unremarkable. She was treated with intravenous followed by oral corticosteroids and recovered totally with resolution of vasculitis on magnetic resonance angiogram over the next 3 months. This child illustrates possible immune-mediated vasculitis caused by dengue infection which is rather a rare presentation in a child who subsequently recovered well. One should consider dengue in childhood strokes in endemic regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stroke intervention: catheter-based therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher J; Abou-Chebl, Alex; Cates, Christopher U; Levy, Elad I; McMullan, Paul W; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Weinberger, Jesse M; Wholey, Mark H

    2011-07-05

    The majority (>80%) of the three-quarters of a million strokes that will occur in the United States this year are ischemic in nature. The treatment of acute ischemic stroke is very similar to acute myocardial infarction, which requires timely reperfusion therapy for optimal results. The majority of patients with acute ischemic stroke do not receive any form of reperfusion therapy, unlike patients with acute myocardial infarction. Improving outcomes for acute stroke will require patient education to encourage early presentation, an aggressive expansion of qualified hospitals, and willing providers and early imaging strategies to match patients with their best options for reperfusion therapy to minimize complications. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Thrombophilia And Arterial Ischemic Stroke

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    A.A. Abrishamizadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS is a common cause of morbidity and mortality with significant socioeconomic impact especially when it affects young patients. Compared to the older adults, the incidence, risk factors, and etiology are distinctly different in younger IS. Hypercoagulable states are relatively more commonly detected in younger IS patients. Thrombophilic states are disorders of hemostatic mechanisms that result in a predisposition to thrombosis .Thrombophilia is an established cause of venous thrombosis. Therefore, it is tempting to assume that these disorders might have a similar relationship with arterial thrombosis. Despite this fact that 1-4 % of ischemic strokes are attributed to Thrombophillia, this   alone rarely causes arterial occlusions .Even in individuals with a positive thrombophilia screen and arterial thrombosis, the former might not be the primary etiological factor. Thrombophilic   disorders can be broadly divided into inherited or acquired conditions. Inherited thrombophilic states include deficiencies of natural anticoagulants such as protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III (AT III deficiency, polymorphisms causing resistance to activated protein C(Factor V Leiden mutation, and disturbance in the clotting balance (prothrombin gene 20210G/A variant. Of all the inherited  thrombophilic disorders, Factor V Leiden mutation is perhaps the commonest cause. On the contrary, acquired thrombophilic disorders are more common and include conditions such as the antiphospholipid syndrome, associated with lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. The more useful and practical approach of ordering various diagnostic tests for the uncommon thrombophilic states tests should be determined by a detailed clinical history, physical examination, imaging studies and evaluating whether an underlying hypercoagulable state appears more likely. The laboratory thrombophilia   screening should be comprehensive and avoid missing the

  8. Angiogenesis-regulating microRNAs and Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke-Jie; Hamblin, Milton; Chen, Y Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Ischemic stroke is the dominant subtype of stroke and results from focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of major cerebral arteries. Thus, the restoration or improvement of reduced regional cerebral blood supply in a timely manner is very critical for improving stroke outcomes and poststroke functional recovery. The recovery from ischemic stroke largely relies on appropriate restoration of blood flow via angiogenesis. Newly formed vessels would allow increased cerebral blood flow, thus increasing the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to affected brain tissue. Angiogenesis is strictly controlled by many key angiogenic factors in the central nervous system, and these molecules have been well-documented to play an important role in the development of angiogenesis in response to various pathological conditions. Promoting angiogenesis via various approaches that target angiogenic factors appears to be a useful treatment for experimental ischemic stroke. Most recently, microRNAs (miRs) have been identified as negative regulators of gene expression in a post-transcriptional manner. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that miRs are essential determinants of vascular endothelial cell biology/angiogenesis as well as contributors to stroke pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the knowledge of stroke-associated angiogenic modulators, as well as the role and molecular mechanisms of stroke-associated miRs with a focus on angiogenesis-regulating miRs. Moreover, we further discuss their potential impact on miR-based therapeutics in stroke through targeting and enhancing post-ischemic angiogenesis.

  9. Polymorphisms in apolipoprotein B and risk of ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown.......Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown....

  10. [Nonfasting triglycerides and risk of ischemic stroke--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, J.J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    The role of triglycerides in the risk of ischemic stroke remains controversial. We tested the hypothesis that increased levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with ischemic stroke in the general population. Men with a nonfasting triglyceride level 5 mmol/l had a multivariable, adjusted...... hazard ratio for ischemic stroke of 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.3-4.8) compared with men with a nonfasting triglyceride level triglycerides is associated with risk of ischemic stroke Udgivelsesdato...

  11. Cerebrovascular arteriopathy (arteriosclerosis) and ischemic childhood stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, S R; Bates, S; Lukin, R R; Benton, C; Third, J; Glueck, C J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the intracranial cerebrovascular abnormalities and clinical status of 8 children who had familial lipoprotein disorders and evidence of thromboembolic cerebrovascular disease. Six of the 8 children had low levels of plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, two had high triglyceride levels, and all came from kindreds characterized by familial lipoprotein abnormalities and premature cardio- and/or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis. Vascular occlusion, irregularities of the arterial lumen, beading, tortuosity, and evidence of collateralization were consistently noted. We speculate that cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis in pediatric ischemic stroke victims who have familial lipoprotein abnormalities may be related to lipoprotein-mediated endothelial damage and thrombosis formation, or to the failure to restore endothelial cells' integrity following damage. The apparent association of lipoproteins and strokes in children and their families merits further exploration, particularly when assessing cerebral angiograms in pediatric ischemic stroke victims. In children with unexplained ischemic cerebrovascular accidents, the diagnostic possibility of occlusive arteriosclerosis with thrombosis must be entertained.

  12. A polymorphism in the promoter region of the survivin gene is related to hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallolas, Judith; Rodríguez, Rocío; Gubern, Carme; Camós, Susanna; Serena, Joaquín; Castellanos, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) of cerebral infarction is a common and serious occurrence following acute ischemic stroke. The expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, has been shown to increase after cerebral ischemia. This protein has been mainly located at the microvasculature within the infarcted and peri-infarcted area, so we aimed to investigate whether survivin gene polymorphisms, also known as BIRC5 gene, were associated with HT of cerebral infarction. Polymorphism screening of the BIRC5 gene was performed in 107 patients with a hemispheric ischemic stroke and 93 controls by polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing analysis. Genotype-phenotype correlation was performed in patients. MRI was carried out within 12 h of symptoms onset and at 72 ± 12 h. The presence of HT was determined on the second DWI sequence and classified according to ECASS II criteria. MMP-9 levels were analyzed at admission. Forty-nine patients (45.8%) had HT. The -241 C/T (rs17878467) polymorphism was identified in the promoter region of the survivin gene. The prevalence of the mutant allele (T) was similar in patients and controls (14 vs. 16%, respectively; P = 0.37). However, 9 (29%) patients with allele T had HT compared to 40 (52.6%) of wild-type (P = 0.021). Logistic regression analysis showed that the polymorphism was associated with a lower risk of HT (OR 0.16; 95% CI 0.04-0.65; P = 0.01). The -241 C/T polymorphism in the promoter region of the survivin gene is associated with a lower risk of HT in patients with ischemic stroke. It has recently been reported that the -241 C/T polymorphism increases survivin promoter activity, reinforcing the hypothesis that patients with the mutant allele may have increased survivin expression in the brain. Different mechanisms, including BBB protection by the inhibition or activation of different angiogenic growth factors and the inhibition of apoptosis during

  13. By Improving Regional Cortical Blood Flow, Attenuating Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Sequential Apoptosis Galangin Acts as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent after Acute Ischemic Stroke

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    Ming Cheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a devastating disease with a complex pathophysiology. Galangin is a natural flavonoid isolated from the rhizome of Alpina officinarum Hance, which has been widely used as an antioxidant agent. However, its effects against ischemic stroke have not been reported and its related neuroprotective mechanism has not really been explored. In this study, neurological behavior, cerebral infarct volumes and the improvement of the regional cortical blood flow (rCBF were used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of galangin in rats impaired by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO-induced focal cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, the determination of mitochondrial function and Western blot of apoptosis-related proteins were performed to interpret the neuroprotective mechanism of galangin. The results showed that galangin alleviated the neurologic impairments, reduced cerebral infarct at 24 h after MCAO and exerted a protective effect on the mitochondria with decreased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS. These effects were consistent with improvements in the membrane potential level (Dym, membrane fluidity, and degree of mitochondrial swelling in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, galangin significantly improved the reduced rCBF after MCAO. Western blot analysis revealed that galangin also inhibited apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner concomitant with the up-regulation of Bcl-2 expression, down-regulation of Bax expression and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, a reduction in cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol, the reduced expression of activated caspase-3 and the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. All these data in this study demonstrated that galangin might have therapeutic potential for ischemic stroke and play its protective role through the improvement in rCBF, mitochondrial protection and inhibiting caspase-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway for the first time.

  14. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: therapeutic approaches

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    Kirchgessner Annette

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death in industrialized countries and the most frequent cause of permanent disability in adults worldwide. Despite advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, therapeutic options remain limited. Only recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rt-PA for thrombolysis is currently approved for use in the treatment of this devastating disease. However, its use is limited by its short therapeutic window (three hours, complications derived essentially from the risk of hemorrhage, and the potential damage from reperfusion/ischemic injury. Two important pathophysiological mechanisms involved during ischemic stroke are oxidative stress and inflammation. Brain tissue is not well equipped with antioxidant defenses, so reactive oxygen species and other free radicals/oxidants, released by inflammatory cells, threaten tissue viability in the vicinity of the ischemic core. This review will discuss the molecular aspects of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischemic stroke and potential therapeutic strategies that target neuroinflammation and the innate immune system. Currently, little is known about endogenous counterregulatory immune mechanisms. However, recent studies showing that regulatory T cells are major cerebroprotective immunomodulators after stroke suggest that targeting the endogenous adaptive immune response may offer novel promising neuroprotectant therapies.

  15. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

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    Robert Perna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic (n=172 or hemorrhagic stroke (n=112 within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program. Participants completed three months of postacute neurorehabilitation and the Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4 at admission and discharge. Admission MPAI-4 scores and level of functioning were comparable. Results. Group ANOVA comparisons show no significant group differences at admission or discharge or difference in change scores. Both groups showed considerably reduced levels of productivity/employment after discharge as compared to preinjury levels. Conclusions. Though the pathophysiology of these types of strokes is different, both ultimately result in ischemic injuries, possibly accounting for lack of findings of differences between groups. In the present study, participants in both groups experienced similar functional levels across all three MPAI-4 domains both at admission and discharge. Limitations of this study include a highly educated sample and few outcome measures.

  17. Genetics of ischemic stroke: Indian perspective

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    Subhash Kaul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A stroke is still a major cause of long-term disability and the third largest killer in the world after heart attack and cancer. Inherited genetic variation has been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis and therefore, there is a need to identify the culprit genetic variants. They may provide novel targets for preventive therapeutics. The most intensively investigated candidate gene is PDE4D. There are several positive replication studies of PDE4D gene with stroke. The genetic contribution to ischemic stroke risk in India has not been explored adequately. Reports on few candidate genes are available but we are still lagging behind in this aspect. Most of the reports are from Andhra Pradesh, a province in south India and a few parts of north India. PDE4D has been identified as a predisposition gene for ischemic stroke in Southern as well as the Northern population of India.

  18. Stem Cell Therapies in Ischemic Stroke

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    Birsen Ince

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have been a great interest in the treatment of neurological diseases. However, technical and ethical issues are still not resolved. Despite all difficulties, there has been a great effort for the translation of knowledge from animal studies to human stroke. To establish standardized protocols, guidelines have been published for the preclinical and clinical stem cell studies. This review summarizes the stem cells applications in patients with ischemic stroke in recent years.

  19. Blood Pressure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is present in up to 84% of patients presenting with acute stroke, and a smaller proportion of patients have blood pressures that are below typical values in the context of cerebral ischemia. Outcomes are generally worse in those who present with either low or severely elevated blood pressure. Several studies have provided valuable information about malignant trends in blood pressure during the transition from the acute to the subacute phase of stroke. It is not uncommon for practitioners in clinical practice to identify what appear to be pressure-dependent neurologic deficits. Despite physiologic and clinical data suggesting the importance of blood pressure modulation to support cerebral blood flow to ischemic tissue, randomized controlled trials have not yielded robust evidence for this in acute ischemic stroke. We highlight previous studies involving acute-stroke patients that have defined trends in blood pressure and that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of blood-pressure modulation in acute ischemic stroke. This overview reports the current status of this topic from the perspective of a stroke neurologist and provides a framework for future research. PMID:26833984

  20. Ischemic stroke susceptibility gene in a Northern Han Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiping Wang; Shujuan Shi; Wenjing Yan; Yan Song; Jingjing Zhan; Chen Zhang; Haiji Wang

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-18 gene promoter polymorphisms are potential risk factors for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, and the-607C al ele may increase ischemic stroke risk in the Han Chinese population. In the present study, we recruited 291 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease from the Affi-liated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical Col ege, China, and 226 healthy controls. Both pa-tients and controls were from the Han population in northern China. Immunoresonance scattering assays detected increased serum amyloid A protein, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-18 levels in ischemic cerebrovascular disease patients compared with healthy controls. Analysis of the-607C/A (rs1946518) polymorphism in the interleukin-18 gene promoter showed ischemic cerebrovascular disease patients exhibited increased frequencies of the CC genotype and C al eles than healthy controls. Genotype and al ele frequencies of the interleukin-18-137G/C (rs187238) polymorphism and the-13T/C (rs11024595) polymorphism in the 5'-flanking region of serum amyloid A, showed no significant difference between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis on the interleukin-18 promoter A/C genetic locus, for correction of age, gender, history of smoking, hyper-tension, diabetes mel itus, hypercholesteremia, and an ischemic stroke family history, showed ischemic cerebrovascular disease risk in individuals without the A al ele (C homozygotes) was 2.2-fold greater than in A al ele carriers. Overal , our findings suggest that the-13T/C (rs11024595) polymorphism in the 5′-flanking region of serum amyloid A has no correlation with ischemic cere-brovascular disease, but the C al ele of the-607C/A (rs1946518) polymorphism in the interleukin-18 promoter is a high-risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the Han population of northern China. In addition, the A al ele is likely a protective gene for ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

  1. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph R E G Geuskens

    Full Text Available CT perfusion (CTP is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up.This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0. Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBV<2.0 ml/100g and infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT regions. False discovery ratio (FDR, defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests.Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml; median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml. Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%. Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289% and 342% (IQR:249%-432% for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43-1.79 ml/100g (P<0.01 and 1.38 (IQR:1.15-1.49 ml/100g (P<0.01 for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly.For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core is misclassified. CTP parameters significantly

  2. CT imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.

    2016-01-01

    Time is of the essence when treating acute ischemic stroke, to limit the damage caused. One form of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) used in such cases is the mechanical removal of the blood clot using stent-retrievers. It is thought that patient selection for IAT requires improvement and that CT

  3. Ischemic Stroke during Pregnancy and Puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Del Zotto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke during pregnancy and puerperium represents a rare occurrence but it could be a serious and stressful event for mothers, infants, and also families. Whenever it does occur, many concerns arise about the safety of the mother and the fetus in relation to common diagnostic tests and therapies leading to a more conservative approach. The physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system and in the coagulability that accompany the pregnant state, which are more significant around delivery and in the postpartum period, likely contribute to increasing the risk of an ischemic stroke. Most of the causes of an ischemic stroke in the young may also occur in pregnant patients. Despite this, there are specific conditions related to pregnancy which may be considered when assessing this particular group of patients such as pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, choriocarcinoma, peripartum cardiomiopathy, amniotic fluid embolization, and postpartum cerebral angiopathy. This article will consider several questions related to pregnancy-associated ischemic stroke, dwelling on epidemiological and specific etiological aspects, diagnostic issue concerning the use of neuroimaging, and the related potential risks to the embryo and fetus. Therapeutic issues surrounding the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelets agents will be discussed along with the few available reports regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy during pregnancy.

  4. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison with the NIHSS and the GCS. ... comes; In-hospital or 30 days mortality and Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 ..... 8. Bamford J, Sandercock P, Dennis M, Burn J, Warlow C.

  5. Ischemic stroke in young adults: an overview of etiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Iuji Yamamoto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke affects mainly people aged over 65 years, and atherosclerosis predominates as the main etiopathogenic factor in ischemic stroke (IS. On the other hand, cardiac embolism and arterial dissection are the most frequent causes of IS in patients aged less than 45 years. However, inappropriate control of traditional vascular risk factors in young people may be causing a significant increase of atherosclerosis-related IS in this population. Furthermore, a variety of etiologies, many of them uncommon, must be investigated. In endemic regions, neurocysticercosis and Chagas' disease deserve consideration. Undetermined cause has been still reported in as many as one third of young stroke patients.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Tosun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ischemic stroke and to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment. METHODS: Overnight polysomnography was performed by a computerized system in 19 subjects with ischemic stroke. Patients with an apnea-hypopnea index > 5 were considered to have obstructive sleep apnea. The appropriate level of continuous positive airway pressure for each patient was determined during an all-night continuous positive airway pressure determination study. Attended continuous positive airway pressure titration was performed with a continuous positive airway pressure auto-titrating device. RESULTS: Obstructive sleep apnea prevalence among patients with ischemic stroke was 73.7%. The minimum SaO2 was significantly lower, and the percent of total sleep time in the wake stage and stage 1 sleep was significantly longer in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. In two patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea, we observed a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index, an increase in mean wake time, mean SaO2, and minimum SaO2, and alterations in sleep structures with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. CONCLUSION: As the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is of particular importance in secondary stroke prevention, we suggest that the clinical assessment of obstructive sleep apnea be part of the evaluation of stroke patients in rehabilitation units, and early treatment should be started.

  7. The effects of estrogen in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koellhoffer, Edward C; McCullough, Louise D

    2013-08-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and the most common cause of long-term disability in the USA. Women have a lower incidence of stroke compared with men throughout most of the lifespan which has been ascribed to protective effects of gonadal steroids, most notably estrogen. Due to the lower stroke incidence observed in pre-menopausal women and robust preclinical evidence of neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of estrogen, researchers have focused on the potential benefits of hormones to reduce ischemic brain injury. However, as women age, they are disproportionately affected by stroke, coincident with the loss of estrogen with menopause. The risk of stroke in elderly women exceeds that of men and it is clear that in some settings estrogen can have pro-inflammatory effects. This review will focus on estrogen and inflammation and its interaction with aging.

  8. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  9. Promoting thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Maaike; Niessen, Louis W; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Koudstaal, Peter J; Franke, Cees L; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Huijsman, Robbert; Lingsma, Hester F; Minkman, Mirella M N; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2011-05-01

    Thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but the number of treatable patients is limited. The PRomoting ACute Thrombolysis in Ischemic StrokE (PRACTISE) trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multidimensional implementation strategy for thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke. The PRACTISE trial was a national multicenter cluster-randomized controlled trial with randomization after pairwise matching. Twelve hospitals, both urban and community, academic and nonacademic, in the Netherlands participated. All patients admitted with stroke within 24 hours from onset of symptoms were registered. The intervention included 5 implementation meetings based on the Breakthrough Series model. The primary outcome was treatment with thrombolysis. Secondary outcomes were admission within 4 hours after onset of symptoms, death or disability at 3 months, and quality of life. Overall 5515 patients were included in the study' 308 patients (12.2%) in the control centers and 393 patients (13.1%) in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis (adjusted OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.68). Among the 1657 patients with ischemic stroke admitted within 4 hours from onset, 391 (44.5%) of 880 in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis and 305 (39.3%) of 777 in the control centers; the adjusted OR for treatment with thrombolysis was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.27). An intensive implementation strategy increases the proportion of patients with acute stroke treated with thrombolysis in real-life settings. An apparently pivotal factor in the improvement of the treatment rate is better application of contraindications for thrombolysis.

  10. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ching-Chih [Community Medicine Research Center and Institute of Public Health, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Tumor Center, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Su, Yu-Chieh [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Tumor Center, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Ho, Hsu-Chueh [Department of Otolaryngology, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Tumor Center, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Tumor Center, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Wen-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Tumor Center, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pesus [Community Medicine Research Center and Institute of Public Health, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yung-Sung, E-mail: enttcd@hotmail.com [Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ye Zhang, Hong Deng, Chao Pan, Yang Hu, Qian Wu, Na Liu, Zhouping Tang Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Stroke is a clinical disease with high incidence, high disability rate, and high mortality. But effective and safe therapy for stroke remains limited. Adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs perform a variety of therapeutic functions. MSC delivery improves neurological outcomes in ischemic stroke models via neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects such as angiogenic effects, promoting endogenous proliferation, and reducing apoptosis and inflammation. MSC secretome also showed powerful therapeutic effects as a cell-based therapy in animal experiments. Several clinical trials on MSC implantation via different routes have now been completed in patients with stroke. Although challenges such as immunogenicity of allo-MSCs and large-scale production strategies need to be overcome, MSCs can be considered as a promising potential therapy for ischemic stroke. Keywords: mesenchymal stromal cell, stroke, therapy, transplantation, exosomes

  12. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Gene Variants Associated With Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, May M.; O’Meara, Ellen S.; Rowland, Charles M.; Shiffman, Dov; Bare, Lance A.; Arellano, Andre R.; Longstreth, W.T.; Lumley, Thomas; Rice, Kenneth; Tracy, Russell P.; Devlin, James J.; Psaty, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which had been associated with coronary heart disease, are associated with incident ischemic stroke. Methods Based on antecedent studies of coronary heart disease, we prespecified the risk allele for each of the 74 SNPs. We used Cox proportional hazards models that adjusted for traditional risk factors to estimate the associations of these SNPs with incident ischemic stroke during 14 years of follow-up in a population-based study of older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). Results In white CHS participants, the prespecified risk alleles of 7 of the 74 SNPs (in HPS1, ITGAE, ABCG2, MYH15, FSTL4, CALM1, and BAT2) were nominally associated with increased risk of stroke (one-sided PDMXL2, and ABCG2) were nominally associated with stroke (one-sided P<0.05, false discovery rate=0.55). The Val12Met SNP in ABCG2 was associated with stroke in both white (hazard ratio, 1.46; 90% CI, 1.05 to 2.03) and black (hazard ratio, 3.59; 90% CI, 1.11 to 11.6) participants of CHS. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the 10-year cumulative incidence of stroke were greater among Val allele homozygotes than among Met allele carriers in both white (10% versus 6%) and black (12% versus 3%) participants of CHS. Conclusions The Val12Met SNP in ABCG2 (encoding a transporter of sterols and xenobiotics) was associated with incident ischemic stroke in white and black participants of CHS. PMID:19023099

  14. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; O’Donnell, Martin J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lang, Eddy S.; Nguyen-Huynh, Mai N.; Schwartz, Neil E.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Schulman, Sam; Vandvik, Per Olav; Spencer, Frederick A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article provides recommendations on the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We generated treatment recommendations (Grade 1) and suggestions (Grade 2) based on high (A), moderate (B), and low (C) quality evidence. Results: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, we recommend IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) if treatment can be initiated within 3 h (Grade 1A) or 4.5 h (Grade 2C) of symptom onset; we suggest intraarterial r-tPA in patients ineligible for IV tPA if treatment can be initiated within 6 h (Grade 2C); we suggest against the use of mechanical thrombectomy (Grade 2C) although carefully selected patients may choose this intervention; and we recommend early aspirin therapy at a dose of 160 to 325 mg (Grade 1A). In patients with acute stroke and restricted mobility, we suggest the use of prophylactic-dose heparin or intermittent pneumatic compression devices (Grade 2B) and suggest against the use of elastic compression stockings (Grade 2B). In patients with a history of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA, we recommend long-term treatment with aspirin (75-100 mg once daily), clopidogrel (75 mg once daily), aspirin/extended release dipyridamole (25 mg/200 mg bid), or cilostazol (100 mg bid) over no antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1A), oral anticoagulants (Grade 1B), the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin (Grade 1B), or triflusal (Grade 2B). Of the recommended antiplatelet regimens, we suggest clopidogrel or aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole over aspirin (Grade 2B) or cilostazol (Grade 2C). In patients with a history of stroke or TIA and atrial fibrillation we recommend oral anticoagulation over no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (Grade 1B). Conclusions: These recommendations can help clinicians make evidence-based treatment decisions with their patients who have had strokes. PMID:22315273

  16. Plasma biomarkers in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Hee; Kang, So Young; Kim, Myung Chun; Lee, Woo In

    2010-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis and timely treatment improves the outcome in patients with ischemic stroke, but a rapid and sensitive blood test for ischemic stroke does not exist. This study tested whether a panel of biomarkers might be useful in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke presenting to the emergency department of a university hospital in Korea were enrolled. Plasma specimens were assayed for brain natriuretic peptide, D-dimer, matrix metalloproteinase-9, S100β, and a proprietary composite multimarker index (MMX). There were 139 patients in this study, 89 of whom were diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke, 11 with acute cerebral hemorrhage, and 39 with other brain disorders. The MMX value was significantly higher in the patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison to 57 healthy controls (p acute ischemic stroke vs those with acute cerebral hemorrhage (p = 0.884). The discriminatory capacity of MMX was modest, with an area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.714 for acute stroke. Ischemic stroke was not diagnosed by any of the biochemical markers individually. Although the data suggest that MMX may be helpful to diagnose an acute stroke, it does not discriminate between acute ischemic stroke and acute hemorrhagic stroke.

  17. Acupuncture regulates the glucose metabolism in cerebral functional regions in chronic stage ischemic stroke patients---a PET-CT cerebral functional imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acupuncture has been applied to aid in the recovery of post-stroke patients, but its mechanism is unclear. This study aims to analyze the relationship between acupuncture and glucose metabolism in cerebral functional regions in post-stroke patients using 18 FDG PET-CT techniques. Forty-three ischemic stroke patients were randomly divided into 5 groups: the Waiguan (TE5 needling group, the TE5 sham needling group, the sham point needling group, the sham point sham needling group and the non-needling group. Cerebral functional images of all patients were then acquired using PET-CT scans and processed by SPM2 software. Results Compared with the non-needling group, sham needling at TE5 and needling/sham needling at the sham point did not activate cerebral areas. However, needling at TE5 resulted in the activation of Brodmann Area (BA 30. Needling/sham needling at TE5 and needling at the sham point did not deactivate any cerebral areas, whereas sham needling at the sham point led to deactivation in BA6. Compared with sham needling at TE5, needling at TE5 activated BA13, 19 and 47 and did not deactivate any areas. Compared with needling at the sham point, needling at TE5 had no associated activation but a deactivating effect on BA9. Conclusion Needling at TE5 had a regulating effect on cerebral functional areas shown by PET-CT, and this may relate to its impact on the recovery of post-stroke patients.

  18. Risk factors for ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack in patients under age 50

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.W.M.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Janssen, M.C.H.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) in young adults under the age of 50. To make recommendations for additional research and practical consequences. From 97 patients with ischemic stroke or TIA under the age of 50, classical cardiovascular risk factors, co

  19. Green space and mortality following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilker, Elissa H; Wu, Chih-Da; McNeely, Eileen; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Spengler, John; Wellenius, Gregory A; Mittleman, Murray A

    2014-08-01

    Residential proximity to green space has been associated with physical and mental health benefits, but whether green space is associated with post-stroke survival has not been studied. Patients ≥ 21 years of age admitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) between 1999 and 2008 with acute ischemic stroke were identified. Demographics, presenting symptoms, medical history and imaging results were abstracted from medical records at the time of hospitalization for stroke onset. Addresses were linked to average Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, distance to roadways with more than 10,000 cars/day, and US census block group. Deaths were identified through June 2012 using the Social Security Death Index. There were 929 deaths among 1645 patients with complete data (median follow up: 5 years). In multivariable Cox models adjusted for indicators of medical history, demographic and socioeconomic factors, the hazard ratio for patients living in locations in the highest quartile of green space compared to the lowest quartile was 0.78 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.63-0.97) (p-trend = 0.009). This association remained statistically significant after adjustment for residential proximity to a high traffic road. Residential proximity to green space is associated with higher survival rates after ischemic stroke in multivariable adjusted models. Further work is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for this association, and to better understand the exposure-response relationships and susceptibility factors that may contribute to higher mortality in low green space areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genistein: A Boon for Mitigating Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Daglia, Maria; Tundis, Rosa; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Sobarzo-Sanchez, Eduardo; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    In last decades, diet and dietary components have been regarded as important strategies to prevent the development or mitigate numerous chronic diseases, including inflammation, cardiovascular pathologies, cancer, etc. One of the most common dietary components of Asian population is soy. A plethora of research shows the promising effect of soy soy-based foodstuffs and genistein, which is one of the predominant isoflavone compounds, in the prevention and mitigation of stroke. Growing evidence shows that genistein, which is a selective estrogen receptor modulator, mitigates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the modification of oxidative stress and molecular pathways. The promising pharmacological role of genistein is attributed to its ability to suppress nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and Akt signaling pathway, direct antioxidant action, and targeting estrogen and androgen-mediated molecular pathways which help to mitigate stroke damages and prolong cell survival. In this work, we systematically review the current reports on the therapeutic role of genistein against ischemic stroke and its molecular mechanism of actions.

  1. Acute ischemic stroke. Imaging and intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, R.G.; Lev, M.H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Neuroradiology Div.; Hirsch, J.A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Interventional Neuroradiology and Endovascular Neurosugery Service; Koroshetz, W.J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Acute Stroke Service; Schaefer, P. (eds.) [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Neuroradiology

    2006-07-01

    This timely book provides basic, practical and up-to-date information on how to use imaging to diagnose and treat patients with acute ischemic stroke. Written by physicians from the Massachusetts General Hospital and faculty from the Harvard Medical School, the book distills years of experience in the day-to-day management of acute stroke patients, as well as leading-edge basic and clinical research, into a practical guide. With the growing awareness that modern CT and MR imaging can meaningfully improve the outcome of the acute stroke patient, this book provides the practical information to advance the capacities of providers in delivering the most advanced care for this disease. (orig.)

  2. Cerebral Microbleeds and Cognitive Function in Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaolu; Wong, Adrian; Liu, Wenyan; Yang, Jie; Chu, Winnie C W; Au, Lisa; Lau, Alexander; Chan, Anne; Xiong, Yunyun; Soo, Yannie; Leung, Thomas; Wong, Lawrence K S; Mok, Vincent C T

    2015-01-01

    We explored the association between cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and cognitive impairment in patients with ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA). A total of 488 ischemic stroke/TIA patients received magnetic resonance imaging. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was used to evaluate global cognitive function and cognitive domains. The association of CMB quantity with cognitive function and the impact of CMB locations (strictly lobar, strictly deep, and mixed regions) on cognitive impairment were examined in regression models with adjustments for confounders. A total of 113 subjects (23.2%) had ≥1 CMB. Strictly lobar, strictly deep, and mixed CMBs were identified in 36, 40, and 37 patients, respectively. The presence of ≥5 CMBs or strictly deep CMBs was associated with the MoCA total score (p = 0.007 and 0.020, respectively). Of all MoCA domains tested, a lower score in the attention domain was related to the presence of ≥5 CMBs (p = 0.014) and strictly deep CMBs (p = 0.028). CMBs were associated with cognitive dysfunction in stroke/TIA patients, especially in the attention domain. This association was mainly driven by CMBs in the deep region, underlining the role of hypertensive microangiopathy in stroke-related cognitive impairment.

  3. Pathogenic Ischemic Stroke Phenotypes in the NINDS-Stroke Genetics Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Jr, Robert D; Chapman, Sherita N; Cole, John W; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Labovitz, Daniel L; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S; McArdle, Patrick F; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B; Meschia, James F

    2014-01-01

    ...)-SiGN (Stroke Genetics Network) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high-quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of pathogenic stroke subtypes...

  4. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population....

  5. Ischemic Stroke:Therapy of Risk and Benefit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2005-01-01

    @@ Therapeutic thrombolysis is an immense opportunity in acute stroke care. For the first time, there is a treatment that has a high probability of being effective if given early enough to patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  6. Relationship between plasma glutamate levels and post-stroke depression in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱方媛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the association between the plasma glutamate levels during acute ischemic stroke andpost-stroke depression(PSD)initially.Methods Seventy-four ischemic stroke patients admitted to the hospital within the first day of stroke onset were evaluated at a follow-up of 2 weeks.The Beck Depression Inventory(BDI,21-item)and DSM-Ⅳcriteria was used to diagnose post-stroke depression(PSD)at 2 weeks after stroke.

  7. The relation between oxidative stress parameters, ischemic stroke,and hemorrhagic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    İçme, Ferhat; Erel, Özcan; AVCİ, AKKAN; SATAR, SALİM; Gülen, Müge; Acehan, Selen

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: The aims of this study were to investigate the significance of oxidative stress parameters in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke and to investigate their effects on stroke severity using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Materials and methods: A total of 92 patients, including 74 with ischemic stroke and 18 with hemorrhagic stroke, and 75 volunteers were enrolled in the study. Total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (...

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Stem Cells in Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Weilin Xu; Jingwei Zheng; Liansheng Gao; Tao Li; Jianmin Zhang; Anwen Shao

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke, the most common subtype of stroke, has been one of the leading causes of mobility and mortality worldwide. However, it is still lacking of efficient agents. Stem cell therapy, with its vigorous advantages, has attracted researchers around the world. Numerous experimental researches in animal models of stroke have demonstrated the promising efficacy in treating ischemic stroke. The underlying mechanism involved antiapoptosis, anti-inflammation, promotion of angiogenesis and ne...

  9. Cross-level interaction between individual socioeconomic status and regional deprivation on overall survival after onset of ischemic stroke: National health insurance cohort sample data from 2002 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaeyong; Choi, Young; Kim, Seung Woo; Lee, Sang Gyu; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-08-01

    The literature on stroke mortality and neighborhood effect is characterized by studies that are often Western society-oriented, with a lack of racial and cultural diversity. We estimated the effect of cross-level interaction between individual and regional socioeconomic status on the survival after onset of ischemic stroke. We selected newly diagnosed ischemic stroke patients from 2002 to 2013 using stratified representative sampling data of 1,025,340 subjects. A total of 37,044 patients over the 10 years from 2004 to 2013 had newly diagnosed stroke. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) of 12- and 36-month mortality using the Cox proportional hazard model, with the reference group as stroke patients with high income in advantaged regions. For the middle income level, the patients in advantaged regions showed low HRs for overall mortality (12-month HR 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.44; 36-month HR 1.25; 95% CI, 1.14-1.37) compared to the others in disadvantaged regions (12-month HR 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19-1.56; 36-month HR 1.30; 95% CI, 1.17-1.44). Interestingly, for the low income level, the patients in advantaged regions showed high HRs for overall mortality (12-month HR 1.27; 95% CI, 1.13-1.44; 36-month HR 1.33; 95% CI, 1.22-1.46) compared to the others in disadvantaged regions (12-month HR 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09-1.43; 36-month HR 1.30; 95% CI, 1.18-1.44). Although we need to perform further investigations to determine the exact mechanisms, regional deprivation, as well as medical factors, might be associated with survival after onset of ischemic stroke in low-income patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Data Supporting Glyburide in Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kevin N.; Simard, J. Marc; Elm, Jordan; Kronenberg, Golo; Kunte, Hagen; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The SUR1-TRPM4 channel is a critical determinant of edema and hemorrhagic transformation after focal ischemia. Blockade of this channel by the small molecule glyburide results in improved survival and neurological outcome in multiple preclinical models of ischemic stroke. A robust, compelling body of evidence suggests that an intravenous (IV) formulation of glyburide, RP-1127, can prevent swelling and improve outcome in patients with stroke. Retrospective studies of diabetic stroke patients show improved outcomes in patients who are continued on sulfonylureas after stroke onset. Early phase II study of MRI and plasma biomarkers support the conclusion that RP-1127 may decrease swelling and hemorrhagic transformation. Finally, the ongoing phase II RP-1127 development program has demonstrated continued safety as well as feasibility of enrollment and tolerability of the intervention. Continued efforts to complete the ongoing phase IIb study and definitive efficacy studies are urgently needed to bring a candidate pharmacotherapy to a population of severe stroke patients that currently have no alternative. PMID:26463916

  11. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L-H; Sandset, E C; Sandset, P M

    2011-01-01

    Krarup L-H, Sandset EC, Sandset PM, Berge E. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 124: 40-44. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background -  Patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation...... in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation....... are at increased risk of stroke progression and recurrence. We sought to assess whether D-dimer and other markers of hemostatic activation could predict these adverse events in such patients. Method -  Blood samples were obtained from patients included in the Heparin in Acute Embolic Stroke Trial. Stroke...

  12. White Matter Hyperintensities Improve Ischemic Stroke Recurrence Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders;

    2017-01-01

    -based, observational cohort study, we included 832 patients (mean age 59.6 (SD 13.9); 42.0% females) with incident ischemic stroke and no AF. We assessed the severity of white matter hyperintensities using MRI. Hazard ratios stratified by the white matter hyperintensities score and adjusted for the components......BACKGROUND: Nearly one in 5 patients with ischemic stroke will invariably experience a second stroke within 5 years. Stroke risk stratification schemes based solely on clinical variables perform only modestly in non-atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and improvement of these schemes will enhance...... their clinical utility. Cerebral white matter hyperintensities are associated with an increased risk of incident ischemic stroke in the general population, whereas their association with the risk of ischemic stroke recurrence is more ambiguous. In a non-AF stroke cohort, we investigated the association between...

  13. Multiple Silent Lacunes Are Associated with Recurrent Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Skjøth, Flemming; Yavarian, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    .16 (0.61-2.22) and 1.51 (0.86-2.66) for cardiovascular events. Conclusions: In this large cohort of patients with incident ischemic stroke and no AF, an increasing number of silent lacunes was associated with increasing incidence rates of ischemic stroke recurrence. In the adjusted Cox proportional...

  14. Intra‐arterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhemer, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with current issues in the field of acute ischemic stroke. The main objective has been to proof the effectiveness and safety of intra-arterial treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MR CLEAN was the first study to proof the safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial

  15. Diabetes and poor outcomes within 6 months after acute ischemic stroke: the China National Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qian; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Yan, Yu; Li, Hao; Zhong, Liyong; Liu, Liping; Zheng, Huaguang; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Yongjun

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, controversy exists with regard to the impact of DM on prognosis after ischemic stroke in the Chinese population. We investigated the associations between DM and death, dependency, and stroke recurrence in patients after ischemic stroke onset in a nationwide, prospective registry, the China National Stroke Registry. The China National Stroke Registry consecutively recruited patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke in 2007 to 2008 and who were prospectively followed up for clinical and functional outcomes (death, dependency, and stroke recurrence) at 3 and 6 months after disease onset. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to analyze the association between DM and stroke outcomes after adjusting for potential confounding including age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, glucose level at admission, hypertension, coronary heart disease, smoking, urinary tract infection, and other factors. DM was identified in 3483 (27.0%) of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without DM, patients with DM had a significantly higher incidence of death or dependency and of recurrent stroke at 3 and 6 months after stroke onset. DM was an independent risk factor for death or dependency (adjusted odds ratio=1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.37) in patients with ischemic stroke at 6 months after onset. DM independently predicted poor outcomes in Chinese patients after acute ischemic stroke.

  16. Gait improvement after treadmill training in ischemic stroke survivors A critical review of functional MRI studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Xiao; Dongfeng Huang; Bryan O'Young

    2012-01-01

    Stroke survivors often present with abnormal gait, movement training can improve the walking performance post-stroke, and functional MRI can objectively evaluate the brain functions before and after movement training. This paper analyzes the functional MRI changes in patients with ischemic stroke after treadmill training with voluntary and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Functional MRI showed that there are some changes in some regions of patients with ischemic stroke including primary sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area and cingulate motor area after treadmill training. These findings suggest that treadmill training likely improves ischemic stroke patients' lower limb functions and gait performance and promotes stroke recovery by changing patients' brain plasticity; meanwhile, the novel treadmill training methods can better training effects.

  17. The Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke (DIAS) clinical trial program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kummer, Rüdiger; Albers, Gregory W; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-10-01

    Desmoteplase is a novel, highly fibrin-specific thrombolytic agent in phase III of clinical development. In comparison to alteplase, it has high fibrin selectivity, is associated with minimal or no neurotoxicity, and has no apparent negative effect on the blood-brain barrier. The safety and efficacy of desmoteplase is being studied in the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program. Three studies (Dose Escalation Study of Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-2) have been completed, two large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trials are ongoing at >200 sites worldwide (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-3 and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-4, n = 800; DIAS-3 and DIAS-4), and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation phase II trial is ongoing in Japan (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-Japan, n = 48; DIAS-J). The objective of DIAS-3 and DIAS-4 is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single IV bolus injection of 90 μg/kg desmoteplase given three- to nine-hours after onset of ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 4-24, age 18-85 years). The objective of DIAS-J is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of desmoteplase 70 and 90 μg/kg three- to nine-hours after ischemic stroke onset in Japanese patients. Patients are included with occlusion or high-grade stenosis (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 0-1) in proximal cerebral arteries on magnetic resonance or computed tomography angiography but excluded with extended ischemic edema on computed tomography or diffusion-weighted imaging. Desmoteplase is the only thrombolytic agent in late-stage development for acute ischemic stroke that is now tested in patients with proven stroke pathology. The results of the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program will show whether patients with major artery occlusions

  18. Factor V leiden and ischemic stroke risk: the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Ali G; Cole, John W; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stine, Oscar C; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2013-05-01

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been associated with ischemic stroke in children but not in adults. Although the FVL mutation is associated with increased risk for venous thrombosis, its association with ischemic stroke in young adults remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined the association between FVL and ischemic stroke in participants of the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study. A population-based case control study identified 354 women and 476 men 15 to 49 years of age with first-ever ischemic stroke and 907 controls. Participant-specific data included vascular risk factors, FVL genotype and, for cases, the ischemic stroke subtype by modified Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the entire population and for subgroups stratified by risk factors and ischemic stroke subtype. The frequency of the FVL mutation was similar between ischemic stroke patients (3.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5%-5.1%) and nonstroke controls (3.8%; 95% CI 2.7%-5.2%). This frequency did not change significantly when cases were restricted to patients with stroke of undetermined etiology (4.1%; 95% CI 2.6%-6.4%). Among young adults, we found no evidence for an association between FVL and either all ischemic stroke or the subgroup with stroke of undetermined etiology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Acute ischemic stroke treatment: State of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajan Ag; White, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is among the leading causes of death and serious disability in the United States. Treatment of the acute ischemic stroke patient requires a multidisciplinary approach involving first-responders, emergency department personnel, neurologists, advanced imaging experts and endovascular specialists with neurosurgical support. Contemporary stroke treatment is a rapidly advancing field. New developments in pharmacologic and endovascular stroke therapy require thoughtful trial design and expeditious trial implementation to assess clinical outcomes. This manuscript reviews the state of the art in acute stroke therapy.

  20. Dyslipidemia and Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tian; ZHANG Jin Tao; YANG Mei; ZHANG Huan; LIU Wen Qing; KONG Yan; XU Tan; ZHANG Yong Hong

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the relationship between dyslipidemia and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MethodsData about 1 568 patients with acute ischemic stroke werecollected from 4 hospitals in Shandong Province from January 2006 to December 2008. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >10 at discharge or death was defined as the outcome. Effect of dyslipidemia on outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis, respectively. ResultsThe serum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C were significantly associated with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis showed that the ORs and 95% CIs were 3.013 (1.259, 7.214)/2.655 (1.298, 5.43), 3.157(1.306, 7.631)/3.405(1.621, 7.154), and 0.482 (0.245, 0.946)/0.51 (0.282, 0.921), respectively, for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test showed no significant difference in observed and predicted risk in patients with acute ischemic stroke (chi-square=8.235, P=0.411). ConclusionSerum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C are positively related with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  1. Occurrence and predictors of persistent impaired glucose tolerance after acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Fonville (Susanne); H.M. den Hertog (Heleen); A.A.M. Zandbergen (Adrienne); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); H.F. Lingsma (Hester)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Impaired glucose tolerance is often present in patients with a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or ischemic stroke and doubles the risk of recurrent stroke. This impaired glucose tolerance can be transient, reflecting an acute stress response, or persistent, representing undiag

  2. Quantitative Measurement of Physical Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively measure and describe the amount and pattern of physical activity in patients within the first week after acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack using accelerometers. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with acute is...... ischemic stroke. The method offers a low cost and noninvasive tool for future clinical interventional physiotherapeutic and early mobilization studies. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01560520....

  3. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Xinchun Ye; Jinxia Hu; Guiyun Cui

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke.

  4. Low dose aspirin after ischemic stroke associated with antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, RHWM; de Groot, PG; Kappelle, LJ

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe course and outcome of eight patients with ischemic stroke as the first thrombotic manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome who received low-dose aspirin as prophylactic treatment. During 8.9 years of follow-up, two patients had a recurrent stroke. Recurrent stroke rate per 100

  5. Genetics of Atrial Fibrillation and Possible Implications for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Lemmens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia mainly caused by valvular, ischemic, hypertensive, and myopathic heart disease. Atrial fibrillation can occur in families suggesting a genetic background especially in younger subjects. Additionally recent studies have identified common genetic variants to be associated with atrial fibrillation in the general population. This cardiac arrhythmia has important public health implications because of its main complications: congestive heart failure and ischemic stroke. Since atrial fibrillation can result in ischemic stroke, one might assume that genetic determinants of this cardiac arrhythmia are also implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Ischemic stroke is a multifactorial, complex disease where multiple environmental and genetic factors interact. Whether genetic variants associated with a risk factor for ischemic stroke also increase the risk of a particular vascular endpoint still needs to be confirmed in many cases. Here we review the current knowledge on the genetic background of atrial fibrillation and the consequences for cerebrovascular disease.

  6. Correlation study on cystatin C and ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Rong-bo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between serum cystatin C (Cys C and patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods The clinical and laboratory data of 115 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 110 controls were recorded and analyzed. Results The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group [(1.15 ± 0.34 mg/L] were higher than that of the control group [(0.99 ± 0.25 mg/L]. The difference between two groups was significant after correction of age and cardiovascular risk factors (t = ? 3.889, P = 0.000. It was found that age, Cys C, homocysteine (Hcy, type 2 diabetes mellitus [hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, fructosamine (FRU], smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension and intima-media thickness (IMT were risk factors for ischemic stroke on univariate Logistic regression analysis. The difference of serum Cys C level between the patients and controls was significant (P = 0.000, but through covariance analysis, after adjusted other risk factors, it was not significant (P = 0.875. Conclusion The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group is higher than the control group. It can be used as an indicator in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The elevation of serum Cys C is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but not an independent risk factor.

  7. Central Nervous System Agents for Ischemic Stroke: Neuroprotection Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Rachna S.; Mao, Lijuan; Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Shuanhu; Zeng, Jiang; Popp, A. John; Wang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and disability in the United States. Ischemic stroke constitutes 85% of all stroke cases. However, no effective treatment has been found to prevent damage to the brain in such cases except tissue plasminogen activator with narrow therapeutic window, and there is an unmet need to develop therapeutics for neuroprotection from ischemic stroke. Studies have shown that mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, immune modulation, and oxidative stress and mediators such as excitatory amino acids, nitric oxide, inflammatory mediators, neurotransmitters, reactive oxygen species, and withdrawal of trophic factors may lead to the development of the ischemic cascade. Hence, it is essential to develop neuroprotective agents targeting either the mechanisms or the mediators leading to development of ischemic stroke. This review focuses on central nervous system agents targeting these biochemical pathways and mediators of ischemic stroke, mainly those that counteract apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidation, and well as glutamate inhibitors which have been shown to provide neuroprotection in experimental animals. All these agents have been shown to improve neurological outcome after ischemic insult in experimental animals in vivo, organotypic brain slice/acute slice ex vivo, and cell cultures in vitro and may therefore aid in preventing long-term morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:21521165

  8. Therapeutically Targeting Neuroinflammation and Microglia after Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjeon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and recent studies posit that inflammation acts as a double-edged sword, not only detrimentally augmenting secondary injury, but also potentially promoting recovery. An initial event of inflammation in ischemic stroke is the activation of microglia, leading to production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators acting through multiple receptor signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the role of microglial mediators in acute ischemic stroke and elaborate on preclinical and clinical studies focused on microglia in stroke models. Understanding how microglia can lead to both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses may be essential to implement therapeutic strategies using immunomodulatory interventions in ischemic stroke.

