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Sample records for ischemic neurologic events

  1. Clinical neurological characteristics of ischemic stroke subtypes in acute phase

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    S. I. Shkrobot

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the present study was to clarify clinical neurological characteristics and different ischemic stroke subtypes unfavorable course predictors in acute phase. Material and Methods. 482 patients with different ischemic stroke subtypes were observed. Among them there were 125 (25.9 % with cardioembolic infarct (CEI, 119 (24.7 % with large artery atherosclerosis (LAAS infarct, 122 (25.3 % with lacunar stroke (LAC, 116 (24.1 % with stroke of undetermined etiology (UDE. The comparative analysis of clinical picture was performed. The predictors of unfavorable course of acute phase were established. Results. We have found out that severe neurological deficit, high mortality and the worst functional outcome during the first 14 days were observed in patients with CEI and LAAS. The highest frequency of early neurological deterioration (END was detected at LAC (in 22.7 % of patients. There was a relationship between END and presence of transient ischemic attack (TIA in past medical history, the level of systolic blood pressure (SBP at the beginning of the disease and the degree of carotid arteries stenosis on the side of lesion. The patients with LAC had mild neurological deficit and better prognosis compared with other ischemic stroke subtypes. Among the clinical factors that have impact on the CEI, LAAS and UDE acute phase course were: the size of lesion, the level of consciousness on the 1st day, the baseline SBP, patient’s age. At LAAS, the presence of transient ischemic attack (TIA in past medical history and low SBP in the onset of the disease (less than140 mm Hg has an additional prognostic value for an unfavorable functional outcome. The severity of LAC in acute period depended on its localization and size. Localization of LAC in the internal capsule, thalamus and pons were characterized by the highest severity. Conclusions. Clinical neurological features of ischemic stroke depend on its subtype and have some prognostic value

  2. [Neurological deterioration within 30 days of ischemic stroke with spontaneous cervicocranial artery dissection].

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    Mori, Mayumi; Wakugawa, Yoshiyuki; Yasaka, Masahiro; Yasumori, Kotaro; Nagata, Shinji; Okada, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the clinical features associated with neurological deterioration within 30 days of ischemic stroke patients with spontaneous cevicocranial dissection (SCCD) and clarify the effect on outcomes. We retrospectively identified 18 patients with SCCD (1.6%, 3 women, 52 ± 16 years old) among 1,112 patients with acute ischemic stroke within 7 days after onset. Of the 18 patients, 13 (72%) had vertebrobasilar arterial dissection. Neurological deterioration was present in 4 patients (22%), and 2 patients (11%) died. All of them became worse within 3 days after onset. Their initial blood pressures were high. All of them had dominant side vertebral artery or basilar artery dissection. Subarachnoid hemorrahage (SAH) were not seen although the agressive anticoagulant therapy were performed except for a case who had aneurysmal change. The patients with neurological deterioration had poor outcome, but the patients without neurological deterioration had good outcome. Recurrent ischemic event or SAH did not occurred in 3 months if they had not neurological deterioration. When we see acute stroke patients with dissection at the dominant side vertebral artery or the basilar artery, we should observe carefully for neurological deterioration especially within three days of onset.

  3. Analysis of epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients admitted diagnosed with acute ischemic cerebrovascular event in internal medicine services and neurology of the Hospital Mexico in March 2013 to March 2014

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    Araya Gonzalez, Manuel Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Records of 100 patients were revised with diagnosis of ischemic cerebrovascular event in the neurology and internal medicine at the Hospital Mexico since March 2013 to March 2014. A total of 46 patients were men and 54 were women. The overall mean age was 69 years, for men have been 66 years and for women from 71. Patients of all provinces were entered main of San Jose with 56% followed by 19% Alajuela. The hospital management by specialty was distributed 60% to internal medicine and 40% neurology. The risk factors most frequently found were: hypertension 85%, diabetes mellitus 40%, smoking 35%, and dyslipidemia 35%. Overweight was observed in 23% of patients and 22% obese. As for the initial clinical manifestations documented in the first physical examination, the 6 most frequently found have been: faciobrachiocrural hemiparesis 60%, delirium 22%, dysarthria 22%, headache 20%, nausea and/or vomiting 17% and aphasia 15%. A total of 13% of patients have altered the consciousness and 5% have required ventilatory support for first 24 hours of evolution. 27% of patients have arrived within the first 3 hours of onset of symptoms, 11% between 3 to 4.5 hours and the remaining 62% beyond 4.5 hours of duration. 70% of patients have had 1 or more comorbidities prior to the event, the top 5 have been: ischemic heart disease 31%, 29% atrial fibrillation, cerebrovascular disease 19%, 16% chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure by 12%. Regarding the topographic classification of stokes, 16% were TACI, PACI 46%, 27% LACI and POCI only 11%. The average NIHSS scale has been 9 points to admission, 10 to 48 hours and 6 points at the time of discharge. Regarding brain scan on admission to 98% of the patients were performed while that between 48-72 hours alone to 74%. The most common initial tomographic CT findings have been: 49% lucency of more than 1/3 of middle cerebral artery territory, without alteration 46%, 8% cerebral edema data and 8% midline deviation. Hemorrhagic

  4. Elevated body temperature in ischemic stroke associated with neurological improvement.

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    Khanevski, A N; Naess, H; Thomassen, L; Waje-Andreassen, U; Nacu, A; Kvistad, C E

    2017-11-01

    Some studies suggest that high body temperature within the first few hours of ischemic stroke onset is associated with improved outcome. We hypothesized an association between high body temperature on admission and detectable improvement within 6-9 hours of stroke onset. Consecutive ischemic stroke patients with NIHSS scores obtained within 3 hours and in the interval 6-9 hours after stroke onset were included. Body temperature was measured on admission. A total of 315 patients with ischemic stroke were included. Median NIHSS score on admission was 6. Linear regression showed that NIHSS score 6-9 hours after stroke onset was inversely associated with body temperature on admission after adjusting for confounders including NIHSS score body temperature and neurological improvement within few hours after admission. This finding may be limited to patients with documented proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion on admission and suggests a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis within the first three hours. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Transient global amnesia and neurological events: the Framingham Heart Study

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    Jose Rafael Romero

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/ objective: Transient global amnesia (TGA is a temporary amnestic syndrome characterized by lack of other focal neurological deficits. Cerebrovascular disease, migraine and seizures have been suggested as underlying mechanisms. TGA may be a risk factor for cerebrovascular or other neurological events. We studied the relation of TGA, vascular risk factors, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI indices of subclinical ischemia and neurological events in a community-based sample. Design/setting: A total of 12 TGA cases were ascertained using standard criteria by experienced neurologists, and matched to 41 stroke- and seizure-free controls. Vascular risk factors, brain MRI findings, and subsequent cerebrovascular or seizure events were compared in cases and controls. Participants: Framingham Heart Study (FHS original and offspring cohort participants were included.Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed in the prevalence of vascular risk factors, or brain MRI measures. Few incident stroke/transient ischemic attacks (TIA (1 event among the cases and 4 in controls or subsequent seizures occurred in either group. Head CT during the acute event (n=11 and brain MRI (n=7 were negative for acute abnormalities. Electroencephalograms (EEG (n=5 were negative for epileptiform activity. Extracranial vascular studies were negative for significant stenosis in all cases.Conclusions: In our community-based study TGA was not related to traditional vascular risk factors, or cerebrovascular disease. However, our study is limited by small sample size and power, and larger studies are required to exclude an association.

  6. Aspirin and the risk of cardiovascular events in atherosclerosis patients with and without prior ischemic events.

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    Bavry, Anthony A; Elgendy, Islam Y; Elbez, Yedid; Mahmoud, Ahmed N; Sorbets, Emmanuel; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2017-09-01

    The benefit of aspirin among patients with stable atherosclerosis without a prior ischemic event is not well defined. Aspirin would be of benefit in outpatients with atherosclerosis with prior ischemic events, but not in those without ischemic events. Subjects from the Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health registry were divided according to prior ischemic event (n =21 724) vs stable atherosclerosis, but no prior ischemic event (n = 11 872). Analyses were propensity score matched. Aspirin use was updated at each clinic visit and considered as a time-varying covariate. The primary outcome was the first occurrence of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. In the group with a prior ischemic event, aspirin use was associated with a marginally lower risk of the primary outcome at a median of 41 months (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65-1.01, P = 0.06). In the group without a prior ischemic event, aspirin use was not associated with a lower risk of the primary outcome at a median of 36 months (HR: 1.03, 95% CI: 0.73-1.45, P = 0.86). In this observational analysis of outpatients with stable atherosclerosis, aspirin was marginally beneficial among patients with a prior ischemic event; however, there was no apparent benefit among those with no prior ischemic event. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Significant interaction of hypertension and homocysteine on neurological severity in first-ever ischemic stroke patients.

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    Fan, Ying-Li; Zhan, Rui; Dong, Yi-Fei; Huang, Lei; Ji, Xi-Xin; Lu, Peng; Liu, Jian; Li, Ping; Cheng, Xiao-Shu

    2018-04-03

    It is not known whether combination of hypertension and high homocysteine (HHcy) impacts on stroke-related neurological severity. Our aim was to determine whether there is an interaction of hypertension and HHcy on neurological severity in first-ever ischemic stroke patients. We analyzed neurological severity among 189 consecutive first-ever ischemic stroke patients with or without hypertension or HHcy. Hypertension (odds ratio [OR]: 8.086, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.596-18.181, P < .001) and total homocysteine (OR: 1.403, 95% CI: 1.247-1.579, P < .001) were independently associated with neurological severity. In receiver-operating characteristic analysis, total homocysteine was a significant predictor of neurological severity (area under curve: 0.794; P < .001). A multiplicative interaction of hypertension and HHcy on more severe neurological severity was revealed by binary logistic regression (OR: 13.154, 95% CI: 5.293-32.691, P < .001). Analysis further identified a more than multiplicative interaction of hypertension and HHcy on neurological severity compared with patients without each condition (OR: 50.600, 95% CI: 14.775-173.285, P < .001). Interaction effect measured on an additive scale showed that 76.4% patients with moderate/severe neurological severity were attributed to interaction of hypertension and HHcy. Significant interaction of hypertension and HHcy on neurological severity was found on multiplicative and additive scale in first-ever Chinese ischemic stroke patients. Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transient global amnesia and neurological events: the Framingham Heart Study

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    Jose Rafael Romero; Jose Rafael Romero; Melissa eMercado; Alexa S Beiser; Alexa S Beiser; Alexa S Beiser; Aleksandra ePikula; Aleksandra ePikula; Sudha eSeshadri; Sudha eSeshadri; Margaret eKelly-Hayes; Philip A Wolf; Philip A Wolf; Carlos S Kase; Carlos S Kase

    2013-01-01

    Background/ objective: Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a temporary amnestic syndrome characterized by lack of other focal neurological deficits. Cerebrovascular disease, migraine and seizures have been suggested as underlying mechanisms. TGA may be a risk factor for cerebrovascular or other neurological events. We studied the relation of TGA, vascular risk factors, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indices of subclinical ischemia and neurological events in a community-based sample. Des...

  9. Body mass index, initial neurological severity and long-term mortality in ischemic stroke.

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    Ryu, Wi-Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Beom Joon; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is believed to increase the risks of ischemic stroke or coronary heart disease; however, regarding outcome after established vascular diseases, recent unexpected evidence has suggested that an increased body mass index (BMI) might have beneficial effects (obesity paradox). The aim of this study was to evaluate the independent association between BMI and long-term mortality after ischemic stroke. A total of 1,592 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were prospectively included through our stroke cohort. In this study, the levels of BMI were classified based on guidelines for the Asian-Pacific population. Initial neurological severity was estimated by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Information on mortality was collected until the end of 2009, and the median follow-up period was 4 years. To examine the association between BMI and long-term mortality, we used Cox's proportional regression analysis. During follow-up, 23% of patients died. Linear regression analysis showed that the level of BMI was inversely related to initial neurological severity (p = 0.002). In the model of adjustment of age and gender using Cox's proportional regression analysis, this inverse trend was also significant (reference, normal weight; hazard ratio of underweight, 2.45; overweight, 0.77; obesity, 0.60). However, after adjustment of all covariates, including initial neurological severity, only the harmful effect of underweight remained significant (2.79; 95% CI, 1.92-4.05); however, beneficial effects of overweight and obesity did not. Our study showed that an independent association between BMI and long-term mortality after ischemic stroke was found only in underweight patients. The obesity paradox phenomenon seems to be limited, and might not be interpreted as a direct causal relationship due to a strong association with initial neurological severity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Worse Neurological State During Acute Ischemic Stroke is Associated with a Decrease in Serum Albumin Levels.

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    Bielewicz, Joanna; Kurzepa, Jacek; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Kamieniak, Piotr; Daniluk, Beata; Bartosik-Psujek, Halina; Rejdak, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    High serum albumin levels during ischemic stroke (IS) decrease the risk of a poor outcome. This study aimed to determine whether serum albumin levels within the first days after IS correlate with radiological and biochemical markers of brain tissue damage. Fifty-six IS patients were enrolled into the study. Neurological examinations were based on the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Serum albumin levels and S100BB were evaluated using commercially available ELISA kits. The albumin decrease index (ADI) was calculated as the difference between serum albumin levels measured on days 1 and 10 of IS. All parameters were estimated on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 10th days of IS, and the volume of ischemic focus was measured on the 10th day. Mean serum albumin levels were decreased during acute IS. There were correlations between the ADI and mean S100BB serum levels (r = 0.36, p albumin levels during the acute phase of IS corresponds to a worse neurological state as a result of a large ischemic focus with intense catabolic processes.

  11. Regulation of Neurological Devices and Neurointerventional Endovascular Approaches for Acute Ischemic Stroke

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    Christopher M. Loftus

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH is charged with ensuring patients in the US have timely access to high-quality, safe, and effective medical devices of public health importance. Within CDRH, the Division of Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices reviews medical technologies that interface with the central and peripheral nervous system (neurotechnologies, including neurointerventional medical devices that are used in the treatment of stroke. Endovascular treatments have demonstrated recent advances in reaching the marketplace and providing more options for patients with acute ischemic stroke and intracranial aneurysms specifically. Depending upon the pathway chosen for regulatory approval, and the evidentiary standard for different regulatory pathways, neurotechnologies can have well-established safety and effectiveness profiles, varying degrees of scientific and clinical uncertainty regarding safety and effectiveness, or when a humanitarian use exists, need only demonstrate a probable benefit and safety to the patient so potentially life-saving treatments can reach the marketplace. Reperfusion therapies have had specific advances in the treatment of stroke patients that originally had limited or no treatment options and for preventative treatments in providing care to patients with intracranial aneurysms to avoid potentially more catastrophic outcomes. Collaboration in multiple forums and environments will be important to continue to foster the neurointerventional technology sector and positively impact clinical medicine, from diagnosing and treating a neurological disorder, to potentially altering the progression of disease, and in many ways, contemporary approved devices have brought a new sense of hope and optimism that serious and otherwise disabling neurological diseases can be treated and in many cases cured with modern therapy. We present here the scope of FDA

  12. Effect of using fluoxetine at different time windows on neurological functional prognosis after ischemic stroke.

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    Guo, Yi; He, Yitao; Tang, Bingshan; Ma, Kefu; Cai, Zhili; Zeng, Siling; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of using fluoxetine at different time intervals after ischemic stroke on neurological functional prognosis in China. The patients enrolled were randomly allocated to three groups. Group A received fluoxetine 20 mg/day immediately; group B received fluoxetine 20 mg/day 7 days after enrollment; and group C did not receive fluoxetine. The therapeutic duration of fluoxetine was 90 days and the follow-up period was 180 days. The mean NIHSS score at day 90 was significantly lower in group A than group C (P = 0.005), while at day 180, the mean score in group A was significantly lower than groups B and C (P = 0.035, P = 0.000), respectively. The mean BI score at day 90 was significantly higher in group A than group C (P = 0.001), while at day 180, the mean score in group A was significantly higher than groups B and C (P = 0.036, P = 0.000), respectively. Regression analysis indicated that lower NIHSS score and higher BI score at day 180 were attributed to the early administration of fluoxetine. In patients with ischemic stroke, early administration of fluoxetine may improve the neurological functional prognosis.

  13. Maximal potential patent foramen diameter does not correlate with the type or frequency of the neurologic event prior to closure.

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    Kutty, Shelby; Brown, Kimberly; Qureshi, Athar M; Latson, Larry A

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed our data on patients undergoing transcatheter patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure to determine if the maximal potential PFO diameter (MPPD) by balloon sizing correlates with important clinical characteristics in this population. We defined stroke as a focal neurologic deficit lasting >24 h, or focal deficit of shorter duration associated with permanent MRI/CT changes consistent with a focal infarction. Parameters analyzed included age, gender, anticoagulation, hypertension, smoking, MRI/CT findings and MPPD at catheterization. We specifically analyzed the type of neurologic event (stroke/transient ischemic attack, TIA), and number of recorded preceding clinical neurologic events. In 216 consecutive patients, 167 suffered a stroke. MRI/CT changes consistent with one or more embolic events were seen in 156 patients; 49 had a clinical TIA. There was no significant difference in MPPD between stroke (11.0 +/- 3.6 mm) and TIA groups (10.9 +/- 3.9 mm; 95% confidence interval for difference: -1.33 to 1.00). MPPD did not differ between MRI/CT-positive vs. -negative strokes, and had no correlation with the number of identified pre-closure clinical neurologic events. Continued investigation is needed to determine whether other PFO characteristics, or other anatomic/physiologic parameters, may be useful to identify patients at high risk for cryptogenic stroke/TIA, even before they have their first neurologic event. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. MRI-validation of SEP monitoring for ischemic events during microsurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms.

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    Krayenbühl, Niklaus; Sarnthein, Johannes; Oinas, Minna; Erdem, Eren; Krisht, Ali F

    2011-09-01

    During surgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms, reduction in SEP amplitude is thought to indicate cortical ischemia and subsequent neurological deficits. Since the sensitivity of SEP is questioned, we investigated SEP with respect to post-operative ischemia. In 36 patients with 51 intracranial aneurysms, clinical evaluation and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) was performed before and within 24h after surgery. During surgery, time of temporary occlusion was recorded. MRI images were reviewed for signs of ischemia. For 43 clip applications (84%), we observed neither pathologic SEP events nor ischemia in MRI. In two cases where reduction lasted >10 min after clip release, SEP events correlated with ischemia in the MRI. Only one of the ischemic patients was symptomatic and developed a transient hemiparesis. While pathologic SEP events correlated with visible ischemia in MRI only in two cases with late SEP recovery, ischemia in MRI may have been transient or may not have reached detection threshold in the other cases, in agreement with the absence of permanent neurological deficits. In complex aneurysm cases, where prolonged temporary occlusion is expected, SEP should be used to detect ischemia at a reversible stage to improve the safety of aneurysm clipping. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke in young adults: A prospective follow-up study.

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    Aarnio, Karoliina; Siegerink, Bob; Pirinen, Jani; Sinisalo, Juha; Lehto, Mika; Haapaniemi, Elena; Nave, Alexander-Heinrich; Kaste, Markku; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka

    2016-05-17

    To study the long-term risk of recurrent cardiac, arterial, and venous events in young stroke patients, and whether these risks differed between etiologic subgroups. The study population comprised 970 patients aged 15-49 years from the Helsinki Young Stroke Registry (HYSR) who had an ischemic stroke in 1994-2007. We obtained follow-up data until 2012 from the Finnish Care Register and Statistics Finland. Cumulative 15-year risks were analyzed with life tables, whereas relative risks and corresponding confidence intervals (CI) were based on hazard ratios (HR) from Cox regression analyses. There were 283 (29.2%) patients with a cardiovascular event during the median follow-up of 10.1 years (range 0.1-18.0). Cumulative 15-year risk for venous events was 3.9%. Cumulative 15-year incidence rate for composite vascular events was 34.0 (95% CI 30.1-38.2) per 1,000 person-years. When adjusted for age and sex, patients with an index stroke caused by high-risk sources of cardioembolism had the highest HR for any subsequent cardiovascular events (3.7; 95% CI 2.6-5.4), whereas the large-artery atherosclerosis group had the highest HR (2.7; 95% CI 1.6-4.6) for recurrent stroke compared with patients with stroke of undetermined etiology. The risk for future cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke in young adults remains high for years after the index stroke, in particular when the index stroke is caused by high-risk sources of cardioembolism or large-artery atherosclerosis. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Thrombolytic utilization for ischemic stroke in US hospitals with neurology residency program.

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    Moradiya, Yogesh; Crystal, Howard; Valsamis, Helen; Levine, Steven R

    2013-12-03

    We aimed to compare the rates of thrombolysis utilization for acute ischemic stroke in hospitals with neurology residency (NR) to those of other teaching (OT) and nonteaching (NT) hospitals. A retrospective serial cross-sectional cohort study of a nationally representative sample of stroke patients was conducted. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited NR program-affiliated hospitals in the United States were cross-matched to the hospitals in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 to 2010. ICD-9-CM codes were used for case ascertainment. A total of 712,433 adult ischemic stroke patients from 6,839 hospital samples were included, of whom 10.1%, 29.1%, and 60.8% were treated in NR, OT, and NT hospitals, respectively. Stroke patients in NR received thrombolysis more frequently (3.74% ± 0.24% [standard error]) than in OT (2.28% ± 0.11%, p < 0.001) and NT hospitals (1.44% ± 0.06%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of thrombolysis rates in NR vs OT and NR vs NT increased with each decade increment in age. In multivariate analysis, NR was independently predictive of higher thrombolysis rate (adjusted OR 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-1.59 [NR vs OT], and adjusted OR 1.82; 95% CI 1.73-1.91 [NR vs NT]). Acute stroke care in NR hospitals is associated with an increased thrombolytic utilization. The disparities between the thrombolysis rate in NR and that in OT and NT hospitals are greater among elderly patients.

  17. The Influence of Various Morphologic and Hemodynamic Carotid Plaque Characteristics on Neurological Events Onset and Deaths

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    Milan D. Brajovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A group of 72 patients with 111 asymptomatic carotid stenoses (ACS, mean age 65.42 ± 9.21, and a group of 36 patients with 58 symptomatic carotid stenoses (SCS, mean age 67.63 ± 8.79, were analyzed prospectively during a 3-year follow-up period. All patients underwent color duplex scan sonography (CDS, carotid arteriography, computed tomography (CT scan, and neurological examination. The aim of the study was to analyze the correlation between echo plaque morphology (degree and plaque quality, local hemodynamic plaque characteristics, ischemic CT findings, and onset of new neurological events and deaths. The results analysis showed significantly more ACS in the group of 30–49% stenosis (p < 0.001, but significantly more SCS in the group of 70–89% (p < 0.0001 and ≥90% stenosis (p < 0.05. Fibrous plaque was more frequent in the ACS group (p < 0.001, while ulcerated and mixed plaques were more frequent in the SCS group (both p < 0.0001. In the SCS group, a significantly higher frequency of increased peak systolic and end diastolic velocities was noted at the beginning and end of the study (both p < 0.01, as well as for contralateral common (CCA or internal carotid artery (ICA occlusion (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively, but reduced carotid blood flow volume (p < 0.05 only at the end of the study. In the ACS group, the best correlation with new neurological events and deaths was shown with positive CT findings, peak systolic flow velocity over 210 cm/sec, end diastolic flow velocity over 110 cm/sec, plaque stenosis ≥70%, plaque ulceration, mixed plaque (all p < 0.0001; stenosis ≥50% (p < 0.001; and reduced carotid blood flow volume (p < 0.05.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Myocardial Fibrosis Related to Ischemic Events

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    Himcinschi Elisabeta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the higher amount of detail it offers, the use of magnetic resonance (MR in the field of cardiology has increased, thus leading to a decrease in the use of invasive and irradiating methods for diagnosing various cardiovascular disorders. The only precautions for MR imaging are metallic implants and advanced-stage chronic kidney disease. For the acquisition of clear and dynamic myocardial images, methods such as spin echo imaging for anatomical description, steady-state free precession imaging for the assessment of ventricular cavity size and function, flow velocity encoding for blood flow measurements, radiofrequency tagging for dynamics, and even spectroscopy for metabolism evaluation are used. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR is considered the gold standard imaging method for the anatomical characterization of the heart and obtaining information related to myocardial dynamics. In case of ischemic events, CMR is used for a detailed description of the necrotic area and the complications, and for tracking the ventricular remodeling. By administrating a contrast agent (gadolinium, the difference between sub-endothelial and transmural infarctions can be distinguished, highlighting even microvascular lesions responsible for the extension of the necrosis. The assessment of the dynamics of ventricular remodeling and viability through late gadolinium enhancement (LGE technology highlights the area of fibrosis and the occurrence of late complications.

  19. Influence of hypothermia combined with erythropoietin on serum neurological function indexes in newborns with severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

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    Hua Tian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the influence of hypothermia combined with erythropoietin (EPO on serum neurological function indexes in newborns with severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Methods: A total of 48 cases of newborns with severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in our hospital were enrolled and divided into control group and observation group according to random number table, 24 cases in each group. On the basis of conventional treatment, patients in control group were treated with mild hypothermia, and those in observation group were treated with mild hypothermia combined with EPO. Serum nerve injury indexes, neurological function indexes and nerve apoptosis indexes were compared between two groups before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, differences in the levels of nerve injury indexes, neurological function indexes and nerve apoptosis indexes were not statistically significant between two groups. After treatment, serum nerve injury indexes NSE and S-100B levels of observation group were lower than those of control group, neurolocial function indexes BDNF, NGF, IGF-1 and GH levels of observation group were higher than those of control group, and nerve apoptosis indexes sFas and sFasL levels of observation group were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia combined with EPO can reduce the neurological damage and inhibit neuronal apoptosis in children with severe HIE.

  20. Lifestyle interventions to prevent cardiovascular events after stroke and transient ischemic attack

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    Deijle, Inger A.; Van Schaik, Sander M.; Van Wegen, Erwin E.H.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Kwakkel, Gert; Van Den Berg-Vos, Renske M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Patients with a transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke have an increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine whether lifestyle interventions focusing on behaviorally modifiable risk factors

  1. The predictive value of thyroid hormone levels on the neurological outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke

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    Guo-dong CHEN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlation between thyroid hormone levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke and the severity of disease and short-term prognosis. Methods According to the level of serum total triiodothyronine (TT3, 98 patients who presented first acute ischemic stroke and without history of thyroid abnormality were divided into low TT3 group and normal TT3 group. Thyroid hormone levels and neurological function defect of those patients were tested, and their neural functional recovery after 3 months was evaluated.  Results Low TT3 group had more severe neural function defect compared to normal TT3 group (χ2 = 58.134, P = 0.000. There were no significant differences on total thyroxine (TT4; t = 1.636, P = 0.105 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH; t = 1.059, P = 0.292 between 2 groups. There was a significantly negative correlation between TT3 levels and National Insititute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score on admission (r = -0.672, P = 0.000. Patients with low TT3 showed a significantly smaller percentage of neurological function improvement on both NIHSS ( χ2 = 8.993, P = 0.003 and modified Rankin Scale (mRS; χ2 = 6.247, P = 0.012 scores compared to those with normal TT3 at 90 d after onset.  Conclusions Low T3 level is associated with the severity of acute ischemic stroke and neural functional recovery, suggesting serum T3 level may be a predictor of neural function improvement in patients with acute ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.02.009

  2. Neurology Concepts: Young Women and Ischemic Stroke-Evaluation and Management in the Emergency Department.

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    Chang, Bernard P; Wira, Charles; Miller, Joseph; Akhter, Murtaza; Barth, Bradley E; Willey, Joshua; Nentwich, Lauren; Madsen, Tracy

    2018-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the incidence of ischemic stroke is highest in older populations, incidence of ischemic stroke in adults has been rising particularly rapidly among young (e.g., premenopausal) women. The evaluation and timely diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young women presents a challenging situation in the emergency department, due to a range of sex-specific risk factors and to broad differentials. The goals of this concepts paper are to summarize existing knowledge regarding the evaluation and management of young women with ischemic stroke in the acute setting. A panel of six board-certified emergency physicians, one with fellowship training in stroke and one with training in sex- and sex-based medicine, along with one vascular neurologist were coauthors involved in the paper. Each author used various search strategies (e.g., PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar) for primary research and reviewed articles related to their section. The references were reviewed and evaluated for relevancy and included based on review by the lead authors. Estimates on the incidence of ischemic stroke in premenopausal women range from 3.65 to 8.9 per 100,000 in the United States. Several risk factors for ischemic stroke exist for young women including oral contraceptive (OCP) use and migraine with aura. Pregnancy and the postpartum period (up to 12 weeks) is also an important transient state during which risks for both ischemic stroke and cerebral hemorrhage are elevated, accounting for 18% of strokes in women under 35. Current evidence regarding the management of acute ischemic stroke in young women is also summarized including use of thrombolytic agents (e.g., tissue plasminogen activator) in both pregnant and nonpregnant individuals. Unique challenges exist in the evaluation and diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young women. There are still many opportunities for future research aimed at improving detection and treatment

  3. Sensitivity of computer assisted radionuclide angiography in transient ischemic attack and prolonged reversible ischemic neurological deficit. Comparison with findings in radiographic angiography and transmission computerized axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buell, U.; Scheid, K.F.; Lanksch, W.; Kleinhans, E.; Ulbert, V.; Reger, U.; Rath, M.; Moser, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Computer assisted radionuclide angiography (CARNA) with 99mTc-DTPA was employed to study 143 patients with transient ischemic attacks (TIA) and 79 patients with prolonged reversible ischemic neurologic deficit (PRIND). The results of CARNA were compared with findings from radiographic angiography (RGA) in 173 patients and with findings in transmission computerized axial tomography (T-CAT) in 154 patients. In patients with TIA, CARNA showed a hemispherical perfusion deficit in 74.8%, and with PRIND 87.3%. This deficit, determined as the relative difference between the involved and the non-involved hemisphere, was significantly (p less than 0.0025) greater in PRIND (minus 23%) than in TIA (minus 17%). Sensitivity of CARNA was independent of the interval from ictus to examination for more than 4 months. RGA in TIA revealed true positives in 82.0%, in PRIND it was 89.5%. T-CAT was positive in TIA in only 16.8% but in PRIND it was 64.4%. Combined sensitivities in TIA (92.4%) and in PRIND (94.0%) were highest with the combination of CARNA and RGA. However, in PRIND the combination of non-invasive methods (CARNA and T-CAT) revealed 93.2% positive findings. Combinations of these evaluation methods may be used to detect cerebrovascular disease in patients with such dysfunction

  4. Risk factors of short-term stroke recurrence in patients with minor ischemic cerebrovascular events

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    Kavian Ghandehari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assessing the risk of recurrent ischemic events in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA and minor ischemic stroke (MIS is of a great importance in clinical practice. METHODS: Consecutive patients with TIA or MIS who were visited in Ghaem Hospital, (Mashhad, Iran were enrolled in a prospective cohort study during 2010 to 2011. Diagnosis of TIA or MIS was accomplished by a stroke neurologist. Only those who presented within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms were recruited. MIS was considered as an ischemic stroke with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS < 4. The endpoint of the study was a new ischemic cerebrovascular event or vascular death in 90 days and additionally in 3 days. The decision to admit and type of treatment in each case was left to the discretion of the stroke neurologist. The association between 20 potential factors with recurrent ischemic events in 3 and 90 days was investigated using univariate and multivariate analysis (MVA. RESULTS: 393 TIA patients (238 males and 155 females and 118 MIS patients (77 males and 41 females were enrolled in the study. Stroke occurred in 117 (23.2% patients, TIA in 99 (19.6%, and there was 11 (2.2% vascular deaths within 3 months in the total 511 patients with minor ischemic events. Crescendo TIAs and multiple TIAs were associated with greater risk of stroke in 3 days in a univariate analysis (OR = 5.12, P < 0.001 and (OR = 3.98, P = 0.003, respectively. Patients with index stroke had 11.5% lower risk of recurrent stroke in 3 days than patients with index TIA in multivariate analysis (OR = 0.115, P = 0.039. Diabetes was independently associated with 3 months stroke recurrence in the patients with minor ischemic events (OR = 2.65, P = 0.039. CONCLUSION: Multiple and crescendo TIAs are the main predictors of stroke recurrence, derived from the univariate analysis of the patients with minor ischemic events.   Keywords: Transient Ischemic Attacks, Infarction, Brain

  5. Intravenous thrombolytic treatment experiences in patients with acute ischemic stroke at the University of Kocatepe, Neurology Clinics

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    Serdar Oruç

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to discuss the results of the intravenous thrombolytic treatment (IV-tPA to acute ischemic stroke patients, in the light of the literature. METHODS: We performed our study with forty acute ischemic stroke patients who were receiving the IV-tPA in the intensive care unit of our neurology clinic between 2011 and 2015.. The demographic, clinical and radiological data were collected retrospectively. The intracranial hemorrhage detected within 3 months after discharge and neurological status at the end of the 3rd month were evaluated by using modified Rankin scale (MRS and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores. The symptom-to-needle time, Alberta stroke programe early computed tomography score (ASPECT and initial and follow-up scores of NIHSS were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were female, twenty-five were male, and the mean age was 66.45±10.56. The initial mean NIHSS score was 13±4.33, whereas it was 4,10±3,37at 3rd month. The initial mean ASPECT score was 8.23±1.20. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was detected in 1 patient and asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was detected in 6. The mean symptom-to-needle time was 139,0±48,1 minutes. The neurological disability of 13 patients ( %32.5 were fully recovered at the end of the 3rd month, while 7 patients were died. (% 17,5 The initial NIHSS and ASPECT scores were significantly different between group of patients with a MRS score between 0-2 and between 3-6 (p=0.03 and p=0.006; respectively, while the symptom-to-needle time was not different (p=0.79. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The results of the current study are in accordance with previous studies in the literature. These results have shown that the IV-tPA treatment is efficient and safe treatment modality in acute ischemic stroke, and reduces disability at the end of the 3rd month.

  6. [Effect of Chinese drugs for activating blood circulation and removing blood stasis on carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic cerebrovascular events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Li, Tao

    2014-03-01

    To explore the effect of Chinese drugs for activating blood circulation and removing blood stasis (CDABCRBS) on carotid atherosclerotic plaque and long-term ischemic cerebrovascular events. By using open and control method, effect of 4 groups of platelet antagonists, platelet antagonists + CDABCRBS, platelet antagonists +atorvastatin, platelet antagonists +atorvastatin +CDABCRBS on carotid atherosclerotic plaque and long-term ischemic cerebrovascular events of 90 cerebral infarction patients were analyzed. Through survival analysis, there was no statistical difference in the effect of the 4 interventions on the variation of carotid stenosis rates or ischemic cerebrovascular events (P > 0.05). The occurrence of ischemic cerebrovascular events could be postponed by about 4 months in those treated with platelet antagonists + CDABCRBS and platelet antagonists + atorvastatin +CDABCRBS. By multivariate Logistic analysis, age, hypertension, and clopidogrel were associated with stenosis of extracranial carotid arteries (P cerebrovascular accidents (P cerebrovascular events. CDABCRBS could effectively prolong the occurrence time of ischemic cerebrovascular events.

  7. Analysis of epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients admitted diagnosed with acute ischemic cerebrovascular event in internal medicine services and neurology of the Hospital Mexico in March 2013 to March 2014; Analisis de las caracteristicas epidemiologicas y clinicas de los pacientes ingresados con diagnostico de evento cerebrovascular isquemico agudo en los servicios de medicina interna y neurologia del Hospital Mexico de marzo 2013 a marzo 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya Gonzalez, Manuel Alberto

    2014-07-01

    Records of 100 patients were revised with diagnosis of ischemic cerebrovascular event in the neurology and internal medicine at the Hospital Mexico since March 2013 to March 2014. A total of 46 patients were men and 54 were women. The overall mean age was 69 years, for men have been 66 years and for women from 71. Patients of all provinces were entered main of San Jose with 56% followed by 19% Alajuela. The hospital management by specialty was distributed 60% to internal medicine and 40% neurology. The risk factors most frequently found were: hypertension 85%, diabetes mellitus 40%, smoking 35%, and dyslipidemia 35%. Overweight was observed in 23% of patients and 22% obese. As for the initial clinical manifestations documented in the first physical examination, the 6 most frequently found have been: faciobrachiocrural hemiparesis 60%, delirium 22%, dysarthria 22%, headache 20%, nausea and/or vomiting 17% and aphasia 15%. A total of 13% of patients have altered the consciousness and 5% have required ventilatory support for first 24 hours of evolution. 27% of patients have arrived within the first 3 hours of onset of symptoms, 11% between 3 to 4.5 hours and the remaining 62% beyond 4.5 hours of duration. 70% of patients have had 1 or more comorbidities prior to the event, the top 5 have been: ischemic heart disease 31%, 29% atrial fibrillation, cerebrovascular disease 19%, 16% chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure by 12%. Regarding the topographic classification of stokes, 16% were TACI, PACI 46%, 27% LACI and POCI only 11%. The average NIHSS scale has been 9 points to admission, 10 to 48 hours and 6 points at the time of discharge. Regarding brain scan on admission to 98% of the patients were performed while that between 48-72 hours alone to 74%. The most common initial tomographic CT findings have been: 49% lucency of more than 1/3 of middle cerebral artery territory, without alteration 46%, 8% cerebral edema data and 8% midline deviation. Hemorrhagic

  8. The association between high on-treatment platelet reactivity and early recurrence of ischemic events after minor stroke or TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zilong; Zheng, Huaguang; Wang, Fei; Wang, Anxin; Liu, Liping; Dong, Kehui; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yilong; Cao, Yibin

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the role of HTPR in predicting early recurrence of ischemic events in patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA. From January 2014 to September 2014, a single center continuously enrolled patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA and gave them antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin with clopidogrel. HTPR was assessed by TEG after 7 days of antiplatelet therapy and detected CYP2C19 genotype. The incidence of recurrent ischemic events was assessed 3 months after onset. The incidence of recurrent ischemic events was compared between the HTPR and NTPR groups with the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk factors associated with recurrent ischemic events. We enrolled 278 eligible patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA. Through TEG testing, patients with HTPR were 22.7%, and carriers were not associated with HTPR to ADP by TEG-ADP(%) (p = 0.193). A total of 265 patients completed 3 months of follow-up, and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with HTPR had a higher percentage of recurrent ischemic events compared with patients with NTPR (p = 0.002). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, history of ischemic stroke or TIA (HR 4.45, 95% CI 1.77-11.16, p = 0.001) and HTPR (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.41-7.91, p = 0.006) was independently associated with recurrent ischemic events. In patients with minor stroke or TIA, the prevalence of HTPR was 22.7%, and HTPR was independently associated with recurrent ischemic events.