  9. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  10. Role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rong; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory response is a double-edged sword, as it not only exacerbates secondary brain injury in the acute stage of stroke but also beneficially contributes to brain recovery after stroke. In this article, we provide an overview on the role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke. We discuss various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in different phases after ischemic stroke and the possible reasons for their failures in clinical trials. Undoubtedly, there is still much to be done in order to translate promising pre-clinical findings into clinical practice. A better understanding of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and identifying the discrepancies between pre-clinical studies and clinical trials may serve as a basis for designing effective therapies. PMID:24006091

  11. Thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke after recent transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, María; Fuentes, Blanca; Masjuan, Jaime; Simal, Patricia; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Reig, Gemma; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Gil-Nuñez, Antonio; Vivancos, Jose; Egido, Jose-Antonio

    2012-04-01

    Safety and efficacy of intravenous thrombolysis in stroke patients with recent transient ischemic attack are hotly debated. Patients suffering transient ischemic attack may present with diffusion-weighted imaging lesions, and although normal computed tomography would not preclude thrombolysis, the concern is that they may be at higher risk for hemorrhage post-thrombolysis treatment. Prior ipsilateral transient ischemic attack might provide protection due to ischemic preconditioning. We assessed post-thrombolysis outcomes in stroke patients who had prior transient ischemic attack. Multicentered prospective study of consecutive acute stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Ipsilateral transient ischemic attack, baseline characteristics, risk factors, etiology, and time-lapse to treatment were recorded. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at seven-days and modified Rankin Scale at three-months, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, and mortality were compared in patients with and without transient ischemic attack. There were 877 patients included, 60 (6·84%) had previous ipsilateral transient ischemic attack within one-month prior to the current stroke (65% in the previous 24 h). Transient ischemic attack patients were more frequently men (70% vs. 53%; P = 0·011), younger (63 vs. 71 years of age; P = 0·011), smokers (37% vs. 25%; P = 0·043), and with large vessel disease (40% vs. 25%; P = 0·011). Severity of stroke at onset was similar to those with and without prior transient ischemic attack (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 12 vs. 14 P = 0·134). Those with previous transient ischemic attack were treated earlier (117 ± 52 vs. 144 ± 38 mins; P ischemic attack was not associated with differences in stroke outcome such as independence (modified Rankin Scale 0-2) (odds ratios: 1·035 (0·57-1·93) P = 0·91), mortality (odds ratios: 0·99 (0·37-2·67) P = 0

  12. Citicoline for ischemic stroke: ICTUS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data available in the literature on the use of citicoline in an experimental model of ischemic stroke (IS and in randomized multicenter placebo-controlled trials. It analyzes the results of the ICTUS trial in which 2298 patients with IS who received randomly citicoline or placebo for 24 hours after the onset of symptoms (I000 mg intravenously every I2 hours during the first 3 days, then orally as one 500-mg tablet every 12 hours during 6 weeks. The results of the trial confirmed the safety of citicoline used in IS, but failed to show its significant advantage over placebo in reducing the degree of disability (global improvement 90 days later. However, to pool the results of the ICTUS trial with those of other randomized multicenter placebo-controlled studies demonstrates a significant decrease in the degree of disability in IS patients treated with citicoline.

  13. [Current registry studies of acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltkamp, R; Jüttler, E; Pfefferkorn, T; Purrucker, J; Ringleb, P

    2012-10-01

    Study registries offer the opportunity to evaluate the effects of new therapies or to observe the consequences of new treatments in clinical practice. The SITS-MOST registry confirmed the validity of findings from randomized trials on intravenous thrombolysis concerning safety and efficacy in the clinical routine. Current study registries concerning new interventional thrombectomy techniques suggest a high recanalization rate; however, the clinical benefit can only be evaluated in randomized, controlled trials. Similarly, the experiences of the BASICS registry on basilar artery occlusion have led to the initiation of a controlled trial. The benefit of hemicraniectomy in malignant middle cerebral artery infarction has been demonstrated by the pooled analysis of three randomized trials. Numerous relevant aspects are currently documented in the DESTINY-R registry. Finally, the recently started RASUNOA registry examines diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke occurring during therapy with new oral anticoagulants.

  14. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Schnohr, Peter; Jensen, Gorm B; Benn, Marianne

    2011-04-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population. A total of 7,579 women and 6,372 men from the Copenhagen City Heart Study with measurements of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol at baseline in 1976-1978 were followed for up to 33 years; of these, 837 women and 837 men developed ischemic stroke during follow-up, which was 100% complete. The fluctuation of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol over 15 years was similar. In both women and men, stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides were associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. Compared to women with triglycerides triglyceride levels of 1.00-1.99 mmol/liter to 3.9 (95%CI, 1.3-11.1) for triglyceride levels ≥ 5 mmol/liter (trend: p cholesterol levels were not associated with risk of ischemic stroke except in men with cholesterol levels ≥ 9.00 mmol/liter vs triglycerides were associated with increasing risk of ischemic stroke while increasing cholesterol levels were not. In men, these results were similar except that cholesterol ≥ 9.00 mmol/liter was associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  15. School-Aged Outcomes After Neonatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa Czech; Pardo, Andrea C.

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the Accident Vasculaire Cérébral de nouveau-né (AVCnn) Study Group, a multicenter registry in France, examined outcomes at 7 years of age in children previously identified with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (NAIS).

  16. School-Aged Outcomes After Neonatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Theresa; Pardo, Andrea C

    2016-02-01

    Investigators from the Accident Vasculaire Cérébral de nouveau-né (AVCnn) Study Group, a multicenter registry in France, examined outcomes at 7 years of age in children previously identified with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (NAIS).

  17. Developing practice recommendations for endovascular revascularization for acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Marc A.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Darkhabani, Ziad; Edgell, Randall C.; English, Joey; Frei, Donald; Jamieson, Dara G.; Janardhan, Vallabh; Janjua, Nazli; Janjua, Rashid M.; Katzan, Irene; Khatri, Pooja; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Liebeskind, David S.; Linfante, Italo; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Shutter, Lori; Xavier, Andrew; Yavagal, Dileep; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines have been established for the management of acute ischemic stroke; however, specific recommendations for endovascular revascularization therapy are lacking. Burgeoning investigation of endovascular revascularization therapies for acute ischemic stroke, rapid device development, and a diverse training background of the providers performing the procedures underscore the need for practice recommendations. This review provides a concise summary of the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology endovascular acute ischemic stroke roundtable meeting. This document was developed to review current clinical efficacy of pharmacologic and mechanical revascularization therapy, selection criteria, periprocedure management, and endovascular time metrics and to highlight current practice patterns. It therefore provides an outline for the future development of multisociety guidelines and recommendations to improve patient selection, procedural management, and organizational strategies for revascularization therapies in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23008406

  18. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS...

  19. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchao; Lin, Yanlin; Liu, Yuxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Bin; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Wenjuan

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies assessing the association between serum uric acid levels and neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke reported conflicting results. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to assess the impact of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched through September 26, 2014 to identify eligible published or unpublished studies on the association between serum uric acid levels and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Hazard ratio (HR) for poor outcome or mean differences of serum uric acid levels with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were pooled using meta-analysis. The primary outcome was occurrence of poor outcomes, while the secondary outcome was the mean differences of serum uric acid levels in patients with good or poor outcomes. Ten eligible studies with a total of 8131 acute ischemic stroke patients were included into the meta-analysis. Compared with low serum uric acid level, high serum uric acid level was associated better outcome after acute ischemic stroke (HR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.68-0.88, P = 0.0001). Sensitivity analysis further identified the prognostic role of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Patients with good outcomes had a higher serum uric acid level compared with those with poor outcome (mean difference = 30.61 μmol/L, 95% CI 20.13-41.08, P acute ischemic stroke. High uric acid level at the onset is a biomarker of better prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  20. Relationship between Estradiol and Antioxidant Enzymes Activity of Ischemic Stroke

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    Nasrin Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Some evidence suggests the neuroprotection of estrogen provided by the antioxidant activity of this compound. The main objective of this study was to determine the level of estradiol and its correlation with the activity of antioxidant enzymes, total antioxidant status and ferritin from ischemic stroke subjects. The study population consisted of 30 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 30 controls. There was no significant difference between estradiol in stroke and control group. The activity of superoxide dismutase and level of ferritin was higher in stroke compared with control group (<.05, <.001, resp.. There was no significant correlation between estradiol and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, total antioxidant status, and ferritin in stroke and control groups. We observed inverse correlation between estradiol with superoxide dismutase in males of stroke patients (=−0.54, =.029. Our results supported that endogenous estradiol of elderly men and women of stroke or control group has no antioxidant activity.

  1. Interactions between Age, Sex, and Hormones in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fudong; McCullough, Louise D.

    2012-01-01

    Age, sex, and gonadal hormones have profound effects on ischemic stroke outcomes, although how these factors impact basic stroke pathophysiology remains unclear. There is a plethora of inconsistent data reported throughout the literature, primarily due to differences in the species examined, the timing and methods used to evaluate injury, the models used, and confusion regarding differences in stroke incidence as seen in clinical populations versus effects on acute neuroprotection or neurorepair in experimental stroke models. Sex and gonadal hormone exposure have considerable independent impact on stroke outcome, but these factors also interact with each other, and the contribution of each differs throughout the lifespan. The contribution of sex and hormones to experimental stroke will be the focus of this review. Recent advances and our current understanding of age, sex, and hormone interactions in ischemic stroke with a focus on inflammation will be discussed. PMID:23068990

  2. Fish Consumption and Ischemic stroke in Southern Sweden

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    Wennberg Maria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between fish intake and stroke incidence has been inconsistent in previous Swedish studies. Here, we report the risk of stroke and fish intake in a cohort from southern Sweden. Findings Data were obtained from an already available population based case-control study where the cases were defined as incident first-time ischemic stroke patients. Complete data on all relevant variables were obtained for 2722 controls and 2469 cases. The data were analyzed with logistic regression analysis. Stroke risk decreased with fat fish intake ([greater than or equal to] 1/week versus Conclusions The results suggest fat fish intake to decrease ischemic stroke risk and lean fish intake to increase women's stroke risk. The inconsistent relationship between fish intake and stroke risk reported in previous studies is further stressed by the results of this study.

  3. Selected acute phase CSF factors in ischemic stroke: findings and prognostic value

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    Intskirveli Nino

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Study aimed at investigation of pathogenic role and prognostic value of several selected cerebrospinal fluid acute phase factors that can reflect the severity of ischemic brain damage. Methods Ninety five acute ischemic stroke patients were investigated. Ischemic region visualized at the twenty fourth hour by conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Stroke severity evaluated by National Institute Health Stroke Scale. One month outcome of disease was assessed by Barthel Index. Cerebrospinal fluid was taken at the sixth hour of stroke onset. CSF pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were studied by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Nitric Oxide and Lipoperoxide radical were measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. CSF Nitrate levels were detected using the Griess reagent. Statistics performed by SPSS-11.0. Results At the sixth hour of stroke onset, cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels were elevated in patients against controls. Severe stroke patients had increased interleukin-6 content compared to less severe strokes (P Conclusion According to present study the cerebrospinal fluid contents of interleukin-6 and nitrates seem to be the most reliable prognostic factors in acute phase of ischemic stroke.

  4. Collateral lessons from recent acute ischemic stroke trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebeskind, David S

    2014-05-01

    Numerous acute ischemic stroke trials have recently published detailed results, providing an opportunity to consider the role of collaterals in stroke pathophysiology and their influential effect on patient outcomes. Safety and Efficacy of NeuroFlo Technology in Ischemic Stroke (SENTIS), the largest randomized controlled trial of device therapy to date, tested the potential augmentation of collateral perfusion. SYNTHESIS Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy (MR RESCUE), and Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III chronicled the saga of endovascular therapy trialed against medical treatment for acute ischemic stroke. These recent randomized studies, however, largely neglect current device technology available for endovascular therapy as advanced by the TREVO2 and SOLITAIRE™(TM) FR With the Intention For Thrombectomy (SWIFT) studies. Such exhaustive efforts in recent trials have failed to introduce a new treatment for stroke that unequivocally improves patient outcomes. Collateral perfusion is widely recognized to vary across individuals in any population and exerts a dramatic effect on baseline variables including the time course of ischemic injury, stroke severity, imaging findings, and therapeutic opportunities. Similarly, collaterals have been recognized to influence recanalization, reperfusion, hemorrhagic transformation, and subsequent neurological outcomes after stroke. Collateral lessons may be gleaned from these trials, to expand consideration of overall study results and perhaps most importantly, alter ongoing and new trials in development. Detailed analyses of available information on collaterals from these trials demonstrate that collaterals may be more influential than the choice of treatment modality or intervention.

  5. Takayasu Arteritis Presenting with Ischemic Stroke: Two case reports

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    Fergane Memmodova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu arteritis is a rare vasculitic disease characterized with inflamation of vessels. It commonly results stenosis and dilatations of aort and aortic branches. Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease is one of the major complications of Takayasu arteritis. In this report we concluded two Takayasu arteritis cases in the light of current data whom presented with ischemic stroke clinical symptoms.

  6. Complications of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke : a CT perfusion evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankbaar, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis the use of CT-perfusion (CTP) imaging in the evaluation of the most severe complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)) and ischemic stroke was explored. These complications are delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after SAH and damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after ischemic str

  7. Dual antiplatelet therapy after noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik

    2014-07-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy simultaneously blocks different platelet activation pathways and might thus be more potent at inhibiting platelet activation and more effective at reducing major ischemic vascular events compared to antiplatelet monotherapy. Aspirin plus clopidogrel dual therapy is now the standard therapy for patients with acute coronary syndrome and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, dual antiplatelet therapy carries an increased risk of bleeding. Patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are generally older and likely to have a fragile cerebrovascular bed, which further increases the risk of systemic major bleeding events and intracranial hemorrhage. Clinical trials and meta-analyses suggest that in comparison to antiplatelet monotherapy, dual antiplatelet therapy initiated early after noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA further reduces the rate of recurrent stroke and major vascular events without significantly increasing the rate of major bleeding events. In contrast, studies of long-term therapy in patients with noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA have yielded inconsistent data regarding the benefit of dual antiplatelet therapy over monotherapy. However, the harm associated with major bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, which is generally more disabling and more fatal than ischemic stroke, is likely to increase with dual antiplatelet therapy. Physicians should carefully assess the benefits and risks of dual antiplatelet therapy versus antiplatelet monotherapy when managing patients with ischemic stroke or TIA.

  8. Impact of Guidelines on Clinical Practice: Intravenous Heparin Use for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jong-Won; Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, SooJoo; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Park, Sang-Soon; Park, Tai Hwan; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Kim, Dong-Eog; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Joon-Tae; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Jay Chol; Oh, Mi-Sun; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Chul; Jang, Myung Suk; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Gorelick, Philip B; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Since its introduction, controversy has existed about the administration of intravenous heparin for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We studied trends in the intravenous heparin use during a 6-year time period and the potential influence of clinical guidelines in national language on intravenous heparin administration in Korea. On the basis of a prospective nationwide multicenter stroke registry, we collected data on patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived within 7 days of symptom onset during the time period 2008 to 2013. We studied patient demographics, prestroke medical history, stroke characteristics, and stroke treatment. Data from a total of 23 425 patients from 12 university hospitals or regional stroke centers were analyzed. The administration of intravenous heparin steadily decreased throughout the study period: 9.7% in 2008, 10.9% in 2009, 9.4% in 2010, 6.0% in 2011, 4.7% in 2012, and 4.3% in 2013 (P for trend stroke severity, atrial fibrillation, and stroke of cardioembolic, other-, and undetermined etiology. In a multivariable logistic model, increase of 1 calendar year (odds ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.95; Pacute ischemic stroke treatment has decreased in Korea, and this change may be attributable to the spread and successful implementation of regional clinical practice guidelines. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Angiogenesis, neurogenesis and neuroplasticity in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, M Angels; Arboix, Adriá; Krupinski, Jerzy

    2010-08-01

    Only very little is know about the neurovascular niche after cardioembolic stroke. Three processes implicated in neurorepair: angiogenesis, neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity, would be naturally produced in adult brains, but also could be stimulated through endogen neurorepair phenomena. Angiogenesis stimulation generates new vessels with the aim to increase collateral circulation. Neurogenesis is controlled by intrinsic genetic mechanisms and growth factors but also ambiental factors are important. The leading process of the migrating neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is closely associated with blood vessels, suggesting that this interaction provides directional guidance to the NPCs. These findings suggest that blood vessels play an important role as a scaffold for NPCs migration toward the damaged brain region. DNA microarray technology and blood genomic profiling in human stroke provided tools to investigate the expression of thousands of genes. Critical comparison of gene expression profiles after stroke in humans with those in animal models should lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of brain ischaemia. Probably the most important part of early recovery after stroke is limited capacity of penumbra/infarct neurones to recover. It became more clear in the last years, that penumbra is not just passively dying over time but it is also actively recovering. This initial plasticity in majority contributes towards later neurogenesis, angiogenesis and final recovery. Penumbra is a principal target in acute phase of stroke. Thus, the origin of newly formed vessels and the pathogenic role of neovascularization and neurogenesis are important unresolved issues in our understanding of the mechanisms after stroke. Biomaterials for promoting brain protection, repair and regeneration are new hot target. Recently developed biomaterials can enable and increase the target delivery of drugs or therapeutic proteins to the brain, allow cell or tissue transplants to

  10. Rotating night shift work and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Devin L; Feskanich, Diane; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Schernhammer, Eva S; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2009-06-01

    Rotating night shift work disrupts circadian rhythms and is associated with coronary heart disease. The relation between rotating night shift work and ischemic stroke is unclear. The Nurses' Health Study, an ongoing cohort study of registered female nurses, assessed in 1988 the total number of years the nurses had worked rotating night shifts. The majority (69%) of stroke outcomes from 1988 to 2004 were confirmed by physician chart review. The authors used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the relation between years of rotating night shift work and ischemic stroke, adjusting for multiple vascular risk factors. Of 80,108 subjects available for analysis, 60% reported at least 1 year of rotating night shift work. There were 1,660 ischemic strokes. Rotating night shift work was associated with a 4% increased risk of ischemic stroke for every 5 years (hazard ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.07; P(trend) = 0.01). This increase in risk was similar when limited to the 1,152 confirmed ischemic strokes (hazard ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.07; P(trend) = 0.10) and may be confined to women with a history of 15 or more years of rotating shift work. Women appear to have a modestly increased risk of stroke after extended periods of rotating night shift work.

  11. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  12. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction.

  13. Anticoagulant therapy for ischemic stroke: A review of literature

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    Mohammad Mehdi Shahpouri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, anticoagulants have been used in the emergent treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Anticoagulants are prescribed in an effort to prevent first or recurrent stroke, especially among patients with cardioembolism due to arterial fibrillation and large-artery atherosclerotic disease. Despite the widespread use, efficacy and safety of anticoagulants are controversial. Experts have given a broad spectrum of opinions. Surveys of practitioners have also demonstrated a lack of consensus on the use of anticoagulants for ischemic stroke. The uncertainty is due, in large part, to the lack of definitive clinical data. A review by the panel of the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association found no strong evidence for effectiveness of anticoagulants in treating acute ischemic stroke. Several clinical trials have suggested that utility of emergent anticoagulation has no significant effect in improving clinical outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In the present review, we have attempted to provide a framework for the emergent use of anticoagulants in acute ischemic stroke patients.

  14. Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage concomitant with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Makoto; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Yonehara, Toshiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ando, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) rarely occurs subsequent to acute ischemic stroke. The incidence, clinical background characteristics, and outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with cSAH were investigated. Our stroke center database was reviewed to identify patients with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) who demonstrated acute cSAH within 14 days of admission between 2005 and 2011. Background characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes at discharge and 3 months after onset were investigated in these patients. Of 4953 acute stroke/TIA patients, cSAH was observed in 8 (.14%) patients (7 men, mean age 71 years): 7 were detected incidentally, and the other was found immediately after a convulsion. Two patients died during their hospital stay, 1 died after discharge, and 3 were dependent at 3 months. Major artery occlusion or severe stenosis was observed in 5 patients. Two patients subsequently developed subcortical hemorrhage. On gradient echo imaging, lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed in 2 patients, and chronic superficial siderosis was observed in 2 patients. In this retrospective review of cases with ischemic stroke and cSAH, over half of patients had occlusion of major arteries. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy was suggested by magnetic resonance imaging findings and subsequent events in 3 patients. The overall outcome was unfavorable although the causal relationship with cSAH was unclear. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multimodal nanoprobes evaluating physiological pore size of brain vasculatures in ischemic stroke models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuyan; Bai, Ying-Ying; Changyi, Yinzhi; Gao, Xihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Wang, Yuancheng; Zhou, Lu; Ju, Shenghong; Li, Cong

    2014-11-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% strokes and originates from a reduction of cerebral blood flow (CBF) after vascular occlusion. For treatment, the first action is to restore CBF by thrombolytic agent recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA). Although rt-PA benefits clinical outcome, its application is limited by short therapeutic time window and risk of brain hemorrhage. Different to thrombolytic agents, neuroprotectants reduce neurological injuries by blocking ischemic cascade events such as excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Nano-neuroprotectants demonstrate higher therapeutic effect than small molecular analogues due to their prolonged circulation lifetime and disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) in ischemic region. Even enhanced BBB permeability in ischemic territories is verified, the pore size of ischemic vasculatures determining how large and how efficient the therapeutics can pass is barely studied. In this work, nanoprobes (NPs) with different diameters are developed. In vivo multimodal imaging indicates that NP uptakes in ischemic region depended on their diameters and the pore size upper limit of ischemic vasculatures is determined as 10-11 nm. Additionally, penumbra defined as salvageable ischemic tissues performed a higher BBB permeability than infarct core. This work provides a guideline for developing nano-neuroprotectants by taking advantage of the locally enhanced BBB permeability in ischemic brain tissues.

  16. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

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    Sheida Shaafi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries.

  17. Supratentorial ischemic stroke: more than an upper motor neuron disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A. van; Pasman, J.W.; Hendricks, H.T.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Zwarts, M.J.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2007-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to identify secondary functional changes in the peripheral motor units of the paretic upper extremity (UE) in patients with severe ischemic stroke and to determine how these changes develop during the first weeks after stroke. An inception cohort of 27 consecutive

  18. CT angiography and CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeters, T. van

    2016-01-01

    CT angiography and CT perfusion are used in patients with acute ischemic stroke for diagnostic purposes and to select patients for treatment. In this thesis, the reproducibility of CT angiography and CT perfusion is examined, the additional value of CT angiography and CT perfusion for stroke outcome

  19. Global DNA methylation of ischemic stroke subtypes.

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    Carolina Soriano-Tárraga

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS, a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder, is among the leading causes of mortality and long-term disability in the western world. Epidemiological data provides evidence for a genetic component to the disease, but its epigenetic involvement is still largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, change over time and may be associated with aging processes and with modulation of the risk of various pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. We analyzed 2 independent cohorts of IS patients. Global DNA methylation was measured by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA of DNA blood samples. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the methylation differences between the 3 most common IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA, small-artery disease (SAD, and cardio-aortic embolism (CE. A total of 485 IS patients from 2 independent hospital cohorts (n = 281 and n = 204 were included, distributed across 3 IS subtypes: LAA (78/281, 59/204, SAD (97/281, 53/204, and CE (106/281, 89/204. In univariate analyses, no statistical differences in LUMA levels were observed between the 3 etiologies in either cohort. Multivariate analysis, adjusted by age, sex, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, confirmed the lack of differences in methylation levels between the analyzed IS subtypes in both cohorts. Despite differences in pathogenesis, our results showed no global methylation differences between LAA, SAD, and CE subtypes of IS. Further work is required to establish whether the epigenetic mechanism of methylation might play a role in this complex disease.

  20. Genetics of ischemic stroke, stroke-related risk factors, stroke precursors and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Morte, David; Guadagni, Fiorella; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Testa, Gianluca; Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Abete, Pasquale; Rengo, Franco; Ferroni, Patrizia; Sacco, Ralph L; Rundek, Tatjana

    2012-04-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of death worldwide and the first cause of disability in the western world. Ischemic stroke (IS) accounts for almost 80% of the total cases of strokes and is a complex and multifactorial disease caused by the combination of vascular risk factors, environment and genetic factors. Investigations of the genetics of atherosclerosis and IS has greatly enhanced our knowledge of this complex multifactorial disease. In this article we sought to review common single-gene disorders relevant to IS, summarize candidate gene and genome-wide studies aimed at discovering genetic stroke risk factors and subclinical phenotypes, and to briefly discuss pharmacogenetics related to stroke treatments. Genetics of IS is, in fact, one of the most promising research frontiers and genetic testing may be helpful for novel drug discoveries as well as for appropriate drug and dose selection for treatment of patients with cerebrovascular disease.

  1. Endovascular reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke: dissecting the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Krogias, Christos; Arthur, Adam S; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability and intravenous thrombolysis has been the only approved acute reperfusion therapy (RT) for many years. Seven randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) have been recently published. These studies have changed the treatment paradigm by establishing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) as the most effective acute stroke therapy for improving functional outcome in anterior circulation ELVO with a NNT of 6. The present review will critically evaluate the results of these RCTs and of the existing meta-analyses investigating the safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy for AIS. Points of debate such as acute stroke imaging, posterior circulation stroke and general anesthesia will be addressed. We will also discuss health policies aiming to increase the availability of endovascular treatment for stroke patients.

  2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to improve outcome in acute ischemic stroke: possible mechanisms and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, Timo; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Kepplinger, Jessica; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Weidner, Kerstin; Reichmann, Heinz; Barlinn, Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Several clinical studies have indicated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) administered in patients after acute ischemic stroke can improve clinical recovery independently of depression. Due to small sample sizes and heterogeneous study designs interpretability was limited in these studies. The mechanisms of action whereby SSRI might improve recovery from acute ischemic stroke are not fully elucidated. We searched MEDLINE using the PubMed interface to identify evidence of SSRI mediated improvement of recovery from acute ischemic stroke and reviewed the literature on the potential underlying mechanisms of action. Among identified clinical studies, a well-designed randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study (FLAME - fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute ischemic stroke) demonstrated improved recovery of motor function in stroke patients receiving fluoxetine. The positive effects of SSRIs on stroke recovery were further supported by a meta-analysis of 52 trials in a total of 4060 participants published by the Cochrane collaboration. Based on animal models, the mechanisms whereby SSRIs might ameliorate functional and structural ischemic-brain damage were suggested to include stimulation of neurogenesis with migration of newly generated cells toward ischemic-brain regions, anti-inflammatory neuroprotection, improved regulation of cerebral blood flow, and modulation of the adrenergic neurohormonal system. However, to date, it remains speculative if and to what degree these mechanisms convert into humans and randomized controlled trials in large populations of stroke patients comparing different SSRIs are still lacking. In addition to the need of comprehensive-clinical evidence, further elucidation of the beneficial mechanisms whereby SSRIs may improve structural and functional recovery from ischemic-brain damage is needed to form a basis for translation into clinical practice.

  3. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Radecki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in Emergency Medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods: A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results: Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85% disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:435–441.

  4. Hepatitis C and recurrent treatment-resistant acute ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Saxsena, Aneeta; Tarsia, Joseph; Dunn, Casey; Aysenne, Aimee; Shah, Basil; Moore, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and thrombolysis, acute ischemic stroke has become a treatable disorder if the patient presents within the 4.5-hour time window. Typically, sporadic stroke is caused by atherosclerotic disease involving large or small cerebral arteries or secondary to a cardioembolic source often associated with atrial fibrillation. In the over-65-year age group, more rare causes of stroke, such as antiphospholipid syndromes, are unusual; such...

  5. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Scalzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF and cerebral blood volume (CBV, mean transit time (MTT, time-to-peak (TTP, and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely.

  6. Radiology of ischemic strokes in children

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    Raybaud, C.A.; Jiddane, M.; Livet, M.O.; Pinsard, N.

    1985-11-01

    Arterial ischemic strokes are a relatively frequent diagnostic occurrence in pediatric neuroradiology. They occur mostly in three main etiologic contexts: 1) congenital heart disease; 2) neonatal distress; 3) infections, focal or general inducing vasculitis, but many cases are considered as idiopathic. The positive diagnosis is made by CT; in neonates, however, ultrasound appears as a promising tool. The CT features are basically similar at that age and in adults, although the site of the infarct may result from pathologies more particular to children (e.g. basal ganglia infarction due to arteritis of the carotid syphon and its branches). Infarcts may be multiple and also more frequently hemorrhagic at that age, the homorrhagic phenomena affecting only the gray matter except in young infants in which the subcortical white matter may be affected also. Anatomical sequels include focal atrophy and asymmetry of the brain. Data regarding the etiology can be gathered from angiography which may show the degree of impairment of the arterial bed, its extent, the collateral blood supply and the morphological type of arterial lesion responsible for the cerebral damage. The most particular picture at that age is that of the often diffuse vasculitis, with its various expressions (segmental narrowing of the lumen, dissecting aneurysm, string-of-beads appearance). (orig.).

  7. Advances in the Critical Care Management of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeta Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Given recent advances in diagnostic modalities and revascularization capabilities, clinicians are not only able to rapidly and accurately identify acute ischemic stroke, but may also be able to aggressively intervene to minimize the extent of infarction. In those cases where revascularization cannot occur and/or the extent of infarction is large, there are multiple strategies to prevent secondary decompensation as the stroke evolves, for instance, if malignant cerebral edema should develop. In this paper, we will review the indications for specialized ICU care for an ischemic stroke patient, the treatment principles, and strategies employed by neurointensivists to minimize secondary neuronal injury, the literature in support of such strategies (and the questions to be addressed by future studies, all with the ultimate goal of increasing the likelihood of favorable neurologic outcomes in our ischemic stroke population.

  8. STUDY OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Ischemic stroke is the 3rd leading cause of death after AMI and cancer. Stroke is also the leading cause of hospital admission causing disability. The study was based on 100 patients with ischemic stroke admitted to the JJM Medical College, Davangere. This study was done to estimate the role of C-reactive protein as a marker of acute inflammation following ischemic stroke and also to determine, its prognostic role, by assessing the functional outcome of patient using modified Barthel index scoring (ADL. Patients with CRP 6 mg/dl suffered severe disease with poor functional outcome. P value <0.05, significant, suggests CRP is a good tool for prognostic indicator

  9. Community Level Disadvantage and the Likelihood of First Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette Boden-Albala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Residing in “disadvantaged” communities may increase morbidity and mortality independent of individual social resources and biological factors. This study evaluates the impact of population-level disadvantage on incident ischemic stroke likelihood in a multiethnic urban population. Methods. A population based case-control study was conducted in an ethnically diverse community of New York. First ischemic stroke cases and community controls were enrolled and a stroke risk assessment performed. Data regarding population level economic indicators for each census tract was assembled using geocoding. Census variables were also grouped together to define a broader measure of collective disadvantage. We evaluated the likelihood of stroke for population-level variables controlling for individual social (education, social isolation, and insurance and vascular risk factors. Results. We age-, sex-, and race-ethnicity-matched 687 incident ischemic stroke cases to 1153 community controls. The mean age was 69 years: 60% women; 22% white, 28% black, and 50% Hispanic. After adjustment, the index of community level disadvantage (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7–2.1 was associated with increased stroke likelihood overall and among all three race-ethnic groups. Conclusion. Social inequalities measured by census tract data including indices of community disadvantage confer a significant likelihood of ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors.

  10. Oxidative stress and pathophysiology of ischemic stroke: novel therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Ramón; Fernández-Gajardo, Rodrigo; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo; Matamala, José Manuel; Carrasco, Rodrigo; Miranda-Merchak, Andrés; Feuerhake, Walter

    2013-08-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death, after ischemic heart disease, and accounts for 9% of deaths worldwide. According to the World Health Organization [WHO], 15 million people suffer stroke worldwide each year. Of these, more than 6 million die and another 5 million are permanently disabled. Reactive oxygen species [ROS] have been implicated in brain injury after ischemic stroke. There is evidence that a rapid increase in the production of ROS immediately after acute ischemic stroke rapidly overwhelm antioxidant defences, causing further tissue damage. These ROS can damage cellular macromolecules leading to autophagy, apoptosis, and necrosis. Moreover, the rapid restoration of blood flow increases the level of tissue oxygenation and accountsfor a second burst of ROS generation, which leads to reperfusion injury. Current measures to protect the brain against severe stroke damage are insufficient. Thus, it is critical to investigate antioxidant strategies that lead to the diminution of oxidative injury. The antioxidant vitamins C and E, the polyphenol resveratrol, the xanthine oxidase [XO] inhibitor allopurinol, and other antioxidant strategies have been reviewed in the setting of strokes. This review focuses on the mechanisms involved in ROS generation, the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and the novel therapeutic strategies to be tested to reduce the cerebral damage related to both ischemia and reperfusion.

  11. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit.

  12. In-hospital medical complications associated with patient dependency after acute ischemic stroke: data from the China National Stroke Registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-lian; ZHAO Xing-quan; DU Wan-liang; WANG An-xin; JI Rui-jun; YANG Zhong-hua; WANG Chun-xue

    2013-01-01

    Background The mortality of stroke patients is strongly affected by medical complications.However,there are limited data investigating the effect of in-hospital medical complications on the dependency of stroke patients worldwide.We prospectively and systematically investigated the effect of medical complications on dependency of patients at 3,6 and 12 months after stroke using the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR).Methods This prospective cohort study collected data of patients age >18 years with acute ischemic stroke in 132 clinical centers distributed across 32 provinces and four municipalities (including Hong Kong region) of China,from September 2007 to August 2008.Data on medical complications,dependency and other information were obtained from paper-based registry forms.Medical complications associated with stroke outcomes were assessed using multivariable Logistic regression.Results Of 11 560 patients with acute ischemic stroke,1826 (15.80%) presented with in-hospital medical complications.In-hospital medical complications were independent risk factors for dependency of patients at 3 months (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.367,95% confidence interval (CI) 2.021-2.771),6 months (adjusted OR 2.257,95% CI 1.922-2.650),and 12 months (adjusted OR 1.820,95% CI 1.538-2.154) after acute ischemic stroke.Conclusion The results demonstrated that the short-term and long-term dependency of acute ischemic stroke patients is significantly associated with in-hospital medical complications in China.

  13. Predictors and Outcomes of Dysphagia Screening After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Martino, Rosemary; Saposnik, Gustavo; Giannakeas, Vasily; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines advocate screening all acute stroke patients for dysphagia. However, limited data are available regarding how many and which patients are screened and how failing a swallowing screen affects patient outcomes. We sought to evaluate predictors of receiving dysphagia screening after acute ischemic stroke and outcomes after failing a screening test. We used the Ontario Stroke Registry from April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2013, to identify patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and determine predictors of documented dysphagia screening and outcomes after failing the screening test, including pneumonia, disability, and death. Among 7171 patients, 6677 patients were eligible to receive dysphagia screening within 72 hours, yet 1280 (19.2%) patients did not undergo documented screening. Patients with mild strokes were significantly less likely than those with more severe strokes to have documented screening (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.64). Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.43-6.47), severe disability (adjusted odds ratio, 5.19; 95% CI, 4.48-6.02), discharge to long-term care (adjusted odds ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.11-3.79), and 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 2.09-2.80). Associations were maintained in patients with mild strokes. One in 5 patients with acute ischemic stroke did not have documented dysphagia screening, and patients with mild strokes were substantially less likely to have documented screening. Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including in patients with mild strokes, highlighting the importance of dysphagia screening for all patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Cancer-associated ischemic stroke is associated with elevated D-dimer and fibrin degradation product levels in acute ischemic stroke with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Tomoyuki; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Hosomi, Naohisa; Takeda, Ikuko; Aoki, Shiro; Sueda, Yoshimasa; Ishihara, Kayoko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yamawaki, Takemori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2012-07-01

    Although several studies have reported various causes of ischemic stroke in patients with cancer, only a few have evaluated the clinical relevance of ischemic stroke pathogenesis to cancer. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics of cancer-associated ischemic stroke. We evaluated 154 ischemic stroke patients without cancer and 57 ischemic stroke patients with cancer who had either received continuous treatment for cancer within 5 years before to the onset of ischemic stroke, or who had been diagnosed with cancer within 1 year after the onset of ischemic stroke. Cancer patients were grouped into "cancer-associated ischemic stroke," the "conventional ischemic stroke," or "other." A total of 15 patients (26%) were classified into the cancer-associated ischemic stroke in cancer patients. In univariate analysis of the cancer-associated ischemic stroke and the others, there were significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and advanced cancer (clinical stage IV), and the levels of d-dimer, fibrin degradation product and hemoglobin. With multivariate regression analysis of those factors, the prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and advanced cancer (clinical stage IV), and the levels of D-dimer and fibrin degradation product remained as statistically independent factors, which were associated with cancer-associated ischemic stroke (n = 111, χ(2) =67.21, P acute ischemic stroke, the cancer-associated ischemic stroke is associated with elevated D-dimer and fibrin degradation products, even after controlling hypertension, hyperlipidemia and advanced cancer (clinical stage IV). © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Racial Difference in Cerebral Microbleed Burden among Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjouei, Shima; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Singh, Mantinderpreet; McCormack, Michael; Noorbakhsh-Sabet, Nariman; Goyal, Nitin; Alexandrov, Anne W; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Zand, Ramin

    2017-08-21

    Data on the epidemiology of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) among patients with ischemic stroke are limited. This study compared the number, associated factors, and topography of CMBs between African American and Caucasian ischemic stroke patients in the Mid-South United States. We evaluated consecutive ischemic stroke patients admitted to our tertiary stroke center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, in a two-year period. We analyzed T2*-weighted magnetic resonance images for the number, location, and topography of CMBs, as well as patients' demographic and clinical information. Among 760 ischemic stroke patients who were included (mean age was 62.1 ± 13.9 years, 51.4% men), 450 (59.2%) were African American. In comparison with Caucasians, African Americans were about five years younger (P = .000) and had a higher rate of hypertension (80.9% vs. 74.5%, P = .036). Similarly, African Americans had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (P = .001). There was no significant difference between African-Americans and Caucasians in terms of CMBs presence and location. African Americans had a higher number of CMBs in comparison with Caucasians, but the difference was not significant. African Americans were more likely to have CMBs ≥5 (P = .047). Although African American stroke patients had a higher rate of large confluent white matter lesions, there was no significant racial difference regarding the rate and severity of deep white matter lesions. We did not observe any differences between African American and Caucasian patients with ischemic stroke patients regarding the presence, number, and location of CMBs. However, our results suggested that the prevalence of multiple CMBs (CMBs ≥5) might be higher among African American stroke patients. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic review of risk factors for progressive ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Yang; Fanyi Kong; Ming Liu; Zilong Hao

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk factors for progressive ischemic stroke, and to prevent onset and make a prognosis of disease, the present study systemically evaluated 19 cohort studies and 10 case-controlled studies of progressive ischemic stroke.SEARCH STRATEGY: A computer-based, online, literature search of PubMed (1966/2007), China Biological Medicine Database (CBM-disc, 1979/2007) and CNKI (www.cnki.net, 1979/2007) was performed to screen for related studies.DATA SELECTION: Cohort or case-controlled studies that focused on risk factors of progressive ischemic stroke were selected for review.Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines.Statistical analysis was performed using RevMan software.MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENT: Risk factors for progressive ischemic stroke.RESULTS: Using the inclusion criteria, 29/781 studies published in English and Chinese were initially reviewed, including 19 cohort studies and 10 case-control studies.Despite variations in determination of progressive ischemic stroke and the intervals between 2 evaluations, all studies described the diagnostic criteria for progressive ischemic stroke.Logistic analysis was employed in 20 of the studies.Meta-analysis of primary data in the related studies determined that the following factors that significantly correlated with progressive ischemic stroke: fever[risk ratio (RR)=2.26,95% confidence interval (Cl):1.20-4.26, P = 0.01;odds ratio (OR)=2.85,95% Cl: 1.64-4.98, P<0.01)1; diabetes (RR= 1.38, 95% Cl: 1.18-1.61,P < 0.01;OR= 2.48, 95% CI: 1.93-3.19, P < 0.01);coronary heart disease (RR= 1.22, 95% Cl: 1.08-1.38, P< 0.01); neuroimaging transformation (RR=1.55, 95%Cl: 1.34-1.80, P < 0.01; OR=2.29,95% Cl: 1.47-.58, P<0.01); and hyperglycemia (RR=2.62, 95% Cl: 1.86-3.68, P<0.01;OR=3.49,95% Cl: 1.92-6.35, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Fever, diabetes, coronary heart disease, neuroimaging transformation, and hyperglycemia are

  17. Mortality study for a decade: ischemic stroke in the elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier J. García Zacarías

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are among the top three causes of death in Cuba and the world, about 80 % of these patients belong to Ischemic Stroke. The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical and developmental profile of patients who died of Ischemic Stroke. A descriptive, prospective research, cross- sectional study was made, the sample included all deaths from ischemic stroke at the University Hospital "Camilo Cienfuegos" Sancti Spiritus, between January 1st, 2001 and December 31, 2010, and persons over 60 years of age with necropsy performed. Atherothrombotic stroke was the most frequent category, the highest mortality rates were observed in persons over 80 years of age and in females, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and transient ischemic attack were the main significant medical history; most patients were admitted in the stroke unit and died in Middle Progressive Care, cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension and hypostatic bronchopne umonia were complications and specific main causes of most frequent death. Value of cerebral edema and hypostatic bronchopneumonia as clinical complications and causes of death in patients investigated is confirmed.

  18. Genome wide analysis of blood pressure variability and ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad S; Nalls, Michael A; Bevan, Steve; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Malik, Rainer; McCarthy, Nina S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Speed, Douglas; Hasan, Nazeeha; Pucek, Mateusz; Rinne, Paul E.; Sever, Peter; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; Maguire, Jane M; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Macleod, Mary J; Attia, John; Markus, Hugh S; Sale, Michele M; Worrall, Bradford B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathy; Meschia, James F; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visit-to-visit variability in BP is associated with ischemic stroke. We sought to determine whether such variability has a genetic aetiology and whether genetic variants associated with BP variability are also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A GWAS for loci influencing BP variability was undertaken in 3,802 individuals from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT) study where long-term visit-to-visit and within visit BP measures were available. Since BP variability is strongly associated with ischemic stroke, we genotyped the sentinel SNP in an independent ischemic stroke population comprising of 8,624 cases and 12,722 controls and in 3,900 additional (Scandinavian) participants from the ASCOT study in order to replicate our findings. Results The ASCOT discovery GWAS identified a cluster of 17 correlated SNPs within the NLGN1 gene (3q26.31) associated with BP variability. The strongest association was with rs976683 (p=1.4×10−8). Conditional analysis on rs976683 provided no evidence of additional independent associations at the locus. Analysis of rs976683 in ischemic stroke patients found no association for overall stroke (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97-1.07; p=0.52) or its sub-types: CE (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.16; p=0.17), LVD (OR 0.98; 95% 0.89-1.07; p=0.60) and SVD (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.17; p=0.19). No evidence for association was found between rs976683 and BP variability in the additional (Scandinavian) ASCOT participants (p=0.18). Conclusions We identified a cluster of SNPs at the NLGN1 locus showing significant association with BP variability. Follow up analyses did not support an association with risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes. PMID:23929743

  19. Elevated admission blood pressure and stroke severity in acute ischemic stroke: the Bergen NORSTROKE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Logallo, Nicola; Oygarden, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2013-01-01

    Transient elevated blood pressure (BP) is frequent in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. The pathophysiology of this response is not clear and its effect on clinical outcome has shown contradictory results. Some studies have suggested that BP elevation may represent a protective response to enhance perfusion in ischemic brain tissue. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between elevated admission BP and stroke severity in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. If it is true that elevated BP represents a protective response in acute ischemia, we expected an inverse association between elevated BP and admission stroke severity, and a positive association between elevated BP and complete neurological recovery within 24 h and/or favorable short-term outcome. Patients with ischemic stroke with hospital admission stroke registry (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). BP was measured immediately after admission in all patients. Elevated BP was defined as systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess stroke severity upon admission. Mild stroke was defined as NIHSS score stroke as NIHSS score 8-14, and severe stroke as NIHSS score ≥15. Complete neurological recovery (CNR) was defined as no persistent ischemic stroke symptoms at 24 h after admission. Favorable short-term outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 at day 7. A total of 749 patients with ischemic stroke were included, of which 621 patients (82.9%) presented with elevated BP. Elevated BP was independently associated with mild stroke (odds ratio, OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.39-3.24; p stroke (OR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.25-0.68; p stroke severity on admission, where elevated BP was associated with mild stroke and lack of elevated BP was associated with severe stroke. This could be explained by a protective effect of elevated BP in the acute phase of ischemic stroke, although the absence of association between

  20. Atrial Fibrillation Genetic Risk and Ischemic Stroke Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Steven A; Parsons, Owen E; Anderson, Christopher D; Benjamin, Emelia J; Malik, Rainer; Weng, Lu-Chen; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathie L; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Ellinor, Patrick T; Markus, Hugh S; Traylor, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a leading cause of cardioembolic stroke, but the relationship between AF and noncardioembolic stroke subtypes are unclear. Because AF may be unrecognized, and because AF has a substantial genetic basis, we assessed for predisposition to AF across ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined associations between AF genetic risk and Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment stroke subtypes in 2374 ambulatory individuals with ischemic stroke and 5175 without from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2 using logistic regression. We calculated AF genetic risk scores using single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AF in a previous independent analysis across a range of preselected significance thresholds. There were 460 (19.4%) individuals with cardioembolic stroke, 498 (21.0%) with large vessel, 474 (20.0%) with small vessel, and 814 (32.3%) individuals with strokes of undetermined cause. Most AF genetic risk scores were associated with stroke, with the strongest association (P=6×10(-)(4)) attributed to scores of 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (each associated with AF at Pgenetic risk and stroke were enriched in the cardioembolic stroke subset (strongest P=1.2×10(-)(9), 944 single-nucleotide polymorphism score). In contrast, AF genetic risk was not significantly associated with noncardioembolic stroke subtypes. Comprehensive AF genetic risk scores were specific for cardioembolic stroke. Incomplete workups and subtype misclassification may have limited the power to detect associations with strokes of undetermined pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to determine whether AF genetic risk is a useful biomarker to enhance clinical discrimination of stroke pathogeneses. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Air Pollution Is Associated With Ischemic Stroke via Cardiogenic Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jong-Won; Bang, Oh Young; Ahn, Kangmo; Park, Sang-Soon; Park, Tai Hwan; Kim, Jae Guk; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, SooJoo; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Kim, Dong-Eog; Kim, Joon-Tae; Choi, Jay Chol; Oh, Mi-Sun; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assessed the impact of short-term exposure to air pollution on ischemic stroke subtype, while focusing on stroke caused via cardioembolism. From a nationwide, multicenter, prospective, stroke registry database, 13 535 patients with acute ischemic stroke hospitalized to 12 participating centers were enrolled in this study. Data on the hourly concentrations of particulate matter air pollution surveillance stations. The average values of these air pollutants over the 7 days before stroke onset from nearest air quality monitoring station in each patient were used to determine association with stroke subtype. The primary outcome was stroke subtype, including large artery atherosclerosis, small-vessel occlusion, cardioembolism, and stroke of other or undetermined cause. Particulate matter air pollution. Our findings suggest that the short-term exposure to air pollutants is associated with cardioembolic stroke, and greater care should be taken for those susceptible to cerebral embolism during peak pollution periods. Public and environmental health policies to reduce air pollution could help slow down global increasing trends of cardioembolic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Intravenous thrombolysis plus hypothermia for acute treatment of ischemic stroke (ICTuS-L): final results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-01-01

    .... Intravenous Thrombolysis Plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) was a randomized, multicenter trial of hypothermia and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in patients treated within 6 hours after ischemic stroke...

  3. Maintenance of normoglycemia may improve outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthi S Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several studies have shown that high admission glucose is associated with poor outcomes after stroke, but the impact of maintenance of normoglycemia on functional outcome during hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke is less well established. Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the independent association of postadmission glycemic status in the 1st week with 3-month functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted within 48 h of symptom onset with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS of ≥4 were selected from a prospectively maintained database by chart review. Demographic data, risk factors, NIHSS, and blood glucose values in the 1st week were collected. The primary outcome was Modified Rankin Scale (mRS score at 3 months (good outcome-mRS ≤2. Results: Over 3 years, 342 patients were enrolled with 220 (64.32% males. Mean age was 60.5 ± 13.4 years, and median admission score on NIHSS was 10 (interquartile range: 6–16. Blood glucose values persistently <140 mg/dl in the 1st week were associated with a good 3-month functional outcome in univariate analysis (P = 0.036. Hypoglycemic episodes occurred only in 11 (3.22% patients. Conclusions: Blood glucose values persistently below 140 mg/dl in the 1st week after acute ischemic stroke were associated with a favorable outcome in our study. Future clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

  5. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C; Southerland, Andrew M; Worrall, Bradford B

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits-Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0-2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p acute ischemic stroke in the setting of LVO. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: role of inflammatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rong; Yang, Guojun; Li, Guohong

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Experimentally and clinically, the brain responds to ischemic injury with an acute and prolonged inflammatory process, characterized by rapid activation of resident cells (mainly microglia), production of proinflammatory mediators, and infiltration of various types of inflammatory cells (including neutrophils, different subtypes of T cells, monocyte/macrophages, and other cells) into the ischemic brain tissue. These cellular events collaboratively contribute to ischemic brain injury. Despite intense investigation, there are still numerous controversies concerning the time course of the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the brain and their pathogenic roles in ischemic brain injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the time-dependent recruitment of different inflammatory cells following focal cerebral I/R. We discuss how these cells contribute to ischemic brain injury and highlight certain recent findings and currently unanswered questions about inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. PMID:20130219

  7. Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Performed in Acute Perinatal Stroke Reveals Hyperperfusion Associated With Ischemic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christopher G; Dehaes, Mathieu; Gagoski, Borjan A; Grant, P Ellen; Rivkin, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Perfusion-weighted imaging in adults with acute stroke often reveals hypoperfusion in the ischemic core and in a surrounding area of nondiffusion-restricted penumbral tissue. Perinatal stroke is common, but the perfusion pattern is rarely documented. We aimed to describe the perfusion pattern in newborns with perinatal stroke. Neonates with clinical features of acute stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Perfusion data were obtained using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling. Strokes were classified as arterial, venous, or both. Core infarction was determined by the presence of restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging. Perfusion-weighted imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging signal in the ischemic area were visually compared with the homologous region in the contralesional hemisphere. Electroencephalogram data were evaluated for seizure activity. In 25 neonates with acute stroke, 8 of 11 (73%) with arterial ischemic stroke demonstrated hyperperfusion, 1 of 9 (11%) with venous stroke, and 4 of 5 (80%) with both. Hypoperfusion was observed in 3 of 9 (33%) with venous and none with arterial ischemic stroke. Perfusion was normal in 4 of 9 (45%) with venous and 1 of 5 (20%) with both. Twenty-one of 24 patients (88%) with electroencephalogram data had either electrographic seizures or focal sharp waves in the ipsilesional hemisphere (11/11 arterial ischemic stroke, 6/9 venous, and 4/5 both). Perfusion-weighted imaging can be obtained in neonates with acute stroke and often reveals hyperperfusion in the infarct core. Penumbra in arterial ischemic stroke is seldom found. Hyperperfusion may be caused by poststroke reperfusion or to neuronal hyperexcitability of stroke-associated seizure. Its identification may be useful for consideration of therapy for acute neonatal stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Ischemic stroke subtype is associated with outcome in thrombolyzed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Ziegler; Svendsen, M L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of ischemic stroke subtype on clinical outcome in patients treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) is sparsely examined. We studied the association between stroke subtype and clinical outcome in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-evaluated patients...... treated with IV-tPA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a single-center retrospective analysis of MRI-selected stroke patients treated with IV-tPA between 2004 and 2010. The Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria were used to establish the stroke subtype by 3 months. The outcomes...... of interest were a 3-month modified Rankin Scale score of 0-1 (favorable outcome), and early neurological improvement defined as complete remission of neurological deficit or improvement of ≥4 on the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale at 24 h. The outcomes among stroke subtypes were compared...

  9. Stress hyperglycemia and acute ischemic stroke in-hospital outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Dimitriou, Panagiotis; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Kostaki, Stavroula; Angelopoulou, Stella-Maria; Papadopoulou, Maria; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2017-02-01

    Stress hyperglycemia is frequent in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is unclear whether stress hyperglycemia only reflects stroke severity or if it is directly associated with adverse outcome. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of stress hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke. We prospectively studied 790 consecutive patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke (41.0% males, age 79.4±6.8years). The severity of stroke was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Stress hyperglycemia was defined as fasting serum glucose levels at the second day after admission ≥126mg/dl in patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The outcome was assessed with adverse outcome rates at discharge (modified Rankin scale between 2 and 6) and with in-hospital mortality. In the total study population, 8.6% had stress hyperglycemia. Patients with stress hyperglycemia had more severe stroke. Independent predictors of adverse outcome at discharge were age, prior ischemic stroke and NIHSS at admission whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of adverse outcome were age, heart rate at admission, prior ischemic stroke, log-triglyceride (TG) levels and stress hyperglycemia, whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were atrial fibrillation (AF), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum log-TG levels and NIHSS at admission. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were age, AF, DBP, log-TG levels and stress hyperglycemia. Stress hyperglycemia does not appear to be directly associated with the outcome of acute ischemic stroke. However, given that patients with stress hyperglycemia had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors than

  10. Return to work after ischemic stroke: a methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Marcella A; Kittner, Steven J

    2002-01-01

    Despite the economic cost of lost employment, return to work after ischemic stroke has received little study. The percentages of patients working after stroke vary widely from 11 to 85%. Comparisons of these studies are difficult because they report return to work in different populations after diverse follow-up periods using variable definitions of stroke and work. Stroke severity as measured by activities of daily living was the most robust predictor of return to work. However, many factors known to influence vocational outcome after other illness (e.g., social and job characteristics) have not been examined. Directions for future studies of return to work are suggested.

  11. Low dose CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Amanda; Symons, Sean; Jakubovic, Raphael; Zhang, Liying; Aviv, Richard I. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); So, Aaron; Lee, Ting-Yim [Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if CT perfusion (CTP) measurements at low doses (LD = 20 or 50 mAs) are similar to those obtained at regular doses (RD = 100 mAs), with and without the addition of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). A single-center, prospective study was performed in patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 37; 54 % male; age = 74 ± 15 years). Two CTP scans were performed on each subject: one at 100 mAs (RD) and one at either 50 or 20 mAs (LD). CTP parameters were compared between the RD and LD scans in regions of ischemia, infarction, and normal tissue. Differences were determined using a within-subjects ANOVA (p < 0.05) followed by a paired t test post hoc analysis (p < 0.01). At 50 mAs, there was no significant difference between cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), or time to maximum enhancement (Tmax) values for the RD and LD scans in the ischemic, infarcted, or normal contralateral regions (p < 0.05). At 20 mAs, there were significant differences between the RD and LD scans for all parameters in the ischemic and normal tissue regions (p > 0.05). CTP-derived CBF and CBV are not different at 50 mAs compared to 100 mAs, even without the addition of ASIR. Current CTP protocols can be modified to reduce the effective dose by 50 % without altering CTP measurements. (orig.)

  12. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Acute on Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Raja Ahsan Aftab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is due to either local thrombus formation or emboli that occlude a cerebral artery, together with chronic kidney disease represent major mortality and morbidity. Here wer present a case of 53 years old Malay man, admitted to a hospital in Malaysia complaining of sudden onset of weakness on right sided upper and lower limb associated with slurred speech. Patient was also suffering from uncontrolled hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease stage 4, and diabetes mellitus(un controlled. He was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke with cranial nerve 7 palsy (with right hemiparesis, acute on chronic kidney disease precipitated by dehydration and ACE inhibitor, and hyperkalemia. Patients with ischemic disease and chronic kidney disaese require constant monitering and carefull selected pharmacotherapy. Patient was placed under observation and was prescribed multiple pharamacotherpay to stabalise detoriating condition. Keywords: ischemic disease; chronic kidney disease; uncontrolled hypertension. | PubMed

  13. Intensive treadmill training in the acute phase after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to (a) assess the feasibility of intensive treadmill training in patients with acute ischemic stroke, (b) test whether physical activity of the legs during training increases with time, and (c) evaluate to what extent training sessions contribute toward the overall physical...... activity of these patients. Twenty hospitalized patients with acute ischemic stroke trained on a treadmill twice daily for 30 min for 5 days and on day 30. Physical activity was measured as activity counts (AC) from accelerometers. A total of 196 of 224 initiated training sessions were completed. Training...... with increasing number of days, with the median AC being 133% higher on day 5 than on day 1. AC in the paretic leg during 60 min of training constituted median 53% of the daytime AC. Early intensive treadmill training in acute ischemic stroke patients is thus feasible and contributes considerably toward...

  14. Clues to occult cancer in patients with ischemic stroke.

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    Suk Jae Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that hidden malignancy could be detected in patients with cryptogenic stroke without active cancer when they showed the distinctive characteristics of cancer-related stroke. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Among 2,562 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, patients with cryptogenic stroke were analyzed and categorized into two groups according to the presence of active cancer: cryptogenic stroke with active cancer (cancer-related stroke, CA-stroke group and without active cancer (CR-stroke group. Patients with active lung cancer without stroke were also recruited for comparison purposes (CA-control. Clinical factors, lesion patterns on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, and laboratory findings were analyzed among groups. A total of 348 patients with cryptogenic stroke were enrolled in this study. Among them, 71 (20.4% patients had active cancer at the time of stroke. The D-dimer levels were significantly higher in patients with CA-stroke than those with CR-stroke or CA-control (both p<0.001. Regarding lesion patterns, patients with CA-stroke mostly had multiple lesions in multiple vascular territories, while more than 80% of patients with CR-stroke had single/multiple lesions in a single vascular territory (P<0.001. D-dimer levels (OR 1.11 per 1 µg/mL increase; 95% CI 1.06-1.15; P<0.001 and DWI lesion patterns (OR 7.13; 95% CI 3.42-14.87; P<0.001 were independently associated with CA-stroke. Workup for hidden malignancy was performed during hospitalization in 10 patients who showed elevated D-dimer levels and multiple infarcts involving multiple vascular territories but had no known cancer, and it revealed hidden malignancies in all the patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with CA-stroke have distinctive D-dimer levels and lesion patterns. These characteristics can serve as clues to occult cancer in patients with cryptogenic stroke.

  15. Anosognosia in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

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    V. N. Grigoryeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the frequency of anosognosia (a deficit of self-awareness, its anatomic correlates associated with other neuropsychological and neurological disorders in acute hemispheric ischemic stroke (IS.Patients and methods 150 patients (83 men and 67 women; mean age, 63.0±9.3 years with acute hemispheric IS were examined. All the patients underwent neurological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological (by the procedure described by A.R. Luria examinations. neuropsychological investigations. Anosognosia was diagnosed using the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX and the authors' procedure involving a scale to measure impaired self-rating of motor abilities and a scale to measure impaired self-rating of cognitive abilities in everyday life.Results and discussion. In the acute period of hemispheric IS, reduced self-awareness of motor and cognitive abilities was noted in 14% of the patients and unawareness of only cognitive abilities was recorded in 15%. Patients with anosognosia and cognitive dysfunction (ACD and those with anosognosia and motor dysfunction (AMD had right-sided hemispheric IS more frequently (76% while this was not found in patients with isolated ACD. The development of anosognosia for paralysis and paresis was favored by the large sizes of an ischemic focus that involved a few lobes in the posterior regions of the brain although no lesions were found in the anosognosia-specific anatomical regions. ACD and AMD proved to be associated with unilateral spatial and tactile neglect and obvious regulatory dysfunction. 

  16. Astrocytes, therapeutic targets for neuroprotection and neurorestoration in ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongwu; Chopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type within the central nervous system. They play essential roles in maintaining normal brain function, as they are a critical structural and functional part of the tripartite synapses and the neurovascular unit, and communicate with neurons, oligodendrocytes and endothelial cells. After an ischemic stroke, astrocytes perform multiple functions both detrimental and beneficial, for neuronal survival during the acute phase. Aspects of the astrocytic inflammatory response to stroke may aggravate the ischemic lesion, but astrocytes also provide benefit for neuroprotection, by limiting lesion extension via anti-excitotoxicity effects and releasing neurotrophins. Similarly, during the late recovery phase after stroke, the glial scar may obstruct axonal regeneration and subsequently reduce the functional outcome; however, astrocytes also contribute to angiogenesis, neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and axonal remodeling, and thereby promote neurological recovery. Thus, the pivotal involvement of astrocytes in normal brain function and responses to an ischemic lesion designates them as excellent therapeutic targets to improve functional outcome following stroke. In this review, we will focus on functions of astrocytes and astrocyte-mediated events during stroke and recovery. We will provide an overview of approaches on how to reduce the detrimental effects and amplify the beneficial effects of astrocytes on neuroprotection and on neurorestoration post stroke, which may lead to novel and clinically relevant therapies for stroke. PMID:26455456

  17. European Stroke Organisation (ESO) guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, George; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Michel, Patrik; Papavasileiou, Vasileios; Petersson, Jesper; Staykov, Dimitre; Thomas, Brenda; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthermia is a frequent complication in patients with acute ischemic stroke. On the other hand, therapeutically induced hypothermia has shown promising potential in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. This Guideline Document presents the European Stroke Organisation guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A multidisciplinary group identified related questions and developed its recommendations based on evidence from randomized controlled trials elaborating the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. This Guideline Document was reviewed within the European Stroke Organisation and externally and was approved by the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and the European Stroke Organisation Executive Committee. We found low-quality evidence, and therefore, we cannot make any recommendation for treating hyperthermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and hyperthermia; moderate evidence to suggest against routine prevention of hyperthermia with antipyretics as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and normothermia; very low-quality evidence to suggest against routine induction of hypothermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The currently available data about the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke are limited, and the strengths of the recommendations are therefore weak. We call for new randomized controlled trials as well as recruitment of eligible patients to ongoing randomized controlled trials to allow for better-informed recommendations in the future. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  18. Shared genetic contribution to ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib‐Samii, Poneh; Harold, Denise; Dichgans, Martin; Williams, Julie; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Fornage, Myriam; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Psaty, Bruce M; Seshadri, Sudha; Nalls, Mike A; Devan, William J; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Malik, Rainer; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Ikram, M Arfan; Clarke, Robert; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Kilarski, Laura L; Walters, Matthew; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lambert, Jean‐Charles; Ibrahim‐Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier‐Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton‐Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao‐Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie‐Thçrèse; Choi, Seung‐Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiçvet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger‐Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George‐Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez‐Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Del Zompo, Maria; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton‐Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li‐San; Dartigues, Jean‐François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak‐Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidence suggests epidemiological and pathological links between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated the evidence that shared genetic factors underpin the two diseases. Methods Using genome‐wide association study (GWAS) data from METASTROKE + (15,916 IS cases and 68,826 controls) and the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP; 17,008 AD cases and 37,154 controls), we evaluated known associations with AD and IS. On the subset of data for which we could obtain compatible genotype‐level data (4,610 IS cases, 1,281 AD cases, and 14,320 controls), we estimated the genome‐wide genetic correlation (rG) between AD and IS, and the three subtypes (cardioembolic, small vessel, and large vessel), using genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We then performed a meta‐analysis and pathway analysis in the combined AD and small vessel stroke data sets to identify the SNPs and molecular pathways through which disease risk may be conferred. Results We found evidence of a shared genetic contribution between AD and small vessel stroke (rG [standard error] = 0.37 [0.17]; p = 0.011). Conversely, there was no evidence to support shared genetic factors in AD and IS overall or with the other stroke subtypes. Of the known GWAS associations with IS or AD, none reached significance for association with the other trait (or stroke subtypes). A meta‐analysis of AD IGAP and METASTROKE + small vessel stroke GWAS data highlighted a region (ATP5H/KCTD2/ICT1) associated with both diseases (p = 1.8 × 10−8). A pathway analysis identified four associated pathways involving cholesterol transport and immune response. Interpretation Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to AD and small vessel stroke and highlight potential causal pathways and loci. Ann Neurol 2016;79:739–747 PMID:26913989

  19. Migraine prophylaxis, ischemic depolarizations, and stroke outcomes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yalcin, Nilufer; Yu, Esther S; Daneshmand, Ali; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Can, Anil; Sengul, Buse; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Ayata, Cenk

    2015-01-01

    Migraine with aura is an established stroke risk factor, and excitatory mechanisms such as spreading depression (SD) are implicated in the pathogenesis of both migraine and stroke. Spontaneous SD waves originate within the peri-infarct tissue and exacerbate the metabolic mismatch during focal cerebral ischemia. Genetically enhanced SD susceptibility facilitates anoxic depolarizations and peri-infarct SDs and accelerates infarct growth, suggesting that susceptibility to SD is a critical determinant of vulnerability to ischemic injury. Because chronic treatment with migraine prophylactic drugs suppresses SD susceptibility, we tested whether migraine prophylaxis can also suppress ischemic depolarizations and improve stroke outcome. We measured the cortical susceptibility to SD and ischemic depolarizations, and determined tissue and neurological outcomes after middle cerebral artery occlusion in wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 knock-in mice treated with vehicle, topiramate or lamotrigine daily for 7 weeks or as a single dose shortly before testing. Chronic treatment with topiramate or lamotrigine reduced the susceptibility to KCl-induced or electric stimulation-induced SDs as well as ischemic depolarizations in both wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice. Consequently, both tissue and neurological outcomes were improved. Notably, treatment with a single dose of either drug was ineffective. These data underscore the importance of hyperexcitability as a mechanism for increased stroke risk in migraineurs, and suggest that migraine prophylaxis may not only prevent migraine attacks but also protect migraineurs against ischemic injury. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Intravenous tenecteplase in acute ischemic stroke: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouz, Réza

    2014-06-01

    Tenecteplase in a genetically engineered variant of alteplase. Although the two have the same mechanism of action, tenecteplase has properties that makes it a seemingly more advantageous thrombolytic. Because of its rapid single-bolus administration, its use is favored over alteplase in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Over the past few years, several clinical studies have been conducted to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke. In spite of the mixed results of these studies, experimentation with tenecteplase continues in from of clinical trials. In this article, the utility of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke will be discussed.

  1. Ischemic Stroke Due to Cardiac Involvement: Emery Dreifuss Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kasım Ulusoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is a hereditary disease. It is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, fatigue related to skapulo-humero-peroneal muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy which develops in adulthood and cardiac conduction system block. Cardiac involvement has a prognostic significance in patients with EDMD and even sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. In this article, an EDMD patient with ischemic stroke clinic who didn’t have regular cardiac follow-up was reported and the importance of the treatment of cardiac diseases which could play a role in ischemic stroke etiology and the implantation of pace-maker was mentioned.

  2. A STUDY ON INTRACRANIAL STENOSIS IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

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    Jerrin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute ischemic stroke is very common cause of significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The causes of acute ischemic stroke could be intracranial or extra cranial. Prevention of the acute episode could be decreased by surgically treating ex tra - cranial vascular disease but the prevention of intracranial cause is only medical. Various risk factors are also associated with development of ischemic stroke. However, the association between these and the pattern of vascular involvement is not clear . AIM: The aim of the study was to 1. Identify the location of the vessel involved in different cases of ischemic stroke 2. To study the various risk factors associated with the development of ischemic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: This was a prospective study conducted between the years 2010 and 2012. All adult patients with acute ischemic stroke which was confirmed by MRI and less than two weeks duration were included in the study. Parameters recorded were presence of pre - existing comorbid conditions, n eurological examination findings, Cardiovascular system examination findings, Blood pressures, blood sugar levels and pattern of vascular involvement. This was assessed using MR angiography or four vessel Doppler. Statistical analysis was done using the SP SS software. RESULTS: Two hundred patients were enrolled in the study. Pure extracranial stenosis was present in 21.5%, extracranial with intracranial stenosis in 34%, and pure intracranial stenosis in 44.5%, which was predominant and resembled other Indi an studies. 15.5% of patients had significant carotid stenosis based on Doppler study and were suitable candidates for carotid endarterectomy. Middle cerebral artery was commonly involved (55%. Hypertension (63.5%, diabetes mellitus (48%, alcoholism (20 .5% and smoking (18.5% were the common risk factors. Prevalence of these risk factors was more in those with intracranial stenosis in our study, elevated total

  3. NLRP3 deficiency ameliorates neurovascular damage in experimental ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Ziying; Wei, Xinbing; Han, Huirong; Meng, Xianfang; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Weichen; Li, Fengli; Xin, Tao; Pang, Qi; Yi, Fan

    2014-04-01

    Although the innate immune response to induce postischemic inflammation is considered as an essential step in the progression of cerebral ischemia injury, the role of innate immunity mediator NLRP3 in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke is unknown. In this study, focal ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in NLRP3(-/-), NOX2(-/-), or wild-type (WT) mice. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Evans blue permeability, and electron microscopic analyses, we found that NLRP3 deficiency ameliorated cerebral injury in mice after ischemic stroke by reducing infarcts and blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. We further showed that the contribution of NLRP3 to neurovascular damage was associated with an autocrine/paracrine pattern of NLRP3-mediated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release as evidenced by increased brain microvessel endothelial cell permeability and microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. Finally, we found that NOX2 deficiency improved outcomes after ischemic stroke by mediating NLRP3 signaling. This study for the first time shows the contribution of NLRP3 to neurovascular damage and provides direct evidence that NLRP3 as an important target molecule links NOX2-mediated oxidative stress to neurovascular damage in ischemic stroke. Pharmacological targeting of NLRP3-mediated inflammatory response at multiple levels may help design a new approach to develop therapeutic strategies for prevention of deterioration of cerebral function and for the treatment of stroke.

  4. Comparisons of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in Penumbra, Infarct, and Normal Brain Regions in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Confirmatory Data Using Bootstrap Confidence Intervals, Analysis of Variance, and Analysis of Means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Mejia, Mariana; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    There is no consensus about apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in acute stroke regions that could be used by clinicians in a day-to-day clinical practice; regional measures using confidence intervals (CIs) and a graphic representation of means are scarce in the literature. Our aim in this study was to compare ADC values in infarct, penumbra, and normal brain regions in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This is a retrospective study of 100 magnetic resonance imaging data sets from AIS patients. ADC values were measured in the infarct, penumbra, and normal regions. Three hundred measurements underwent 1-way analysis of variance, analysis of means, and calculation of 95% and 84% CIs. There was a statistically significant difference at the P level less than .025 in ADC values for the 3 regions (F[2, 297] = 168.039, P ≤ .001), with no overlap of the CIs for the means among the regions: normal brain (mean [M] = .847, standard deviation [SD] = .103, 95% CI: .825-.866), infarct (M = .533, SD = .157, 95% CI: .501-.563), and penumbra (M = .764, SD = .110, 95% CI: .740-.787). ADC values might be used as reference data in acute stroke-specific populations; CIs would provide radiologists and clinicians with additional quantitative tools to evaluate penumbra, infarct, and normal brain tissue and to tailor follow-up and treatment options for selected patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hemorrhagic transformation in ischemic stroke and its treatment during thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Paciaroni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic transformation (HT of brain infarction or hemorrhagic infarction is a complication of acute ischemic stroke, especially in cardioembolic stroke, and represents the most feared complication of thrombolysis. HT is a multifocal secondary bleeding into brain infarcts with innumerable foci of capillary and venular extravasation either remaining as discrete petechiae or emerging to form confluent purpura. HT is evidenced as a parenchymal area of increased density within an area of low attenuation in a typical vascular distribution on non-contrasted CT scans and is subdivided into two major categories on the basis of standardised definition: haemorrhagic infarct (HI and parenchymal haematoma (PH. PH has been associated to poor outcome in ischemic stroke patients. Thus, its prevention, early detection and adequate treatment represent key points in the management of acute stroke.

  6. The iScore predicts poor functional outcomes early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Raptis, Stavroula; Kapral, Moira K; Liu, Ying; Tu, Jack V; Mamdani, Muhammad; Austin, Peter C

    2011-12-01

    The iScore is a prediction tool originally developed to estimate the risk of death after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke. Our objective was to determine whether the iScore could also predict poor functional outcomes. We applied the iScore to patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke at multiple hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 2003 and 2008, who had been identified from the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network regional stroke center database (n=3818) and from an external data set, the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network Ontario Stroke Audit (n=4635). Patients were excluded if they were included in the sample used to develop and validate the initial iScore. Poor functional outcomes were defined as: (1) death at 30 days or disability at discharge, in which disability was defined as having a modified Rankin Scale 3 to 5; and (2) death at 30 days or institutionalization at discharge. The prevalence of poor functional outcomes in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network and the Ontario Stroke Audit, respectively, were 55.7% and 44.1% for death at 30 days or disability at discharge and 16.9% and 16.2%, respectively, for death at 30 days or institutionalization at discharge. The iScore stratified the risk of poor outcomes in low- and high-risk individuals. Observed versus predicted outcomes showed high correlations: 0.988 and 0.940 for mortality or disability and 0.985 and 0.993 for mortality or institutionalization in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network and Ontario Stroke Audit cohorts. The iScore can be used to estimate the risk of death or a poor functional outcome after an acute ischemic stroke.

  7. Remote ischemic per-conditioning: a novel therapy for acute stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Cecil D; Manlhiot, Cedric; Schmidt, Michael R; Nielsen, Torsten T; Redington, Andrew N

    2011-10-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning is a phenomenon by which a short period of sublethal ischemia to an organ protects against subsequent ischemia in another organ. We have recently demonstrated that remote ischemic conditioning by transient hind limb ischemia delivered during ischemia and before reperfusion can provide potent cardioprotection, a phenomenon we termed per-conditioning. This study evaluated whether remote ischemic per-conditioning may provide neuroprotection in a clinically relevant rat model of acute ischemic stroke. Remote ischemic conditioning by transient limb ischemia was used in a rat transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model of acute stroke. A total of 39 P60 rats were randomly allocated to receive preconditioning, per-conditioning, or sham conditioning. Cerebral ischemia was maintained for 120 minutes followed by reperfusion. The resulting infarct size at 24 hours was quantified using computerized image analysis of 2-3-5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride-stained brain sections. Compared with control, both pre- and per-conditioning significantly reduced brain infarct size with the more clinically relevant per-conditioning stimulus being superior to preconditioning. Remote per-conditioning by transient limb ischemia is a facile, clinically relevant stimulus that provides potent neuroprotection in a model of regional brain ischemia-reperfusion injury. Further studies are required to better understand the mechanisms and biology of this response before translation to randomized controlled trials of remote per-conditioning for acute ischemic stroke.

  8. RAAS and stress markers in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Back, C.; Thiesen, K L; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade has neuroprotective effects in animal stroke models, but no effects in clinical stroke trials. We evaluated cerebral and peripheral changes in the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) and stress responses in acute ischemic stroke patients....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood from a jugular and cubital vein was collected within 48 h of stroke onset, after 24 and 48 h, and renin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, aldosterone, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and cortisol were measured. Post-stroke cubital vein samples were collected after 8 (4.7-10) months......-stroke. No differences in RAAS were detected between jugular and cubital plasma levels. Jugular venous plasma levels of epinephrine and cortisol were elevated in the acute phase compared to cubital levels (P cortisol levels in the jugular vein blood may reflect a higher...

  9. Positive effects of intermittent fasting in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Ng, Gavin Yong Quan; Poh, Luting; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2017-03-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary protocol where energy restriction is induced by alternate periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Prophylactic intermittent fasting has been shown to extend lifespan and attenuate the progress and severity of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular (e.g. stroke and myocardial infarction), neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) and cancerous diseases in animal models. Stroke is the second leading cause of death, and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity have been associated with elevated risks of stroke in humans. Recent studies have shown that prophylactic IF may mitigate tissue damage and neurological deficit following ischemic stroke by a mechanism(s) involving suppression of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death pathways in animal stroke models. This review summarizes data supporting the potential hormesis mechanisms of prophylactic IF in animal models, and with a focus on findings from animal studies of prophylactic IF in stroke in our laboratory.

  10. Spontaneous Low Frequency Oscillations in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2014-01-01

    patients admitted to the stroke unit with symptoms of ischemic stroke. 11/29 patients received thrombolytic therapy. NIRS examination was conducted 2 days (median time) from stroke onset. NIRS optodes were placed on each side of the head with a 3 cm source-detector distance. Using transfer function.......09-0.11 Hz range are affected by changes in cerebral autoregulation (CA), which is altered following stroke. We examined oxyHb LFOs at bed-side as a marker of CA in the subacute phase in stroke patients with or without recombinant tissue plasminogen activator thrombolytic therapy. Methods: We recruited 29...... analysis, inter-hemispheric phase shift and amplitude ratio of the oxyHb oscillations in the 0.09-0.11 Hz range were assessed. Results: The correlation between NIHSS scores at admission and oxyHb parameters revealed a significant positive correlation between stroke severity at admission and inter...

  11. Risk factors for progressive ischemic stroke A retrospective analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive ischemic stroke has higher fatality rate and disability rate than common cerebral infarction, thus it is very significant to investigate the early predicting factors related to the occurrence of progressive ischemic stroke, thc potential pathological mechanism and the risk factors of early intervention for preventing the occurrence of progressive ischemic stroke and ameliorating its outcome.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the possible related risk factors in patients with progressive ishcemic stroke, so as to provide reference for the prevention and treatment of progressive ishcemic stroke.DESIGN: A retrospective analysis.SETTING: Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Beijing Coal Mining Group.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 280 patients with progressive ischemic stroke were selected from the Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Beijing Coal Mining Group from March 2002 to June 2006, including 192 males and 88 females, with a mean age of (62±7) years old. They were all accorded with the diagnostic standards for cerebral infarction set by the Fourth National Academic Meeting for Cerebrovascular Disease in 1995, and confired by CT or MRI, admitted within 24 hours after attack, and the neurological defect progressed gradually or aggravated in gradients within 72 hours after attack, and the aggravation of neurological defect was defined as the neurological deficit score decreased by more than 2 points. Meanwhile,200 inpatients with non-progressive ischemic stroke (135 males and 65 females) were selected as the control group.METHODS: After admission, a univariate analysis of variance was conducted using the factors of blood pressure, history of diabetes mellitus, fever, leukocytosis, levels of blood lipids, fibrinogen, blood glucose and plasma homocysteine, cerebral arterial stenosis, and CT symptoms of early infarction, and the significant factors were involved in the multivariate non-conditional Logistic regression analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

  12. Thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: where and when?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Micieli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of acute ischemic stroke remains an open challenge for the clinicians and is closely connected to the ready acknowledgment of symptoms, to the promptness of the instrumental diagnosis and consequently to the rapidity of the pharmacological intervention. Although several studies have validated the effectiveness and the safety profileof the intravenous fibrinolytic treatment, the number of patients who benefit of such therapeutic opportunity is still too little. This data is partially due to the delay within patients arrive to the hospital and to the doubts of the physicians on the possible collateral effects, but it is also related to logistic and organizational-managerial problematic of the patient with acute stroke.These last ones mainly derive from the deficiency on the national territory of dedicated structures (Stroke Unit, from the absence of operative connections between the 118-service and the Stroke Unit, from the delay of the neurologist calling in the emergency room that does not allow an adapted diagnostic evaluation of the ischemic event. The spread of the intravenous fibrinolysis must therefore necessarily pass through the creation of participation protocols between hospitals with stroke unit and primary aid, and between department of emergency/ urgency and staff of the stroke unit also previewing the creation of professional figures like those of the urgency neurologist that could have the full right of the management and the treatment of cerebral ischemic pathology.

  13. THE IMPACT OF COMORBIDITY ON COGNITIVE PARAMETERS AFTER ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirena Valkova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study is to examine the impact of comorbidity on cognitive parameters after the first ever ischemic stroke.Material and methods: We examined 112 patients (aged 46 to 84 (66.67± 5.96, 69 males and 43 females with first ever ischemic stroke. For cognitive assessment we used Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, 10 word test (for short term memory and delayed recall, Isaack’s test for verbal fluency (VF, Geriatric depression scale (GDS, Hamilton depression scale (HDS, Blessed dementia information memory concentration test (revised, BDIMCT, Benton Visual Retention test (A,E; BVRT – number of corrects and number of errors and Wiskonsin Card Sorting Test (number of errors, WCST. The patients were examined on two step model. At acute stage, after collecting medical history, somatic and neurological examinations, MMSE, 10 words test and HDS were applied. At subacute stroke stage (90±5 days after first stroke symptoms, all cognitive tests were used. „STATGRAPHICS Plus 5.0 (free version” was used for statistical analysis.Results: Chronic ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most important additional risk factors for cognitive decline. Thyroid pathology, renal failure and anemia are independently associated with poststroke depression.Conclusions: On the basis of these data we can conclude that vascular risk factors are independently associated with cognitive and emotional changes after stroke and their effects should be assessed and taken into account for subsequent treatment of stroke survivors.

  14. [Technical standards for the interventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlenbruch, M A; Bendszus, M

    2015-10-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is the leading cause of acquired disability and its treatment is still a major challenge. For more than a decade, various mechanical devices have been developed for the recanalization of proximal artery occlusions in acute ischemic stroke but most of them have been approved for clinical use, only on the basis of uncontrolled case series. Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-specific plasminogen activator administered (iv rtPA) within 4.5 h of symptom onset is so far the only approved medicinal treatment in the acute phase of cerebral infarction. With the introduction of stent retrievers, mechanical thrombectomy has demonstrated substantial rates of partial or complete arterial recanalization and improved outcomes compared with iv rtPA and best medical treatment alone in multiple randomized clinical trials in select patients with acute ischemic stroke and proximal artery occlusions. This review discusses the evolution of endovascular stroke therapy followed by a discussion of the current technical standards of mechanical thrombectomy that have to be considered during endovascular stroke therapy and the updated treatment recommendations of the ESO Karolinska stroke update.

  15. Imaging biomarkers in acute ischemic stroke trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harston, G W J; Rane, N; Shaya, G; Thandeswaran, S; Cellerini, M; Sheerin, F; Kennedy, J

    2015-05-01

    Imaging biomarkers are increasingly used to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of acute ischemic stroke. However, this approach of routinely using imaging biomarkers to inform treatment decisions has yet to be translated into successful randomized trials. The aim of this study was to systematically review the use of imaging biomarkers in randomized controlled trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke, exploring the purposes for which the imaging biomarkers were used. We performed a systematic review of imaging biomarkers used in randomized controlled trials of acute ischemic stroke, in which a therapeutic intervention was trialed within 48 hours of symptom onset. Data bases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, strokecenter.org, and the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (1995-2014). Eighty-four studies met the criteria, of which 49 used imaging to select patients; 31, for subgroup analysis; and 49, as an outcome measure. Imaging biomarkers were broadly used for 8 purposes. There was marked heterogeneity in the definitions and uses of imaging biomarkers and significant publication bias among post hoc analyses. Imaging biomarkers offer the opportunity to refine the trial cohort by minimizing participant variation, to decrease sample size, and to personalize treatment approaches for those who stand to benefit most. However, within imaging modalities, there has been little consistency between stroke trials. Greater effort to prospectively use consistent imaging biomarkers should help improve the development of novel treatment strategies in acute stroke and improve comparison between studies. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Pathogenic ischemic stroke phenotypes in the NINDS-stroke genetics network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D; Chapman, Sherita N; Cole, John W; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Labovitz, Daniel L; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S; McArdle, Patrick F; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B; Meschia, James F

    2014-12-01

    NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke)-SiGN (Stroke Genetics Network) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high-quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of pathogenic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major pathogenic groups without weighting toward the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16 954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded readjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. The distribution of pathogenic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (Pstroke pathogenesis (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (κ 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (κ 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.75). This study demonstrates that pathogenic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a patient with stroke does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Admitting acute ischemic stroke patients to a stroke care monitoring unit versus a conventional stroke unit : a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, Geert; Elting, Jan Willem; Langedijk, Marc; Maurits, Natasha M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pathophysiological considerations and observational studies indicate that elevated body temperature, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrhythmias in the acute phase of ischemic stroke may aggravate brain damage and worsen outcome. METHODS: Both units were organized with the

  18. Admitting acute ischemic stroke patients to a stroke care monitoring unit versus a conventional stroke unit : a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, Geert; Elting, Jan Willem; Langedijk, Marc; Maurits, Natasha M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pathophysiological considerations and observational studies indicate that elevated body temperature, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrhythmias in the acute phase of ischemic stroke may aggravate brain damage and worsen outcome. METHODS: Both units were organized with the

  19. EFFICACY OF MELDONIUM IN ACUTE PERIOD OF ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As long as systemic thrombolysis is indicated to not more than 10% of patients with ischemic stroke, the search for medical agents for basic treatment of stroke is an important problem of today’s neurology.Aim: To evaluate efficacy of meldonium in patients with acute ischemic stroke.Materials and methods: One hundred and fourteen patients were assessed in the acute period of strokes in the internal carotid artery system. The main group included 70 patients who were given meldonium (Mildronate in addition to their basic treatment regimen. The drug was administered intravenously in daily drop infusions at dose of 10 ml of 10% solution for 10 days, thereafter they were switched to oral treatment at 250 mg daily for 2 to 3 weeks. The control group consisted of 40 patients who received only basic treatment regimen. Both groups were compatible for their age, gender distribution, severity of stroke and degree of neurologic dysfunction.Results: In the patients who were given meldonium in addition to basic treatment of ischemic stroke, neurological deficiency, assessed by NIHSS, scored significantly better than in those from the control group (3.1 ± 0.1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.17, p < 0.05. Also, they had significantly less disability on modified Rankin scale (1.3 ± 0.03 vs. 1.07 ± 0.07, p < 0.01 and more improvement in mobility as per Rivermead mobility index (3.6 ± 0.17 vs. 2.9 ± 0.25, p < 0.05.Conclusion: The addition of meldonium to the set of medical treatment in ischemic stroke patients gives positive results reflecting a decreased neurological deficiency, increased levels of mobility and daily activities.

  20. Rare variants in ischemic stroke: an exome pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Cole

    Full Text Available The genetic architecture of ischemic stroke is complex and is likely to include rare or low frequency variants with high penetrance and large effect sizes. Such variants are likely to provide important insights into disease pathogenesis compared to common variants with small effect sizes. Because a significant portion of human functional variation may derive from the protein-coding portion of genes we undertook a pilot study to identify variation across the human exome (i.e., the coding exons across the entire human genome in 10 ischemic stroke cases. Our efforts focused on evaluating the feasibility and identifying the difficulties in this type of research as it applies to ischemic stroke. The cases included 8 African-Americans and 2 Caucasians selected on the basis of similar stroke subtypes and by implementing a case selection algorithm that emphasized the genetic contribution of stroke risk. Following construction of paired-end sequencing libraries, all predicted human exons in each sample were captured and sequenced. Sequencing generated an average of 25.5 million read pairs (75 bp×2 and 3.8 Gbp per sample. After passing quality filters, screening the exomes against dbSNP demonstrated an average of 2839 novel SNPs among African-Americans and 1105 among Caucasians. In an aggregate analysis, 48 genes were identified to have at least one rare variant across all stroke cases. One gene, CSN3, identified by screening our prior GWAS results in conjunction with our exome results, was found to contain an interesting coding polymorphism as well as containing excess rare variation as compared with the other genes evaluated. In conclusion, while rare coding variants may predispose to the risk of ischemic stroke, this fact has yet to be definitively proven. Our study demonstrates the complexities of such research and highlights that while exome data can be obtained, the optimal analytical methods have yet to be determined.

  1. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study wa...

  2. Treatment and partial recovery of ischemic stroke hemiplegy through acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves Nordon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present the case of a patient with hemiplegy and dysphonia due to an ischemic stroke in the pons who was treated through classical systemic and scalpean acupuncture and electroacupuncture, presenting considerable improvement in speaking, walking and moving her right arm after three months of treatment.

  3. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Caffes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1–transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1–Trpm4 channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1–Kir6.2 channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  4. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Weissenborn, Karin; Prange, Hilmar; Schneider, Dietmar; Weimar, Christian; Wartenberg, Katja; Schellinger, Peter D.; Bohn, Matthias; Becker, Harald; Wegrzyn, Martin; Jaehnig, Peter; Herrmann, Manfred; Knauth, Michael; Baehr, Mathias; Heide, Wolfgang; Wagner, Armin; Schwab, Stefan; Reichmann, Heinz; Schwendemann, Guenther; Dengler, Reinhard; Kastrup, Andreas; Bartels, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Numerous preclinical findings and a clinical pilot study suggest that recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) provides neuroprotection that may be beneficial for the treatment of patients with ischemic stroke. Although EPO has been considered to be a safe and well-tolerated dru

  5. Update on the Role of Cannabinoid Receptors after Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano S. A. Capettini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids are considered as key mediators in the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. In particular, they have been shown to reduce the ischemic injury after acute cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. These protective and anti-inflammatory properties on peripheral tissues and circulating inflammatory have been demonstrated to involve their binding with both selective cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 and type 2 (CB2 transmembrane receptors. On the other hands, the recent discoveries of novel different classes of cannabinoids and receptors have increased the complexity of this system in atherosclerosis. Although only preliminary data have been reported on the activities of novel cannabinoid receptors, several studies have already investigated the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in ischemic stroke. While CB1 receptor activation has been shown to directly reduce atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, controversial data have been shown on neurotransmission and neuroprotection after stroke. Given its potent anti-inflammatory activities on circulating leukocytes, the CB2 activation has been proven to produce protective effects against acute poststroke inflammation. In this paper, we will update evidence on different cannabinoid-triggered avenues to reduce inflammation and neuronal injury in acute ischemic stroke.

  6. Genetic overlap between diagnostic subtypes of ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); M. Traylor (Matthew); R. Malik (Rainer); S. Bevan (Steve); G.J. Falcone (Guido J.); J. Hopewell; Y.-C. Cheng (Yu-Ching); I. Cotlarciuc (Ioana); J.C. Bis (Joshua); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); G. Boncoraglio (Giorgio Battista); R. Clarke (Robert); J.W. Cole (John W.); M. Fornage (Myriam); K.L. Furie (Karen); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); J. Jannes (Jim); T. Kittner (Thomas); L.F. Lincz (Lisa); J.M. Maguire (Jane); J.F. Meschia (James F.); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); E.A. Parati (Eugenio A.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P.M. Rothwell (Peter); S. Seshadri (Sudha); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); P. Sharma (Pankaj); C. Sudlow (Cathie); K.L. Wiggins (Kerri); B.B. Worrall (Bradford B.); J. Rosand (Jonathan); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); C. Kubisch (Christian); H.S. Markus (Hugh); C. Levi (Christopher); J. Attia (John); N.R. Wray (Naomi)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Purpose: Despite moderate heritability, the phenotypic heterogeneity of ischemic stroke has hampered gene discovery, motivating analyses of diagnostic subtypes with reduced sample sizes. We assessed evidence for a shared genetic basis among the 3 major subtypes: large arte

  7. Effects of different classes of antihypertensive agents on the outcome of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Papadopoulou, Maria; Kazantzidou, Pavlina; Kostaki, Stavroula; Kouparanis, Antonios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2015-04-01

    It is unclear whether antihypertensive treatment before stroke affects acute ischemic stroke severity and outcome. To evaluate this association, the authors studied 482 consecutive patients (age 78.8±6.7 years) admitted with acute ischemic stroke. Stroke severity was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The outcome was assessed with rates of adverse outcome (modified Rankin scale at discharge ≥2). Independent predictors of severe stroke (NIHSS ≥16) were female sex and atrial fibrillation. Treatment with diuretics before stroke was associated with nonsevere stroke. At discharge, patients with adverse outcome were less likely to be treated before stroke with β-blockers or with diuretics. Independent predictors of adverse outcome were older age, higher NIHSS at admission, and history of ischemic stroke. Treatment with diuretics before stroke appears to be associated with less severe neurologic deficit in patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Experimental neuroprotection in ischemic stroke: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah, Gary B; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-04-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. To date, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and mechanical thrombectomy have been standards of care for AIS. There have been many advances in diagnostic imaging and endovascular devices for AIS; however, most neuroprotective therapies seem to remain largely in the preclinical phase. While many neuroprotective therapies have been identified in experimental models, none are currently used routinely to treat stroke patients. This review seeks to summarize clinical studies pertaining to neuroprotection, as well as the different preclinical neuroprotective therapies, their presumed mechanisms of action, and their future applications in stroke patients.

  9. [Neuroprotective treatment with citicoline (ceraxon) in patients with ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, M Iu; Boĭko, A N; Kamchatnov, P R; Kabanov, A A; Iasamanova, A N; Shchukin, I A; Kolesnikova, T I; Chubykin, V I; Glukhareva, A P; Gusev, E I

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of neurological symptoms assessed with the Scandinavian stroke scale, the Barthel index and the modified Rankin scale was studied in 89 patients with moderate ischemic stroke who received citicoline (ceraxone) intravenously and orally. The results were compared to a group of 52 age-, sex- and stroke-matched patients who did not receive citicoline. To the date of discharge from the hospital (days 21-24), the full restoration (pciticoline was significantly (p<0.05) higher in patients younger than 70 years and when the drug was used in the first hours of disease.

  10. Effect of hyperthermia on prognosis after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Monica; Saqqur, Maher; Kamruzzaman, Anmmd; Lees, Kennedy R; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2009-09-01

    Experimental studies have shown that hyperthermia is a determinant of poor outcome after ischemic stroke. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of temperature on poststroke outcome have, however, been limited by small sample sizes. We sought to evaluate the effect of temperature and timing of hyperthermia on outcome after ischemic stroke. Data of 5305 patients in acute stroke trials from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA) data set were analyzed. Data for temperatures at baseline, eighth, 24th, 48th, and 72nd hours, and seventh day were assessed in relation to outcome (poor versus good) based on the modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Hyperthermia was defined as temperature >37.2 degrees C and poor outcome as 90-day modified Rankin Scale >2. Hazard ratios with 95% CIs were reported for hyperthermia in relation to the outcome. Logistic regression models, in relation to hyperthermia, were fitted for a set of preselected covariates at different time points to identify predictors/determinants of hyperthermia. The average age of patients was 68.0+/-11.9 years, 2380 (44.9%) were females, and 42.3% (2233) received thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. After adjustment, hyperthermia was a statistically significant predictor of poor outcome. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for poor outcome in relation to hyperthermia at different time points were: baseline 1.2 (1.0 to 1.4), eighth hour 1.7 (1.2 to 2.2), 24th hour 1.5 (1.2 to 1.9), 48th hour 2.0 (1.5 to 2.6), 72nd hour 2.2 (1.7 to 2.9), and seventh day 2.7 (2.0 to 3.8). Gender, stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >16), white blood cell count, and antibiotic use were significantly associated with hyperthermia (Pacute ischemic stroke, is associated with a poor clinical outcome. The later the hyperthermia occurs within the first week, the worse the prognosis. Severity of stroke and inflammation are important determinants of hyperthermia after ischemic stroke

  11. Asymmetric Dimethyarginine as Marker and Mediator in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Weissenborn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor, is known as mediator of endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Circulating ADMA levels are correlated with cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia, age and smoking. Accordingly, clinical studies found evidence that increased ADMA levels are associated with a higher risk of cerebrovascular events. After the acute event of ischemic stroke, levels of ADMA and its analog symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA are elevated through augmentation of protein methylation and oxidative stress. Furthermore, cleavage of ADMA through dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAHs is reduced. This increase of dimethylarginines might be predictive for adverse clinical outcome. However, the definite role of ADMA after acute ischemic stroke still needs to be clarified. On the one hand, ADMA might contribute to brain injury by reduction of cerebral blood flow. On the other hand, ADMA might be involved in NOS-induced oxidative stress and excitotoxic neuronal death. In the present review, we highlight the current knowledge from clinical and experimental studies on ADMA and its role for stroke risk and ischemic brain injury in the hyperacute stage after stroke. Finally, further studies are warranted to unravel the relevance of the close association of dimethylarginines with stroke.

  12. Prevalence of cerebral microbleeds in Thai patients with ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artit Potigumjon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebral microbleeds (CMBs are commonly detected. Ethnicity seems to play a role in the prevalence of CMB, with higher prevalence in participants from Asian origin. The purpose of the study is to look for the prevalence of CMBs and associated factors in Thai patients with ischemic stroke. Methods: Patients with acute ischemic stroke who had MRI and magnetic resonance angiography during January–August 2014 were included in the study. T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo was used to define CMBs. Baseline characteristics, stroke subtypes, and severity of white matter lesions were compared between patients with and without CMBs. Results: Two hundred patients were included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 61-year-old. Mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was 8. The prevalence of CMBs was 20% (39/200 patients. Hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–8.68, P = 0.037, and moderate-to-severe white matter lesions (Fazekas 2–3, OR 7.61, 95% CI 3.06–18.95, P < 0.001 were related to the presence of CMBs. Conclusions: CMBs were found in 20% of patients with ischemic stroke, which was lower than those reported from Japanese studies but comparable to a Chinese study. CMBs were associated with hypertension and severity of the white matter lesions.

  13. Prevalence of Cerebral Microbleeds in Thai Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potigumjon, Artit; Watcharakorn, Arvemas; Dharmasaroja, Pornpatr A

    2017-01-01

    With the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are commonly detected. Ethnicity seems to play a role in the prevalence of CMB, with higher prevalence in participants from Asian origin. The purpose of the study is to look for the prevalence of CMBs and associated factors in Thai patients with ischemic stroke. Patients with acute ischemic stroke who had MRI and magnetic resonance angiography during January-August 2014 were included in the study. T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo was used to define CMBs. Baseline characteristics, stroke subtypes, and severity of white matter lesions were compared between patients with and without CMBs. Two hundred patients were included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 61-year-old. Mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was 8. The prevalence of CMBs was 20% (39/200 patients). Hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-8.68, P = 0.037), and moderate-to-severe white matter lesions (Fazekas 2-3, OR 7.61, 95% CI 3.06-18.95, P CMBs. CMBs were found in 20% of patients with ischemic stroke, which was lower than those reported from Japanese studies but comparable to a Chinese study. CMBs were associated with hypertension and severity of the white matter lesions.

  14. Correlation Analysis of Sleep Quality and Youth Ischemic Stroke

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    Shunqing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study risk factors related to ischemic stroke (IS in youth and the influence of sleep quality on youth ischemic stroke incidence. Methods. 223 patients aged 18 to 45 years who were admitted to Puyang People’s Hospital from June 2011 to February 2013 with a first-ever ischemic stroke were selected as the research cases. 158 young people with a normal physical examination were selected as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI questionnaire was used to analyse the correlation between sleep quality and youth IS incidence. The US National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS and modified Rankin Scale (MRS scores were used to assess cases’ state of illness and prognosis three months after IS. Results. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the association of these risk factors with youth IS incidence, from highest to lowest, was hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, smoking history, high homocysteine, the quality of sleep, family history of stroke, and alcoholism. Poor sleep quality ranked fifth among all risk factors and was positively correlated with poor prognosis for youth IS patients. Conclusion. The results of this study showed that sleep quality is an important factor in the pathogenesis and prognosis of youth IS.

  15. Ischemic Stroke Treatment Trials: Neuroimaging Advancements and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vivek P; Heit, Jeremy J

    2017-06-01

    There have been significant advancements in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the last 2 decades. Recent trials have placed a significant emphasis on minimizing the time from symptom onset to stroke treatment by reperfusion therapies, which decreases the cerebral infarct volume and improves clinical outcomes. These clinical advances have paralleled and been aided by advances in neuroimaging. However, controversy remains regarding how much time should be spent on neuroimaging evaluation versus expediting patient treatment. In this review article, we examine the key endovascular stroke trials published in the past 25 years, and we briefly highlight the failures and successes of endovascular stroke trials performed in the past 4 years. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using time from symptom onset versus neuroimaging in determining endovascular stroke therapy candidacy.

  16. Highly sensitive troponin T in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Ueland, T; Aukrust, P;

    2012-01-01

    in decedents than in survivors. After adjustment for stroke severity, C-reactive protein, age, NT-proBNP and prior heart and/or renal failure, hsTnT levels were not a significant predictor of long-term all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion: Elevated levels of hsTnT are frequently present......Background: Newly developed troponin assays have superior diagnostic and prognostic performance in acute coronary syndrome (ACS), when compared to conventional troponin assays; however, highly sensitive troponin has not been evaluated in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Highly...... sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) was measured daily during the first 4 days in 193 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke without overt ACS or atrial fibrillation. The patients were previously tested normal with a fourth-generation TnT assay. The patients were followed for 47 months, with all...