  9. How study patients who receive fluo pyrimidines to prevent ischemic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldombide, L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Ischemic heart disease is the main cause of death in Uruguay and cancer is the second. The pillar of the systemic treatment of colorectal cancer are fluo pyrimidines and cause acute ischemic events in 3-8% of t rated patients. The 5 fluorouracil is the third anticancer drug most used Objective: Due to the high incidence of the two diseases and the risk of death caused by the ischemic treatment complications, the literature is analyzed to define how to study patients who receive fluo pyrimidines as a medium of preventing the same. Development: fluo pyrimidines cardio-toxicity can occur by myocardial toxicity, vasospasm, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency, autoimmune phenomena, platelet hyper aggregability, etc. The clinic is varied and underestimated: angina, abnormal ST silent and reversible, arrhythmias, heart failure, hypertension and heart failure. It is the most common complication with continuous infusion of 5 Fu and its equivalent capecitabine with bolus f lou pyrimidines. It is common that ischemic heart disease prioritises the risk increase of complications, but their absence does not exist. Without ischemic heart disease it is difficult to prevent ischemic events, however proposes that the older higher risk. Results: No uniform guidelines is advised: detailed history, determine if risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia and They are present electrocardiogram and cardiac evaluation. Warn the patient about angina l pain as early symptom and monitor symptoms during chemotherapy including cardio-vascular hypotension. Discontinue the medication and perform classic anti-angina l symptoms and / or signs of ischemia. Not reintroduce unless it is the only therapeutic option, since mortality may exceed

  10. Darapladib for preventing ischemic events in stable coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, Harvey D.; Held, Claes; Stewart, Ralph; Tarka, Elizabeth; Brown, Rebekkah; Davies, Richard Y.; Budaj, Andrzej; Harrington, Robert A.; Steg, P. Gabriel; Ardissino, Diego; Armstrong, Paul W.; Avezum, Alvaro; Aylward, Philip E.; Bryce, Alfonso; Chen, Hong; Chen, Ming-Fong; Corbalan, Ramon; Dalby, Anthony J.; Danchin, Nicolas; de Winter, Robbert J.; Denchev, Stefan; Diaz, Rafael; Elisaf, Moses; Flather, Marcus D.; Goudev, Assen R.; Granger, Christopher B.; Grinfeld, Liliana; Hochman, Judith S.; Husted, Steen; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Koenig, Wolfgang; Linhart, Ales; Lonn, Eva; López-Sendón, José; Manolis, Athanasios J.; Mohler, Emile R.; Nicolau, José C.; Pais, Prem; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Pedersen, Terje R.; Pella, Daniel; Ramos-Corrales, Marco A.; Ruda, Mikhail; Sereg, Mátyás; Siddique, Saulat; Sinnaeve, Peter; Smith, Peter; Sritara, Piyamitr; Swart, Henk P.; Westendorp, Iris C. D.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity promotes the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, and elevated plasma levels of this enzyme are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Darapladib is a selective oral inhibitor of lipoprotein-associated

  11. Adverse events following yellow fever immunization: Report and analysis of 67 neurological cases in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Reinaldo de Menezes; Pavão, Ana Luiza Braz; de Oliveira, Patrícia Mouta Nunes; dos Santos, Paulo Roberto Gomes; Carvalho, Sandra Maria D; Mohrdieck, Renate; Fernandes, Alexandre Ribeiro; Sato, Helena Keico; de Figueiredo, Patricia Mandali; von Doellinger, Vanessa Dos Reis; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S

    2014-11-20

    Neurological adverse events following administration of the 17DD substrain of yellow fever vaccine (YEL-AND) in the Brazilian population are described and analyzed. Based on information obtained from the National Immunization Program through passive surveillance or intensified passive surveillance, from 2007 to 2012, descriptive analysis, national and regional rates of YFV associated neurotropic, neurological autoimmune disease, and reporting rate ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated for first time vaccinees stratified on age and year. Sixty-seven neurological cases were found, with the highest rate of neurological adverse events in the age group from 5 to 9 years (2.66 per 100,000 vaccine doses in Rio Grande do Sul state, and 0.83 per 100,000 doses in national analysis). Two cases had a combination of neurotropic and autoimmune features. This is the largest sample of YEL-AND already analyzed. Rates are similar to other recent studies, but on this study the age group from 5 to 9 years of age had the highest risk. As neurological adverse events have in general a good prognosis, they should not contraindicate the use of yellow fever vaccine in face of risk of infection by yellow fever virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. C-reactive protein predicts further ischemic events in first-ever transient ischemic attack or stroke patients with intracranial large-artery occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Molina, Carlos A; Chacón, Pilar; Montaner, Joan; Rovira, Alex; Ibarra, Bernardo; Quintana, Manuel

    2003-10-01

    The role of inflammation in intracranial large-artery occlusive disease is unclear. We sought to investigate the relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and the risk of further ischemic events in first-ever transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke patients with intracranial large-artery occlusive disease. Of a total of 127 consecutive first-ever TIA or ischemic stroke patients with intracranial stenoses detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, 71 fulfilled all inclusion criteria, which included angiographic confirmation. Serum high-sensitivity CRP level was determined a minimum of 3 months after the qualifying event. Patients were followed up during 1 year after blood sampling. Thirteen patients (18.3%) with intracranial large-artery occlusive disease experienced an end point event: 9 cerebral ischemic events, 7 of which were attributable to intracranial large-artery occlusive disease, and 4 myocardial infarctions. Patients in the highest quintile of high-sensitivity CRP level had a significantly higher adjusted odds ratio for new events compared with those in the first quintile (odds ratio, 8.66; 95% CI, 1.39 to 53.84; P=0.01). A high-sensitivity CRP level above the receiver operating characteristic curve cutoff value of 1.41 mg/dL emerged as an independent predictor of new end point events (hazard ratio, 7.14; 95% CI, 1.77 to 28.73; P=0.005) and of further intracranial large-artery occlusive disease-related ischemic events (hazard ratio, 30.67; 95% CI, 3.6 to 255.5; P=0.0015), after adjustment for age, sex, and risk factors. Kaplan-Meier curves showed that a significantly lower proportion of patients with a high-sensitivity CRP >1.41 mg/dL remained free of a new ischemic event (P<0.0001). High-sensitivity CRP serum level predicts further intracranial large-artery occlusive disease-related and any major ischemic events in patients with first-ever TIA or stroke with intracranial large-artery occlusive disease. These findings

  13. Neurological outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke receiving enoxaparin or heparin for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: subanalysis of the Prevention of VTE after Acute Ischemic Stroke with LMWH (PREVAIL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Carlos S; Albers, Gregory W; Bladin, Christopher; Fieschi, Cesare; Gabbai, Alberto A; O'Riordan, William; Pineo, Graham F

    2009-11-01

    The Prevention of VTE after Acute Ischemic Stroke with LMWH (PREVAIL) study demonstrated that enoxaparin was superior to unfractionated heparin (UFH) in preventing venous thromboembolism in patients with ischemic stroke and was associated with a small but statistically significant increase in extracranial hemorrhage rates. In this PREVAIL subanalysis, we evaluate the long-term neurological outcomes associated with the use of enoxaparin compared with UFH. We also determine predictors of stroke progression. Acute ischemic stroke patients aged >or=18 years, who could not walk unassisted, were randomized to receive enoxaparin (40 mg once daily) or UFH (5000 U every 12 hours) for 10 days. Patients were stratified according to baseline stroke severity using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. End points for this analysis included stroke progression (>or=4-point increase in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score), neurological outcomes up to 3 months postrandomization (assessed using National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and modified Rankin Scale score), and incidence of intracranial hemorrhage. Stroke progression occurred in 45 of 877 (5.1%) patients in the enoxaparin group and 42 of 872 (4.8%) of those receiving UFH. Similar improvements in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin Scale scores were observed in both groups over the 90-day follow-up period. Incidence of intracranial hemorrhage was comparable between groups (20 of 877 [2.3%] and 22 of 872 [2.5%] in enoxaparin and UFH groups, respectively). Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, hyperlipidemia, and Hispanic ethnicity were independent predictors of stroke progression. The clinical benefits associated with use of enoxaparin for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with acute ischemic stroke are not associated with poorer long-term neurological outcomes or increased rates of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage compared

  14. Higher admission fasting plasma glucose levels are associated with a poorer short-term neurologic outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients with good collateral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Jiang, Beisi; Kanesan, Lasheta; Zhao, Yuwu; Yan, Bernard

    2018-04-12

    In this retrospective study, we sought to delineate the collateral circulation status of acute ischemic stroke patients by CT perfusion and evaluate 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores of patients with good or poor collaterals and its correlation with admission fasting plasma glucose (FPG). We enrolled acute ischemic stroke patients who presented to our hospital 4.5 h within an onset of the first episode between January 2009 and December 2015. Neurological assessment was performed using the 90-day mRS scores (0-2 for a favorable and 3-6 for an unfavorable neurologic outcome). Relative filling time delay (rFTD) was evaluated by CT perfusion scan. The primary outcomes were 90-day mRS scores stratified by good (rFTD ≤ 4 s) versus poor collateral circulation (rFTD > 4 s). Totally 270 patients were included, and 139 (51.5%) patients achieved a favorable neurologic outcome. One hundred eighty-five (68.5%) patients had good collateral circulation. Significantly greater portions of patients with good collateral circulation (60.5%, 112/185) achieved a favorable neurologic outcome compared to those with poor collateral circulation (31.8%, 27/85) (P collateral circulation achieving a favorable neurologic outcome had significantly lower baseline FPG (6.6 ± 1.96) than those with good collateral circulation achieving an unfavorable neurologic outcome (8.12 ± 4.02; P = 0.002). Spearman correlation analysis showed that rFTD significantly correlated with 90-day mRS scores (adjusted r = 0.258; P collateral circulation. FPG and rFTD may serve as useful predictors of short-term patient outcome and could be used for risk stratification in clinical decision making.

  15. Prothrombotic factors do not increase the risk of recurrent ischemic events after cryptogenic stroke at young age: the FUTURE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Mijntje M I; van Alebeek, Mayte E; Arntz, Renate M; Synhaeve, Nathalie E; Maaijwee, Noortje A M M; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C; van der Vlugt, Maureen J; van Dijk, Ewoud J; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2018-05-01

    The role of hypercoagulable states and preceding infections in the etiology of young stroke and their role in developing recurrent ischemic events remains unclear. Our aim is to determine the prevalence of these conditions in patients with cryptogenic stroke at young age and to assess the long-term risk of recurrent ischemic events in patients with and without a hypercoagulable state or a recent pre-stroke infection with Borrelia or Syphilis. We prospectively included patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke, aged 18-50, admitted to our hospital between 1995 and 2010. A retrospective analysis was conducted of prothrombotic factors and preceding infections. Outcome was recurrent ischemic events. Prevalence of prothrombotic factors did not significantly differ between patients with a cryptogenic stroke and with an identified cause (24/120 (20.0%) and 32/174 (18.4%) respectively). In patients with a cryptogenic stroke the long-term risk [mean follow-up of 8.9 years (SD 4.6)] of any recurrent ischemic event or recurrent cerebral ischemia did not significantly differ between patients with and without a hypercoagulable state or a recent infection. In patients with a cryptogenic stroke 15-years cumulative risk of any recurrent ischemic event was 24 and 23% in patients with and without any prothrombotic factor respectively. The prevalence of prothrombotic factors and preceding infections did not significantly differ between stroke patients with a cryptogenic versus an identified cause of stroke and neither is significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic events after cryptogenic stroke.

  16. Ischemic Volume and Neurological Deficit: Correlation of Computed Tomography Perfusion with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale Score in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanis, Giovanni; Ajčević, Miloš; Stragapede, Lara; Lugnan, Carlo; Ridolfi, Mariana; Caruso, Paola; Naccarato, Marcello; Ukmar, Maja; Manganotti, Paolo

    2018-04-30

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is the most adopted stroke patients' evaluation tool in emergency settings to assess the severity of stroke and to determine the patients' eligibility for specific treatments. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is crucial to identify salvageable tissue that can benefit from the reperfusion treatment. The aim of this study is to identify the relation between the NIHSS scores and the hypoperfused volumes evaluated by CTP in patients with hyperacute ischemic stroke. This retrospective study was conducted on 105 patients with ischemic stroke who underwent NIHSS assessment and CTP in the hyperacute phase. Hypoperfused volume was evaluated by CTP maps processed with semi-automatic algorithm. An analysis was conducted to determine the degree of correlation between the NIHSS scores and the ischemic lesion volumes and to investigate the relation between the anterior and the posterior circulation strokes, as well as between the right and the left hemispheric strokes. A significant correlation was found between ischemic volume and NIHSS score at baseline (r = .82; P correlation was identified in the anterior circulation stroke (r = .76; P correlated for the left and the right hemispheric strokes (r = .83 and .81; P correlation between the baseline NIHSS score and the ischemic volume estimated by CTP. We confirmed that NIHSS is a reliable predictor of perfusion deficits in acute ischemic stroke. CTP allows fast imaging assessment in the hyperacute phase. The results highlight the importance of these diagnostic tools in the assessment of stroke severity and in acute decision-making. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Common genetic markers and prediction of recurrent events after ischemic stroke in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, A; Grassi, M; Del Zotto, E; Lodigiani, C; Ferrazzi, P; Spalloni, A; Patella, R; Giossi, A; Volonghi, I; Iacoviello, L; Magoni, M; Rota, L L; Rasura, M; Padovani, A

    2009-09-01

    Scarce information is available on the usefulness of new prediction markers for identifying young ischemic stroke patients at highest risk of recurrence. The predictive effect of traditional risk factors as well as of the 20210A variant of prothrombin gene, the 1691A variant of factor V gene, and the TT677 genotype of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene on the risk of recurrence was investigated in a hospital-based cohort study of 511 ischemic stroke patients younger than 45 years followed up for a mean of 43.4 months. Outcome measures were fatal/nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or TIA. Risk prediction was assessed with the use of the concordance c (c index), and the Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI). The risk of recurrence increased with increasing number of traditional factors (hazard ratio [HR] 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.57-3.35 for subjects with 1 factor: HR 5.25, 95% CI 2.45-11.2 for subjects with 2), as well as with that of predisposing genotypes (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.33-2.89 for subjects carrying 1 at-risk genotype; HR 3.83, 95% CI 1.76-8.34 for those carrying 2). The c statistics increased significantly when the genotypes were included into a model with traditional risk factors (0.696 vs 0.635, test z = 2.41). The NRI was also significant (NRI = 0.172, test z = 2.17). Addition of common genetic variants to traditional risk factors may be an effective method for discriminating young stroke patients at different risk of future ischemic events.

  18. Neurologic Adverse Events Associated with Voriconazole Therapy: Report of Two Pediatric Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevliya Öcal Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although voriconazole, a triazole antifungal, is a safe drug, treatment with this agent is associated with certain adverse events such as hepatic, neurologic, and visual disturbances. The current report presents two cases, one a 9-year-old boy and the other a 17-year-old girl, who experienced neurologic side effects associated with voriconazole therapy. Our aim is to remind readers of the side effects of voriconazole therapy in order to prevent unnecessary investigations especially for psychological and ophthalmologic problems. The first case was a 9-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis and invasive aspergillosis that developed photophobia, altered color sensation, and fearful visual hallucination. The second case was a 17-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and she experienced photophobia, fatigue, impaired concentration, and insomnia, when the dose of voriconazole therapy was increased from 12 mg/kg/day to 16 mg/kg/day. The complaints of the two patients disappeared after discontinuation of voriconazole therapy. Our experience in these patients reminded us of the importance of being aware of the neurologic adverse events associated with voriconazole therapy in establishing early diagnosis and initiating prompt treatment. In addition, although serum voriconazole concentration was not measured in the present cases, therapeutic drug monitoring for voriconazole seems to be critically important in preventing neurologic side effects in pediatric patients.

  19. Prediction of early neurological deterioration using diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging in hyperacute middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F; Rovira, Alex; Molina, Carlos A; Grivé, Elisenda; Montaner, Joan; Alvarez-Sabín, José

    2002-09-01

    Early neurological deterioration (END) occurs in approximately one third of all ischemic stroke patients and is associated with a poor outcome. Our study sought to assess the value of ultra-early MRI in the prediction of END in stroke patients. Between August 1999 and November 2001, 38 stroke patients with a proven middle cerebral artery (MCA) or intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion on MR angiography underwent perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) within 6 hours after onset, and 30 fulfilled all inclusion criteria. Control DWI and MR angiography were performed between days 3 and 5. Cranial CT was performed to rule out hemorrhagic transformation. Vascular risk factors, temperature, blood pressure, glycemia, and blood count were assessed on admission. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were obtained at baseline and at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours. At the same time points, transcranial Doppler (TCD) examinations were conducted to assess arterial recanalization. END was defined as an increase in the NIHSS score >4. A logistic regression model was applied to detect independent predictors of END. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate the relationship between infarct growth and duration of vessel occlusion. Initial MR angiography showed an occlusion of intracranial ICA in 7 patients (23.3%), of proximal MCA in 14 (46.6%), and of distal MCA in the remaining 9 (30%). A PWI-DWI mismatch >20% was observed in 28 patients (93.3%). END occurred in 7 patients (23.3%). Baseline NIHSS score (P=0.05), proximal site of occlusion (P=0.002), initial DWI (P=0.002) and PWI (P=0.003) volumes, and reduced PWI-DWI mismatch (P=0.038) were associated with END in the univariate analysis. Only hyperacute DWI volume remained as a predictor of END when a logistic regression model was applied (odds ratio, 11.5; 95% CI, 2.31 to 57.10; P=0.0028). A receiver operator characteristic curve identified a cutoff point of DWI >89 cm(3

  20. Characteristic adverse events and their incidence among patients participating in acute ischemic stroke trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Kerrick; Fulton, Rachael L; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Lees, Kennedy R

    2014-09-01

    Adverse events (AE) in trial populations present a major burden to researchers and patients, yet most events are unrelated to investigational treatment. We aimed to develop a coherent list of expected AEs, whose incidence can be predicted by patient characteristics that will inform future trials and perhaps general poststroke care. We analyzed raw AE data from patients participating in acute ischemic stroke trials. We identified events that occurred with a lower 99% confidence bound greater than nil. Among these, we applied receiver operating characteristic principles to select the fewest types of events that together represented the greatest number of reports. Using ordinal logistic regression, we modeled the incidence of these events as a function of patient age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and multimorbidity status, defining Ppatients, reporting 21 217 AEs. Among 756 types of AEs, 132 accounted for 82.7%, of which 80% began within 10 days after stroke. Right hemisphere (odds ratio [OR], 1.67), increasing baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (OR, 1.11), multimorbidity status (OR, 1.09 per disease), patient age (OR, 1.01 per year), height (OR, 1.01 per centimeter), diastolic blood pressure (OR, 0.99 per mm Hg), and smoking (OR, 0.82) were independently associated with developing more AEs but together explained only 13% of the variation. A list of 132 expected AEs after acute ischemic stroke may be used to simplify interpretation and reporting of complications. AEs can be modestly predicted by patient characteristics, facilitating stratification of patients by risk for poststroke complications. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. The QT dispersion and QTc dispersion in patients presenting with acute neurological events and its impact on early prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash Kumar Rahar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To find out and investigate whether the QT dispersion and QTc dispersion is related to type and prognosis of the acute stroke in patients presenting within 24 h of the onset of stroke. Settings and Design: This was a observational study conducted at Mahatma Gandhi Hospital, Dr. SN. Medical College, Jodhpur, during January 2014 to January 2015. Subjects and Methods: The patients presented within 24 h of onset of acute stroke (hemorrhagic, infarction, or transient ischemic event were included in the study. The stroke was confirmed by computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with (i altered sensorium because of metabolic, infective, seizures, trauma, or tumor; (ii prior history of cardiovascular disease, electrocardiographic abnormalities' because of dyselectrolytemia; and (iii and patients who were on drugs (antiarrhythmic drugs, antipsychotic drugs, erythromycin, theophylline, etc., which known to cause electrocardiogram changes, were excluded from the study. National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS was calculated at the time of admission and Modified Rankin Scale (MRS at the time of discharge. Fifty age- and sex-matched healthy controls included. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test, ANOVA, and area under curve for sensitivity and specificity for the test. Results: We included 52 patients (male/female: 27/25 and 50 controls (26/24. The mean age of patients was 63.17 ± 08.90 years. Of total patients, infarct was found in 32 (61.53%, hemorrhage in 18 (34.61%, transient ischemic attack (TIA in 1 (1.9%, and subarachnoid hemorrhage in 1 (1.9% patient. The QT dispersion and QTc dispersion were significantly higher in cases as compare to controls. (87.30 ± 24.42 vs. 49.60 ± 08.79 ms; P < 0.001 and (97.53 ± 27.36 vs. 56.28 ± 09.86 ms; P < 0.001. Among various types of stroke, the mean QT dispersion and QTc dispersion were maximum and significantly higher in hemorrhagic stroke as compared to infarct and

  2. Prognostic value of intravenous dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy after an acute myocardial ischemic event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, L.T.; Byers, S.; Shaw, L.; Barth, G.; Goodgold, H.; Chaitman, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients recovering from an acute coronary event were studied by intravenous dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy to evaluate the prognostic value and safety of the test in this patient subset. Forty-four patients (58%) had unstable angina and 33 (42%) had an acute myocardial infarction. One death occurred within 24 hours of testing. Sixty-eight patients were followed for an average of 12 months; 25, 31 and 23% had a fixed, reversible or combined thallium defect on their predischarge thallium scan. During follow-up, 10 patients died or had a nonfatal myocardial infarction; in each case, a reversible or combined myocardial thallium defect was present. Univariate analysis of 17 clinical, scintigraphic and angiographic variables showed that a reversible thallium defect and the angiographically determined extent of coronary artery disease were predictors of future cardiac events. The extent of coronary disease and global left ventricular ejection fraction were predictors of subsequent reinfarction or death. Logistic regression analyses revealed that a reversible thallium defect (p less than 0.001) and the extent of coronary disease (p less than 0.009) were the only significant predictors of a cardiac event. When death or reinfarction were the outcome variables, the extent of coronary disease (p less than 0.02) and left ventricular ejection fraction (p less than 0.06) were the only variables selected. Thus, intravenous dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy after an acute coronary ischemic syndrome is a useful and relatively safe noninvasive test to predict subsequent cardiac events

  3. Percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale in patients with presumed paradoxical embolism: periprocedural results and midterm risk of recurrent neurologic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, Manrico; Casalino, Laura; Gnecco, Giovanni; Bezante, Gian Paolo; Pongiglione, Giacomo; Marasini, Maurizio; Del Sette, Massimo; Barsotti, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    To report our data on selected patients with previous paradoxical embolism who underwent transcatheter patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure. Between July 2001 and July 2007, percutaneous PFO closure was performed on 128 patients (65 women, mean age: 46 +/- 12.8 years). Patent foramen ovale closure was recommended for secondary prevention in patients with previous transient ischemic attacks (52.5%), stroke (46%), or peripheral embolism (1.5%). Implantation was successful in all patients, and at the end of intervention, complete PFO closure was achieved in 70.3% of them. There were no "major" complications (ie, deaths, device embolization or thrombosis, need for cardiac surgery). The overall incidence of complications (mostly hemorrhagic) was 7%. The mean follow-up period was 32 months. Complete closure had been achieved in 78.4% and in 82.5% of patients at the third month of transesophageal echocardiography examination and at the sixth month of transcranial Doppler examination, respectively. There were no recurrent thromboembolic events during the follow-up period. Percutaneous closure of PFO is a feasible procedure, but it is not a risk-free technique. However, in correctly selected patients (ie, large PFO and those at risk for neurologic relapse), nearly complete PFO closure seems to provide protection from future neurologic ischaemic events at midterm follow-up.

  4. Clinical problems of the patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage which had not been diagnosed until they suffered ischemic neurological deficits and/or rebleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Issei; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Moroi, Junta

    2011-01-01

    A small part of the patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are not properly diagnosed until they suffer ischemic neurological deficits and/or rebleeding during vasospasm. We therefore investigated the clinical profile of such patients. We retrospectively analyzed 581 patients with aneurysmal SAH experienced in our institute between 2001 and 2009. Patient's characteristics, presence and severity of headache before final diagnosis, imaging investigations they received, their World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grades at admission, the location of aneurysm, treatment, and outcome at discharge were investigated. Five patients were not correctly diagnosed until they presented neurological deficits due to vasospasm or experienced simultaneous rebleeding. Their mean age was 69.4, and all were female. Although all patients had a bad headache, they did not undergo any imaging examinations. Immediate coil embolization was performed for 2 patients, 1 died due to rupturing during embolization procedure. The other 3 were treated by open clipping surgery (2 delayed and 1 immediate). Four patients had some disability as a sequel, and their outcomes were significantly worse compared with 53 patients with SAH in WFNS Grade II. The patients with SAH who had not been properly diagnosed in the acute stage had a poor outcome. We should be very careful when we see patients complaining of severe headache. (author)

  5. [Importance of hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with ischemic events of the heart or brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Aguilera-Saborido, A; Solanella-Soler, J

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy (H-LVH) is a potentially modifiable vascular risk factor (VRF) often overlooked in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate the frequency of H-LVH in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) or ischemic stroke (IS). We retrospectively assessed all the echocardiography studies of patients admitted with the diagnosis CHD or IS over a 4-year period. We studied 533 patients, 330 with CHD and 203 with IS. Mean age was 69 (±11) years, 61.5% males. Hypertension was the most common RF: 362 patients (67.9%) (CHD vs. IS: 70 vs. 64.5%; P=NS). H-LVH was seen in 234 patients (43.9%) (CHD vs. IS: 44.8 vs. 42.3%; P=NS). Patients with H-LVH were older and received a greater number of antihypertensive drugs at discharge. Half of patients with hypertension presented H-LVH (184 patients; 50.8%), with similar frequency in both groups (CHD vs. IS: 50.6 vs. 51.1%; P=NS). Neither patients' characteristics nor VRF with the exception of hypertension (P=.0001) were associated with H-LVH. H-LVH is a major VRF in patients with ischemic events in the heart and brain. Nearly half the patients present H-LVH, with a similar frequency in both groups. It is important to identify H-LVH in these patients to optimize treatment and improve long-term prognosis. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. C-reactive protein gene C1444T polymorphism and risk of recurrent ischemic events in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherostenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F; Massot, Andreu; Alvarez-Sabín, Jose; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; del Rio-Espinola, Albert; Chacon, Pilar; Quintana, Manuel; Molina, Carlos A; Rovira, Alex; Montaner, Joan

    2009-01-01

    High levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with an increased risk of further ischemic events in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD). It remains unknown to which extent this increased risk might be genetically predetermined. We aimed to investigate the relationship between a common genetic polymorphism of the CRP gene and the risk of recurrent ischemic events in symptomatic ICAD patients. We studied 75 consecutive patients with a first-ever cerebral ischemic event attributable to symptomatic ICAD. Blood samples were drawn 3 months after the qualifying event. Genomic DNA was isolated and the C1444T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the CRP gene was determined. The blood concentration of CRP was also measured. Patients underwent long-term clinical follow-up to detect the occurrence of further major ischemic events. During a median follow-up time of 23 months, 18 patients (24%) suffered a major ischemic event (10 ischemic strokes, 3 transient ischemic attacks and 5 myocardial infarctions). Raised CRP levels at baseline (p = 0.02) and the presence of the T allele within the CRP C1444T SNP were associated with a higher risk of recurrent ischemic events (p = 0.02). Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, vascular risk factors and CRP level identified that the presence of the T allele in the studied polymorphism predicted the occurrence of further ischemic events (hazard ratio 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-11.1; p = 0.025). The presence of the T allele within the CRP gene C1444T polymorphism may be associated with a higher risk of further ischemic events in symptomatic ICAD patients. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Role of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling pathway in the recovery of neurological function after early ischemic stroke in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Zhi; Wang, Chun; Wang, Qian; Lin, Yong-Zhong; Ge, Yu-Song; Li, Dong-Mei; Mao, Geng-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to explore the role of fractalkine/CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling pathway in the recovery of neurological functioning after an early ischemic stroke in rats. After establishment of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) models, 50 rats were divided into blank, sham, model, positive control and CX3CR1 inhibitor groups. Neurological impairment, walking and grip abilities, and cortical and hippocampal infarctions were evaluated by Zea Longa scoring criterion, beam-walking assay and grip strength test, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. qRT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect mRNA and protein expressions. ELISA was conducted to measure concentration of sFractalkine (sFkn), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and TNF-α. The recovery rate of neurological functioning impairment and reduced walking and grip abilities was faster in the positive control and CX3CR1 inhibitor groups than the model group. The model, positive control and CX3CR1 inhibitor groups showed increased mRNA and protein expression of chemokine C-X3-C motif ligand 1 (CX3CL1) and CX3CR1, concentration of sFkn, IL-1β and TNF-α, and size of cortical and cerebral infarctions while decreased expression of NGF and BDNF compared with the blank and sham groups. Compared with the model group, the mRNA and protein expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1, concentration of sFkn, IL-1β and TNF-α, and size of cortical and cerebral infarctions decreased while expression of NGF and BDNF increased in the positive control and CX3CR1 inhibitor groups. Thus, the study suggests that inhibition of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling pathway promotes the recovery of neurological functioning after the occurrence of an early ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of platelet inhibition with cangrelor during PCI on ischemic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Deepak L; Stone, Gregg W; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Gibson, C Michael; Steg, P Gabriel; Hamm, Christian W; Price, Matthew J; Leonardi, Sergio; Gallup, Dianne; Bramucci, Ezio; Radke, Peter W; Widimský, Petr; Tousek, Frantisek; Tauth, Jeffrey; Spriggs, Douglas; McLaurin, Brent T; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Généreux, Philippe; Liu, Tiepu; Prats, Jayne; Todd, Meredith; Skerjanec, Simona; White, Harvey D; Harrington, Robert A

    2013-04-04

    The intensity of antiplatelet therapy during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is an important determinant of PCI-related ischemic complications. Cangrelor is a potent intravenous adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist that acts rapidly and has quickly reversible effects. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 11,145 patients who were undergoing either urgent or elective PCI and were receiving guideline-recommended therapy to receive a bolus and infusion of cangrelor or to receive a loading dose of 600 mg or 300 mg of clopidogrel. The primary efficacy end point was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, ischemia-driven revascularization, or stent thrombosis at 48 hours after randomization; the key secondary end point was stent thrombosis at 48 hours. The primary safety end point was severe bleeding at 48 hours. The rate of the primary efficacy end point was 4.7% in the cangrelor group and 5.9% in the clopidogrel group (adjusted odds ratio with cangrelor, 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.93; P=0.005). The rate of the primary safety end point was 0.16% in the cangrelor group and 0.11% in the clopidogrel group (odds ratio, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.53 to 4.22; P=0.44). Stent thrombosis developed in 0.8% of the patients in the cangrelor group and in 1.4% in the clopidogrel group (odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.90; P=0.01). The rates of adverse events related to the study treatment were low in both groups, though transient dyspnea occurred significantly more frequently with cangrelor than with clopidogrel (1.2% vs. 0.3%). The benefit from cangrelor with respect to the primary end point was consistent across multiple prespecified subgroups. Cangrelor significantly reduced the rate of ischemic events, including stent thrombosis, during PCI, with no significant increase in severe bleeding. (Funded by the Medicines Company; CHAMPION PHOENIX ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01156571.).

  9. Trends in C-Reactive Protein Levels Are Associated with Neurological Change Twenty-Four Hours after Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Dipender; Sivakumaran, Prasanthi; Wilding, Peter; Love, Madeleine; Veltkamp, Roland; Kar, Arindam

    2016-08-01

    Elevated inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with worse outcomes in patients thrombolysed for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). To investigate whether changes in CRP levels are associated with neurological change after thrombolysis for AIS. Retrospective analysis of a single-center database of consecutive thrombolysis cases for AIS from October 18, 2011, to June 15, 2015, inclusive. Multivariate regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between change in CRP 12-24 hours after thrombolysis and change in NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score 24 hours after thrombolysis. The other potentially confounding predictor variables included in the model were CRP on admission and NIHSS score before thrombolysis. Complete data were available for 108 out of possible 435 eligible patients. Increases in CRP levels 12-24 hours after thrombolysis were negatively associated with reduction in NIHSS score 24 hours after thrombolysis (coefficient .08, 95% confidence interval .031-.129, P = .002). Thus, on average, for every 12.5 mg/L additional increase in CRP 12-24 hours after thrombolysis, NIHSS score at 24 hours improved by 1 point less. While it was previously known that elevated CRP levels are associated with worse outcomes in patients thrombolysed for AIS, the current work demonstrates that changes in CRP levels after thrombolysis also relate to neurological change, and thus may have scope for use as prognostic markers. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside may improve neurological outcomes in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sheng

    Full Text Available Ganglioside has a neuroprotective role in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. This study aimed to evaluate the neurological outcomes of monosialoganglioside as adjuvant treatment for neonatal HIE by conducting a meta-analysis.A comprehensive literature search was made in the Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang, CNKI, VIP databases through October 2016. Randomized controlled trials comparing monosialoganglioside with the usual treatment for newborns having HIE deemed eligible. Weighted mean difference (WMD and risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated for continuous and dichotomous data, respectively.Ten trials consisting of 787 neonates were included. Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside significantly reduced major neurodevelopmental disabilities (RR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.21-0.57, cerebral palsy (RR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.12-0.87, mental retardation (RR = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.11-0.88 as well as improved the mental (WMD = 14.95; 95% CI = 7.44-22.46 and psychomotive (WMD = 13.40; 95% CI = 6.69-20.11 development index during the follow-up. Also, monosialoganglioside significantly improved Neonatal Behavioral Neurological Assessment scores (WMD = 2.91; 95% CI = 2.05-3.78 compared with the usual treatment. However, adverse effects associated with monosialoganglioside were poorly reported in the included trials.Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside had beneficial effects in improving neurological outcomes in neonatal HIE. However, these findings should be interpreted with caution because of methodological flaws in the included trials. Furthermore, safety of monosialoganglioside use should also be further evaluated.

  11. Paracetamol, Ibuprofen, and Recurrent Major Cardiovascular and Major Bleeding Events in 19 120 Patients With Recent Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Valcarcel, Jaime; Sissani, Leila; Labreuche, Julien; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Chamorro, Angel; Fisher, Marc; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M; Hennerici, Michael G; Mattle, Heinrich P; Rothwell, Peter M; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Vicaut, Eric; Amarenco, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The presumed safety of paracetamol in high-cardiovascular risk patients has been questioned. We determined whether paracetamol or ibuprofen use is associated with major cardiovascular events (MACE) or major bleeding in 19 120 patients with recent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack of mainly atherothrombotic origin included in the Prevention of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events of ischemic origin with terutroban in patients with a history of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (PERFORM) trial. We performed 2 nested case-control analysis (2153 cases with MACE during trial follow-up and 4306 controls matched on Essen stroke risk score; 809 cases with major bleeding matched with 1616 controls) and a separate time-varying analysis. 12.3% were prescribed paracetamol and 2.5% ibuprofen. Median duration of treatment was 14 (interquartile range 5-145) days for paracetamol and 9 (5-30) days for ibuprofen. Paracetamol, but not ibuprofen, was associated with increased risk of MACE (odds ratio 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.42) or a major bleeding (odds ratio 1.60, 95% CI 1.26-2.03), with no impact of daily dose and duration of paracetamol treatment. Time-varying analysis found an increased risk of MACE with both paracetamol (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.05-1.43) and ibuprofen (hazard ratio 1.47, 95% CI 1.06-2.03) and of major bleeding with paracetamol (hazard ratio 1.95, 95% CI 1.45-2.62). There was a weak and inconsistent signal for association between paracetamol or ibuprofen and MACE or major bleeding, which may be related to either a genuine but modest effect of these drugs or to residual confounding. http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN66157730. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Effect of platelet inhibition with cangrelor during PCI on ischemic events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatt, D.L.; Stone, G.W.; Mahaffey, K.W.; Gibson, C.M.; Steg, P.G.; Hamm, C.W.; Price, M.J.; Leonardi, S.; Gallup, D.; Bramucci, E.; Radke, P.W.; Widimsky, P.; Tousek, F.; Tauth, J.; Spriggs, D.; McLaurin, B.T.; Angiolillo, D.J.; Genereux, P.; Liu, T.; Prats, J.; Todd, M.; Skerjanec, S.; White, H.D.; Harrington, R.A.; Verheugt, F.W.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The intensity of antiplatelet therapy during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is an important determinant of PCI-related ischemic complications. Cangrelor is a potent intravenous adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist that acts rapidly and has quickly reversible effects.

  13. Are 12-lead ECG findings associated with the risk of cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke in young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirinen, Jani; Putaala, Jukka; Aarnio, Karoliina; Aro, Aapo L; Sinisalo, Juha; Kaste, Markku; Haapaniemi, Elena; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Lehto, Mika

    2016-11-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) in a young patient is a disaster and recurrent cardiovascular events could add further impairment. Identifying patients with high risk of such events is therefore important. The prognostic relevance of ECG for this population is unknown. A total of 690 IS patients aged 15-49 years were included. A 12-lead ECG was obtained 1-14 d after the onset of stroke. We adjusted for demographic factors, comorbidities, and stroke characteristics, Cox regression models were used to identify independent ECG parameters associated with long-term risks of (1) any cardiovascular event, (2) cardiac events, and (3) recurrent stroke. Median follow-up time was 8.8 years. About 26.4% of patients experienced a cardiovascular event, 14.5% had cardiac events, and 14.6% recurrent strokes. ECG parameters associated with recurrent cardiovascular events were bundle branch blocks, P-terminal force, left ventricular hypertrophy, and a broader QRS complex. Furthermore, more leftward P-wave axis, prolonged QTc, and P-wave duration >120 ms were associated with increased risks of cardiac events. No ECG parameters were independently associated with recurrent stroke. A 12-lead ECG can be used for risk prediction of cardiovascular events but not for recurrent stroke in young IS patients. KEY MESSAGES ECG is an easy, inexpensive, and useful tool for identifying young ischemic stroke patients with a high risk for recurrent cardiovascular events and it has a statistically significant association with these events even after adjusting for confounding factors. Bundle branch blocks, P-terminal force, broader QRS complex, LVH according to Cornell voltage duration criteria, more leftward P-wave axis, prolonged QTc, and P-wave duration >120 ms are predictors for future cardiovascular or cardiac events in these patients. No ECG parameters were independently associated with recurrent stroke.

  14. Quantitative characterization of myocardial infarction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts future cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauly John M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can provide quantitative data of the myocardial tissue utilizing high spatial and temporal resolution along with exquisite tissue contrast. Previous studies have correlated myocardial scar tissue with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia. This study was conducted to evaluate whether characterization of myocardial infarction by CMR can predict cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM. Results We consecutively studied 86 patients with ICM (LVEF Conclusion Quantification of the scar volume and scar percentage by CMR is superior to LVEDV, LVESV, and LVEF in prognosticating the future likelihood of the development of cardiovascular events in patients with ICM.

  15. Fibrinogen concentration and risk of ischemic stroke and acute coronary events in 5113 patients with transient ischemic attack and minor ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothwell, PM; Howard, SC; Power, DA; Gutnikov, SA; Algra, A; van Gijn, J; Clark, TG; Murphy, MFG; Warlow, CP

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Fibrinogen is an independent risk factor for coronary events in population-based studies and in patients with coronary heart disease, but there is uncertainty about prediction of stroke, particularly in secondary prevention. Methods - We studied unpublished data from 3

  16. Subclinical ischemic events in patients undergoing carotid artery stent placement: comparison of proximal and distal protection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Emrah; Gürkaş, Erdem; Akpinar, Cetin Kursad; Saleem, Muhammad A; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2017-10-01

    To determine the relative effectiveness of proximal and distal protection in prevention of cerebral ischemic events during carotid artery stent (CAS) placement using diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI). We analyzed data from patients who had undergone DW-MRI before and within 24 hours of CAS for symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis (with last ischemic events within 3 months). The study was performed prospectively; patients were not randomized, and were treated either with a proximal balloon occlusion system (Mo.Ma; Invatec, Roncadelle, Italy) or filter-type distal protection device (Spider device; ev3, Plymouth, Minnesota, USA). Of the 45 patients (mean age±SD: 66.9±9.8 years; 73.3% were men) who underwent CAS, 19 had proximal protection and 26 distal protection. New ischemic lesions were detected in 26/45 patients on DW-MRI scans obtained within 24 hours after CAS. The proportion of patients with new lesions on DW-MRI at 24 hours was not different between the two groups (47.4% vs 65.4% for proximal and distal protection, respectively). The mean number of new ischemic lesions on post-CAS DW-MRI was non-significantly higher in patients who underwent CAS with distal protection (2.80±3.54 for proximal protection vs 4.96±5.11 for distal protection; p=0.12). The proportion of patients with new lesions >1 cm did not differ between the two groups (5.3% for proximal protection vs 11.5% for distal protection; p=0.62). There was no difference in the rates of ischemic stroke between patients who underwent CAS treatment using proximal and distal protection (5.3% vs 7.7%; p=1.000). We found a relatively high rate of new ischemic lesions in patients undergoing CAS with cerebral protection. There was no difference in the proportion of patients with new lesions between patients treated using distal protection and those treated using proximal protection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  17. Observed and predicted reduction of ischemic cardiovascular events in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Boman, Kurt; Brudi, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) trial, combined ezetimibe (10 mg) and simvastatin (40 mg) decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 50% and ischemic cardiovascular event (ICE) risk by 22% compared to placebo. A larger decrease in ICE risk might have been...... expected for the degree of lipid-lowering observed. This analysis investigated relations between changes in lipoprotein components (LCs), and ICE risk decrease in the SEAS trial in all patients, by severity of aortic stenosis (AS), and compared to results of other clinical trials. A total of 1,570 patients...

  18. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheida Shaafi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries.

  19. Early and continuous neurologic improvements after intravenous thrombolysis are strong predictors of favorable long-term outcomes in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Leonard L L; Paliwal, Prakash; Teoh, Hock L; Seet, Raymond C; Chan, Bernard P L; Wakerley, Benjamin; Liang, Shen; Rathakrishnan, Rahul; Chong, Vincent F; Ting, Eric Y S; Sharma, Vijay K

    2013-11-01

    Intravenously administered tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) remains the only approved therapeutic agent for arterial recanalization in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Considerable proportion of AIS patients demonstrate changes in their neurologic status within the first 24 hours of intravenous thrombolysis with IV tPA. However, there are little available data on the course of clinical recovery in subacute 2- to 24-hour window and its impact. We evaluated whether neurologic improvement at 2 and 24 hours after IV tPA bolus can predict functional outcomes in AIS patients at 3 months. Data for consecutive AIS patients treated with IV tPA within 4.5 hours of symptom onset during 2007-2011 were prospectively entered in our thrombolyzed registry. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were recorded before IV tPA bolus, at 2 and 24 hours. Early neurologic improvement (ENI) at 2 hours was defined as a reduction in NIHSS score by 10 or more points from baseline or an absolute score of 4 or less points at 2 hours. Continuous neurologic improvement (CNI) was defined as a reduction of NIHSS score by 8 or more points between 2 and 24 hours or an absolute score of 4 or less points at 24 hours. Favorable functional outcomes at 3 months were determined by modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0-1. Of 2460 AIS patients admitted during the study period, 263 (10.7%) received IV tPA within the time window; median age was 64 years (range 19-92), with 63.9% being men, a median NIHSS score of 17 points (range 5-35), and a median onset-to-treatment time of 145 minutes (range 57-270). Overall, 130 (49.4%) thrombolyzed patients achieved an mRS score of 0-1 at 3 months. The female gender, age, and baseline NIHSS score were found to be significantly associated with CNI on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, NIHSS score at onset and female gender (odds ratio [OR]: 2.218, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.140-4.285; P=.024) were found to be independent predictors of

  20. Association of serial biochemical markers with acute ischemic stroke: the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Lindsell, Christopher; Broderick, Joseph; Fagan, Susan C; Tilley, Barbara C; Levine, Steven R

    2006-10-01

    Biochemical markers of acute neuronal injury may aid in the diagnosis and management of acute ischemic stroke. Serum samples from the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study were analyzed for the presence of 4 biochemical markers of neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell injury. These biochemical markers, myelin basic protein (MBP), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100beta, and soluble thrombomodulin, were studied for an association with initial stroke severity, infarct volume, and functional outcome. In the original NINDS study, serum samples were drawn from all patients on presentation to the Emergency Department and at approximately 2 and 24 hours after initiation of study therapy. In this analysis, stored serum samples were available for 359 patients; 107 patients had samples for all 3 time points. Serum marker concentrations were measured by ELISA techniques. We examined the relation between serum concentrations of each marker and the degree of baseline neurological deficit, functional outcome, and infarct size on computed tomography at 24 hours and the effect of fibrinolytic therapy. Higher 24-hour peak concentrations of MBP, NSE, and S100beta were associated with higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale baseline scores (r=0.186, P<0.0001; r=0.117, P=0.032; and r=0.263, P<0.0001, respectively). Higher peak concentrations of MBP and S100beta (r=0.209, P<0.0001; r=0.239, P<0.0001) were associated with larger computed tomography lesion volumes. Patients with favorable outcomes had smaller changes in MBP and S100beta (P<0.05) concentrations in the first 24 hours. Soluble thrombomodulin was not associated with any severity or outcome measure. This study corroborates previous work demonstrating correlations of MBP, NSE, and S100beta with clinical and radiographic features in acute stroke. Despite significantly better outcomes in the tissue plasminogen activator-treated group, we

  1. MINOR NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION AFTER THE ONSET OF PUBERTY - ASSOCIATION WITH PERINATAL EVENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SOORANILUNSING, RJ; HADDERSALGRA, M; HUISJES, HJ; TOUWEN, BCL

    In order to study the hypotheses that puberty is related to a decrease of minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and that persisting MND is associated with perinatal factors, two groups (174 normal, 172 MND) of the Groningen Perinatal Project were followed from 12 to 14 years. At 14 years almost all

  2. Routine Troponin Measurements Are Unnecessary to Exclude Asymptomatic Coronary Events in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farwa; Young, Jimmy; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining serum troponin levels in every patient with acute stroke is recommended in recent stroke guidelines, but there is no evidence that these contribute positively to clinical care. We sought to determine the clinical significance of measuring troponin levels in acute ischemic stroke patients. We reviewed 398 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke at a large academic institution from 2010 to 2012. Troponin levels were measured as a result of protocol in place during part of the study period. The mean age was 70 years (standard deviation ±16 years) and 197 (49.5%) were men. Chronic kidney disease was present in 78 (19.6%), coronary artery disease in 107 (26.9%), and atrial fibrillation in 107 (26.9%). Serum troponin T was measured in 246 of 398 patients (61.8%). Troponin was elevated (>.01 ng/mL) at any point in 38 of 246 patients (15.5%) and was elevated in 28 patients at all 3 measurements (11.3% of those with troponin measured). Only 4 of 246 patients (1.6%) had a significant uptrend. Two were iatrogenic in the setting of hemodynamic augmentation using vasopressors to maintain cerebral perfusion. One case was attributed to stroke and chronic kidney disease and another case to heart failure from inflammatory fibrocalcific mitral valvular heart disease. Serum troponin elevation in patients with ischemic stroke is not usually caused by clinically significant acute myocardial ischemia unless iatrogenic in the setting of vasopressor administration. Serum troponin levels should be measured judicially, based on clinical context, rather than routinely in all stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of β-Blocker Therapy With Risks of Adverse Cardiovascular Events and Deaths in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Mérie, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Mads Wissenberg

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Clinical guidelines have been criticized for encouraging the use of β-blockers in noncardiac surgery despite weak evidence. Relevant clinical trials have been small and have not convincingly demonstrated an effect of β-blockers on hard end points (ie, perioperative myocardial infarction......, ischemic stroke, cardiovascular death, and all-cause death). OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of β-blocker treatment with major cardiovascular adverse events (MACE) and all-cause mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease undergoing noncardiac surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND EXPOSURE...... to calculate the 30-day risks of MACE (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death) and all-cause mortality associated with β-blocker therapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Thirty-day risk of MACE and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Of 28,263 patients with ischemic heart disease undergoing...