  17. Prevalence and association between risk factors, stroke subtypes, and abnormal ankle brachial index in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanakorn, Disya; Keandoungchun, Jesada; Tegeler, Charles H

    2012-08-01

    Abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) identifies a stroke subgroup with high risk of subsequent stroke and other vascular events. There are few data regarding the prevalence of abnormal ABI in ischemic stroke in Asian countries. We evaluated the prevalence of abnormal ABI in 747 Thai patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and assessed the correlation of abnormal ABI with stroke risk factors and stroke subtypes. The prevalence of abnormal ABI (≤0.9) in ischemic stroke patients was 18.1%. Abnormal ABI in ischemic stroke patients was significantly correlated with female gender (odds ratio [OR], 1.61; confidence interval [CI], 1.09-2.40; P = .017), age ≥ 60 years (OR, 3.54; CI, 2.14-5.85; P ischemic events, including coronary artery disease (OR, 2.55; CI, 1.47-4.43; P = .001), cerebrovascular disease (OR, 2.15; CI, 1.37-3.55; P = .002), and atrial fibrillation (OR, 1.71; CI, 1.03-2.82; P = .036). There was a significant difference in the prevalence of abnormal ABI among stroke subtypes (P stroke (29.2%), and undetermined etiology (20.6%). An ABI examination should be considered in patients with ischemic stroke to facilitate the early detection and treatment of asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease and identification of excess risk for subsequent stroke or other vascular events. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of magnesium sulfate in neuroprotection in acute ischemic stroke

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    Harpreet Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion on clinical outcome of patients of acute stroke. Materials and Methods: Sixty consecutive cases of acute ischemic stroke hospitalised within 24 h of an episode of stroke were taken as subjects. All subjects underwent a computed tomography head, and those found to have evidence of bleed/space-occupying lesions were excluded from the study. The subjects taken up for the study were divided into two groups of 30 subjects each. Both the groups received the standard protocol management for acute ischemic stroke. Subjects of Group 1 additionally received intravenous magnesium sulfate as initial 4 g bolus dose over 15 min followed by 16 g as slow infusion over the next 24 h. In all the subjects of the two study groups, serum magnesium levels were estimated at the time of admission (Day 0, Day 1 and Day 2 of hospitalization using an atomic absorption spectrometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Scandinavian stroke scores were calculated on Day 3, day of discharge and Day 28. Paired t-test was employed for comparison of stroke scores on Day 3, day of discharge and Day 28 within the same group and the unpaired t-test was used for the intergroup comparison, i.e. comparison of stroke scores of control group with corresponding stroke scores of magnesium group. Results: Comparison of stroke scores on Day 3 and day of discharge, on the day of discharge and Day 28 and on Day 3 and Day 28 in the magnesium group produced a t-value of 5.000 and P 0.05, which was not significant. Conclusions: The study failed to document a statistical significant stroke recovery in spite of achieving a significant rise in serum magnesium level, more than that necessary for neuroprotection, with an intravenous magnesium sulfate regime.

  19. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B

    1984-01-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by 133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow....... It is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes...

  20. Acute Phase Reactants and Ischemic Stroke

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    Mustafa Sahan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases which called as stroke causes severe mortality and morbidity. Stoke is the third cause of death and first cause of the sequela among in its disorder group. Stroke with a 80-85% has the most frequency and the most cause of death in among the neurological disorders. Besides its lethal effects, sequela of stroke also cause physiological problems on individuals, families and social groups, it also brings some economic problems. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(2.000: 85-140

  1. Serum inflammatory cytokines combined with NIHSS to evaluate the condition of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Heng; LONG Chong-rong; Wang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the changes of serum inflammatory cytokines and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score in acute ischemic stroke patients and their clinical significances on patients' condition assessment. Methods The serum levels of three cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), were measured and compared between 90 acute ischemic stroke patients (ischemic stroke group) and 50 healthy ...

  2. Sex differences in neuroinflammation and neuroprotection in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychala, Monica S; Honarpisheh, Pedram; McCullough, Louise D

    2017-01-02

    Stroke is not only a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide it also disproportionally affects women. There are currently over 500,000 more women stroke survivors in the US than men, and elderly women bear the brunt of stroke-related disability. Stroke has dropped to the fifth leading cause of death in men, but remains the third in women. This review discusses sex differences in common stroke risk factors, the efficacy of stroke prevention therapies, acute treatment responses, and post-stroke recovery in clinical populations. Women have an increased lifetime risk of stroke compared to men, largely due to a steep increase in stroke incidence in older postmenopausal women, yet most basic science studies continue to only evaluate young male animals. Women also have an increased lifetime prevalence of many common stroke risk factors, including hypertension and atrial fibrillation, as well as abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome. None of these age-related risk factors have been well modeled in the laboratory. Evidence from the bench has implicated genetic and epigenetic factors, differential activation of cell-death programs, cell-cell signaling pathways, and systemic immune responses as contributors to sex differences in ischemic stroke. The most recent basic scientific findings have been summarized in this review, with an emphasis on factors that differ between males and females that are pertinent to stroke outcomes. Identification and understanding of the underlying biological factors that contribute to sex differences will be critical to the development of translational targets to improve the treatment of women after stroke. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Functional disability of ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Kapadohos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the first cause of disability, in the developed countries and it is frequently described by the literature as a major global health problem. It is estimated that stroke is responsible for approximately 4.5 million deaths per year and over 9 million stroke survivors, globally. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the consequences of functional disability that stroke imposes on the survivors’ life and to shortly describe functional instruments used in evaluation of stroke patients.The method οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature, mainly in the pub med data base which referred to the functional disability of stroke patients, as well as to the scales used for the evaluation of functional state. Results: Despite the accurate diagnosis and the recent therapeutic advances, stroke can still cause long-term disability in the majority of patients which induces significant changes between the patient and his environment. The results of recent studies indicate that the loss of independence that experience stroke survivals has significant consequences on their quality of life and it is likely to lead to family-crisis and social isolation. It is also widely accepted that the economic impact of stroke is considerable, worldwide. Recovery of functional disability after stroke is influenced by many variables, of which the main are the initial severity of stroke, the level of deficit and the level of social and family support. Ιn clinical practise many measurement instruments are applied and capable of providing assessments of functional ability and other related concepts since it is well documented that evaluation of functional state is a matter of great importance for the assessment of patients’ outcome. Conclusions: As it is supported by published evidence, rehabilitation of neurological deficit in conjunction with

  4. Aortic atheromas in acute ischemic stroke patients in northern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telman, Gregory; Kouperberg, Efim; Sprecher, Elliot; Agmon, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    There are currently no data on ethnic differences in aortic atherosclerosis in Arab and Jewish patients from northern Israel with acute ischemic stroke. Data on demographic and risk factors alongside transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) data and treatment details for 509 patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. The patients with aortic atheromas were older and had significantly more frequent vascular risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and smoking), as well as vascular disease (ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and carotid plaques). They were also treated with statins more often than those without aortic atheroma. Logistic regression analysis showed that age, smoking, ethnicity, and the presence of carotid plaques were independent predictors for aortic atheromas. Aortic plaques were found more frequently in Jewish patients than Arab patients (160 (41.9%) vs. 35 (27.3%); p= 0.003). This finding did not change after adjustment for age, sex, all vascular risk factors, and type of antithrombotic treatment. We did not find any difference between Arab and Jewish patients in the distribution of plaques by location or complexity before and after adjustment for age, sex, all vascular risk factors, or type of antithrombotic or lipid-lowering treatment. Our findings emphasize the influence of ethnicity on the prevalence of aortic atheromas in acute ischemic stroke patients in northern Israel. The search for genetic, cultural, socioeconomic, and other factors explaining these ethnic differences should be the topic of future studies.

  5. Gene variants associated with ischemic stroke: the cardiovascular health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, May M; O'Meara, Ellen S; Rowland, Charles M; Shiffman, Dov; Bare, Lance A; Arellano, Andre R; Longstreth, W T; Lumley, Thomas; Rice, Kenneth; Tracy, Russell P; Devlin, James J; Psaty, Bruce M

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which had been associated with coronary heart disease, are associated with incident ischemic stroke. Based on antecedent studies of coronary heart disease, we prespecified the risk allele for each of the 74 SNPs. We used Cox proportional hazards models that adjusted for traditional risk factors to estimate the associations of these SNPs with incident ischemic stroke during 14 years of follow-up in a population-based study of older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). In white CHS participants, the prespecified risk alleles of 7 of the 74 SNPs (in HPS1, ITGAE, ABCG2, MYH15, FSTL4, CALM1, and BAT2) were nominally associated with increased risk of stroke (one-sided PDMXL2, and ABCG2) were nominally associated with stroke (one-sided P<0.05, false discovery rate=0.55). The Val12Met SNP in ABCG2 was associated with stroke in both white (hazard ratio, 1.46; 90% CI, 1.05 to 2.03) and black (hazard ratio, 3.59; 90% CI, 1.11 to 11.6) participants of CHS. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the 10-year cumulative incidence of stroke were greater among Val allele homozygotes than among Met allele carriers in both white (10% versus 6%) and black (12% versus 3%) participants of CHS. The Val12Met SNP in ABCG2 (encoding a transporter of sterols and xenobiotics) was associated with incident ischemic stroke in white and black participants of CHS.

  6. Chromosome 9p21 In Ischemic Stroke: Population Structure and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, CD; Biffi, A; Rost, NS; Cortellini, L; Furie, KL; Rosand, J

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sequence variants on chromosome 9p21.3 are implicated in coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI), but studies in ischemic stroke have produced inconsistent results. We investigated whether these conflicting findings were due to false positive studies confounded by population stratification, or false negative studies that failed to account for effects specific to certain stroke subtypes. Methods After assessing for population stratification at 9p21.3 using genome-wide data, we meta-analyzed 8 ischemic stroke studies. This analysis focused on two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1537378 and rs10757278, as these variants are in strong linkage disequilibrium with most SNPs analyzed in prior studies of the region. Results Principal component analysis of the genome-wide data showed no evidence of population stratification at that locus. Meta-analysis confirmed that both rs1537378 and rs10757278 are risk factors for ischemic stroke (odds ratios 1.09, [p = 0.0014], and 1.11, [p = 0.001] respectively). Subtype analysis revealed a substantial increase in the effect of each SNP for risk of large artery (LA) stroke, achieving an effect size similar to that seen in CAD/MI. Conclusions Variants on 9p21.3 are associated with ischemic stroke, and restriction of analysis to LA stroke increases effect size towards that observed in prior association studies of CAD/MI. Previous inconsistent findings are best explained by this subtype-specificity rather than any unmeasured confounding by population stratification. PMID:20395606

  7. Recurrent ischemic strokes in a young celiac woman with MTHFR gene mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisa Fabbri; Lisa Rustignoli; Antonio Muscari; Giovanni M Puddu; Maria Guarino; Rita Rinaldi; Elena Minguzzi

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently associated with neurological disorders,but very few reports concern the association with ischemic stroke.A 26-year-old woman affected by CD with secondary amenorrhea,carrier of a homozygous 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutation with hyperhomocysteinemia,was affected by two occipital ischemic strokes within a period of 5 mo.At the time of the second stroke,while she was being treated with folic acid,acetylsalicylic acid and a gluten-free diet,she had left hemianopsia,left hemiparesthesias,and gait imbalance.Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a subacute right occipital ischemic lesion,which was extended to the dorsal region of the right thalamus and the ipsilateral thalamocapsular junction.Antitransglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies were no longer present,while antinuclear antibodies,antineuronal antibodies and immune circulating complexes were only slightly elevated.Since the patient was taking folic acid,her homocysteine levels were almost normal and apparently not sufficient alone to explain the clinical event.A conventional cerebral angiography showed no signs of vasculitis.Finally,rare causes of occipital stroke in young patients,such as Fabry's disease and mitochondrial myopathy,encephalomyopathy,lactic acidosis and stroke-like symptoms,were also excluded by appropriate tests.Thus,the most probable cause for the recurrent strokes in this young woman remained CD,although the mechanisms involved are still unknown.The two main hypotheses concern malabsorption (with consequent deficiency of vitamins known to exert neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects) and immunemediated mechanisms.CD should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young patients.

  8. Apoptosis and Acute Brain Ischemia in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radak, Djordje; Katsiki, Niki; Resanovic, Ivana; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Sudar-Milovanovic, Emina; Zafirovic, Sonja; Mousad, Shaker A; Isenovic, Esma R

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis may contribute to a significant proportion of neuron death following acute brain ischemia (ABI), but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Brain ischemia may lead to stroke, which is one of the main causes of long-term morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries. Therefore, stroke prevention and treatment is clinically important. There are two important separate areas of the brain during ABI: the ischemic core and the ischemic penumbra. The ischemic core of the brain experiences a sudden reduction of blood flow, just minutes after ischemic attack with irreversible injury and subsequent cell death. On the other hand, apoptosis within the ischemic penumbra may occur after several hours or days, while necrosis starts in the first hours after the onset of ABI in the ischemic core. ABI is characterized by key molecular events that initiate apoptosis in many cells, such as overproduction of free radicals, Ca2+ overload and excitotoxicity. These changes in cellular homeostasis may trigger either necrosis or apoptosis, which often depends on cell type, cell age, and location in the brain. Apoptosis results in DNA fragmentation, degradation of cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins, cross-linking of proteins, formation of apoptotic bodies, expression of ligands for phagocytic cell receptors and finally uptake by phagocytic cells. This review focuses on recent findings based on animal and human studies regarding the apoptotic mechanisms of neuronal death following ABI and the development of potential neuroprotective agents that reduce morbidity. The effects of statins on stroke prevention and treatment as well as on apoptotic mediators are also considered. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells promote recovery after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Ko, Tsui-Ling; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Lin, Maan-Yuh Anya; Fu, Tz-Win; Hsiao, Hsiao-Sheng; Hsu, Jung-Yu C; Fu, Yu-Show

    2011-07-01

    Stroke is a cerebrovascular defect that leads to many adverse neurological complications. Current pharmacological treatments for stroke remain unclear in their effectiveness, whereas stem cell transplantation shows considerable promise. Previously, we have shown that human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) can differentiate into neurons in neuronal-conditioned medium. Here we evaluate the therapeutic potential of HUMSC transplantation for ischemic stroke in rats. Focal cerebral ischemia was produced by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion. The HUMSCs treated with neuronal-conditioned medium or not treated were transplanted into the ischemic cortex 24 hours after surgery. Histology and MRI revealed that rats implanted with HUMSCs treated with neuronal-conditioned medium or not treated exhibited a trend toward less infarct volume and significantly less atrophy compared with the control group, which received no HUMSCs. Moreover, rats receiving HUMSCs showed significant improvements in motor function, greater metabolic activity of cortical neurons, and better revascularization in the infarct cortex. Implanted HUMSCs, treated or not treated, survived in the infarct cortex for at least 36 days and released neuroprotective and growth-associated cytokines, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, platelet-derived growth factor-AA, basic fibroblast growth factor, angiopoietin-2, CXCL-16, neutrophil-activating protein-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic benefits of HUMSC transplantation for ischemic stroke, likely due to the ability of the cells to produce growth-promoting factors. Thus, HUMSC transplantation may be an effective therapy in the future.

  10. Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke. PMID:24646159

  11. Effect of pre-stroke use of ACE inhibitors on ischemic stroke severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caplan Louis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent trials suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI are effective in prevention of ischemic stroke, as measured by reduced stroke incidence. We aimed to compare stroke severity between stroke patients who were taking ACEI before their stroke onset and those who were not, to examine the effects of pretreatment with ACEI on ischemic stroke severity. Methods We retrospectively studied 126 consecutive patients presenting within 24 hours of ischemic stroke onset, as confirmed by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI. We calculated the NIHSS score at presentation, as the primary measure of clinical stroke severity, and categorized stroke severity as mild (NIHSS [less than or equal to] 7, moderate (NIHSS 8–13 or severe (NIHSS [greater than or equal to] 14. We analyzed demographic data, risk-factor profile, blood pressure (BP and medications on admissions, and determined stroke mechanism according to TOAST criteria. We also measured the volumes of admission diffusion- and perfusion-weighted (DWI /PWI magnetic resonance imaging lesions, as a secondary measure of ischemic tissue volume. We compared these variables among patients on ACEI and those who were not. Results Thirty- three patients (26% were on ACE-inhibitors. The overall median baseline NIHSS score was 5.5 (range 2–21 among ACEI-treated patients vs. 9 (range 1–36 in non-ACEI patients (p = 0.036. Patients on ACEI prior to their stroke had more mild and less severe strokes, and smaller DWI and PWI lesion volumes compared to non-ACEI treated patients. However, none of these differences were significant. Predictably, a higher percentage of patients on ACEI had a history of heart failure (p = 0.03. Age, time-to-imaging or neurological evaluation, risk-factor profile, concomitant therapy with lipid lowering, other antihypertensives or antithrombotic agents, or admission BP were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion Our results

  12. Incidence and risk conditions of ischemic stroke in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satue, E; Vila-Corcoles, A; Ochoa-Gondar, O; de Diego, C; Forcadell, M J; Rodriguez-Blanco, T; Barnes, L; Jariod, M

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate incidence and mortality from ischemic stroke in older adults with specific underlying chronic conditions, evaluating the influence of these conditions in developing stroke. Population-based cohort study involving 27,204 individuals ≥60 years old in Southern Catalonia, Spain. All cases of hospitalization from ischemic stroke (confirmed by neuro-imaging) were collected from 01/12/2008 until 30/11/2011. Incidence rates and 30-day mortality were estimated according to age, sex, chronic illnesses, and underlying conditions. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to calculate Hazards Ratio (HR) and estimate the association between baseline conditions and risk of developing stroke. Mean incidence rate reached 453 cases per 100,000 person-years. Maximum rates appeared among individuals with history of prior stroke (2926 per 100,000), atrial fibrillation (1815 per 100,000), coronary artery disease (1104 per 100,000), nursing-home residence (1014 per 100,000), and advanced age ≥80 years (1006 per 100,000). Thirty-day mortality was 13% overall, reaching 21% among patients over 80 years. Age [HR: 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.07], history of prior stroke (HR: 5.08; 95% CI: 3.96-6.51), history of coronary artery disease (HR: 1.65; 95% CI: 1.21-2.25), atrial fibrillation (HR: 2.96; 95% CI: 2.30-3.81), diabetes mellitus (HR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.23-1.95), and smoking (HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.15-2.34) emerged independently associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Incidence and mortality from ischemic stroke remains considerable. Apart from age and history of atherosclerosis (prior stroke or coronary artery disease), atrial fibrillation, diabetes, and smoking were the underlying conditions most strongly associated with an increased risk. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mechanism of troponin elevations in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K.; Atar, Dan; Mickley, Hans

    2007-01-01

    the introduction of troponin in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, this marker has been measured in a number of other conditions as well. One of these conditions is acute ischemic stroke, causing diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. Because various electrocardiographic alterations have also been reported......Ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases frequently co-exist in the same patient, and similar risk factors are shared. For 60 years, experimental, observational, and clinical trial data have incessantly indicated that neurologically induced myocardial injury exists. Since...

  14. Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner Frandsen, Nicole; Sørensen, Margit; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were......-report and verified by measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Fewer patients than expected were recruited, which renders this report a pilot study. RESULTS: The 6-month self-reported smoking cessation rate was 37.8% in the minimal intervention group and 42.9% in the intensive intervention group. Smoking...... randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program...

  15. Thrombolysis outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with prior stroke and diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, N K; Ahmed, N; Davalos, A;

    2011-01-01

    in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Register) compared to nonthrombolyzed controls (C; data from Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive). METHODS: We selected ischemic stroke patients on whom we held data on age, baseline NIH Stroke Scale score (NIHSS), and 90-day modified Rankin Scale score (m......BACKGROUND: Patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM) and prior stroke (PS) were excluded from European approval of alteplase in stroke. We examined the influence of DM and PS on the outcomes of patients who received thrombolytic therapy (T; data from Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis......RS). We compared the distribution of mRS between T and C by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH) test and proportional odds logistic regression, after adjustment for age and baseline NIHSS, in patients with and without DM, PS, or the combination. We report odds ratios (OR) for improved distribution of m...

  16. Paradoxical effect of obesity on hemorrhagic transformation after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Kyung; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2013-09-23

    Among the patients with established coronary artery diseases, obese patients tend to have a more favorable prognosis, which is called as obesity paradox. Interestingly, mildly obese patients who underwent coronary revascularization had a lower risk of bleeding. In this context, we have investigated the association between obesity and hemorrhagic transformation (HTf) after acute ischemic stroke. A total of 365 patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke were included in this study. Demographic, clinical and radiological information was collected and HTf was evaluated through follow-up T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo MRI performed usually within 1 week after occurrence of stroke. Body mass index was calculated, and obesity was defined using the World Health Organization Western Pacific Regional Office criteria. The HTf was identified in 59 patients (16.2%). As the severity of obesity increased, the occurrence of HTf decreased. Compared with the normal weight group and after controlling possible confounders including acute and previous treatment, stroke severity and subtype, the risk of HTf decreased significantly in the obese group (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.87). The better outcome for HTf seen in obese patients suggests the existence of a "bleeding-obesity paradox" in acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Rodent models of ischemic stroke lack translational relevance... are baboon models the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecien, Timothy D; Sy, Christopher; Ding, Yuchuan

    2014-05-01

    Rodent models of ischemic stroke are associated with many issues and limitations, which greatly diminish the translational potential of these studies. Recent studies demonstrate that significant differences exist between rodent and human ischemic stroke. These differences include the physical characteristics of the stroke, as well as changes in the subsequent inflammatory and molecular pathways following the acute ischemic insult. Non-human primate (NHP) models of ischemic stroke, however, are much more similar to humans. In addition to evident anatomical similarities, the physiological responses that NHPs experience during ischemic stroke are much more applicable to the human condition and thus make it an attractive model for future research. The baboon ischemic stroke model, in particular, has been studied extensively in comparison to other NHP models. Here we discuss the major shortcomings associated with rodent ischemic stroke models and provide a comparative overview of baboon ischemic stroke models. Studies have shown that baboons, although more difficult to obtain and handle, are more representative of ischemic events in humans and may have greater translational potential that can offset these deficiencies. There remain critical issues within these baboon stroke studies that need to be addressed in future investigations. The most critical issue revolves around the size and the variability of baboon ischemic stroke. Compared to rodent models, however, issues such as these can be addressed in future studies. Importantly, baboon models avoid many drawbacks associated with rodent models including vascular variability and inconsistent inflammatory responses - issues that are inherent to the species and cannot be avoided.

  18. Transient ischemic attack and acute ischemic stroke: associations with retinal microvascular signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie Jin; Baker, Michelle L; Hand, Peter J; Hankey, Graeme J; Lindley, Richard I; Rochtchina, Elena; Wong, Tien Y; Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Small vessel disease plays a role in cerebral events. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and patterns of retinal microvascular signs (surrogates for cerebral small vessel disease) among patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or acute stroke and population control subjects. Patients with TIA or acute stroke aged ≥49 years admitted to hospitals in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia, were recruited to the Multi-Centre Retina and Stroke Study (n=693, 2005 to 2007). Control subjects were Blue Mountains Eye Study participants aged ≥49 years without TIAs or stroke (n=3384, 1992 to 1994, west of Sydney). TIA, ischemic stroke, or primary intracerebral hemorrhage was classified using standardized neurological assessments, including neuroimaging. Retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking, enhanced arteriolar light reflex) were assessed from retinal photographs masked to clinical information. Patients with TIA or acute stroke were older than control subjects and more likely to have stroke risk factors. After adjustment for study site and known risk factors, all retinal microvascular signs were more common in patients with TIA or acute stroke than in control subjects (OR, 1.9 to 8.7; Pischemic stroke had similar prevalences of nondiabetic retinopathy (26.9% versus 29.5%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.6), diabetic retinopathy (55.5% versus 50.0%; OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.4 to 3.6), focal arteriolar narrowing (15.6% versus 18.4%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.4 to 1.5), and arteriovenous nicking (23.0% versus 17.8%; OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7 to 2.7). Patients with TIA and acute stroke may share similar risk factors or pathogenic mechanisms.

  19. Does computed tomography permeability predict hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peggy Yen; Allison Cobb; Jai Jai Shiva Shankar

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use perfusion-derived permeability-surface area product maps to predict hemorrhagic transformation following thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic stroke.METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed our prospectively kept acute stroke database over five consecutive months for patients with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke(AIS) who had computed tomography(CT) perfusion(CTP) done at arrival. Patients included in the analyses also had to have a follow-up CT. The permeability-surface area product maps(PS) was calculated for the side of the ischemia and/or infarction and for the contralateral unaffected side at the same level. The cerebral blood flow map was used to delineate the ischemic territory. Next, a region of interest was drawn at the centre of this territory on the PS parametric map. Finally, a mirror region of interest was created on the contralateral side at the same level. The relative permeability-surface area product maps(r PS) provided an internal control and was calculated as the ratio of the PS on the side of the AIS to the PS on the contralateral side. A student t-test was performed after log conversion of r PS between patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation. Log conversion was used to convert the data into normal distribution to use t-test. For the group of patients who experienced intracranial bleed, a student t-test was performed between those with only petechial hemorrhage and those with more severe parenchymal hematoma with subarachnoid haemorrhage.RESULTS: Of 84 patients with AIS and CTP at admission, only 42 patients had a follow-up CT. The r PSderived using the normal side as the internal control was significantly higher(P = 0.003) for the 15 cases of hemorrhagic transformation(1.71 + 1.64) compared to 27 cases that did not have any(1.07 + 1.30). Patients with values above the overall mean r PS of 1.3 had an increased likelihood of subsequent hemorrhagic transformation. The sensitivity of using this score to predict

  20. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11......,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator....... No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit....

  1. Actual directions in the primary prevention of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Viktorovich Fonyakin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic directions in the primary prevention of ischemic stroke are presented. Population and high-risk strategies are identified in the system of primary prevention of stroke. The population strategy proposes the use of diverse medical, social, and educational measures that promote the elimination of the negative impact of lifestyle, nutrition, and environment on the incidence of stroke. The high-risk strategy implies individual preventive management in patients at high risk for cardiovascular events. Adequate antihypertensive therapy with blood pressure goals being achieved; antithrombotic therapy with a drug being rationally chosen; normalization of lipid metabolic parameters; and substantiated surgical intervention into the carotid arteries are able to substantially reduce the risk of primary stroke.

  2. Thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting in acute ischemic stroke management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Arnholm, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Markus; Kondziella, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    -term outcome (mRS ≤ 2). Harms included complications during and following EVT. Mean age was 64.3 years (standard deviation ±12.5), 40 (85%) patients received IVT initially. Median NIHSS was 16 (inter-quartile range 14-19). Mean time from stroke onset to recanalization was 311 min (standard deviation ±78......Extracranial carotid artery occlusion or high-grade stenosis with concomitant intracranial embolism causes severe ischemic stroke and shows poor response rates to intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). Endovascular therapy (EVT) utilizing thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting was long considered risky......-center analysis of 47 consecutive stroke patients with carotid occlusion or high-grade stenosis and concomitant intracranial embolus treated between September 2011 and December 2014. Benefits included early improvement of stroke severity (NIHSS ≥ 10) or complete remission within 72 h and favorable long...

  3. Association between fifteen risk factors and progressing ischemic stroke in the Han population of northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shan-shan; TENG Da; YOU Ding-yun; SU Zhi-qiang; LI Fang; ZHAO Ji-yang

    2010-01-01

    Background The mortality and disability associated with progressing ischemic stroke are much higher than general ischemic stroke. This study was conducted to determine the risk factors for progressing ischemic stroke in the Han population of northeast China.Methods A total of 2511 patients with ischemic stroke within 24 hours admitted to Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University were studied, from November 2007 to May 2009. All of the patients were classified into the progressing or non-progressing group according to the scores of the Scandinavian Neurological Stroke Scale. Fifteen putative risk factors were evaluated. The influence of risk factors for progressing ischemic stroke was analyzed with the simple Logistic analysis, the multiple Logistic analysis, and the stepwise Logistic regression model. All the statistical analysis was performed by SAS 9.1.Results Totally 359 (14.3%) patients met the criteria for progressing ischemic stroke. The Logistic analysis showed that age, family stroke history, smoking history, hypertension on admission, a drop in blood pressure after admission to the hospital, high serum glucose on admission, and fever were related to progressing ischemic stroke in the Han population of northeast China.Conclusion People of the ischemic stroke with these factors are more likely to develop progressing ischemic stroke.

  4. Exercise promotes axon regeneration of newborn striatonigral and corticonigral projection neurons in rats after ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Wan Zhang

    Full Text Available Newborn striatal neurons induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO can form functional projections targeting into the substantia nigra, which should be very important for the recovery of motor function. Exercise training post-stroke improves motor recovery in clinic patients and increases striatal neurogenesis in experimental animals. This study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise on axon regeneration of newborn projection neurons in adult rat brains following ischemic stroke. Rats were subjected to a transient MCAO to induce focal cerebral ischemic injury, followed by 30 minutes of exercise training daily from 5 to 28 days after MCAO. Motor function was tested using the rotarod test. We used fluorogold (FG nigral injection to trace striatonigral and corticonigral projection neurons, and green fluorescent protein (GFP-targeting retroviral vectors combined with FG double labeling (GFP(+ -FG(+ to detect newborn projection neurons. The results showed that exercise improved the recovery of motor function of rats after MCAO. Meanwhile, exercise also increased the levels of BDNF and VEGF, and reduced Nogo-A in ischemic brain. On this condition, we further found that exercise significantly increased the number of GFP(+ -FG(+ neurons in the striatum and frontal and parietal cortex ipsilateral to MCAO, suggesting an increase of newborn striatonigral and corticonigral projection neurons by exercise post-stroke. In addition, we found that exercise also increased NeuN(+ and FG(+ cells in the striatum and frontal and parietal cortex, the ischemic territory, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immunopositive staining cells in the substantia nigra, a region remote from the ischemic territory. Our results provide the first evidence that exercise can effectively enhance the capacity for regeneration of newborn projection neurons in ischemic injured mammalian brains while improving motor function. Our results provide a very important cellular mechanism

  5. [Presence of immune complexes in ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromadzka, G; Uchacz, I; Palasik, W; Ryglewicz, D; Korlak, J; Członkowska, A

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that inflammatory responses play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cerebral infarct. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of immunocomplexes (i.c.) in patients with stroke in the early period of the disease. Studies were performed on 35 subjects. The concentration of immunocomplexes was determined with the precipitation method (3.5% polyethylenoglikol was used). Increased concentration of i.c. was found in patients with cerebral infarct (after 12 hours and 7 days). It suggests, that i.c. could be one of the markers for systemic inflammation and be important in the patogenesis of atherosclerosis and stroke.

  6. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate II, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments. PMID:28286764

  7. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate, Richard; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments.

  8. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Reis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments.

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia after recanalization in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Man; Lee, Jin Soo; Song, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Hye Seon; Jung, Hae-Sun; Choi, Huimahn Alex; Lee, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves outcomes in experimental stroke models, especially after ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated the clinical and radiological effects of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke patients after recanalization. A prospective cohort study at 2 stroke centers was performed. We enrolled patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation with an initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale≥10 who had successful recanalization (≥thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia, 2b). Patients at center A underwent a mild hypothermia (34.5°C) protocol, which included mechanical ventilation, and 48-hour hypothermia and 48-hour rewarming. Patients at center B were treated according to the guidelines without hypothermia. Cerebral edema, hemorrhagic transformation, good outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale, ≤2), mortality, and safety profiles were compared. Potential variables at baseline and during the therapy were analyzed to evaluate for independent predictors of good outcome. The hypothermia group (n=39) had less cerebral edema (P=0.001), hemorrhagic transformation (P=0.016), and better outcome (P=0.017) compared with the normothermia group (n=36). Mortality, hemicraniectomy rate, and medical complications were not statistically different. After adjustment for potential confounders, therapeutic hypothermia (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-8.9; P=0.047) and distal occlusion (odds ratio, 7.3; 95% confidence interval; 1.3-40.3; P=0.022) were the independent predictors for good outcome. Absence of cerebral edema (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-18.2; P=0.006) and no medical complications (odds ratio, 9.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-39.9; P=0.003) were also independent predictors for good outcome during the therapy. In patients with ischemic stroke, after successful recanalization, therapeutic hypothermia may reduce risk of cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation, and lead to improved

  10. Safety Outcomes After Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Patients With Recent Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkler, Alexander E; Salehi Omran, Setareh; Gialdini, Gino; Lerario, Michael P; Yaghi, Shadi; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Navi, Babak B

    2017-08-01

    It is uncertain whether previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of receiving intravenous thrombolysis (tPA [tissue-type plasminogen activator]) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Using administrative claims data, we identified adults with AIS who received intravenous tPA at California, New York, and Florida hospitals from 2005 to 2013. Our primary outcome was intracerebral hemorrhage, and our secondary outcomes were unfavorable discharge disposition and inpatient mortality. We used logistic regression to compare rates of outcomes in patients with and without previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of intravenous tPA for AIS. We identified 36 599 AIS patients treated with intravenous tPA, of whom 568 (1.6%) had a previous ischemic stroke in the past 3 months. Of all patients who received intravenous tPA, the rate of intracerebral hemorrhage was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.7%-5.1%), and death occurred in 10.7% (95% CI, 10.4%-11.0%). After adjusting for demographics, vascular risk factors, and the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index, previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of thrombolysis for AIS was not associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.6-1.4; P=0.62), but was associated with an increased risk of death (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9; P=0.001) and unfavorable discharge disposition (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7; P=0.04). Among patients who receive intravenous tPA for AIS, recent ischemic stroke is not associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage but is associated with a higher risk of death and unfavorable discharge disposition. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Distribution territories and causative mechanisms of ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Alvarez-Sabin, J. [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica, Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic stroke prognosis, risk of recurrence, clinical assessment, and treatment decisions are influenced by stroke subtype (anatomic distribution and causative mechanism of infarction). Stroke subtype diagnosis is better achieved in the early phase of acute ischemia with the use of multimodal MR imaging. The pattern of brain lesions as shown by brain MR imaging can be classified according to a modified Oxfordshire method, based on the anatomic distribution of the infarcts into six groups: (1) total anterior circulation infarcts, (2) partial anterior circulation infarcts, (3) posterior circulation infarcts, (4) watershed infarcts, (5) centrum ovale infarcts, and (6) lacunar infarcts. The subtype of stroke according to its causative mechanism is based on the TOAST method, which classifies stroke into five major etiologic groups: (1) large-vessel atherosclerotic disease, (2) small-vessel atherosclerotic disease, (3) cardioembolic source, (4) other determined etiologies, and (5) undetermined or multiple possible etiologies. The different MR imaging patterns of acute ischemic brain lesions visualized using diffusion-weighted imaging and the pattern of vessel involvement demonstrated with MR angiography are essential factors that can suggest the most likely causative mechanism of infarction. This information may have an impact on decisions regarding therapy and the performance of additional diagnostic tests. (orig.)

  12. Microglial Responses after Ischemic Stroke and Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn A. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is caused by blockage of blood vessels in the brain leading to tissue death, while intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH occurs when a blood vessel ruptures, exposing the brain to blood components. Both are associated with glial toxicity and neuroinflammation. Microglia, as the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS, continually sample the environment for signs of injury and infection. Under homeostatic conditions, they have a ramified morphology and phagocytose debris. After stroke, microglia become activated, obtain an amoeboid morphology, and release inflammatory cytokines (the M1 phenotype. However, microglia can also be alternatively activated, performing crucial roles in limiting inflammation and phagocytosing tissue debris (the M2 phenotype. In rodent models, microglial activation occurs very early after stroke and ICH; however, their specific roles in injury and repair remain unclear. This review summarizes the literature on microglial responses after ischemic stroke and ICH, highlighting the mediators of microglial activation and potential therapeutic targets for each condition.

  13. Blunt Traumatic Extracranial Cerebrovascular Injury and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Foreman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic stroke occurs in a significant subset of patients with blunt traumatic cerebrovascular injury (TCVI. The patients are victims of motor vehicle crashes, assaults or other high-energy collisions, and suffer ischemic stroke due to injury to the extracranial carotid or vertebral arteries. Summary: An increasing number of patients with TCVI are being identified, largely because of the expanding use of computed tomography angiography for screening patients with blunt trauma. Patients with TCVI are particularly challenging to manage because they often suffer polytrauma, that is, numerous additional injuries including orthopedic, chest, abdominal, and head injuries. Presently, there is no consensus about optimal management. Key Messages: Most literature about TCVI and stroke has been published in trauma, general surgery, and neurosurgery journals; because of this, and because these patients are managed primarily by trauma surgeons, patients with stroke due to TCVI have been essentially hidden from view of neurologists. This review is intended to bring this clinical entity to the attention of clinicians and investigators with specific expertise in neurology and stroke.

  14. Lack of association between serum uric acid levels and outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Irene; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus; Kremer, Berry; de Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prognostic value of serum uric acid (UA) in acute ischemic stroke is controversial. The aim of this study is to further analyse the relation between UA and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Methods: We analysed UA levels in blood samples collected within 6 h of stroke onset from p

  15. Lack of association between serum uric acid levels and outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Irene; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus; Kremer, Berry; de Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prognostic value of serum uric acid (UA) in acute ischemic stroke is controversial. The aim of this study is to further analyse the relation between UA and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Methods: We analysed UA levels in blood samples collected within 6 h of stroke onset from

  16. An unusual cause of ischemic stroke - Cerebral air embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Suri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Air embolism is a preventable, often undiagnosed but potentially treatable cause of ischemic stroke with a high morbidity and mortality. It is usually iatrogenic ocurring especially in patients in ICU setting. We describe the case and neuroimaging of a patient with ischaemic stroke due to air embolism during manipulation of central venous line. We also review the literature with respect to aetiology, incidence pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options for venous and air embolism. Cerebral air embolism should be considered in patients with sudden neurological deterioration after central venous or arterial manipulations or certain neurological procedures. Prevention, as well as early diagnosis and management, may reduce morbidity and mortality.

  17. Low ankle-brachial index predicts cardiovascular risk after acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Markus A; Lutz, Katrin; Röhl, Jens-Eric; Neuner, Bruno; Masuhr, Florian

    2009-12-01

    A low ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) is an established risk marker for cardiovascular disease and mortality in the general population, but little is known about its prognostic value in individuals with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). An inception cohort of 204 patients with acute ischemic stroke or TIA was followed up for a mean of 2.3 years. At baseline, patients underwent ABI measurement and were assessed for risk factors, cardiovascular comorbidities, and cervical or intracranial artery stenosis. The association between low ABI (stroke, myocardial infarction, or death was examined by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. A low ABI was found in 63 patients (31%) and was associated with older age, current smoking, hypertension, peripheral arterial disease, and cervical or intracranial stenosis. During a total of 453.0 person-years of follow-up, 37 patients experienced outcome events (8.2% per person-year), with a higher outcome rate per person-year in patients with low ABI (12.8% vs 6.3%, P=0.03). In survival analysis adjusted for age and stroke etiology, patients with a low ABI had a 2 times higher risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death than those with a normal ABI (hazard ratio=2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.5). Additional adjustment for risk factors and cardiovascular comorbidities did not attenuate the association. A low ABI independently predicted subsequent cardiovascular risk and mortality in patients with acute stroke or TIA. ABI measurement may help to identify high-risk patients for targeted secondary stroke prevention.

  18. Vertebrobasilar territory ischemic stroke after electrical injury: delayed sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajendra S; Gupta, Pankaj K; Handa, Rahul; Nagpal, Kadam; Prakash, Swayam; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-07-01

    Electrical injuries are of very common occurrence in India and can be rarely fatal. Usually most of the patients recover without any serious complications. Rarely, neurologic aftereffects have been observed in some survivors. These neurologic insults can occur as immediate or delayed manifestations and can affect the nervous system at various levels resulting in hemiplegia, aphasia, parkinsonism, choreoathetosis, and can also involve brainstem, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, and autonomic nervous system. The involvement of vertebrobasilar territory is a rare complication of electrical injury. We herein report a case of 55-year-old male laborer who presented with vertebrobasilar territory ischemic stroke, which occurred 2 weeks after an electrical injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ante mortem case report of a posterior circulation ischemic stroke occurring as a delayed complication of electrical injury.

  19. Endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke: The standard of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh P Jadhav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ischemic stroke continues to be a major cause of permanent disability and death worldwide. Outcomes are particularly poor in patients presenting with large vessel occlusive disease with resultant ischemia and tissue injury in large and eloquent territories. Intravenous thrombolysis has been the mainstay of medical therapy, however treatment is limited to a subset of patients and many patients continue to have poor outcomes. Three trials in 2013 investigating the benefit of intra-arterial therapy failed to demonstrate benefit over medical therapy alone. More recently, five trials in 2015 were completed demonstrating superior outcomes with intra-arterial therapy with improved results attributed to higher and faster rates of recanalization in a select patient population. These trials have introduced a new standard of care in the management of acute ischemic stroke patients.

  20. Ischemic stroke as the first manifestation of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zis, Panagiotis; Assi, Avraam; Kravaritis, Dimitrios; Sevastianos, Vassilios A

    2014-03-01

    A 38-year-old obese woman, with a past medical history of cholecystectomy and dyslipidaemia, presented with acute occipital headache, vomiting and rotational vertigo which lasted 8 hours. On admission neurological examination was unremarkable, however general physical examination revealed hepatomegaly. Routine blood tests showed abnormal liver function tests. MRI scan indicated an acute ischemic infarct in the right cerebellum. Extensive investigation was negative. However, liver MRI revealed multiple lesions in both liver lobes. Ultrasound guided liver biopsy and histopathological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic hemangioendothelioma. In conclusion, hypercoaguable state related to hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma can lead to an ischemic stroke, as a rare first manifestation of the disease. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CURRENT REPERFUSION THERAPY POSSIBILITIES IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION AND ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Konstantinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke remain to be of the greatest medical and social importance because of their high prevalence, disability, and mortality rates. Intractable thrombotic occlusion of the respective artery leads to the formation of an ischemic lesion focus in the tissue of the heart or brain. Emergency reperfusion serves to decrease a necrotic focus, makes its formation reversible, and reduces patient death rates. The paper considers main reperfusion therapy lines: medical (with thrombolytic drugs and mechanical (with primary interventions one and their combination in treating patients with acute myocardial and cerebral ischemia. Each reperfusion procedure is discussed in view of its advantages, disadvantages, available guidelines, and possibilities of real clinical practice. Tenecteplase is assessed in terms of its efficacy, safety, and capacities for bolus administration, which allows its use at any hospital and at the pre-hospital stage. Prehospital thrombolysis permits reperfusion therapy to bring much closer to the patient and therefore aids in reducing time to reperfusion and in salvaging as much the myocardial volume as possible. The rapidest recovery of myocardial and cerebral perfusion results in a decreased necrotic area and both improved immediate and late prognosis. The results of randomized clinical trials studying the possibilities of the medical and mechanical methods to restore blood flow are analyzed in the context of evidence-based medicine. The reason why despite the available contraindications, limited efficiency, and the risk of hemorrhagic complications, thrombolytic therapy remains the method of choice for prehospital reperfusion, an alternative to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI if it cannot be carried out in patients with myocardial infarction at the stated time, and the only treatment ischemic stroke treatment that has proven its efficiency and safety in clinical trials is under

  2. Texture analysis of computed tomography images of acute ischemic stroke patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.S.; Castellano, G. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Neurofisica], e-mail: marciaso@ifi.unicamp.br; Fernandes, P.T.; Avelar, W.M.; Santos, S.L.M.; Li, L.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Lab. de Neuroimagem

    2009-11-15

    Computed tomography (CT) images are routinely used to assess ischemic brain stroke in the acute phase. They can provide important clues about whether to treat the patient by thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator. However, in the acute phase, the lesions may be difficult to detect in the images using standard visual analysis. The objective of the present study was to determine if texture analysis techniques applied to CT images of stroke patients could differentiate between normal tissue and affected areas that usually go unperceived under visual analysis. We performed a pilot study in which texture analysis, based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix, was applied to the CT brain images of 5 patients and of 5 control subjects and the results were compared by discriminant analysis. Thirteen regions of interest, regarding areas that may be potentially affected by ischemic stroke, were selected for calculation of texture parameters. All regions of interest for all subjects were classified as lesional or non-lesional tissue by an expert neuroradiologist. Visual assessment of the discriminant analysis graphs showed differences in the values of texture parameters between patients and controls, and also between texture parameters for lesional and non-lesional tissue of the patients. This suggests that texture analysis can indeed be a useful tool to help neurologists in the early assessment of ischemic stroke and quantification of the extent of the affected areas. (author)

  3. Hospital Variation in Home-Time After Acute Ischemic Stroke: Insights From the PROSPER Study (Patient-Centered Research Into Outcomes Stroke Patients Prefer and Effectiveness Research).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Emily C; Xian, Ying; Xu, Haolin; Wu, Jingjing; Saver, Jeffrey L; Smith, Eric E; Schwamm, Lee H; Peterson, Eric D; Reeves, Mathew J; Bhatt, Deepak L; Maisch, Lesley; Hannah, Deidre; Lindholm, Brianna; Olson, DaiWai; Prvu Bettger, Janet; Pencina, Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-10-01

    Stroke survivors identify home-time as a high-priority outcome; there are limited data on factors influencing home-time and home-time variability among discharging hospitals. We ascertained home-time (ie, time alive out of a hospital, inpatient rehabilitation facility, or skilled nursing facility) at 90 days and 1-year post discharge by linking data from Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Registry patients (≥65 years) to Medicare claims. Using generalized linear mixed models, we estimated adjusted mean home-time for each hospital. Using linear regression, we examined associations between hospital characteristics and risk-adjusted home-time. We linked 156 887 patients with ischemic stroke at 989 hospitals to Medicare claims (2007-2011). Hospital mean home-time varied with an overall unadjusted median of 59.5 days over the first 90 days and 270.2 days over the first year. Hospital factors associated with more home-time over 90 days included higher annual stroke admission volume (number of ischemic stroke admissions per year); South, West, or Midwest geographic regions (versus Northeast); and rural location; 1-year patterns were similar. Lowest home-time quartile patients (versus highest) were more likely to be older, black, women, and have more comorbidities and severe strokes. Home-time variation decreased after risk adjustment (interquartile range, 57.4-61.4 days over 90 days; 266.3-274.2 days over 1 year). In adjusted analyses, increasing annual stroke volume and rural location were associated with significantly more home-time. In older ischemic stroke survivors, home-time post discharge varies by hospital annual stroke volume, severity of case-mix, and region. In adjusted analyses, annual ischemic stroke admission volume and rural location were associated with more home-time post stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Role of Acute Lesion Topography in Initial Ischemic Stroke Severity and Long-Term Functional Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ona; Cloonan, Lisa; Mocking, Steven J T; Bouts, Mark J R J; Copen, William A; Cougo-Pinto, Pedro T; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Schaefer, Pamela W; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2015-09-01

    Acute infarct volume, often proposed as a biomarker for evaluating novel interventions for acute ischemic stroke, correlates only moderately with traditional clinical end points, such as the modified Rankin Scale. We hypothesized that the topography of acute stroke lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may provide further information with regard to presenting stroke severity and long-term functional outcomes. Data from a prospective stroke repository were limited to acute ischemic stroke subjects with magnetic resonance imaging completed within 48 hours from last known well, admission NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and 3-to-6 months modified Rankin Scale scores. Using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping techniques, including age, sex, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging lesion volume as covariates, statistical maps were calculated to determine the significance of lesion location for clinical outcome and admission stroke severity. Four hundred ninety subjects were analyzed. Acute stroke lesions in the left hemisphere were associated with more severe NIHSS at admission and poor modified Rankin Scale at 3 to 6 months. Specifically, injury to white matter (corona radiata, internal and external capsules, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and uncinate fasciculus), postcentral gyrus, putamen, and operculum were implicated in poor modified Rankin Scale. More severe NIHSS involved these regions, as well as the amygdala, caudate, pallidum, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and precentral gyrus. Acute lesion topography provides important insights into anatomic correlates of admission stroke severity and poststroke outcomes. Future models that account for infarct location in addition to diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging volume may improve stroke outcome prediction and identify patients likely to benefit from aggressive acute intervention and personalized rehabilitation strategies. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Acute childhood arterial ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yock-Corrales, Adriana; Mackay, Mark T; Mosley, Ian; Maixner, Wirginia; Babl, Franz E

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about the presenting features of acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in children presenting to the emergency department (ED). Yet, initial clinical assessment is a key step in the management pathway of stroke. We describe the presentation in the ED of children with confirmed acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes. We conducted a retrospective descriptive case series of consecutive patients aged 1 month to younger than 18 years and presenting to a single-center tertiary ED with radiologically confirmed acute ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke during a 5-year period. Patients were identified by medical record search with International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes for hemorrhagic stroke and through the hospital stroke registry for acute ischemic stroke. Signs, symptoms, and initial management were described. Fifty patients with acute ischemic stroke and 31 with hemorrhagic stroke were identified. Mean age was 8.7 years (SD 5.2), and 51% were male. Fifty-six percent were previously healthy. Median time from onset of symptoms to ED presentation was 21 hours (interquartile range 6 to 48 hours) for acute ischemic stroke and 12 hours (interquartile range 4 to 72 hours) for hemorrhagic stroke. Acute ischemic stroke presented with symptoms of focal limb weakness (64%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 49% to 77%), facial weakness (60%; 95% CI 45% to 73%), and speech disturbance (46%; 95% CI 31% to 60%). Few patients with acute ischemic stroke presented with vomiting and altered mental status. Most patients with acute ischemic stroke had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 or greater (86%; 95% CI 73% to 94%) and presented with at least 1 focal neurologic sign (88%; 95% CI 73% to 98%). Hemorrhagic stroke presented with headache (73%; 95% CI 54% to 87%), vomiting (58%; 95% CI 40% to 75%), and altered mental status (48%; 95% CI 30% to 67%). GCS score in hemorrhagic stroke was less than 14 in 38% and less than 8 in 19% (95% CI 7% to

  6. Hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke in diabetics on sulfonylureas

    OpenAIRE

    Trostdorf, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses the question whether sulfonylureas may reduce the risk of hemorrhagic transformation. We analized data of 765 Patients who presented with ischemic stroke in 2005 and 2006 at the Charité Berlin. We included all patients without excluding criteria and with an Diabetes mellitus. According to medication with or without sulfonylureas we built a treatment and a controlgroup. Hemorrhagic transformations presented significantly fewer in the group with sulfonylureas. Mortality ...

  7. Effects of Shuxuetong injection applied in acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of Shuxuetong injection in adjuvant treatment of ischemic stroke on the degree of nerve injury, lipid metabolism and blood coagulation function. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke admitted in our hospital during the period from May 2012 to May 2015 were selected for retrospective analysis. They were divided into the control group receiving regular treatment and the Shuxuetong group receiving adjuvant treatment with Shuxuetong injection. One and the three months after treatment, serum was collected and nerve injury molecules, indexes of lipid metabolism and blood coagulation function were measured. Results: One month after treatment, the contents of neuron-specific enolase, S100 cal-cium binding protein B, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, thromboxane B2, fibrinogen and D-dimer in the serum of patients from Shuxuetong group were significantly lower than those of control group. The con-tents of high-density lipoprotein and 6-keto prostaglandin F1a were significantly higher than those of control group. Three months after treatment, the contents of neuron-specific enolase, S100 calcium binding protein B, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density li-poprotein, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, thromboxane B2, fibrinogen and D-dimer in the serum of patients from Shuxuetong group were significantly lower than those of control group. The contents of high-density lipoprotein and 6-keto prostaglandin F1a were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with Shuxuetong injection can reduce the injury of nerve function of patients with ischemic stroke and improve blood lipid metabolism and blood coagulation function, which is an effective drug for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  8. Effects of Shuxuetong injection applied in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effects of Shuxuetong injection in adjuvant treatment of ischemic stroke on the degree of nerve injury, lipid metabolism and blood coagulation function. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke admitted in our hospital during the period from May 2012 to May 2015 were selected for retrospective analysis. They were divided into the control group receiving regular treatment and the Shuxuetong group receiving adjuvant treatment with Shuxuetong injection. One and the three months after treatment, serum was collected and nerve injury molecules, indexes of lipid metabolism and blood coagulation function were measured. Results: One month after treatment, the contents of neuron-specific enolase, S100 calcium binding protein B, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, thromboxane B2, fibrinogen and D-dimer in the serum of patients from Shuxuetong group were significantly lower than those of control group. The contents of high-density lipoprotein and 6-keto prostaglandin F1a were significantly higher than those of control group. Three months after treatment, the contents of neuron-specific enolase, S100 calcium binding protein B, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, thromboxane B2, fibrinogen and D-dimer in the serum of patients from Shuxuetong group were significantly lower than those of control group. The contents of high-density lipoprotein and 6-keto prostaglandin F1a were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with Shuxuetong injection can reduce the injury of nerve function of patients with ischemic stroke and improve blood lipid metabolism and blood coagulation function, which is an effective drug for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  9. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinos, Anna; Schaink, Alexis K; Dhalla, Irfan; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K; Sikich, Nancy; Lum, Cheemun; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kelloway, Linda; Xie, Xuanqian; Hill, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    Although intravenous thrombolysis increases the probability of a good functional outcome in carefully selected patients with acute ischemic stroke, a substantial proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis do not have a good outcome. Several recent trials of mechanical thrombectomy appear to indicate that this treatment may be superior to thrombolysis. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) compared with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. We systematically searched seven databases for randomized controlled trials published between January 2005 and March 2015 comparing stent retrievers or thromboaspiration devices with best medical therapy (with or without intravenous thrombolysis) in adults with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the included trials. We combined the data using a fixed or random effects meta-analysis, where appropriate. We identified 1579 studies; of these, we evaluated 122 full-text papers and included five randomized control trials (n=1287). Compared with patients treated medically, patients who received mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to be functionally independent as measured by a modified Rankin score of 0-2 (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-3.04; I2=0%). This finding was robust to subgroup analysis. Mortality and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different between the two groups. Mechanical thrombectomy significantly improves functional independence in appropriately selected patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  10. Ginsenoside Rd and ischemic stroke; a short review of literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Fazel Nabavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng is a well-known economic medical plant that is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine. This species contains a unique class of natural products—ginsenosides. Recent clinical and experimental studies have presented numerous lines of evidence on the promising role of ginsenosides on different diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancer. Nowadays, most of the attention has focused on ginsenoside Rd as a neuroprotective agent to attenuate ischemic stroke damages. Some of the evidence showed that ginsenoside Rd ameliorates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation. Ginsenoside Rd can prolong neural cells' survival through the upregulation of the endogenous antioxidant system, phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 pathways, preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential, suppression of the nuclear factor-kappa B, transient receptor potential melastatin, acid sensing ion channels 1a, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1, protein tyrosine kinase activation, as well as reduction of cytochrome c-releasing and apoptosis-inducing factor. In the current work, we review the available reports on the promising role of ginsenoside Rd on ischemic stroke. We also discuss its chemistry, source, and the molecular mechanism underlying this effect.

  11. Genome response to tissue plasminogen activator in experimental ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Dazhi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is known to have functions beyond fibrinolysis in acute ischemic stroke, such as blood brain barrier disruption. To further delineate tPA functions in the blood, we examined the gene expression profiles induced by tPA in a rat model of ischemic stroke. Results tPA differentially expressed 929 genes in the blood of rats (p ≤ 0.05, fold change ≥ |1.2|. Genes identified had functions related to modulation of immune cells. tPA gene expression was found to be dependent on the reperfusion status of cerebral vasculature. The majority of genes regulated by tPA were different from genes regulated by ischemic stroke. Conclusions tPA modulates gene expression in the blood of rats involving immune cells in a manner that is dependent on the status of vascular reperfusion. These non-fibrinolytic activities of tPA in the blood serve to better understand tPA-related complications.

  12. Do energy drinks cause epileptic seizure and ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikici, Suber; Saritas, Ayhan; Besir, Fahri Halit; Tasci, Ahmet Hakan; Kandis, Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Energy drinks are popular among young individuals and marketed to college students, athletes, and active individuals between the ages of 21 and 35 years. We report a case that had ischemic stroke and epileptic seizure after intake of energy drink with alcohol. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first report of ischemic stroke after intake of energy drink. A previously healthy 37-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure. According to his wife's testimony, just before loss of consciousness, the patient had been drinking 3 boxes of energy drinks (Redbull, Istanbul, Turkey, 250 mL) with vodka on an empty stomach. He did not have a history of seizures, head trauma, or family history of seizures or another disease. In cranial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, there were hyperintense signal changes in bilateral occipital area (more pronounced in the left occipital lobe), right temporal lobe, frontal lobe, and posterior parietal lobe. All tests associated with possible etiologic causes of ischemic stroke in young patients were negative. Herein, we want to attract attention to adverse effect of energy drink usage.

  13. Acute MRI Changes in Progressive Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, Elizabeth; Rostrup, Egill; Rosenbaum, S

    2008-01-01

    as a permanent decrease of >/=3 Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) points for speech or >/=2 SSS points for consciousness or >/=2 SSS points for limb strength, when assessed at baseline compared to the day after admission and daily during the following week. Patients were followed up on day 90 and assessed using......-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance angiography were performed 3 times, immediately after clinical evaluation, on day 7 and after 3 months. Clinical neurological assessments were performed every 2 h during the first 24 h and once daily from day 2 to 7. SIP was defined...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. Results: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  14. Acute MRI changes in progressive ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, E.; Rostrup, E.; Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    as a permanent decrease of >or=3 Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) points for speech or >or=2 SSS points for consciousness or >or=2 SSS points for limb strength, when assessed at baseline compared to the day after admission and daily during the following week. Patients were followed up on day 90 and assessed using......-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance angiography were performed 3 times, immediately after clinical evaluation, on day 7 and after 3 months. Clinical neurological assessments were performed every 2 h during the first 24 h and once daily from day 2 to 7. SIP was defined...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  15. Mendelian Genes and Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Small-Vessel Ischemic Stroke in Sporadic Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Michael; O'Donnell, Martin; Thijs, Vincent; Dans, Antonio; López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Gómez-Arbeláez, Diego; Mondo, Charles; Czlonkowska, Anna; Skowronska, Marta; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Yusuf, Salim; Paré, Guillaume

    2017-08-01

    Mendelian strokes are rare genetic disorders characterized by early-onset small-vessel stroke. Although extensively studied among families with syndromic features, whether these genes affect risk among sporadic cases is unknown. We sequenced 8 genes responsible for Mendelian stroke in a case-control study of sporadic stroke cases (≤70 years). Participants included 1251 primary stroke cases of small-vessel pathology (637 intracerebral hemorrhage and 614 small-vessel ischemic stroke cases) and 1716 controls from the INTERSTROKE study (Study of the Importance of Conventional and Emerging Risk Factors of Stroke in Different Regions and Ethnic Groups of the World). Overall, the prevalence of canonical disease-causing mutations was 0.56% in cases and 0.23% in controls (odds ratio=1.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-7.57; P=0.33). CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathies with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathies) mutations were more frequent among cases (0.48%) than controls (0.23%) but were not significantly associated with stroke risk (odds ratio=2.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-8.02; P=0.27). Next, we included all rare nonsynonymous mutations to investigate whether other types of mutations may contribute to stroke risk. Overall, 13.5% of cases and 14.2% of controls were carriers of at least one rare nonsynonymous mutation among the 8 Mendelian stroke genes. Mutation carriers were not at elevated risk of stroke (odds ratio=0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.16; P=0.55). In the absence of syndromic features and family history of stroke, screening for Mendelian mutations among small-vessel stroke patients is unlikely to have high diagnostic utility. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Integrated analysis of ischemic stroke datasets revealed sex and age difference in anti-stroke targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Xing; Dai, Shao-Xing; Wang, Qian; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Hong, Yi; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Liu, Dahai; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a common neurological disorder and the burden in the world is growing. This study aims to explore the effect of sex and age difference on ischemic stroke using integrated microarray datasets. The results showed a dramatic difference in whole gene expression profiles and influenced pathways between males and females, and also in the old and young individuals. Furthermore, compared with old males, old female patients showed more serious biological function damage. However, females showed less affected pathways than males in young subjects. Functional interaction networks showed these differential expression genes were mostly related to immune and inflammation-related functions. In addition, we found ARG1 and MMP9 were up-regulated in total and all subgroups. Importantly, IL1A, ILAB, IL6 and TNF and other anti-stroke target genes were up-regulated in males. However, these anti-stroke target genes showed low expression in females. This study found huge sex and age differences in ischemic stroke especially the opposite expression of anti-stroke target genes. Future studies are needed to uncover these pathological mechanisms, and to take appropriate pre-prevention, treatment and rehabilitation measures.

  17. Difference in the Location and Risk Factors of Cerebral Microbleeds According to Ischemic Stroke Subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bum Joon; Yoon, Youngshin; Sohn, Hoyon; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S.; Kwon, Sun U.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The location of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) may differ according to ischemic stroke subtype, and the underlying pathomechanism may differ by their location. Here, we investigated the characteristics of CMBs according to various ischemic stroke subtypes to verify this issue. Methods Patients with acute ischemic stroke were consecutively included. The presence of CMBs was determined by gradient echo image sequence. The distribution of CMBs was classified as deep, lobar, o...

  18. History, Evolution, and Importance of Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holodinsky, Jessalyn K; Yu, Amy Y X; Assis, Zarina A; Al Sultan, Abdulaziz S; Menon, Bijoy K; Demchuk, Andrew M; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    More than 800,000 people in North America suffer a stroke each year, with ischemic stroke making up the majority of these cases. The outcomes of ischemic stroke range from complete functional and cognitive recovery to severe disability and death; outcome is strongly associated with timely reperfusion treatment. Historically, ischemic stroke has been treated with intravenous thrombolytic agents with moderate success. However, five recently published positive trials have established the efficacy of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we will discuss the history of stroke treatments moving from various intravenous thrombolytic drugs to intra-arterial thrombolysis, early mechanical thrombectomy devices, and finally modern endovascular devices. Early endovascular therapy failures, recent successes, and implications for current ischemic stroke management and future research directions are discussed.

  19. Altered resting-state FMRI signals in acute stroke patients with ischemic penumbra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hsiung Tsai

    Full Text Available Identifying the ischemic penumbra in acute stroke subjects is important for the clinical decision making process. The aim of this study was to use resting-state functional magnetic resonance singal (fMRI to investigate the change in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF of these subjects in three different subsections of acute stroke regions: the infarct core tissue, the penumbra tissue, and the normal brain tissue. Another aim of this study was to test the feasilbility of consistently detecting the penumbra region of the brain through ALFF analysis.Sixteen subjects with first-ever acute ischemic stroke were scanned within 27 hours of the onset of stroke using magnetic resonance imaging. The core of infarct regions and penumbra regions were determined by diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging respectively. The ALFF were measured from resting-state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD fMRI scans. The averaged relative ALFF value of each regions were correlated with the time after the onset of stroke.Relative ALFF values were significantly different in the infarct core tissue, penumbra tissue and normal brain tissue. The locations of lesions in the ALFF maps did not match perfectly with diffusion and perfusion-weighted imagings; however, these maps provide a contrast that can be used to differentiate between penumbra brain tissue and normal brain tissue. Significant correlations between time after stroke onset and the relative ALFF values were present in the penumbra tissue but not in the infarct core and normal brain tissue.Preliminary results from this study suggest that the ALFF reflects the underlying neurovascular activity and has a great potential to estimate the brain tissue viability after ischemia. Results also show that the ALFF may contribute to acute stroke imaging for thrombolytic or neuroprotective therapies.

  20. [Intravenous thrombolysis for ischemic stroke: Experience in 54 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara O, Carlos; Bulatova, Kateryna; Aravena, Felipe; Caba, Sheila; Monsalve, Juan; Lara, Hugo; Nieto, Elena; Navarrete, Isabel; Morales, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) reduces disability in patients with ischemic stroke. However, its implementation in Chilean public general hospitals has been slow and faces some difficulties. To analyze the results of an intravenous thrombolysis protocol implementation in a public general hospital. During a lapse of 28 months a standardized protocol for intravenous thrombolysis implemented in the emergency room of a public hospital, was prospectively evaluated. Fifty four patients with ischemic stroke were treated and assessed three months later as outpatients. At three months of follow-up, 66.4% of patients subjected to thrombolysis had a favorable evolution, defined as having 0 to 1 points in the modified Rankin scale. Intracerebral hemorrhage rate was 11.1%, including 5.5% of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Four percent of patients had systemic bleeding complications after thrombolysis. The mortality rate was 14.8%. The success rates, mortality, and complications rate were comparable to the results obtained in international studies, despite of the absence of a stroke unit to manage stroke and its complications.

  1. An evaluation of ischemic stroke using dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Hironaka; Katayama, Yasuo; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    To assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI, echo planar imaging was performed in 10 patients with ischemic stroke. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (MTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured based on moment analysis and the gamma variate method. These measurements, however, are not suitable for the detection of cerebral ischemia during the hyperacute stage. Therefore, we additionally studied the changes in a concentration curve (time-{Delta}R{sup *} curve) of Gd-DTPA, injected into the median vein of the forearm. From the curve the SUM ({Delta}R{sup *}) time to peak and the {Delta}R{sup *} peak, which may be calculated quickly, were determined and were compared to rCBV, MTT, and rCBF, respectively. The rCBV and the rCBF in the ischemic regions were less than those in the contralateral healthy regions, and the MTT in the ischemic regions was longer than that in the contralateral healthy regions. Additionally, SUM ({Delta}R{sup *}) and the {Delta}R{sup *} peak in the ischemic regions were less, and the time to peak in the ischemic regions was longer than the value in the contralateral healthy regions, correlating well to the rCBV, rCBF, and MTT measurements. Also, images of these parameters, depicting the ischemic lesion earlier than conventional T2 weighted images, can be easily made by using an MRI console. These results suggest that the SUM ({Delta}R{sup *}), time to peak and the {Delta}R{sup *} peak images calculated with dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI may be one of the best techniques for the detection of cerebral ischemic lesions during the hyperacute stage. (K.H.)

  2. Intrapulmonary shunt is a potentially unrecognized cause of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushora, Mohannad Y; Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Alnabki, Ziad; Shenoy, Mohan; Alshaher, Motaz; Stoddard, Marcus F

    2013-07-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability. Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a harbinger of stroke. The etiology of stroke in as many as 40% of patients remains undetermined after extensive evaluation. It was hypothesized that intrapulmonary shunt is a potential facilitator of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or TIA. Patients undergoing clinically indicated transesophageal echocardiography were prospectively enrolled. Comprehensive multiplane transesophageal echocardiographic imaging was performed and saline contrast done to assess for intrapulmonary shunt and patent foramen ovale. Three hundred twenty-one patients with either nonhemorrhagic CVA (n = 262) or TIA (n = 59) made up the stroke group. Three hundred twenty-one age-matched and gender-matched patients made up the control group. Intrapulmonary shunt occurred more frequently in the stroke group (72 of 321) compared with the control group (32 of 321) (22% vs 10%, P CVA and/or TIA (odds ratio, 2.6; P CVA or TIA (n = 71), intrapulmonary shunt occurred more frequently (25 of 71) than in the control group (5 of 71) (35% vs 7%, P CVA or TIA in patients with cryptogenic CVA or TIA (odds ratio, 6.3; P CVA and TIA, especially in patients with cryptogenic CVA and TIA. Future studies assessing the prognostic significance of intrapulmonary shunt on cerebral vascular event recurrence rates in patients after initial CVA or TIA would be of great interest. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stroke awareness decreases prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed arrival at hospital is one of the major obstacles in enhancing the rate of thrombolysis therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Our study aimed to investigate factors associated with prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in Korea. Methods A prospective, multicenter study was conducted at 14 tertiary hospitals in Korea from March 2009 to July 2009. We interviewed 500 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived within 48 hours. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors influencing prehospital delay. Results Among the 500 patients (median 67 years, 62% men, the median time interval from symptom onset to arrival was 474 minutes (interquartile range, 170-1313. Early arrival within 3 hours of symptom onset was significantly associated with the following factors: high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, previous stroke, atrial fibrillation, use of ambulance, knowledge about thrombolysis and awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke. Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke (OR 4.438, 95% CI 2.669-7.381, knowledge about thrombolysis (OR 2.002, 95% CI 1.104-3.633 and use of ambulance (OR 1.961, 95% CI 1.176-3.270 were significantly associated with early arrival. Conclusions In Korea, stroke awareness not only on the part of patients, but also of bystanders, had a great impact on early arrival at hospital. To increase the rate of thrombolysis therapy and the incidence of favorable outcomes, extensive general public education including how to recognize stroke symptoms would be important.

  4. Multiparametric, longitudinal optical coherence tomography imaging reveals acute injury and chronic recovery in experimental ischemic stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Mandeville, Emiri T; Can, Anil; Blasi, Francesco; Climov, Mihail; Daneshmand, Ali; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yu, Esther; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H; Sakadžić, Sava; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2013-01-01

    .... A multi-parametric Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) platform for longitudinal imaging of ischemic stroke in mice, through thinned-skull, reinforced cranial window surgical preparations, is described...

  5. The role of monocytes in ischemic stroke pathobiology: New avenues to explore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman eElAli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke accounts for the majority of stroke cases and constitutes a major cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. Inflammation has been reported to constitute a major component of ischemic stroke pathobiology. In the acute phase of ischemic stroke, microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, are activated, followed by several infiltration waves of different circulating immune cells into the brain. Among these circulating immune cells, monocytes have been shown to play a particularly important role. Following their infiltration, monocytes differentiate into potent phagocytic cells, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs in the ischemic brain. Initially, the presence of these cells was considered as marker of an exacerbated inflammatory response that contributes to brain damage. However, the recent reports are suggesting a more complex and multiphasic roles of these cells in ischemic stroke pathobiology. Monocytes constitute a heterogeneous group of cells, which comprises two major subsets in rodent and three major subsets in human. In both species, two equivalent subsets exist, the pro-inflammatory subset and the anti-inflammatory subset. Recent data have demonstrated that ischemic stroke differentially regulate monocyte subsets, which directly affect ischemic stroke pathobiology and may have direct implications in ischemic stroke therapies. Here we review the recent findings that addressed the role of different monocyte subsets in ischemic stroke pathobiology, and the implications on therapies.

  6. Migraine and risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and hospital readmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm, Fanny P; Houle, Timothy T; Grabitz, Stephanie D

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether patients with migraine are at increased risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and whether this may lead to an increased hospital readmission rate. DESIGN: Prospective hospital registry study. SETTING: Massachusetts General Hospital and two satellite campuses between...... was hospital readmission within 30 days of surgery. Exploratory outcomes included post-discharge stroke and strata of neuroanatomical stroke location. RESULTS: 10 179 (8.2%) patients had any migraine diagnosis, of whom 1278 (12.6%) had migraine with aura and 8901 (87.4%) had migraine without aura. 771 (0.......9 (2.9 to 5.0) for migraine without aura, and 6.3 (3.2 to 9.5) for migraine with aura. : Patients with migraine had a higher rate of readmission to hospital within 30 days of discharge (adjusted odds ratio 1.31, 1.22 to 1.41). CONCLUSIONS: Surgical patients with a history of migraine are at increased...

  7. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (Ppneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, Ppneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome.

  8. Intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke in the 3- to 4·5-hour window--the Malabar experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Kizhakkaniyakath Abdu; Ummer, Karadan; Pradeep Kumar, Vayyattu Govindankutty; Noone, Mohan Leslie

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator has been shown to be beneficial up to 4.5-hours of symptom onset. The study aims to review our experience with thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in the 3- to 4.5-hours window in acute ischemic stroke. Prospective observational study of patients with acute ischemic stroke thombolysed between 3- and 4.5-hours after onset from July 2009 to October 2012 at a tertiary-care center in the Malabar region of South India. The dose of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator used was 50 mg in all patients. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were similar to European Co-operative Acute Stroke Study-3 criteria, with the exceptions that we did not use an age cutoff of 80 years and did not restrict thrombolysis for previous stroke with diabetes or elevated blood glucose levels. Good outcome was defined as a three-month modified Rankin Score of 2 or less. The chi-square test was used to compare the outcome among various sub-types of ischemic stroke. The age, blood glucose, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Score, and time to thrombolysis were compared between groups with the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test. Thirty-one patients (median age 65 years, range 44-85, and median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Score 10, range 5-22) were thrombolysed in the 3- to 4.5-hours window after stroke onset during the study period. In the first 24 h, 16 patients (52%) improved in National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Score by 4 or more points while three worsened by 4 or more points. At the three-month follow up, 15 patients (48%) were functionally independent (modified Rankin Score ≤ 2). None had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. There was no significant difference in outcome between the various ischemic stroke sub-types. The baseline age, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Score, blood glucose, and onset to treatment time did not differ

  9. Computed tomography in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, Karl-Olof [HUG-Geneva University Hospital, Geneva University Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Department of Imaging and Medical Informatics, Geneva (Switzerland); Baird, Alison E. [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Cerebrovascular Disease and Stroke, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Box 1213, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Stroke remains the third most important cause of mortality in industrialized countries; this has prompted research for improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with signs of acute cerebral ischemia. Over the last decade, there has been a parallel in progress in techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic options. While previously only used for excluding hemorrhage, imaging now has the possibility to detect ischemia, vascular occlusion, as well as detect tissue at risk in one setting. It should also allow to monitor treatment and predict/exclude therapeutic complications. Parallel to advances in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke, computed tomography has improved immensely over the last decade due to the development of CT scanners that are faster and that allow to acquire studies such as CT perfusion or CT angiography in a reliable way. CT can detect many signs that might help us detect impending signs of massive infarction, but we still lack the experience to use these alone to prevent a patient from benefitting from possible therapy. (orig.)

  10. RECAST (Remote Ischemic Conditioning After Stroke Trial): A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Phase II Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Timothy J; Hedstrom, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Saoirse; Donnelly, Richard; Barrett, David A; Sarmad, Sarir; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M

    2017-05-01

    Repeated episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion (remote ischemic conditioning [RIC]) may improve outcome after acute stroke. We performed a pilot blinded placebo-controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke, randomized 1:1 to receive 4 cycles of RIC within 24 hours of ictus. The primary outcome was tolerability and feasibility. Secondary outcomes included safety, clinical efficacy (day 90), putative biomarkers (pre- and post-intervention, day 4), and exploratory hemodynamic measures. Twenty-six patients (13 RIC and 13 sham) were recruited 15.8 hours (SD 6.2) post-onset, age 76.2 years (SD 10.5), blood pressure 159/83 mm Hg (SD 25/11), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 (interquartile range, 3.75-9.25). RIC was well tolerated with 49 out of 52 cycles completed in full. Three patients experienced vascular events in the sham group: 2 ischemic strokes and 2 myocardial infarcts versus none in the RIC group (P=0.076, log-rank test). Compared with sham, there was a significant decrease in day 90 NIHSS score in the RIC group, median NIHSS score 1 (interquartile range, 0.5-5) versus 3 (interquartile range, 2-9.5; P=0.04); RIC augmented plasma HSP27 (heat shock protein 27; Pacute stroke is well tolerated and appears safe and feasible. RIC may improve neurological outcome, and protective mechanisms may be mediated through HSP27. A larger trial is warranted. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN86672015. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Ischemic Stroke: Progress and Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Ferri, Anna Lucia; Bersano, Anna; Lisini, Daniela; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Frigerio, Simona; Parati, Eugenio

    2016-05-27

    Stroke is the most common neurological cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, afflicting 15 million people every year. The numbers are expected to increase, mostly due to aging populations. One in five stroke patients dies, and one in three are left with permanent disabilities. Although some acute phase therapies such as intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) andendovascular treatment have been shown to improve ischemic stroke outcome, these therapies are available only for a small proportion of patients. The use of stem cells to replace brain cells lost during stroke is a long-term goal, and one which is difficult to achieve given that transplanted cells must integrate and restore neural pathways to regain function of damaged parts of the brain. Over the past decade the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as therapy has emerged as a particularly attractive option. MSCs are a class of multipotent, self-renewing cells that give rise to differentiated progeny when implanted into appropriate tissues. Herein, we present a review of the application of MSCs in ischemic stroke, including the source of MSCs, the route and timing of their delivery into the brain and the endpoints measured. Experimental data of transplantation of MSCs in animal stroke models suggest an improved functional recovery. The transplantation of MSCs influences a wide range of events by modulating the inflammatory environment, stimulating endogenous neurogenesis and angiogenesis and reducing the formation of glial scar, although the precise, underlying mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. The results from early clinical trials highlight the need to optimize variables such as cell selection and route of administration in order to translate these results into safe and successful clinical applications.

  12. Current trends in the management of acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Paramasivam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability and most of the cases are those of ischemic stroke. Management strategies especially for large vessel occlusive stroke have undergone a significant change in the recent years that include widespread use of thrombolytic medications followed by endovascular clot removal. For successful treatment by endovascular thrombectomy, the important factors are patient selection based on clinical criterion including age, time of onset, premorbid clinical condition, co-morbidities, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, and imaging criterion including computed tomography (CT head, CT angiogram and CT perfusion. Patients presenting within 4.5 hours of onset are considered for intravenous (IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. Mechanical clot retrieval devices have evolved over the past decade. The Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia device was approved first followed by the penumbra revascularization system. They have proven in various studies to improve recanalization with acceptable rates of symptomatic intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Introduction of stent retrievers has led to a new era in the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Recent trials namely MRCLEAN, ESCAPE, SWIFT PRIMEs, and EXTEND-IA have used the stent retriever predominantly and have shown unequivocal benefit in the outcome at 90 days for AIS patients with large vessel occlusion. More recently, a new catheter namely 5 MAX ACE was introduced along with improvement in the suction device. This has led to a direct aspiration first pass technique resulting in faster recanalization. Advancements in the endovascular management of AIS with large vessel occlusion have resulted in a paradigm shift in the way this disease is managed. Improvements in patient selection using clinical and imaging criterion along with technical and technological advancements in mechanical thrombectomy have made possible a significantly

  13. Current trends in the management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability and most of the cases are those of ischemic stroke. Management strategies especially for large vessel occlusive stroke have undergone a significant change in the recent years that include widespread use of thrombolytic medications followed by endovascular clot removal. For successful treatment by endovascular thrombectomy, the important factors are patient selection based on clinical criterion including age, time of onset, premorbid clinical condition, co-morbidities, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, and imaging criterion including computed tomography (CT) head, CT angiogram and CT perfusion. Patients presenting within 4.5 hours of onset are considered for intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. Mechanical clot retrieval devices have evolved over the past decade. The Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia device was approved first followed by the penumbra revascularization system. They have proven in various studies to improve recanalization with acceptable rates of symptomatic intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Introduction of stent retrievers has led to a new era in the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Recent trials namely MRCLEAN, ESCAPE, SWIFT PRIMEs, and EXTEND-IA have used the stent retriever predominantly and have shown unequivocal benefit in the outcome at 90 days for AIS patients with large vessel occlusion. More recently, a new catheter namely 5 MAX ACE was introduced along with improvement in the suction device. This has led to a direct aspiration first pass technique resulting in faster recanalization. Advancements in the endovascular management of AIS with large vessel occlusion have resulted in a paradigm shift in the way this disease is managed. Improvements in patient selection using clinical and imaging criterion along with technical and technological advancements in mechanical thrombectomy have made possible a significantly improved outcome

  14. Value of measuring serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels in diagnosing acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassan, Pooja; Keir, Geoffrey; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Brown, Martin M

    2012-08-01

    It has previously been reported that serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor are raised after acute ischemic stroke compared to healthy controls. The aim of this prospective study was to ascertain whether serum vascular endothelial growth factor measurements could be used to distinguish between acute ischemic stroke and common stroke mimics in the emergency room. Blood samples were taken on arrival to hospital and daily for six-days, in 44 patients with suspected ischemic stroke (29 acute infarcts and 15 stroke mimics), arriving within 24 h of symptom onset. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The neurological deficit was recorded daily using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Evaluation of infarct volumes was based on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels were significantly raised in acute ischemic stroke patients on the day of symptom onset and at all other time points, compared to healthy controls (P acute ischemic stroke on admission to hospital were only 69% and 73%, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were also elevated in four out of 15 stroke mimics, including three patients presenting with postictal paresis. Vascular endothelial growth factor has limited clinical utility in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke in the emergency room because levels are also raised in common stroke mimics. Further studies are required to establish the mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor elevation in postictal paresis. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  15. Self-perceived psychological stress and ischemic stroke: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomstrand Christian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of evidence suggests that psychological stress contributes to coronary artery disease. However, associations between stress and stroke are less clear. In this study, we investigated the possible association between ischemic stroke and self-perceived psychological stress, as measured by a single-item questionnaire, previously reported to be associated with myocardial infarction. Methods In the Sahlgrenska Academy Study on Ischemic Stroke (SAHLSIS, 600 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke (aged 18 to 69 years and 600 age-matched and sex-matched population controls were recruited. Ischemic stroke subtype was determined according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST criteria. Self-perceived psychological stress preceding stroke was assessed retrospectively using a single-item questionnaire. Results Permanent self-perceived psychological stress during the last year or longer was independently associated with overall ischemic stroke (multivariate adjusted odds ratio (OR 3.49, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.06 to 5.93. Analyses by stroke subtype showed that this association was present for large vessel disease (OR 3.91, 95% CI 1.58 to 9.67, small vessel disease (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.64 to 6.24, and cryptogenic stroke (OR 4.03, 95% CI 2.34 to 6.95, but not for cardioembolic stroke (OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.64 to 3.39. Conclusion In this case-control study, we found an independent association between self-perceived psychological stress and ischemic stroke. A novel finding was that this association differed by ischemic stroke subtype. Our results emphasize the need for further prospective studies addressing the potential role for psychological stress as a risk factor for ischemic stroke. In such studies ischemic stroke subtypes should be taken into consideration.

  16. Trial design and reporting standards for intra-arterial cerebral thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higashida, Randall T; Furlan, Anthony J; Roberts, Heidi; Tomsick, Thomas; Connors, Buddy; Barr, John; Dillon, William; Warach, Steven; Broderick, Joseph; Tilley, Barbara; Sacks, David

    2003-01-01

    .... A number of well-designed randomized stroke trials and case series have now been reported in the literature to evaluate the safety and efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke...

  17. Impaired cerebral autoregulation is associated with brain atrophy and worse functional status in chronic ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio C Aoi

    Full Text Available Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA is impaired following stroke. However, the relationship between dCA, brain atrophy, and functional outcomes following stroke remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine whether impairment of dCA is associated with atrophy in specific regions or globally, thereby affecting daily functions in stroke patients.We performed a retrospective analysis of 33 subjects with chronic infarctions in the middle cerebral artery territory, and 109 age-matched non-stroke subjects. dCA was assessed via the phase relationship between arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity. Brain tissue volumes were quantified from MRI. Functional status was assessed by gait speed, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL, modified Rankin Scale, and NIH Stroke Score.Compared to the non-stroke group, stroke subjects showed degraded dCA bilaterally, and showed gray matter atrophy in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes ipsilateral to infarct. In stroke subjects, better dCA was associated with less temporal lobe gray matter atrophy on the infracted side ([Formula: see text] = 0.029, faster gait speed ([Formula: see text] = 0.018 and lower IADL score ([Formula: see text]0.002. Our results indicate that better dynamic cerebral perfusion regulation is associated with less atrophy and better long-term functional status in older adults with chronic ischemic infarctions.

  18. Prevention of the collapse of pial collaterals by remote ischemic perconditioning during acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junqiang; Ma, Yonglie; Dong, Bin; Bandet, Mischa V; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Winship, Ian R

    2017-08-01

    Collateral circulation is a key variable determining prognosis and response to recanalization therapy during acute ischemic stroke. Remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) involves inducing peripheral ischemia (typically in the limbs) during stroke and may reduce perfusion deficits and brain damage due to cerebral ischemia. In this study, we directly investigated pial collateral flow augmentation due to RIPerC during distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in rats. Blood flow through pial collaterals between the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and the MCA was assessed in male Sprague Dawley rats using in vivo laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) during distal MCAo. LSCI and TPLSM revealed that RIPerC augmented collateral flow into distal MCA segments. Notably, while control rats exhibited an initial dilation followed by a progressive narrowing of pial arterioles 60 to 150-min post-MCAo (constricting to 80-90% of post-MCAo peak diameter), this constriction was prevented or reversed by RIPerC (such that vessel diameters increased to 105-110% of post-MCAo, pre-RIPerC diameter). RIPerC significantly reduced early ischemic damage measured 6 h after stroke onset. Thus, prevention of collateral collapse via RIPerC is neuroprotective and may facilitate other protective or recanalization therapies by improving blood flow in penumbral tissue.

  19. Clinical predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in non lacunar ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia R. Balian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic transformation is a complex phenomenon where brain tissue bleeds, which could be associated or not to an increase in the neurological deficit after the acute ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to evaluate clinical predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in patients with non-lacunar ischemic stroke. We performed a prospective analysis of the clinical records and images of patients with non-lacunar ischemic stroke. Demographics, vascular risk factors, previous medications and the information of the event in patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation were here compared. We included in this study 747 patients with non-lacunar stroke, the mean age was 77 ± 11 years and 61% were females. In the univariate analysis, the age, a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease and the previous use of oral anticoagulation resulted statistically significant. In the multivariate analysis of logistic regression adjusted by age and vascular risk factors: the age > 80 years (OR 3.6, CI 95% 1.8-7.6, the pulse pressure > 60 mmHg at admission (OR 5.3, CI 95% 3.2-9.1, the chronic kidney disease (OR 3, CI 95% 2.5-3.8 and the presence of previous atrial fibrillation (OR 3.5, CI 95% 2.1-6.1 were associated with and increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation. The predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in our cohort showed a relationship with severe vascular illness. The identification of these patients could influence therapeutic decisions that could increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation

  20. Retrosternal Mass: An Interesting Allergic Reaction to Intravenous Thrombolytic Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Mehrpour

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA, is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke.

  1. Prediction factors of recurrent ischemic events in one year after minor stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of a subsequent stroke following a minor stroke is high. However, there are no effective rating scales to predict recurrent stroke following a minor one. Therefore, we assessed the risk factors associated with recurrent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA within one year of minor stroke onset in order to identify possible risk factors. METHODS: Eight hundred and sixty-three non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke patients in the Chinese IntraCranial AtheroSclerosis Study that presented with minor stroke, defined as an admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale (NIHSS score of ≤3, were consecutively enrolled in our study. Clinical information and imaging features upon admission, and any recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA within one year was recorded. Cox regression was used to identify risk factors associated with recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA within the year following stroke onset. RESULTS: A total of 50 patients (6.1% experienced recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA within one year of minor stroke onset. Multivariate Cox regression model identified lower admission NIHSS score (HR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.33; P<0.0001, history of coronary heart disease (HR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.17 to 5.86; P = 0.02, severe stenosis or occlusion of large cerebral artery (HR, 4.68; 95% CI, 1.87 to 11.7; P = 0.001, and multiple acute cerebral infarcts (HR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.01 to 6.80; P = 0.05 as independent risk factors for recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA within one year. CONCLUSIONS: Some minor stroke patients are at higher risk for recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA. Urgent and intensified therapy may be reasonable in these patients.

  2. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation for Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: The AnStroke Trial (Anesthesia During Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwhagen Hendén, Pia; Rentzos, Alexandros; Karlsson, Jan-Erik; Rosengren, Lars; Leiram, Birgitta; Sundeman, Henrik; Dunker, Dennis; Schnabel, Kunigunde; Wikholm, Gunnar; Hellström, Mikael; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective studies have found that patients receiving general anesthesia for endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke have worse neurological outcome compared with patients receiving conscious sedation. In this prospective randomized single-center study, we investigated the impact of anesthesia technique on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients. Ninety patients receiving endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke in 2013 to 2016 were included and randomized to general anesthesia or conscious sedation. Difference in neurological outcome at 3 months, measured as modified Rankin Scale score, was analyzed (primary outcome) and early neurological improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and cerebral infarction volume. Age, sex, comorbidities, admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, intraprocedural blood pressure, blood glucose, Paco2 and Pco2 modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia score, and relevant time intervals were recorded. In the general anesthesia group 19 of 45 patients (42.2%) and in the conscious sedation group 18 of 45 patients (40.0%) achieved a modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 (P=1.00) at 3 months, with no differences in intraoperative blood pressure decline from baseline (P=0.57); blood glucose (P=0.94); PaCO2 (P=0.68); time intervals (P=0.78); degree of successful recanalization, 91.1% versus 88.9% (P=1.00); National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at 24 hours 8 (3-5) versus 9 (2-15; P=0.60); infarction volume, 20 (10-100) versus 20(10-54) mL (P=0.53); and hospital mortality (13.3% in both groups; P=1.00). In endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke, no difference was found between general anesthesia and conscious sedation in neurological outcome 3 months after stroke. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01872884. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Predictors of Outcome in Patients Presenting with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mild Stroke Scale Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmuir, Cynthia L; Hammer, Maxim; Jovin, Tudor; Reddy, Vivek; Wechsler, Lawrence; Jadhav, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    Although National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a known predictor of outcome in acute ischemic stroke, there are other factors like age, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow that may be predictors of outcome but are not assessed by the traditional NIHSS. The aim of this retrospective review was to identify predictors of outcome in mild ischemic stroke. Discharge outcomes from patients who presented to our large academic stroke center with acute ischemic stroke from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Of 7189 patients reviewed, 2597 had initial NIHSS less than 5. Outcome measures were modified Rankin Scale (MRS) score 0-1 and discharge to home. In all, 65% of patients with NIHSS 0-4 were discharged directly home independent of treatment. Of those patients discharged to home, 74% were able to ambulate independently and 98% passed their dysphagia screen. Of patients not discharged directly home, 66% were unable to ambulate independently and 21% did not pass their dysphagia screen. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant effect of dysphagia screen (P = .001), ability to ambulate independently (P = .002), age (P = .016), and NIHSS (P = .005) on discharge to home but not MRS of 0-1 (P = .564). In patients with mild stroke scale scores defined as NIHSS 0-4, several factors including age, NIHSS, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow may be independent predictors of functional outcome and discharge home. These data support the development of a modified grading system for assessing functional outcome in mild stroke that considers these factors. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Angiographic findings of ischemic stroke in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirane, R; Sato, S; Yoshimoto, T

    1992-12-01

    A cooperative study was undertaken in the Tohoku district of Japan to investigate the relatively rare phenomenon of cerebral infarction in children. The purpose of the present paper is to describe the cerebral angiographic findings in 48 children whose ischemic lesions were confirmed by CT scan. The majority of lesions were considered to be idiopathic. The areas of cerebral infarction appearing in the CT scans were located in the territory of the middle cerebral artery including the basal ganglia. Angiographical abnormalities were observed in 40 patients (83%). The majority occurred in the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery and in the cisternal portion of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Multiple lesions, such as in the C1, A1, and M1 or the C1, M1, and M2 segments were observed in 22 cases. These lesions generally appeared in continuation; no bilateral intracranial lesions were observed. Repeated angiography was performed in 22 cases, and in 55% of these some recovery of the lesions was seen.

  5. Lipid profiles and ischemic stroke risk: variations by sex within racial/ethnic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gezmu T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tefera Gezmu,1 Dona Schneider,1 Kitaw Demissie,2 Yong Lin,2 Christine Giordano,3 Martin S Gizzi4 1Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, 2Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Piscataway, NJ, 3Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, 4New Jersey Neuroscience Institute at JFK Medical Center and Seton Hall University, Edison, NJ, USA Abstract: Evidence implicates lipid abnormalities as important but modifiable risk factors for stroke. This study assesses whether hypercholesterolemia can be used to predict the risk for etiologic subtypes of ischemic stroke between sexes within racial/ethnic groups. Data elements related to stroke risk, diagnosis, and outcomes were abstracted from the medical records of 3,290 acute stroke admissions between 2006 and 2010 at a regional stroke center. Sex comparison within racial/ethnic groups revealed that South Asian and Hispanic men had a higher proportion of ischemic stroke than women, while the inverse was true for Whites and African Americans (P=0.0014. All women, except South Asian women, had higher mean plasma total cholesterol and higher blood circulating low-density lipoprotein levels (≥100 mg/dL than men at the time of their admissions. The incidence of large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA was more common among women than men, except among Hispanics, where men tended to have higher incidences. A regression analysis that considered patients diagnosed with either LAA or small-artery occlusion etiologic subtype as the outcomes and high-density lipoproteins and triglycerides as predictors showed inconsistent associations between lipid profiles and the incidence of these subtypes between the sexes within racial/ethnic groups. In conclusion, our investigation suggests that women stroke patients may be at increased risk for stroke etiologic subtype LAA than men. Although the higher prevalence of stroke

  6. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Is a Prognostic Marker in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jie; Huang, Wensi; Chen, Xiaoli; Li, Qian; Cai, Zhengyi; Yu, Tieer; Shao, Bei

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is uncertain whether neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is related with functional outcome and recurrent ischemic stroke. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio with stroke severity, functional outcome, and recurrent ischemic stroke after acute ischemic stroke. A total of 280 patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio value (3). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected for all patients. We evaluated the association between neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and (1) stroke severity on admission, (2) functional outcome at 3 months, and (3) recurrent ischemic stroke. Regression analyses were performed, adjusting for confounders. After adjustment for potential confounders, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was associated with an increased risk of stroke severity on admission (odds ratio [OR] 1.364, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.101-1.690, P = .005) and primary unfavorable outcome (OR 1.455, 95% CI 1.083-1.956, P = .013). After a median of 1.13 years (interquartile range.91-1.42) of follow-up, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was associated with recurrent ischemic stroke after adjustment (hazard ratio 1.499, 95% CI 1.161-1.935, P = .002). Our study suggests that neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is associated with stroke severity on admission, primary unfavorable functional outcome, and recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stress worsens endothelial function and ischemic stroke via glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkaya, Mustafa; Prinz, Vincent; Custodis, Florian; Gertz, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Kroeber, Jan; Fink, Klaus; Plehm, Ralph; Gass, Peter; Laufs, Ulrich; Endres, Matthias

    2011-11-01

    Chronic stress is associated with increased stroke risk. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood. We examined the effects of chronic stress on endothelial function and ischemic brain injury in a mouse model. 129/SV mice were treated with glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone (25 mg kg(-1)/d) or vehicle and exposed to 28 days of chronic stress consisting of exposure to rat, restraint stress, and tail suspension. Heart rate and blood pressure were continuously recorded by telemetry. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein expression as well as superoxide production and lipid hydroperoxides were quantified. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation was measured in aortic rings. Ischemic lesion volume was quantified after 30 minutes filamentous middle cerebral artery occlusion and 72 hours reperfusion. Chronic stress caused a significant increase in heart rate, impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, increased superoxide production, and reduced aortic and brain endothelial nitric oxide synthase levels. Animals exposed to chronic stress showed major increases in ischemic lesion size. These deleterious effects of stress were completely reversed by treatment with mifepristone. Chronic stress increases stroke vulnerability likely through endothelial dysfunction, which can be reversed by a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist.

  8. Therapeutic Potential of Non-Psychotropic Cannabidiol in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Mishima, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2010-07-08

    Cannabis contains the psychoactive component delta⁸-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta⁸-THC), and the non-psychoactive components cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol, and cannabigerol. It is well-known that delta⁸-THC and other cannabinoid CB₁ receptor agonists are neuroprotective during global and focal ischemic injury. Additionally, delta⁸-THC also mediates psychological effects through the activation of the CB₁ receptor in the central nervous system. In addition to the CB₁ receptor agonists, cannabis also contains therapeutically active components which are CB₁ receptor independent. Of the CB₁ receptor-independent cannabis, the most important is CBD. In the past five years, an increasing number of publications have focused on the discovery of the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective effects of CBD. In particular, CBD exerts positive pharmacological effects in ischemic stroke and other chronic diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cerebroprotective action of CBD is CB₁ receptor-independent, long-lasting, and has potent anti-oxidant activity. Importantly, CBD use does not lead to tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic possibility of CBD as a cerebroprotective agent, highlighting recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms, and therapeutic time window of CBD in ischemic stroke.

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Non-Psychotropic Cannabidiol in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Fujiwara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis contains the psychoactive component delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC, and the non-psychoactive components cannabidiol (CBD, cannabinol, and cannabigerol. It is well-known that delta9-THC and other cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists are neuroprotective during global and focal ischemic injury. Additionally, delta9-THC also mediates psychological effects through the activation of the CB1 receptor in the central nervous system. In addition to the CB1 receptor agonists, cannabis also contains therapeutically active components which are CB1 receptor independent. Of the CB1 receptor-independent cannabis, the most important is CBD. In the past five years, an increasing number of publications have focused on the discovery of the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective effects of CBD. In particular, CBD exerts positive pharmacological effects in ischemic stroke and other chronic diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cerebroprotective action of CBD is CB1 receptor-independent, long-lasting, and has potent anti-oxidant activity. Importantly, CBD use does not lead to tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic possibility of CBD as a cerebroprotective agent, highlighting recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms, and therapeutic time window of CBD in ischemic stroke.

  10. Posterior circulation ischemic stroke following Russell′s viper envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddalingana Gouda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke following viper bite is rare. We report a case of posterior circulation ischemic infarction following viper bite in a previously healthy woman. Soon after being bitten by the snake on the left leg, she developed local redness, echymosis and one hour later became drowsy. On examination she had skew deviation of eyes and down gaze preference, generalized hypotonia. A CT scan of brain showed infarcts in cerebellar hemispheres and occipital lobes on both sides and that was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging of brain. Her coagulation profile was deranged. Most common and serious central nervous system complication following snake bite is intracranial hemorrhage. Ischemic stroke commonly involves anterior circulation. Bilateral cerebellar and occipital infraction is not yet reported in literature. Exact cause for the development of infarction is not clear. The possible mechanisms of infarction in this scenario are discussed. Patient was treated with anti-snake venom and showed a good recovery. Early imaging and early treatment with anti-snake venom is important for a favorable outcome.