  4. Heparin monotherapy or bivalirudin during percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndromes or stable ischemic heart disease: results from the Evaluation of Drug-Eluting Stents and Ischemic Events registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangalore, Sripal; Pencina, Michael J; Kleiman, Neal S; Cohen, David J

    2014-06-01

    The use of bivalirudin versus unfractionated heparin monotherapy in patients without ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction is not well defined. The study population consisted of patients enrolled in the Evaluation of Drug-Eluting Stents and Ischemic Events (EVENT) registry with either non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndromes or stable ischemic heart disease, who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with either unfractionated heparin or bivalirudin monotherapy. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for baseline characteristics. The primary bleeding (in-hospital composite bleeding-access site bleeding, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction major/minor bleeding, or transfusion) and primary (in-hospital death/myocardial infarction) and secondary ischemic outcomes (death/myocardial infarction/unplanned repeat revascularization at 12 months) were evaluated. Propensity score matching yielded 1036 patients with non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndromes and 2062 patients with stable ischemic heart disease. For the non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome cohort, bivalirudin use was associated with lower bleeding (difference, -3.3% [-0.8% to -5.8%]; P=0.01; number need to treat=30) without increase in either primary (difference, 1.2% [4.1% to -1.8%]; P=0.45) or secondary ischemic outcomes, including stent thrombosis (difference, 0.0% [1.3% to -1.3%]; P=1.00). Similarly, in the stable ischemic heart disease cohort, bivalirudin use was associated with lower bleeding (difference, -1.8% [-0.4% to -3.3%]; P=0.01; number need to treat=53) without increase in either primary (difference, 0.4% [2.3% to -1.5%]; P=0.70) or secondary ischemic outcomes, including stent thrombosis (difference, 0.0% [0.7% to -0.7%]; P=1.00) when compared with unfractionated heparin monotherapy. Among patients with non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndromes or stable ischemic heart disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, bivalirudin use

  5. Unexplained neurological events during bathing in young people: Possible association with the use of gas geysers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Prabhjeet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report sudden, unexplained neurological collapse in 14 young people while bathing with hot water associated with the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG-based water heaters (gas geysers in ill-ventilated bathrooms. None of the patients reported any circumstantial evidence of seizures or prior epilepsy. One patient developed cortical blindness and demonstrated posterior leucoencephalopathy on imaging studies. The remaining patients made rapid and excellent recovery without any residual neurological sequelae. In these cases, the results of all routine investigations, i.e., serum chemistry, brain imaging (computed tomography in 2 and magnetic resonance imaging in 10 and electroencephalography were normal. The clinical clustering of these cases in winter months with similar presentations of reversible encephalopathy probably indicates an inhalational toxin exposure. Therefore, we postulate a hypothesis that harmful emissions consisting of carbon monoxide (CO, hydrocarbon gases (HC and nitrogen oxides (NOx, produced by incomplete combustion of LPG might be responsible for the cellular injury and subsequent transient neurological deficits. Physicians should be aware of this entity in order to avoid misdiagnosis of this condition as seizures, and a public awareness should also be created regarding the proper use of these devices.

  6. Predicting Long-term Ischemic Events Using Routine Clinical Parameters in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: The OPT-CAD Risk Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yaling; Chen, Jiyan; Qiu, Miaohan; Li, Yi; Li, Jing; Feng, Yingqing; Qiu, Jian; Meng, Liang; Sun, Yihong; Tao, Guizhou; Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Chunyu; Guo, Jincheng; Pu, Kui; Chen, Shaoliang; Wang, Xiaozeng

    2018-06-05

    The prognosis of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) at hospital discharge was constantly varying, and post-discharge risk of ischemic events remain a concern. However, risk prediction tools to identify risk of ischemia for these patients has not yet been reported. We sought to develop a scoring system for predicting long-term ischemic events in CAD patients receiving antiplatelet therapy that would be beneficial in appropriate personalized decision-making for these patients. In this prospective Optimal antiPlatelet Therapy for Chinese patients with Coronary Artery Disease (OPT-CAD, NCT01735305) registry, a total of 14,032 patients with CAD receiving at least one kind of antiplatelet agent were enrolled from 107 centers across China, from January 2012 to March 2014. The risk scoring system was developed in a derivation cohort (enrolled initially 10,000 patients in the database) using a logistic regression model and was subsequently tested in a validation cohort (the last 4,032 patients). Points in risk score was assigned based on the multivariable odds ratio of each factor. Ischemic events were defined as the composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction or stroke. Ischemic events occurred in 342 (3.4%) patients in the derivation cohort and 160 (4.0%) patients in the validation cohort during 1-year follow-up. The OPT-CAD score, ranging from 0-257 points, consist of 10 independent risk factors, including age (0-71 points), heart rates (0-36 points), hypertension (0-20 points), prior myocardial infarction (16 points), prior stroke (16 points), renal insufficient (21 points), anemia (19 points), low ejection fraction (22 points), positive cardiac troponin (23 points) and ST-segment deviation (13 points). In predicting 1-year ischemic events, the area under receiver operating characteristics curve were 0.73 and 0.72 in derivation and validation cohort, respectively. The incidences of ischemic events in low- (0-90 points), medium- (91-150 points) and

  7. Prevalence of Fabry Disease and Outcomes in Young Canadian Patients With Cryptogenic Ischemic Cerebrovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanthier, Sylvain; Saposnik, Gustavo; Lebovic, Gerald; Pope, Karen; Selchen, Daniel; Moore, David F

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies reported Fabry disease in 0% to 4% of young patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke (IS). We sought to determine the prevalence of Fabry and outcomes among young Canadians with cryptogenic IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We prospectively enrolled individuals aged 18 to 55 with IS or speech or motor TIA, and no cause identified despite predetermined investigation. α-galactosidase-A gene was sequenced for Fabry diagnosis. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was measured at presentation to quantify stroke severity. Modified Rankin Scale determined functional outcomes ≤7 days after presentation and 6 months later. We enrolled 365 patients with IS and 32 with TIA. α-galactosidase-A sequencing identified a single carrier of a genetic variant of unknown significance (p.R118C) and no well-recognized pathogenic variants. Mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 3.1. Proportion of patients with modified Rankin Scale of 0 to 2 was 70.7% at ≤7 days and 87.4% at 6 months. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at presentation and diabetes mellitus predicted 6-month modified Rankin Scale. Thirteen patients experienced 5 recurrent IS and 9 TIA during follow-up. No patient died. Most patients (98.7%) returned home. Among previous workers, 43% had residual working limitations. In this Canadian cohort of patients with cryptogenic IS or TIA, the prevalence of Fabry was 0.3% if p.R118C variant is considered as pathogenic. This suggests that more cost-effective methods should be applied for diagnosis of Fabry rather than systematic genetic screening in this population. Overall, cryptogenic IS in young adults is associated with favorable outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Short-term outcome of patients with possible transient ischemic attacks: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Mariana; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Canh?o, Patr?cia

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) have an increased risk of vascular events. There is scarce data regarding the prognosis of patients with transient neurological symptoms less typical of TIA, in whom a vascular origin cannot be excluded, also known as possible TIA. In this study we aimed to compare the short-term prognosis between TIA and Possible TIA patients. Methods Patients with transient neurological events consecutively referred to a TIA Clinic during five years w...

  9. Neurological, Metabolic, and Psychiatric Adverse Events in Children and Adolescents Treated With Aripiprazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Klaus Damgaard; Bruhn, Christina Hedegaard; Pagsberg, Anne-Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a partial dopamine agonist with only minor neurological and psychiatric adverse effects, making it a potential first-line drug for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, the evidence of its use in children and adolescents is rather sparse. The aim of this case study...... with schizophrenia and psychoses, not otherwise specified; and the non-PS group consisted of fourteen cases including autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome. The main reported adverse effects in the non-PS group were chronic...

  10. Inter-observer agreement of canine and feline paroxysmal event semiology and classification by veterinary neurology specialists and non-specialists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    neurology specialists and non-specialists) on the description and classification of videos depicting paroxysmal events, without knowing any results of diagnostic workup. An online questionnaire study was conducted, where participants watched 100 videos of dogs and cats exhibiting paroxysmal events...... low levels of agreement described here highlight the need for further discussions between neurology experts regarding classifying and describing epileptic seizures, and additional training of non-specialists to facilitate accurate diagnosis. There is a need for diagnostic tools (e...

  11. VEGF Signaling in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon W. Shim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a potent growth factor playing diverse roles in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. In the brain, VEGF mediates angiogenesis, neural migration and neuroprotection. As a permeability factor, excessive VEGF disrupts intracellular barriers, increases leakage of the choroid plexus endothelia, evokes edema, and activates the inflammatory pathway. Recently, we discovered that a heparin binding epidermal growth factor like growth factor (HB-EGF—a class of EGF receptor (EGFR family ligands—contributes to the development of hydrocephalus with subarachnoid hemorrhage through activation of VEGF signaling. The objective of this review is to entail a recent update on causes of death due to neurological disorders involving cerebrovascular and age-related neurological conditions and to understand the mechanism by which angiogenesis-dependent pathological events can be treated with VEGF antagonisms. The Global Burden of Disease study indicates that cancer and cardiovascular disease including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are two leading causes of death worldwide. The literature suggests that VEGF signaling in ischemic brains highlights the importance of concentration, timing, and alternate route of modulating VEGF signaling pathway. Molecular targets distinguishing two distinct pathways of VEGF signaling may provide novel therapies for the treatment of neurological disorders and for maintaining lower mortality due to these conditions.

  12. Effect of alternate energy substrates on mammalian brain metabolism during ischemic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppaka, S S; Puchowicz; LaManna, J C; Gatica, J E

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of brain metabolism and cerebral blood flow involves complex control systems with several interacting variables at both cellular and organ levels. Quantitative understanding of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous brain control mechanisms during internal and external stimuli requires the development and validation of a computational (mathematical) model of metabolic processes in brain. This paper describes a computational model of cellular metabolism in blood-perfused brain tissue, which considers the astrocyte-neuron lactate-shuttle (ANLS) hypothesis. The model structure consists of neurons, astrocytes, extra-cellular space, and a surrounding capillary network. Each cell is further compartmentalized into cytosol and mitochondria. Inter-compartment interaction is accounted in the form of passive and carrier-mediated transport. Our model was validated against experimental data reported by Crumrine and LaManna, who studied the effect of ischemia and its recovery on various intra-cellular tissue substrates under standard diet conditions. The effect of ketone bodies on brain metabolism was also examined under ischemic conditions following cardiac resuscitation through our model simulations. The influence of ketone bodies on lactate dynamics on mammalian brain following ischemia is studied incorporating experimental data.

  13. Predictors of long-term recurrent vascular events after ischemic stroke at young age: the Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Grassi, Mario; Lodigiani, Corrado; Patella, Rosalba; Gandolfo, Carlo; Zini, Andrea; Delodovici, Maria Luisa; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Del Sette, Massimo; Toriello, Antonella; Musolino, Rossella; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bovi, Paolo; Adami, Alessandro; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Sessa, Maria; Cavallini, Anna; Marcheselli, Simona; Bonifati, Domenico Marco; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Tancredi, Lucia; Chiti, Alberto; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Spalloni, Alessandra; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Giacalone, Giacomo; Ferrazzi, Paola; Poli, Loris; Morotti, Andrea; Rasura, Maurizia; Simone, Anna Maria; Gamba, Massimo; Cerrato, Paolo; Micieli, Giuseppe; Melis, Maurizio; Massucco, Davide; De Giuli, Valeria; Iacoviello, Licia; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-04-22

    Data on long-term risk and predictors of recurrent thrombotic events after ischemic stroke at a young age are limited. We followed 1867 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who were 18 to 45 years of age (mean age, 36.8±7.1 years; women, 49.0%), as part of the Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults (IPSYS). Median follow-up was 40 months (25th to 75th percentile, 53). The primary end point was a composite of ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, or other arterial events. One hundred sixty-three patients had recurrent thrombotic events (average rate, 2.26 per 100 person-years at risk). At 10 years, cumulative risk was 14.7% (95% confidence interval, 12.2%-17.9%) for primary end point, 14.0% (95% confidence interval, 11.4%-17.1%) for brain ischemia, and 0.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.4%-1.3%) for myocardial infarction or other arterial events. Familial history of stroke, migraine with aura, circulating antiphospholipid antibodies, discontinuation of antiplatelet and antihypertensive medications, and any increase of 1 traditional vascular risk factor were independent predictors of the composite end point in multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis. A point-scoring system for each variable was generated by their β-coefficients, and a predictive score (IPSYS score) was calculated as the sum of the weighted scores. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the 0- to 5-year score was 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.71; mean, 10-fold internally cross-validated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.65). Among patients with ischemic stroke aged 18 to 45 years, the long-term risk of recurrent thrombotic events is associated with modifiable, age-specific risk factors. The IPSYS score may serve as a simple tool for risk estimation.

  14. Intraplaque stretch in carotid atherosclerotic plaque--an effective biomechanical predictor for subsequent cerebrovascular ischemic events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongzhao Teng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stretch is a mechanical parameter, which has been proposed previously to affect the biological activities in different tissues. This study explored its utility in determining plaque vulnerability. METHODS: One hundred and six patients with mild to moderate carotid stenosis were recruited in this study (53 symptomatic and 53 asymptomatic. High resolution, multi-sequence magnetic resonance (MR imaging was performed to delineate various plaque components. Finite element method was used to predict high stretch concentration within the plaque. RESULTS: During a two-year follow-up, 11 patients in symptomatic group and 3 in asymptomatic group experienced recurrent cerebrovascular events. Plaque stretch at systole and stretch variation during one cardiac cycle was greater in symptomatic group than those in the asymptomatic. Within the symptomatic group, a similar trend was observed in patients with recurrent events compared to those without. CONCLUSION: Plaques with high stretch concentration and large stretch variation are associated with increased risk of future cerebrovascular events.

  15. How study patients who receive fluo pyrimidines to prevent ischemic events; Como estudiar los pacientes que recibiran fluopirimidinas para prevenir eventos isquemicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldombide, L. [Hospital de Clinicas. Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: Ischemic heart disease is the main cause of death in Uruguay and cancer is the second. The pillar of the systemic treatment of colorectal cancer are fluo pyrimidines and cause acute ischemic events in 3-8% of t rated patients. The 5 fluorouracil is the third anticancer drug most used Objective: Due to the high incidence of the two diseases and the risk of death caused by the ischemic treatment complications, the literature is analyzed to define how to study patients who receive fluo pyrimidines as a medium of preventing the same. Development: fluo pyrimidines cardio-toxicity can occur by myocardial toxicity, vasospasm, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency, autoimmune phenomena, platelet hyper aggregability, etc. The clinic is varied and underestimated: angina, abnormal ST silent and reversible, arrhythmias, heart failure, hypertension and heart failure. It is the most common complication with continuous infusion of 5 Fu and its equivalent capecitabine with bolus f lou pyrimidines. It is common that ischemic heart disease prioritises the risk increase of complications, but their absence does not exist. Without ischemic heart disease it is difficult to prevent ischemic events, however proposes that the older higher risk. Results: No uniform guidelines is advised: detailed history, determine if risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia and They are present electrocardiogram and cardiac evaluation. Warn the patient about angina l pain as early symptom and monitor symptoms during chemotherapy including cardio-vascular hypotension. Discontinue the medication and perform classic anti-angina l symptoms and / or signs of ischemia. Not reintroduce unless it is the only therapeutic option, since mortality may exceed.

  16. Carotid artery disease progression and related neurologic events after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Go, Catherine; Ling, Jennifer; Naddaf, Abdallah; Steinmetz, Amy; Abou Ali, Adham N; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2016-08-01

    During the last decade, there has been a dramatic improvement in best medical treatment for patients with vascular disease. Yet, there is a paucity of contemporary long-term data for restenosis and contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA) progression. This study assessed ipsilateral and contralateral disease progression and cerebrovascular events after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). A consecutive cohort of CEAs between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, was retrospectively analyzed. End points were restenosis ≥50% and ≥70%, contralateral carotid disease progression (50%-69%, 70%-99%, or occlusion) and stroke. Survival analysis and Cox regression models were used to assess the effect of baseline predictors. During the 11-year study period, 1639 patients underwent 1782 CEAs (50.0% patch closure, 23.9% primary closure, 26.1% eversion, and 2.5% combined with coronary artery bypass grafting). The combined stroke/death rate was 2.6% overall and 1.8% in the asymptomatic cohort. The rate of restenosis ≥50% at 2, 5, and 10 years was 8.5%, 15.6%, 27.2%, and the rate for restenosis ≥70% was 3.4%, 6.5%, 10.2%, respectively. Restenosis ≥50% was predicted by hypertension (hazard ratio [HR], 2.09; P = .027), female gender (HR, 1.43; P = .042), and younger age (≤65 years; HR, 1.56; P = .016), but not by statins, surgical technique, symptoms, or other baseline risk factors. Restenoses remained asymptomatic in 125 of 148 (84.5%). Progression of contralateral ICA disease at 2, 5, and 10 years was estimated at 5.4%, 15.5%, and 46.8%, respectively. Contralateral progression was only predicted by smoking (HR, 1.74; P = .008). The stroke rate in patients with disease progression of the contralateral ICA was not different compared with those without progression (7.0% vs 3.3%; P = .063). Any-stroke rates at 2, 5, and 10 years were 4.6%, 7.3%, and 15.7%, respectively. Predictors were symptomatic lesion (HR, 1.48; P = .039), renal insufficiency, defined as a

  17. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-11-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG).

  18. Efficacy of passive hypothermia and adverse events during transport of asphyxiated newborns according to the severity of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Nuria; Alsina, Miguel; Alarcon, Ana; Arca-Díaz, Gemma; Agut, Thais; García-Alix, Alfredo

    To determine if the efficacy of passive hypothermia and adverse events during transport are related to the severity of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. This was a retrospective study of 67 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, born between April 2009 and December 2013, who were transferred for therapeutic hypothermia and cooled during transport. Fifty-six newborns (84%) were transferred without external sources of heat and 11 (16%) needed an external heat source. The mean temperature at departure was 34.4±1.4°C and mean transfer time was 3.3±2.0h. Mean age at arrival was 5.6±2.5h. Temperature at arrival was between 33 and 35°C in 41 (61%) infants, between 35°C and 36.5°C in 15 (22%) and encephalopathy had greater risk of having an admission temperatureencephalopathy and the umbilical artery pH were independent risk factors for a low temperature on admission (pencephalopathy. The risk of overcooling during transport is greater in newborns with severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and those with more severe acidosis at birth. The most common adverse events during transport are related to physiological deterioration and bleeding from the endotracheal tube. This observation provides useful information to identify those asphyxiated infants who require closer clinical surveillance during transport. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypothermia therapy for newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia reduces cerebral injury and improves the neurological outcome secondary to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. It has been indicated for asphyxiated full-term or near-term newborn infants with clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A search was performed for articles on therapeutic hypothermia in newborns with perinatal asphyxia in PubMed; the authors chose those considered most significant. There are two therapeutic hypothermia methods: selective head cooling and total body cooling. The target body temperature is 34.5 °C for selective head cooling and 33.5 °C for total body cooling. Temperatures lower than 32 °C are less neuroprotective, and temperatures below 30 °C are very dangerous, with severe complications. Therapeutic hypothermia must start within the first 6h after birth, as studies have shown that this represents the therapeutic window for the hypoxic-ischemic event. Therapy must be maintained for 72 h, with very strict control of the newborn's body temperature. It has been shown that therapeutic hypothermia is effective in reducing neurologic impairment, especially in full-term or near-term newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Therapeutic hypothermia is a neuroprotective technique indicated for newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transient Ischemic Attack and Ischemic Stroke in Danon Disease with Formation of Left Ventricular Apical Thrombus despite Normal Systolic Function

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    Takeshi Tsuda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Danon disease is a rare X-linked dominant skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder presenting with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome, skeletal myopathy, and mild intellectual disability. Early morbidity and mortality due to heart failure or sudden death are known in Danon disease, more in males than in females. Here, we present a 17-year-old female adolescent with Danon disease and severe concentric hypertrophy with normal left ventricular (LV systolic function, who has been complaining of intermittent headache and weakness for about 3 years, initially diagnosed with hemiplegic migraine. Subsequently, her neurological manifestation progressed to transient ischemic attack (TIA and eventually to ischemic stroke confirmed by CT scan with 1-day history of expressive aphasia followed by persistent left side weakness and numbness. Detailed echocardiogram for the first time revealed a small LV apical thrombus with unchanged severe biventricular hypertrophy and normal systolic function. This unexpected LV apical thrombus may be associated with a wide spectrum of neurological deficits ranging from TIA to ischemic stroke in Danon disease. Possibility of cerebral ischemic events should be suspected in Danon disease when presenting with neurological deficits even with normal systolic function. Careful assessment for LV apical thrombus is warranted in such cases.

  2. Influence of one-year neurologic outcome of treatment on newborns with moderate and severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy by rhuEP0 combined with ganglioside (GM1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X-Y; Ye, M-Y; Zhang, A-M; Wang, W-D; Zeng, F; Li, J-L; Fang, F

    2015-10-01

    To observe the one-year neurologic prognostic outcome of newborns with moderate and severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) who received recombinant human erythropoietin (rhuEPO) combined with exogenous monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) treatment to provide new guidelines for clinical treatment. Seventy-six newborns with moderate and severe HIE were selected from February 2011 to February 2014 in our hospital. This study received the informed consent of our hospital's Ethics Committee and the newborns' guardians. The newborns were divided to an observation group (n = 34 cases) and a control group (n = 42 cases). All newborns underwent hypothermia and conventional treatment for their conditions. The control group received GMl treatment and observation group received rhuEPO combined with GMl treatment. The curative differences and neural behavior from these two groups were compared. The excellent, efficient proportion and total effective rate of the newborns from the observation group were higher than the control group. The death rate, cerebral palsy and the invalid ratio of the newborns from the observation group were lower than that of the control group. Awareness, muscle tension, primitive reflex and increased intracranial pressure recovery time of the newborns in the observation group were less than those of the control group. The Neonatal Behavior Neurological Assessment (NBNA) score of both groups after the treatment of 7, 14 and 28 days were significantly higher and increased with time (p newborns from the two groups all increased after treatment of 3, 6 and 12 months than those of before, which increased with time (p newborns with HIE improves short-term clinical effects and long-term neurological symptoms.

  3. [Is a patient's knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors better after the occurrence of a major ischemic event? Survey of 135 cases and 260 controls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensel, A-S; Lermusiaux, P; Boileau, C; Feugier, P; Sérusclat, A; Zerbib, Y; Ninet, J

    2013-12-01

    We hypothezised that patients (cases) who are hospitalized for a major ischemic event--myocardial infarction, stroke, decompensation of peripheral arterial disease--acquire better knowledge than a control population--atheromatous patients without a major ischemic event, patients consulting for a vein disease or a diabetes evaluation, and accompanists--about cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity) and have a better understanding of the usefulness of making changes in their lifestyle (quit smoking, regular exercise, Mediterranean diet, low salt diet, weight control, diabetes care). A questionnaire was proposed at vascular surgery consultations and vascular and cardiac functional explorations, at the M Pavillon of the Édouard-Herriot hospital, Lyon, France. In five months, 395 questionnaires (135 cases and 260 controls) were analyzed. The global knowledge score was statistically higher for cases than for controls (cases 3.23±1.81; controls 2.77±2.03; P=0.037). Cases did not abide by monitoring and dietary rules better, except as regards the management of diabetes. Regular physical activity was statistically more prevalent among controls than among cases. Cases mainly received their information from their doctors (general practitioner for 59% of controls and 78% of cases, cardiologist for 25% of controls and 57% of cases) while controls got their information more through magazines or advertising. Our results show that after a major ischemic event, cases' knowledge of risk factors is better than the rest of the population without improved rules lifestyle changes. This suggests the usefulness of evaluating a therapeutic education program for atheromatous disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Melatonin and Ischemic Stroke: Mechanistic Roles and Action

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    Syed Suhail Andrabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological disabilities and brain’s vulnerability towards it proves to be fatal and socio-economic loss of millions of people worldwide. Ischemic stroke remains at the center stage of it, because of its prevalence amongst the several other types attacking the brain. The various cascades of events that have been associated with stroke involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, upregulation of Ca2+ level, and so forth. Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by pineal and extra pineal tissues responsible for various physiological processes like sleep and mood behaviour. Melatonin has been implicated in various neurological diseases because of its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. We have previously reviewed the neuroprotective effect of melatonin in various models of brain injury like traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In this review, we have put together the various causes and consequence of stroke and protective role of melatonin in ischemic stroke.

  5. Melatonin and Ischemic Stroke: Mechanistic Roles and Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological disabilities and brain's vulnerability towards it proves to be fatal and socio-economic loss of millions of people worldwide. Ischemic stroke remains at the center stage of it, because of its prevalence amongst the several other types attacking the brain. The various cascades of events that have been associated with stroke involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, upregulation of Ca(2+) level, and so forth. Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by pineal and extra pineal tissues responsible for various physiological processes like sleep and mood behaviour. Melatonin has been implicated in various neurological diseases because of its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. We have previously reviewed the neuroprotective effect of melatonin in various models of brain injury like traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In this review, we have put together the various causes and consequence of stroke and protective role of melatonin in ischemic stroke.

  6. Wpływ rehabilitacji neurologicznej na funkcjonowanie pacjentów po przebytym udarze niedokrwiennym mózgu – analiza retrospektywna = The influence of neurological rehabilitation on the functioning of patients after ischemic stroke – a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystian Kałużny

    2016-12-01

    autorski kwestionariusz ankiety sondażowej zawierającym wybrane elementy skali Barthel. Wyniki: W badanej grupie statystycznie istotnie częściej występowały osoby ze środowiska wiejskiego, u których stwierdzono współistniejące choroby tj. nadciśnienie tętnicze, migotanie przedsionków, cukrzyca, choroba niedokrwienna serca i inne. Wśród pacjentów przekazanych bezpośrednio z Centrum Leczenia Udarów Mózgu do Kliniki Rehabilitacji u ponad połowy pacjentów zaobserwowano poprawę funkcjonowania w przeciągu 1 miesiąca pobytu, natomiast z pacjentów korzystających z rehabilitacji wtórnej poprawę funkcjonalną zaobserwowano tylko u co czwartego pacjenta. Wnioski: 1   Rehabilitacja neurologiczna istotnie wpływa na funkcjonowanie pacjentów po udarze niedokrwiennym mózgu. 2   Rehabilitacja wdrożona we wczesnym okresie po udarze niedokrwiennym mózgu ma znamiennie wyższą efektywność co przekłada się na większą poprawę stanu funkcjonalnego pacjentów po udarze niedokrwiennym mózgu. 3   Zastosowanie metody PNF i NDT-Bobath istotnie wpływa na poprawę stanu funkcjonalnego pacjentów po udarze niedokrwiennym mózgu.       Abstract Introduction: The functioning of patients after ischemic stroke is a source of interest to many researchers and a huge challenge for modern medicine. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, stroke is the third leading cause of death (after heart disease and cancer and the leading cause of severe disability in the population of people over the age of 45, which would have important clinical consequences, social and economic. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the applied neurological rehabilitation of patients after ischemic stroke, the assessment of the functioning of patients after ischemic stroke underwent neurological rehabilitation and assessment of the impact of additional factors on the effectiveness of neurological rehabilitation. Material and methods: The study group

  7. Stressful life events and maltreatment in conversion (functional neurological) disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Lea; Pasman, Joëlle A; Nicholson, Timothy; Aybek, Selma; David, Anthony S; Tuck, Sharon; Kanaan, Richard A; Roelofs, Karin; Carson, Alan; Stone, Jon

    2018-04-01

    Stressful life events and maltreatment have traditionally been considered crucial in the development of conversion (functional neurological) disorder, but the evidence underpinning this association is not clear. We aimed to assess the association between stressors and functional neurological disorder. We systematically reviewed controlled studies reporting stressors occurring in childhood or adulthood, such as stressful life events and maltreatment (including sexual, physical abuse, and emotional neglect) and functional neurological disorder. We did a meta-analysis, with assessments of methodology, sources of bias, and sensitivity analyses. 34 case-control studies, with 1405 patients, were eligible. Studies were of moderate-to-low quality. The frequency of childhood and adulthood stressors was increased in cases compared with controls. Odds ratios (OR) were higher for emotional neglect in childhood (49% for cases vs 20% for controls; OR 5·6, 95% CI 2·4-13·1) compared with sexual abuse (24% vs 10%; 3·3, 2·2-4·8) or physical abuse (30% vs 12%; 3·9, 2·2-7·2). An association with stressful life events preceding onset (OR 2·8, 95% CI 1·4-6·0) was stronger in studies with better methods (interviews; 4·3, 1·4-13·2). Heterogeneity was significant between studies (I 2 21·1-90·7%). 13 studies that specifically ascertained that the participants had not had either severe life events or any subtype of maltreatment all found a proportion of patients with functional neurological disorder reporting no stressor. Stressful life events and maltreatment are substantially more common in people with functional neurological disorder than in healthy controls and patient controls. Emotional neglect had a higher risk than traditionally emphasised sexual and physical abuse, but many cases report no stressors. This outcome supports changes to diagnostic criteria in DSM-5; stressors, although relevant to the cause in many patients, are not a core diagnostic feature. This

  8. Neurology in Federico Fellini?s work and life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Caramelli, Paulo; Cardoso, Francisco Eduardo Costa

    2014-09-01

    The authors present a historical review of the neurological diseases related to the famous moviemaker Federico Fellini. There is an account of diseases depicted on his movies as well as his ischemic stroke and consequent neurological deficit - left spatial neglect.

  9. Pioglitazone after Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernan, Walter N; Viscoli, Catherine M; Furie, Karen L; Young, Lawrence H; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Gorman, Mark; Guarino, Peter D; Lovejoy, Anne M; Peduzzi, Peter N; Conwit, Robin; Brass, Lawrence M; Schwartz, Gregory G; Adams, Harold P; Berger, Leo; Carolei, Antonio; Clark, Wayne; Coull, Bruce; Ford, Gary A; Kleindorfer, Dawn; O'Leary, John R; Parsons, Mark W; Ringleb, Peter; Sen, Souvik; Spence, J David; Tanne, David; Wang, David; Winder, Toni R

    2016-04-07

    Patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are at increased risk for future cardiovascular events despite current preventive therapies. The identification of insulin resistance as a risk factor for stroke and myocardial infarction raised the possibility that pioglitazone, which improves insulin sensitivity, might benefit patients with cerebrovascular disease. In this multicenter, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 3876 patients who had had a recent ischemic stroke or TIA to receive either pioglitazone (target dose, 45 mg daily) or placebo. Eligible patients did not have diabetes but were found to have insulin resistance on the basis of a score of more than 3.0 on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. The primary outcome was fatal or nonfatal stroke or myocardial infarction. By 4.8 years, a primary outcome had occurred in 175 of 1939 patients (9.0%) in the pioglitazone group and in 228 of 1937 (11.8%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the pioglitazone group, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62 to 0.93; P=0.007). Diabetes developed in 73 patients (3.8%) and 149 patients (7.7%), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.69; Pischemic stroke or TIA, the risk of stroke or myocardial infarction was lower among patients who received pioglitazone than among those who received placebo. Pioglitazone was also associated with a lower risk of diabetes but with higher risks of weight gain, edema, and fracture. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00091949.).

  10. Future cardiac events in patients with ischemic ECG changes during adenosine infusion as a myocardial stress agent and normal cardiac scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Hamid; Niaz, Khalid; Hatazawa, Jun; Gasmelseed, Ahmed; Samiri, Hussain Al; Al Othman, Maram; Hammad, Mai Al

    2017-11-01

    We sought to determine the prognostic importance of adenosine-induced ischemic ECG changes in patients with normal single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion images (MPI). We carried out a retrospective analysis of 765 patients undergoing adenosine MPI between January 2013 and January 2015. Patients with baseline ECG abnormalities and/or abnormal scan were excluded. Overall, 67 (8.7%) patients had ischemic ECG changes during adenosine infusion in the form of ST depression of 1 mm or more. Of these, 29 [43% (3.8% of all patients)] had normal MPI (positive ECG group). An age-matched and sex-matched group of 108 patients with normal MPI without ECG changes served as control participants (negative ECG group). During a mean follow-up duration of 33.3±6.1 months, patients in the positive ECG group did not have significantly more adverse cardiac events than those in the negative ECG group. One (0.9%) patient in the negative ECG group had a nonfatal myocardial infarction (0.7% annual event rate after a negative MPI). Also in this group, two (1.8%) patients admitted with a diagnosis of CAD where they have been ruled out by angiography. A fourth case in this, in the negative ECG group, was admitted because of heart failure that proved to be secondary to a pulmonary cause and not CAD. A case only in the positive ECG group was admitted as a CAD that was ruled out by coronary angiography. Patients with normal myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in whom ST-segment depression develops during adenosine stress test appear to have no increased risk for future cardiac events compared with similar patients without ECG evidence of ischemia.

  11. Diabetes, fasting glucose levels, and risk of ischemic stroke and vascular events: findings from the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Cammack, Sam; Chong, Ji; Wang, Culing; Wright, Clinton; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Paik, Myunghee C; Sacco, Ralph L

    2008-06-01

    There is insufficient randomized trial data to support evidence-based recommendations for tight control of fasting blood glucose (FBG) among diabetic subjects in primary stroke prevention. We explored the relationship between FBG among diabetic subjects and risk of ischemic stroke in a multiethnic prospective cohort. Medical and social data and FBG values were collected for 3,298 stroke-free community residents: mean age +/- SD was 69 +/-10 years; 63% were women, 21% were white, 24% were black, and 53% were Hispanic; and follow-up was 6.5 years. Baseline FBG levels were categorized: 1) elevated FBG: history of diabetes and FBG >or=126 mg/dl (7.0 mmol/l); 2) target FBG: history of diabetes and FBG benefits of tighter glucose control for primary stroke prevention.

  12. Safety and efficacy of device closure for patent foramen ovale for secondary prevention of neurological events: Comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakeem, Abdul; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Hacioglu, Yalcin; Uretsky, Barry F.; Gundogdu, Betul; Leesar, Massoud; Bailey, Steven R.; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Background: Controversy persists regarding the management of patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing PFO closure with medical therapy. Methods and Results: A prospective protocol was developed and registered using the following data sources: PubMed, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, conference proceedings, and Internet-based resources of clinical trials. Primary analyses were performed using the intention-to-treat method. Three randomized trials comparing percutaneous PFO closure vs. medical therapy for secondary prevention of embolic neurological events formed the data set. Baseline characteristics were similar. During long-term follow-up, the pooled incidence of the primary endpoint (composite of stroke, death, or fatal stroke) was 3.4% in the PFO closure arm and 4.8% in the medical therapy group [risk-reduction (RR) 0.7 (0.48–1.06); p = 0.09]. The incidence of recurrent neurological events (secondary endpoint) was 1.7% for PFO closure and 2.7% for medical therapy [RR 0.66 (0.35–1.24), p = 0.19]. There was no difference in terms of death or adverse events between the two groups. Conclusions: While this meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials demonstrated no statistical significance in comparison to medical therapy, there was a trend towards overall improvement in outcomes in the PFO closure group

  13. Safety and efficacy of device closure for patent foramen ovale for secondary prevention of neurological events: Comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakeem, Abdul [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos [Citizens Memorial Hospital Heart and Vascular Institute, Bolivar, MO (United States); Hacioglu, Yalcin; Uretsky, Barry F.; Gundogdu, Betul [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Leesar, Massoud [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bailey, Steven R. [University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Cilingiroglu, Mehmet, E-mail: mcilingiroglu@yahoo.com [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Background: Controversy persists regarding the management of patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing PFO closure with medical therapy. Methods and Results: A prospective protocol was developed and registered using the following data sources: PubMed, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, conference proceedings, and Internet-based resources of clinical trials. Primary analyses were performed using the intention-to-treat method. Three randomized trials comparing percutaneous PFO closure vs. medical therapy for secondary prevention of embolic neurological events formed the data set. Baseline characteristics were similar. During long-term follow-up, the pooled incidence of the primary endpoint (composite of stroke, death, or fatal stroke) was 3.4% in the PFO closure arm and 4.8% in the medical therapy group [risk-reduction (RR) 0.7 (0.48–1.06); p = 0.09]. The incidence of recurrent neurological events (secondary endpoint) was 1.7% for PFO closure and 2.7% for medical therapy [RR 0.66 (0.35–1.24), p = 0.19]. There was no difference in terms of death or adverse events between the two groups. Conclusions: While this meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials demonstrated no statistical significance in comparison to medical therapy, there was a trend towards overall improvement in outcomes in the PFO closure group.

  14. The preventing recurrent vascular events and neurological worsening through intensive organized case-management (PREVENTION trial protocol [clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00931788

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    Tsuyuki Ross

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivors of transient ischemic attack (TIA or stroke are at high risk for recurrent vascular events and aggressive treatment of vascular risk factors can reduce this risk. However, vascular risk factors, especially hypertension and high cholesterol, are not managed optimally even in those patients seen in specialized clinics. This gap between the evidence for secondary prevention of stroke and the clinical reality leads to suboptimal patient outcomes. In this study, we will be testing a pharmacist case manager for delivery of stroke prevention services. We hypothesize this new structure will improve processes of care which in turn should lead to improved outcomes. Methods We will conduct a prospective, randomized, controlled open-label with blinded ascertainment of outcomes (PROBE trial. Treatment allocation will be concealed from the study personnel, and all outcomes will be collected in an independent and blinded manner by observers who have not been involved in the patient's clinical care or trial participation and who are masked to baseline measurements. Patients will be randomized to control or a pharmacist case manager treating vascular risk factors to guideline-recommended target levels. Eligible patients will include all adult patients seen at stroke prevention clinics in Edmonton, Alberta after an ischemic stroke or TIA who have uncontrolled hypertension (defined as systolic blood pressure (BP > 140 mm Hg or dyslipidemia (fasting LDL-cholesterol > 2.00 mmol/L and who are not cognitively impaired or institutionalized. The primary outcome will be the proportion of subjects who attain 'optimal BP and lipid control'(defined as systolic BP Conclusions Nearly one-quarter of those who survive a TIA or minor stroke suffer another vascular event within a year. If our intervention improves the provision of secondary prevention therapies in these patients, the clinical (and financial implications will be enormous.

  15. Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke with Active Cancer

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    Ki-Woong Nam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke patients with active cancer are known to have poor clinical outcomes. However, the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase (IV t-PA in this group are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether stroke patients with cancer had poor clinical outcomes after use of IV t-PA. We reviewed ischemic stroke patients with active cancer treated with isolated IV t-PA between April 2010 and March 2015 at three national university hospitals from the registry for ischemic stroke in Korea. The clinical outcomes of early neurological deterioration (END, hemorrhagic transformation, in-hospital mortality, 3-month modified Rankin scale (mRS, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS discharge score, and duration of hospitalization were compared. We enrolled a total of 12 patients, and the cohort showed poor outcomes including 4 (33% END events, 7 (58% hemorrhagic transformations, 3 (25% in-hospital mortality cases, and 7 (58% poor mRS (3–6 scores. Additionally, the cryptogenic stroke group (n = 6 more frequently had high mRS scores (P = 0.043 as well as tendencies for frequent END events, hemorrhagic transformations, in-hospital mortality cases, and higher discharge NIHSS scores without statistical significance. In conclusion, ischemic stroke patients with active cancer, especially those with a cryptogenic mechanism, showed poor clinical outcomes after use of IV t-PA.

  16. Successful Intra-Arterial Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Immediate Postpartum Period: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, Jose C.; Masjuan, J.; Garcia, N.; Lecinana, M. de

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in pregnancy and the puerperium is a rare but potentially devastating event. We present the case of a previously healthy woman who underwent a cesarean delivery and experienced a middle cerebral artery thrombosis in the immediate postpartum period that was subsequently lysed with intra-arterial urokinase. The patient made a complete neurologic recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of successful intra-arterial thrombolysis for ischemic stroke in the postpartum period

  17. Albumin Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Safety Analysis of the ALIAS Part 2 Multicenter Trial.

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    Michael D Hill

    Full Text Available Albumin treatment of ischemic stroke was associated with cardiopulmonary adverse events in previous studies and a low incidence of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to describe the neurological and cardiopulmonary adverse events in the ALIAS Part 2 Multicenter Trial.Ischemic stroke patients, aged 18-83 and a baseline NIHSS ≥ 6, were randomized to treatment with ALB or saline control within 5 hours of stroke onset. Neurological adverse events included symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, hemicraniectomy, neurological deterioration and neurological death. Cardiopulmonary adverse events included pulmonary edema/congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, atrial fibrillation, pneumonia and pulmonary thromboembolism.Among 830 patients, neurological and cardiopulmonary adverse events were not differentially associated with poor outcome between ALB and saline control subjects. The rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the first 24h was low overall (2.9%, 24/830 but more common in the ALB treated subjects (RR = 2.4, CI95 1.01-5.8. The rate of pulmonary edema/CHF in the first 48h was 7.9% (59/830 and was more common among ALB treated subjects (RR = 10.7, CI95 4.3-26.6; this complication was expected and was satisfactorily managed with mandated diuretic administration and intravenous fluid guidelines. Troponin elevations in the first 48h were common, occurring without ECG change or cardiac symptoms in 52 subjects (12.5%.ALB therapy was associated with an increase in symptomatic ICH and pulmonary edema/congestive heart failure but this did not affect final outcomes. Troponin elevation occurs routinely in the first 48 hours after acute ischemic stroke.ClincalTrials.gov NCT00235495.

  18. Change of the elasticity COEFFICIENT of the walls of the common carotid artery as a predictor of adverse cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients after ischemic hemispheric stroke. Results of one year observation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Lisovaya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the relationship between carotid artery elastic properties and risk of recurrent coronary and cerebral ischemic events in III grade arterial hypertension patients after ischemic stroke. Methods. 102 mild-to-moderate arterial hypertension patients were enrolled to the scrutiny in 3 weeks after ischemic stroke and then they had been being studied prospectively for 12 months period regarding survival rate and unfavorable clinical outcomes. Clinical interviews were performed every 3 months during 1 year after blood sampling. Clinical events included the following: certainly diagnosed ischemic stroke or TIA; coronary ischemic events, sudden death, diabetes mellitus, and all cardiovascular events including chronic heart failure and hospitalization. Elastic properties of carotid artery were determined by high resolution B-modal echography. Results. Univariate analysis has found that age-, gender-, index NIHSS-, Barthel index- and Rankin score index-adjusted variable of total cardiovascular events positively correlated with the presence of type 2 diabetes (R=0.62; P =0.001, systolic BP (R=0.50; P=0.022, the total cholesterol levels (R=0.56; P =0.004, and LDL cholesterol in plasma (R=0,64; P =0,012, fasting blood glucose (R=0,56; P =0,014, and negatively correlated with distensibility coefficient (R=-0.80; P=0.009, cross-section compliance of the common carotid artery (R=-0.70; P=0.004, of pressure-straine elastic modulus (R=-0.64; P =0.041, and the Young's modulus (R=-0.52; P=0.011. Multivariate analysis showed that after exclusion of all indicators with a high level of mutual associations among the variables that have demonstrated the existence of an independent significant association in linear regression with a total value of cardiovascular events elasticity (R = -0,76; P = 0,006, the level of total MS (R = 0,55; P = 0,009, and LDL cholesterol in plasma (R = 0,62; P = 0,014, diabetes mellitus type 2 (R = 0,62; P = 0

  19. Neurological adverse events temporally associated to mass vaccination against yellow fever in Juiz de Fora, Brazil, 1999-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Guilherme Côrtes; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; Sá Carvalho, Marilia; Batista, Maristela; de Almeida, Sonia Maria Rodrigues

    2007-04-20

    The identification of adverse events following immunization (AEFI) and their prompt investigation are important to allow a timely and scientifically based response to the users of immunization services. This article presents an analysis of notified AEFI cases between 1999 and 2005 and their temporal association with 2001 yellow fever vaccination campaign, AEFI notification attributed to yellow fever vaccination rose from 0.06 to 1.32 per 100,000 vaccinees in Brazil, between 1998 and 2000. During the 2001 yellow fever mass vaccination campaign held in Juiz de Fora, Brazil, 12 cases of aseptic meningitis were temporally associated to yellow fever vaccination, but clinical and laboratory data were not available to confirm nor deny causality. Epidemiological studies associated to enhanced surveillance and standardized protocols should take advantage of public health interventions like mass vaccination campaigns and implementation of new vaccination strategies in order to assess and investigate vaccine safety.

  20. Neurological aspects of eclampsia

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    Jovanović Dejana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficult types of preeclampsia and eclampsia are presented with the neurological symptoms. The break of cerebral autoregulation mechanism plays the most important role in pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm. Nevertheless eclampsia isn’t just an ordinary hypertensive encephalopathy because other pathogenic mechanisms are involved in its appearance. The main neuropathologic changes are multifocal vasogenic edema, perivascular multiple microinfarctions and petechial hemorrhages. Neurological clinical manifestations are convulsions, headache, visual disturbances and rarely other discrete focal neurological symptoms. Eclampsia is a high-risk factor for onset of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. This is a reason why neurological diagnostic tests are sometimes needed. The method of choice for evaluation of complicated eclampsia is computerized brain topography that shows multiple areas of hypodensity in occipitoparietal regions. These changes are focal vasogenic cerebral edema. For differential diagnosis of eclampsia and stroke other diagnostic methods can be used - fundoscopic exam, magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebral angiography and cerebrospinal fluid exam. The therapy of eclampsia considers using of magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive, anticonvulsive and antiedematous drugs.

  1. Neurology of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; Geocadin, R G

    2017-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide an up-to-date review of the science and clinical practice pertaining to neurologic injury after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The past two decades have seen a major shift in the science and practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with a major emphasis on postresuscitation neurologic care. This chapter provides a nuanced and thoughtful historic and bench-to-bedside overview of the neurologic aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A particular emphasis is made on the anatomy and pathophysiology of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, up-to-date management of survivors of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and a careful discussion on neurologic outcome prediction. Guidance to practice evidence-based clinical care when able and thoughtful, pragmatic suggestions for care where evidence is lacking are also provided. This chapter serves as both a useful clinical guide and an updated, thorough, and state-of-the-art reference on the topic for advanced students and experienced practitioners in the field. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Current neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases

  3. Impact of TCFA on Unanticipated Ischemic Events in Medically Treated Diabetes Mellitus: Insights From the PROSPECT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedhi, Elvin; Kennedy, Mark W; Maehara, Akiko; Lansky, Alexandra J; McAndrew, Thomas C; Marso, Steven P; De Bruyne, Bernard; Serruys, Patrick W; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-04-01

    This study sought to investigate the relationship between thin-cap fibroatheromas (TCFAs) on major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) arising from medically treated nonculprit lesions (NCLs) in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). MACEs occur frequently in patients with DM and ACS. The impact of plaque composition on subsequent MACEs in DM patients with ACS is unknown. In the PROSPECT (Providing Regional Observations Study Predictors of Events in the Coronary Tree) study, using 3-vessel radiofrequency intravascular ultrasound, we analyzed the incidence of NCL-MACE in 2 propensity-matched groups according to the presence of DM and TCFA. Among 697 patients, 119 (17.7%) had DM. The 3-year total MACE rate (29.4% vs. 18.8%; p = 0.01) was significantly higher in patients with versus without DM, driven by a higher rate of NCL-MACE in DM (18.7% vs. 10.4%; p = 0.02). Propensity score matching generated 2 balanced groups with and without DM of 82 patients each. Among DM patients, the presence of ≥1 TCFA was associated with higher NCL-MACE at 3 years (27.8% vs. 8.9% in patients without a TCFA, hazard ratio: 3.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.98 to 12.96; p = 0.04). DM patients without a TCFA had a similar 3-year rate of NCL-MACE as patients without DM (8.9% vs. 8.9%; hazard ratio: 1.09; 95% confidence interval: 0.27 to 4.41; p = 0.90). ACS patients with DM and ≥1 TCFA have a high rate of NCL-MACE at 3 years. In contrast, the prognosis of ACS patients with DM but no TCFAs is favorable and similar to patients without DM. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk of stroke and cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in patients with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome: secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Alfred; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B

    2011-01-01

    To perform a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial, which tested the effect of treatment with atorvastatin in reducing stroke in subjects with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, to explore the effects of treatment...

  5. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery.

  6. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ischemic stroke in combined cerebrovascular abnormalities - aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery and arteriovenous malformation temporo occipital in the right hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, T.; Naydenov, K.; Manchev, I.; Manchev, L.

    2016-01-01

    A case of combined vascular abnormalities is presented- an aneurysm of the internal carotid artery and arterio-venous malformation temporooccipitally on the right, clinically presented by an ischemic brain stroke in the territory supplied by the right middle cerebral artery. Treatment included - hypo-tensive drugs, antiplatelet (antiaggregants) agents and vasodilators, which lead to significant improvement of the general and focal neurological symptoms. Neurosurgical intervention is been discussed, in order to remove the vascular malformation and to prevent future vascular events. Key words: Aneurysm. Arteriovenous Malformation. Ischemic Stroke

  8. USE OF DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR REVEALING HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN LESIONS IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shimchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents advantages of use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI for revealing hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions in neonates. The trial included 97 neonates with perinatal brain lesion who had been undergoing treatment at a resuscitation department or neonatal pathology department in the first month of life. The article shows high information value of diffusion-weighted images (DWI for diagnostics of hypoxic-ischemic lesions in comparison with regular standard modes. In the event of no structural brain lesions of neonates, pronounced increase in signal characteristics revealed by DWI indicated considerable pathophysiological alterations. Subsequently, children developed structural alterations in the form of cystic encephalomalacia with expansion of cerebrospinal fluid spaces manifested with pronounced neurological deficit. DW MRI has been offered as a method of prognosticating further neurological development of children on early stages. 

  9. Misdiagnosis of acute peripheral vestibulopathy in central nervous ischemic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Eva Maria; Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Ropposch, Thorsten; Nemetz, Ulrike; Lackner, Andreas; Walch, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Vertigo is a very common symptom at otorhinolaryngology (ENT), neurological, and emergency units, but often, it is difficult to distinguish between vertigo of peripheral and central origin. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a hospital database, including all patients admitted to the ENT University Hospital Graz after neurological examination, with a diagnosis of peripheral vestibular vertigo and subsequent diagnosis of central nervous infarction as the actual cause for the vertigo. Twelve patients were included in this study. All patients with acute spinning vertigo after a thorough neurological examination and with uneventful computed tomographic scans were referred to our ENT department. Nine of them presented with horizontal nystagmus. Only 1 woman experienced additional hearing loss. The mean diagnostic delay to the definite diagnosis of a central infarction through magnetic resonance imaging was 4 days (SD, 2.3 d). A careful otologic and neurological examination, including the head impulse test and caloric testing, is mandatory. Because ischemic events cannot be diagnosed in computed tomographic scans at an early stage, we strongly recommend to perform cranial magnetic resonance imaging within 48 hours from admission if vertigo has not improved under conservative treatment.

  10. Program of rehabilitative exercise and education to avert vascular events after non-disabling stroke or transient ischemic attack (PREVENT Trial: a multi-centred, randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Kara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite lack of outward signs, most individuals after non-disabling stroke (NDS and transient ischemic attack (TIA have significant cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and are at high risk of a major stroke, hospitalization for other vascular events, or death. Most have multiple modifiable risk factors (e.g., hypertension, physical inactivity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, tobacco consumption, psychological stress. In addition, accelerated rates of depression, cognitive decline, and poor quality of sleep have been reported following TIA, which correlate with poor functional outcomes and reduced quality of life. Thus, NSD and TIA are important warning signs that should not be overlooked. The challenge is not unlike that facing other 'silent' conditions - to identify a model of care that is effective in changing people's current behaviors in order to avert further morbidity. Methods/Design A single blind, randomized controlled trial will be conducted at two sites to compare the effectiveness of a program of rehabilitative exercise and education versus usual care in modifying vascular risk factors in adults after NDS/TIA. 250 adults within 90 days of being diagnosed with NDS/TIA will be randomly allocated to a 12-week program of exercise and education (PREVENT or to an outpatient clinic assessment and discussion of secondary prevention recommendations with return clinic visits as indicated (USUAL CARE. Primary outcome measures will include blood pressure, waist circumference, 12-hour fasting lipid profile, and 12-hour fasting glucose/hemoglobin A1c. Secondary measures will include exercise capacity, walking endurance, physical activity, cognitive function, depression, goal attainment and health-related quality of life. Outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention, and 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Direct health care costs incurred over one year by PREVENT versus USUAL CARE participants will also be

  11. Astrocytes, therapeutic targets for neuroprotection and neurorestoration in ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongwu; Chopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type within the central nervous system. They play essential roles in maintaining normal brain function, as they are a critical structural and functional part of the tripartite synapses and the neurovascular unit, and communicate with neurons, oligodendrocytes and endothelial cells. After an ischemic stroke, astrocytes perform multiple functions both detrimental and beneficial, for neuronal survival during the acute phase. Aspects of the astrocytic inflammatory response to stroke may aggravate the ischemic lesion, but astrocytes also provide benefit for neuroprotection, by limiting lesion extension via anti-excitotoxicity effects and releasing neurotrophins. Similarly, during the late recovery phase after stroke, the glial scar may obstruct axonal regeneration and subsequently reduce the functional outcome; however, astrocytes also contribute to angiogenesis, neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and axonal remodeling, and thereby promote neurological recovery. Thus, the pivotal involvement of astrocytes in normal brain function and responses to an ischemic lesion designates them as excellent therapeutic targets to improve functional outcome following stroke. In this review, we will focus on functions of astrocytes and astrocyte-mediated events during stroke and recovery. We will provide an overview of approaches on how to reduce the detrimental effects and amplify the beneficial effects of astrocytes on neuroprotection and on neurorestoration post stroke, which may lead to novel and clinically relevant therapies for stroke. PMID:26455456

  12. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  13. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Schnohr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events. RESULTS: Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations...

  14. Design and Rationale of the Intima-Medial Thickness Sub-Study of the PreventIon of CArdiovascular Events in iSchemic Stroke Patients with High Risk of Cerebral hemOrrhage (PICASSO-IMT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Woo-Keun; Kim, Yong Jae; Lee, Juneyoung; Kwon, Sun U

    2017-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the main mechanisms of stroke and cardiovascular diseases and is associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events. Intima-medial thickness (IMT) is a well-known surrogate marker of atherosclerosis and has been used to predict stroke and cardiovascular events. However, the clinical significance of IMT and IMT change in stroke has not been investigated in well-designed studies. The PreventIon of CArdiovascular events in iSchemic Stroke patients with high risk of cerebral hemOrrhage-Intima-Media Thickness (PICASSO-IMT) sub-study is designed to investigate the effects of cilostazol, probucol, or both on IMT in patients with stroke. PICASSO-IMT is a prospective sub-study of the PICASSO study designed to measure IMT and plaque score at 1, 13, 25, 37, and 49 months after randomization. The primary outcome is the change in mean carotid IMT, which is defined as the mean of the far-wall IMTs of the right and left common carotid arteries, between baseline and 13 months after randomization. PICASSO-IMT will provide the largest IMT data set in a stroke population and will provide valuable information about the clinical significance of IMT in patients with ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurology in Federico Fellini?s work and life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available The authors present a historical review of the neurological diseases related to the famous moviemaker Federico Fellini. There is an account of diseases depicted on his movies as well as his ischemic stroke and consequent neurological deficit - left spatial neglect.

  16. Neurologic manifestations of achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jacqueline T; Bodensteiner, John B; Butler, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the best described and most common form of the congenital short-limbed dwarfing conditions. Achondroplasia is apparent at birth and has a birth prevalence of 1 in 20000-30000 live-born infants. Achondroplasia is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition, although 80% of cases occur sporadically as new events in their families. Achondroplasia is caused, in virtually all of the cases, by a G380R mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Patients with achondroplasia should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians including geneticists, neurologists, and orthopedists, since there are numerous bony and neurological complications. The most severe complication results from craniocervical stenosis and medullary and upper spinal cord compression, which can have devastating and even lethal sequelae during early childhood. In subsequent decades, including adolescence, spinal cord and nerve compression are more prominent. The neurological complications of achondroplasia have been recognized in adults for more than a century and are attributed to bony defects, connective tissue structures, or both. Similar neurological complications are now appreciated in infants, young children, and teenagers with achondroplasia. Defective connective tissue elements in achondroplasia frequently lead to ligamentous laxity, which can aggravate the complications associated with bony stenosis. Bony abnormalities are known to cause neurological morbidity and lead to a shortened lifespan. Neurological complications associated with achondroplasia are reviewed, including recommendations for the evaluation and management of these clinical problems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetics of ischemic stroke: future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael M

    2006-11-01

    Ischemic stroke has long been thought to have a genetic component that is independent of conventional vascular risk factors. It has been estimated that over one half of stroke risk is determined by inherited genes. However, until recently, strong evidence of genetic influence on ischemic stroke has been subject to criticism because the risk factors for stroke are also inherited and because previous studies suffered from limitations imposed by this highly heterogeneous neurological disorder. Recent advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of specific genetic loci that impart susceptibility to ischemic stroke. We review the studies of these genes and discuss the future potential applications of genetic markers on the management of ischemic stroke patients.

  18. [Primary emergencies: management of acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Didier; Goldstein, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The emergency diagnostic strategy for acute ischemic stroke consists of:--identification of stroke, based on clinical examination (sudden onset of a focal neurological deficit);--identification of the ischemic or hemorrhagic nature by MRI or CT;--determination of the early time-course (clinical examination) and the cause. In all strokes (ischemic or hemorrhagic), treatment consists of:--the same general management (treatment of a life-threatening emergency, ensuring normal biological parameters except for blood pressure, and prevention of complications);--decompressive surgery in the rare cases of intracranial hypertension. For proven ischemic stroke, other therapies consist of: rt-PA for patients admitted with 4.5 hours of stroke onset who have no contraindications, and aspirin (160 to 300 mg) for patients who are not eligible for rt-PA. These treatments should be administered within a few hours. A centralized emergency call system (phone number 15 in France) is the most effective way of achieving this objective.

  19. Neurologic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakeres, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    There is a wide range of indications for radiographic evaluation of possible cerebrovascular disease, since a wide range of neurologic symptoms can be encountered secondary to ischemia. Frequently the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease is clear on clinical grounds, but radiographic evaluation is essential both to quantify the extent of disease and establish the underlying cause (e.g., vasculitis, embolus) while excluding other causes so that the proper therapy can follow

  20. Improving prediction of ischemic cardiovascular disease in the general population using apolipoprotein B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels predict fatal myocardial infarction. Whether apoB also predicts nonfatal ischemic cardiovascular events is unclear. We tested the following hypotheses: apoB predicts ischemic cardiovascular events, and apoB is a better predictor of ischemic cardiovascular events tha...

  1. What causes disability after transient ischemic attack and minor stroke?: Results from the CT and MRI in the Triage of TIA and minor Cerebrovascular Events to Identify High Risk Patients (CATCH) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Shelagh B; Modi, Jayesh; Patel, Shiel K; Aram, Heidi; Demchuk, Andrew M; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D

    2012-11-01

    Minor stroke and transient ischemic attack portend a significant risk of disability. Three possible mechanisms for this include disability not captured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, symptom progression, or recurrent stroke. We sought to assess the relative impact of these mechanisms on disability in a population of patients with transient ischemic attack and minor stroke. Five hundred ten consecutive minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scalefour of 499 (15%; 95% CI, 12%-18%) patients had a disabled outcome. Baseline factors predicting disability were: age≥60 years, diabetes mellitus, premorbid modified Rankin Scale 1, ongoing symptoms, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, CT/CT angiography-positive metric, and diffusion-weighted imaging positivity. In the multivariable analysis ongoing symptoms (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.4; P=0.004), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2-4.3; P=0.009), female sex (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3; P=0.025), and CT/CT angiography-positive metric (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4; P=0.001) predicted disability. Of the 463 patients who did not have a recurrent event, 55 were disabled (12%). By contrast 19 of 36 (53%) patients were disabled after a recurrent event (risk ratio, 4.4; 95% CI, 3-6.6; Pstroke become disabled. In terms of absolute numbers, most patients have disability as a result of their presenting event; however, recurrent events have the largest relative impact on outcome.

  2. Smoking cessation and outcome after ischemic stroke or TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Katherine A; Viscoli, Catherine M; Spence, J David; Young, Lawrence H; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Gorman, Mark; Gerstenhaber, Brett; Guarino, Peter D; Dixit, Anand; Furie, Karen L; Kernan, Walter N

    2017-10-17

    To assess whether smoking cessation after an ischemic stroke or TIA improves outcomes compared to continued smoking. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 3,876 nondiabetic men and women enrolled in the Insulin Resistance Intervention After Stroke (IRIS) trial who were randomized to pioglitazone or placebo within 180 days of a qualifying stroke or TIA and followed up for a median of 4.8 years. A tobacco use history was obtained at baseline and updated during annual interviews. The primary outcome, which was not prespecified in the IRIS protocol, was recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), or death. Cox regression models were used to assess the differences in stroke, MI, and death after 4.8 years, with correction for adjustment variables prespecified in the IRIS trial: age, sex, stroke (vs TIA) as index event, history of stroke, history of hypertension, history of coronary artery disease, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures. At the time of their index event, 1,072 (28%) patients were current smokers. By the time of randomization, 450 (42%) patients had quit smoking. Among quitters, the 5-year risk of stroke, MI, or death was 15.7% compared to 22.6% for patients who continued to smoke (adjusted hazard ratio 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.90). Cessation of cigarette smoking after an ischemic stroke or TIA was associated with significant health benefits over 4.8 years in the IRIS trial cohort. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurovascular Injury in Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoming; De Silva, T. Michael; Chen, Jun; Faraci, Frank M.

    2017-01-01

    The consequences of cerebrovascular disease are among the leading health issues worldwide. Large and small cerebral vessel disease can trigger stroke and contribute to the vascular component of other forms of neurological dysfunction and degeneration. Both forms of vascular disease are driven by diverse risk factors, with hypertension as the leading contributor. Despite the importance of neurovascular disease and subsequent injury following ischemic events, fundamental knowledge in these areas lag behind our current understanding of neuroprotection and vascular biology in general. The goal of this review is to address select key structural and functional changes in the vasculature that promote hypoperfusion and ischemia, while also affecting the extent of injury and effectiveness of therapy. In addition, as damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major consequences of ischemia, we discuss cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced changes in BBB integrity and function, including alterations in endothelial cells and the contribution of pericytes, immune cells, and matrix metalloproteinases. Identification of cell types, pathways, and molecules that control vascular changes before and after ischemia may result in novel approaches to slow the progression of cerebrovascular disease and lessen both the frequency and impact of ischemic events. PMID:28154097

  4. Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Vascular Ischemic (Occlusive) Diseases: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is primarily considered to be an autoimmune pathological condition that is also referred to as "Hughes syndrome". It is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and pregnancy pathologies in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant. APS can occur either as a primary disease or secondary to a connective tissue disorder, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Damage to the nervous system is one of the most prominent clinical constellations of sequelae in APS and includes (i) arterial/venous thrombotic events, (ii) psychiatric features and (iii) other non-thrombotic neurological syndromes. In this overview we compare the most important vascular ischemic (occlusive) disturbances (VIOD) with neuro-psychiatric symptomatics, together with complete, updated classifications and hypotheses for the etio-pathogenesis of APS with underlying clinical and laboratory criteria for optimal diagnosis and disease management. PMID:18159581

  5. Ischemic preconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-meng Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we hypothesized that an increase in integrin αv ß 3 and its co-activator vascular endothelial growth factor play important neuroprotective roles in ischemic injury. We performed ischemic preconditioning with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 5 minutes in C57BL/6J mice. This was followed by ischemic injury with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 30 minutes. The time interval between ischemic preconditioning and lethal ischemia was 48 hours. Histopathological analysis showed that ischemic preconditioning substantially diminished damage to neurons in the hippocampus 7 days after ischemia. Evans Blue dye assay showed that ischemic preconditioning reduced damage to the blood-brain barrier 24 hours after ischemia. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. Western blot assay revealed a significant reduction in protein levels of integrin αv ß 3, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor in mice given ischemic preconditioning compared with mice not given ischemic preconditioning 24 hours after ischemia. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning is associated with lower integrin αv ß 3 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the brain following ischemia.

  6. [Post-marketing re-evaluation of Kudiezi injection study on early treatment in patients with ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoqin; Wei, Xu; Xie, Yanming; Zou, Yihuai; Zhao, Xingquan; Han, Jianhua; Wang, Xinzhi; Ma, Yunzhi; Bi, Qi; Xie, Qingfan; Zhao, Jianjun; Cao, Xiaolan; Chen, Hongxia; Wang, Shizhong; Yan, Rongmei; Han, Zucheng; Yi, Danhui; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-10-01

    To study the effect and safety of Kudiezi injection on patients with acute ischemic stroke. Seven hundreds patients were divided into two groups by central randomization system. The study group, 346 cases, was treated with kudiezi injection plus traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) synthesis rehabilitation project, and the control group, 354 cases, was treated with synthetic rehabilitation project. The patients were treated for 10 to 21 days. Before treatment and at the 7th, 14th and 21th day of treatment, the indexes include NIHSS used for evaluating the neurological deficit degree and the motor function score (Fugl-Meyer) for evaluating motor function were observed. The safety index is defined by adverse observation event and laboratory test. The incidence of adverse events and laboratory tests results were observed before and after treatment at the same time. Application of generalized estimating equation model, we found that as the treatment time, NIHSS score and FMI score of the two groups showed a trend of improvement. And at the 14th days and 21th days of treatment, compared to the control group the treatment group showed significant statistical difference on the impact of NIHSS and FMI (Pinjection plus TCM rehabilitation project of ischemic stroke showed some superiority to western medicine rehabilitation program on improving the neurological deficit and motor function. Kudiezi injection is safe and effective in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  7. The influence of general anesthesia on the brain in aged patients with previous ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Yasuaki; Kayama, Takamasa; Kondo, Rei; Oki, Masato; Takaoka, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    Whenever we discuss the overall results of surgical treatment for unruptured cerebral aneurysms, especially in aged patients, we tend to consider advanced age or general anesthesia as causes for unfavorable results. There are no reports concerning ischemic stroke events following general anesthesia in aged patients with a prior history of cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this study is to clarify the influence of general anesthesia on the brats in aged patients with a previous history of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The subjects were 30 consecutive patients over 70 years of age with previous ischemic cerebrovascular disease who underwent various surgeries except brain and cardiac surgery under general anesthesia. The patients were 70 to 85 years old, with a mean age of 76. Twenty-three were men and 7 were women. Surgical procedures were 12 gastrointestinal, 6 orthopedic and 4 urogenital and others. The type of cerebrovascular disease evaluated by neuroradiologist and anesthesiologist based on MR imaging was devided as follows: 16 patients had minor stroke, 7 had transient ischemic attack/reversible ischemic neurological deficit (TIA/RIND) and 7 had asymptomatic cerebral infarction. MR angiography was also assessed to evaluate the main artery in the brain. Blood pressure and arterial blood gas (PaCO 2 ) during general anesthesia were analyzed, and the rate of systemic and neurological complications following general anesthesia were evaluated. MR angiography revealed no occlusion or severe stenosis of the main artery in the brain of any of the patients. The minimum systolic blood pressure showed less than 100 mmHg transiently for 5-20 minutes in 28 of 30 patients during general anesthesia. The minimum value was 65 mmHg maintained for 5 minutes. The minimum PaCO 2 during general anesthesia was as follows: 1 case 36 mmHg. There were no neurological complications following general anesthesia in this study. One of 30 patients (3.3%) had suffered from pneumonia

  8. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  9. Ischemic stroke risk factors during Greek economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Fiolaki, Aidonio; Markou, Sofia; Markoula, Sofia; Kosmidou, Maria; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2016-02-01

    The impact of Greece's economic crisis on healthcare is of great concern. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of economic crisis on the prevention of cerebral ischemic events. Retrospective analysis of patients with ischemic stroke (IS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) admitted to a tertiary neurological department in northwestern Greece during the period 2008-2014. Using 2011 as the transitional year IS/TIA patients were dichotomized according to their admission date in two subgroups: the "before economic crisis" subgroup and the "after economic crisis" subgroup. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictor variables of statin/antihypertensive pretreatment. Patients admitted after the economic crisis outbreak (mean age: 57.6 ± 13.5 years) were found to have lower waist periphery measurements (p = 0.001), lower incidence of diabetes (p = 0.028), hyperlipidemia (p = 0.002) and metabolic syndrome(p crisis (mean age: 59.6 ± 11.1 years). However, between the two subgroups were no significant differences in the rates of untreated patients with hyperlipidemia (p = 0.189) and/or hypertension (p = 0.313). Even though statin pretreatment prior to stroke onset was found to be reduced during economic crisis compared to the period before the crisis, (OR = 0.58, 95%CI: 0.34-0.95, p = 0.032), this association did not retain statistical significance in the multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR = 1.69, 95%CI = 0.83-3.42, p = 0.143). Our study supports that at present financial crisis has not significantly affected the prevention of cerebrovascular events in the citizens of a provincial city area. Data from other regions and time-periods are needed for the final verdict. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Profile of Neurology Patients Evaluated in the Emergency Department

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    Ufuk Emre

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early, rapid, and multidisciplinary approaches are very important in the diagnosis of neurological disorders in emergency departments. The present study aimed to investigate the features of patients that presented for neurology consultation in the emergency department. METHODS: The present study included 780 patients. Patient demographic features, reasons for emergent treatment and neurological consultation, neurological diagnosis by the neurologist, and laboratory (total blood count, serum glucose level, urea, creatine, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and D-dimer levels and imaging findings were retrospectively evaluated based on patient charts. RESULTS: Impaired consciousness was the most frequent reason for neurological consultation (19.7%. Among these patients, ischemic stroke was diagnosed in 27.9%, hypoxic encephalopathy in 18.2%, cerebral hemorrhage in 9.1%, and 11% had no neurological diagnosis. Other common reasons for neurological consultation were vertigo, headache, seizure, and stroke. Clinical findings were related to other systemic causes in 43.7% of the study group. Focal neurological findings were present, especially in patients that presented with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, epilepsy, and hypoxic encephalopathy. CONCLUSION: In emergency departments, metabolic causes should be ruled out in patients with impaired consciousness and the absence of focal neurological signs. Intracranial structural disorders must be evaluated when focal neurological signs are present. Cautiously prepared algorithms and neurological examination training will help improve the accuracy of emergency department diagnoses

  11. Olanzapine-induced ischemic colitis

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    Esteban Sáez-González

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic colitis (IC is an uncommon adverse event associated with antipsychotic agents, more commonly found with phenothiazine drugs and atypical neuroleptics such as clozapine. The risk of developing ischemic colitis increases when anticholinergic drugs are associated. Case report: We report the case of a 38-year-old woman with a history of schizoaffective disorder who had been on chronic quetiapine for 3 years, and presented to the ER because of diarrhea for 5 days. Four months previously, olanzapine had been added to her psychiatric drug regimen. Physical examination revealed abdominal distension with abdominal tympanic sounds and tenderness. Emergency laboratory tests were notable for increased acute phase reagents. Tomography revealed a concentric thickening of the colonic wall in the transverse, descending and sigmoid segments, with no signs of intestinal perforation. Colonoscopy demonstrated severe mucosal involvement from the sigmoid to the hepatic flexure, with ulcerations and fibrinoid exudate. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of ischemic colitis. The only relevant finding in her history was the newly added drug to her baseline regimen. An adverse effect was suspected because of its anticholinergic action at the intestinal level, and the drug was withdrawn. After 6 months of follow-up clinical, laboratory and endoscopic recovery was achieved. Discussion: Antipsychotic medication should be considered as a potential cause of ischemic colitis, particularly atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine and olanzapine; despite being uncommon, this adverse event may result in high morbidity and mortality.

  12. Hypoxic-ischemic encefalopathy: Clinical course and prognosis

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    Ćosić-Cerovac Nataša

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Establishing the value of neurological examination, and additional diagnostic methods (ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in the diagnosis and prognosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and its treatment, tracking the clinical course, and making the prognosis of neurological development in newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encefalopathy. Methods. The group of 40 term newborn infants with suspected intrauterine asphyxia was examined. All the infants were prospectivelly followed untill the 3rd year of age at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in order to estimate their neurological development and to diagnose the occurence of persistent neurological disorders. All the infants were analyzed by their gestational age and Apgar score in the 1st and the 5th minute of life. They were all examined neurologically and by ultrasonography in the first week of life and, repeatedly, at the age of 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, as well as in the 24th month of life. They were treated by the standard methods for this disease. Finally, all the infants were examined neurologically and by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in their 3rd year of age. On the basis of neurological finding infants were devided into 3 groups: infants with normal neurological finding, infants with mild neurological symptomatology, and infants with severe neurological disorders. Results. It was shown that neurological finding, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain positively correlated with the later neurological development of the infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Conclusion. Only the combined use of these techniques had full diagnostic and prognostic significance emphasizing that the integrative approach was very important in the diagnosis of brain lesions in infants.

  13. Neurological adverse events of new generation sodium blocker antiepileptic drugs. Meta-analysis of randomized, double-blinded studies with eslicarbazepine acetate, lacosamide and oxcarbazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Giovannelli, Fabio; Maratea, Dario; Fadda, Valeria; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of overall tolerability and neurological adverse effects (AEs) of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), lacosamide (LCM) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) from double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Indirect comparisons of patients withdrawing because of AEs, and the incidence of some vestibulocerebellar AEs between these three antiepileptic dugs (AEDs). We searched MEDLINE for all randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigating therapeutic effects of fixed oral doses of ESL, LCM and OXC in patients with drug resistant epilepsy. Withdrawal rate due to AEs, percentages of patients with serious AEs, and the proportion of patients experiencing any neurological AE, nausea and vomiting were assessed for their association with the experimental drug. Analyses were performed between recommended daily doses of each AED according to the approved summary of product characteristics (SPC). Risk differences were used to evaluate the association of any AE [99% confidence intervals (CIs)] or study withdrawals because of AEs (95% CIs) with the experimental drug. Indirect comparisons between withdrawal rate and AEs dizziness, coordination abnormal/ataxia and diplopia were estimated according to network meta-analysis (Net-MA). Eight randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials (4 with ESL, 3 with LCM, and 1 with OXC) were included in our analysis. At high doses (OXC 1200mg, ESL 1200mg and LCM 400mg) there was an increased risk of AE-related study withdrawals compared to placebo for all drugs. Several AEs were associated with the experimental drug. Both number and frequency of AEs were dose-related. At high recommended doses, patients treated with OXC withdrew from the experimental treatment significantly more frequently than patients treated with ESL and LCM. Furthermore, the AEs coordination abnormal/ataxia and diplopia were significantly more frequently observed in patients treated with OXC compared to patients treated with LCM and ESL. The overall tolerability

  14. ANNUAL FORECAST IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE: ROLE OF PATHOLOGICAL ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX

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    A. N. Sumin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the factors associated with a poor annual prognosis in patients with acute stroke and prognostic role of pathological ankle-brachial index (ABI.Material and methods. The study included 345 patients (age 63.6±7.8 years, 181 males and 164 females with ischemic stroke that were observed for 1 year. All patients were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 included patients with favorable annual outcome of stroke; Group 2 included patients that during a year had any clinical events including death. All patients underwent a standard neurological and instrumental examination including assessment of peripheral arteries status by sphygmomanometry.Results. Both groups did not differ by age and sex. The frequency of unfavorable outcomes (death, re-stroke, cardiovascular events 1 year after ischemic stroke was 29.5%. Chronic heart failure, atrial fibrillation, previous cardiovascular events, presence of peripheral atherosclerosis, overweight were identified most commonly in Group 2. Patients of Group 2 initially had a rough neurological deficit. The pathological ABI was detected in 70.7% of patients in Group 2 vs 33.8% of patients in Group 1 (p=0.000001. A strong relationship of pathological ABI with a poor outcome of stroke was found by regression analysis.Conclusions. Detection of pathological ABI in patients with ischemic stroke makes it possible to reveal peripheral atherosclerosis and to carry out the targeted preventive measures in these patients. Risk stratification can contribute to more individual and effective secondary prevention in patients with cerebrovascular disease. 

  15. Events

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    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  16. Job loss and broken partnerships: do the number of stressful life events influence the risk of ischemic heart disease in men?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Margit; Christensen, Ulla; Lund, Rikke

    2008-01-01

    % confidence interval 1.02-1.85). We found no indication of dose-response relationship between number of events and risk of IHD. CONCLUSION: In this study of middle-aged men, we found only weak support for the effect of psychosocial stress on IHD measured with register based life events; we found that IHD...... was associated with broken partnerships but not with job loss. We did not find that the risk of incident IHD varied with the number of these stressful life events....

  17. Transient Ischemic Attack Caused by Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Ufuk Emre

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient Ischemic Attack Caused by Iron Deficiency Anemia Transient ischemic attacks are episodes of transient focal ischemia involving the brain or brainstem. They are commonly two to thirty minutes in duration and lasting less than 24 hours. Anemia of iron deficiency isn’t frequently cause for transient ischemic attack. It has been reported as a risk factor for childhood ischemic strokes. In the iron deficiency anemia, T‹A may develop as result of hypercoagulable state and increased viscosity that is caused by anemic hypoxia that is result of reduce hemoglobine level, seconder thrombosis and microcytose As iron deficiency anemia has been reported so rarely in adult patients with transient ischemic attacks as a cause, we aimed to discuss the clinical and outcome features of two cases with iron deficiency anemia and transient ischemic attacks in this study. Materials and methods: Routine neurologic examination, biochemical screen, serological tests, vasculitic markers, thyroid function tests, vitamin B 12 level, cranial imaging, vertebral carotid doppler USG examination was conducted in the two patients. Anemia of iron deficiency was found as the only risk factor for TIA and the two patients were treated with replacement of iron and antiagregan therapy. Neurological examination revealed no abnormality through the two years of follow-up. The iron deficiency anemia may be cause of many neurologic problems such a irritability, lethargy, headache, development retardation except from T‹A. In the iron deficiency anemia, early diagnosis and treatment is important

  18. Clinical predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in non lacunar ischemic stroke

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    Natalia R. Balian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic transformation is a complex phenomenon where brain tissue bleeds, which could be associated or not to an increase in the neurological deficit after the acute ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to evaluate clinical predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in patients with non-lacunar ischemic stroke. We performed a prospective analysis of the clinical records and images of patients with non-lacunar ischemic stroke. Demographics, vascular risk factors, previous medications and the information of the event in patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation were here compared. We included in this study 747 patients with non-lacunar stroke, the mean age was 77 ± 11 years and 61% were females. In the univariate analysis, the age, a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease and the previous use of oral anticoagulation resulted statistically significant. In the multivariate analysis of logistic regression adjusted by age and vascular risk factors: the age > 80 years (OR 3.6, CI 95% 1.8-7.6, the pulse pressure > 60 mmHg at admission (OR 5.3, CI 95% 3.2-9.1, the chronic kidney disease (OR 3, CI 95% 2.5-3.8 and the presence of previous atrial fibrillation (OR 3.5, CI 95% 2.1-6.1 were associated with and increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation. The predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in our cohort showed a relationship with severe vascular illness. The identification of these patients could influence therapeutic decisions that could increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation

  19. Treatment with intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is associated with reduced bed day use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Thorkild; Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need for hospi......Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need...

  20. Thrombogenicity and central pulse pressure to enhance prediction of ischemic event occurrence in patients with established coronary artery disease: The MAGMA-ischemia score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliden, Kevin P; Chaudhary, Rahul; Navarese, Eliano P; Sharma, Tushar; Kaza, Himabindu; Tantry, Udaya S; Gurbel, Paul A

    2018-01-01

    Conventional cardiovascular risk estimators based on clinical demographics have limited prediction of coronary events. Markers for thrombogenicity and vascular function have not been explored in risk estimation of high-risk patients with coronary artery disease. We aimed to develop a clinical and biomarker score to predict 3-year adverse cardiovascular events. Four hundred eleven patients, with ejection fraction ≥40% undergoing coronary angiography, and found to have a luminal diameter stenosis ≥50%, were included in the analysis. Thrombelastography indices and central pulse pressure (CPP) were determined at the time of catheterization. We identified predictors of death, myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke and developed a numerical ischemia risk score. The primary endpoint of cardiovascular death, MI or stroke occurred in 22 patients (5.4%). The factors associated with events were age, prior PCI or CABG, diabetes, CPP, and thrombin-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength, and were included in the MAGMA-ischemia score. The MAGMA-ischemia score showed a c-statistic of 0.85 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.80-0.87; pMAGMA-ischemia score greater than 5 had highest risk to develop clinical events, hazard ratio for the primary endpoint: 13.9 (95% CI 5.8-33.1, pMAGMA-ischemia score yielded a higher discrimination. Inclusion of CPP and assessment of thrombogenicity in a novel score for patients with documented CAD enhanced the prediction of events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Experience in using intravenous thrombolysis in ischemic stroke in Tatarstan

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    Dina Rustemovna Khasanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes experience with intravenous thrombolysis used in a few vascular centers of the Republic of Tatarstan in the past 5 years. Intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (actilise was carried in 300 patients (188 men and 112 women aged 21 to 79 years (mean age 59.8±13.7 years who had ischemic stroke (IS. Significant positive changes (a neurological deficit decrease on the NIHSS score by ≥ 4 points were observed in 67.3% of cases; mortality was 6.7%. Hemorrhagic events as asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformations were found in 19.3% of cases with the neurological disorders being progressive in 4.6%. Recanalization of internal carotid artery occlusion was recorded only in 24.0% of the patients and that of occlusion of the proximal segments of the middle cerebral artery was in 50.1%. Examples of effective intravenous thrombolysis in IS in the carotid and vertebrobasilar beds are given. Whether intravenous thrombolysis can be more extensively used in IS is discussed.

  2. Explicit diagnostic criteria for transient ischemic attacks to differentiate it from migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R.; Gurary, Natalia M.; Gilev, Denis V.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of transient ischemic attacks is fraught with problems. The inter-observer agreement has repeatedly been shown to be low even in a neurological setting, and the specificity of the diagnosis is modest to low, reflected in a poor separation of transient ischemic attacks an...