  11. Gender differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Alberti, Andrea; Lanari, Alessia; Micheli, Sara; Bertolani, Luca; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Billeci, Antonia M R; Comi, Giancarlo; Previdi, Paolo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women than men owing to the fact that women have more stroke events and are less likely to recover. Age-specific stroke rates are higher in men; however, because of women's longer life expectancy and the much higher incidence of stroke at older ages, women have more stroke events than men overall. The aims of this prospective study in consecutive patients were to assess whether there are gender differences in stroke risk factors, treatment or outcome. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were included in this prospective study at four study centers. Disability was assessed using a modified Rankin Scale score (>or=3 indicating disabling stroke) in both genders at 90 days. Outcomes and risk factors in both genders were compared using the chi(2) test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify any independent predictors of outcome. A total of 1136 patients were included in this study; of these, 494 (46%) were female. Women were statistically older compared with men: 76.02 (+/- 12.93) and 72.68 (+/- 13.27) median years of age, respectively. At admission, females had higher NIH Stroke Scale scores compared with males (9.4 [+/- 6.94] vs 7.6 [+/- 6.28] for men; p = 0.0018). Furthermore, females tended to have more cardioembolic strokes (153 [30%] vs 147 [23%] for men; p = 0.004). Males had lacunar and atherosclerotic strokes more often (146 [29%] vs 249 [39%] for men; p = 0.002, and 68 [13%] vs 123 [19%] for men; p = 0.01, respectively). The mean modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months was also significantly different between genders, at 2.5 (+/- 2.05) for women and 2.1 (+/- 2.02) for men (p = 0.003). However, at multivariate analysis, female gender was not an indicator for negative outcome. It was concluded that female gender was not an independent factor for negative outcome. In addition, both genders demonstrated different stroke pathophysiologies. These findings should be taken into account when diagnostic workup and

  12. Premature menopause or early menopause and risk of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Walter A.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Miller, Virginia M.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Brown, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The general consensus has been that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS). We reviewed new observational studies that challenge this simple conclusion. Methods This was a review of observational studies of the association of premature or early menopause with stroke or IS published in English from 2006 through 2010. Results Three cohort studies showed an increased risk of all stroke in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy compared with women who conserved their ovaries before age 50 years. The increased risk of stroke was reduced by hormonal therapy (HT) in one of the studies, suggesting that estrogen deprivation is involved in the association. Four additional observational studies showed an association of all stroke or IS with the early onset of menopause or with a shorter lifespan of ovarian activity. In three of the seven studies, the association was restricted to IS. Age at menopause was more important than type of menopause (natural vs induced). Conclusions The findings from seven recent observational studies challenge the consensus that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for IS and can be reconciled by a unifying timing hypothesis. We hypothesize that estrogen is protective for IS before age 50 years and may become a risk factor for IS after age 50 years or, possibly, after age 60 years. These findings are relevant to women who experienced premature or early menopause, or to women considering prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of natural menopause. PMID:21993082

  13. Apoptosis in rat transient focal cerebral ischemic stroke: clinical implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shoushu Jiao; Jue Wang Gal Hever; Rongzheng Kuang; Jean-Claude Louis; Ella Magal

    2000-01-01

    @@In the early phase of cerebral ischemia, factors threatening neuronal survival in the penumbra include mainly glutamate excitotoxicity, free radical damage and energy failure resulting from recurrent depolarization waves. However, at later times, other mechanisms come into play. The initial ischemic event activates a variety of genetic programs that unfold over the course of hours and days. Both positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance based techniques demonstrate that the development of irretrievable tissue damage is relatively slow, progressing over the course of several days in some cases, and a viable tissue, defined by hemodynamic and metabolic criteria,is still present many hours after stroke in human or in monkey. These findings suggest that the brain can potentially be “rescued” from infarction many hours after onset of ischemia and challenge the widespread notion of an early and short “therapeutic window” (~3-6h). This realization is of critical importance for stroke therapy because most patients reach medical attention at a time when current therapeutic strategies may no longer be effective. Therefore, it would be highly desirable to develop therapeutic interventions that can be instituted many hours after the onset of ischemia. We believe that addressing the mechanisms of delayed cell death is key to a successful therapy. The studies presented here were designed to document the potential contribution of apoptosis to ischemia induced neuronal death. We will discuss the morphological, biochemical and pharmacological evidence for apoptosis in the ischemic stroke.

  14. Systemic inflammation as a therapeutic target in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    Acute systemic inflammatory reaction superimposed on chronic low-grade inflammation accompanies acute ischemic stroke. Elevated blood levels of systemic inflammatory markers such as IL-6 or C-reactive protein are associated with an unfavorable functional outcome and increased mortality after stroke. Animal studies have demonstrated a causal relationship between systemic inflammation and ischemic brain damage. The mechanisms linking systemic inflammation with poor outcome include increased neutrophil infiltration of cerebral cortex, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, impaired tissue reperfusion, increased platelet activation and microvascular coagulation and complement-dependent brain injury. Non-selective (e.g., by statins) or selective (e.g., by inhibition of IL-6) attenuation of systemic inflammation, enhancement of systemic anti-inflammatory response (e.g., by infusion of IL-1 receptor antagonist), prevention of infections that exacerbate systemic inflammation or inhibition of neuronal pathways triggering inflammatory reaction are potential therapeutic targets in stroke patients. This review discusses the relationship between systemic inflammation, cerebral ischemia and prognosis in the context of therapeutic strategies.

  15. Specific features of reperfusion therapy for vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Anisimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke in the vertebrobasilar system (VBS is characterized by the high rates of death and disability; reperfusion therapy in patients with a lesion focus in the VBS is safe and effective beyond the 4.5-hour therapeutic window. Actively developed current methods for the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke enable one to increase recanalization rates and hence to improve the degree of functional recovery in this group of patients. Considering that there are no significant differences in the outcomes of systemic and selective thrombolytic therapy in patients with occlusion of the basilar arteries, the urgent problem is to increase the time from the onset of the disease to reperfusion therapy, therefore combined reperfusion therapy may be an optimal option. This approach would make it possible to initiate the therapy in a shorter period of time and to use the advantages of both reperfusion techniques. Intravenous thrombolysis as the rapidest and technically simplest method may be performed in the first step of therapy in the clinics unequipped with an X-ray surgical service, with the patient being further transported to a specialized endovascular center if the intravenous injection of a thrombolytic agent has no effect. Taking into account the fact that reperfusion therapy may be performed in patients with vertebrobasilar stroke in the wider therapeutic window, a similar organizational chart with multistep therapy for this disease might become the treatment of choice.

  16. Statin Prescription Adhered to Guidelines for Patients Hospitalized due to Acute Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Oh, Mi Sun; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Cho, A-Hyun; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Byung-Chul; ,

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Secondary stroke prevention guidelines recommend statins for the management of dyslipidemia in ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). This study assessed the guideline-based statin prescription (GBSP) rate in Korea and the associated physician and patient factors. Methods A survey was conducted to assess Korean neurologists' knowledge of and attitude toward the current dyslipidemia management guidelines. The characteristics and discharge statin prescriptio...

  17. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Mohammad Reza; Ghandehari, Kavian

    2012-10-01

    The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and Ischemic Stroke (IS) was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males) with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000) respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020). Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occurrence of IS and IHD.

  18. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration

  19. A COMPAR A TIVE STUDY OF SELECTIVE INDICATOR PROFILES IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE AND HEMORRHAGIC STROKE

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanaswamy; Ravi; Nagarjun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Urban India, stroke accounts for 1% mortality in all hospital admissions. The pathogenic role of increased plasma fibrinogen level in causing stroke has been recently reinforced. It was therefore of interest to measure plasma fibrinogen level in patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and to compare it with lipid profile....

  20. Current perspectives on cardioembolic ischemic stroke in very old patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arboix A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adrià Arboix,1 Joan Massons,1 Josefina Alió2 1Division of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Department of Neurology, Hospital Universitari del Sagrat Cor, University of Barcelona, 2Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain Abstract: The oldest old population (>85 years of age represents the faster growing segment of the elderly in developed countries. Cardioembolic infarction (CI accounts for 14%–30% of all cerebral infarcts and is the most severe ischemic stroke subtype with the highest in-hospital mortality. Also, CI is associated with a low frequency of symptom-free patients at hospital discharge and presents a non-negligible risk of early embolic recurrence. Moreover, cardioembolic stroke is the acute cerebrovascular event most commonly found in very old subjects. However, some clinical aspects of the natural course of the disease in very old patients are still poorly defined. The present report presents an updated review of relevant aspects of CI related to clinical manifestations, biological characteristics, prognostic implications, and treatment strategies, which may contribute to improving the quality of care and outcome of acute cardioembolic stroke in very old patients. The most relevant aspects of CI are discussed based on the data published in the literature and the authors' experience in the management of stroke patients, collected from the hospital-based "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry". The following aspects are commented on: epidemiologic data and risk factors, clinical characteristics, cardiac workup studies, special cardioembolic clinical features, outcome, thrombolytic therapy, antithrombotic treatment, and indications for future research lines. Cardioembolic stroke is an important topic in the frontier between cardiology and vascular neurology. The impact of CI on the patients' health and quality of life, health care systems, and society

  1. Prevalence of electrocardiographic ST-T changes during acute ischemic stroke in patients without known ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K; Bak, Søren; Flemming Høilund-Carlsen, Poul;

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated characteristics and prevalence of ST-segment depression and/or T-wave inversion in the resting electrocardiogram of 244 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, but without ischemic heart disease. The prevalence of ST-T changes ranged from 13% to 16% and this is what to expect...

  2. Diagnosing Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Ischemic Strokes and Transient Ischemic Attacks Using Echocardiographic Measurements of Left Atrium Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Kristoffer Grundtvig; Christensen, Hanne; Høst, Nis;

    2016-01-01

    AF in patients with ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA). We retrospectively analyzed 219 patients who after acute IS or TIA underwent a transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients were designated as patients with paroxysmal AF if they had one or more reported incidents...

  3. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Fauzia Akbary; Shengli Li; Jing Lu; Feng Ling; Xunming Ji; Guowei Shang; Jian Chen; Xiaokun Geng; Xin Ye; Guoxun Xu; Ju Wang; Jiasheng Zheng; Hongjun Li

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiol-ogy in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group:middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood lfow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood lfow was restored. A revers-ible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identiifed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symp-toms of neurological deifcits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental ifndings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the ifeld of brain injury research.

  4. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-12-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research.

  5. Determinants of Emergency Medical Services Utilization Among Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients in Hubei Province in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaoxv; Yang, Tingting; Gong, Yanhong; Zhou, Yanfeng; Li, Wenzhen; Song, Xingyue; Wang, Mengdie; Hu, Bo; Lu, Zuxun

    2016-03-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) can effectively shorten the prehospital delay for patients with acute ischemic stroke. This study aimed to investigate EMS utilization and its associated factors in patients with acute ischemic stroke in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 1, 2014, to January 31, 2015, which included 2096 patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke from 66 hospitals in Hubei province in China. A multivariable stepwise logistic regression model was undertaken to identify the factors associated with EMS utilization. Of the 2096 participants, only 323 cases (15.4%) used EMS. Those acute ischemic stroke patients who previously used EMS (odds ratio [OR] =9.8), whose National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was ≥10 (OR=3.7), who lived in urban communities (OR=2.5), who had sudden onset of symptoms (OR=2.4), who experienced their first stroke (OR=1.8), and who recognized initial symptom as stroke (OR=1.4) were more likely to use EMS. Additionally, when acute ischemic stroke patients' stroke symptom were noticed first by others (OR=2.1), rather than by the patients, EMS was more likely to be used. A very low proportion of patients with acute ischemic stroke used the EMS in Hubei province in China. Considerable education programs are required regarding knowledge of potential symptoms and the importance of EMS for stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Cortical myoclonus during IV thrombolysis for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bentes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with an acute middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke developing subtle involuntary movements of the paretic upper limb with cortical origin during rt-PA perfusion. Despite the multiple potential pathophysiological mechanisms for the relationship between thrombolysis and epileptic activity, seizures during this procedure are scarcely reported. Our hypothesis is that subtle and transient clinical seizures, like those described in our patient, may not be detected or are misdiagnosed as nonepileptic involuntary movements. We aimed to draw attention to the recognition challenge of this paroxysmal motor behavior, highlighting this clinical and neurophysiological identification using video recording and back-average analysis of the EEG.

  7. Phosphodiesterase 4 D Gene Polymorphism in Relation to Intracranial and Extracranial Atherosclerosis in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayantee Kalita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In ischemic stroke, extracranial MR angiography (ECMRA is more frequently abnormal in Caucasians and intracranial (ICMRA in Asians which may have a genetic basis. We report phosphodiesterase (PDE4D gene polymorphism and its correlation with MRA findings in patients with ischemic stroke.

  8. Strongly increased levels of fibrinogen elastase degradation products in patients with ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lau, L.M.L. de; Cheung, E.Y.L.; Kluft, C.; Leebeek, F.W.G.; Meijer, P.; Laterveer, R.; Dippel, D.W.J.; Maat, M.P.M.de

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is associated with leucocyte activation. Activated leucocytes release elastase, an enzyme that can degrade fibrinogen. Fibrinogen elastase degradation products (FgEDP) may serve as a specific marker of elastase proteolytic activity. In a case-control study of 111 ischemic stroke pati

  9. Value of Whole Brain Computed Tomography Perfusion for Predicting Outcome after TIA or Minor Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Wijngaard, Ido R.; Algra, Ale; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert J.; Boiten, Jelis; Wermer, Marieke J H; Van Walderveen, Marianne A A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction About 15% of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor ischemic stroke have functional impairment after 3 months. We studied the role of whole brain computed tomography perfusion (WB-CTP) in the emergency diagnosis of TIA or minor stroke in predicting disability at 3 months

  10. Fibrinogen γ′ in ischemic stroke: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.Y.L. Cheung (Elim); S.U. de Willige; H.L. Vos (Hans); F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); R.M. Bertina (Rogier); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - To determine the contribution of fibrinogen γ′ levels and FGG haplotypes to ischemic stroke. METHODS - Associations between fibrinogen γ′ levels, fibrinogen γ′/total fibrinogen ratio, and FGG haplotypes with the risk of ischemic stroke were determined in 124 case

  11. Strongly increased levels of fibrinogen elastase degradation products in patients with ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lau, L.M.L. de; Cheung, E.Y.L.; Kluft, C.; Leebeek, F.W.G.; Meijer, P.; Laterveer, R.; Dippel, D.W.J.; Maat, M.P.M.de

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is associated with leucocyte activation. Activated leucocytes release elastase, an enzyme that can degrade fibrinogen. Fibrinogen elastase degradation products (FgEDP) may serve as a specific marker of elastase proteolytic activity. In a case-control study of 111 ischemic stroke pati

  12. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplantation promotes the release of endogenous erythropoietin after ischemic stroke

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    Wen Lv

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC transplantation protected ischemic cerebral injury by stimulating endogenous erythropoietin. The model of ischemic stroke was established in rats through transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Twenty-four hours later, 1 × 10 6 human BMSCs (hBMSCs were injected into the tail vein. Fourteen days later, we found that hBMSCs promoted the release of endogenous erythropoietin in the ischemic region of rats. Simultaneously, 3 μg/d soluble erythropoietin receptor (sEPOR was injected into the lateral ventricle, and on the next 13 consecutive days. sEPOR blocked the release of endogenous erythropoietin. The neurogenesis in the subventricular zone was less in the hBMSCs + sEPOR group than in the hBMSCs + heat-denatured sEPOR group. The adhesive-removal test result and the modified Neurological Severity Scores (mNSS were lower in the hBMSCs + sEPOR group than in the heat-denatured sEPOR group. The adhesive-removal test result and mNSS were similar between the hBMSCs + heat-denatured sEPOR group and the hBMSCs + sEPOR group. These findings confirm that BMSCs contribute to neurogenesis and improve neurological function by promoting the release of endogenous erythropoietin following ischemic stroke.

  13. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplantation promotes the release of endogenous erythropoietin after ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Lv; Wen-yu Li; Xiao-yan Xu; Hong Jiang; Oh Yong Bang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation protected ischemic cerebral injury by stimulating endogenous erythropoietin. The model of isch-emic stroke was established in rats through transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Twenty-four hours later, 1 × 106 human BMSCs (hBMSCs) were injected into the tail vein. Fourteen days later, we found that hBMSCs promoted the release of endogenous erythropoietin in the ischemic region of rats. Simultaneously, 3 μg/d soluble erythropoietin receptor (sEPOR) was injected into the lateral ventricle, and on the next 13 consecutive days. sEPOR blocked the release of endogenous erythropoietin. The neurogenesis in the subventricular zone was less in the hBMSCs + sEPOR group than in the hBMSCs + heat-denatured sEPOR group. The adhesive-removal test result and the modified Neurological Severity Scores (mNSS) were lower in the hBMSCs + sEPOR group than in the heat-denatured sEPOR group. The adhesive-removal test result and mNSS were similar between the hBMSCs + heat-denatured sEPOR group and the hBMSCs + sEPOR group. These ifndings conifrm that BMSCs contribute to neurogenesis and improve neurological function by promoting the release of endogenous erythropoietin following ischemic stroke.

  14. Analysis of acute ischemic stroke presenting classic lacunar syndrome. A study by diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terai, Satoshi; Ota, Kazuki; Tamaki, Kinya [Hakujyuji Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We retrospectively assessed the pathophysiological features of acute ischemic stroke presenting ''classic'' lacunar syndrome by using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Subjects were 16 patients who were admitted to our hospital within 24 hours of stroke onset and underwent DWI examination on admission. These were divided into three categorical groups; pure motor hemiplegia (PMH) in 8, sensorimotor stroke (SMS) in 7, and dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome (DCHS) in 1. The fresh responsible lesions were identified by DWI in the perforating territory in 7 patients with PMH and 7 with SMS. Four (one had two possible response lesions; pons and corona radiata) and five patients in the respective groups were diagnosed as lacunar infarction on admission (the largest dimension of the lesion measuring smaller than 15 mm). On the contralateral side to the neurological symptoms, DWI revealed high intensities in cortex, subcortical white matter, and anterior and posterior border zones in the remaining one patient with PMH and in the precentral arterial region in one with DCHS. They were diagnosed as atherothrombotic infarction resulting from the occlusion of the internal carotid artery and cerebral embolism due to atrial fibrillation, respectively. Three patients with PMH showed progressive deterioration after admission and follow-up DWI study in an acute stage revealed enlargement of heir ischemic lesions. The present study suggests that DWI is a useful imaging technique for diagnosis of clinical categories and observation for pathophsiological alteration in the acute ischemic stroke patients with ''classic'' lacunar syndrome. Our results also indicate a necessity to be aware that various types of fresh ischemic lesions other than a single lacune might possibly be developing in cases with this syndrome. (author)

  15. Imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke patients: Current neuroradiological perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Head and Neck Radiology, Thyroid Radiology Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Chul Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Yeop [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Advances in imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke now provide crucial information such as infarct core, ischemic penumbra/degree of collaterals, vessel occlusion, and thrombus that helps in the selection of the best candidates for reperfusion therapy. It also predicts thrombolytic efficacy and benefit or potential hazards from therapy. Thus, radiologists should be familiar with various imaging studies for patients with acute ischemic stroke and the applicability to clinical trials. This helps radiologists to obtain optimal rapid imaging as well as its accurate interpretation. This review is focused on imaging studies for acute ischemic stroke, including their roles in recent clinical trials and some guidelines to optimal interpretation.

  16. Clinical experience with ceraxon used in ischemic stroke

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    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Citicoline (Ceraxon is a neuroprotective agent used in acute ischemic stroke (IS and chronic cerebrovascular diseases. The efficiency and safety of Ceraxon intravenously in a dose of2000 mg/day for 10 days, then orally for 35 days with evaluation of its effect on cognitive functions were studied in 24 patients (13 men, 11 women; mean age 68.2+9.3 years with IS. During treatment, none of the patients died or developed recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or other vascular events. A gradual regression of neurological disorders and a lower degree of disability were observed in most patients (18/24. Ceraxon was found to have a positive effect on cognitive function and their improvement on day 45 after disease onset. The findings agree with the results of the multicenter studies showing the efficacy and safety of citicoline in IS.

  17. Clinical and EEG features of ischemic stroke patients with abnormal discharges

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    Jia-lei YANG

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical and EEG features of ischemic stroke patients with abnormal discharges.  Methods Clinical data and 24-hour EEG monitoring of 162 ischemic stroke patients were analyzed retrospectively. One-year follow-up was carried out and post-ischemic epilepsy was diagnosed.  Results Among 162 ischemic stroke patients, 24-hour EEG was abnormal in 87 cases (53.70%. According to the correspondence of site of infarcts and abnormal discharges, these 87 cases were classified into 2 groups: matched group (N = 24, 27.59% and unmatched group (N = 63, 72.41%. There was no significant difference between 2 groups in terms of Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP and TOAST classification (P = 0.792, 0.111, while there was significant difference between 2 groups on the site of infarcts (P = 0.000. In matched group, the infarcts were mainly located in cortex (N = 23, 95.83%. However, in unmatched group, the infarcts were mainly located in cortex and basal ganglia (N = 27, 42.86%, or in basal ganglia only (N = 24, 38.10%. In matched group, 24-hour EEG showed slowing of background activities, and sharp waves and sharp and slow wave complex which were corresponding to the infarct sites. The abnormal discharges could only be recorded around the infarct unilaterally. In unmatched group, the epileptiform discharges were recorded in both contralateral and ipsilateral ischemic hemispheres, usually with widespread slow waves and asymmetric background. The infarcts were limited, but abnormal discharges were widespread. For example, the infarct was located in deep brain, while scalp abnormal discharges were recorded. Although there was no significant difference in terms of epilepsy incidence between 2 groups (P = 0.908, the types of epilepsy were statistically different between 2 groups (P = 0.000. In matched group, the main type was partial seizure. But in unmatched group, the main types of epilepsy were secondary generalized seizure and

  18. The Fangshan/Family-based Ischemic Stroke Study In China (FISSIC protocol

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    Chen Dafang

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exact etiology of ischemic stroke remains unclear, because multiple genetic predispositions and environmental risk factors may be involved, and their interactions dictate the complexity. Family-based studies provide unique features in design, while they are currently underrepresented for studies of ischemic stroke in developing countries. The Fangshan/Family-based Ischemic Stroke Study In China (FISSIC program aims to conduct a genetic pedigree study of ischemic stroke in rural communities of China. Methods/Design The pedigrees of ischemic stroke with clear documentation are recruited by using the proband-initiated contact method, based on the stroke registry in hospital and communities. Blood samples and detailed information of pedigrees are collected through the health care network in the rural area, and prospective follow-up of the pedigrees cohort is scheduled. Complementary strategies of both family-based design and matched case-spousal control design are used, and comprehensive statistical methods will be implemented to ascertain potential complex genetic and environmental factors and their interactions as well. Discussion This study is complementary to other genetic pedigree studies of ischemic stroke, such as the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS, which are established in developed countries. We describe the protocol of this family-based genetic epidemiological study that may be used as a new practical guideline and research paradigm in developing countries and facilitate initiatives of stroke study for international collaborations.

  19. Simulation of human ischemic stroke in realistic 3D geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Thierry; Duarte, Max; Descombes, Stéphane; Dronne, Marie-Aimée; Massot, Marc; Louvet, Violaine

    2013-06-01

    In silico research in medicine is thought to reduce the need for expensive clinical trials under the condition of reliable mathematical models and accurate and efficient numerical methods. In the present work, we tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling human ischemic stroke. This problem induces peculiar difficulties like potentially large stiffness which stems from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of steep spatial gradients in the reaction fronts, spatially very localized. Furthermore, simulations on realistic 3D geometries are mandatory in order to describe correctly this type of phenomenon. The main goal of this article is to obtain, for the first time, 3D simulations on realistic geometries and to show that the simulation results are consistent with those obtain in experimental studies or observed on MRI images in stroke patients. For this purpose, we introduce a new resolution strategy based mainly on time operator splitting that takes into account complex geometry coupled with a well-conceived parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures. We consider then a high order implicit time integration for the reaction and an explicit one for the diffusion term in order to build a time operator splitting scheme that exploits efficiently the special features of each problem. Thus, we aim at solving complete and realistic models including all time and space scales with conventional computing resources, that is on a reasonably powerful workstation. Consequently and as expected, 2D and also fully 3D numerical simulations of ischemic strokes for a realistic brain geometry, are conducted for the first time and shown to reproduce the dynamics observed on MRI images in stroke patients. Beyond this major step, in order to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of the simulations, we indicate how the present numerical strategy can be coupled with spatial

  20. Registro de enfermedad cerebrovascular isquémica Ischemic stroke registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I. Rojas

    2006-12-01

    patients with ischemic stroke. We analyzed all consecutive ischemic stroke in patients admitted at Hospital Italiano of Buenos Aires, between June 1, 2003 and June 1, 2005. Among 395 ischemic stroke patients, the mean age was 71.36 years (± 13.82 and 55% were male. Ischemic stroke subtypes were as follows: 40% patients had lacunar, 20% atherosclerotic stroke, 10% cardioembolic infarction, and 5% other causes of stroke. Hypertension (76%, hyperlipemia (50% and prior stroke (34% were the most frequent risk factors. Most patients with cortical symptoms had significant large-artery atherosclerosis (> 70%. Stroke informations in developing countries is difficult to obtain. This could be the reason for the very few stroke registries in South America. Hypertension was the most frequent risk factor in our registry. The pattern of stroke subtypes seems to be different from that reported in other regions of the world, with a higher frequency of small-vessel disease.

  1. Prediction of ischemic stroke in young Indians: is thrombophilia profiling a way out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tathagata; Gupta, Neha; Choudhry, Ved Prakash; Behari, Madhuri; Saxena, Renu; Ashraf, Mohammad Z

    2013-06-01

    Stroke in the young is attributed to the prevalence of thrombophilia, however, reports explaining the cause mechanisms from Indian populations are largely not known. The information about the association of inherited thrombophilia and occurrence of stroke is still missing. Therefore, we describe here 52 cases of young ischemic stroke of which 22 cases were of recurrent stroke and 30 cases of first episode stroke along with an equal number of healthy controls. Imaging techniques (CT/MRI/Doppler studies) were used to identify the type and location of infarcts among various regions of the brain. All the patients and controls were screened for hypercoagulable state by employing Pro C global test. Those tested positive for the latter were evaluated for conventional thrombophilic factors, activity levels of protein C and protein S, antithrombin III levels, plasma homocysteine levels and presence of activated protein C resistance, lupus anticoagulant, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T) and prothrombin G20210A polymorphisms. Out of 52 cases there were 22 cases of recurrent stroke and 30 cases of first ischemic stroke. Infarcts were single in 39 out of 52 cases and multiple in 13 cases. Among the different regions of brain internal capsule infarcts were seen in 13 of 52 (25%) cases, and cerebellum, basal ganglion and midbrain infarcts were seen in five cases (9.6%) each and remaining infarcts were in other anatomical regions of the brain. Left middle cerebral artery territory was involved in 17 of 52 (32.7%) cases. The prevalence of individual thrombophilia among cases ranged from 28.8% (15/52) for protein S and 11.5% (6/52) for protein C deficiencies respectively. All cases of protein C were protein S deficient. Five cases of protein C deficiency patients were of 25 years and younger as compared with one case in the at least 25 years age group. Plasma homocysteine levels were elevated in three cases (5.7%) as compared with normal levels in controls

  2. The Prognostic Values of Leukocyte Rho Kinase Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

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    Cheng-I. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It has been reported that leukocyte ROCK activity is elevated in patients after ischemic stroke, but it is unclear whether leukocyte ROCK activity is associated with clinical outcomes following acute stroke events. The objective of this study is to investigate if leukocyte ROCK activity can predict the outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 110 patients of acute ischemic stroke and measured the leukocyte ROCK activity and plasma level of inflammatory cytokines to correlate the clinical outcomes of these patients. Results. The leukocyte ROCK activity at 48 hours after admission in acute ischemic stroke patients was higher as compared to a risk-matched population. The leukocyte ROCK activity significantly correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS difference between admission and 90 days after stroke event. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates showed lower stroke-free survival during follow-up period in patients with high leukocyte ROCK activity or plasma hsCRP level. Leukocyte ROCK activity independently predicted the recurrent stroke in patients with atherosclerotic stroke. Conclusions. This study shows elevated leukocyte ROCK activity in patients with ischemic stroke as compared to risk-matched subjects and is an independent predictor for recurrent stroke.

  3. In-111-labeled leukocyte brain SPECT imaging. Clinical significance in evaluating acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujinuma, Kunihiko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-02-01

    Many experimental studies have demonstrated that leukocyte infiltration plays an important role in the progression of ischemic cellular damage or post perfusion brain injury. However, only a few clinical studies have been reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of leukocyte accumulation in the ischemic brain tissue. Seventy six patients (49 men, 27 women; mean age: 65.5{+-}13.9 years) with acute ischemic stroke were studied by leukocyte brain SPECT imaging. A diagnosis included cardioembolism (n=46), atherothrombotic infarction (n=24), TIA (n=3) and lacuna (n=3). Immediately after the CBF study using Tc-99m-ECD (600 MBq), indium-111-labeled autologous leukocytes were injected. A brain scan for leukocytes was performed 48 hours later. The leukocyte-SPECT study was made 11.1{+-}7.7 days after the onset of stroke. Regional accumulation of leukocytes in the ischemic tissue was evaluated both by visual assessment and by measuring the hemispheric asymmetry index for leukocyte (AI-leuko), and was evaluated by comparison with variable factors including age, gender, infarction size, hemorrhagic transformation, timing of study after the onset, type of stroke and functional outcome. Of the 61 patients with acute ischemic stroke within 2 weeks of onset, 28 patients showed the accumulation of leukocytes in the central zone of ischemia. Six of 7 patients with repeated studies showed a reduction in leukocyte accumulation with time after the onset. Factors significantly associated with the higher accumulation of leukocyte included cardioembolic stroke, larger size of infarct, presence of hemorrhagic transformation and significant reduction in flow. In the 61 patients within 2 weeks of onset, the functional outcome was significantly correlated with the accumulation of leukocyte (p<0.001). The accumulation of leukocytes was seen more in patients with embolic stroke, larger infarction, and hemorrhagic transformation. The higher accumulation

  4. Non-convulsive status epilepticus after ischemic stroke: a hospital-based stroke cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; Vidale, Simone; Gorgone, Gaetano; Pisani, Laura Rosa; Sironi, Luigi; Arnaboldi, Marco; Pisani, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate in the setting of a stroke unit ward the usefulness of a prolonged (>6 h) video-EEG recording (PVEEG) in identifying non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) in patients with an acute ischemic stroke. Predictors of NCSE were also evaluated. Patients with an acute ischemic stroke, referred to our unit, were included in this prospective observational study. A PVEEG recording was implemented after stroke in all patients during the first week: (a) promptly in those exhibiting a clear or suspected epileptic manifestation; (b) at any time during the routine activity in the remaining patients. After the first week, a standard EEG/PVEEG recording was hooked up only in presence of an evident or suspected epileptic manifestation or as control of a previous epileptic episode. NCSE was identified in 32 of the 889 patients (3.6 %) included in the study. It occurred early (within the first week) in 20/32 (62.5 %) patients and late in the remaining 12. Diagnosis was made on the basis of a specific clinical suspect (n = 19, 59.4 %) or without any suspect (n = 13, 40.6 %). In a multivariate analysis, a significant association of NCSE was observed with NIHSS score, infarct size and large atherothrombotic etiology. NCSE is not a rare event after an acute ischemic stroke and a delayed diagnosis could worsen patient prognosis. Since NCSE can be difficult to be diagnosed only on clinical grounds, implementation of a prompt PVEEG should be kept available in a stroke unit whenever a patient develop signs, although subtle, consistent with NCSE.

  5. Differences in Acute Ischemic Stroke Quality of Care and Outcomes by Primary Stroke Center Certification Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shumei; Cox, Margueritte; Patel, Puja; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Xian, Ying; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2017-02-01

    Primary stroke center (PSC) certification was established to identify hospitals providing evidence-based care for stroke patients. The numbers of PSCs certified by Joint Commission (JC), Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, Det Norske Veritas, and State-based agencies have significantly increased in the past decade. This study aimed to evaluate whether PSCs certified by different organizations have similar quality of care and in-hospital outcomes. The study population consisted of acute ischemic stroke patients who were admitted to PSCs participating in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Measures of care quality and outcomes were compared among the 4 different PSC certifications. A total of 477 297 acute ischemic stroke admissions were identified from 977 certified PSCs (73.8% JC, 3.7% Det Norske Veritas, 1.2% Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, and 21.3% State-based). Composite care quality was generally similar among the 4 groups of hospitals, although State-based PSCs underperformed JC PSCs in a few key measures, including intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator use. The rates of tissue-type plasminogen activator use were higher in JC and Det Norske Veritas (9.0% and 9.8%) and lower in State and Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program certified hospitals (7.1% and 5.9%) (PStroke hospitals with PSC certification, acute ischemic stroke quality of care and outcomes may differ according to which organization provided certification. These findings may have important implications for further improving systems of care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Ischemic stroke assessment with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiguo; Li, Pengcheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Hu, Bo

    1999-09-01

    Many authors have elucidated the theory about oxygenated hemoglobin, deoxygenated hemoglobin absorption in near-infrared spectrum. And the theory has opened a window to measure the hemodynamic changes caused by stroke. However, no proper animal model still has established to confirm the theory. The aim of this study was to validate near-infrared cerebral topography (NCT) as a practical tool and to try to trace the focal hemodynamic changes of ischemic stroke. In the present study, middle cerebral artery occlusion model and the photosensitizer induced intracranial infarct model had been established. NCT and functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) were obtained during pre- and post-operation. The geometric shape and infarct area of NCT image was compared with the fMRI images and anatomical samples of each rat. The results of two occlusion models in different intervene factors showed the NCT for infarct focus matched well with fMRI and anatomic sample of each rats. The instrument might become a practical tool for short-term prediction of stroke and predicting the rehabilitation after stroke in real time.

  7. Limb apraxia in acute ischemic stroke: a neglected clinical challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Caroline; Suchan, Julia; Himmelbach, Marc; Haarmeier, Thomas; Borchers, Svenja

    2014-04-01

    Symptoms of limb apraxia and executive dysfunctions are currently not explicitly considered by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and, thus, not routinely tested by clinicians in the acute care of patients with suspected stroke. Neuropsychological testing, clinical examination, MRI, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were performed in a right-handed patient with acute onset of left-sided sensorimotor hemiparesis due to a right hemisphere ischemic stroke. Deficits in the execution of meaningless and meaningful gestures were not detected properly on initial clinical examination but were revealed later on through neuropsychological testing. Instead, the patient's inability to respond to specific instructions in the acute care setting was mistaken to reflect severe deficits in auditory comprehension. fMRI revealed right-hemispheric localization of language in the right-handed patient. We suggest including a bedside test for limb apraxia symptoms in acute clinical care of stroke patients. The distinction between deficits in limb praxis and impairments of language can be complicated owing to the common hemispheric co-localization of the two functions.

  8. Genetic Factors Influencing Coagulation Factor XIII B-Subunit Contribute to Risk of Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanscombe, Ken B; Traylor, Matthew; Hysi, Pirro G; Bevan, Stephen; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Worrall, Bradford B; Seshadri, Sudha; Sudlow, Cathie; Williams, Frances M K; Markus, Hugh S; Lewis, Cathryn M

    2015-08-01

    Abnormal coagulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, but how this association is mediated and whether it differs between ischemic stroke subtypes is unknown. We determined the shared genetic risk between 14 coagulation factors and ischemic stroke and its subtypes. Using genome-wide association study results for 14 coagulation factors from the population-based TwinsUK sample (N≈2000 for each factor), meta-analysis results from the METASTROKE consortium ischemic stroke genome-wide association study (12 389 cases, 62 004 controls), and genotype data for 9520 individuals from the WTCCC2 ischemic stroke study (3548 cases, 5972 controls-the largest METASTROKE subsample), we explored shared genetic risk for coagulation and stroke. We performed three analyses: (1) a test for excess concordance (or discordance) in single nucleotide polymorphism effect direction across coagulation and stroke, (2) an estimation of the joint effect of multiple coagulation-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in stroke, and (3) an evaluation of common genetic risk between coagulation and stroke. One coagulation factor, factor XIII subunit B (FXIIIB), showed consistent effects in the concordance analysis, the estimation of polygenic risk, and the validation with genotype data, with associations specific to the cardioembolic stroke subtype. Effect directions for FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly discordant with cardioembolic disease (smallest P=5.7×10(-04)); the joint effect of FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms was significantly predictive of ischemic stroke (smallest P=1.8×10(-04)) and the cardioembolic subtype (smallest P=1.7×10(-04)). We found substantial negative genetic covariation between FXIIIB and ischemic stroke (rG=-0.71, P=0.01) and the cardioembolic subtype (rG=-0.80, P=0.03). Genetic markers associated with low FXIIIB levels increase risk of ischemic stroke cardioembolic subtype. © 2015 The

  9. Association between ischemic stroke and iron-deficiency anemia: a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Liang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Very little is known about the relationship between non-sickle cell anemia and stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA with stroke based on a nationwide coverage database in Taiwan. METHODS: The case-control study subjects were obtained from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We included 51,093 subjects with stroke as cases and randomly selected 153,279 controls (3 controls per case in this study.Separate conditional logistic regression analyses were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR for having been previously diagnosed with IDA between cases and controls.We further analyzed the association between stroke and IDA by stroke subtype. RESULTS: Results showed that 3,685 study subjects (1.81% had been diagnosed with IDA prior to the index date; of those subjects, 1,268 (2.48% were cases and 2,417 (1.58% were controls (p<0.001. Conditional logistic regression shows that the OR of having previously received an IDA diagnosis among cases was 1.49 (95% CI: 1.39~1.60; p < 0.01 that of controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, hyperlipidemia, tobacco use disorder, and alcohol abuse/alcohol dependency syndrome. Furthermore, the adjusted OR of prior IDA for cases with ischemic stroke was found to be 1.45 (95% CI: 1.34~1.58 compared to controls. However, we did not find any significant relationship between IDA and subarachnoid/intracerebral hemorrhage even adjusting for other confounding factors (OR=1.17, 95% CI=0.97~1.40. CONCLUSION: There is a significant association between prior IDA and ischemic stroke.

  10. Neuronal functionality assessed by magnetoencephalography is related to oxidative stress system in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenza, Giovanni; Zappasodi, Filippo; Squitti, Rosanna; Altamura, Claudia; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Ercolani, Matilde; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Lupoi, Domenico; Passarelli, Francesco; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Tecchio, Franca

    2009-02-15

    The hypoxic brain damage induced by stroke is followed by an ischemia-reperfusion injury modulated by oxidative stress. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recording of rest and evoked cortical activities is a sensitive method to analyse functional changes following the acute ischemic damage. We aimed at investigating whether MEG signals are related to oxidative stress compounds in acute stroke. Eighteen stroke patients and 20 controls were enrolled. All subjects underwent MEG assessment to record background activity and somatosensory evoked responses (M20 and M30) of rolandic regions, neurological examination assessed by National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and plasmatic measurement of copper, iron, zinc, ceruloplasmin, transferrin, total peroxides and Total Anti-Oxidant Status. Magnetic Resonance was performed to estimate the lesion site and volume. Delta power and M20 equivalent current dipole (ECD) strength in the affected hemisphere (AH) correlated with NIHSS scores (respectively, rho=.692, p=.006 and rho=-.627, p=.012) and taken together explained 67% of NIHSS variability (p=.004). Higher transferrin and lower peroxides levels correlated with better clinical status (respectively, rho=-.600, p=.014 and rho=.599, p=.011). Transferrin also correlated with AH M20 ECD strength (rho=.638 p=.014) and inversely with AH delta power (rho=-.646 p=.023) and the lesion volume, especially in cortico-subcortical stroke (p=.037). Our findings strengthen MEG reliability in honing the evaluation of neuronal damage in acute ischemic stroke also demonstrating an association between the MEG parameters most representing the clinical status and the oxidative stress compounds. Our results meet at a possible protective role of transferrin in limiting the oxidative damage in acute stroke.

  11. Collateral blood vessels in acute ischemic stroke: a physiological window to predict future outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Heitor Castelo Branco Rodrigues; Pacheco, Felipe Torres; Rocha, Antonio J

    2016-08-01

    Collateral circulation is a physiologic pathway that protects the brain against ischemic injury and can potentially bypass the effect of a blocked artery, thereby influencing ischemic lesion size and growth. Several recent stroke trials have provided information about the role of collaterals in stroke pathophysiology, and collateral perfusion has been recognized to influence arterial recanalization, reperfusion, hemorrhagic transformation, and neurological outcomes after stroke. Our current aim is to summarize the anatomy and physiology of the collateral circulation and to present and discuss a comprehensible review of the related knowledge, particularly the effects of collateral circulation on the time course of ischemic injury and stroke severity, as well as imaging findings and therapeutic implications.

  12. Genetic Polymorphisms and Clopidogrel Efficacy for Acute Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuesong; Chen, Weiqi; Xu, Yun; Yi, Xingyang; Han, Yan; Yang, Qingwu; Li, Xin; Huang, Li'an; Johnston, S Claiborne; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Guangyao; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Yilong

    2017-01-03

    The association of genetic polymorphisms and clopidogrel efficacy in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) remains controversial. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between genetic polymorphisms, especially CYP2C19 genotype, and clopidogrel efficacy for ischemic stroke or TIA. We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed and EMBASE from their inceptions to June 24, 2016. Studies that reported clopidogrel-treated patients with stroke or TIA and with information on genetic polymorphisms were included. The end points were stroke, composite vascular events, and any bleeding. Among 15 studies of 4762 patients with stroke or TIA treated with clopidogrel, carriers of CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles (*2, *3, and *8) were at increased risk of stroke in comparison with noncarriers (12.0% versus 5.8%; risk ratio, 1.92, 95% confidence interval, 1.57-2.35; PPON1, P2Y12, and COX-1 with outcomes were observed in 1 study. Carriers of CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles are at greater risk of stroke and composite vascular events than noncarriers among patients with ischemic stroke or TIA treated with clopidogrel. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or flutter in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack by Holter monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Sandeep; Bagarhatta, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and flutter are strong risk factors for stroke. Due to high recurrence rate of ischemic events and given the benefit of oral anticoagulation over antiplatelet drugs, it is important to identify this arrhythmia. Unfortunately, paroxysmal AF or flutter is asymptomatic in majority and therefore, difficult to detect. Consecutive patients presenting with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack were included. All patients free of AF or flutter on presentation underwent 24 h Holter monitoring within 7 days of admission. Overall, fifty two (52) patients (mean age 59.51 ± 13.45 years) with acute stroke (80.8%) and TIA (19.8%) underwent 24 h Holter monitoring. Paroxysmal AF was detected in 3 cases (5.8%), all 3 patients had acute stroke and were older than age 60 years. Type of stroke was the only factor which was associated with greater risk of having paroxysmal AF or flutter, AF accounted for 50% cases (2 out of 4) of clinically suspected cardio embolic stroke. Screening consecutive patients with ischemic stroke with routine Holter monitoring will identify new atrial fibrillation/flutter in approximately one in 17 patients. Older age and type of stroke are strongly associated with increased risk. By carefully selecting the patients, the detection rates could be further increased. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The iScore predicts total healthcare costs early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewara, Emmanuel M; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Bravata, Dawn M; Williams, Linda S; Fang, Jiming; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    The ischemic Stroke risk score is a validated prognostic score which can be used by clinicians to estimate patient outcomes after the occurrence of an acute ischemic stroke. In this study, we examined the association between the ischemic Stroke risk score and patients' 30-day, one-year, and two-year healthcare costs from the perspective of a third party healthcare payer. Patients who had an acute ischemic stroke were identified from the Registry of Canadian Stroke Network. The 30-day ischemic Stroke risk score prognostic score was determined for each patient. Direct healthcare costs at each time point were determined using administrative databases in the province of Ontario. Unadjusted mean and the impact of a 10-point increase ischemic Stroke risk score and a patient's risk of death or disability on total cost were determined. There were 12,686 patients eligible for the study. Total unadjusted mean costs were greatest among patients at high risk. When adjusting for patient characteristics, a 10-point increase in the ischemic Stroke risk score was associated with 8%, 7%, and 4% increase in total costs at 30 days, one-year, and two-years. The same increase was found to impact patients at low, medium, and high risk differently. When adjusting for patient characteristics, patients in the high-risk group had the highest total costs at 30 days, while patients at medium risk had the highest costs at both one and two-years. The ischemic Stroke risk score can be useful as a predictor of healthcare utilization and costs early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  15. The Usefulness of the TOAST Classification and Prognostic Significance of Pyramidal Symptoms During the Acute Phase of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadkowiak, Edyta; Chojdak-Łukasiewicz, Justyna; Guziński, Maciej; Noga, Leszek; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2016-04-01

    Cerebellar stroke is a rare condition with very nonspecific clinical features. The symptoms in the acute phase could imitate acute peripheral vestibular disorders or a brainstem lesion. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification in cerebellar stroke and the impact of clinical features on the prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed 107 patients with diagnosed ischemic cerebellar infarction. We studied the clinical features and compared them based on the location of the ischemic lesion and its distribution in the posterior interior cerebellar artery (PICA), superior cerebellar artery (SCA), and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territories. According to the TOAST classification, stroke was more prevalent in atrial fibrillation (26/107) and when the lesion was in the PICA territory (39/107). Pyramidal signs occurred in 29/107 of patients and were more prevalent when the lesion was distributed in more than two vascular regions (p = 0.00640). Mortality was higher among patients with ischemic lesion caused by cardiac sources (p = 0.00094) and with pyramidal signs (p = 0.00640). The TOAST classification is less useful in assessing supratentorial ischemic infarcts. Cardioembolic etiology, location of the ischemic lesion, and pyramidal signs support a negative prognosis.

  16. 17q25 Locus is associated with white matter hyperintensity volume in ischemic stroke, but not with lacunar stroke status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Samii, Poneh; Rost, Natalia; Traylor, Matthew; Devan, William; Biffi, Alessandro; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Bevan, Steve; Kanakis, Allison; Valant, Valerie; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Malik, Rainer; Richie, Alexa; Gamble, Dale; Segal, Helen; Parati, Eugenio A; Ciusani, Emilio; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Maguire, Jane; Wardlaw, Joanna; Worrall, Bradford; Bis, Joshua; Wiggins, Kerri L; Longstreth, Will; Kittner, Steve J; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Mosley, Thomas; Falcone, Guido J; Furie, Karen L; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Lau, Benison C; Saleem Khan, Muhammed; Sharma, Pankaj; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Braxton D; Psaty, Bruce M; Sudlow, Cathie; Levi, Christopher; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Rothwell, Peter M; Meschia, James; Dichgans, Martin; Rosand, Jonathan; Markus, Hugh S

    2013-06-01

    Recently, a novel locus at 17q25 was associated with white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on MRI in stroke-free individuals. We aimed to replicate the association with WMH volume (WMHV) in patients with ischemic stroke. If the association acts by promoting a small vessel arteriopathy, it might be expected to also associate with lacunar stroke. We quantified WMH on MRI in the stroke-free hemisphere of 2588 ischemic stroke cases. Association between WMHV and 6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms at chromosome 17q25 was assessed by linear regression. These single-nucleotide polymorphisms were also investigated for association with lacunar stroke in 1854 cases and 51 939 stroke-free controls from METASTROKE. Meta-analyses with previous reports and a genetic risk score approach were applied to identify other novel WMHV risk variants and uncover shared genetic contributions to WMHV in community participants without stroke and ischemic stroke. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 17q25 were associated with WMHV in ischemic stroke, the most significant being rs9894383 (P=0.0006). In contrast, there was no association between any single-nucleotide polymorphism and lacunar stroke. A genetic risk score analysis revealed further genetic components to WMHV shared between community participants without stroke and ischemic stroke. This study provides support for an association between the 17q25 locus and WMH. In contrast, it is not associated with lacunar stroke, suggesting that the association does not act by promoting small-vessel arteriopathy or the same arteriopathy responsible for lacunar infarction.

  17. Update on Inflammatory Biomarkers and Treatments in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Aldo; Liberale, Luca; Vecchié, Alessandra; Casula, Matteo; Carbone, Federico; Dallegri, Franco; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2016-11-25

    After an acute ischemic stroke (AIS), inflammatory processes are able to concomitantly induce both beneficial and detrimental effects. In this narrative review, we updated evidence on the inflammatory pathways and mediators that are investigated as promising therapeutic targets. We searched for papers on PubMed and MEDLINE up to August 2016. The terms searched alone or in combination were: ischemic stroke, inflammation, oxidative stress, ischemia reperfusion, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, autoimmunity. Inflammation in AIS is characterized by a storm of cytokines, chemokines, and Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) released by several cells contributing to exacerbate the tissue injury both in the acute and reparative phases. Interestingly, many biomarkers have been studied, but none of these reflected the complexity of systemic immune response. Reperfusion therapies showed a good efficacy in the recovery after an AIS. New therapies appear promising both in pre-clinical and clinical studies, but still need more detailed studies to be translated in the ordinary clinical practice. In spite of clinical progresses, no beneficial long-term interventions targeting inflammation are currently available. Our knowledge about cells, biomarkers, and inflammatory markers is growing and is hoped to better evaluate the impact of new treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies and cell-based therapies.

  18. Plasminogen Activators and Ischemic Stroke: Conditions for Acute Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate acute treatment with plasminogen activators (PAs) can significantly increase the probability of minimal or no disability in selected ischemic stroke patients. There is a great deal of evidence showing that intravenous recombinant tissue PAs (rt-PA) infusion accomplishes this goal, recanalization with other PAs has also been demonstrated in the development of this treatment. Recanalization of symptomatic, documented carotid or vertebrobasilar arterial territory occlusions have also been achieved by local intra-arterial PA delivery, although only a single prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study has been reported. The increase in intracerebral hemorrhage with these agents by either delivery approach underscores the need for careful patient selection, dose-appropriate safety and efficacy, proper clinical trial design, and an understanding of the evolution of cerebral tissue injury due to focal ischemia. Principles underlying the evolution of focal ischemia have been expanded by experience with acute PA intervention. Several questions remain open that concern the manner in which PAs can be applied acutely in ischemic stroke and how injury development can be limited. PMID:23539414

  19. Update on Inflammatory Biomarkers and Treatments in Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Aldo; Liberale, Luca; Vecchié, Alessandra; Casula, Matteo; Carbone, Federico; Dallegri, Franco; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    After an acute ischemic stroke (AIS), inflammatory processes are able to concomitantly induce both beneficial and detrimental effects. In this narrative review, we updated evidence on the inflammatory pathways and mediators that are investigated as promising therapeutic targets. We searched for papers on PubMed and MEDLINE up to August 2016. The terms searched alone or in combination were: ischemic stroke, inflammation, oxidative stress, ischemia reperfusion, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, autoimmunity. Inflammation in AIS is characterized by a storm of cytokines, chemokines, and Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) released by several cells contributing to exacerbate the tissue injury both in the acute and reparative phases. Interestingly, many biomarkers have been studied, but none of these reflected the complexity of systemic immune response. Reperfusion therapies showed a good efficacy in the recovery after an AIS. New therapies appear promising both in pre-clinical and clinical studies, but still need more detailed studies to be translated in the ordinary clinical practice. In spite of clinical progresses, no beneficial long-term interventions targeting inflammation are currently available. Our knowledge about cells, biomarkers, and inflammatory markers is growing and is hoped to better evaluate the impact of new treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies and cell-based therapies. PMID:27898011

  20. Update on Inflammatory Biomarkers and Treatments in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Bonaventura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available After an acute ischemic stroke (AIS, inflammatory processes are able to concomitantly induce both beneficial and detrimental effects. In this narrative review, we updated evidence on the inflammatory pathways and mediators that are investigated as promising therapeutic targets. We searched for papers on PubMed and MEDLINE up to August 2016. The terms searched alone or in combination were: ischemic stroke, inflammation, oxidative stress, ischemia reperfusion, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, autoimmunity. Inflammation in AIS is characterized by a storm of cytokines, chemokines, and Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs released by several cells contributing to exacerbate the tissue injury both in the acute and reparative phases. Interestingly, many biomarkers have been studied, but none of these reflected the complexity of systemic immune response. Reperfusion therapies showed a good efficacy in the recovery after an AIS. New therapies appear promising both in pre-clinical and clinical studies, but still need more detailed studies to be translated in the ordinary clinical practice. In spite of clinical progresses, no beneficial long-term interventions targeting inflammation are currently available. Our knowledge about cells, biomarkers, and inflammatory markers is growing and is hoped to better evaluate the impact of new treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies and cell-based therapies.

  1. An Inflammatory Polymorphisms Risk Scoring System for the Differentiation of Ischemic Stroke Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiño, Elena; Krupinski, Jurek; Carrera, Caty; Gallego-Fabrega, Cristina; Montaner, Joan; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has been associated with atherothrombotic stroke and recently with cardioembolic stroke. Different genetic risk factors have been specifically associated with the subtypes of ischemic stroke (cardioembolic, atherothrombotic, and lacunar). However, there are no studies that have generated genetic risk scores for the different subtypes of ischemic stroke using polymorphisms associated with inflammation. Methods. We have analyzed 68 polymorphisms of 30 inflammatory mediator genes in 2,685 subjects: 1,987 stroke cases and 698 controls. We generated a genetic scoring system with the most significant polymorphisms weighted by the odds ratio of every polymorphism and taken into consideration the stroke subtype. Results. Three polymorphisms, rs1205 (CRP gene), rs1800779, and rs2257073 (NOS3 gene), were associated with cardioembolic stroke (p value stroke subtype (p value: 0.001) and was replicated in an independent cohort (p value: 0.017). The subjects with the highest score presented a cardioembolic stroke in 92.2% of the cases (p value: 0.002). Conclusion. The genetics of inflammatory markers is more closely associated with cardioembolic strokes than with atherothrombotic or lacunar strokes. The genetic risk scoring system could be useful in the prediction and differentiation of ischemic stroke; however, it might be specific to particular ischemic stroke subtypes. PMID:26355258

  2. An Inflammatory Polymorphisms Risk Scoring System for the Differentiation of Ischemic Stroke Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Muiño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has been associated with atherothrombotic stroke and recently with cardioembolic stroke. Different genetic risk factors have been specifically associated with the subtypes of ischemic stroke (cardioembolic, atherothrombotic, and lacunar. However, there are no studies that have generated genetic risk scores for the different subtypes of ischemic stroke using polymorphisms associated with inflammation. Methods. We have analyzed 68 polymorphisms of 30 inflammatory mediator genes in 2,685 subjects: 1,987 stroke cases and 698 controls. We generated a genetic scoring system with the most significant polymorphisms weighted by the odds ratio of every polymorphism and taken into consideration the stroke subtype. Results. Three polymorphisms, rs1205 (CRP gene, rs1800779, and rs2257073 (NOS3 gene, were associated with cardioembolic stroke (p value <0.05. The score generated was only associated with the cardioembolic stroke subtype (p value: 0.001 and was replicated in an independent cohort (p value: 0.017. The subjects with the highest score presented a cardioembolic stroke in 92.2% of the cases (p value: 0.002. Conclusion. The genetics of inflammatory markers is more closely associated with cardioembolic strokes than with atherothrombotic or lacunar strokes. The genetic risk scoring system could be useful in the prediction and differentiation of ischemic stroke; however, it might be specific to particular ischemic stroke subtypes.

  3. Incidence, trends, and predictors of ischemic stroke 30 days after an acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajermo, Ulf; Ulvenstam, Anders; Modica, Angelo; Jernberg, Tomas; Mooe, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a known complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Treatment of AMI has undergone great changes in recent years. We aimed to investigate whether changes in treatment corresponded to a lower incidence of ischemic stroke and which factors predicted ischemic stroke after AMI. Data were taken from the Swedish Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive Care Admissions. Patients with their first registered AMI between 1998 and 2008 were included. To identify ischemic strokes, we used the Swedish national patient register. To study a potential trend in the incidence of ischemic stroke after AMI over time, we divided the patient population into 5 time periods. Event-free survival was studied by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to identify stroke predictors. Of 173,233 patients with AMI, 3571 (2.1%) developed ischemic stroke within 30 days. The incidence of ischemic stroke was significantly lower during the years 2007 to 2008 compared with 1998 to 2000, with respective rates of 2.0% and 2.2% (P=0.02). Independent predictors of an increased risk of stroke were age, female sex, prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, clinical signs of heart failure in hospital, ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment at discharge. Percutaneous coronary intervention, fibrinolysis, acetylsalicylic acid, statins, and P2Y12 inhibitors were predictors of reduced risk of stroke. The incidence of ischemic stroke within 30 days of an AMI has decreased during the period 1998 to 2008. This decrease is associated with increased use of acetylsalicylic acid, P2Y12 inhibitors, statins, and percutaneous coronary intervention.

  4. Relation between reperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsch, Alexander D. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Niesten, Joris M.; Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Utrecht Stroke Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: DUST investigators

    2015-12-15

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) is given in acute ischemic stroke patients to achieve reperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a serious complication of IV-rtPA treatment and related to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. It is unclear whether HT occurs secondary to reperfusion in combination with ischemic BBB injury or is caused by the negative effect of IV-rtPA on BBB integrity. The aim of this study was to establish the association between reperfusion and the occurrence of HT. From the DUST study, patients were selected with admission and follow-up non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging, and a perfusion deficit in the middle cerebral artery territory on admission. Reperfusion was categorized qualitatively as reperfusion or no-reperfusion by visual comparison of admission and follow-up CTP. Occurrence of HT was assessed on follow-up NCCT. The association between reperfusion and occurrence of HT on follow-up was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) with additional stratification for IV-rtPA treatment. Inclusion criteria were met in 299 patients. There was no significant association between reperfusion and HT (OR 1.2 95%CI 0.5-3.1). In patients treated with IV-rtPA (n = 203), the OR was 1.3 (95%CI 0.4-4.0), and in patients not treated with IV-rtPA (n = 96), the OR was 0.8 (95%CI 0.1-4.5). HT occurred in 14 % of the IV-rtPA patients and in 7 % of patients without IV-rtPA (95%CI of difference -1 to 14 %). Our results suggest that the increased risk of HT after acute ischemic stroke treatment is not dependent on the reperfusion status. (orig.)

  5. Mobilization of endogenous bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells and therapeutic potential of parathyroid hormone after ischemic stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wang

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major neurovascular disorder threatening human life and health. Very limited clinical treatments are currently available for stroke patients. Stem cell transplantation has shown promising potential as a regenerative treatment after ischemic stroke. The present investigation explores a new concept of mobilizing endogenous stem cells/progenitor cells from the bone marrow using a parathyroid hormone (PTH therapy after ischemic stroke in adult mice. PTH 1-34 (80 µg/kg, i.p. was administered 1 hour after focal ischemia and then daily for 6 consecutive days. After 6 days of PTH treatment, there was a significant increase in bone marrow derived CD-34/Fetal liver kinase-1 (Flk-1 positive endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in the peripheral blood. PTH treatment significantly increased the expression of trophic/regenerative factors including VEGF, SDF-1, BDNF and Tie-1 in the brain peri-infarct region. Angiogenesis, assessed by co-labeled Glut-1 and BrdU vessels, was significantly increased in PTH-treated ischemic brain compared to vehicle controls. PTH treatment also promoted neuroblast migration from the subventricular zone (SVZ and increased the number of newly formed neurons in the peri-infarct cortex. PTH-treated mice showed significantly better sensorimotor functional recovery compared to stroke controls. Our data suggests that PTH therapy improves endogenous repair mechanisms after ischemic stroke with functional benefits. Mobilizing endogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells/progenitor cells using PTH and other mobilizers appears an effective and feasible regenerative treatment after ischemic stroke.

  6. Discontinuation of oral anticoagulation preceding acute ischemic stroke--prevalence and outcomes: Comprehensive chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanga, Subba R; Satti, Sudhakar R; Williams, James; Weintraub, William; Doorey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants (OAC) are the therapy of choice to prevent thromboembolism in patients at risk. Discontinuation of OAC prior to elective medical and surgical procedures may reduce the risk of bleeding, but may expose patients to increased risk of thromboembolism and ischemic stroke. The current public health burden of ischemic strokes associated with OAC discontinuation is unknown. We aimed to study the prevalence OAC discontinuation in patients who presented with acute ischemic stroke as well as the outcomes of these strokes. Retrospective cross-sectional study by intensive chart review of all acute ischemic stroke patients over 6 months in a large tertiary care community hospital. A total of 431 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted during study period, of which 11 (2.6%) had OAC discontinuation within 120 days prior to the index admission. Several strokes occurred after relatively brief discontinuations. The patient group with discontinuation was older, had higher comorbidities and also had a clinically significant stroke and resulting higher mortality and morbidity. About 2.6% or 1 in every 38 of all ischemic stokes occurred after OAC discontinuation. Strokes occurring after OAC discontinuation also have higher mortality and morbidity. Our data suggest that any planned discontinuation of OAC, however brief, should be carefully considered.

  7. A stress-related explanation to the increased blood pressure and its course following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Oygarden, Halvor; Logallo, Nicola; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Moen, Gunnar; Naess, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    A hypertensive response after ischemic stroke is frequent, yet its pathophysiology is unknown. Mechanisms related to local ischemic damage, major vascular occlusion, and psychological stress due to acute illness have been proposed. We assessed the natural course of blood pressure (BP) within the first 24 h in groups of ischemic stroke patients with different characteristics. We hypothesized that a consistent BP reduction, regardless of stroke location, time window from debut to admission and presence of persistent vascular occlusion, would favor a stress-related mechanism as an important cause of the hypertensive response after ischemic stroke. Ischemic stroke patients (n=1067) were prospectively registered, and BP was measured on admission and stroke onset or had persistent MCA occlusion versus normal MRA findings. We found a relatively consistent decline in BP within 24 h after admission across different stroke locations in patients admitted within or after 6 h of stroke onset and in patients with persistent MCA occlusion. Our findings suggest that a systemic factor such as psychological stress may be an important contributor to the frequently elevated BP on admission in patients with ischemic stroke.

  8. Obesity and Abdominal Fat Markers in Patients with a History of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Yaroslav; Pieper, Lars; Klotsche, Jens; Riedel, Oliver; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal obesity is a well-recognized cardiovascular risk factor. Conflicting data concerning its significance with respect to stroke have been discussed in recent years. The objective of this study was to analyze the association between anthropometric parameters and the risk of stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in German primary care. Patient recruitment in this large-scale epidemiological study was performed in 3188 representative primary care offices in Germany. Among 6980 study participants, 1745 patients with a history of stroke or TIA were identified and matched for age and gender with 5235 regional controls. Associations between standard anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and cerebrovascular risk were investigated using logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, and vascular risk factors. BMI showed no significant associations with the risk of stroke or TIA in any of the applied mathematical models. Markers of abdominal obesity were associated with an increased risk of stroke or TIA in the unadjusted model (waist circumference: odds ratio [OR] 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.32; waist-to-hip ratio: OR 1.21; 95% CI, 1.05-1.38; waist-to-height ratio: OR 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09-1.44, comparisons between top and bottom tertiles). After adjustment for vascular risk factors, all associations were insignificant. Abdominal obesity is a stronger predictor of risk of stroke or TIA than BMI. However, the association between abdominal obesity and the risk of stroke or TIA is not independent of other vascular risk factors. Stroke-related weight changes should be considered in longitudinal studies examining the role of obesity in cerebrovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Early outcome in acute ischemic stroke is not influenced by the prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeKeyser, J; Herroelen, L; DeKlippel, N

    Aspirin reduces the occurrence of ischemic strokes. In some prophylactic trials it was suggested that aspirin might also lessen stroke severity, and hence improve outcome in patients sustaining an ischemic stroke. We examined stroke severity (by using the Mathew scale) and early outcome (Barthel

  10. Abnormal organization of white matter network in patients with no dementia after ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shi

    Full Text Available Structural changes after ischemic stroke could affect information communication extensively in the brain network. It is likely that the defects in the white matter (WM network play a key role in information interchange. In this study, we used graph theoretical analysis to examine potential organization alteration in the WM network architecture derived from diffusion tensor images from subjects with no dementia and experienced stroke in the past 5.4-14.8 months (N = 47, Mini-Mental Screening Examination, MMSE range 18-30, compared with a normal control group with 44 age and gender-matched healthy volunteers (MMSE range 26-30. Region-wise connectivity was derived from fiber connection density of 90 different cortical and subcortical parcellations across the whole brain. Both normal controls and patients with chronic stroke exhibited efficient small-world properties in their WM structural networks. Compared with normal controls, topological efficiency was basically unaltered in the patients with chronic stroke, as reflected by unchanged local and global clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, and regional efficiency. No significant difference in hub distribution was found between normal control and patient groups. Patients with chronic stroke, however, were found to have reduced betweenness centrality and predominantly located in the orbitofrontal cortex, whereas increased betweenness centrality and vulnerability were observed in parietal-occipital cortex. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score of patient is correlated with the betweenness centrality of right pallidum and local clustering coefficient of left superior occipital gyrus. Our findings suggest that patients with chronic stroke still exhibit efficient small-world organization and unaltered topological efficiency, with altered topology at orbitofrontal cortex and parietal-occipital cortex in the overall structural network. Findings from this study could

  11. Prognostic Significance of Uric Acid Levels in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Zhi-Chao; Lu, Tao-Sheng; You, Shou-Jiang; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The importance and function of serum uric acid (UA) levels in patients with cardiovascular disease or stroke are unclear. We sought to evaluate the appropriate UA levels for stroke patients and the association between endogenous UA levels and clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, particularly regarding the possible interaction between gender and UA levels with respect to AIS prognosis. We examined 303 patients who had an onset of ischemic stroke within 48 h. Of those, 101 patients received thrombolytic treatment. Serum UA (μmol/L) levels were measured the second morning after admission. Patient prognosis was evaluated 90 days after clinical onset by modified Rankin Scale. Patients were divided into four groups according to serum UA quartiles. A binary multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess clinical relevance in regard to functional outcome and endogenous UA levels. Analysis of subgroups by gender and normal glomerular filtration rate were also been done. Poor functional outcome was associated with older age, history of atrial fibrillation, or higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with higher UA levels (>380 μmol/L) or lower UA levels (≤250 μmol/L) were 2-3 times more likely to have a poor outcome (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.14-7.61; OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.02-7.58, respectively) compared to the baseline group (UA level 316-380 μmol/L). The same results were observed in thrombolyzed patients. Patients with high and low UA levels were 9-18 times more likely to having poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 316-380 μmol/L; OR 18.50, 95% CI: 2.041-167.67; OR 9.66, 95% CI 1.42-65.88, respectively). In men, patients with high UA levels were 6 times more likely to have poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 279-334 μmol/L; OR 6.10, 95% CI 1.62-22.93). However, female patients with UA level 271-337 μmol/L were seven times more

  12. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Serum Levels Influence Ischemic Stroke Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smedt, Ann; Brouns, Raf; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Raedt, Sylvie; Moens, Maarten; Wilczak, Nadine; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is neuroprotective in animal models of stroke. We investigated whether serum IGF-I levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke influence stroke severity and outcome. Methods-Concentrations of IGF-I and IGF binding protein 3 were measured

  13. Ischemic stroke activates hematopoietic bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courties, Gabriel; Herisson, Fanny; Sager, Hendrik B; Heidt, Timo; Ye, Yuxiang; Wei, Ying; Sun, Yuan; Severe, Nicolas; Dutta, Partha; Scharff, Jennifer; Scadden, David T; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Moskowitz, Michael A; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-30

    The mechanisms leading to an expanded neutrophil and monocyte supply after stroke are incompletely understood. To test the hypothesis that transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in mice leads to activation of hematopoietic bone marrow stem cells. Serial in vivo bioluminescence reporter gene imaging in mice with tMCAO revealed that bone marrow cell cycling peaked 4 days after stroke (Pcell cycle analysis showed activation of the entire hematopoietic tree, including myeloid progenitors. The cycling fraction of the most upstream hematopoietic stem cells increased from 3.34%±0.19% to 7.32%±0.52% after tMCAO (Pstroke. The hematopoietic system's myeloid bias was reflected by increased expression of myeloid transcription factors, including PU.1 (Pstem cell quiescence. In mice with genetic deficiency of the β3 adrenergic receptor, hematopoietic stem cells did not enter the cell cycle in increased numbers after tMCAO (naive control, 3.23±0.22; tMCAO, 3.74±0.33, P=0.51). Ischemic stroke activates hematopoietic stem cells via increased sympathetic tone, leading to a myeloid bias of hematopoiesis and higher bone marrow output of inflammatory Ly6C(high) monocytes and neutrophils. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Predictors of extubation success in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Hanafy, Khalid A; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-09-15

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients often undergo intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV). Prolonged intubation and MV have disadvantages and complications. Conventional extubation criteria based only on respiratory parameters are insufficient to guide extubation practices in stroke patients where capacity for airway protection is a major concern. To identify clinical and neuroanatomical markers of successful extubation in AIS patients requiring MV. Retrospective review of tertiary care hospital patient database from May 2009-November 2012 to identify consecutive patients with AIS intubated during hospitalization. We assessed the effect of age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, level of consciousness, facial weakness, dysarthria, neglect, infarct location, dysphagia, respiratory parameters and history of pneumonia on successful extubation by hospital discharge using multivariate logistic regression analysis. 112 subjects met study criteria and were included in the analysis. Age and NIHSS scores (mean±standard deviation) were 74.5±16.1years and 19±9.8, respectively; 56% were women. In multivariate analysis, NIHSS score≤15 (Odds Ratio 4.6, 95% Confidence Interval 1.9-11.3, pstroke and absence of dysarthria prior to intubation were independently associated with extubation success. Our findings could help inform extubation practices in patients with AIS though prospective validation is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the motor cortical excitability changes after ischemic stroke

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    D K Prashantha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We evaluated progressive changes in excitability of motor cortex following ischemic stroke using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients (24 men, 7 women; age 37.3 ± 8.2 years were recruited and TMS was performed using Magstim 200 stimulator and a figure-of-eight coil. Resting motor threshold (RMT was recorded from affected and unaffected hemispheres and motor evoked potential (MEP was recorded from contralateral FDI muscle. Central motor conduction time (CMCT was calculated using F wave method. All measurements were done at baseline (2 nd , 4 th , and 6 th week of stroke. Results: Affected hemisphere: MEP was recordable in 3 patients at baseline (all had prolonged CMCT. At 4 weeks, MEP was recordable in one additional patient and CMCT remained prolonged. At 6 weeks, CMCT normalized in one patient. RMT was recordable (increased in 3 patients at baseline, in one additional patient at 4 weeks, and reduced marginally in these patients at 6 weeks. Unaffected hemisphere: MEP was recordable in all patients at baseline, and reduced significantly over time (2 nd week 43.52 ± 9.60, 4 th week 38.84 ± 7.83, and 6 th week 36.85 ± 7.27; P < 0.001. The CMCT was normal and remained unchanged over time. Conclusion: The increase in excitability of the unaffected motor cortex suggests plasticity in the post-stroke phase.

  16. Angiogenesis in Ischemic Stroke and Angiogenic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine

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    Sai-Wang Seto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the major causes of death and adult disability worldwide. The underlying pathophysiology of stroke is highly complicated, consisting of impairments of multiple signalling pathways, and numerous pathological processes such as acidosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, calcium overload, cerebral inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. The current treatment for ischemic stroke is limited to thromolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA. tPA has a very narrow therapeutic window, making it suitable to only a minority of stroke patients. Hence, there is great urgency to develop new therapies that can protect brain tissue from ischemic damage. Recent studies have shown that new vessel formation after stroke not only replenishes blood flow to the ischemic area of the brain, but also promotes neurogenesis and improves neurological functions in both animal models and patients. Therefore, drugs that can promote angiogenesis after ischemic stroke can provide therapeutic benefits in stroke management. In this regard, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM has a long history in treating stroke and the associated diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated the pro-angiogenic effects of various Chinese herbs and herbal formulations in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on angiogenesis in the context of ischemic stroke and discuss the potential use of CHM in stroke management through modulation of angiogenesis.

  17. Myelin basic protein and ischemia modified albumin levels in acute ischemic stroke cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Serdar; Akdur, Okhan; Yildirim, Ahmet; Adam, Gurhan; Cakir, Dilek Ulker; Karaman, Handan Isin Ozisik

    2015-01-01

    To investigate early diagnostic effects of serum myelin basic protein (MBP) and ischemic modified albumin (IMA) levels in patients with ischemic stroke. Fifty patients who presented to an emergency service with acute ischemic stroke between June 2013 to March 2014 were evaluated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty four healthy cases were included as control group. All patients' serum IMA and MBP level were assessed. Mean IMA value was 0.52±0.25 cases with acute ischemic stroke and serum IMA levels were significantly higher than the control group (pacute ischemic stroke group and control group related to the MBP serum levels (P>0.05). Statistically significant correlation was detected between the volumes of diffusion restriction on MRI and NIHSS score (P=0.002, r=0.43) and IMA (P=0.015, r=0.344) levels. We have found that serum IMA levels are elevated in acute ischemic stroke cases and these levels are correlated with the ischemic tissue volume. MBP levels do not increase in early period of stroke cases.

  18. Intracranial stents in the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Acosta, F; Jiménez Gómez, E; Bravo Rey, I; Bravo Rodríguez, F A; Ochoa Sepúlveda, J J; Oteros Fernández, R

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intracranial stenting as a rescue therapy after failed mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We retrospectively studied 42 patients treated with intracranial stenting after failed mechanical thrombectomy between December 2008 and January 2016. We compared outcomes before and after the incorporation of stentrievers. We assessed the degree of recanalization in the carotid and basilar territories (modified TIMI score), prognostic factors, and outcome (modified Rankin Score at 3 months). Safety was evaluated in function of the appearance of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH). Median NIHSS was 17 in patients with carotid territory strokes and 26 in those with vertebrobasilar territory strokes. Median time from onset of symptoms to treatment was 225minutes in carotid territory strokes and 390minutes in vertebrobasilar territory strokes. A total of 10 patients underwent intravenous fibrinolytic therapy before treatment with stentrievers. Two patients developed SICH; both had undergone intravenous fibrinolytic therapy (p=0.0523). Recanalization was effective in 30 (71.4%) in the entire series: in 7 (50%) of 14 patients treated before the incorporation of stentrievers and in 23 (82.1%) of 28 treated after the incorporation of stentrievers (p=0.0666). Outcome at 3 months was good in 2 (14.3%) patients in the earlier group and in 14 (50%) patients in the later group (p=0.042). We found significant associations between recanalization and outcome (p=0.0415) and between shorter time to treatment and outcome (p=0.002). Outcome was good in 14 (48.3%) of the 29 patients with carotid territory strokes and in 2 (15.4%) of the 13 patients with vertebrobasilar territory strokes (p=0.078). Intracranial stenting is the rescue treatment when the usual treatment fails. Stentrievers must be used to eliminate the clot burden before stenting. In our study, antiplatelet treatment did not seem to increase the risk of SICH

  19. Strong complement activation after acute ischemic stroke is associated with unfavorable outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Széplaki, Gábor; Szegedi, Róbert; Hirschberg, Kristóf

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: According to data from animal models, complement activation plays a major role in the brain injury after acute ischemic stroke. Scarce findings are, however, available on the detection of complement activation products in stroke patients. METHODS: We have measured plasma levels...... role in the development of brain infarct. The measurement of complement activation products might help to determine the clinical prognosis after acute ischemic stroke. Furthermore, there is potential usefulness of complement modulating therapy in ischemic stroke....... of the five complement activation products (C1rC1sC1inh, C4d, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9) in samples of 26 patients with ischemic stroke upon admission. Twenty-six patients with severe carotid atherosclerosis served as patient controls. RESULTS: Levels of two activation products (SC5b-9 and C4d)) were significantly...

  20. Analysis of risk factors and risk assessment for ischemic stroke recurrence

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    Xiu-ying LONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To screen the risk factors for recurrence of ischemic stroke and to assess the risk of recurrence. Methods Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS was used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in 176 patients with ischemic stroke (96 cases of first onset and 80 cases of recurrence. Univariate and multivariate stepwise Logistic regression analysis was used to screen risk factors for recurrence of ischemic stroke.  Results There were significant differences between first onset group and recurrence group on age, the proportion of > 75 years old, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, peripheral angiopathy, transient ischemic attack (TIA or ischemic stroke, drinking and ESRS score (P < 0.05, for all. First onset group included one case of ESRS 0 (1.04%, 8 cases of 1 (8.33%, 39 cases of 2 (40.63%, 44 cases of 3 (45.83%, 4 cases of 4 (4.17%. Recurrence group included 2 cases of ESRS 3 (2.50%, 20 cases of 4 (25% , 37 cases of 5 (46.25% , 18 cases of 6 (22.50% , 3 cases of 7 (3.75% . There was significant difference between 2 groups (Z = -11.376, P = 0.000. Logistic regression analysis showed ESRS > 3 score was independent risk factor for recurrence of ischemic stroke (OR = 31.324, 95%CI: 3.934-249.430; P = 0.001.  Conclusions ESRS > 3 score is the independent risk factor for recurrence of ischemic stroke. It is important to strengthen risk assessment of recurrence of ischemic stroke. To screen and control risk factors is the key to secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.07.011

  1. Sex Differences in Stroke Subtypes, Severity, Risk Factors, and Outcomes Among Elderly Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

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    Changshen eYu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the age-specific incidence and mortality of stroke is higher among men, stroke has a greater clinical effect on women. However, the sex differences in stroke among elderly patients are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the sex differences in stroke among elderly stroke patients.Methods: Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1,484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients (≥75 years old from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China. Information regarding their stroke subtypes, severity, risk factors, and outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke were recorded.Results: Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20% vs. 12.54%, hypertension (76.42% vs. 66.39%, dyslipidemias (30.35% vs. 22.76%, and obesity (18.40% vs. 9.32%, P < 0.05. Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11% vs. 17.45%, current smoking (29.60% vs. 13.05%, and alcohol consumption (12.15% vs. 0.47%, P < 0.05. Moreover, dependency was more common among women at 3 and 12 months after stroke, although the sex difference disappeared after adjusting for stroke subtypes, severity, and risk factors. Conclusions: Elderly women with acute ischemic stroke had more severe stroke status and worse outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke. Thus, elderly female post-acute ischemic stroke patients are a crucial population that should be assisted with controlling their risk factors for stroke and changing their lifestyle.

  2. Limb remote ischemic per-conditioning in combination with post-conditioning reduces brain damage and promotes neuroglobin expression in the rat brain after ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Changhong; Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Brian; Li, Ning; Li, Weiguang; Zhang, Chenggang; Jin, Kunlin; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Limb remote ischemic per-conditioning or post-conditioning has been shown to be neuroprotective after cerebral ischemic stroke. However, the effect of combining remote per-conditioning with post-conditioning on ischemic/reperfusion injury as well as the underlying mechanisms are largely unexplored. Methods: Here, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The limb ischemic stimulus was immediately applied after onset of focal ischemia (per-conditioning), followed by repeated short episodes of remote ischemia 24 hr after reperfusion (post-conditioning). The infarct volume, motor function, and the expression of neuroglobin (Ngb) were measured at different durations after reperfusion. Results: We found that a single episode of limb remote per-conditioning afforded short-term protection, but combining repeated remote post-conditioning during the 14 days after reperfusion significantly ameliorated cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Interestingly, we also found that ischemic per- and post-conditioning significantly increased expression of Ngb, an oxygen-binding globin protein that has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective against stroke, at peri-infarct regions from day 1 to day 14 following ischemia/reperfusion. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the conventional per-conditioning combined with post-conditioning may be used as a novel neuroprotective strategy against ischemia-reperfusion injury, and Ngb seems to be one of the important players in limb remote ischemia-mediated neuroprotection. PMID:25868435

  3. Neural stem cell transplantation in ischemic stroke: A role for preconditioning and cellular engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstock, Joshua D; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Ye, Daniel; Gessler, Florian A; Maric, Dragan; Vicario, Nunzio; Lee, Yang-Ja; Pluchino, Stefano; Hallenbeck, John M

    2017-07-01

    Ischemic stroke continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. To protect and/or repair the ischemic brain, a multitiered approach may be centered on neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation. Transplanted NSCs exert beneficial effects not only via structural replacement, but also via immunomodulatory and/or neurotrophic actions. Unfortunately, the clinical translation of such promising therapies remains elusive, in part due to their limited persistence/survivability within the hostile ischemic microenvironment. Herein, we discuss current approaches for the development of NSCs more amenable to survival within the ischemic brain as a tool for future cellular therapies in stroke.

  4. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. Methods From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. Results In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; P<0.001), and lower mortality (0.42 [0.21-0.82]; P=0.0108). In-hospital statin use was associated with good functional outcome (1.31 [1.12-1.53]; P=0.001), and lower mortality (0.41 [0.29-0.58]; P<0.001). In contrast, statin withdrawal was associated with poor functional outcome (1.83 [1.01-3.30]; P=0.045). In patients treated with thrombolysis, statin was associated with good functional outcome (1.44 [1.10-1.89]; P=0.001), despite an increased risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). Conclusions The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence. PMID:26437994

  5. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke with cerebral microbleeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhong-Song; Duckwiler, Gary R; Jahan, Reza; Tateshima, Satoshi; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Szeder, Viktor; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kim, Doojin; Ali, Latisha K; Starkman, Sidney; Vespa, Paul M; Salamon, Noriko; Villablanca, J Pablo; Viñuela, Fernando; Feng, Lei; Loh, Yince; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-06-01

    The influence of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) on post-thrombolytic hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke remains controversial. To investigate the association of CMBs with HT and clinical outcomes among patients with large-vessel occlusion strokes treated with mechanical thrombectomy. We analyzed patients with acute stroke treated with Merci Retriever, Penumbra system or stent-retriever devices. CMBs were identified on pretreatment T2-weighted, gradient-recall echo MRI. We analyzed the association of the presence, burden, and distribution of CMBs with HT, procedural complications, in-hospital mortality, and clinical outcome. CMBs were detected in 37 (18.0%) of 206 patients. Seventy-three foci of microbleeds were identified. Fourteen patients (6.8%) had ≥2 CMBs, only 1 patient had ≥5 CMBs. Strictly lobar CMBs were found in 12 patients, strictly deep CMBs in 12 patients, strictly infratentorial CMBs in 2 patients, and mixed CMBs in 11 patients. There were no significant differences between patients with CMBs and those without CMBs in the rates of overall HT (37.8% vs 45.6%), parenchymal hematoma (16.2% vs 19.5%), procedure-related vessel perforation (5.4% vs 7.1%), in-hospital mortality (16.2% vs 18.3%), and modified Rankin Scale score 0-3 at discharge. CMBs were not independently associated with HT or in-hospital mortality in patients treated with either thrombectomy or intravenous thrombolysis followed by thrombectomy. Patients with CMBs are not at increased risk for HT and mortality following mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke. Excluding such patients from mechanical thrombectomy is unwarranted. The risk of HT in patients with ≥5 CMBs requires further study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Endovascular Intervention for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Light of Recent Trials

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    Kenan Alkhalili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three recently published trials, MR RESCUE, IMS III, and SYNTHESIS Expansion, evaluating the efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke have generated concerns about the future of endovascular approach. However, the tremendous evolution that imaging and endovascular treatment modalities have undergone over the past several years has raised doubts about the validity of these trials. In this paper, we review the role of endovascular treatment strategies in acute ischemic stroke and discuss the limitations and shortcomings that prevent generalization of the findings of recent trials. We also provide our experience in endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  7. [NDT-Bobath method used in the rehabilitation of patients with a history of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Kubsik, Anna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and disability in human. The vitally important problem after ischemic stroke is hemiparesis of the body. The most common methods used in improving the mobility of patients after ischemic stroke is a Bobath-NDT (Neuro-Developmental Treatment - Bobath), which initiated the Berta and Karel Bobath for children with cerebral palsy. It is a method designed to neurophysiological recovery of these vital functions that the patient was lost due to illness, and wants it back.

  8. Elevated Troponin Level with Negative Outcome Was Found in Ischemic Stroke

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    Buse Hasırcı

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Troponin increment is a highly sensitive and specific marker of myocardial necrosis. The reason of high troponin levels in acute stroke is not clear. The aim of this study was to identify the relationships between cardiac troponin-I (cTnI level and stroke. Methods. This study recruited 868 patients who were admitted to Istanbul Medeniyet University due to acute ischemic stroke, and the diagnosis was confirmed by diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. The patients with the causes increasing troponin level were excluded from the study. A total of 239 patients were finally included in the study. Clinics were evaluated by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS. Results. Serum level of troponin was higher in ischemic stroke patients with anterior circulation involvement in comparison to posterior involvement or hemorrhagic stroke (. Higher troponin levels related to increased stroke scale scores at discharge in ischemic stroke (. The level of cTnI was correlated with stroke scale scores at both admission and discharge in posterior stroke patients (. Conclusion. cTnI is a highly specific and sensitive marker of myocardial damage, and its elevation was associated with more severe neurological deficits in acute ischemic stroke.

  9. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  10. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Cevik

    Full Text Available Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics. These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides

  11. Attitudes to Stem Cell Therapy Among Ischemic Stroke Survivors in the Lund Stroke Recovery Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aked, Joseph; Delavaran, Hossein; Lindvall, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Kokaia, Zaal; Lindgren, Arne

    2017-04-15

    Preclinical studies suggest that stem cell therapy (SCT) may improve poststroke recovery, and clinical trials investigating safety are ongoing. However, knowledge about patients' attitudes to SCT in stroke is limited. We evaluated the knowledge and attitudes to this therapeutic approach as well as possible factors influencing this among stroke patients potentially suitable for SCT. Consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients aged 20-75 years with NIH stroke scale scores 1-18 were included. Exclusion criteria were severe comorbidities or infratentorial stroke. Clinical follow-up after 3-5 years assessed severity of residual stroke symptoms, cognitive function, functional status, patient-reported outcome, and comorbidity, and after receiving standardized information, the participants also completed an eight-item questionnaire on knowledge and attitudes about SCT. The relationships between clinical variables and positive attitude to SCT were assessed with logistic regression analyses. Of 108 patients included at baseline, 84 participated at follow-up and completed the questionnaire. In total, 12% had prior knowledge of SCT. When informed, 63% were positive toward it and 36% reported willingness to participate in SCT trials. Only 5%-8% expressed ethical considerations regarding different stem cell sources. Positive attitudes to SCT were associated with male gender (OR: 3.74; 95% CI: 1.45-9.61; P stroke patients had limited prior knowledge of SCT, yet attitudes were positive among the majority after receiving standardized and neutral information. Gender and degree of stroke recovery may influence attitudes to SCT, indicating a need for targeted information to improve knowledge about SCT.

  12. Pediatric cerebral stroke: susceptibility-weighted imaging may predict post-ischemic malignant edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Poretti, Andrea; Orman, Gunes; Meoded, Avner; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2013-10-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is an advanced MRI technique providing information on the blood oxygenation level. Deoxyhemoglobin is increased in hypoperfused tissue characterized by SWI-hypointensity, while high oxyhemoglobin concentration within hyperperfused tissue results in a SWI iso- or hyperintensity compared to healthy brain tissue. We describe a child with a stroke, where SWI in addition to excluding hemorrhage and delineating the thrombus proved invaluable in determining regions of hyperperfusion or luxury perfusion, which contributed further to the prognosis including an increased risk of developing post-ischemic malignant edema.

  13. Effects of blood pressure-lowering treatment in different subtypes of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Jusufovic, Mirza; Sandset, Per Morten; Bath, Philip M W; Berge, Eivind

    2015-03-01

    The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST) found no benefits of blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan in acute stroke. We have investigated whether the effect of treatment is different in different subtypes of ischemic stroke. SCAST was a randomized- and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan in 2029 patients presenting within 30 hours of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg. Ischemic stroke subtype was categorized by the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification. There were 2 primary effect variables: the composite vascular end point of vascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke during the first 6 months and functional outcome at 6 months. A total of 1733 patients with ischemic stroke were included: total anterior circulation infarcts in 129, partial anterior in 850, posterior in 236, and lacunar in 510 patients. For functional outcome there was a significant trend toward a better effect of candesartan in patients with larger infarcts (total anterior circulation or partial anterior circulation) than in patients with smaller infarcts (lacunar infarction; P=0.02). For the composite vascular end point, there were no differences in treatment effect. The results suggest that the effect of blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan may differ according to different types of acute ischemic stroke, but this needs to be confirmed in future trials. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00120003. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Homozygous ALDH2*2 Is an Independent Risk Factor for Ischemic Stroke in Taiwanese Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Chun-Chung; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Peng, Giia-Sheun

    2016-09-01

    The *2 allele of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2) is the most common variant in Asian populations. The variant resulting in enzyme dysfunction was highly related to coronary artery disease. Recently, genome-wide association studies also discovered that the 12q24 locus near ALDH2 gene was associated with hypertension and ischemic stroke. This study intended to further investigate whether the above variant of ALDH2 increases the risk for ischemic stroke in Taiwanese. A case-control study was conducted on 914 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 746 nonstroke controls. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to identify the ALDH2 genotype. Vascular risk factors, stroke subtypes, vascular stenosis, and stroke outcomes were analyzed. ALDH2 genotypes differed significantly between male controls (*1/*1 versus *1/*2 versus *2/*2=53.8% versus 39.9% versus 6.4%) and male patients with ischemic stroke (*1/*1 versus *1/*2 versus *2/*2=51.5% versus 37.3% versus 11.2%; P=0.048). No significant difference was found between groups for female patients (P=0.228). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the ALDH2*2/*2 genotype was an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in male patients (odds ratio, 1.93 [95% confidence interval, 1.07-3.46]; P=0.028). Further analysis of men with ischemic stroke demonstrated that the polymorphism of ALDH2 was not related to vascular risk factors, severity of vascular atherosclerosis, stroke subtypes, and stroke functional outcomes. The study demonstrated that ALDH2*2/*2 may be an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in Taiwanese men, but not in Taiwanese women. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Endovascular thrombectomy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke

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    Cleusa P. Ferri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Few patients benefit from the current standard treatment for acute ischemic stroke (AIS, encouraging the development of new treatments. Objective To systematically review the literature on the efficacy and/or safety of endovascular thrombectomy in AIS compared to standard treatment and to identify ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Method Searches for RCTs were performed in Medline/Embase, and for ongoing trials: International Clinical Trial Registry Platform, Clinicaltrials.gov and ISRCTN registry (to June 15th, 2015. Results From the eight published RCTs, five showed the superiority of treatment that includes thrombectomy compared to standard care alone. From the 13 ongoing RCTs, 3 have been halted, one has not started, one has unknown status and eight will end between 2016 - 2020. Conclusion Evidence favours a combination of the standard therapy with endovascular thrombectomy. The selection criteria however limit the number of people who can benefit. Further studies are needed to prove its cost-effectiveness.

  16. The Use of Major Risk Factors for Computer-Based Distinction of Diabetic Patients with Ischemic Stroke and Without Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Features include age, gender, duration of diabetes , cholesterol, higher density lipoprotein (HDL), triglicerit levels, neuropathy, nephropathy ...THE USE of MAJOR RISK FACTORS for COMPUTER-BASED DISTINCTION of DIABETIC PATIENTS with ISCHEMIC STROKE and WITHOUT STROKE Sibel Oge Merey1...boun.edu.tr Abstract- This study proposes a computer-based decision support system to investigate the distinctive factors of diabetes mellitus (DM

  17. Prestroke glycemic control is associated with the functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke: the Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hata, Jun; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Ago, Tetsuro; Sambongi, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Yoshihisa; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Kitazono, Takanari

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for stroke. However, it is uncertain whether prestroke glycemic control (PSGC) status affects clinical outcomes of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between PSGC status and neurological or functional outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. From the Fukuoka Stroke Registry (FSR), a multicenter stroke registry in Japan, 3627 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke within 24 hours after onset were included in the present analysis. The patients were categorized into 4 groups based on their PSGC status: excellent (hemoglobin [Hb] A1c on admissionStroke Scale [NIHSS] score during hospitalization or 0 points on NIHSS score at discharge), neurological deterioration (≥1 point increase in NIHSS score) and poor functional outcome (death or dependency at discharge, modified Rankin Scale 2-6). The age- and sex-adjusted ORs for neurological improvement were lower, and those for neurological deterioration and a poor functional outcome were higher in patients with poorer PSGC status. After adjusting for multiple confounding factors, these trends were unchanged (all probability values for trends were ischemic stroke patients, HbA1c on admission was an independent significant predictor for neurological and functional outcomes.

  18. The fate of medications evaluated for ischemic stroke pharmacotherapy over the period 1995–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a brain damage caused by a loss of blood supply to a portion of the brain, which requires prompt and effective treatment. The current pharmacotherapy for ischemic stroke primarily relies on thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activators (rt-PAs to breakdown blood clots. Neuroprotective agents that inhibit excitatory neurotransmitters are also used to treat ischemic stroke but have failed to translate into clinical benefits. This poses a major challenge in biomedical research to understand what causes the progressive brain cell death after stroke and how to develop an effective pharmacotherapy for stroke. This brief review analyzes the fate of about 430 potentially useful stroke medications over the period 1995–2015 and describes in detail those that successfully reached the market. Hopefully, the information from this analysis will shed light on how future stroke research can improve stroke drug discovery.

  19. Genetic overlap between diagnostic subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Elizabeth G; Traylor, Matthew; Malik, Rainer; Bevan, Steve; Falcone, Guido; Hopewell, Jemma C; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Bis, Joshua C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Clarke, Robert; Cole, John W; Fornage, Myriam; Furie, Karen L; Ikram, M Arfan; Jannes, Jim; Kittner, Steven J; Lincz, Lisa F; Maguire, Jane M; Meschia, James F; Mosley, Thomas H; Nalls, Mike A; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Parati, Eugenio A; Psaty, Bruce M; Rothwell, Peter M; Seshadri, Sudha; Scott, Rodney J; Sharma, Pankaj; Sudlow, Cathie; Wiggins, Kerri L; Worrall, Bradford B; Rosand, Jonathan; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S; Levi, Christopher; Attia, John; Wray, Naomi R

    2015-03-01

    Despite moderate heritability, the phenotypic heterogeneity of ischemic stroke has hampered gene discovery, motivating analyses of diagnostic subtypes with reduced sample sizes. We assessed evidence for a shared genetic basis among the 3 major subtypes: large artery atherosclerosis (LAA), cardioembolism, and small vessel disease (SVD), to inform potential cross-subtype analyses. Analyses used genome-wide summary data for 12 389 ischemic stroke cases (including 2167 LAA, 2405 cardioembolism, and 1854 SVD) and 62 004 controls from the Metastroke consortium. For 4561 cases and 7094 controls, individual-level genotype data were also available. Genetic correlations between subtypes were estimated using linear mixed models and polygenic profile scores. Meta-analysis of a combined LAA-SVD phenotype (4021 cases and 51 976 controls) was performed to identify shared risk alleles. High genetic correlation was identified between LAA and SVD using linear mixed models (rg=0.96, SE=0.47, P=9×10(-4)) and profile scores (rg=0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.93). Between LAA and cardioembolism and SVD and cardioembolism, correlation was moderate using linear mixed models but not significantly different from zero for profile scoring. Joint meta-analysis of LAA and SVD identified strong association (P=1×10(-7)) for single nucleotide polymorphisms near the opioid receptor μ1 (OPRM1) gene. Our results suggest that LAA and SVD, which have been hitherto treated as genetically distinct, may share a substantial genetic component. Combined analyses of LAA and SVD may increase power to identify small-effect alleles influencing shared pathophysiological processes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Antiplatelet Agents for the Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Weiming; Zhu, Qin; Lan, Qing; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-05-01

    Stroke can cause high morbidity and mortality, and ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients have a high stroke recurrence rate. Antiplatelet agents are the standard therapy for these patients, but it is often difficult for clinicians to select the best therapy from among the multiple treatment options. We therefore performed a network meta-analysis to estimate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane) for relevant studies published through August 2015. The primary end points of this meta-analysis were overall stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and fatal stroke. A total of 30 trials were included in our network meta-analysis and abstracted data. Among the therapies evaluated in the included trials, the estimates for overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke for cilostazol (Cilo) were significantly better than those for aspirin (odds ratio [OR] = .64, 95% credibility interval [CrI], .45-.91; OR = .23, 95% CrI, .08-.58). The estimate for fatal stroke was highest for Cilo plus aspirin combination therapy, followed by Cilo therapy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that Cilo significantly improves overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke in IS or TIA patients and reduces fatal stroke, but with low statistical significance. Our results also show that Cilo was significantly more efficient than other therapies in Asian patients; therefore, future trials should focus on Cilo treatment for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke in non-Asian patients.

  1. Current knowledge on the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties of citicoline in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, Mikhail Yu; Gusev, Eugeny I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-lasting disability and death. Two main strategies have been proposed for the treatment of ischemic stroke: restoration of blood flow by thrombolysis or mechanical thrombus extraction during the first few hours of ischemic stroke, which is one of the most effective treatments and leads to a better functional and clinical outcome. The other direction of treatment, which is potentially applicable to most of the patients with ischemic stroke, is neuroprotection. Initially, neuroprotection was mainly targeted at protecting gray matter, but during the past few years there has been a transition from a neuron-oriented approach toward salvaging the whole neurovascular unit using multimodal drugs. Citicoline is a multimodal drug that exhibits neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in a variety of experimental and clinical disorders of the central nervous system, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and global cerebral hypoxia. Citicoline has a prolonged therapeutic window and is active at various temporal and biochemical stages of the ischemic cascade. In acute ischemic stroke, citicoline provides neuroprotection by attenuating glutamate exitotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In the subacute and chronic phases of ischemic stroke, citicoline exhibits neuroregenerative effects and activates neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis and enhances neurotransmitter metabolism. Acute and long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and in most clinical studies is effective and improves functional outcome.

  2. Ischemic postconditioning fails to protect against neonatal cerebral stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Louis Leger

    Full Text Available The lack of efficient neuroprotective strategies for neonatal stroke could be ascribed to pathogenic ischemic processes differentiating adults and neonates. We explored this hypothesis using a rat model of neonatal ischemia induced by permanent occlusion of the left distal middle cerebral artery combined with 50 min of occlusion of both common carotid arteries (CCA. Postconditioning was performed by repetitive brief release and occlusion (30 s, 1 and/or 5 min of CCA after 50 min of CCA occlusion. Alternative reperfusion was generated by controlled release of the bilateral CCA occlusion. Blood-flow velocities in the left internal carotid artery were measured using color-coded pulsed Doppler ultrasound imaging. Cortical perfusion was measured using laser Doppler. Cerebrovascular vasoreactivity was evaluated after inhalation with the hypercapnic gas or inhaled nitric oxide (NO. Whatever the type of serial mechanical interruptions of blood flow at reperfusion, postconditioning did not reduce infarct volume after 72 hours. A gradual perfusion was found during early re-flow both in the left internal carotid artery and in the cortical penumbra. The absence of acute hyperemia during early CCA re-flow, and the lack of NO-dependent vasoreactivity in P7 rat brain could in part explain the inefficiency of ischemic postconditioning after ischemia-reperfusion.