  3. MODELS OF MAJOR ADVERSE CARDIAC EVENT RISK USING RESULTS OF EXERCISE STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY WITH NONINVASIVE CORONARY ARTERY FLOW ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zagatina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound non-invasive coronary artery imaging contributes to the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD in clinical practice. However, data of the prognostic value obtained from a complex analysis of contractility disorders and coronary blood flow parameters during exercise tests in the world literature are still not available. Aim. To develop risk models for adverse outcomes in patients with probable or definite IHD based on the results of a stress test with a noninvasive coronary blood flow study. Material and methods. Medical data of 689 patients with probable or definite IHD who underwent stress echocardiography with satisfactory visualization of the anterior interventricular artery (AIVA were included in the analysis. All patients had stress echocardiography on a horizontal bicycle ergometer. Registration of coronary blood flow in the middle third of the AIVA was performed at rest and at the peak of the load with calculation of the coronary reserve value. Further patient follow-up lasted 3 years. Models of further negative outcomes were developed on the basis of the stress echocardiography results and of coronary blood flow parameters. Results. Three models that take into account the factors associated with further mortality, mortality/myocardial infarction and sum of negative outcomes were developed in the study. These models divide a cohort of patients with probable or definite IHD into groups of low, medium and very high risks. Factors associated with the risk of death include: age >56 years, load power <100 W, breach of contractility in the blood supply zone of the circumflex artery initially and during exercise, the difference in blood flow velocities in the AIVA<10 cm/s, coronary reserve of AIVA<2. The risk model of death, taking into account these factors, suggests dividing patients into low-risk group if there are ≤2 factors (mortality 0.6% for 3 years, medium risk – from 2 to 4 factors (mortality 1.8%, high risk – ≥5

  4. Anticoagulant therapy and outcomes in patients with prior or acute heart failure and acute coronary syndromes: Insights from the APixaban for PRevention of Acute ISchemic Events 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornel, Jan H; Lopes, Renato D; James, Stefan; Stevens, Susanna R; Neely, Megan L; Liaw, Danny; Miller, Julie; Mohan, Puneet; Amerena, John; Raev, Dimitar; Huo, Yong; Urina-Triana, Miguel; Gallegos Cazorla, Alex; Vinereanu, Dragos; Fridrich, Viliam; Harrington, Robert A; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H

    2015-04-01

    Clinical outcomes and the effects of oral anticoagulants among patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and either a history of or acute heart failure (HF) are largely unknown. We aimed to assess the relationship between prior HF or acute HF complicating an index ACS event and subsequent clinical outcomes and the efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with placebo in these populations. High-risk patients were randomly assigned post-ACS to apixaban 5.0 mg or placebo twice daily. Median follow-up was 8 (4-12) months. The primary outcome was cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The main safety outcome was thrombolysis in myocardial infarction major bleeding. Heart failure was reported in 2,995 patients (41%), either as prior HF (2,076 [28%]) or acute HF (2,028 [27%]). Patients with HF had a very high baseline risk and were more often managed medically. Heart failure was associated with a higher rate of the primary outcome (prior HF: adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.73, 95% CI 1.42-2.10, P acute HF: adjusted HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.35-2.01, P acute HF: adjusted HR 2.52, 95% CI 1.82-3.50). Patients with acute HF also had significantly higher rates of thrombolysis in myocardial infarction major bleeding (prior HF: adjusted HR 1.22, 95% CI 0.65-2.27, P = .54, acute HF: adjusted HR 1.78, 95% CI 1.03-3.08, P = .04). There was no statistical evidence of a differential effect of apixaban on clinical events or bleeding in patients with or without prior HF; however, among patients with acute HF, there were numerically fewer events with apixaban than placebo (14.8 vs 19.3, HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.57-1.01, interaction P = .13), a trend that was not seen in patients with prior HF or no HF. In high-risk patients post-ACS, both prior and acute HFs are associated with an increased risk of subsequent clinical events. Apixaban did not significantly reduce clinical events and increased bleeding in patients with and without HF; however, there was a tendency toward fewer clinical

  5. Computed tomographic, electrocardiographic and clinical investigations in patients with ischemic strokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchev, L.; Mitev, M.; Milanova, V.; Zafirova, E.; Manolova, T.; Manchev, I.; Toneva, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Computed Tomography (CT) is a widely available and reliable method for the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. It allows in the first hours of the occurrence of vascular events to be established the type of brain stroke and creates conditions for timely fibrinolytic or surgical treatment. In many cases where it cannot be performed echocardiographic examination modern electrocardiography (ECG) makes it possible to demonstrate the presence of cardiac disease. These two methods in combination with neurological status create conditions for determining the treatment strategy for ischemic brain stroke (IBS). We studied 222 patients (92 men and 110 women with a middle age 59.7 years) selected randomized. At a computed tomography study in the early hours of IBS were found pathological findings in 115 patients (51.8%) slightly more often in women. IBS in the carotid system were greatly predominant in comparison with those in the vertebrobasilar system (VBS), which can be explained with the blood flow to the brain stem. When ECG is most commonly met diagnosis: hypertension HSSN 111 stage II - III functional class NYUHA, ischemic cardiomyopathy in 64 patients overall, with almost equal frequency in men 30 (17.5%) and women - 34 (19.8%). In neurological examination significantly predominant clinical symptoms karoditnata vasculature, in 154 patients (69.3%) compared to that of the VBS- 68 (30.7%). Fulfilled study shows the need for better coordination of the activities of specialists in diagnostic imaging and neurologists for their work in specialized hospitals (Stroke Units). (authors)

  6. Neurology and literature 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2014-05-01

    Good literary fiction has the potential to move us, extend our sense of life, transform our prospective views and help us in the face of adversity. A neurological disorder is likely to be the most challenging experience a human being may have to confront in a lifetime. As such, literary recreations of illnesses have a doubly powerful effect. Study the synergies between neurology and fictional literature with particular reference to narrative based medicine (NBM). Doctors establish boundaries between the normal and the abnormal. Taking a clinical history is an act of interpretation in which the doctor integrates the science of objective signs and measurable quantities with the art of subjective clinical judgment. The more discrepancy there is between the patient's experience with the illness and the doctor's interpretation of that disease, the less likely the doctor-patient interaction is to succeed. NBM contributes to a better discernment of the meanings, thus considering disease as a biographical event rather than just a natural fact. Drawing from their own experience with disease, writers of fiction provide universal insights through their narratives, whilst neuroscientists, like Cajal, have occasionally devoted their scientific knowledge to literary narratives. Furthermore, neurologists from Alzheimer to Oliver Sacks remind us of the essential value of NBM in the clinic. Integrating NBM (the narrative of patients) and the classic holistic approach to patients with our current paradigm of evidence based medicine represents a challenge as relevant to neurologists as keeping up with technological and scientific advances. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Definition and evaluation of transient ischemic attack: a scientific statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Stroke Council; Council on Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia; Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention; Council on Cardiovascular Nursing; and the Interdisciplinary Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease. The American Academy of Neurology affirms the value of this statement as an educational tool for neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, J Donald; Saver, Jeffrey L; Albers, Gregory W; Alberts, Mark J; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Feldmann, Edward; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Higashida, Randall T; Johnston, S Claiborne; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Lutsep, Helmi L; Miller, Elaine; Sacco, Ralph L

    2009-06-01

    This scientific statement is intended for use by physicians and allied health personnel caring for patients with transient ischemic attacks. Formal evidence review included a structured literature search of Medline from 1990 to June 2007 and data synthesis employing evidence tables, meta-analyses, and pooled analysis of individual patient-level data. The review supported endorsement of the following, tissue-based definition of transient ischemic attack (TIA): a transient episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia, without acute infarction. Patients with TIAs are at high risk of early stroke, and their risk may be stratified by clinical scale, vessel imaging, and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnostic recommendations include: TIA patients should undergo neuroimaging evaluation within 24 hours of symptom onset, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion sequences; noninvasive imaging of the cervical vessels should be performed and noninvasive imaging of intracranial vessels is reasonable; electrocardiography should occur as soon as possible after TIA and prolonged cardiac monitoring and echocardiography are reasonable in patients in whom the vascular etiology is not yet identified; routine blood tests are reasonable; and it is reasonable to hospitalize patients with TIA if they present within 72 hours and have an ABCD(2) score >or=3, indicating high risk of early recurrence, or the evaluation cannot be rapidly completed on an outpatient basis.

  8. Protective effects of incensole acetate on cerebral ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaieff, Arieh; Yu, Jin; Zhu, Hong; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Shohami, Esther; Kindy, Mark S

    2012-03-14

    The resin of Boswellia species is a major anti-inflammatory agent that has been used for centuries to treat various conditions including injuries and inflammatory conditions. Incensole acetate (IA), a major constituent of this resin, has been shown to inhibit NF-κB activation and concomitant inflammation, as well as the neurological deficit following head trauma. Here, we show that IA protects against ischemic neuronal damage and reperfusion injury in mice, attenuating the inflammatory nature of ischemic damage. IA given post-ischemia, reduced infarct volumes and improved neurological activities in the mouse model of ischemic injury in a dose dependent fashion. The protection from damage was accompanied by inhibition of TNF-α, IL-1β and TGF-β expression, as well as NF-κB activation following injury. In addition, IA is shown to have a therapeutic window of treatment up to 6h after ischemic injury. Finally, the protective effects of IA were partially mediated by TRPV3 channels as determined by the TRPV3 deficient mice and channel blocker studies. This study suggests that the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities of IA may serve as a novel therapeutic treatment for ischemic and reperfusion injury, and as a tool in the ongoing research of mechanisms for neurological damage. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  10. Rate and predictors of serious neurologic causes of dizziness in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navi, Babak B; Kamel, Hooman; Shah, Maulik P; Grossman, Aaron W; Wong, Christine; Poisson, Sharon N; Whetstone, William D; Josephson, S Andrew; Johnston, S Claiborne; Kim, Anthony S

    2012-11-01

    To describe the rate and predictors of central nervous system (CNS) disease in emergency department (ED) patients with dizziness in the modern era of neuroimaging. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all adults presenting between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, to an academic ED for a primary triage complaint of dizziness, vertigo, or imbalance. The final diagnosis for the cause of dizziness was independently assigned by 2 neurologists, with a third neurologist resolving any disagreements. The primary outcome was a composite of ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, transient ischemic attack, seizure, brain tumor, demyelinating disease, and CNS infection. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to assess the association between clinical variables and serious CNS causes of dizziness. Of 907 patients experiencing dizziness (mean age, 59 years; 58% women [n=529]), 49 (5%) had a serious neurologic diagnosis, including 37 cerebrovascular events. Dizziness was often caused by benign conditions, such as peripheral vertigo (294 patients [32%]) or orthostatic hypotension (121 patients [13%]). Age 60 years or older (odds ratio [OR], 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-11.2), a chief complaint of imbalance (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.3-15.2), and any focal examination abnormality (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 3.1-11.2) were independently associated with serious neurologic diagnoses, whereas isolated dizziness symptoms were inversely associated (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.0-0.7). Dizziness in the ED is generally benign, although a substantial fraction of patients harbor serious neurologic disease. Clinical suspicion should be heightened for patients with advanced age, imbalance, or focal deficits. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. METABOLIC THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Zavaliy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the world experience of metabolic therapy use in the treatment of ischemic stroke. The issue still remains prominent. The reasonability of prescribing metabolic drugs is not completely clear, its effectiveness has not been fully proved, despite numerous studies which show only trends. The article presents an overview of the most popular drugs of different pharmacological groups with a metabolic effect which affect different parts of the ischemic cascade. Ethylmethylhydroxypyridine succinate and cytoflavin have predominantly antihypoxic effect, improve functional outcome and neurological functions, and normalize overall well-being and adaptation. Cerebrolysin is a complex of low molecular weight biologically active peptides derived from the pig’s brain. It has a multimodal effect on the brain, helps to reduce the volume of cerebral infarction, restores neurologic functions and improves the functional outcome. Cortexin is a mixture of cattle brain polypeptides, also has a complex action that provides the most complete reversion of neurological deficit, improves cognitive functions and the functional outcome, reduces the level of paroxysmal convulsive readiness and improves bioelectric activity of the brain. Citicoline is a precursor of cell membrane key ultrastructures, contributes to significant reduction in the volume of cortical brain damage, improves cholinergic transmission, which results in better clinical outcome, even despite the questionable impact on the neurological status. Choline Alfoscerate is a precursor of choline, and the use of the drug significantly limits the growth of the cerebral infarction area starting from the first day of therapy, leads to reversion of neurological symptoms and achievement of rehabilitation goals. Actovegin is deproteinized derivative of calf blood, activates metabolism in tissues, improves trophism and stimulates regeneration. In a large study, it was shown that Actovegin improved

  12. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

  13. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  14. Neurologic emergencies in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Vernon B

    2014-12-01

    Sports neurology is an emerging area of subspecialty. Neurologists and non-neurologists evaluating and managing individuals participating in sports will encounter emergencies that directly or indirectly involve the nervous system. Since the primary specialty of sports medicine physicians and other practitioners involved in the delivery of medical care to athletes in emergency situations varies significantly, experience in recognition and management of neurologic emergencies in sports will vary as well. This article provides a review of information and elements essential to neurologic emergencies in sports for the practicing neurologist, although content may be of benefit to readers of varying background and expertise. Both common neurologic emergencies and less common but noteworthy neurologic emergencies are reviewed in this article. Issues that are fairly unique to sports participation are highlighted in this review. General concepts and principles related to treatment of neurologic emergencies that are often encountered unrelated to sports (eg, recognition and treatment of status epilepticus, increased intracranial pressure) are discussed but are not the focus of this article. Neurologic emergencies can involve any region of the nervous system (eg, brain, spine/spinal cord, peripheral nerves, muscles). In addition to neurologic emergencies that represent direct sports-related neurologic complications, indirect (systemic and generalized) sports-related emergencies with significant neurologic consequences can occur and are also discussed in this article. Neurologists and others involved in the care of athletes should consider neurologic emergencies in sports when planning and providing medical care.

  15. Mechanism of troponin elevations in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K.; Atar, Dan; Mickley, Hans

    2007-01-01

    the introduction of troponin in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, this marker has been measured in a number of other conditions as well. One of these conditions is acute ischemic stroke, causing diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. Because various electrocardiographic alterations have also been reported...... in these patients, it has been suggested that elevated troponin levels are somehow neurologically mediated, thus not caused by direct cardiac release. In conclusion, this review examines the available studies that systematically measured troponin in patients with acute ischemic stroke to properly interpret troponin...... elevations in these patients Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar-15...

  16. [Neurology! Adieau? (Part 2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szirmai, Imre

    2010-05-30

    The education of neurologists is debilitated worldwide. University professors are engaged in teaching, research and patient-care. This triple challenge is very demanding, and results in permanent insecurity of University employees. To compensate for the insufficient clinical training, some institutes in the USA employ academic staff members exclusively for teaching. The formation of new subspecialties hinders the education and training of general neurologists. At present, four generations of medical doctors are working together in hospitals. The two older generations educate the younger neurologists who have been brought up in the world of limitless network of sterile information. Therefore their manual skills at the bedside and their knowledge of emergency treatment are deficient. Demographics of medical doctors changed drastically. Twice as many women are working in neurology and psychiatry than men. Integrity of neurology is threatened by: (1) Separation of the cerebrovascular diseases from general neurology. Development of "stroke units" was facilitated by the better reimbursement for treatment and by the interest of the pharmaceutical companies. Healthcare politics promoted the split of neurology into two parts. The independent status of "stroke departments" will reduce the rest of clinical neurology to outpatient service. (2) The main argumentation to segregate the rare neurological diseases was that their research will provide benefit for the diseases with high prevalence. This argumentation serves territorial ambitions. The separation of rare diseases interferes with the teaching of differential diagnostics in neurological training. The traditional pragmatic neurology can not be retrieved. The faculty of neurology could retain its integrity by the improvement of diagnostic methods and the ever more effective drugs. Nevertheless, even the progression of neurological sciences induces dissociation of clinical neurology. Neurology shall suffer fragmentation if

  17. Neurological complications of Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2018-04-26

    Zika virus (ZIKV) disease is a vector-borne infectious disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Recently, ZIKV has caused outbreaks in most American countries. Areas covered: Publications about neurological complications of ZIKV infection retrieved from pubmed searchers were reviewed, and reference lists and relevant articles from review articles were also examined. Vertical/intrauterine transmission leads to congenital infection and causes microcephaly and congenital ZIKV syndrome. ZIKV preferentially infects human neural progenitor cells and triggers cell apoptosis. ZIKV RNA has been identified in foetal brain tissue and brains of microcephalic infants who died; amniotic fluid and placentas of pregnant mothers; and umbilical cord, cerebro-spinal fluid and meninges of newborns. The increase in the number of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) cases during the ZIKV outbreak in the Americas provides epidemiological evidence for the link between ZIKV infection and GBS. Less frequently reported ZIKV neurological complications include encephalitis/meningoencephalitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, myelitis, cerebrovascular complications (ischemic infarction; vasculopathy), seizures and encephalopathy, sensory polyneuropathy and sensory neuronopathy. Analysis of GBS incidence could serve as an epidemiological 'marker' or sentinel for ZIKV disease and other neurological complications associated to ZIKV. Expert commentary: An expanding spectrum of neurological complications associated with ZIKV infection is being recognised.

  18. Electroacupuncture preconditioning reduces cerebral ischemic injury via BDNF and SDF-1α in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ji Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to determine if electroacupuncture (EA preconditioning improves tissue outcome and functional outcome following experimentally induced cerebral ischemia in mice. In addition, we investigated whether the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF-1α and infarct volume were related with improvement in neurological and motor function by interventions in this study. Methods After treatment with EA at the acupoints ‘Baihui (GV20’ and ‘Dazhui (GV14’ for 20 min, BDNF was assessed in the cortical tissues based on Western blot and the SDF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF levels in the plasma determined by ELISA. To assess the protective effects of EA against ischemic injury, the mice received once a day 20 min EA preconditioning for three days prior to the ischemic event. Focal cerebral ischemia was then induced by photothrombotic cortical ischemia. Infarct volumes, neurobehavioral deficit and motor deficit were evaluated 24 h after focal cerebral ischemia. Results The expression of BDNF protein increased significantly from 6 h, reaching a plateau at 12 h after the end of EA treatment in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, SDF-1α, not VEGF, increased singnificantly from 12 h to 48 h after EA stimulation in the plasma. Moreover, EA preconditioning reduced the infarct volume by 43.5% when compared to control mice at 24 h after photothrombotic cortical ischemia. Consistent with a smaller infarct size, EA preconditioning showed prominent improvement of neurological function and motor function such as vestibule-motor function, sensori-motor function and asymmetric forelimb use. The expression of BDNF colocalized within neurons and SDF-1α colocalized within the cerebral vascular endothelium was observed throughout the ischemic cortex by EA. Conclusions Pretreatment with EA increased the production of BDNF and SDF-1α, which elicited

  19. Hypercholesterolemia in patients of ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, E.; Ali, R.; Din, M.J.U.; Saeed, A.; Jadoon, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a common neurological disease that results in significant mortality and morbidity globally. Several risk factors have been identified for stroke among which hyperlipidaemia is one of the modifiable risk factors. Recent clinical trials have shown a reduction in ischemic stroke for patients taking lipid lowering medications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the frequency of hypercholesterolemia in patients of ischemic stroke in Hazara region. Method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Medical Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. Ninety patients of stroke confirmed as ischemic by CT scan brain were enrolled in the study after informed consent. The frequency of hypercholesterolemia in patients was recorded. Results: There were 55 (61.1 percentage) males. The mean age of patients was 64.4±11.5 years. The mean serum cholesterol in all patients was 4.16±1.1 mmol/l. The mean serum cholesterol of male patients was 4.3±1.2 mmol/l and 4.0±10.9 mmol/l in the case of females. Conclusions: Hypercholesterolemia could not be established as a major risk factor for stroke in our setup through this study that allude to the fact that other risk factors might be contributing more to the incidence of cerebrovascular accident in our population. (author)

  20. Ischemic necrosis and osteochondritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    Osteonecrosis indicates that ischemic death of the cellular constituents of bone and marrow has occurred. Historically, this first was thought to be related to sepsis in the osseous segments. However, continued studies led to the use of the term aseptic necrosis. Subsequent observations indicated that the necrotic areas of bone were not only aseptic, but were also avascular. This led to the terms ischemic necrosis, vascular necrosis and bone infarction. Ischemic necrosis of bone is discussed in this chapter. It results from a significant reduction in or obliteration of blood supply to the affected area. The various bone cells, including osteocytes, osteoclasts, and osteoblasts, usually undergo anoxic death in 12 to 48 hours after blood supply is cut off. The infarct that has thus developed in three-dimensional and can be divided into a number of zones: a central zone of cell death; an area of ischemic injury, most severe near the zone of cell death, and lessening as it moves peripherally; an area of active hyperemia and the zone of normal unaffected tissue. Once ischemic necrosis has begun, the cellular damage provokes an initial inflammatory response, which typically is characterized by vasodilatation, transudation of fluid and fibrin, and local infiltration of flammatory cells. This response can be considered the first stage in repair of the necrotic area

  1. Neurologic emergencies in HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-De-Villoria, J A; Fernández-García, P; Borrego-Ruiz, P J

    HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients comprise a heterogeneous group including transplant patients, patients undergoing treatment with immunosuppressors, uremic patients, alcoholics, undernourished patients, diabetics, patients on dialysis, elderly patients, and those diagnosed with severe or neoplastic processes. Epileptic seizures, focal neurologic signs, and meningoencephalitis are neurologic syndromes that require urgent action. In most of these situations, neuroimaging tests are necessary, but the findings can be different from those observed in immunocompetent patients in function of the inflammatory response. Infectious disease is the first diagnostic suspicion, and the identification of an opportunistic pathogen should be oriented in function of the type and degree of immunosuppression. Other neurologic emergencies include ischemic stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, neoplastic processes, and pharmacological neurotoxicity. This article reviews the role of neuroimaging in HIV-negative immunodepressed patients with a neurologic complication that requires urgent management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    , as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training...

  3. Drug Delivery to the Ischemic Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to the brain is insufficient to meet metabolic demand. This can result from cerebral artery occlusion that interrupts blood flow, limits CNS supply of oxygen and glucose, and causes an infarction/ischemic stroke. Ischemia initiates a cascade of molecular events inneurons and cerebrovascular endothelial cells including energy depletion, dissipation of ion gradients, calcium overload, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, and accumulation of ions and fluid. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with cerebral ischemia and leads to vasogenic edema, a primary cause of stroke-associated mortality. To date, only a single drug has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for acute ischemic stroke treatment, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). While rt-PA therapy restores perfusion to ischemic brain, considerable tissue damage occurs when cerebral blood flow is re-established. Therefore, there is a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can “rescue” salvageable brain tissue and/or protect BBB integrity during ischemic stroke. One class of drugs that may enable neural cell rescue following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins). Understanding potential CNS drug delivery pathways for statins is critical to their utility in ischemic stroke. Here, we review molecular pathways associated with cerebral ischemia and novel approaches for delivering drugs to treat ischemic disease. Specifically, we discuss utility of endogenous BBB drug uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/Oatps) and nanotechnology-based carriers for optimization of CNS drug delivery. Overall, this chapter highlights state-of-the-art technologies that may improve pharmacotherapy of cerebral ischemia. PMID:25307217

  4. The menagerie of neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Shin C.; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurology is a field known for “eponymophilia.” While eponym use has been a controversial issue in medicine, animal-related metaphoric descriptions continue to flourish in neurologic practice, particularly with the advent of neuroimaging. To provide practicing and trainee neurologists with a useful reference for all these colorful eponyms, we performed a literature review and summarized the various animal eponyms in the practice of neurology (and their etiologic implications) to date. We believe that the ability to recognize animal-like attributes in clinical neurology and neuroradiology may be attributed to a visual phenomenon known as pareidolia. We propose that animal eponyms are a useful method of recognizing clinical and radiologic patterns that aid in the diagnostic process and therefore are effective aidesmémoire and communicative tools that enliven and improve the practice of neurology. PMID:29473555

  5. Hospital costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisman, Leander R; Tan, Siok Swan; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Koudstaal, Peter J; Redekop, William K

    2015-06-02

    There have been no ischemic stroke costing studies since major improvements were implemented in stroke care. We therefore determined hospital resource use and costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands for 2012. We conducted a retrospective cost analysis using individual patient data from a national diagnosis-related group registry. We analyzed 4 subgroups: inpatient ischemic stroke, inpatient TIA, outpatient ischemic stroke, and outpatient TIA. Costs of carotid endarterectomy and costs of an extra follow-up visit were also estimated. Unit costs were based on reference prices from the Dutch Healthcare Insurance Board and tariffs provided by the Dutch Healthcare Authority. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between hospital costs and various patient and hospital characteristics. A total of 35,903 ischemic stroke and 21,653 TIA patients were included. Inpatient costs were €5,328 ($6,845) for ischemic stroke and €2,470 ($3,173) for TIA. Outpatient costs were €495 ($636) for ischemic stroke and €587 ($754) for TIA. Costs of carotid endarterectomy were €6,836 ($8,783). Costs of inpatient days were the largest contributor to hospital costs. Age, hospital type, and region were strongly associated with hospital costs. Hospital costs are higher for inpatients and ischemic strokes compared with outpatients and TIAs, with length of stay (LOS) the most important contributor. LOS and hospital costs have substantially declined over the last 10 years, possibly due to improved hospital stroke care and efficient integrated stroke services. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Cryptogenic transient ischemic attack after nose blowing: association of huge atrial septal aneurysm with patent foramen ovale as potential cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotze U

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ulrich Lotze,1 Uwe Kirsch,1 Marc-Alexander Ohlow,2 Thorsten Scholle,3 Jochen Leonhardi,3 Bernward Lauer,2 Gerhard Oltmanns,4 Hendrik Schmidt5,6 1Department of Internal Medicine, DRK Krankenhaus Sondershausen, Sondershausen, Germany; 2Department of Cardiology, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany; 3Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Germany; 4Department of Internal Medicine, DRK Krankenhaus Sömmerda; Sömmerda, Germany; 5Department of Cardiology and Diabetology, Klinikum Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; 6Department of Internal Medicine III, Martin-Luther-Univeristy Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany Abstract: Association of atrial septal aneurysm (ASA with patent foramen ovale (PFO is considered an important risk factor for cardioembolism frequently forwarding paradoxical embolism in patients with cryptogenic or unexplained cerebral ischemic events. We herein describe the case of a 69-year-old male patient reporting uncontrolled movements of the right arm due to a muscle weakness, slurred speech, and paresthesia in the oral region some seconds after he had blown his nose. These neurological symptoms had improved dramatically within a few minutes and were completely regressive at admission to our hospital about two hours later. On transesophageal echocardiography (TEE a huge ASA associated with PFO was detected. Diagnosis of the large-sized ASA was also confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Due to the early complete recovery from his neurological symptoms, the patient was diagnosed with a transient ischemic attack (TIA. After nine days he was discharged in a good clinical condition under the treatment with oral anticoagulation. It is concluded that in cryptogenic or unexplained stroke or TIA TEE should always be performed to rule out ASA and PFO as potential sources for paradoxical embolism in those inconclusive clinical situations. Keywords: congenital cardiac abnormality, atrial septal

  7. SPECT study of cerebral blood flow reactivity after acetazolamide in patients with transient ischemic attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, F.; Celsis, P.; Clanet, M.; Guiraud-Chaumeil, B.; Rascol, A.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated 15 patients with one or more transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in the internal carotid artery territory within the month following the most recent TIA. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by single-photon emission computed tomography, using intravenous xenon-133 before and after injection of 1 g acetazolamide. Six patients had severe carotid stenosis or occlusion; the other nine patients had no significant carotid lesions. Twenty age-matched volunteers free of neurologic symptoms or history were used as controls. Mean CBF in the sylvian region was not significantly different between patients and controls. Seven patients exhibited a focal hypoperfusion at rest in the symptomatic hemisphere, and their hypoperfused areas were hyporeactive after administration of acetazolamide. Seven other patients exhibited hyporeactive areas after acetazolamide administration while their CBF tomograms at rest were normal. Thus, CBF abnormalities were detected in 14 of the 15 patients. Our findings suggest that CBF measured early after acetazolamide administration could be useful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of TIA. In the nine patients with no significant lesion of the internal carotid artery, the areas of hypoperfusion were small and were probably related to the focal ischemic event. In the six patients with severe lesions of the internal carotid artery, abnormalities were of variable size and intensity but were often large and pronounced. The discrepancy between these two subgroups of patients could be ascribed to the hemodynamic influence of the internal carotid artery lesions. Moreover, our findings may provide some insight into the pathophysiology of TIAs

  8. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study...... was set up to clarify whether this effort has resulted in a decreased proportion of patients with known AF experiencing an ischemic stroke. METHODS: Patients admitted to the Department of Neurology, Vejle Hospital, Denmark, with ischemic stroke from January 1997 to December 2012 were included in the study....... RESULTS: A total of 4134 patients were included in the study. Overall, the yearly proportion of patients with known AF varied between 9% and 18%. No significant change was observed (P = .511). The proportion of patients with known AF treated with anticoagulants at the time of the stroke and the proportion...

  9. Neuropsychological evaluation of children after ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Inês Elcione

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to associate neuropsychological evaluation with neuroimaging results in children with cerebral tomography indicating ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD. Neuroimaging, neurological exams and neuropsychological instruments were used to evaluate five children. The study revealed that the cognitive and perceptive skills in two children were normal and motor sequele in four cases. The rhythm, visual and speech receptive skills remained unchanged. In four cases the SPECT exam showed regions with hypoperfusion and in four cases the EEG was normal. Neuropsychological, neurological and image indication some degree of sequele demonstrating the importance of follow up of children who had suffered cerebrovascular disease.

  10. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Quantification In Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netravati M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a distinct shift of emphasis in clinical neurology in the last few decades. A few years ago, it was just sufficient for a clinician to precisely record history, document signs, establish diagnosis and write prescription. In the present context, there has been a significant intrusion of scientific culture in clinical practice. Several criteria have been proposed, refined and redefined to ascertain accurate diagnosis for many neurological disorders. Introduction of the concept of impairment, disability, handicap and quality of life has added new dimension to the measurement of health and disease and neurological disorders are no exception. "Best guess" treatment modalities are no more accepted and evidence based medicine has become an integral component of medical care. Traditional treatments need validation and new therapies require vigorous trials. Thus, proper quantification in neurology has become essential, both in practice and research methodology in neurology. While this aspect is widely acknowledged, there is a limited access to a comprehensive document pertaining to measurements in neurology. This following description is a critical appraisal of various measurements and also provides certain commonly used rating scales/scores in neurological practice.

  12. EFFICACY OF MELDONIUM IN ACUTE PERIOD OF ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As long as systemic thrombolysis is indicated to not more than 10% of patients with ischemic stroke, the search for medical agents for basic treatment of stroke is an important problem of today’s neurology.Aim: To evaluate efficacy of meldonium in patients with acute ischemic stroke.Materials and methods: One hundred and fourteen patients were assessed in the acute period of strokes in the internal carotid artery system. The main group included 70 patients who were given meldonium (Mildronate in addition to their basic treatment regimen. The drug was administered intravenously in daily drop infusions at dose of 10 ml of 10% solution for 10 days, thereafter they were switched to oral treatment at 250 mg daily for 2 to 3 weeks. The control group consisted of 40 patients who received only basic treatment regimen. Both groups were compatible for their age, gender distribution, severity of stroke and degree of neurologic dysfunction.Results: In the patients who were given meldonium in addition to basic treatment of ischemic stroke, neurological deficiency, assessed by NIHSS, scored significantly better than in those from the control group (3.1 ± 0.1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.17, p < 0.05. Also, they had significantly less disability on modified Rankin scale (1.3 ± 0.03 vs. 1.07 ± 0.07, p < 0.01 and more improvement in mobility as per Rivermead mobility index (3.6 ± 0.17 vs. 2.9 ± 0.25, p < 0.05.Conclusion: The addition of meldonium to the set of medical treatment in ischemic stroke patients gives positive results reflecting a decreased neurological deficiency, increased levels of mobility and daily activities.

  13. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  14. William Shakespeare's neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Many of Shakespeare's plays contain characters who appear to be afflicted by neurological or psychiatric disorders. Shakespeare, in his descriptive analysis of his protagonists, was contributing to the understanding of these disorders. In fact, Charcot frequently used Shakespearean references in his neurological teaching sessions, stressing how acute objective insight is essential to achieving expert clinical diagnosis. Charcot found in Shakespeare the same rigorous observational techniques for which he himself became famous. This chapter describes many of Shakespearean characters suffering from varied neurological disorders, including Parkinsonism, epilepsy, sleeping disturbances, dementia, headache, prion disease, and paralyses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Aberrant functional connectivity of resting state networks in transient ischemic attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transient ischemic attack (TIA is usually defined as a neurologic ischemic disorder without permanent cerebral infarction. Studies have showed that patients with TIA can have lasting cognitive functional impairment. Inherent brain activity in the resting state is spatially organized in a set of specific coherent patterns named resting state networks (RSNs, which epitomize the functional architecture of memory, language, attention, visual, auditory and somato-motor networks. Here, we aimed to detect differences in RSNs between TIA patients and healthy controls (HCs. METHODS: Twenty one TIA patients suffered an ischemic event and 21 matched HCs were enrolled in the study. All subjects were investigated using cognitive tests, psychiatric tests and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Independent component analysis (ICA was adopted to acquire the eight brain RSNs. Then one-sample t-tests were calculated in each group to gather the spatial maps of each RSNs, followed by second level analysis to investigate statistical differences on RSNs between twenty one TIA patients and 21 controls. Furthermore, a correlation analysis was performed to explore the relationship between functional connectivity (FC and cognitive and psychiatric scales in TIA group. RESULTS: Compared with the controls, TIA patients exhibited both decreased and increased functional connectivity in default mode network (DMN and self-referential network (SRN, and decreased functional connectivity in dorsal attention network (DAN, central-executive network (CEN, core network (CN, somato-motor network (SMN, visual network (VN and auditory network (AN. There was no correlation between neuropsychological scores and functional connectivity in regions of RSNs. CONCLUSIONS: We observed selective impairments of RSN intrinsic FC in TIA patients, whose all eight RSNs had aberrant functional connectivity. These changes indicate that TIA is a disease with widely abnormal brain

  16. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  17. Ischemic Stroke during Pregnancy and Puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Del Zotto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke during pregnancy and puerperium represents a rare occurrence but it could be a serious and stressful event for mothers, infants, and also families. Whenever it does occur, many concerns arise about the safety of the mother and the fetus in relation to common diagnostic tests and therapies leading to a more conservative approach. The physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system and in the coagulability that accompany the pregnant state, which are more significant around delivery and in the postpartum period, likely contribute to increasing the risk of an ischemic stroke. Most of the causes of an ischemic stroke in the young may also occur in pregnant patients. Despite this, there are specific conditions related to pregnancy which may be considered when assessing this particular group of patients such as pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, choriocarcinoma, peripartum cardiomiopathy, amniotic fluid embolization, and postpartum cerebral angiopathy. This article will consider several questions related to pregnancy-associated ischemic stroke, dwelling on epidemiological and specific etiological aspects, diagnostic issue concerning the use of neuroimaging, and the related potential risks to the embryo and fetus. Therapeutic issues surrounding the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelets agents will be discussed along with the few available reports regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy during pregnancy.

  18. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praticò Andrea D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage.

  19. Analysis of ischemic cerebral lesions using 3.0-T diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance angiography after revascularization surgery for ischemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Yasuo; Mizunari, Takayuki; Takagi, Ryo; Amano, Yasuo; Mizumura, Sunao; Komaba, Yuichi; Okubo, Seiji; Kobayashi, Shiro; Teramoto, Akira

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral revascularization surgery (CRS) is increasingly recognized as an important component in the treatment of complex cerebral vascular disease and tumors. CRS requires that the incidence of perioperative neurological complications should be minimized, because CRS for ischemic disease is often not the goal of treatment, but rather a prophylactic surgery. CRS carries the risk of focal postoperative neurological deficits. Little has been established concerning mechanisms of post-CRS ischemia. We used 3.0-T diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to analyze the incidence and mechanism of ischemic lesions. We studied the anterior circulation territory after 20 CRS procedures involving 33 vascular anastomosis procedures (13 double anastomoses and 7 single anastomoses) in 12 men and 8 women between June 2007 and October 2011. The operations included single or double superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis to treat internal carotid artery/MCA occlusions or severe MCA stenosis. A combined STA-MCA anastomosis and indirect bypass were performed for moyamoya disease. Postoperative DWI and MRA were obtained in all patients between 24 and 96 h after surgery to detect thromboembolism, hypoperfusion, or procedural ischemic complications and vasospasms of the donor STA. Follow-up DWI and MRA were carried out 1.8±0.6 days after CRS (range, 1-4 days). Temporary occlusion time for anastomoses averaged 18.9 min (range, 16-32 min). Asymptomatic new hyperintensities occurred in the ipsilateral hemisphere of 2 patients on postoperative DWI (10% patients/6.0% anastomoses), and 1 moyamoya patient (5.0% patients/3.0% anastomoses) developed a symptomatic hyperintensity in the ipsilateral occipital lobe in response to the operation. Two abnormal small (3.0-T DWI study of CRS and related clinical events. The incidence of symptomatic postoperative DWI abnormalities was restricted to 1 moyamoya patient

  20. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive

  1. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  2. Neurologic complications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pace

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic side effects related to cancer therapy are a common problem in oncology practice. These complications can negatively affect the management of the patient, because they can inhibit treatment and diminish quality of life. Therefore specific skills are required to recognise symptoms and clinical manifestations. This review focuses on the most common neurologic complications to improve physician’s familiarity in determining the aetiology of these symptoms.

  3. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  4. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: cause, effect, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berry S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Shauna Berry,1 Weijie V Lin,2 Ama Sadaka,1 Andrew G Lee1–7 1Department of Ophthalmology, Blanton Eye Institute, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB, Galveston, TX, USA; 4Department of Ophthalmology, 5Department of Neurology, 6Department of Neurosurgery, Weill Cornell Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 7Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION is the most common form of ischemic optic neuropathy and the second most common optic neuropathy. Patients are generally over the age of 50 years with vasculopathic risk factors (eg, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea. The exact mechanism of NAION is not fully understood. In addition, several treatment options have been proposed. This article summarizes the current literature on the diagnosis, treatment, and management of NAION. Keywords: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, ischemic optic neuropathy

  6. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pezzini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1 the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2 migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3 the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4 migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions.

  7. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2) migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3) the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4) migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions. PMID:21197470

  8. Multiple Silent Lacunes Are Associated with Recurrent Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Skjøth, Flemming; Yavarian, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    ackground: Silent lacunes are a common finding on brain imaging in ischemic stroke patients, but the prognostic significance of these lesions is uncertain. We aimed at investigating the association of silent lacunes and the risk of ischemic stroke recurrence, death, and cardiovascular events...... in a cohort of patients with incident ischemic stroke and no atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: We included 786 patients (mean age 59.5 (SD 14.0); 42.9% females) in a registry-based, observational cohort study on patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. On brain MRI we assessed the number of silent lacunes...... as none, single, or multiple and we calculated stratified incidence rates of the outcomes. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for age, gender, congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, and vascular disease were calculated with no silent lacunes as reference. In additional analyses, we...

  9. Neurosteroids and Ischemic Stroke: Progesterone a Promising Agent in Reducing the Brain Injury in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2017-01-01

    Progesterone (P4), a well-known neurosteroid, is produced by ovaries and placenta in females and by adrenal glands in both sexes. Progesterone is also synthesized by central nervous system (CNS) tissues to perform various vital neurological functions in the brain. Apart from performing crucial reproductive functions, it also plays a pivotal role in neurogenesis, regeneration, cognition, mood, inflammation, and myelination in the CNS. A substantial body of experimental evidence from animal models documents the neuroprotective role of P4 in various CNS injury models, including ischemic stroke. Extensive data have revealed that P4 elicits neuroprotection through multiple mechanisms and systems in an integrated manner to prevent neuronal and glial damage, thus reducing mortality and morbidity. Progesterone has been described as safe for use at the clinical level through different routes in several studies. Data regarding the neuroprotective role of P4 in ischemic stroke are of great interest due to their potential clinical implications. In this review, we succinctly discuss the biosynthesis of P4 and distribution of P4 receptors (PRs) in the brain. We summarize our work on the general mechanisms of P4 mediated via the modulation of different PR and neurotransmitters. Finally, we describe the neuroprotective mechanisms of P4 in ischemic stroke models and related clinical prospects.

  10. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  11. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  12. Protective effects of angiopoietin-like 4 on the blood-brain barrier in acute ischemic stroke treated with thrombolysis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Xu, Xiaofeng; Chu, Xiuli; Yu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Yuwu

    2017-04-03

    Given the risk of blood-brain barrier damage (BBB) caused by ischemic and tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis, the preservation of vascular integrity is important. Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), a protein secreted in hypoxia, is involved in the regulation of vascular permeability. We hypothesized that Angptl4 might exert a protective effect in thrombolysis through stabilizing blood-brain barrier and inhibit hyper-permeability. We investigated the role of Angptl4 in stroke using a transient focal cerebral ischemia mouse model. The treated mice were administered Angptl4 1h after the ischemic event upon reperfusion. Our results showed that Angptl4 combined with thrombolysis greatly reduced the infarct volume and consequent neurological deficit. Western blot analyses and gelatin zymography revealed that Angptl4 protected the integrity of the endothelium damaged by thrombolysis. Angptl4 inhibited the up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the vascular endothelium after stroke, which was suppressed by counteracting VEGFR signaling and diminishing downstream Src signaling, and led to the increased stability of junctions and improved endothelial cell barrier integrity. These findings demonstrated that Angptl4 protects the permeability of the BBB damaged by ischemic and thrombolysis. Suggested that Angptl4 might be a promising target molecule in therapies for vasoprotection after thrombolysis treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Antiplatelet Treatment After Transient Ischemic Attack and Ischemic Stroke in Patients With Cerebral Microbleeds in 2 Large Cohorts and an Updated Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kui Kai; Lovelock, Caroline E; Li, Linxin; Simoni, Michela; Gutnikov, Sergei; Küker, Wilhelm; Mak, Henry Ka Fung; Rothwell, Peter M

    2018-06-01

    In patients with transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke, microbleed burden predicts intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and ischemic stroke, but implications for antiplatelet treatment are uncertain. Previous cohort studies have had insufficient follow-up to assess the time course of risks, have not stratified risks by antithrombotic use, and have not reported extracranial bleeds or functional outcome of ICH versus ischemic stroke. In 2 independent prospective cohorts with transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (Oxford Vascular Study/mainly white; University of Hong Kong/mainly Chinese), antiplatelet treatment was started routinely irrespective of microbleed burden. Risks, time course and outcome of ICH, extracranial bleeds, and recurrent ischemic events were determined and stratified by microbleed burden (0 versus 1, 2-4, and ≥5), adjusting for age, sex, and vascular risk factors. Microbleeds were more frequent in the Chinese cohort (450 of 1003 versus 165 of 1080; P <0.0001), but risk associations were similar during 7433 patient-years of follow-up. Among 1811 patients on antiplatelet drugs, risk of major extracranial bleeds was unrelated to microbleed burden ( P trend =0.87), but the 5-year risk of ICH was steeply related ( P trend <0.0001), with 11 of 15 (73%) of ICH in 140 of 1811 (7.7%) patients with ≥5 microbleeds. However, risk of ischemic stroke also increased with microbleed burden ( P trend =0.013), such that risk of ischemic stroke and coronary events exceeded ICH and major extracranial bleeds during the first year, even among patients with ≥5 microbleeds (11.6% versus 3.9%). However, this ratio changed over time, with risk of hemorrhage (11.2%) matching that of ischemic events (12.0%) after 1 year. Moreover, whereas the association between microbleed burden and risk of ischemic stroke was due mainly to nondisabling events ( P trend =0.007), the association with ICH was accounted for ( P trend <0.0001) by disabling/fatal events (≥5 microbleeds

  14. Neurologic Complications of Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Rajat

    2018-02-01

    Neurologic disturbances including encephalopathy, seizures, and focal deficits complicate the course 10-30% of patients undergoing organ or stem cell transplantation. While much or this morbidity is multifactorial and often associated with extra-cerebral dysfunction (e.g., graft dysfunction, metabolic derangements), immunosuppressive drugs also contribute significantly. This can either be through direct toxicity (e.g., posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome from calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus in the acute postoperative period) or by facilitating opportunistic infections in the months after transplantation. Other neurologic syndromes such as akinetic mutism and osmotic demyelination may also occur. While much of this neurologic dysfunction may be reversible if related to metabolic factors or drug toxicity (and the etiology is recognized and reversed), cases of multifocal cerebral infarction, hemorrhage, or infection may have poor outcomes. As transplant patients survive longer, delayed infections (such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy) and post-transplant malignancies are increasingly reported.