  3. Ischemic stroke subtypes and migraine with visual aura in the ARIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulakis, X Michelle; Kodumuri, Nishanth; Giamberardino, Lauren D; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Yim, Eunsil; Sen, Souvik

    2016-12-13

    To investigate the association among migraine, ischemic stroke, and stroke subtypes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. In this ongoing, prospective, longitudinal community-based cohort study, participants were given an interview ascertaining migraine history in 1993-1995, and were followed for all vascular events, including stroke. All stroke events over the subsequent 20 years were adjudicated and classified into stroke subtypes by standard definitions. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for stroke risk factors were used to study the relationship between migraine and ischemic stroke, overall, as well as stroke subtypes (cardioembolic, lacunar, or thrombotic). We identified 1,622 migraineurs among 12,758 participants. Mean age of the study population at the 3rd clinical visit was 59 years. When compared to nonheadache participants, there was a significant association between migraine with visual aura and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.6, p = 0.008). Migraine without visual aura was not significantly associated with ischemic stroke (HR 1.2, CI 1.0-1.8, p = 0.28) when compared to nonheadache participants. Among the 3 subtypes of ischemic stroke evaluated, migraine with visual aura was significantly associated only with cardioembolic stroke (HR 3.7, 95% CI 1.6-8.7, p = 0.003). In participants with migraine with visual aura in late middle age, increased risk of cardioembolic stroke was observed. Migraine with visual aura was linked to increased stroke risk, while migraine without visual aura was not, over the period of 20 years. These results are specific to older migraineurs. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Etiologic Subtypes, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci Şule Özer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke in people aged less than 45 years is less frequent than in older patients, but has major impacts on both the individual and society. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic subtypes of acute ischemic stroke in the young. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the hospital records of 619 patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke between January 2011 and November 2014. Acute ischemic stroke in the young was defined as patients aged 45 years and under. Demographic data, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores at admission and detailed investigations aimed at determining etiologic cause were recorded. Etiologic stroke subtypes were determined using the automated Causative Classification System. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS scores were recorded in the follow-up. Results: There were 32 (5.2% young patients with acute ischemic stroke. The rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and coronary artery disease were significantly lower in young patients compared with patients aged more than 45 years (p<0.05. The mean NIHSS score at admission and hospital mortality was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p=0.006, p=0.043. Cardioaortic embolism was the most common etiologic stroke subtype in both groups. Other causes were significantly more frequent in the young acute ischemic stroke group compared with the older patients. The median follow-up mRS was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p<0.001. Conclusion: Young patients with ischemic stroke have different risk factors, stroke etiology, stroke severity and prognosis compared with patients older than 45 years with the same condition

  5. Significance of large vessel intracranial occlusion causing acute ischemic stroke and TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wade S; Lev, Michael H; English, Joey D; Camargo, Erica C; Chou, Maggie; Johnston, S Claiborne; Gonzalez, Gilberto; Schaefer, Pamela W; Dillon, William P; Koroshetz, Walter J; Furie, Karen L

    2009-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion (LVO)-vertebral, basilar, carotid terminus, middle and anterior cerebral arteries-likely portends a worse prognosis than stroke unassociated with LVO. Because little prospective angiographic data have been reported on a cohort of unselected patients with stroke and with transient ischemic attack, the clinical impact of LVO has been difficult to quantify. The Screening Technology and Outcome Project in Stroke Study is a prospective imaging-based study of stroke outcomes performed at 2 academic medical centers. Patients with suspected acute stroke who presented within 24 hours of symptom onset and who underwent multimodality CT/CT angiography were approached for consent for collection of clinical data and 6-month assessment of outcome. Demographic and clinical variables and 6-month modified Rankin Scale scores were collected and combined with blinded interpretation of the CT angiography data. The OR of each variable, including occlusion of intracranial vascular segment in predicting good outcome and 6-month mortality, was calculated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Over a 33-month period, 735 patients with suspected stroke were enrolled. Of these, 578 were adjudicated as stroke and 97 as transient ischemic attack. Among patients with stroke, 267 (46%) had LVO accounting for the stroke and 13 (13%) of patients with transient ischemic attack had LVO accounting for transient ischemic attack symptoms. LVO predicted 6-month mortality (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.7 to 7.3; PStroke Scale and age, independently predicted outcome. Large vessel intracranial occlusion accounted for nearly half of acute ischemic strokes in unselected patients presenting to academic medical centers. In addition to age and baseline stroke severity, occlusion of either the basilar or internal carotid terminus segment is an independent predictor of outcome at 6 months.

  6. Brain pericytes serve as microglia-generating multipotent vascular stem cells following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Rika; Kawahara, Maiko; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Takahashi, Ai; Tanaka, Yasue; Narita, Aya; Kuwahara-Otani, Sachi; Hayakawa, Tetsu; Yagi, Hideshi; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Nakagomi, Takayuki

    2016-03-07

    Microglia are the resident macrophage population of the central nervous system (CNS) and play essential roles, particularly in inflammation-mediated pathological conditions such as ischemic stroke. Increasing evidence shows that the population of vascular cells located around the blood vessels, rather than circulating cells, harbor stem cells and that these resident vascular stem cells (VSCs) are the likely source of some microglia. However, the precise traits and origins of these cells under pathological CNS conditions remain unclear. In this study, we used a mouse model of cerebral infarction to investigate whether reactive pericytes (PCs) acquire microglia-producing VSC activity following ischemia. We demonstrated the localization of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1)-expressing microglia to perivascular regions within ischemic areas. These cells expressed platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ), a hallmark of vascular PCs. PDGFRβ(+) PCs isolated from ischemic, but not non-ischemic, areas expressed stem/undifferentiated cell markers and subsequently differentiated into various cell types, including microglia-like cells with phagocytic capacity. The study results suggest that vascular PCs acquire multipotent VSC activity under pathological conditions and may thus be a novel source of microglia.

  7. Detection of atrial fibrillation with concurrent holter monitoring and continuous cardiac telemetry following ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Marc A; Krishnan, Kousik; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for recurrent ischemic stroke. We aimed to compare the detection rate of AF using continuous cardiac telemetry (CCT) versus Holter monitoring in hospitalized patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Between June 2007 and December 2008, 133 patients were admitted to an academic institution for ischemic stroke or TIA and underwent concurrent inpatient CCT and Holter monitoring. Rates of AF detection by CCT and Holter monitoring were compared using the McNemar paired proportion test. Among the 133 patients, 8 (6.0%) were diagnosed with new-onset AF. On average, Holter monitoring was performed for 29.8 hours, and CCT was performed for 73.6 hours. The overall rate of AF detection was higher for Holter monitoring compared with CCT (6.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-11.6 vs 0; 95% CI, 0-3.4; P = .008). Holter detection of AF was even higher in specific subgroups (those with an embolic infarct pattern, those age >65 years, and those with coronary artery disease). Holter monitoring detected AF in 6% of hospitalized ischemic stroke and TIA patients, with higher proportions in high-risk subgroups. Compared with CCT, Holter monitoring is significantly more likely to detect arrhythmias.

  8. Role of homocysteine in the ischemic stroke nad development of ischemic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lehotsky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a toxic, sulfur-containing intermediate of methionine metabolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy, as a consequence of impaired Hcy metabolism or defects in crucial co-factors that participate in its recycling, is assumed as an independent human stroke risk factor. Neural cells are sensitive to prolonged hHcy treatment, because Hcy cannot be metabolized either by the transsulfuration pathway or by the folate/vitamin B12 independent remethylation pathway. Its detrimental effect after ischemia-induced damage includes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and posttranslational modifications of proteins via homocysteinylation and thiolation. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC is an adaptive response of the CNS to sub-lethal ischemia, which elevates tissues tolerance to subsequent ischemia. The main focus of this review is on the recent data on homocysteine metabolism and mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. In this context, the review documents an increased oxidative stress and functional modification of enzymes involved in redox balance in experimentally induced hyperhomocysteinemia. It also gives an interpretation whether hyperhomocysteinemia alone or in combination with IPC affects the ischemia-induced neurodegenerative changes as well as intracellular signalling. Studies document that hHcy alone significantly increased Fluoro-Jade C- and TUNEL-positive cell neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus as well as in the cortex. IPC, even if combined with hHcy, could still preserve the neuronal tissue from the lethal ischemic effects. This review also describes the changes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK protein pathways following ischemic injury and IPC. These studies provide evidence for the interplay and tight integration between ERK and p38 MAPK signalling mechanisms in response to the hHcy and also in association of hHcy with ischemia/IPC challenge in the rat brain. Further investigations of the protective factors

  9. A critical velocity of squeezing a droplet through a circular constriction: implications on ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Drapaca, Corina

    2016-11-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for about 87 percent of all stroke cases. In these cases, models of squeezing a droplet through a smaller constriction channel can help better understand the pathology and capillary restoring after a Stroke. In the present research, we analytical expressed the minimum impulse of squeezing a droplet through a circular channel as well as its critical velocity. By comparison with a previously defined critical velocity, we find the difference between these two. Applications of this research in the understanding of ischemic stroke are also discussed. Zhifeng Zhang thanks the support of Robert A. Sebrosky Graduate Fellowship in Engineering Science and Mechanics, the Pennsylvania State University.

  10. Increasing Incidence of Hospitalization for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack in Young Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibæk, Maiken; Dehlendorff, Christian; Jørgensen, Henrik S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have reported increasing incidence of ischemic stroke in adults younger than 50 to 55 years. Information on temporal trends of other stroke subtypes and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate temporal trends of the incidence...... of hospitalizations for TIA and stroke including sex- and subtype-specific trends in young adults aged 15 to 30 years. METHODS AND RESULTS: From the Danish National Patient Register, we identified all cases of first-ever stroke and TIA (age 15-30 years) in Denmark, who were hospitalized during the study period...

  11. Reperfusion Therapies of Acute Ischemic Stroke: potentials and failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios eTsivgoulis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years clinical research has focused on the development of reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke (AIS, which include the use of systemic intravenous thrombolytics (alteplase, desmoteplase or tenecteplase, the augmentation of systemic intravenous recanalization with ultrasound, the bridging of intravenous with intra-arterial thrombolysis, the use of multi-modal approaches to reperfusion including thrombectomy and thromboaspiration with different available retrievers. Clinical trials testing these acute reperfusion therapies provided novel insight regarding the comparative safety and efficacy, but also raised new questions and further uncertainty on the field. Intravenous alteplase (tPA remains the fastest and easiest way to initiate acute stroke reperfusion treatment, and should continue to be the first-line treatment for patients with AIS within 4.5 hours from onset. The use of tenecteplase instead of tPA and the augmentation of systemic thrombolysis with ultrasound are both novel therapeutical modalities that may emerge as significant options in AIS treatment. Endovascular treatments for AIS are rapidly evolving due to technological advances in catheter-based interventions and are currently emphasizing speed in order to result in timely restoration of perfusion of still-salvageable, infracted brain tissue, since delayed recanalization of proximal intracranial occlusions has not been associated with improved clinical outcomes. Comprehensive imaging protocols in AIS may enable better patient selection for endovascular interventions and for testing multi-modal combinatory strategies.

  12. Reversed Robin Hood syndrome in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Sharma, Vijay K; Lao, Annabelle Y; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Malkoff, Marc D; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2007-11-01

    Recurrent hemodynamic and neurological changes with persisting arterial occlusions may be attributable to cerebral blood flow steal from ischemic to nonaffected brain. Transcranial Doppler monitoring with voluntary breath-holding and serial NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were obtained in patients with acute middle cerebral artery or internal carotid artery occlusions. The steal phenomenon was detected as transient, spontaneous, or vasodilatory stimuli-induced velocity reductions in affected arteries at the time of velocity increase in normal vessels. The steal magnitude (%) was calculated as [(MFVm-MFVb)/MFVb]x100, where m=minimum and b=baseline mean flow velocities (MFV) during the 15- to 30-second period of a total 30 second of breath-holding. Six patients had steal phenomenon on transcranial Doppler (53 to 73 years, NIHSS 4 to 15 points). Steal magnitude ranged from -15.0% to -43.2%. All patients also had recurrent neurological worsening (>2 points increase in NIHSS scores) at stable blood pressure. In 3 of 5 patients receiving noninvasive ventilatory correction for snoring/sleep apnea, no further velocity or NIHSS score changes were noted. Our descriptive study suggests possibility to detect and quantify the cerebral steal phenomenon in real-time. If the steal is confirmed as the cause of neurological worsening, reversed Robin Hood syndrome may identify a target group for testing blood pressure augmentation and noninvasive ventilatory correction in stroke patients.

  13. Risk of stroke and cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in patients with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome: secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Alfred; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B

    2011-01-01

    To perform a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial, which tested the effect of treatment with atorvastatin in reducing stroke in subjects with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, to explore the effects of treatment...... in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome (MetS)....

  14. Proteinuria is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke among diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, G; Rahman, K M; Uddin, M J; Bhattacharjee, M; Dey, S K; Israil, A; Miah, A H; Sarkar, U K; Islam, S S; Rahman, M M; Hossain, F; Bhuiya, M M; Bhowmik, R; Chowdhury, A H; Kabir, M S; Uddin, M S

    2012-07-01

    This study was done to assess the relationship between proteinuria and ischemic stroke in subjects with diabetes mellitus, and to determine whether proteinuria is an independent risk factor for stroke. This comparative study was conducted in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to June 2010. It was done to establish the relationship between proteinuria (Microalbuminuria) and ischemic stroke among diabetic patients. Other risk factors were also assessed. Patients were divided in Group A - diabetic patients with ischemic stroke (n=50) and Group B diabetic patients without stroke (n=50). Mean age of the Group A & B were 60.16±8.33 and 57.19±7.73 years (p=0.068). Mean Blood sugar (2 hours after Break Fast) was 14.68±4.32mmol/L in Group A and 14.75±4.02mmol/L in Group B (p>0.05). Albumin Creatinine ratio was abnormal in 84.0% in Group A and 22.0% in Group A (p=0.001) [Odds ratio (95%CI) = 18.61 (6.78-51.09)]. Logistic regression analysis has also shown that microalbuminuria (ACR) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke (p=0.001), [Odds ratio (95%CI) = 19.811(5.915-66.348)]. In diabetic patients increased urinary protein is a risk factor for stroke. Estimation of urinary protein (Microalbuminuria) may be used as a predictor for ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes.

  15. Thrombectomy within 8 hours after symptom onset in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovin, Tudor G; Chamorro, Angel; Cobo, Erik; de Miquel, María A; Molina, Carlos A; Rovira, Alex; San Román, Luis; Serena, Joaquín; Abilleira, Sonia; Ribó, Marc; Millán, Mònica; Urra, Xabier; Cardona, Pere; López-Cancio, Elena; Tomasello, Alejandro; Castaño, Carlos; Blasco, Jordi; Aja, Lucía; Dorado, Laura; Quesada, Helena; Rubiera, Marta; Hernandez-Pérez, María; Goyal, Mayank; Demchuk, Andrew M; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Gallofré, Miquel; Dávalos, Antoni

    2015-06-11

    We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of thrombectomy for the treatment of stroke in a trial embedded within a population-based stroke reperfusion registry. During a 2-year period at four centers in Catalonia, Spain, we randomly assigned 206 patients who could be treated within 8 hours after the onset of symptoms of acute ischemic stroke to receive either medical therapy (including intravenous alteplase when eligible) and endovascular therapy with the Solitaire stent retriever (thrombectomy group) or medical therapy alone (control group). All patients had confirmed proximal anterior circulation occlusion and the absence of a large infarct on neuroimaging. In all study patients, the use of alteplase either did not achieve revascularization or was contraindicated. The primary outcome was the severity of global disability at 90 days, as measured on the modified Rankin scale (ranging from 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]). Although the maximum planned sample size was 690, enrollment was halted early because of loss of equipoise after positive results for thrombectomy were reported from other similar trials. Thrombectomy reduced the severity of disability over the range of the modified Rankin scale (adjusted odds ratio for improvement of 1 point, 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.8) and led to higher rates of functional independence (a score of 0 to 2) at 90 days (43.7% vs. 28.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.0). At 90 days, the rates of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage were 1.9% in both the thrombectomy group and the control group (P=1.00), and rates of death were 18.4% and 15.5%, respectively (P=0.60). Registry data indicated that only eight patients who met the eligibility criteria were treated outside the trial at participating hospitals. Among patients with anterior circulation stroke who could be treated within 8 hours after symptom onset, stent retriever thrombectomy reduced the severity of post-stroke disability and increased the

  16. Endothelial Progenitor Cells for Ischemic Stroke: Update on Basic Research and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of human death and disability worldwide. So far, ultra-early thrombolytic therapy is the most effective treatment. However, most patients still live with varying degrees of neurological dysfunction due to its narrow therapeutic time window. It has been confirmed in many studies that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, as a kind of adult stem cells, can protect the neurovascular unit by repairing the vascular endothelium and its secretory function, which contribute to the recovery of neurological function after an ischemic stroke. This paper reviews the basic researches and clinical trials of EPCs especially in the field of ischemic stroke and addresses the combination of EPC application with new technologies, including neurovascular intervention, synthetic particles, cytokines, and EPC modification, with the aim of shedding some light on the application of EPCs in treating ischemic stroke in the future.

  17. Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke: The Role of Leukocytes and Glial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Youl; Park, Joohyun; Chang, Ji Young; Kim, Sa-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The immune response after stroke is known to play a major role in ischemic brain pathobiology. The inflammatory signals released by immune mediators activated by brain injury sets off a complex series of biochemical and molecular events which have been increasingly recognized as a key contributor to neuronal cell death. The primary immune mediators involved are glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocyte. After ischemic stroke, activation of glial cells and subsequent release of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals are important for modulating both neuronal cell damage and wound healing. Infiltrated leukocytes release inflammatory mediators into the site of the lesion, thereby exacerbating brain injury. This review describes how the roles of glial cells and circulating leukocytes are a double-edged sword for neuroinflammation by focusing on their detrimental and protective effects in ischemic stroke. Here, we will focus on underlying characterize of glial cells and leukocytes under inflammation after ischemic stroke.

  18. Development and Validation of Intracranial Thrombus Segmentation on CT Angiography in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.M.; Marquering, H.A.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Van Zwam, W.H.; Van der Lugt, A.; Majoie, C.B.; Niessen, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Thrombus characterization is increasingly considered important in predicting treatment success for patients with acute ischemic stroke. The lack of intensity contrast between thrombus and surrounding tissue in CT images makes manual delineation a difficult and time consuming

  19. Development and validation of intracranial thrombus segmentation on CT angiography in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Marquering, H.A.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Zwam, W.H. van; Lugt, A. van der; Majoie, C.B.; Niessen, W.J.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Thrombus characterization is increasingly considered important in predicting treatment success for patients with acute ischemic stroke. The lack of intensity contrast between thrombus and surrounding tissue in CT images makes manual delineation a difficult and time consuming

  20. Stroke and Drug Delivery--In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Both cerebral hypoperfusion and focal cerebral infarcts are caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, leading to stroke and subsequent brain damage. At present, only few medical treatments of stroke are available, with the Food...... and Drug Administration-approved tissue plasminogen activator for treatment of acute ischemic stroke being the most prominent example. A large number of potential drug candidates for treatment of ischemic brain tissue have been developed and subsequently failed in clinical trials. A deeper understanding...... of permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood-brain...

  1. Inherited Prothrombotic Risk Factors in Migraine, Stroke, or Transient Ischemic Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and association of inherited prothrombotic risk factors in children with established diagnoses of stroke, transient ischemic attack, or migraine were studied at Zagreb University School of Medicine, Croatia.

  2. Prevalence of PTSD in Survivors of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: A Meta-Analytic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edmondson, Donald; Richardson, Safiya; Fausett, Jennifer K; Falzon, Louise; Howard, Virginia J; Kronish, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common in survivors of acute life-threatening illness, but little is known about the burden of PTSD in survivors of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA...

  3. Influence of Kinesitherapy on Gait in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danche Vasileva

    2015-10-01

    CONCLUSION: The applied specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology continued later as exercise program at home, which significantly improved gait cadence and speed of movement in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period and is with a supportive prolonged exposure.

  4. Autologous Intravenous Mononuclear Stem Cell Therapy in Chronic Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhasin A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The regenerative potential of brain has led to emerging therapies that can cure clinico-motor deficits after neurological diseases. Bone marrow mononuclear cell therapy is a great hope to mankind as these cells are feasible, multipotent and aid in neurofunctional gains in Stroke patients. Aims: This study evaluates safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous mononuclear (MNC stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic ischemic stroke (CIS using clinical scores and functional imaging (fMRI and DTI. Design: Non randomised controlled observational study Study: Twenty four (n=24 CIS patients were recruited with the inclusion criteria as: 3 months–2years of stroke onset, hand muscle power (MRC grade at least 2; Brunnstrom stage of recovery: II-IV; NIHSS of 4-15, comprehendible. Fugl Meyer, modified Barthel Index (mBI and functional imaging parameters were used for assessment at baseline, 8 weeks and at 24 weeks. Twelve patients were administered with mean 54.6 million cells intravenously followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Twelve patients served as controls. All patients were followed up at 24 weeks. Outcomes: The laboratory and radiological outcome measures were within normal limits in MNC group. Only mBI showed statistically significant improvement at 24 weeks (p<0.05 whereas the mean FM, MRC, Ashworth tone scores in the MNC group were high as compared to control group. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4, BA 6 post stem cell infusion compared to controls indicating neural plasticity. Cell therapy is safe and feasible which may facilitate restoration of function in CIS.

  5. Role of heparin during endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farook, Naureen; Haussen, Diogo; Sur, Samir; Snelling, Brian; Gersey, Zachary; Yavagal, Dileep; Peterson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Systemic heparinization has become the mainstay anticoagulant in neurointerventional procedures to prevent thromboembolic complications. Its benefit during endovascular therapy for acute stroke however has not been established. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the impact of heparin during endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We performed a retrospective review of our interventional stroke database from February 2009 to September 2012 for patients with anterior circulation AIS with ICA-T or MCA M1 occlusions. 76 patients were categorized into 2 groups: intraprocedural vs. no intraprocedural heparin use. Outcomes measured included reperfusion (modified TICI scale), cerebral hemorrhages (ECASS criteria), and 90-day outcomes (modified Rankin scale). Baseline characteristics were similar between heparin and non-heparin treated patients, except for presence of CAD (6% vs. 30%, p=0.01), Coumadin (0% vs. 11%, p=0.04), and NIHSS (15.6±5.0 vs. 18.1±4.6, p=0.03). There was a nonsignificantly higher reperfusion rate achieved in heparin-treated patients compared to non heparin-treated patients (63% vs. 50%, p=0.35). Patients who received heparin had significantly lower rates of hemorrhage (p=0.02). Multivariate logistic regression for good outcome revealed only age (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.78-0.95; p<0.01), ASPECTS (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.01-4.50; p=0.04), and successful reperfusion (OR 19.25; 95% CI 2.37-155.95; p<0.01) independently associated with mRS 0-2 at 90 days. The use of intraprocedural heparin in patients with AIS from MCA M1 or ICA-T occlusion was found safe. The impact of heparinization is unclear and warrants further evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preliminary findings of the effects of autonomic dysfunction on functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li; Leung, Howan; Chen, Xiang Yan; Han, Jing Hao; Leung, Thomas; Soo, Yannie; Wong, Eddie; Chan, Anne; Lau, Alexander; Wong, Ka Sing

    2012-05-01

    Impaired autonomic function is common in the acute poststroke phase but little is known about its effects on functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. This study sought to investigate the impact of autonomic dysfunction by Ewing's classification on functional outcome 2 months after acute ischemic stroke. 34 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients within 7 days after onset were enrolled. On admission, autonomic function was assessed by Ewing's battery tests. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), autonomy in activities of daily living by the Barthel Index (BI), and global disability by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). BI and mRS were also evaluated 2 months after ischemic stroke onset. On admission, eight patients were diagnosed as minor autonomic dysfunction and 26 patients as relatively severe autonomic dysfunction. The prevalence of relatively severe autonomic dysfunction in ischemic stroke patients was 76.5%. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the minor and severe autonomic dysfunction groups. 2 months after stroke onset, the mean BI score of patients with minor autonomic dysfunction and severe autonomic dysfunction increased from 76.3±15.3 on admission to 95.0±7.1, 66.5±15.2 on admission to 74.8±15.9 respectively. The mean BI score after 2-month stroke onset and the change in BI from admission to 2-month outcome (delta BI) in patients with severe autonomic dysfunction were lower than those in patients with minor autonomic dysfunction (all Pacute stroke patients. Relatively severe autonomic dysfunction is related to an unfavorable functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Variant of Kalirin Gene Is Associated with Ischemic Stroke in a Chinese Han Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ischemic stroke is a complex disorder resulting from the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Previous studies showed that kalirin gene variations were associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the association between this gene and ischemic stroke was unknown. We performed this study to confirm if kalirin gene variation was associated with ischemic stroke. Methods. We enrolled 385 ischemic stroke patients and 362 controls from China. Three SNPs of kalirin gene were genotyped by means of ligase detection reaction-PCR method. Data was processed with SPSS and SHEsis platform. Results. SNP rs7620580 (dominant model: OR = 1.590, p = 0.002 and adjusted OR = 1.662, p = 0.014; additive model: OR = 1.490, p = 0.002 and adjusted OR = 1.636, p = 0.005; recessive model: OR = 2.686, p = 0.039 and SNP rs1708303 (dominant model: OR = 1.523, p = 0.007 and adjusted OR = 1.604, p = 0.028; additive model: OR = 1.438, p = 0.01 and adjusted OR = 1.476, p = 0.039 were associated with ischemic stroke. The GG genotype and G allele of SNP rs7620580 were associated with a risk for ischemic stroke with an adjusted OR of 3.195 and an OR of 1.446, respectively. Haplotype analysis revealed that A–T–G,G-T-A, and A-T-A haplotypes were associated with ischemic stroke. Conclusions. Our results provide evidence that kalirin gene variations were associated with ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population.

  8. Association of IL8 and IL10 gene allelic variants with ischemic stroke risk and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherenko A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluating a role of IL8 gene –781 C/T, and IL10 gene –592C/A polymorphisms as genetic markers of ischemic stroke risk. Methods. A case group consisted of 183 patients with ischemic stroke, which were treated in the Brain Vascular Pathology unit of SI «Institute of Gerontology of NAMS of Ukraine». A control group included 88 healthy individuals older than 65 years without any history of ischemic stroke. Genotyping was performed using PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL8 –781T allele carriers in the case group (81,6 % comparing to the control (70,1% was revealed. –781T allele carriers have nearly 2-fold increased ischemic stroke development risk (OR = 1.886; 95 % CI: 1.041–3.417. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL10 gene –592C allele carriers was observed in the patients with ischemic stroke (98,2% comparing to the control (90,7 %. The ischemic stroke development risk in such individuals is 5-fold increased (OR = 5.71; 95 % CI: 1.48–22.11. It was revealed that –592C allele homozygotes with ischemic stroke have more than 2-fold higher improvement (according to the Rankin scale chances during the first fortnight of treatment (OR = 2,76; 95 % CI: 1,26–6,07. Conclusions. On the basis of the obtained significant differences, IL8 gene –781T and IL10 gene –592C variants may be considered the factors of ischemic stroke hereditary susceptibility. Besides, IL10 gene –592CC genotype is a genetic marker of the patients state positive dynamics during first two weeks of treatment.

  9. Treatment with Evasin-3 reduces atherosclerotic vulnerability for ischemic stroke, but not brain injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Copin, Jean-Christophe; da Silva, Rafaela F.; Rodrigo A. Fraga-Silva; Capettini, Luciano; Quintao, Silvia; Lenglet, Sébastien; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Burger, Fabienne; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Schaller, Karl; Deruaz, Maud; Proudfoot, Amanda E; Dallegri, Franco; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic inflammation might have a pathophysiological role in both carotid plaque rupture and ischemic stroke injury. Here, we investigated the potential benefits of the CXC chemokine-binding protein Evasin-3, which potently inhibits chemokine bioactivity and related neutrophilic inflammation in two mouse models of carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke, respectively. In the first model, the chronic treatment with Evasin-3 as compared with Vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)) wa...

  10. Correlation between Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) with Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) in Ischemic Stroke Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Andi Asadul

    2016-01-01

    - The neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a family of polypeptides that play critical role during neuronal development, appear to mediate protective role on neurorepair in ischemic stroke. Naturally in adult brain neurorepair process consist of: angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuronal plasticity, it can also be stimulated by endogenous neurorepair. In this study we observed correlation between NGF and BDNF ischemic stroke patient's onset...

  11. Intravenous administration of achyranthes bidentata polypeptides supports recovery from experimental ischemic stroke in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Achyranthes bidentata Blume (A. bidentata is a commonly prescribed Chinese medicinal herb. A. bidentata polypeptides (ABPP is an active composite constituent, separated from the aqueous extract of A. bidentata. Our previous studies have found that ABPP have the neuroprotective function in vitro and in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model in attenuating the brain infract area induced by focal ischemia-reperfusion. However, the ultimate goal of the stroke treatment is the restoration of behavioral function. Identifying behavioral deficits and therapeutic treatments in animal models of ischemic stroke is essential for potential translational applications. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effect of ABPP on motor, sensory, and cognitive function in an ischemic stroke model with MCAO was investigated up to day 30. The function recovery monitored by the neurological deficit score, grip test, body asymmetry, beam-balancing task, and the Morris Water Maze. In this study, systemic administration of ABPP by i.v after MCAO decreased the neurological deficit score, ameliorated the forepaw muscle strength, and diminished the motor and sensory asymmetry on 7(th and 30(th day after MCAO. MCAO has been observed to cause prolonged disturbance of spatial learning and memory in rats using the MWM, and ABPP treatment could improve the spatial learning and memory function, which is impaired by MCAO in rats, on 30(th day after MCAO. Then, the viable cells in CA1 region of hippocampus were counted by Nissl staining, and the neuronal cell death were significantly suppressed in the ABPP treated group. CONCLUSION: ABPP could improve the recovery of sensory, motor and coordination, and cognitive function in MCAO-induced ischemic rats. And this recovery had a good correlation to the less of neuronal injury in brain.

  12. Comparative study of DSC-PWI and 3D-ASL in ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shui-xia; Yao, Yi-hao; Zhang, Shun; Zhu, Wen-jie; Tang, Xiang-yu; Qin, Yuan-yuan; Zhao, Ling-yun; Liu, Cheng-xia; Zhu, Wen-zhen

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze the relationship between three dimensional arterial spin labeling (3D-ASL) and dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI) in ischemic stroke patients. Thirty patients with ischemic stroke were included in this study. All subjects underwent routine magnetic resonance imaging scanning, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), 3D-ASL and DSC-PWI on a 3.0T MR scanner. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on the cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps (derived from ASL) and multi-parametric DSC perfusion maps, and then, the absolute and relative values of ASL-CBF, DSC-derived CBF, and DSC-derived mean transit time (MTT) were calculated. The relationships between ASL and DSC parameters were analyzed using Pearson's correlation analysis. Receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to define the thresholds of relative value of ASL-CBF (rASL) that could best predict DSC-CBF reduction and MTT prolongation. Relative ASL better correlated with CBF and MTT in the anterior circulation with the Pearson correlation coefficients (R) values being 0.611 (P1.0 were 75.7%, 89.2% and 87.8% respectively. ASL-CBF map has better linear correlations with DSC-derived parameters (DSC-CBF and MTT) in anterior circulation in ischemic stroke patients. Additionally, when rASL is lower than 0.585, it could predict DSC-CBF decrease with moderate accuracy. If rASL values range from 0.585 to 0.952, we just speculate the prolonged MTT.

  13. Increased serum neuron specific enolase concentrations in patients with hyperglycemic cortical ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, JW; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1998-01-01

    A detrimental effect of hyperglycemia in ischemic brain has been demonstrated in laboratory experiments and it has been found that hyperglycemia in ischemic stroke is a predictor of poor outcome. We determined serum neuron specific enolase (NSE) concentrations in 41 consecutive patients with a cereb

  14. A specific dietary intervention to restore brain structure and function after ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesmann, M.; Zinnhardt, B.; Reinhardt, D.; Eligehausen, S.; Wachsmuth, L.; Hermann, S.; Dederen, P.J.; Hellwich, M.; Kuhlmann, M.T.; Broersen, L.M.; Heerschap, A.; Jacobs, A.H.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAo) is among the most common causes of ischemic stroke in humans. Cerebral ischemia leads to brain lesions existing of an irreversibly injured core and an ischemic boundary zone, the penumbra, containing damaged but potentially salvageable tissue. Using a t

  15. [The effect of cerebrolysin in dosage 50 ml on the volume of lesion in ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamalov, N A; Stakhovskaia, L V; Burenchev, D V; Kichuk, I V; Tvorogova, T V; Botsina, A Iu; Smychkov, A S; Kerbikov, O B; Moessler, H; Novak, P; Skvortsova, V I

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to assess safety and efficacy of cerebrolysin used in dosage 50 ml in acute ischemic stroke. Forty-seven patients with ischemic stroke, aged 45-85 years, who were admitted to a clinical unit within the first 12 h after stroke onset were included in the study. A quantitative time-related MRI analysis of the dynamics of neurological deficit revealed the more rapid decrease of stroke volume to the 28th day in the group treated with cerebrolysin (45.4% versus 43.6% in the placebo-group (p cerebrolysin was found. The results of this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study suggest the positive effect of cerebrolysin on the dynamics of volume lesion in patients with ischemic stroke.

  16. Cardiac myxoma causing acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jennifer; Leszczyszyn, David; Mathew, Don

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke in the pediatric population is a rare occurrence, and its possible causes span a wide differential that includes atrial myxomas. Myxomas are friable cardiac tumors that produce "showers" of emboli resulting in transient neurological deficits, cutaneous eruptions, and ophthalmologic deficits. We present an 11-year-old boy with a months-long history of an intermittent spotted "rash" who presented with acute ischemic stroke caused by a left atrial myxoma. We also review clinical features in all 16 other cases of cardiac myxoma causing pediatric stroke reported in the literature. Our case, along with the review of the literature, highlights the fact that myxomas often initially present as stroke with acute hemiplegia and transient cutaneous eruptions due to fragmentation of the tumor. Cardiac myxoma should be considered in any child presenting with ischemic stroke, and transient skin findings may provide an important diagnostic clue prior to onset of neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Behavior outcome after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, with similar brain damage, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Saur, Lisiani; Boisserand, Lígia Simões Braga; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Xavier, Léder Leal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    Stroke causes disability and mortality worldwide and is divided into ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes. Although clinical trials suggest distinct recovery profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic events, this is not conclusive due to stroke heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to produce similar brain damage, using experimental models of ischemic (IS) and hemorrhagic (HS) stroke and evaluate the motor spontaneous recovery profile. We used 31 Wistar rats divided into the following groups: Sham (n=7), ischemic (IS) (n=12) or hemorrhagic (HS) (n=12). Brain ischemia or hemorrhage was induced by endotelin-1 (ET-1) and collagenase type IV-S (collagenase) microinjections, respectively. All groups were evaluated in the open field, cylinder and ladder walk behavioral tests at distinct time points as from baseline to 30 days post-surgery (30 PS). Histological and morphometric analyses were used to assess the volume of lost tissue and lesion length. Present results reveal that both forms of experimental stroke had a comparable long-term pattern of damage, since no differences were found in volume of tissue lost or lesion size 30 days after surgery. However, behavioral data showed that hemorrhagic rats were less impaired at skilled walking than ischemic ones at 15 and 30 days post-surgery. We suggest that experimentally comparable stroke design is useful because it reduces heterogeneity and facilitates the assessment of neurobiological differences related to stroke subtypes; and that spontaneous skilled walking recovery differs between experimental ischemic and hemorrhagic insults.

  18. [CLINICAL-HEMODYNAMIC PECULIARITIES OF THE COURSE OF HEMODYNAMIC ISCHEMIC STROKE IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrobot, S; Sokhor, N; Milevska-Vovchuk, L; Yasniy, O; Shkrobot, L

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the research is to study the peculiarities of cardiac morphometric parameters, the parameters of central hemodynamics and their impact on the course of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in acute period. 116 patients were performed Echo-Doppler-cardiography in acute period of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in order to evaluate cardiac morphometric parameters. These patients were also performed transcranial duplex scanning. The results established that among significant clinical factors that influence the course of the acute period of hemodynamic ischemic stroke the most important are: the size of the focus, the level of consciousness on the 1st day, primary systolic arterial pressure, age of the patient. Hemodynamic ischemic stroke occurs on the background of changes of cardiac morphometric parameters and the disorders of the central hemodynamics. There is a close connection between the severity of hemodynamic ischemic stroke on the 7th and 14th day with the ejection fraction, the size of left atrium, the thickness of posterior wall of left ventricle, final diastolic size of left ventricle. The interrelation between the parameters of cerebral hemodynamics and cardiac morphometric parameters was established. cardiac morphometric parameters and parameters of central hemodynamics can be predictors of the course of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in acute period.

  19. Remote ischemic perconditioning as an adjunct therapy to thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Kristina Dupont; Hjort, Niels; Zeidler, Dora; Sørensen, Leif; Nørgaard, Anne; Hansen, Troels Martin; von Weitzel-Mudersbach, Paul; Simonsen, Claus Z; Damgaard, Dorte; Gottrup, Hanne; Svendsen, Kristina; Rasmussen, Peter Vestergaard; Ribe, Lars R; Mikkelsen, Irene K; Nagenthiraja, Kartheban; Cho, Tae-Hee; Redington, Andrew N; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Østergaard, Leif; Mouridsen, Kim; Andersen, Grethe

    2014-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning is neuroprotective in models of acute cerebral ischemia. We tested the effect of prehospital rPerC as an adjunct to treatment with intravenous alteplase in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Open-label blinded outcome proof-of-concept study of prehospital, paramedic-administered rPerC at a 1:1 ratio in consecutive patients with suspected acute stroke. After neurological examination and MRI, patients with verified stroke receiving alteplase treatment were included and received MRI at 24 hours and 1 month and clinical re-examination after 3 months. The primary end point was penumbral salvage, defined as the volume of the perfusion-diffusion mismatch not progressing to infarction after 1 month. Four hundred forty-three patients were randomized after provisional consent, 247 received rPerC and 196 received standard treatment. Patients with a nonstroke diagnosis (n=105) were excluded from further examinations. The remaining patients had transient ischemic attack (n=58), acute ischemic stroke (n=240), or hemorrhagic stroke (n=37). Transient ischemic attack was more frequent (P=0.006), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission was lower (P=0.016) in the intervention group compared with controls. Penumbral salvage, final infarct size at 1 month, infarct growth between baseline and 1 month, and clinical outcome after 3 months did not differ among groups. After adjustment for baseline perfusion and diffusion lesion severity, voxelwise analysis showed that rPerC reduced tissue risk of infarction (P=0.0003). Although the overall results were neutral, a tissue survival analysis suggests that prehospital rPerC may have immediate neuroprotective effects. Future clinical trials should take such immediate effects, and their duration, into account. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00975962.

  20. Which risk factors are more associated with ischemic stroke than intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Emer R; Kapral, Moira K; Fang, Jiming; Eikelboom, John W; ó Conghaile, Aengus; Canavan, Michelle; O'Donnell, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    The decision to prescribe oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation is based on an assessment of the competing risks of ischemic stroke and major bleeding, of which intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most important type. We sought to determine the comparative importance of risk factors for ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation with particular emphasis on risk factors common to both stroke types. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke or ICH and atrial fibrillation included in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network constituted the cohort. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline risk factors and presentation with ICH versus ischemic stroke. Risk factors included: (1) those previously reported to be risk factors for both ischemic stroke and major bleeding (particularly ICH) ("shared" risk factors, including age, alcohol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, prior stroke/transient ischemic attack and preadmission dementia); and (2) other risk factors associated with either stroke subtype alone. A total of 3197 patients presented with atrial fibrillation and acute stroke, of which 12.2% presented with ICH. Of the "shared" risk factors, age (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06-1.34 per decade) and prior stroke/transient ischemic attack (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.12-1.87) were more associated with ischemic stroke than ICH, whereas a history of hypertension (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.68-1.17), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.23; 95% CI, 0.92-1.64), renal impairment (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71), and alcohol intake were not more strongly associated with either stroke subtype. Of the risk factors known to be associated with both ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with atrial fibrillation, we found that none had a stronger association with ICH. Older age was more strongly associated with ischemic stroke than ICH.

  1. Cardiac Arrest in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Incidence, Predisposing Factors, and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Nikneshan, Davar; Tu, Jack V; Fang, Jiming; Holloway, Robert; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is a devastating complication of acute ischemic stroke, but little is known about its incidence and characteristics. We studied a large ischemic stroke inpatient population and compared patients with and without cardiac arrest. We studied consecutive patients from the Ontario Stroke Registry who had an ischemic stroke between July 2003 and June 2008 at 11 tertiary care stroke centers in Ontario. Multivariable analyses were used to determine independent predictors of cardiac arrest and associated outcomes. Adjusted survival curves were computed, and hazard ratios for mortality at 30 days and 1 year were determined for cardiac arrest and other major outcomes. Among the 9019 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 352 had cardiac arrest, for an overall incidence of 3.9%. In a sensitivity analysis with palliative patients removed, the incidence of cardiac arrest was 2.5%. Independent predictors of cardiac arrest were as follows: older age, greater stroke severity, preadmission dependence, and a history of diabetes, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Systemic complications associated with cardiac arrest were as follows: myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia. Patients with cardiac arrest had higher disability at discharge, and a markedly increased 30-day mortality of 82.1% compared with 9.3% without cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest had a high incidence and was associated with poor outcomes after ischemic stroke, including multiple medical complications and very high mortality. Predictors of cardiac arrest identified in this study could help risk stratify ischemic stroke patients for cardiac investigations and prolonged cardiac monitoring. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Emerging Roles of microRNAs in Ischemic Stroke: As Possible Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnam, Seyed Esmaeil; Winlow, William; Farbood, Yaghoob; Moghaddam, Hadi Fathi; Farzaneh, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability worldwide. The consequences of stroke injuries are profound and persistent, causing in considerable burden to both the individual patient and society. Current treatments for ischemic stroke injuries have proved inadequate, partly owing to an incomplete understanding of the cellular and molecular changes that occur following ischemic stroke. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenously expressed RNA molecules that function to inhibit mRNA translation and have key roles in the pathophysiological processes contributing to ischemic stroke injuries. Potential therapeutic areas to compensate these pathogenic processes include promoting angiogenesis, neurogenesis and neuroprotection. Several miRNAs, and their target genes, are recognized to be involved in these recoveries and repair mechanisms. The capacity of miRNAs to simultaneously regulate several target genes underlies their unique importance in ischemic stroke therapeutics. In this Review, we focus on the role of miRNAs as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, as well as promising therapeutic agents in cerebral ischemic stroke.

  3. The Predictive Value of Waist-To-Height Ratio for Ischemic Stroke in a Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study among Mongolian Men in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Xu, Tian; Bu, Xiaoqing; Peng, Hao; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Yonghong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the associations between waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) and risk of ischemic stroke among Mongolian men in China. Methods A population-based prospective cohort study was conducted from June 2003 to July 2012 in Inner Mongolia, an autonomous region in north China. A total of 1034 men aged 20 years and older free of cardiovascular disease were included in the cohort and followed up for an average of 9.2 years. The subjects were divided into four groups by WHtR levels (WHtR0.60). The cumulative survival rates of ischemic stroke among the four groups were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared by log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to evaluate the associations between obesity indices and ischemic stroke. Results A total of 47 ischemic stroke patients were observed during the follow-up period. The cumulative incidence and incidence density of ischemic stroke were 4.55% and 507.61/100 000 person-years, respectively. After the major risk factors were adjusted, individuals with WHtR>0.60 had a 3.56-fold increased risk of ischemic stroke compared with those with 0.40≤WHtR≤0.50. Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of ischemic stroke for a 1-SD increase in WHtR was 1.34(95% CI: 1.00–1.81). After adding BMI or WC to models, higher WHtR remained significantly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the cumulative survival rate in the group with WHtR>0.60 was significantly lower than in the group with 0.40≤WHtR≤0.50 (log-rank test, P = 0.025). The areas under the curve for each index were as follows: 0.586 for WHtR, 0.543 for WC; 0.566 for BMI. Conclusions Higher WHtR is associated with risk of ischemic stroke in Mongolian males. WHtR may be useful in predicting ischemic stroke incidence in males. PMID:25353632

  4. Gut dysbiosis is associated with metabolism and systemic inflammation in patients with ischemic stroke

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    Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Urabe, Takao; Ueno, Yuji; Yamashiro, Yuichiro; Nomoto, Koji; Takahashi, Takuya; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Asahara, Takashi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    The role of metabolic diseases in ischemic stroke has become a primary concern in both research and clinical practice. Increasing evidence suggests that dysbiosis is associated with metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the gut microbiota, as well as concentrations of organic acids, the major products of dietary fiber fermentation by the gut microbiota, are altered in patients with ischemic stroke, and to examine the association between these changes and host metabolism and inflammation. We analyzed the composition of the fecal gut microbiota and the concentrations of fecal organic acids in 41 ischemic stroke patients and 40 control subjects via 16S and 23S rRNA-targeted quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses, respectively. Multivariable linear regression analysis was subsequently performed to evaluate the relationships between ischemic stroke and bacterial counts and organic acid concentrations. Correlations between bioclinical markers and bacterial counts and organic acids concentrations were also evaluated. Although only the bacterial counts of Lactobacillus ruminis were significantly higher in stroke patients compared to controls, multivariable analysis showed that ischemic stroke was independently associated with increased bacterial counts of Atopobium cluster and Lactobacillus ruminis, and decreased numbers of Lactobacillus sakei subgroup, independent of age, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Changes in the prevalence of Lactobacillus ruminis were positively correlated with serum interleukin-6 levels. In addition, ischemic stroke was associated with decreased and increased concentrations of acetic acid and valeric acid, respectively. Meanwhile, changes in acetic acid concentrations were negatively correlated with the levels of glycated hemoglobin and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, whereas changes in valeric acid concentrations were positively correlated with the

  5. Polymorphism of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Affects the Clinical Phenotypes of Ischemic Stroke in Korean Population

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    Yoo, Seung Don; Yun, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hee-Sang; Kim, Su Kang; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Je, Goun; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Chung, Seung Joon; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2293054 [Ile734Ile], rs1047735 [His902His], rs2293044 [Val1353Val], rs2682826 (3'UTR) of nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are associated with the development and clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke. Methods We enrolled 120 ischemic stroke patients and 314 control subjects. Ischemic stroke patients were divided into subgroups according to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS, <6 and ≥6) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI, <60 and ≥60). SNPStats, SNPAnalyzer, and HelixTree programs were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and p-values. Multiple logistic regression models were performed to analyze genetic data. Results No SNPs of the NOS1 gene were found to be associated with ischemic stroke. However, in an analysis of clinical phenotypes, we found that rs2293054 was associated with the NIHSS scores of ischemic stroke patients in codominant (p=0.019), dominant (p=0.007), overdominant (p=0.033), and log-additive (p=0.0048) models. Also, rs2682826 revealed a significant association in the recessive model (p=0.034). In allele frequency analysis, we also found that the T alleles of rs2293054 were associated with lower NIHSS scores (p=0.007). Respectively, rs2293054 had a significant association in the MBI scores of ischemic stroke in codominant (p=0.038), dominant (p=0.031), overdominant (p=0.045), and log-additive (p=0.04) models. Conclusion These results suggest that NOS1 may be related to the clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke in Korean population. PMID:26949676

  6. Readministration of intravenous alteplase in acute ischemic stroke patients: case series and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Malik, Ahmed A; Freese, Melissa; Thompson, Michelle J; Khan, Asif A; Suri, M Fareed K

    2015-02-01

    Because of a high risk of recurrence of ischemic events, some patients may be candidates for readministration of intravenous (IV) alteplase. We performed a single-center review and performed a search on PubMed from January 1966 to April 2014 for cases of readministration of alteplase. Favorable outcome was defined by a modified Rankin scale of 0 to 2 at discharge or at 1 to 3 months, improvement of greater than or equal to 4 points within 24 hours in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, or as a major improvement in the 72-hour National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. Four ischemic stroke patients underwent readministration of IV alteplase in our single-center review. None of the patients had symptomatic or asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage.In 2 patients, IV alteplase had been administered for a previous acute ischemic stroke, 6 and 49 days before the index ischemic stroke.At discharge, both patients had a favorable outcome. A total of 22 cases of readministration of alteplase for ischemic stroke have been reported in literature. The mean interval between the 2 administrations of alteplase was 428 days (range, 3 hours to 2280 days).Asymptomatic post thrombolytic intracerebral hemorrhages were seen in 2 patients. Favorable outcome was seen in 16 patients. A total of 9 underwent readministration of IV alteplase within 3 months for recurrent ischemic stroke. Favorable outcome was seen in 5 of these 9 patients. We observed a relatively high rate of favorable outcomes and a small rate of adverse events after readministration of IV alteplase in ischemic stroke patients.

  7. Projected Numbers of Ischemic Strokes Recorded in the Austrian Stroke-Unit Registry from 2012 to 2075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinka, Eugen; Seyfang, Leonard; Mutzenbach, Sebastian; Stadler, Katharina; Pikija, Slaven; Killer, Monika; Broussalis, Erasmia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study analyzed the number of patients with ischemic strokes recorded in the Austrian Stroke-Unit Registry with the aim of projecting this number from 2012 to 2075 and to highlight that the Austrian health system will face a dramatic increase in older patients within the next few decades. Methods Current demographic information was obtained from EUROSTAT, and information on age- and sex-stratified 1-year incidence rates of ischemic stroke were obtained from the Austrian Stroke-Unit Registry. Sensitivity analysis was performed by analyzing the projections based on predicted ageing, main, and growth population scenarios, and with stratification by age and gender. Results The total number of ischemic strokes recorded in the Austrian Stroke-Unit Registry was 8,690 in 2012 and is expected to increase to 15,826, 15,626, or 18,134 in 2075 according to the ageing, main, and growth scenarios, respectively. The corresponding numbers of patients are projected to increase or decrease within different age strata as follows (100%=number of registered ischemic strokes in 2012): 0–40 years, 100%/99% (males/females); 40–50 years, 83%/83%; 50–60 years, 98%/97%; 60–70 years, 126%/119%; 70–80 years, 159%/139%; 80–90 years, 307%/199%; and 90+ years, 894%/413%. Conclusions The ageing population in Austria will result in the number of patients increasing considerably from 2012 to 2075, to 182%, 180%, or 208% (relative to 100% in 2012) according to the ageing, main, and growth scenarios, respectively; the corresponding value among those aged 80+ years is 315%, 290%, or 347%. These figures demonstrated the importance of improving primary preventive measures. The results of this study should provide a basis for discussions among health-care professionals and economists to face the future large financial burden of ischemic stroke on the Austrian health system.

  8. Genetic heritability of ischemic stroke and the contribution of previously reported candidate gene and genomewide associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Steve; Traylor, Matthew; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Malik, Rainer; Paul, Nicola L M; Jackson, Caroline; Farrall, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of genetics to stroke risk, and whether this differs for different stroke subtypes, remainsuncertain. Genomewide complex trait analysis allows heritability to be assessed from genomewide association study (GWAS) data. Previous candidate gene studies have identified many associations with stoke but whether these are important requires replication in large independent data sets. GWAS data sets provide a powerful resource to perform replication studies. We applied genomewide complex trait analysis to a GWAS data set of 3752 ischemic strokes and 5972 controls and determined heritability for all ischemic stroke and the most common subtypes: large-ve