  15. The applications of pharmacogenomics to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, C; McSweeney, C; Mao, Y

    2014-01-01

    The most common neurological disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders, have received recent attention with regards to pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. Here, we will focus on a neglected neurodegenerative disorder, cerebral ischemic stroke (CIS), and highlight recent advances in two disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's diseases (AD), that possess both similar and distinct mechanisms in regards to potential therapeutic targets. In the first part of this review, we will focus primarily on mechanisms that are somewhat specific to each disorder which are involved in neurodegeneration (i.e., protease pathways, calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species regulation, DNA repair mechanisms, neurogenesis regulation, mitochondrial function, etc.). In the second part of this review, we will discuss the applications of the genome-wide technology on pharmacogenomics of mental illnesses including schizophrenia (SCZ), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

  16. Incontinentia pigmenti with neurologic and oculodental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Arturo Avina Fierro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Incontinentia pigmenti is a genodermatosis with X-linked dominant inheritance, characterized by cutaneous, neurologic, ophthalmologic, and dental abnormalities with a pattern suggestive of somatic mosaicism. We describe a 21-month-old girl showing characteristic cutaneous findings of incontinentia pigmenti in chronic evolution of hyperpigmented, hypopigmented, and atrophic stages, linear and whorled pattern involving the Blaschko's lines. The patient has history of seizures, and electroencephalography showed epileptiform discharges at temporal lobule, cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed cerebral dysgenesis, neuronal migration disorder, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. She has motor and mental delay with spastic quadriplegia, and ophthalmologic loss of central vision by ischemic optic neuropathy with decreased blood flow to eye's optic nerve. The dermatologic features were confirmed by skin biopsy that showed slight atrophy and some scattered apoptotic cells in the epidermis, epidermal hypopigmentation, and reduced melanocyte number, these histological features confirmed the genodermatosis diagnosis: Bloch-Sulzberger syndrome.

  17. Risk factors in various subtypes of ischemic stroke according to toast criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquil, N.; Begum, I.; Ahmed, A.; Vohra, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    To identify the frequency of risk factors in various subtypes of acute ischemic stroke according to TOAST criteria. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Ziauddin Hospital, Karachi, from January to December 2007. Methodology: Patients with acute ischemic stroke were enrolled. Studied variables included demographic profile, history of risk factors, physical and neurological examination, and investigations relevant with the objectives of the study. Findings were described as frequency percentages. Proportions of risk factors against subtypes was compared using chi-square test with significance at p < 0.05. Results: Out of the 100 patients with acute ischemic stroke, mean age at presentation was 63.5 years. Risk factor distribution was hypertension in 85%, Diabetes mellitus in 49%, ischemic heart disease in 30%, dyslipedemia in 22%, smoking in 9%, atrial fibrillation in 5%, and previous history of stroke in 29%. The various subtypes of acute ischemic stroke were lacunar infarct in 43%, large artery atherosclerosis in 31%, cardioembolic type in 8%, stroke of other determined etiology in 1% and stroke of undetermined etiology in 18%. Hypertension and Diabetes were the most important risk factors in both large and small artery atherosclerosis. In patients with cardio-embolic stroke significant association was found with ischemic heart disease (p=0.01). Conclusion: Importance and relevance of risk factors evaluated for subtypes rather than ischemic stroke as a whole should be reflected in preventive efforts against the burden of ischemic stroke. (author)

  18. Contribution of EEG in transient neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Tcheumeni, Nadine Carole; Turki, Sahar; Amiel, Hélène; Meppiel, Elodie; Masmoudi, Sana; Roos, Caroline; Crassard, Isabelle; Plaisance, Patrick; Benbetka, Houria; Guichard, Jean-Pierre; Houdart, Emmanuel; Baudoin, Hélène; Kubis, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    Identification of stroke mimics and 'chameleons' among transient neurological deficits (TND) is critical. Diagnostic workup consists of a brain imaging study, for a vascular disease or a brain tumour and EEG, for epileptiform discharges. The precise role of EEG in this diagnostic workup has, however, never been clearly delineated. However, this could be crucial in cases of atypical or incomplete presentation with consequences on disease management and treatment. We analysed the EEG patterns on 95 consecutive patients referred for an EEG within 7 days of a TND with diagnostic uncertainty. Patients were classified at the discharge or the 3-month follow-up visit as: 'ischemic origin', 'migraine aura', 'focal seizure', and 'other'. All patients had a brain imaging study. EEG characteristics were correlated to the TND symptoms, imaging study, and final diagnosis. Sixty four (67%) were of acute onset. Median symptom duration was 45 min. Thirty two % were 'ischemic', 14% 'migraine aura', 19% 'focal seizure', and 36% 'other' cause. EEGs were recorded with a median delay of 1.6 day after symptoms onset. Forty EEGs (42%) were abnormal. Focal slow waves were the most common finding (43%), also in the ischemic group (43%), whether patients had a typical presentation or not. Epileptiform discharges were found in three patients, one with focal seizure and two with migraine aura. Non-specific EEG focal slowing is commonly found in TND, and may last several days. We found no difference in EEG presentation between stroke mimics and stroke chameleons, and between other diagnoses.

  19. Efficacy and Safety of REVIVE SE Thrombectomy Device for Acute Ischemic Stroke: River JAPAN (Reperfuse Ischemic Vessels with Endovascular Recanalization Device in Japan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Ota, Shinzo; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Kondo, Rei; Satow, Tetsu; Kubo, Michiya; Tsumoto, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Yukiko; Kataoka, Taketo; Imamura, Hirotoshi; Todo, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Mikito; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Kazunori; Ito, Yasushi; Sugiu, Kenji; Matsumaru, Yuji; Yoshimura, Shinichi

    2018-04-15

    REVIVE SE (REVIVE) is a closed-ended, self-expanding stent retriever used in the RIVER JAPAN study. We present our early experience with REVIVE for revascularization of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in patients who have failed or are ineligible for intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. This prospective, single-arm, non-randomized, multicenter registry study followed up patients undergoing mechanical thrombectomy with REVIVE for 90 days. The primary endpoint was a post-procedure Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score ≥2a. Secondary endpoints were clot migration/embolization; recanalization without symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) at 24 h; symptomatic ICH; good neurological outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score decrease ≥10) at day 90; device- or procedure-related serious adverse events (SAEs) and mortality at day 90. To confirm non-inferiority of REVIVE, results were compared with historical data of the Merci Retriever. About 49 patients were enrolled (median age 73 years; males 46.9%; middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion 83.7%; median NIHSS score 17). A post-procedure TICI score ≥2a was observed in 73.5% (36/49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 58.9-85.1) of patients. No post-procedural clot migration/embolization events occurred. Successful recanalization without symptomatic ICH was observed in 62.5% (30/48, 95% CI 47.4-76.0). The good neurological outcome was achieved in 66.7% (32/48) patients. Symptomatic ICH and device- or procedure-related SAEs were reported in 6.3% and 12.2% of patients, respectively. Two deaths were reported. REVIVE demonstrated equivalent efficacy and safety as the Merci Retriever. Results suggest that REVIVE is effective and safe in recanalizing occluded intracranial arteries in AIS.

  20. Cerebral arteriovenous malformations. the relationship between clinical related events and rCBF SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Bo; Shi Xiangen

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between clinical related events and rCBF SPECT imaging in patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), the radioactive counting difference between normal and lesion site was divided by regional pixel considered as ischemic index (II). II was measured in 20 AVM cases and compared with patients' age, sex,neurological history and the size of lesions. The degree of rCBF reduction correlated with clinical neurological manifestation and showed no significant relationship with the age, sex and size of malformed vessels. II in patients with seizures was higher than that in patients with hemorrhage. The rCBF SPECT imaging may be useful for evaluation of the hemodynamics in AVMs

  1. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, R.L.; Chavali, R.V.; Robson, C.D.; Barnes, P.D.; Burrows, P.E. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Eldredge, E.A. [Department of Anesthesia, Children`s Hospital Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Scott, R.M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children`s Hospital Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher`s exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. (orig.) With 8 tabs., 37 refs.

  2. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.L.; Chavali, R.V.; Robson, C.D.; Barnes, P.D.; Burrows, P.E.; Eldredge, E.A.; Scott, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher's exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. (orig.)

  3. The ischemic perinatal brain damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisi, G.; Mauri, C.; Canossi, G.; Della Giustina, E.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy'' covers a large part of neonatal neuropathology including the various forms of intracerebral haemorrhage. In the present work the term is confined to ischemic brain edema and actual infarction, be it diffuse or focal. Eighteen newborns with CT evidence of ischemic brain lesions and infarctual necrosis were selected. Emphasis is placed on current data on neuropathology of ischemic brain edema and its CT appearance. Particular entities such as periventricular leukomalacia and multicystic encephalopathy are discussed. Relationship between CT and temporal profile of cerebral damage is emphasized in order to predict the structural sequelae and the longterm prognosis

  4. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rezvani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD and Ischemic Stroke (IS was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Results: Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000 respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020. Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Conclusion: Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occur r ence of IS and IHD.

  5. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Mohammad Reza; Ghandehari, Kavian

    2012-10-01

    The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and Ischemic Stroke (IS) was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males) with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000) respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020). Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occurrence of IS and IHD.

  6. Structural genomic variation in ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarin, Mar; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Fung, Hon-Chung; Scholz, Sonja; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Crews, Cynthia; Britton, Angela; Wavrant De Vrieze, Fabienne; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Silliman, Scott; Case, L. Douglas; Hardy, John A.; Rich, Stephen S.; Meschia, James F.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2008-01-01

    Technological advances in molecular genetics allow rapid and sensitive identification of genomic copy number variants (CNVs). This, in turn, has sparked interest in the function such variation may play in disease. While a role for copy number mutations as a cause of Mendelian disorders is well established, it is unclear whether CNVs may affect risk for common complex disorders. We sought to investigate whether CNVs may modulate risk for ischemic stroke (IS) and to provide a catalog of CNVs in patients with this disorder by analyzing copy number metrics produced as a part of our previous genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association study of ischemic stroke in a North American white population. We examined CNVs in 263 patients with ischemic stroke (IS). Each identified CNV was compared with changes identified in 275 neurologically normal controls. Our analysis identified 247 CNVs, corresponding to 187 insertions (76%; 135 heterozygous; 25 homozygous duplications or triplications; 2 heterosomic) and 60 deletions (24%; 40 heterozygous deletions;3 homozygous deletions; 14 heterosomic deletions). Most alterations (81%) were the same as, or overlapped with, previously reported CNVs. We report here the first genome-wide analysis of CNVs in IS patients. In summary, our study did not detect any common genomic structural variation unequivocally linked to IS, although we cannot exclude that smaller CNVs or CNVs in genomic regions poorly covered by this methodology may confer risk for IS. The application of genome-wide SNP arrays now facilitates the evaluation of structural changes through the entire genome as part of a genome-wide genetic association study. PMID:18288507

  7. Effect of cation type and concentration of nitrates on neurological disorders during experimental cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzenkov, V S; Krushinskii, A L; Reutov, V P

    2013-10-01

    Experiments were performed on the model of ischemic stroke due to bilateral occlusion of the carotid arteries. Nitrates had various effects on the dynamics of neurological disorders and mortality rate of Wistar rats, which depended on the cation type and concentration.

  8. African Journal of Neurological Sciences 2013 - Vol. 32, No 2 http ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gukiusu

    % vs. 10.5%, p = 0.007) were significantly higher among HIV + than HIV-. Similarly, stroke on admission ..... Neurology 2011 ; 76 : 444-50. 20. PATEL VB, SACOOR Z, FRANCIS P, BILL PL, BHIGJEE AI, Connolly C: Ischemic stroke in young.

  9. American Academy of Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on draft guideline manuscript on autism and sleep problems. Capitol Hill Report: Opioid Epidemic Declared Public Health Emergency Read the latest news on how the AAN is fighting for neurology in Washington DC. New Study: Virtual Reality Training May Be as Effective as Regular Therapy ...

  10. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a

  11. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  12. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  13. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Neurological problems of jazz legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L

    2009-08-01

    A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid.

  15. The beginnings of the Southern Child/Pediatric Neurology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyken, Paul Richard; Bodensteiner, John B

    2015-04-01

    The founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society was in many ways parallel to that of the Child Neurology Society. The organization started out as the Southern Child Neurology Society but the name was changed at the time of incorporation so as to avoid confusion of identity and purpose with the larger Child Neurology Society. Although there are archives of early days and the later development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society, the details have never been set down in a narrative explaining the events that led to the development of the organization. In this paper, we try to produce a written record of the history of the founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Neurovascular regulation in the ischemic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Katherine; Iadecola, Costantino

    2015-01-10

    The brain has high energetic requirements and is therefore highly dependent on adequate cerebral blood supply. To compensate for dangerous fluctuations in cerebral perfusion, the circulation of the brain has evolved intrinsic safeguarding measures. The vascular network of the brain incorporates a high degree of redundancy, allowing the redirection and redistribution of blood flow in the event of vascular occlusion. Furthermore, active responses such as cerebral autoregulation, which acts to maintain constant cerebral blood flow in response to changing blood pressure, and functional hyperemia, which couples blood supply with synaptic activity, allow the brain to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion in the face of varying supply or demand. In the presence of stroke risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes, these protective processes are impaired and the susceptibility of the brain to ischemic injury is increased. One potential mechanism for the increased injury is that collateral flow arising from the normally perfused brain and supplying blood flow to the ischemic region is suppressed, resulting in more severe ischemia. Approaches to support collateral flow may ameliorate the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia by rescuing cerebral perfusion in potentially viable regions of the ischemic territory.

  17. Systemic risk score evaluation in ischemic stroke patients (SCALA): a prospective cross sectional study in 85 German stroke units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, Christian; Goertler, Michael; Röther, Joachim; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Darius, Harald; Nabavi, Darius Günther; Kim, In-Ha; Theobald, Karlheinz; Diener, Han-Christoph

    2007-11-01

    Stratification of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or ischemic stroke (IS) by risk of recurrent stroke can contribute to optimized secondary prevention. We therefore aimed to assess cardiovascular risk factor profiles of consecutive patients hospitalized with TIA/IS to stratify the risk of recurrent stroke according to the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) and of future cardiovascular events according to the ankle brachial index (ABI) as a marker of generalized atherosclerosis In this cross-sectional observational study, 85 neurological stroke units throughout Germany documented cardiovascular risk factor profiles of 10 consecutive TIA/IS patients on standardized questionnaires. Screening for PAD was done with Doppler ultrasonography to calculate the ABI. A total of 852 patients (57% men) with a mean age of 67+/-12.4 years were included of whom 82.9 % had IS. The median National Institutes of Health stroke sum score was 4 (TIA: 1). Arterial hypertension was reported in 71%, diabetes mellitus in 26%, clinical PAD in 10%, and an ABI or = 3 was observed in 58%, which in two previous retrospective analyses corresponded to a recurrent stroke risk of > or = 4%/year. The correlation between the ESRS and the ABI was low (r = 0.21). A high proportion of patients had asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease and a considerable risk of recurrent stroke according to the ABI and ESRS category. The prognostic accuracy as well as the potential benefit of various risk stratification scores in secondary stroke prevention require validation in a larger prospective study.

  18. Post dengue neurological complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hizlinda Tohid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain–Barre syndrome (GBS is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case.

  19. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  20. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  1. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  2. Prevalence and Distribution of Neurological Disease in a Neurology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research – January 2011 – Vol. 1 N0.1. >>>63<<<. Prevalence and Distribution of Neurological Disease in a. Neurology Clinic in Enugu, Nigeria. Onwuekwe IO* and Ezeala-Adikaibe B*. *Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine,. University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, ...

  3. Survey of the professors of child neurology: neurology versus pediatrics home for child neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L; McConnell, Emily R; Fernandez, Rosamary; Brooks-Kayal, Amy

    2014-09-01

    The optimal academic home for child neurology programs between adult neurology versus pediatric departments remains an open question. The Professors of Child Neurology, the national organization of child neurology department chairs, division chiefs, and training program directors, was surveyed to evaluate the placement of child neurology programs. Professors of Child Neurology members were surveyed regarding the placement of child neurology programs within adult neurology versus pediatric departments. Questions explored academic versus clinical lines of reporting and factors that may be advantages and disadvantages of these affiliations. Issues also addressed were the current status of board certification and number of clinics expected in academic child neurology departments. Of 120 surveys sent, 95 responses were received (79% response rate). The primary academic affiliation is in neurology in 54% of programs versus 46% in pediatrics, and the primary clinical affiliation is 45% neurology and 55% pediatrics. Advantages versus disadvantages of one's primary affiliation were similar whether the primary affiliation was in neurology or pediatrics. While 61% of respondents are presently board certified in pediatrics, only 2% of those with time-limited certification in general pediatrics plan to be recertified going forward. Typically six to eight half-day clinics per week are anticipated for child neurologists in academic departments without additional funding sources. Overall, leaders of child neurology departments and training programs would not change their affiliation if given the opportunity. Advantages and disadvantages associated with current affiliations did not change whether child neurology was located in neurology or pediatrics. Board certification by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in child neurology is virtually universal, whereas pediatric board certification by the American Board of Pediatrics is being maintained by very few. Most academic

  4. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  5. MRI in ischemic brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrich, W.; Friedmann, G.; Pawlik, G.; Boecher-Schwarz, H.G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The results of MRI and CT in 55 patients with brain infarcts were compared; in 26 of these cases an additional PET examination was obtained in order to study the regional glucose utilisation. MRI was superior to CT, demonstrating 11% more of the infarcts, particularly during the first 24 hours, in small lesions confined to the grey or subcortical white matter and in infratentorial ischemic lesion. On the other hand, only CT was able to show fresh hemorrhage, although MRI was the method of choice to demonstrate old blood collections. To characterise the follow up of an infarct, CT and MRI were similar, except the marginal contrast enhancement sometimes demonstrated by CT studies between the 2nd and 4th week after stroke event. PET was inferior to show details because of its poorer spatial resolution, but anyhow had a high sensitivity and provided additional informations concerning secondary inactivations of brain areas not directly damaged. Additionally PET was able to demonstrate areas of anaerobic glycolysis and lesions of diminished glucose utilisation in TIAs. Small areas of gliosis in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were frequently found in patients with cerebro-vascular diseases; they were best shown by MRI, but do not correlate with the extent of vascular stenoses or occlusions, shown by angiography. (orig) [de

  6. Imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, Martin J.; Reba, Richard C.; Bogaert, Jan; Boxt, Larry M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy, characterized by extensive coronary artery disease and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, the prognosis remains poor with only a 50-60% 5-year survival rate. The composition of atherosclerotic lesions is currently regarded as being more important than the degree of stenosis in determining acute events. If imaging techniques could distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques, then high-risk patient subgroups could be identified. Another important concept is that LV dysfunction may be the result of either scarring due to necrosis or to the presence of myocardial hibernation, in which there is sufficient blood flow to sustain viable myocytes, but insufficient to maintain systolic contraction. This concept of myocardial viability is critical for making optimal clinical management decisions. This review describes how noninvasive imaging methods can be used to distinguish regions of irreversibly injured myocardium from viable but hibernating segments. Technical advances in CT and MR have made imaging of the beating heart possible. Considerable clinical progress has already been made and further cardiac applications are expected. Radiologists therefore have new opportunities for involvement in cardiac imaging but must recognize the political implications as well as the diagnostic potential of these modalities not only for the heart, but also for the whole vascular system. This review focuses on imaging myocardial injury. It compares state-of-the-art CT and MR with more established yet contemporary echocardiography and nuclear scintigraphy. (orig.)

  7. Early VEGF inhibition attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption in ischemic rat brains by regulating the expression of MMPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ping; Gao, Yi; Li, Chen-Long; Wang, Hong-Jun; Chen, Ling-Chao; Feng, Yan; Li, Rui-Yan; Li, Yong-Li; Jiang, Chuan-Lu

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy in preserving the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Loss of the BBB is the key event associated with morbidity and mortality in these patients. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, the effects of VEGF inhibition and the possible mechanism that underlies acute cerebral ischemia in rats was investigated. Following the induction of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for a 90‑min period, either an anti‑VEGF neutralizing antibody (RB‑222; 5 or 10 µg), or IgG (control), was administered by intracerebroventricular injection at 1 h following reperfusion. Functional outcomes, BBB leakage, brain edema, microvessel numbers and the relative protein levels of VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, occludin and collagen-IV were then determined using neurological assessments, Evans Blue staining, brain water content, CD31 staining and western blotting. Treatment with RB‑222 at a dose of 5 and 10 µg significantly improved neurological functional outcomes and diminished infarct size, BBB leakage and brain edema compared with the MCAO and IgG groups at 24 h following reperfusion; 10 µg RB‑222 was more effective than a 5 µg dose of the antibody. In addition, RB‑222 reduced the number of immature microvessels, which subsequently attenuated BBB permeability. RB‑222 significantly repressed VEGF expression as well as decreased MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 expression. However, it enhanced occludin and collagen‑IV levels in the ischemic rat brain compared with the MCAO and IgG groups. Taken together, the results indicate that early inhibition of VEGF may have significant potential against cerebral ischemia, partly by regulating the expression of MMPs.

  8. [Broad ischemic stroke revealing infective endocarditis in a young patient: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelosaona, Fanomezantsoa Noella; Razafimahefa, Julien; Randrianasolo, Rahamefy Odilon; Rakotoarimanana, Solofonirina; Tehindrazanarivelo, Djacoba Alain

    2016-01-01

    Broad ischemic stroke is mainly due to a cardiac embolus or to an atheromatous plaque. In young subjects, one of the main causes of ischemic stroke (broad ischemic stroke in particolar) is embolic heart disease including infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis is a contraindication against the anticoagulant therapy (which is indicated for the treatment of embolic heart disease complicated by ischemic stroke). One neurologic complications of infective endocarditis is ischemic stroke which often occurs in multiple sites. We here report the case of a 44-year old man with afebrile acute onset of severe left hemiplegia associated with a sistolic mitral murmur, who had fever in hospital on day 5 with no other obvious source of infection present. Brain CT scan showed full broad ischaemic stroke of the right middle cerebral artery territory and doppler ultrasound, performed after stroke onset, showed infective endocarditis affecting the small mitral valve. He was treated with 4 weeks of antibiotic therapy without anticoagulant therapy ; evolution was marked by the disappearance of mitral valve vegetations and by movement sequelae involving the left side of the body. In practical terms, our problem was the onset of the fever which didn't accompany or pre-exist patient's deficit, leading us to the misdiagnosis of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin. This case study underlines the importance of doppler ultrasound, in the diagnosis of all broad ischemic strokes, especially superficial, before starting anticoagulant therapy.

  9. Genetic inhibition of CETP, ischemic vascular disease and mortality, and possible adverse effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Trine Holm; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Schou, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    This study tested whether genetic variation in the CETP gene is consistent with a protective effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibition on risk of ischemic events and on total mortality, without the adverse effects reported for torcetrapib.......This study tested whether genetic variation in the CETP gene is consistent with a protective effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibition on risk of ischemic events and on total mortality, without the adverse effects reported for torcetrapib....

  10. Ischemic stroke associated with radio frequency ablation for nodal reentry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz M, Juan C; Duran R, Carlos E; Perafan B, Pablo; Pava M, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia is the most common type of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. In those patients in whom drug therapy is not effective or not desired, radio frequency ablation is an excellent therapeutic method. Although overall these procedures are fast and safe, several complications among which ischemic stroke stands out, have been reported. We present the case of a 41 year old female patient with repetitive episodes of tachycardia due to nodal reentry who was treated with radiofrequency ablation. Immediately after the procedure she presented focal neurologic deficit consistent with ischemic stroke in the right medial cerebral artery territory. Angiography with angioplastia and abxicimab was performed and then tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) was locally infused, with appropriate clinical and angiographic outcome.

  11. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences (AJNS) is owned and controlled by the Pan African Association of Neurological Sciences (PAANS). The AJNS's aim is to publish scientific papers of any aspects of Neurological Sciences. AJNS is published quarterly. Articles submitted exclusively to the AJNS are accepted if neither ...

  12. Ischemic stroke destabilizes circadian rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin Jimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central circadian pacemaker is a remarkably robust regulator of daily rhythmic variations of cardiovascular, endocrine, and neural physiology. Environmental lighting conditions are powerful modulators of circadian rhythms, but regulation of circadian rhythms by disease states is less clear. Here, we examine the effect of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythms in rats using high-resolution pineal microdialysis. Methods Rats were housed in LD 12:12 h conditions and monitored by pineal microdialysis to determine baseline melatonin timing profiles. After demonstration that the circadian expression of melatonin was at steady state, rats were subjected to experimental stroke using two-hour intralumenal filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The animals were returned to their cages, and melatonin monitoring was resumed. The timing of onset, offset, and duration of melatonin secretion were calculated before and after stroke to determine changes in circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion. At the end of the monitoring period, brains were analyzed to determine infarct volume. Results Rats demonstrated immediate shifts in melatonin timing after stroke. We observed a broad range of perturbations in melatonin timing in subsequent days, with rats exhibiting onset/offset patterns which included: advance/advance, advance/delay, delay/advance, and delay/delay. Melatonin rhythms displayed prolonged instability several days after stroke, with a majority of rats showing a day-to-day alternation between advance and delay in melatonin onset and duration. Duration of melatonin secretion changed in response to stroke, and this change was strongly determined by the shift in melatonin onset time. There was no correlation between infarct size and the direction or amplitude of melatonin phase shifting. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating

  13. Remote Ischemic Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Przyklenk, Karin; Redington, Andrew; Yellon, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) brief, reversible episodes of ischemia with reperfusion in one vascular bed, tissue or organ confer a global protective phenotype and render remote tissues and organs resistant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The peripheral stimulus can be chemical, mechanical or electrical and involves activation of peripheral sensory nerves. The signal transfer to the heart or other organs is through neuronal and humoral communications. Protection can be transferred, even across species, with plasma-derived dialysate and involves nitric oxide, stromal derived factor-1α, microRNA-144, but also other, not yet identified factors. Intracardiac signal transduction involves: adenosine, bradykinin, cytokines, and chemokines, which activate specific receptors; intracellular kinases; and mitochondrial function. RIC by repeated brief inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff protects against endothelial dysfunction and myocardial injury in percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary artery bypass grafting and reperfused acute myocardial infarction. RIC is safe and effective, noninvasive, easily feasible and inexpensive. PMID:25593060

  14. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  15. Comparison of Clinical Characteristics among Subtypes of Visual Symptoms in Patients with Transient Ischemic Attack: Analysis of the PROspective Multicenter registry to Identify Subsequent cardiovascular Events after TIA (PROMISE-TIA) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Uehara, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Kazumi; Okada, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Tanahashi, Norio; Suzuki, Akifumi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Arii, Kazumasa; Nagahiro, Shinji; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Iihara, Koji; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2018-06-01

    A transient visual symptom (TVS) is a clinical manifestation of transient ischemic attack (TIA). The aim of this study was to investigate differences in clinical characteristics among subtypes of TVS using multicenter TIA registry data. Patients with TIA visiting within 7 days of onset were prospectively enrolled from 57 hospitals between June 2011 and December 2013. Clinical characteristics were compared between patients with 3 major subtypes of TVS (transient monocular blindness [TMB], homonymous lateral hemianopia [HLH], and diplopia). Of 1365 patients, 106 (7.8%) had TVS, including 40 TMB (38%), 34 HLH (32%), 17 diplopia (16%), and 15 others/unknown (14%). Ninety-one patients with 1 of the 3 major subtypes of TVS were included. Symptoms persisted on arrival in 12 (13%) patients. Isolated TVS was significantly more common in TMB than in HLH and diplopia (88%, 62%, and 0%, respectively; P TIA multicenter cohort. Some differences in clinical characteristics were found among subtypes of TVS. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurological Consequences of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Phillipe D.; Hinder, Lucy M.; Callaghan, Brian C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity, primarily a consequence of poor dietary choices and an increased sedentary lifestyle, has become a global pandemic that brings with it enormous medical, social, and economic challenges. Not only does obesity increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and certain cancers, but it is also recognized as a key driver of other metabolic syndrome (MetS) components. These components include insulin resistance, hyperglycemia with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, and are underlying contributors to systemic metabolic dysfunction. More recently, obesity and diet-induced metabolic dysfunction have been identified as risk factors for the development of a wide variety of neurological disorders in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. An abundance of literature has shown that obesity is associated with mild cognitive impairment and altered hippocampal structure and function, and there is a robust correlation between obesity and Alzheimer’s type dementia. Similarly, many reports show that both the autonomic and somatic components of the peripheral nervous system are impacted by obesity. The autonomic nervous system, under control of the hypothalamus, displays altered catabolic and anabolic processes in obese individuals attributed to sympathetic-parasympathetic imbalances. A close association also exists between obesity and polyneuropathy, a complication most commonly found in prediabetic and diabetic patients, and is likely secondary to a combination of obesity-induced dyslipidemia with hyperglycemia. This review will outline the pathophysiological development of obesity and dyslipidemia, discuss the adverse impact of these conditions on the nervous system, and provide evidence for lipotoxicity and metabolic inflammation as the drivers underlying the neurological consequences of obesity. In addition, this review will examine the benefits of lifestyle and surgical interventions in obesity-induced neurological disorders. PMID

  17. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  18. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  19. History of Neurology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinde

    2000-01-01

    @@In 1921, the first independent department of neurology was established in Beijing. Before 1949, all over China only 12 professional doctors lectured neurology in medical colleges. Only 30 medically trained personnel were engaged in the neurological departments. The neurological departments contained roughly 200 beds. The thesis on stroke was written by Zhang Shanlei and published in 1922. Author discussed the cerebral stroke on basis of Chinese traditional medicine and European medicine. The first Textbook of Neurology in China was written by Professor Cheng Yu-lin and was published in 1939. In 1952, the Chinese Society of Neurology and Psychiatry of Chinese Medical Association was established. In 1955, the first issue of the Chinese Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry was published.

  20. Neurological and cardiac complications in a cohort of children with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumana H Albaramki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with chronic kidney disease are at risk of major neurologic and cardiac complications. The purpose of this study is to review the neurological and cardiac complications in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. A retrospective review of medical records of children with ESRD at Jordan University Hospital was performed. All neurological and cardiac events were recorded and analyzed. Data of a total of 68 children with ESRD presenting between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed. Neurological complications occurred in 32.4%; seizures were the most common event. Uncontrolled hypertension was the leading cause of neurological events. Cardiac complications occurred in 39.7%, the most common being pericardial effusion. Mortality from neurological complications was 45%. Neurological and cardiac complications occurred in around a third of children with ESRD with a high mortality rate. More effective control of hypertension, anemia, and intensive and gentle dialysis are needed.

  1. Ischemic stroke subtype is associated with outcome in thrombolyzed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Ziegler; Svendsen, M L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of ischemic stroke subtype on clinical outcome in patients treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) is sparsely examined. We studied the association between stroke subtype and clinical outcome in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-evaluated patients...... patients were more likely to achieve early neurological improvement and favorable outcome compared with LVD stroke following MRI-based IV-tPA treatment. This finding may reflect a difference in the effect of IV-tPA among stroke subtypes....

  2. A Case Of Transient Ischemic Attack Presenting As Hemichroea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Özdemir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chorea is defined as; involuntary movements of the distal parts of limbs which have arrhythmic, rapid, bouncing or smooth, simple or complex properties. Choreiform movements occur when putamen, globus pallidus and subthalamic nucleus are affected. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Chorea may be a rare symptom of cerebral hypoperfusion. Transient ischemic attack is an event that occurs in short term characterized by a temporary ischemia of brain. A wide variety of symptoms can be seen depending on the localization of cerebral hypoperfusion. Hemichorea is a very rare finding observed during transient ischemic attacks. In this article hemichorea in a case of symptomatic transient ischemic attack is discussed with relevant literature.

  3. Classification of etiologic subtypes for transient ischemic attacks. Clinical significance of lacunar transient ischemic attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Yasumasa; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Tanaka, Eijiro; Morii, Fukiko; Koizumi, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Lacunar transient ischemic attack (lacunar TIA) may have been underestimated because of diagnostic difficulties. The aim of our study was to classify TIAs by etiologic subtypes, especially using defined criteria for diagnosis of lacunar TIA and clarify clinical characteristics of lacunar TIA.105 TIA patients out of consecutive 1,244 patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to our hospital between January 2007 and June 2010 were enrolled in the present study. TIA was defined as an acute focal neurological deficit lasting less than 24 hours, suspected to be of cerebrovascular origin regardless of ischemic lesions on MRI. TIAs were classified to 5 etiologic subtypes; cardioembolic TIA, atherothrombotic TIA, lacunar TIA, other etiologies, and undetermined etiology and clinical characteristics in each subtype and the incidence of recurrent stroke after TIA were investigated. Lacunar TIA was diagnosed if the following criteria were fulfilled; presence of lacunar infarct on MRI and/or the presence of unilateral dysfunction of at least two of three body parts (face, arm, leg) in the absence of cortical dysfunction presumed due to subcortical ischemia. Absence of cardiac sources of embolism and large artery atherosclerosis. In 105 patients with TIA, lacunar TIA was the most frequent etiology (31%) followed by cardioembolic TIA (27%), atherothrombotic TIA (19%), undetermined etiology (18%), and other etiologies (6%). In patients with lacunar TIA, history of repeated TIA was more frequent and systolic blood pressure on admission was higher significantly than in cardioembolic TIA. Six of 105 patients had experienced recurrent stroke after TIA during admission. Among these 6 patients, 3 patients were diagnosed as lacunar infarctions. Lacunar TIA was most common TIA subtype in the present study. It is critical to identify lacunar TIA on admission because some patients with lacunar TIAs experience early recurrent stroke. (author)

  4. Serum C-Reactive Protein Level as a Biomarker for Differentiation of Ischemic from Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Roudbary

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accidents rank first in the frequency and importance among all neurological disease. Although a number of studies had shown increased level of the high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP in patients with ischemic stroke, the association of increased hs-CRP with various type of stroke especially the assessment hs-CRP level in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke have not been investigated. In the present study, we assessed the concentration of hs-CRP in patients with documented ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the first 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. Thirty-two patients with Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were evaluated at neurology department of Poursina Hospital. The presence of baseline vascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking, was determined. The blood samples were then collected and routine hematology and biochemistry tests were done. hs-CRP levels were determined using a highly sensitive immunonephelometric method. In this cross sectional study, the age of patient varied from 45-85 years (Mean 70.9  9.4. Serum level of hs-CRP in Ischemic patients were 18.92  11.28 and in hemorrhagic group was 2.65  1.7. This relationship was statistically significant (P<0.0001. It might be concluded that hs-CRP might be considered as a usefully adjunct method for the initial diagnosis of the type of stroke.

  5. Ischemic lesions related to cerebral angiography: Evaluation by diffusion weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Koki; Tomura, Noriaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Sakuma, Ikuo; Watarai, Jiro

    2003-01-01

    We examined the incidence of ischemic lesions occurring after cerebral angiography by means of diffusion weighted MR imaging (DWI). Fifty patients were included in this study. Balloon occlusion tests of the internal carotid artery were performed in 9 of the 50 patients. DWI was performed on the same day as the cerebral angiography or on the following day. No new neurological deficits were found after cerebral angiography. However, 13 of the 50 cases revealed new ischemic lesions after cerebral angiography. The incidence of ischemic lesions was significantly different between patients who underwent balloon occlusion tests and patients who did not. The incidence of ischemic lesions was not influenced by the duration of the procedure, use of additional catheters, total amount of contrast material or the type of contrast material. The incidence of clinically silent ischemic lesions related to cerebral angiography is greater than the incidence of neurological complications. In patients who underwent occlusion tests of the internal carotid artery, the incidence of silent lesions was significantly higher than in patients who did not. (orig.)

  6. Primary care perceptions of neurology and neurology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Angela M; Wade, Carrie; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-06-01

    Neurophobia (fear of neural sciences) and evaluation of independent sector contracts in neurology have seldom been examined among general practitioners (GPs). A questionnaire determined GPs' perceptions of neurology compared with other medical specialties. GP experiences of neurology services with independent sector companies and the local National Health Service (NHS) were compared. Areas of potential improvement in NHS neurology services were recorded from thematic analyses. Among 76 GPs neurology was perceived to be as interesting as other medical specialties. GPs reported less knowledge, more difficulty and less confidence in neurology compared with other medical specialties. There was a preference for a local NHS neurology service (pneurology services provided better patient satisfaction. GPs prefer local NHS neurology services to independent sector contracts. GPs' evaluations should inform commissioning of neurology services. Combating neurophobia should be an integral part of responsive commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. [Surgery of refractory ischemic arrhythmia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, M; Graffigna, A; Salerno, G

    1992-03-01

    Since June 1980, 138 patients have undergone surgical treatment for refractory ventricular tachycardia due to ischemic heart disease. Electrically guided surgical ablation (EGSA) of the focus was performed in 117 patients, while 14 patients underwent application of automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD), and 8 patients underwent heart transplantation. During the whole period considered, among the EGSA patients an operative mortality of 13 patients was observed (11.4%), with a late mortality of another 14 patients (13.4%). Two early and six late recurrences were described, and 4 cases of sudden or unexplained death, with 2 cases clearly due to an arrhythmic event. Multivariate analysis showed preoperative ejection fraction lower than 25% as a powerful predictor of early mortality (32% vs 0%). Actuarial survival rate of patients with LVEF lower than 25% was 67 +/- 12% vs 95 +/- 2% at one year and 37 +/- 25% vs 94 +/- 8% at 8 years. A high operative mortality was then observed in patients who underwent aneurysmectomy alone or visually guided procedures as compared to electrically guided procedures (75% or 3 deaths out of 4 patients vs 8.5% or 10 out of 113 patients, respectively). Patients who received an AICD with or without associated procedures showed 1 case of in-hospital mortality and no late mortality; in 6 patients at least one shock was delivered; in two patients the AICD was implanted during an EGSA procedure, due to multiple or difficult origins of the arrhythmias. Of patients who underwent heart transplantation one case of later mortality was observed due to malignancy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Molecular genetics in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J B

    1993-12-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the identification of mutations in genes that cause inherited neurological disorders. Abnormalities in the genes for Huntington disease, neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2, one form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fragile X syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, Kennedy syndrome, Menkes disease, and several forms of retinitis pigmentosa have been elucidated. Rare disorders of neuronal migration such as Kallmann syndrome, Miller-Dieker syndrome, and Norrie disease have been shown to be due to specific gene defects. Several muscle disorders characterized by abnormal membrane excitability have been defined as mutations of the muscle sodium or chloride channels. These advances provide opportunity for accurate molecular diagnosis of at-risk individuals and are the harbinger of new approaches to therapy of these diseases.

  9. Neurological complications of alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Nikiforov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nervous system lesions associated with chronic alcohol intoxication are common in clinical practice. They lead to aggravated alcoholic disease, its more frequent recurrences, and intensified pathological craving for alcohol. Neurological pathology in turn occurs with frequent exacerbations. The interaction of diseases, age, and medical  pathomorphism modifies the clinical presentation and course of the  major pathology, as well as comorbidity, the nature and severity of  complications, worsens quality of life in a patient, and makes the  diagnostic and treatment process difficult. The paper discusses the  classification, clinical variants, biochemical and molecular biological  aspects of various complications of alcoholic disease. It considers its  most common form, in particular alcoholic polyneuropathy, as well as its rarer variants, such as hemorrhagic encephalopathy with a subacute course (Gayet–Wernicke encephalopathy.

  10. Deja vu in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The significance of deja vu is widely recognised in the context of temporal lobe epilepsy, and enquiry about deja vu is frequently made in the clinical assessment of patients with possible epilepsy. Deja vu has also been associated with several psychiatric disorders. The historical context of current understanding of deja vu is discussed. The literature reveals deja vu to be a common phenomenon consistent with normality. Several authors have suggested the existence of a "pathological" form of deja vu that differs, qualitatively or quantitatively, from "non-pathological" deja vu. The features of deja vu suggesting neurological or psychiatric pathology are discussed. Several neuroanatomical and psychological models of the deja vu experience are highlighted, implicating the perceptual, mnemonic and affective regions of the lateral temporal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala in the genesis of deja vu. A possible genetic basis for a neurochemical model of deja vu is discussed. Clinical approaches to the patient presenting with possible deja vu are proposed.

  11. Neurology of ciguatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J

    2001-01-01

    Ciguatera is a widespread ichthyosarcotoxaemia with dramatic and clinically important neurological features. This severe form of fish poisoning may present with either acute or chronic intoxication syndromes and constitutes a global health problem. Ciguatera poisoning is little known in temperate countries as a potentially global problem associated with human ingestion of large carnivorous fish that harbour the bioaccumulated ciguatoxins of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. This neurotoxin is stored in the viscera of fish that have eaten the dinoflagellate and concentrated it upwards throughout the food chain towards progressively larger species, including humans. Ciguatoxin accumulates in all fish tissues, especially the liver and viscera, of "at risk" species. Both Pacific (P-CTX-1) and Caribbean (C-CTX-1) ciguatoxins are heat stable polyether toxins and pose a health risk at concentrations above 0.1 ppb. The presenting signs of ciguatera are primarily neurotoxic in more than 80% of cases. Such include the pathognomonic features of postingestion paraesthesiae, dysaesthesiae, and heightened nociperception. Other sensory abnormalities include the subjective features of metallic taste, pruritis, arthralgia, myalgia, and dental pain. Cerebellar dysfunction, sometimes diphasic, and weakness due to both neuropathy and polymyositis may be encountered. Autonomic dysfunction leads to hypotension, bradycardia, and hypersalivation in severe cases. Ciguatoxins are potent, lipophilic sodium channel activator toxins which bind to the voltage sensitive (site 5) sodium channel on the cell membranes of all excitable tissues. Treatment depends on early diagnosis and the early administration of intravenous mannitol. The early identification of the neurological features in sentinel patients has the potential to reduce the number of secondary cases in cluster outbreaks.

 PMID:11118239

  12. Perfusion differences on SPECT and PWI in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuutinen, Juho; Liu, Yawu; Laakso, Mikko P.; Karonen, Jari O.; Vanninen, Esko J.; Kuikka, Jyrki T.; Aronen, Hannu J.; Vanninen, Ritva L.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to compare the flow defect volumes on perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PWI) and 99m Tc-labeled ethylcysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at acute and subacute stages of ischemic stroke and to analyze the relationship between the detected flow defects on the two methods and neurological status and clinical outcomes. Perfusion defects on PWI and SPECT were measured within 48 h and on day 8 of the onset of stroke from 22 patients with their first-ever acute supratentorial ischemic stroke. The primary neurological status was evaluated prior to the imaging. Clinical outcome was assessed at 3 months after the onset of the stroke. The volumes of cerebral blood flow (CBF) defects did not differ between SPECT and PWI within the 48-h examinations. However, the volume of CBF defect was significantly larger on SPECT than on PWI on day 8 (p = 0.03). Within the 48-h examinations, the CBF defect volumes on SPECT and PWI were comparably related to the neurological status. On day 8, the CBF defect volume on SPECT showed higher correlation to the neurological status and more precisely predicted the clinical outcomes at 3 months than PWI. 99m TC-ECD-SPECT and PWI both have ability to detect cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with ischemic stroke but with some differences. The value of SPECT is more accurate in terms of the delayed outcome, such as prognosis and rehabilitation planning. (orig.)

  13. Child Neurology Services in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

  14. Computerized tomography of the brain and associated risk factors in 240 patients iwth reversible cerebral ischemic attacks (RIAs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzao, L.; Fantozzi, L.M.; Carolei, A.; Pappata, S.; Vesentini, G.; Allori, L.; Rasura, M.; Fieschi, C.

    1985-01-01

    The frequency and distribution of focal low density cerebral ischemic lesions in RIA patients with regard to factors as age at onset, number and temporal profile of the reversible cerebral ischemic events on admission, presence of associated medical conditions such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, have been investigated with computerized tomography of the brain. (author). 7 refs.; 1 tab

  15. Baseline characteristics of the 3096 patients recruited into the 'Triple Antiplatelets for Reducing Dependency after Ischemic Stroke' trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Philip Mw; Appleton, Jason P; Beridze, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Background The risk of recurrence following ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack is highest immediately after the event. Antiplatelet agents are effective in reducing the risk of recurrence and two agents are superior to one in the early phase after ictus. Design The triple antiplatelets...

  16. Influence of Bleeding Pattern on Ischemic Lesions After Spontaneous Hypertensive Intracerebral Hemorrhage with Intraventricular Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Lara, Lucia; Murthy, Santosh B; Nekoovaght-Tak, Saman; Ali, Hasan; McBee, Nichol; Dlugash, Rachel; Ram, Malathi; Thompson, Richard; Awad, Issam A; Hanley, Daniel F; Ziai, Wendy C

    2018-03-27

    Concomitant acute ischemic lesions are detected in up to a quarter of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Influence of bleeding pattern and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) on risk of ischemic lesions has not been investigated. Retrospective study of all 500 patients enrolled in the CLEAR III randomized controlled trial of thrombolytic removal of obstructive IVH using external ventricular drainage. The primary outcome measure was radiologically confirmed ischemic lesions, as reported by the Safety Event Committee and confirmed by two neurologists. We assessed predictors of ischemic lesions including analysis of bleeding patterns (ICH, IVH and subarachnoid hemorrhage) on computed tomography scans (CT). Secondary outcomes were blinded assessment of mortality and modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 30 and 180 days. Ischemic lesions occurred in 23 (4.6%) during first 30 days after ICH. Independent risk factors associated with ischemic lesions in logistic regression models adjusted for confounders were higher IVH volume (p = 0.004) and persistent subarachnoid hemorrhage on CT scan (p = 0.03). Patients with initial IVH volume ≥ 15 ml had five times the odds of concomitant ischemic lesions compared to IVH volume < 15 ml. Patients with ischemic lesions had significantly higher odds of death at 1 and 6 months (but not poor outcome; mRS 4-6) compared to patients without concurrent ischemic lesions. Occurrence of ischemic lesions in the acute phase of IVH is not uncommon and is significantly associated with increased early and late mortality. Extra-parenchymal blood (larger IVH and visible subarachnoid hemorrhage) is a strong predictor for development of concomitant ischemic lesions after ICH.

  17. Risk of ischemic stroke after atrial fibrillation diagnosis: A national sample cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyoung Son

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke and associated with a 5-fold higher risk of stroke. In this retrospective cohort study, the incidence of and risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with AF were identified. All patients (≥30 years old without previous stroke who were diagnosed with AF in 2007-2013 were selected from the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort. To identify factors that influenced ischemic stroke risk, Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted. During a mean follow-up duration of 3.2 years, 1022 (9.6% patients were diagnosed with ischemic stroke. The overall incidence rate of ischemic stroke was 30.8/1000 person-years. Of all the ischemic stroke that occurred during the follow-up period, 61.0% occurred within 1-year after AF diagnosis. Of the patients with CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≥2, only 13.6% were receiving warfarin therapy within 30 days after AF diagnosis. Relative to no antithrombotic therapy, warfarin treatment for >90 days before the index event (ischemic stroke in stroke patients and death/study end in non-stroke patients associated with decreased ischemic stroke risk (Hazard Ratio = 0.41, 95%confidence intervals = 0.32-0.53. Heart failure, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus associated with greater ischemic stroke risk. AF patients in Korea had a higher ischemic stroke incidence rate than patients in other countries and ischemic stroke commonly occurred at early phase after AF diagnosis. Long-term (>90 days continuous warfarin treatment may be beneficial for AF patients. However, warfarin treatment rates were very low. To prevent stroke, programs that actively detect AF and provide anticoagulation therapy are needed.

  18. Affective disorders in neurological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, F M; Kessing, L V; Sørensen, T M

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the temporal relationships between a range of neurological diseases and affective disorders. METHOD: Data derived from linkage of the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and the Danish National Hospital Register. Seven cohorts with neurological index diagnoses and two...... of affective disorder was lower than the incidence in the control groups. CONCLUSION: In neurological diseases there seems to be an increased incidence of affective disorders. The elevated incidence was found to be particularly high for dementia and Parkinson's disease (neurodegenerative diseases)....

  19. A pathophysiological role of TRPV1 in ischemic injury after transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyanohara, Jun [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan); Shirakawa, Hisashi, E-mail: shirakaw@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan); Sanpei, Kazuaki [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan); Nakagawa, Takayuki [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan); Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital (Japan); Kaneko, Shuji [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2015-11-20

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel with high Ca{sup 2+} permeability, which functions as a polymodal nociceptor activated by heat, protons and several vanilloids, including capsaicin and anandamide. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the mammalian brain, their pathophysiological roles in the brain remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether TRPV1 is involved in cerebral ischemic injury using a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model in wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-knockout (KO) mice. For transient ischemia, the left MCA of C57BL/6 mice was occluded for 60 min and reperfused at 1 and 2 days after ischemia. We found that neurological and motor deficits, and infarct volumes in TRPV1-KO mice were lower than those of WT mice. Consistent with these results, intracerebroventricular injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (20 nmol), 30 min before the onset of ischemia attenuated neurological and motor deficits and improved infarct size without influencing cerebral blood flow in the occluded MCA territory. The protective effect of capsazepine on ischemic brain damage was not observed in TRPV1-KO mice. WT and TRPV1-KO mice did not show any differences with respect to the increased number of Iba1-positive microglia/macrophages, GFAP-positive astrocytes, and Gr1-positive neutrophils at 1 and 2 days after cerebral ischemia. Taken together, we conclude that brain TRPV1 channels are activated by ischemic stroke and cause neurological and motor deficits and infarction after brain ischemia. - Highlights: • We investigated whether TRPV1 is involved in transient ischemic brain damage in mice. • Neurological deficits and infarct volumes were lower in TRPV1-KO mice than in WT mice. • Injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, attenuated neurological deficits and improved infarct size. • No differences in astrocytic or microglial activation were observed between WT and TRPV1-KO mice.

  20. A pathophysiological role of TRPV1 in ischemic injury after transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyanohara, Jun; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Sanpei, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel with high Ca"2"+ permeability, which functions as a polymodal nociceptor activated by heat, protons and several vanilloids, including capsaicin and anandamide. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the mammalian brain, their pathophysiological roles in the brain remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether TRPV1 is involved in cerebral ischemic injury using a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model in wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-knockout (KO) mice. For transient ischemia, the left MCA of C57BL/6 mice was occluded for 60 min and reperfused at 1 and 2 days after ischemia. We found that neurological and motor deficits, and infarct volumes in TRPV1-KO mice were lower than those of WT mice. Consistent with these results, intracerebroventricular injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (20 nmol), 30 min before the onset of ischemia attenuated neurological and motor deficits and improved infarct size without influencing cerebral blood flow in the occluded MCA territory. The protective effect of capsazepine on ischemic brain damage was not observed in TRPV1-KO mice. WT and TRPV1-KO mice did not show any differences with respect to the increased number of Iba1-positive microglia/macrophages, GFAP-positive astrocytes, and Gr1-positive neutrophils at 1 and 2 days after cerebral ischemia. Taken together, we conclude that brain TRPV1 channels are activated by ischemic stroke and cause neurological and motor deficits and infarction after brain ischemia. - Highlights: • We investigated whether TRPV1 is involved in transient ischemic brain damage in mice. • Neurological deficits and infarct volumes were lower in TRPV1-KO mice than in WT mice. • Injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, attenuated neurological deficits and improved infarct size. • No differences in astrocytic or microglial activation were observed between WT and TRPV1-KO mice.

  1. Imaging of acute neurological conditions in pregnancy and the puerperium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dineen, R.; Banks, A.; Lenthall, R.

    2005-01-01

    Eclampsia is one of the most common acute neurological events occurring during pregnancy. However, there are many other conditions that can present during pregnancy and the puerperium and that may either mimic eclampsia or produce other acute neurological manifestations. Frequently the symptoms and signs are non-specific, and it can be difficult to differentiate between these conditions on clinical grounds alone. Neuroradiological studies can provide valuable diagnostic information, and interventional radiological procedures may play a part in the subsequent management of these conditions. This review focuses on the imaging of acute neurological conditions which may be associated with, or present during, pregnancy and the puerperium

  2. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  3. Risk factors in various subtypes of ischemic stroke according to TOAST criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquil, Nadia; Begum, Imtiaz; Ahmed, Arshia; Vohra, Ejaz Ahmed; Soomro, Bashir Ahmed

    2011-05-01

    To identify the frequency of risk factors in various subtypes of acute ischemic stroke according to TOAST criteria. Cross-sectional, observational study. Ziauddin Hospital, Karachi, from January to December 2007. Patients with acute ischemic stroke were enrolled. Studied variables included demographic profile, history of risk factors, physical and neurological examination, and investigations relevant with the objectives of the study. Findings were described as frequency percentages. Proportions of risk factors against subtypes was compared using chi-square test with significance at p dyslipedemia in 22%, smoking in 9%, atrial fibrillation in 5%, and previous history of stroke in 29%. The various subtypes of acute ischemic stroke were lacunar infarct in 43%, large artery atherosclerosis in 31%, cardioembolic type in 8%, stroke of other determined etiology in 1% and stroke of undetermined etiology in 18%. Hypertension and Diabetes were the most important risk factors in both large and small artery atherosclerosis. In patients with cardio-embolic stroke significant association was found with ischemic heart disease (p=0.01). Importance and relevance of risk factors evaluated for subtypes rather than ischemic stroke as a whole should be reflected in preventive efforts against the burden of ischemic stroke.

  4. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in children : CT findings related to prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Min; Il, Yim Byung; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Suh, Jung Ho

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate prognosis-related CT findings in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. For the purpose of prognosis, 28 children with a clinical history and CT findings suggestive of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) were restrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic criteria for HIE, as seen on CT scanning, were as follows : 1, ventricular collapse;2, effacement of cortical sulci;3, prominent enhancement of cortical vessels;4, poor differentiation of gray and white matter;5, reversal sign;6, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern;7, high density on tentorial edge, as seen on precontrast scans;and 8, low density in thalamus, brain stem and basal ganglia. On the basis of clinical outcome, we divided the patients into three groups, as follows:group I(good prognosis);group II(neurologic sequelae), and group III(vegetative state or expire), and among these, compared CT findings. There were thirteen patients in group I, six in group II, and nine in group III. Ventricular collapse, effacement of cortical sulci, and prominent enhancement of cortical vessels were noted in all groups, whereas poor differentiation of gray and white matter, reversal sign, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern, high density on tentorial edge, on precontrast scan, and low density in brain stem and basal ganglia were observed only in groups II and III. CT findings showed distinct differences between groups in whom prognosis was good, and in whom it was poor. An awareness of poor prognostic CT findings may be clinically helpful in the evaluation of patients with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

  5. THE IMPACT OF COMORBIDITY ON COGNITIVE PARAMETERS AFTER ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirena Valkova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study is to examine the impact of comorbidity on cognitive parameters after the first ever ischemic stroke.Material and methods: We examined 112 patients (aged 46 to 84 (66.67± 5.96, 69 males and 43 females with first ever ischemic stroke. For cognitive assessment we used Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, 10 word test (for short term memory and delayed recall, Isaack’s test for verbal fluency (VF, Geriatric depression scale (GDS, Hamilton depression scale (HDS, Blessed dementia information memory concentration test (revised, BDIMCT, Benton Visual Retention test (A,E; BVRT – number of corrects and number of errors and Wiskonsin Card Sorting Test (number of errors, WCST. The patients were examined on two step model. At acute stage, after collecting medical history, somatic and neurological examinations, MMSE, 10 words test and HDS were applied. At subacute stroke stage (90±5 days after first stroke symptoms, all cognitive tests were used. „STATGRAPHICS Plus 5.0 (free version” was used for statistical analysis.Results: Chronic ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most important additional risk factors for cognitive decline. Thyroid pathology, renal failure and anemia are independently associated with poststroke depression.Conclusions: On the basis of these data we can conclude that vascular risk factors are independently associated with cognitive and emotional changes after stroke and their effects should be assessed and taken into account for subsequent treatment of stroke survivors.

  6. Neurological complications following liver transplant: a pictorial review of radiological and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Kyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Deok Hee; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    Neurological complications are a rare but important and significant source of information about morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. Based on the clinical and radiological findings of 21 patients, neurological complications were categorized into five main groups; focal hemorrhagic or occlusive complications (n=11); diffuse hypoxic-ischemic injury (n=3); hypertensive encephalopathy (n=1); central pontine or extra-pontine myelinolysis (n=4); and infection (n=2). Neurological manifestations varied according to the location of the lesion, although seizures were the most common manifestation. In this pictorial review, we illustrate the radiological findings, focusing on MR and CT images, of a spectrum of neurological complications following liver transplants, as well as their clinical correlations.

  7. Neurological complications following liver transplant: a pictorial review of radiological and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Kyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Deok Hee; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul

    2005-01-01

    Neurological complications are a rare but important and significant source of information about morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. Based on the clinical and radiological findings of 21 patients, neurological complications were categorized into five main groups; focal hemorrhagic or occlusive complications (n=11); diffuse hypoxic-ischemic injury (n=3); hypertensive encephalopathy (n=1); central pontine or extra-pontine myelinolysis (n=4); and infection (n=2). Neurological manifestations varied according to the location of the lesion, although seizures were the most common manifestation. In this pictorial review, we illustrate the radiological findings, focusing on MR and CT images, of a spectrum of neurological complications following liver transplants, as well as their clinical correlations

  8. Trends in neurology fellowship training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jordan S.A. Williams; Trent S. Hodgson; Fernando D. Goldenberg; Rimas V. Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Aim:Aneed for Neurologists exists in the USA.The majority of Neurology residency graduates go on to additional subspecialty training. Methods: Data from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education from 2001-2014 and the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties from was analyzed for trends in the number of Neurology subspecialty training programs and their composition. Results: There has been an overall trend of growth in the number of accredited Neurology subspecialty training programs and fellows. These trends vary between specific subspecialties. Conclusion: The authors provide an overview of the contemporary state of Neurology subspecialty training in the USA. A clearer understanding of subspecialty training allows for anticipation of workforce surpluses and deficits.

  9. Acute Management of Hemostasis in Patients With Neurological Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharoglu, M Irem; Brand, Anneke; Koopman, Maria M; Vermeulen, Marinus; Roos, Yvo B W E M

    2017-10-01

    Neurological injuries can be divided into those with traumatic and nontraumatic causes. The largest groups are traumatic brain injury (TBI) and nontraumatic stroke. TBI patients may present with intracranial hemorrhages (contusions, or subdural or epidural hematomas). Strokes are ischemic or hemorrhagic. In all these disorders, thrombosis and hemostasis play a major role. Treatment aims to either cease bleeding and/or restore perfusion. We reviewed hemostatic and thrombolytic therapies in patients with neurological injuries by MEDLINE and EMBASE search using various key words for neurological disorders and hemostatic therapies restricted to English language and human adults. Review of articles fulfilling inclusion criteria and relevant references revealed that, in patients with ischemic stroke, intravenous thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5-5 hours after onset of symptoms improves clinical outcome. In contrast, there are no hemostatic therapies that are proven to improve clinical outcome of patients with hemorrhagic stroke or TBI. In patients with hemorrhagic stroke who use vitamin K antagonist or direct oral anticoagulants, there is evidence that specific reversal therapies improve hemostatic laboratory parameters but without an effect on clinical recovery. In patients with hemorrhagic stroke or TBI who use concomitant antiplatelet therapy, there is evidence for harm of platelet transfusion. In patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, tranexamic acid was shown to reduce rebleeding rate without improving clinical outcome. The effects of tranexamic acid in patients with TBI are still under investigation. We conclude that, in patients with ischemic stroke, thrombolytic therapy improves outcome when given within 4.5-5 hours. In hemorrhagic stroke and TBI, most hemostatic therapies improved or corrected laboratory parameters but not clinical outcome. Currently, in several trials, the effects of tranexamic acid are

  10. Discrimination of acute ischemic stroke from nonischemic vertigo in patients presenting with only imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shoji; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Yonehara, Toshiro; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ando, Yukio; Uchino, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Some patients who present with an acute feeling of imbalance are experiencing an ischemic stroke that is not evident on computed tomography (CT) scans. The aim of this study was to compare ischemic stroke and nonischemic vertigo patient groups and to investigate independent factors associated with ischemic stroke. We examined 332 consecutive patients with an acute feeling of imbalance who showed no neurologic findings or responsible lesions on CT scan at the hyperacute phase. We examined their clinical backgrounds, physical findings, and laboratory examinations, with ischemic stroke diagnosed by later CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We identified 41 (12.3%) ischemic stroke patients. Atrial fibrillation (odds ratio 4.1; 95% confidence interval 1.4-11.5), white blood cell count (10(3)/μL, 1.4; 1.2-1.6), head and/or neck pain (4.6; 2.1-10.3), first attack of imbalance feeling (3.3; 1.1-12.2), and dizziness (3.7; 1.7-8.3) were significant and independent factors associated with ischemic stroke among patients with an acute feeling of imbalance. We used these factors to calculate an "imbalance score"; 1 point was given for the presence of each factor and a score of 3-5 points was independently associated with ischemic stroke. An awareness of these factors may indicate that further examinations including MRI are necessary to rule out ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazirolan, T.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease has increased over the last years. Cardiac MRI is the only imaging modality that provides 'one stop shop' assessment. Information about ventricular function, myocardial ischemia and myocardial viability can be obtained in a single cardiac MRI session. Additionally, Cardiac MRI has become a gold standard method in evaluation of myocardial viability and in assessment of ventricular mass and function. As a result, cardiac MRI enable radiologist to comprehensively assess ischemic heart disease. The aim of this presentation is to provide the reader a state-of-the art on how the newest cardiac MRI techniques can be used to study ischemic heart disease patients.

  12. MR imaging of ischemic penumbra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Osamu; Aoki, Shigeki; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Hayashi, Naoto; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Mori, Harushi; Yamada, Haruyasu; Watanabe, Makoto; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is one of the most fatal diseases despite current advances in medical science. Recent demonstration of efficacy using intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis demands therapeutic intervention tailored to the physiologic state of the individual tissue and stratification of patients according to the potential risks for therapies. In such an era, the role of the neuroimaging becomes increasingly important to evaluate the extent and location of tissues at risk of infarction (ischemic penumbra), to distinguish it from unsalvageable infarcted tissues or doomed hemorrhagic parenchyma. In this review, we present briefly the current role and limitation of computed tomography and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We also present the possible applications of advanced MR techniques, such as diffusion and perfusion imaging, concentrating on the delineation or detection of ischemic penumbra

  13. Establishment of modified reversible regional cerebral ischemic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Xunming; Ling Feng; Zhao Xiqing; Xuan Yun; Wang Yueqin; Ling Xiaolan; Chang Hongjun; Zhang Zhiping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Modifying the method of establishing reversible middle cerebral ischemic models in rats for improvement of the stability and rate of success, so as to raise the reliability of cerebral ischemic study. Methods: Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups, modified and control groups, 30 rats in each group. The method of silicone- tipping on one end of the nylon suture was used to modify the establishment of embolus, and tip-heating method was used to establish the traditional embolus with all the other steps of the procedure just the same. The Zea Longa 5 scoring scale was used to estimate the neurological deficiency while TTC staining method was used to measure and calculate the volume of cerebral infarction. The percentage of successful models with 3-4 grade scorings and the coefficient of the variations of cerebral infarct volume were used to estimate the stability of the models. Results: The rate of success of establishment models in the modification group was significantly higher in comparing with the traditional group (93% vs 60%, χ 2 =9.32, P=0.002). The percentage of model establishment with 3-4 grade neurological scores in modification group was higher than that in the traditional group 96.4% vs 61.2%, χ 2 =9.51, P=0.002). The cerebral infarct volume in modification group and traditional group were (4.1450±0.5019) cm 3 and (3.8435 ± 0.8164) cm 3 , and the coefficients of variation were 12.01% and 21.24% respectively, which indicated that the stability of models was significantly higher in modification group than in the traditional one. Conclusions: The rates of success and stability of the models for reversible focal cerebral ischemia made by the modification method were significantly improved, with decreasing the cost of model creation and increasing the accuracy of study of ischemic cerebral vascular disease. (authors)

  14. Relationship between pattern of ischemic manifestation and hemodynamics in symptomatic M1 stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumitsu, Naoki; Sako, Kazuhiro; Aizawa, Shizuka; Shirai, Wakako

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism through which ischemic manifestations develop in patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis is still uncertain. It may cause ischemic symptoms through both embolic and hemodynamic mechanisms. In this study, we compared the findings from cerebral angiograms with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with M1 stenosis to determine the pathogenesis of ischema. At our hospital from 1994 to 2000, 14 patients (12 males and 2 females; mean age, 60.9; range, 31 to 85 years) with angiographically demonstrated symptomatic M1 stenosis were enrolled in this study. In 10, their stenotic lesion was located at the proximal site of the perforating arteries and for the other 4, stenosis was found at the distal site. Nine presented with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 5 with completed stroke for an initial episode. The discrepancy in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was evaluated in relation to the site and degree of stenosis, type of ischemic presentation, and frequency of ischemic events. There was no significant difference in CBF between the patients with stenosis involving the proximal site and those with distal stenosis; but the cortical CBF decreased significantly in those with severe stenosis compared with moderate stenosis. The cortical CBF of those who had a complete stroke is similar to that of the patients with TIA; but CBF of BGA decreased significantly in those with a complete stroke. The single ischemic event group showed a significant decrease in cortical CBF. On the other hand, the group with multiple ischemic events exhibited normal hemodynamics. We concluded that multiple ischemic events that occurred in M1 stenosis are caused by an embolic mechanism. (author)

  15. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF STATIN-ASSOCIATED MUSCLE DAMAGE PREDICTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    V. I. Petrov; O. N. Smuseva; Yu. V. Solovkina

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To assess the risk factors of statin-associated muscle damage in patient with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. 258 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with statin were included into the study. Total plasma creatine kinase levels were measured and SLCO1B1*5 genotyping was performed. Relationship between statin therapy and adverse events was evaluated by Naranjo algorithm.Results. Patients with muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer (48.8 vs 11.9 months,...

  16. Incidental primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in a patient presenting with transient ischemic attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francischetti, Ivo M B; Cajigas, Antonio; Suhrland, Mark; Farinhas, Joaquim M; Khader, Samer

    2017-08-01

    We describe a case of a 41-year old male patient with no significant prior medical history who presents with symptoms of Transient Ischemic Attack and stroke. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain identified areas of ischemia in the left side, and angiography showed occlusion of the left Medial Cerebral Artery (MCA). Cardiac Transthoracic Echocardiogram (TTE) for stroke evaluation incidentally noted a mediastinal abnormality leading to cancer work-up. Computer Tomography (CT) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT scan of the chest incidentally revealed an avid 6 cm paraesophagial/subcarinal mass. Further diagnostic work-up with endoscopic and endobronchial ultra sound (EBUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the mass yielded a cytology diagnosis of Germ Cell Tumor (GCT), with choriocarcinoma component. Additionally, high plasma levels of β-human chorionic gonadotrophin (β-HCG) were detected with no evidence of testicular tumor. This exceedingly rare presentation for a primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma underscores the importance of complete investigation of young patients presenting with neurological symptoms compatible with ischemic events. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:738-743. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pediatric ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Mohandas, Surath

    2014-10-01

    Dengue infection is an important arboviral infection in southeast Asia, especially in India. Neurological manifestations of dengue are increasingly recognized. We report an ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis in an 8-year-old child. We present a girl with a short febrile illness followed by episodic severe headache, with gradually progressive hemiparesis and visual impairment. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple infarctions in the anterior and posterior circulation. The magnetic resonance angiogram revealed irregular narrowing of bilateral middle cerebral arteries, right anterior cerebral artery, left posterior cerebral, and bilateral vertebral arteries suggestive of vasculitis. Her dengue serology was strongly positive for immunoglobulin M with 68.9 panbio units. The rest of the evaluation for pediatric stroke was unremarkable. She was treated with intravenous followed by oral corticosteroids and recovered totally with resolution of vasculitis on magnetic resonance angiogram over the next 3 months. This child illustrates possible immune-mediated vasculitis caused by dengue infection which is rather a rare presentation in a child who subsequently recovered well. One should consider dengue in childhood strokes in endemic regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sodium Valproate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Is Associated With Reduced Stroke Risk After Previous Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Rebecca L.; Crichton, Siobhan; Wolfe, Charles D.A.; Yi, Qilong; Li, Linxin; Hankey, Graeme J.; Rothwell, Peter M.

    2018-01-01

    Background and Purpose— A variant in the histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) gene is associated with large artery stroke. Therefore, inhibiting HDAC9 might offer a novel secondary preventative treatment for ischemic stroke. The antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (SVA) is a nonspecific inhibitor of HDAC9. We tested whether SVA therapy given after ischemic stroke was associated with reduced recurrent stroke rate. Methods— Data were pooled from 3 prospective studies recruiting patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack and long-term follow-up: the South London Stroke Register, The Vitamins to Prevent Stroke Study, and the Oxford Vascular Study. Patients receiving SVA were compared with patients who received antiepileptic drugs other than SVA using survival analysis and Cox Regression. Results— A total of 11 949 patients with confirmed ischemic event were included. Recurrent stroke rate was lower in patient taking SVA (17 of 168) than other antiepileptic drugs (105 of 530; log-rank survival analysis P=0.002). On Cox regression, controlling for potential cofounders, SVA remained associated with reduced stroke (hazard ratio=0.44; 95% confidence interval: 0.3–0.7; P=0.002). A similar result was obtained when patients taking SVA were compared with all cases not taking SVA (Cox regression, hazard ratio=0.47; 95% confidence interval: 0.29–0.77; P=0.003). Conclusions— These results suggest that exposure to SVA, an inhibitor of HDAC, may be associated with a lower recurrent stroke risk although we cannot exclude residual confounding in this study design. This supports the hypothesis that HDAC9 is important in the ischemic stroke pathogenesis and that its inhibition, by SVA or a more specific HDAC9 inhibitor, is worthy of evaluation as a treatment to prevent recurrent ischemic stroke. PMID:29247141

  19. An autosomal recessive leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa maps to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhouche Ahmed; Benomar Ali; Errguig Leila; Lachhab Lamiae; Bouslam Naima; Aasfara Jehanne; Sefiani Sanaa; Chabraoui Layachi; El Fahime Elmostafa; El Quessar Abdeljalil; Jiddane Mohamed; Yahyaoui Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Single-gene disorders related to ischemic stroke seem to be an important cause of stroke in young patients without known risk factors. To identify new genes responsible of such diseases, we studied a consanguineous Moroccan family with three affected individuals displaying hereditary leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa that appears to segregate in autosomal recessive pattern. Methods All family members underwent neurologic...

  20. Deep vein thrombosis after ischemic stroke: rationale for a therapeutic trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, N.M.; Norris, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the legs occurs in 23% to 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke, and pulmonary embolism accounts for about 5% of deaths. New heparinoid substances, lacking the hazards of more established anticoagulants, raise the question of DVT prophylaxis for these patients. Two hundred fifty consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients were evaluated for the presence of DVT of the legs in a feasibility study for a trial of low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis. Forty-nine patients were found suitable for the study, of whom 11 (22.5%) developed DVT. All patients underwent clinical examination, I-125 fibrinogen leg scanning, and impedance plethysmography. Five patients were sufficiently alert and without serious neurologic deficits to justify DVT prophylaxis. Recent advances in noninvasive diagnostic techniques to detect DVT early and the development of relatively safe heparinoid compounds increase the need for a prophylactic study in patients with ischemic stroke

  1. Hemispheric distribution of middle cerebral artery ischemic strokes in patients admitted to military hospital rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.; Ishtiaq, S.; Zulfiqar, S.O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the difference in the frequency of middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic strokes between left and right cerebral hemispheres in the adult patients admitted to the Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: MH Rawalpindi from 01 Dec 2013 to 30 Mar 2014. Patients and Methods: Seventy eight adult patients admitted to MH Rawalpindi with neurologic deficits consistent with MCA strokes and having no evidence of intracerebral haemorrhage on Computed Tomographic (CT) scan of brain. Descriptive Statistics were calculated using SPSS version 17. Results: A total of 78 patients met the inclusion criteria of the study; 35 (45 percent) patients had right MCA stroke while 43 (55 percent) had left MCA stroke. Conclusion: Left MCA ischemic strokes are more common than right MCA ischemic strokes. (author)

  2. Noninvasive Ventilatory Correction as an Adjunct to an Experimental Systemic Reperfusion Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Barlinn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common condition in patients with acute ischemic stroke and associated with early clinical deterioration and poor functional outcome. However, noninvasive ventilatory correction is hardly considered as a complementary treatment option during the treatment phase of acute ischemic stroke. Summary of Case. A 55-year-old woman with an acute middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA and enrolled into a thrombolytic research study. During tPA infusion, she became drowsy, developed apnea episodes, desaturated and neurologically deteriorated without recanalization, re-occlusion or intracerebral hemorrhage. Urgent noninvasive ventilatory correction with biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP reversed neurological fluctuation. Her MCA completely recanalized 24 hours later. Conclusions. Noninvasive ventilatory correction should be considered more aggressively as a complementary treatment option in selected acute stroke patients. Early initiation of BiPAP can stabilize cerebral hemodynamics and may unmask the true potential of other therapies.

  3. Young ischemic stroke in Tunisia: a multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefi, Asma; Larbi, Thara; Abdallah, Meya; Ouni, Amira El; Bougacha, Neil; Bouslama, Kamel; Hamzaoui, Saloua; M'rad, Skander

    2017-04-01

    There is wanting data regarding young ischemic stroke in developing countries, especially in Tunisia. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors and etiologies of young ischemic stroke in Tunisian and make a comparison with previous reports. A total of 102 young ischemic stroke patients (15-45 years old) were admitted, between January 1996 and August 2007, to 11 departments of internal medicine in different Tunisian hospitals. The risk factors for stroke were documented and assessed. Diagnosis workup consisted of anamnesis, complete physical examination and extensive laboratory, radiologic, immunologic, neurologic and cardiologic examination. Stroke etiologies were classified according the Trial of ORG 10172 in acute stroke treatment. There were 42 men (41.2%) and 60 women (58.89%) with a mean age at onset of 35.7 years. As regards stroke subtype, large-artery atherosclerosis was diagnosed in 6.9% of cases, cardioembolism in 11.8%, small-vessel occlusion in 8.8%, other determined etiology in 37.3% and undetermined etiology in 35.3%. Concerning the traditional risk factors, smoking (31.4%), hypertension and diabetes mellitus (12.7% for each one) and a family history of stroke (10.8%) were the most common. The mean follow-up period was 30.5 months. In our study, traditional risk factors were not-so-uncommon in young adults with ischemic stroke suggesting that prevention can go through controlling these factors. Stroke of other determined etiology was the most common among our patients, so that a broad and detailed diagnostic workup is crucial to puzzle out the etiology for more and better stroke prevention.

  4. Poorly Controlled Homocystinuria: A Rare Cause of Ischemic Priapism?

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Johnson, BSc, MBChB; Elaine Murphy, MRCP, FRCPath; Amr Raheem, MB BCh, PhD; David Ralph, BSc, MS FRCS(Urol)

    2018-01-01

    We report on the 1st case of ischemic priapism secondary to poorly controlled homocystinuria. Homocystinuria is a rare, autosomal recessive, inherited disorder of metabolism that is caused by a deficiency of cystathionine synthase, leading to marked hyperhomocysteinemia. Arterial and/or venous thromboemboli are a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with homocystinuria. Untreated patients have a 50% chance of having a vascular event by 30 years of age. Increased homocysteine lev...

  5. Frida Kahlo's neurological deficits and her art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrys, Valmantas

    2013-01-01

    World-famous Mexican painter Frida Kahlo is an impressive example of a professional artist whose artistic subject matter was extremely influenced by her chronic, severe illness. Many of her best-known works depict her physical and mental suffering. She was one of those very uncommon artists who dared to show their nude, sick body. This chapter describes and explains the biographical events and works of Frida Kahlo that are closely related to neurology: congenital anomaly (spina bifida), poliomyelitis, spine injury, and neuropathic pain. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-01-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions.

  7. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  9. JIGSAW PUZZLE IMPROVE FINE MOTOR ABILITIES OF UPPER EXTREMITIES IN POST-STROKE ISCHEMIC CLIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ischemic stroke is a disease caused by focal cerebral ischemia, where is a decline in blood flow that needed for neuronal metabolism, leading to neurologic deficit include motor deficit such as fine motor skills impairment. Therapy of fine motor skills disorders is to improve motor function, prevent contractures and complications. These study aimed to identify the effect of playing Jigsaw Puzzle on muscle strength, extensive motion, and upper extremity fine motor skills in patients with ischemic stroke at Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta. Methods: Experimental Quasi pre-posttest one group control. The number of samples were 34 respondents selected using purposive sampling technique. The samples were divided into intervention and control groups. The intervention group was 17 respondents who were given standard treatment hospital and played Jigsaw Puzzle 2 times a day for six days. Control group is one respondent given by hospital standard therapy without given additional Jigsaw Puzzle game. Evaluation of these research is done on the first and seventh day for those groups. Result: The results showed that muscle strength, the range of joint motion and fine motor skills of upper extremities increased (p = 0.001 significantly after being given the Jigsaw Puzzle games. These means playing Jigsaw Puzzle increase muscle strength, the range of joint motion and upper extremity fine motor skill of ischemic stroke patients. Discussion and conclusion: Jigsaw puzzle game administration as additional rehabilitation therapy in upper extremity fine motor to minimize the occurrence of contractures and motor disorders in patients with ischemic stroke. Jigsaw puzzle game therapy capable of creating repetitive motion as a key of neurological rehabilitation in Ischemic Stroke. This study recommends using jigsaw puzzle game as one of intervention in the nursing care of Ischemic Stroke patients.

  10. Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy after Bee Sting and Treatment with Zolpidem: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Demir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, a metabolic encephalopathy, develops as a result of cessation or reduction of oxygen and blood flow to the brain. The clinical picture may vary in severity from minimal neurologic deficits to coma. In living patients, permanent neuropsychological sequelae can develop. Herein, we present a case of HIE that occured after anaphylactic reaction due to bee sting, which was treatedm with zolpidem.

  11. A Rare Case Series of Ischemic Stroke Following Russell’s Viper Snake Bite in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Krishna Pothukuchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite is an important medical problem in India. Among their various manifestations, cerebral complications are uncommonly found in literature. Moreover, Ischemic stroke following snake bite is quite rare. Here we report a case series of two such cases that developed neurological manifestations following Russell’s viper bite. On computerized tomography (CT scan of brain; cerebral infarcts were revealed. Their likely mechanisms are discussed in present study which include disseminated intravascular coagulation, toxin induced vasculitis and endothelial damage.

  12. Pathophysiology of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy – biomarkers, animal models and treatment perspectives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riljak, V.; Kraf, J.; Daryanani, A.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Otáhal, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl.5 (2016), S533-S545 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33115A; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08565S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S; GA MŠk LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy * excitotoxicity * oxidative stress * inflammation * biomarkers Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  13. Correlative study between neuron-specific enolase and blood sugar level in ischemic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Aparna; Saxena, Kiran; Verma, Meena; Bharosay, Anuradha

    2011-01-01

    Background: A study to investigate the level of the neurobiochemical marker, Neuron-Specific Enolase (NSE), at the time of admission and its correlation with the blood sugar level in ischemic stroke patients. Patients and Methods: We investigated 90 patients with complete stroke who were admitted to the Stroke Unit of the Department of Neurology at Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Sciences. NSE was measured with commercially available quantitative ′sandwich′ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assa...

  14. An autosomal recessive leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa maps to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhouche Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-gene disorders related to ischemic stroke seem to be an important cause of stroke in young patients without known risk factors. To identify new genes responsible of such diseases, we studied a consanguineous Moroccan family with three affected individuals displaying hereditary leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa that appears to segregate in autosomal recessive pattern. Methods All family members underwent neurological and radiological examinations. A genome wide search was conducted in this family using the ABI PRISM linkage mapping set version 2.5 from Applied Biosystems. Six candidate genes within the region linked to the disease were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Evidence of linkage was obtained on chromosome 17q24.2-25.3. Analysis of recombination events and LOD score calculation suggests linkage of the responsible gene in a genetic interval of 11 Mb located between D17S789 and D17S1806 with a maximal multipoint LOD score of 2.90. Sequencing of seven candidate genes in this locus, ATP5H, FDXR, SLC25A19, MCT8, CYGB, KCNJ16 and GRIN2C, identified three missense mutations in the FDXR gene which were also found in a homozygous state in three healthy controls, suggesting that these variants are not disease-causing mutations in the family. Conclusion A novel locus for leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa has been mapped to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3 in a consanguineous Moroccan family.

  15. Severe hypertriglyceridemia does not protect from ischemic brain injury in gene-modified hypertriglyceridemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Ping; Qi, Rong; Wang, Yu-Hui; Liu, George; Wang, Chun

    2016-05-15

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a weak risk factor in primary ischemic stroke prevention. However, clinical studies have found a counterintuitive association between a good prognosis after ischemic stroke and HTG. This "HTG paradox" requires confirmation and further explanation. The aim of this study was to experimentally assess this paradox relationship using the gene-modified mice model of extreme HTG. We first used the human Apolipoprotein CIII transgenic (Tg-ApoCIII) mice and non-transgenic (Non-Tg) littermates to examine the effect of HTG on stroke. To our surprise, infarct size, neurological deficits, brain edema, BBB permeability, neuron density and lipid peroxidation were the same in Tg-ApoCIII mice and Non-Tg mice after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). In the late phase (21 days after surgery), no differences were found in brain atrophy, neurological dysfunctions, weight and mortality between the two groups. To confirm the results in Tg-ApoCIII mice, Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1(GPIHBP1) knockout mice, another severe HTG mouse model, were used and yielded similar results. Our study demonstrates for the first time that extreme HTG does not affect ischemic brain injuries in the tMCAO mouse model, indicating that the association between HTG and good outcomes after ischemic stroke probably represents residual unmeasured confounding. Further clinical and prospective population-based studies are needed to explore variables that contribute to the paradox. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  17. A century of Dutch neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, P J; Bruyn, G W; Moffie, D

    1998-12-01

    The Netherlands Society of Neurology evolved from the Society of Psychiatry founded in 1871. The name was changed into Netherlands Society of Psychiatry and Neurology (NSPN) in 1897. In the same year, the word neurology was also added to the name of the journal. The Society steadily blossomed, but in 1909 the first signs of dissatisfaction occurred: the Amsterdam Neurologists Society was founded. A few split-offs would follow. The number of members of the NSPN increased from 205 in 1920 to 585 in 1960. In the early 1960s, the Society was reorganised and would consist of two sections, one for psychiatry and one for neurology. However, this would not last, as a full separation was established in 1974. For several reasons, the name of the journal was changed four times until it assumed its present name in 1974. The 100th volume of CNN was not published, as expected. in 1996, but in 1998, because of two skipped publication years, one during WWII and another in the 1970s. During the last decades of the nineteenth century, teaching of neurology was mostly given within the frame of psychiatry, following the German tradition of 'brainpsychiatry' (organic or biologic psychiatry). The first official chair of psychiatry was founded at Utrecht, 1893 (Winkler). In Amsterdam, private teachers such as Delprat taught 'electro-therapy and nervous diseases' since the 1880s. The first extraordinary chair of neurology and electrotherapy was founded for his successor, Wertheim Salomonson in 1899. The first university clinic for psychiatry and neurology started at the Amsterdam Municipal University, when Winkler became professor of psychiatry and neurology in Amsterdam in 1896. Around the turn of the century, chairs of psychiatry and neurology were also founded in Groningen and Leiden. Separate chairs for neurology and psychiatry appeared in Amsterdam in 1923 and in Utrecht in 1936. Following an initiative of Brouwer, the first neurological university clinic opened its doors in

  18. Fetal heart rate patterns in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: relationship with early cerebral activity and neurodevelopmental outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Deirdre M

    2009-09-01

    Despite widespread use of fetal heart rate monitoring, the timing of injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains unclear. Our aim was to examine fetal heart rate patterns during labor in infants with clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of HIE and to relate these findings to neurodevelopmental outcome. Timing of onset of pathological cardiotocographs (CTGs) was determined in each case by two blinded reviewers and related to EEG grade at birth and neurological outcome at 24 months. CTGs were available in 35 infants with HIE (17 mild, 12 moderate, 6 severe on EEG). Admission CTGs were normal in 24\\/35 (69%), suspicious in 8\\/35 (23%), and pathological in 3\\/35 (8%). All CTGs developed nonreassuring features prior to delivery. Three patterns of fetal heart rate abnormalities were seen: group 1, abnormal CTGs on admission in 11\\/35 (31%); group 2, normal CTGs on admission with gradual deterioration to pathological in 20\\/35 cases (57%); and group 3, normal CTGs on admission with acute sentinel events in 4\\/35 (11.5%). The median (interquartile range) duration between the development of pathological CTGs and delivery was 145 (81, 221) minutes in group 2 and 22 (12, 28) minutes in group 3. There was no correlation between duration of pathological CTG trace and grade of encephalopathy (R = 0.09, P = 0.63) or neurological outcome (P = 0.75). However, the grade of encephalopathy was significantly worse in group 3 (P = 0.001), with a trend to worse outcomes. The majority of infants with HIE have normal CTG traces on admission but develop pathological CTG patterns within hours of delivery. More severe encephalopathy was associated with normal admission CTG and acute sentinel events shortly before delivery.

  19. Fetal heart rate patterns in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: relationship with early cerebral activity and neurodevelopmental outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Deirdre M

    2012-01-31

    Despite widespread use of fetal heart rate monitoring, the timing of injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains unclear. Our aim was to examine fetal heart rate patterns during labor in infants with clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of HIE and to relate these findings to neurodevelopmental outcome. Timing of onset of pathological cardiotocographs (CTGs) was determined in each case by two blinded reviewers and related to EEG grade at birth and neurological outcome at 24 months. CTGs were available in 35 infants with HIE (17 mild, 12 moderate, 6 severe on EEG). Admission CTGs were normal in 24\\/35 (69%), suspicious in 8\\/35 (23%), and pathological in 3\\/35 (8%). All CTGs developed nonreassuring features prior to delivery. Three patterns of fetal heart rate abnormalities were seen: group 1, abnormal CTGs on admission in 11\\/35 (31%); group 2, normal CTGs on admission with gradual deterioration to pathological in 20\\/35 cases (57%); and group 3, normal CTGs on admission with acute sentinel events in 4\\/35 (11.5%). The median (interquartile range) duration between the development of pathological CTGs and delivery was 145 (81, 221) minutes in group 2 and 22 (12, 28) minutes in group 3. There was no correlation between duration of pathological CTG trace and grade of encephalopathy (R = 0.09, P = 0.63) or neurological outcome (P = 0.75). However, the grade of encephalopathy was significantly worse in group 3 (P = 0.001), with a trend to worse outcomes. The majority of infants with HIE have normal CTG traces on admission but develop pathological CTG patterns within hours of delivery. More severe encephalopathy was associated with normal admission CTG and acute sentinel events shortly before delivery.

  20. Why neurology? Factors which influence career choice in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Hoyle, Chad; Yin, Han; McCoyd, Matthew; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the factors which influence the decision to pursue a career in neurology. An anonymous survey was developed using a Likert scale to rate responses. The survey was sent to adult and child neurology faculty, residents and fellows, as well as medical students applying for neurology. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the factors of influence. Respondents were subsequently categorized into pre-neurology trainees, neurology trainees, child neurologists and adult neurologists, and differences between the groups were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test. One hundred and thirty-three anonymous responses were received. The respondents were neurologists across all levels of training and practice. Across all respondents, the most common factor of high importance was intellectual content of specialty, challenging diagnostic problems, type of patient encountered and interest in helping people. Responses were similar across the groups; however, the earliest trainees cited interest in helping people as most important, while those in neurology training and beyond cite intellectual content of the specialty as most important. As trainees transition from their earliest levels of clinical experience into working as residents and faculty, there is a shift in the cited important factors. Lifestyle and financial factors seem to be the least motivating across all groups. Encouragement from peers, mentors, faculty and practicing physicians is considered high influences in a smaller number of neurologists. This may present an opportunity for practicing neurologists to make connections with medical students early in their education in an effort to encourage and mentor candidates.

  1. Unilateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    of this study was to investigate the ipRGC mediated pupil response in patients with a unilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Consensual pupil responses during and after exposure to continuous 20 s blue (470 nm) or red (660 nm) light of high intensity (300 cd/m(2)) were recorded...

  2. [Ischemic stroke in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekker, M.S.; Wermer, M.J.; Riksen, N.P.; Klijn, C.J.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2016-01-01

    - In virtually all age groups, the incidence of ischemic stroke is higher in men. However, in women aged between 25-49 years the prevalence is higher than in men. Female-specific risk factors and disorders may explain this peak.- Pregnancy and the post-partum period are associated with physiological

  3. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...

  4. Usefulness of cardiometabolic index for the estimation of ischemic stroke risk among general population in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyu; Chen, Yintao; Guo, Xiaofan; Chang, Ye; Sun, Yingxian

    2017-11-01

    Cardiometabolic index (CMI) has been recognized as a novel and practical marker for the assessment of cardiometabolic risk as it is independently related to diabetes and atherosclerotic progression. This study tested the hypothesis that CMI represents a risk of ischemic stroke in a general population of rural China. From July 2012 to August 2013, we examined data from a large cross-sectional study of 11,345 participants (mean age 53.8 years; 60.8% females) who underwent biochemical determinations and anthropometric measurements in rural areas of northeast China. Ischemic stroke was documented as a history of cerebrovascular events and verified by medical record review. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was given to 3.1% of females and 3.2% of males. The cardio-metabolic profile was notably more adverse in ischemic stroke groups, irrespective of gender. A dose-response manner was detected for the prevalence of ischemic stroke, exhibiting a significant increase from the lowest to the highest quartiles of CMI (1.2% to 6.4% in females, P for trenddiscrimination power of CMI in predicting ischemic stroke was relatively higher for females (AUC: 0.685) than males (AUC: 0.573). The strong and independent association of CMI with ischemic stroke in females, in comparison with the much lesser degree in males, provides further insight to better stratify by sex in investigations of ischemic stroke and solidly corroborates the potential role of ischemic stroke prevention targeted at CMI.

  5. Neurologic Complications of Smallpox Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox and smallpox vaccination is reviewed from the Departments of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

  6. Neurological complication in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritarwan, K.

    2018-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is neurotropic and immunotropic, making themassive destruction of both systems. Although their amount has been reduced, there is still neurological presentations and complications of HIV remain common in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Neurological opportunistic infections (OI) occur in advanced HIV diseases such as primary cerebral lymphoma, cryptococcal meningitis, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and progressive multifocal encephalopathy. Neurological problem directly related to HIV appear at any stage in the progress of HIV disease, from AIDS-associated dementia to the aseptic meningitis of primary HIV infection observed in subjects with an immune deficiency. The replication of peripheral HIV viral is able to be controlled in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy. Non-HIV-related neurological disease such as stroke increased important as the HIV population ages.

  7. Neurological complications following bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was to report on Brazilian cases of neurological complications from bariatric surgery. The literature on the subject is scarce. METHOD: Cases attended by neurologists in eight different Brazilian cities were collected and described in the present study. RESULTS: Twenty-six cases were collected in this study. Axonal polyneuropathy was the most frequent neurological complication, but cases of central demyelination, Wernicke syndrome, optical neuritis, radiculits, meralgia paresthetica and compressive neuropathies were also identified. Twenty-one patients (80% had partial or no recovery from the neurological signs and symptoms. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery, a procedure that is continuously increasing in popularity, is not free of potential neurological complications that should be clearly presented to the individual undergoing this type of surgery. Although a clear cause-effect relation cannot be established for the present cases, the cumulative literature on the subject makes it important to warn the patient of the potential risks of this procedure.

  8. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 31, No 2 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 29, No 2 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 31, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Historical perspective of Indian neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-10-01

    To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. THE HISTORY OF NEUROLOGY IN INDIA IS DIVIDED INTO TWO PERIODS: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20(th) century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of basic, clinical and epidemiological research being

  15. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  16. Neurologic and neuromuscular functional disorders of the pharynx and esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuttge-Hannig, A.; Hannig, C.

    2007-01-01

    Neurologic swallowing disorders are an increasing diagnostic problem in our overaged population. Undiagnosed chronic aspiration pneumonia is the cause of death in 20-40% of all inhabitants of nursing homes. In neurologic diseases of the pharynx, the physiologic interaction of pharyngeal contraction, closure of the pharynx, and esophageal motility are frequently disturbed. This may be due to cortical, bulbar, or cerebellar brain damage of ischemic or traumatic origin. Furthermore diseases or peripheral nerves, muscles, and synapses cause disturbances. The most life-threatening complication of these disturbances is tracheal aspiration, which requires an iso-osmolar contrast medium for imaging studies that cause no or minimal pulmonary problems. Utilizing fast dynamic documentation we can analyze the swallowing act in 35 images within the passage time of 0.7 s. This requires digital frame sequences from 15-50 images/s, which can be provided by DSI or videofluoroscopy. Neurologic and neuromuscular patterns are demonstrated with and without tracheal aspiration. The differentiation of aspiration in a so-called pre-, intra-, and postdeglutitive form is possible. We distinguish four grades of severity of aspiration, which is also of great clinical impact for the differential rehabilitation therapy. The efficiency of the rehabilitation protocol can be assessed by the dynamic swallowing studies. (orig.) [de

  17. Influence of early neurological complications on clinical outcome following lung transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Josep; Salvado, Maria; Martinez-de La Ossa, Alejandro; Deu, Maria; Romero, Laura; Roman, Antonio; Sacanell, Judith; Laborda, Cesar; Rochera, Isabel; Nadal, Miriam; Carmona, Francesc; Santamarina, Estevo; Raguer, Nuria; Canela, Merce; Solé, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Neurological complications after lung transplantation are common. The full spectrum of neurological complications and their impact on clinical outcomes has not been extensively studied. We investigated the neurological incidence of complications, categorized according to whether they affected the central, peripheral or autonomic nervous systems, in a series of 109 patients undergoing lung transplantation at our center between January 1 2013 and December 31 2014. Fifty-one patients (46.8%) presented at least one neurological complication. Critical illness polyneuropathy-myopathy (31 cases) and phrenic nerve injury (26 cases) were the two most prevalent complications. These two neuromuscular complications lengthened hospital stays by a median period of 35.5 and 32.5 days respectively. However, neurological complications did not affect patients' survival. The real incidence of neurological complications among lung transplant recipients is probably underestimated. They usually appear in the first two months after surgery. Despite not affecting mortality, they do affect the mean length of hospital stay, and especially the time spent in the Intensive Care Unit. We found no risk factor for neurological complications except for long operating times, ischemic time and need for transfusion. It is necessary to develop programs for the prevention and early recognition of these complications, and the prevention of their precipitant and risk factors.

  18. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology.

  19. An investigation of the cost and benefit of mechanical thrombectomy for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Aquilla S; Campbell, John M; Spiotta, Alejandro; Vargas, Jan; Turner, Raymond D; Chaudry, M Imran; Battenhouse, Holly; Holmstedt, Christine A; Jauch, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The use of mechanical thrombectomy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke has significantly advanced over the past 5 years, with few available data. The aim of this study was to analyze the cost and benefit of mechanical thrombectomy devices utilized during endovascular therapy of ischemic stroke patients. A retrospective chart review of patients that underwent intra-arterial stroke interventions was conducted. Clinical, angiographic, all devices used, procedural and postprocedural event and outcome data were collected. Thrombectomy devices were categorized as Penumbra aspiration system thrombectomy (group P) or stent retriever (group S). Statistical analysis of outcomes and costs for each group was performed. 171 patients underwent mechanical thrombectomy. The Penumbra aspiration system was able to primarily achieve recanalization in 41.7% and the stent retriever in 70.4% of the time (p=0.006). The average cost was $11 159 and $16 022 (p=0.0002) in groups P and S, respectively. Average time to recanalization for group P was 85.1 min and for group S, 51.6 min (p<0.0001). Procedural complications were more frequent with the stent retriever (11.1% vs 9.0%; p=0.72) as were periprocedural significant complications (14.8 v 3%; p=0.04). Successful recanalization rates (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction score 2b-3) were the same in groups P and S (78.5 vs. 77.8%). Similar rates of good neurologic outcomes were seen in group P (36.4%) and group S (50.0%) (p=0.19). For the treatment of acute stroke patients, the use of aspiration appears to be the most cost effective method to achieve acceptable recanalization rates and low complication rates. Stent retriever with local aspiration, despite higher costs and complication rates, yielded better overall outcome.

  20. Correlative study between neuron-specific enolase and blood sugar level in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Pandey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A study to investigate the level of the neurobiochemical marker, Neuron-Specific Enolase (NSE, at the time of admission and its correlation with the blood sugar level in ischemic stroke patients. Patients and Methods: We investigated 90 patients with complete stroke who were admitted to the Stroke Unit of the Department of Neurology at Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Sciences. NSE was measured with commercially available quantitative ′sandwich′ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits obtained from R and D Systems. Hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose concentration ≥ 7 mmol / L, and measured using the glucose oxidase method immediately. Results: Significantly increased NSE and lipid profile levels were found in ischemic stroke patients as compared to the control. Hyperglycemic ischemic stroke patients had increased levels of NSE, lipid profile, and National Institute of Health stroke scale scores (NIHSS score compared to normoglycemic ischemic stroke patients. In addition the serum NSE level of hyperglycemic stroke patients was also positively correlated with the blood sugar level (r = 0.734 P < 0.001. Conclusions: Hyperglycemia predicts an increased risk of poor outcome after ischemic stroke and it is reflected by a significantly increased level of Neuron-Specific Enolase.

  1. Nutrition for brain recovery after ischemic stroke: an added value to rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilani, Roberto; Sessarego, Paolo; Iadarola, Paolo; Barbieri, Annalisa; Boschi, Federica

    2011-06-01

    In patients who undergo rehabilitation after ischemic stroke, nutrition strategies are adopted to provide tube-fed individuals with adequate nutrition and/or to avoid the body wasting responsible for poor functional outcome and prolonged stay in the hospital. Investigations have documented that nutrition interventions can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function in individuals with ischemic stroke. Experimental studies have shown that protein synthesis is suppressed in the ischemic penumbra. In clinical studies on rehabilitation patients designed to study the effects of counteracting or limiting this reduction of protein synthesis by providing protein supplementation, patients receiving such supplementation had enhanced recovery of neurocognitive function. Cellular damage in cerebral ischemia is also partly caused by oxidative damage secondary to free radical formation and lipid peroxidation. Increased oxidative stress negatively affects a patient's life and functional prognosis. Some studies have documented that nutrition supplementation with B-group vitamins may mitigate oxidative damage after acute ischemic stroke. Experimental investigations have also shown that cerebral ischemia changes synaptic zinc release and that acute ischemia increases zinc release, aggravating neuronal injury. In clinical practice, patients with ischemic stroke were found to have a lower than recommended dietary intake of zinc. Patients in whom daily zinc intake was normalized had better recovery of neurological deficits than subjects given a placebo. The aim of this review is to highlight those brain metabolic alterations susceptible to nutrition correction in clinical practice. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between cerebral ischemia and nutrition metabolic conditions are discussed.

  2. The distribution of N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine in experimental ischemic brain of the mongolian gerbil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinnouchi, Seishi; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Katsushi; Ueda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Tadatoshi

    1988-01-01

    We studied the distribution of N-isopropyl-p-[I-131]-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in permanent and temporary ischemic brains of mongolian gerbils. For the permanent ischemic brain model, the right common carotid artery was ligated under ether anesthesia. For the temporary ischemic brain model, the right common carotid artery was clamped by a clip and recirculated at 3 hours thereafter. After given time intervals, 1.35 MBq (50 μCi) of IMP was injected intravenously into 17 gerbils (permanent ischemic brain model), 18 gerbils (temporary ischemic brain model) which had severe neurological symptoms, and 3 normal gerbils for controls. One minute, 10 minutes, 1 hour and 6 hours after the injection, gerbils were sacrified and autoradiography of the brain was performed. The activity of IMP in various parts of the brain was calculated from each autoradiogram. In permanent ischemic brains, low perfusion areas were observed in the right cerebral hemisphere, the brain stem (5 ∼ 20 % of normal value), and in the left hemisphere (40 ∼ 60 % of normal value). In temporary ischemic brains, focal areas of increased activity were observed in the right cerebral hemisphere and the thalamus from 10 minutes to 24 hours after recirculation. The high activity disappeared rapidly at 10 minutes after the injection. It seemed that this high activity represented luxury perfusion in the region with severe tissue damage. In the left hemisphere, almost complete recovery of perfusion occurred at 1 ∼ 3 days after recirculation. These results suggested the possibility of IMP to demonstrate cerebral ischemia, luxury perfusion and diaschisis. (author)

  3. Economic impact of enoxaparin after acute ischemic stroke based on PREVAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Graham; Lin, Jay; Stern, Lee; Subrahmanian, Tarun; Annemans, Lieven

    2011-04-01

    The efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) versus unfractionated heparin (UFH) has been demonstrated for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after acute ischemic stroke. Few data exist regarding the economic impact of LMWHs versus UFH in this population. A decision-analytic model was constructed using clinical information from the Prevention of VTE after Acute Ischemic stroke with LMWH Enoxaparin (PREVAIL) study, and drug costs and mean Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services event costs. When considering the total cost of events and drugs, enoxaparin was associated with cost-savings of $895 per patient compared with UFH ($2018 vs $2913). Findings were retained within the univariate and multivariate analyses. From a payer perspective, enoxaparin was cost-effective compared with UFH in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The difference was driven by the lower clinical event rates with enoxaparin. Use of enoxaparin may help to reduce the clinical and economic burden of VTE.

  4. Current Opinion on the Role of Neurogenesis in the Therapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer Disease, Parkinson Disease, and Ischemic Stroke; Considering Neuronal Voiding Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hoon Han

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, and ischemic stroke have increased in occurrence and become important health issues throughout the world. There is currently no effective therapeutic strategy for addressing neurological deficits after the development of these major neurological disorders. In recent years, it has become accepted that adult neural stem cells located in the subventricular and subgranular zones have the ability to proliferate and differentiate in order to replace lost or damaged neural cells. There have been many limitations in the clinical application of both endogenous and exogenous neurogenesis for neurological disorders. However, many studies have investigated novel mechanisms in neurogenesis and have shown that these limitations can potentially be overcome with appropriate stimulation and various approaches. We will review concepts related to possible therapeutic strategies focused on the perspective of neurogenesis for the treatment of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and ischemic stroke based on current reports.

  5. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35–54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16–2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55–64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56–1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  6. Stroke and Drug Delivery--In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    of permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood-brain......Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Both cerebral hypoperfusion and focal cerebral infarcts are caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, leading to stroke and subsequent brain damage. At present, only few medical treatments of stroke are available, with the Food...... and Drug Administration-approved tissue plasminogen activator for treatment of acute ischemic stroke being the most prominent example. A large number of potential drug candidates for treatment of ischemic brain tissue have been developed and subsequently failed in clinical trials. A deeper understanding...

  7. A hyperacute neurology team - transforming emergency neurological care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitkunan, Arani; MacDonald, Bridget K; Boodhoo, Ajay; Tomkins, Andrew; Smyth, Caitlin; Southam, Medina; Schon, Fred

    2017-07-01

    We present the results of an 18-month study of a new model of how to care for emergency neurological admissions. We have established a hyperacute neurology team at a single district general hospital. Key features are a senior acute neurology nurse coordinator, an exclusively consultant-delivered service, acute epilepsy nurses, an acute neurophysiology service supported by neuroradiology and acute physicians and based within the acute medical admissions unit. Key improvements are a major increase in the number of patients seen, the speed with which they are seen and the percentage seen on acute medical unit before going to the general wards. We have shown a reduced length of stay and readmission rates for patients with epilepsy. Epilepsy accounted for 30% of all referrals. The cost implications of running this service are modest. We feel that this model is worthy of widespread consideration. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  8. Association between bullous pemphigoid and neurologic diseases: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-de-la-Asunción, E; Ruano-Ruiz, J; Rodríguez-Martín, A M; Vélez García-Nieto, A; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-11-01

    In the past 10 years, bullous pemphigoid has been associated with other comorbidities and neurologic and psychiatric conditions in particular. Case series, small case-control studies, and large population-based studies in different Asian populations, mainland Europe, and the United Kingdom have confirmed this association. However, no data are available for the Spanish population. This was an observational, retrospective, case-control study with 1:2 matching. Fifty-four patients with bullous pemphigoid were selected. We compared the percentage of patients in each group with concurrent neurologic conditions, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and solid tumors using univariate logistic regression. An association model was constructed with conditional multiple logistic regression. The case group had a significantly higher percentage of patients with cerebrovascular accident and/or transient ischemic attack (odds ratio [OR], 3.06; 95% CI, 1.19-7.87], dementia (OR, 5.52; 95% CI, 2.19-13.93), and Parkinson disease (OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.57-15.94). A significantly higher percentage of cases had neurologic conditions (OR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.89-13.91). Dementia and Parkinson disease were independently associated with bullous pemphigoid in the multivariate analysis. Patients with bullous pemphigoid have a higher frequency of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Recurrent Stroke in Minor Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack With Metabolic Syndrome and/or Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqi; Pan, Yuesong; Jing, Jing; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Meng, Xia; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to determine the risk conferred by metabolic syndrome (METS) and diabetes mellitus (DM) to recurrent stroke in patients with minor ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack from the CHANCE (Clopidogrel in High-risk patients with Acute Non-disabling Cerebrovascular Events) trial. In total, 3044 patients were included. Patients were stratified into 4 groups: neither, METS only, DM only, or both. METS was defined using the Chinese Diabetes Society (CDS) and International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) definitions. The primary outcome was new stroke (including ischemic and hemorrhagic) at 90 days. A multivariable Cox regression model was used to assess the relationship of METS and DM status to the risk of recurrent stroke adjusted for potential covariates. Using the CDS criteria of METS, 53.2%, 17.2%, 19.8%, and 9.8% of patients were diagnosed as neither, METS only, DM only, and both, respectively. After 90 days of follow-up, there were 299 new strokes (293 ischemic, 6 hemorrhagic). Patients with DM only (16.1% versus 6.8%; adjusted hazard ratio 2.50, 95% CI 1.89-3.39) and both (17.1% versus 6.8%; adjusted hazard ratio 2.76, 95% CI 1.98-3.86) had significantly increased rates of recurrent stroke. No interaction effect of antiplatelet therapy by different METS or DM status for the risk of recurrent stroke ( P =0.82 for interaction in the fully adjusted model of CDS) was observed. Using the METS (IDF) criteria demonstrated similar results. Concurrent METS and DM was associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke in patients with minor stroke and transient ischemic attack. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  10. Prehospital cardiac arrest survival and neurologic recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, M; Sinclair, D; Butler, G; Cain, E

    1993-01-01

    Many studies of prehospital defibrillation have been conducted but the effects of airway intervention are unknown and neurologic follow-up has been incomplete. A non-randomized cohort prospective study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of defibrillation in prehospital cardiac arrest. Two ambulance companies in the study area developed a defibrillation protocol and they formed the experimental group. A subgroup of these patients received airway management with an esophageal obturator airway (EOA) or endotracheal intubation (ETT). The control group was composed of patients who suffered a prehospital cardiac arrest and did not receive prehospital defibrillation. All survivors were assessed for residual deficits using the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Dementia Rating Scale (DRS). A total of 221 patients were studied over a 32-month period. Both the experimental group (N = 161) and the control group (N = 60) were comparable with respect to age, sex distribution, and ambulance response time. Survival to hospital discharge was 2/60 (3.3%) in the control group and 12/161 (6.3%) in the experimental group. This difference is not statistically significant. Survival in the experimental group by airway management technique was basic airway support (3/76 3.9%), EOA (3/67 4.5%), and ETT (6/48 12.5%). The improved effect on survival by ETT management was statistically significant. Survivors had minor differences in memory, work, and recreation as compared to ischemic heart disease patients as measured by the SIP and DRS. No effect of defibrillation was found on survival to hospital discharge. However, endotracheal intubation improved survival in defibrillated patients. Survivors had a good functional outcome.

  11. Perfil inflamatório, metabólico e lipídico na síndrome isquêmica aguda: relação com eventos intra e pós-hospitalares Inflammatory, lipid, and metabolic profile in acute ischemic syndrome: correlation with hospital and posthospital events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth da Rosa Duarte

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Associar o perfil lipídico, inflamatório (proteína C reativa ultra sensível - PCR us - e fibrinogênio e metabólico (glicose com eventos intra e pós-hospitalares de pacientes com síndrome isquêmica aguda (SIA e descrever preditores de mortalidade nesta população. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte com 199 pacientes com SIA (angina instável, infarto agudo do miocárdio com ou sem supradesnivelamento de ST internados na unidade de terapia intensiva (UTI de uma instituição de referência cardiológica, no período de março a novembro de 2002. Foram registrados as doenças prévias, as medicações em uso e os fatores de risco coronarianos. Os eventos clínicos intra-hospitalares considerados foram Re-IAM, angina, insuficiência cardíaca (IC, fibrilação ventricular e óbito e os pós-hospitalares (30 dias após a alta foram Re-IAM, angina, IC, óbito e re-internação para procedimentos percutâneos (ACTP ou de revascularização (CRM. RESULTADOS: A PCR us e a glicemia alterada associaram-se, significativamente, com os eventos intra-hospitalares (p=0,03 e pOBJECTIVE: To associate the markers lipid profile, inflammatory profile (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein HSCRP and fibrinogen, and metabolic profile (glucose determination with hospital and posthospital events in patients with acute ischemic syndrome (AIS and to describe the predictors of mortality in this population. METHODS: A cohort study with 199 patients with AIS (unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction (AMI with or without ST segment elevation admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU of a university cardiology Hospital, from March to November 2002. The previous diseases, the medication in use, and the coronary risk factors were recorded. The clinical events considered in the hospital were reinfarction, angina, heart failure (HF, ventricular fibrillation, and death; the posthospital events considered (30 days after hospital discharge were reinfarction, angina, HF

  12. Superselective intra-arterial fibrinolysis for acute cerebral ischemic infarct : usefulness of diffusion weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Woo Mok; Lee, Se Jin; Kim, Yong Sun; Han, Gun Soo; Bae, Won Kyong

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of superselective intra-arterial fibrinolysis for acute cerebral stroke and the usefulness of pre-and postfibrinolysis diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). In 41 patients with acute ischemic stroke whose treatment involved intra-arterial fibrinolysis, the occlusion site, degree of recanalization, and clinical results were compared. In 12 patients, diffusion weighted MRI was performed before fibrinolysis, and eight of these also underwent diffusion-weighted MRI after fibrinolysis. Using diffusion-weighted MRI, neurological outcomes were compared with signal intensity ratio (SIR, or the average signal intensity within the region of interest divided by that in the contralateral, nonischemic, homologous region). Twenty patients showed complete recanalization, nine partial recanalization, and in twelve there was no recanalization. Fourteen patients (34%) improved neurologically. No relationship existed between occlusion sites, degree of recanalization, and clinical outcome. Among 12 patients who underwent DWI before fibrinolysis, complete recanalization was noted in eight. Neurological improvement was seen in four patients with low SIR( 1.7), neurological outcome was poor despite complete recanalization. Although superselective intra-arterial fibrinolysis for acute cerebral stroke is a good therapeutic method for recanalization, the clinical outcome can be disappointing. We therefore suggest that in cases of acute cerebral ischemic infaret, SIR-as seen on DWI-might be useful for predicting the benefits of recanalization. In such cases, further investigation of the use of DWI prior to fibrinolysis is therefore needed

  13. [Effect of "Xingnao Kaiqiao Zhenfa" (Acupuncture Technique for Restoring Consciousness) Combined with Rehabilitation Training on Nerve Repair and Expression of Growth-associated Protein-43 of Peri-ischemic Cortex in Ischemic Stroke Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Yan, Xing-Zhou; Li, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Min

    2017-06-25

    To observe the effect of "Xingnao Kaiqiao Zhenfa" (acupuncture technique for restoring consciousness) combined with enriched rehabilitation training on motor function and expression of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) of peri-ischemic cortex in ischemic stroke rats, so as to investigate its mechanism underlying improvement of ischemic stroke. SD rats were randomly divided into sham operation, model, rehabilitation and comprehensive rehabilitation groups, which were further divided into 3 time-points:7, 14 and 21 d ( n =6 in each). Cerebral ischemia(CI) model was established by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery with heat-coagulation. The rehabilitation group was treated by enriched rehabilitation training, once a day. The comprehensive rehabilitation group was treated by acupuncture combined with enriched rehabilitation training. Acupuncture was applied to bilateral "Neiguan"(PC 6) and "Shuigou"(GV 26) for 30 min, once a day. The neurological function score, balance-beam walking test and rotating-rod walking test were evaluated at the end of the corresponding treatment time. The expression of GAP-43 in peri-ischemic cortex was detected by immunohistochemistry. In comparison with the sham operation group, the scores of neurological function, beam walking test and rotating-rod walking test were significantly higher in the model group ( P beam walking and rotating-rod walking tests in the rehabilitation group compared with the model group on day 7 ( P >0.05). Compared with the model group at the other time points, the scores of neurological function, balance-beam walking test and rotating-rod walking test were significantly lower in the rehabilitation and comprehensive rehabilitation groups ( P beam walking test and rotating-rod walking test were significantly lower in the comprehensive rehabilitation group ( P <0.05). In comparison with the sham operation group, the number of GAP-43 positive cells of peri-ischemic cortex was significantly higher in the

  14. Social network diversity and risks of ischemic heart disease and total mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barefoot, John C; Grønbaek, Morten; Jensen, Gorm

    2005-01-01

    Measures of various types of social contacts were used as predictors of ischemic heart disease events and total mortality in an age-stratified random sample of 9,573 adults enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Copenhagen, Denmark). Baseline examinations were conducted in 1991-1994, and pa......Measures of various types of social contacts were used as predictors of ischemic heart disease events and total mortality in an age-stratified random sample of 9,573 adults enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Copenhagen, Denmark). Baseline examinations were conducted in 1991...

  15. Robotic exoskeleton assessment of transient ischemic attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Simmatis

    Full Text Available We used a robotic exoskeleton to quantify specific patterns of abnormal upper limb motor behaviour in people who have had transient ischemic attack (TIA. A cohort of people with TIA was recruited within two weeks of symptom onset. All individuals completed a robotic-based assessment of 8 behavioural tasks related to upper limb motor and proprioceptive function, as well as cognitive function. Robotic task performance was compared to a large cohort of controls without neurological impairments corrected for the influence of age. Impairment in people with TIA was defined as performance below the 5th percentile of controls. Participants with TIA were also assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA of the arm, the Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT, the Purdue pegboard test (PPB, and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA. Age-related white matter change (ARWMC, prior infarction and cella-media index (CMI were assessed from baseline CT scan that was performed within 24 hours of TIA. Acute infarction was assessed from diffusion-weighted imaging in a subset of people with TIA. Twenty-two people with TIA were assessed. Robotic assessment showed impaired upper limb motor function in 7/22 people with TIA patients and upper limb sensory impairment in 4/22 individuals. Cognitive tasks involving robotic assessment of the upper limb were completed in 13 participants, of whom 8 (61.5% showed significant impairment. Abnormal performance in the CMSA arm inventory was present in 12/22 (54.5% participants. ARWMC was 11.8 ± 6.4 and CMI was 5.4 ± 1.5. DWI was positive in 0 participants. Quantitative robotic assessment showed that people who have had a TIA display a spectrum of upper limb motor and sensory performance deficits as well as cognitive function deficits despite resolution of symptoms and no evidence of tissue infarction.

  16. Robotic exoskeleton assessment of transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmatis, Leif; Krett, Jonathan; Scott, Stephen H; Jin, Albert Y

    2017-01-01

    We used a robotic exoskeleton to quantify specific patterns of abnormal upper limb motor behaviour in people who have had transient ischemic attack (TIA). A cohort of people with TIA was recruited within two weeks of symptom onset. All individuals completed a robotic-based assessment of 8 behavioural tasks related to upper limb motor and proprioceptive function, as well as cognitive function. Robotic task performance was compared to a large cohort of controls without neurological impairments corrected for the influence of age. Impairment in people with TIA was defined as performance below the 5th percentile of controls. Participants with TIA were also assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA) of the arm, the Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT), the Purdue pegboard test (PPB), and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Age-related white matter change (ARWMC), prior infarction and cella-media index (CMI) were assessed from baseline CT scan that was performed within 24 hours of TIA. Acute infarction was assessed from diffusion-weighted imaging in a subset of people with TIA. Twenty-two people with TIA were assessed. Robotic assessment showed impaired upper limb motor function in 7/22 people with TIA patients and upper limb sensory impairment in 4/22 individuals. Cognitive tasks involving robotic assessment of the upper limb were completed in 13 participants, of whom 8 (61.5%) showed significant impairment. Abnormal performance in the CMSA arm inventory was present in 12/22 (54.5%) participants. ARWMC was 11.8 ± 6.4 and CMI was 5.4 ± 1.5. DWI was positive in 0 participants. Quantitative robotic assessment showed that people who have had a TIA display a spectrum of upper limb motor and sensory performance deficits as well as cognitive function deficits despite resolution of symptoms and no evidence of tissue infarction.

  17. The neurological basis of occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline.

  18. Free radical scavenger, edaravone, reduces the lesion size of lacunar infarction in human brain ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Although free radicals have been reported to play a role in the expansion of ischemic brain lesions, the effect of free radical scavengers is still under debate. In this study, the temporal profile of ischemic stroke lesion sizes was assessed for more than one year to evaluate the effect of edaravone which might reduce ischemic damage. Methods We sequentially enrolled acute ischemic stroke patients, who admitted between April 2003 and March 2004, into the edaravone(-) group (n = 83) and, who admitted between April 2004 and March 2005, into the edaravone(+) group (n = 93). Because, edaravone has been used as the standard treatment after April 2004 in our hospital. To assess the temporal profile of the stroke lesion size, the ratio of the area [T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (T2WI)/iffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI)] were calculated. Observations on T2WI were continued beyond one year, and observational times were classified into subacute (1-2 months after the onset), early chronic (3-6 month), late chronic (7-12 months) and old (≥13 months) stages. Neurological deficits were assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale upon admission and at discharge and by the modified Rankin Scale at 1 year following stroke onset. Results Stroke lesion size was significantly attenuated in the edaravone(+) group compared with the edaravone(-) group in the period of early and late chronic observational stages. However, this reduction in lesion size was significant within a year and only for the small-vessel occlusion stroke patients treated with edaravone. Moreover, patients with small-vessel occlusion strokes that were treated with edaravone showed significant neurological improvement during their hospital stay, although there were no significant differences in outcome one year after the stroke. Conclusion Edaravone treatment reduced the volume of the infarct and improved neurological deficits during the subacute period, especially

  19. Free radical scavenger, edaravone, reduces the lesion size of lacunar infarction in human brain ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Akifumi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although free radicals have been reported to play a role in the expansion of ischemic brain lesions, the effect of free radical scavengers is still under debate. In this study, the temporal profile of ischemic stroke lesion sizes was assessed for more than one year to evaluate the effect of edaravone which might reduce ischemic damage. Methods We sequentially enrolled acute ischemic stroke patients, who admitted between April 2003 and March 2004, into the edaravone(- group (n = 83 and, who admitted between April 2004 and March 2005, into the edaravone(+ group (n = 93. Because, edaravone has been used as the standard treatment after April 2004 in our hospital. To assess the temporal profile of the stroke lesion size, the ratio of the area [T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (T2WI/iffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI] were calculated. Observations on T2WI were continued beyond one year, and observational times were classified into subacute (1-2 months after the onset, early chronic (3-6 month, late chronic (7-12 months and old (≥13 months stages. Neurological deficits were assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale upon admission and at discharge and by the modified Rankin Scale at 1 year following stroke onset. Results Stroke lesion size was significantly attenuated in the edaravone(+ group compared with the edaravone(- group in the period of early and late chronic observational stages. However, this reduction in lesion size was significant within a year and only for the small-vessel occlusion stroke patients treated with edaravone. Moreover, patients with small-vessel occlusion strokes that were treated with edaravone showed significant neurological improvement during their hospital stay, although there were no significant differences in outcome one year after the stroke. Conclusion Edaravone treatment reduced the volume of the infarct and improved neurological deficits during the subacute

  20. [Neurologic aspects of vibration syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langauer-Lewowicka, H; Zajac-Nedza, M

    1997-01-01

    The authors present divergent opinions on the pathogenesis of vibratory syndrome, and primarily on its angio-neurological form, i.e. vascular, neurogenic and immunological theory. In the light of these concepts the clinical manifestations of vibratory syndrome are discussed in view of both systemic and local developments. The issues concerning neurological diagnostics with reference to the usefulness of electrophysiological methods are thoroughly analysed. Difficulties in early diagnosis and identification of symptoms that distinguish vibratory syndrome from other syndromes with similar manifestations are highlighted.

  1. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  2. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  3. Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Perna, Robert; Temple, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic (n = 172) or hemorrhagic stroke (n = 112) within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program....

  4. Vascular Neurology Nurse Practitioner Provision of Telemedicine Consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart M. Demaerschalk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective was to define and evaluate a role for the Vascular Neurology-Nurse Practitioner (VN-NP in the delivery of telemedicine consultations in partnership with a vascular neurologist. Methods. Prospective stroke alert patients at participating hospitals underwent a two-way audio video telemedicine consultation with a VN-NP at a remotely located stroke center in partnership with a vascular neurologist. Demographic information, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores, diagnoses, CT contraindications to thrombolysis, thrombolysis eligibility, and time interval data were collected. The inter-rater agreement between VN-NP and vascular neurologist assessments was calculated. Results. Ten patients were evaluated. Four were determined to have ischemic stroke, one had a transient ischemic attack, two had intracerebral hemorrhages, and three were stroke mimics. Overall, three patients received thrombolysis. The inter-rater agreement between VN-NP and vascular neurologist assessments were excellent, ranging from 0.9 to 1.0. The duration of VN-NP consultation was 53.2±9.0 minutes, which included the vascular neurologist supervisory evaluation time of 12.0±9.6 minutes. Conclusion. This study illustrated that a stroke center VN-NP, in partnership with a vascular neurologist, could deliver timely telemedicine consultations, accurate diagnoses, and correct treatments in acute stroke patients who presented to remotely located rural emergency departments within a hub and spoke network. VN-NPs may fulfill the role of a telestroke provider.

  5. Vascular neurology nurse practitioner provision of telemedicine consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaerschalk, Bart M; Kiernan, Terri-Ellen J; Investigators, Starr

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The objective was to define and evaluate a role for the Vascular Neurology-Nurse Practitioner (VN-NP) in the delivery of telemedicine consultations in partnership with a vascular neurologist. Methods. Prospective stroke alert patients at participating hospitals underwent a two-way audio video telemedicine consultation with a VN-NP at a remotely located stroke center in partnership with a vascular neurologist. Demographic information, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, diagnoses, CT contraindications to thrombolysis, thrombolysis eligibility, and time interval data were collected. The inter-rater agreement between VN-NP and vascular neurologist assessments was calculated. Results. Ten patients were evaluated. Four were determined to have ischemic stroke, one had a transient ischemic attack, two had intracerebral hemorrhages, and three were stroke mimics. Overall, three patients received thrombolysis. The inter-rater agreement between VN-NP and vascular neurologist assessments were excellent, ranging from 0.9 to 1.0. The duration of VN-NP consultation was 53.2 +/- 9.0 minutes, which included the vascular neurologist supervisory evaluation time of 12.0 +/- 9.6 minutes. Conclusion. This study illustrated that a stroke center VN-NP, in partnership with a vascular neurologist, could deliver timely telemedicine consultations, accurate diagnoses, and correct treatments in acute stroke patients who presented to remotely located rural emergency departments within a hub and spoke network. VN-NPs may fulfill the role of a telestroke provider.

  6. [Pseudo-tumoral and ischemic encephalic Erdheim-Chester disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezyane, T; Abouzahir, A; Bassou, D; Zoubeir, Y; Hammi, S; Mahassin, F; Ohayon, V; Archane, M-I

    2009-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-langerhans cell histiocytosis of unknown etiology. It is a multi-systematic xanthogranulomatous infiltration with almost constant bone involvement; the neurological manifestations are not specific and occur in 15-20% of cases. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman hospitalized for a frontal syndrome and right hemiparesis. Imaging revealed a left caudate nucleus process with recent infarct. Cardiovascular involvement and bilateral osteosclerosis of long bones strongly suggested ECD, confirmed after biopsies of the pericardium and bone. Pseudo-tumor encephalic ECD is very rare; the caudate nuclei is an unusual localization; ischemic stroke has been exceptionally described. Prognosis depends largely on the involvement of the central nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  7. [Silent myocardial ischemia in patients with transient ischemic attacks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Valiente, S; Mostacero, E; del Río, A; Morales, F

    1994-10-01

    Given evidence that ischemic heart disease is the most frequent cause of death in patients with cerebrovascular disease, we used ergometrics to screen 80 patients with TIA for silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) at the neurological unit of Hospital Clínico Universitario in Zaragoza, Spain. The patients were compared with a control group of 80 with no signs of heart disease. Neither the patients nor the controls had ever shown clinical signs of coronary ischemia and their baseline electrocardiograms were normal. Stress test results were positive in 25 (31%) of the TIA patients, and in 4 (5%) (p Hiperlipidemia (75% testing positive versus 43% negative, p < 0.01) and diabetes (31% testing positive versus 13% negative, p < 0.01) were the risk factors statistically related with a positive stress test.

  8. Subjective Cognitive Impairment, Depressive Symptoms, and Fatigue after a TIA or Transient Neurological Attack: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Frank G; Plaizier, Nicole O; Vermeer, Sarah E; Góraj, Bozena M; Koudstaal, Peter J; Richard, Edo; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Kessels, Roy P C; van Dijk, Ewoud J

    2017-01-01

    Subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), depressive symptoms, and fatigue are common after stroke and are associated with reduced quality of life. We prospectively investigated their prevalence and course after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or nonfocal transient neurological attack (TNA) and the association with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesions. The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Subjective Fatigue subscale from the Checklist Individual Strength were used to assess subjective complaints shortly after TIA or TNA and six months later. With repeated measure analysis, the associations between DWI lesion presence or clinical diagnosis (TIA or TNA) and subjective complaints over time were determined. We included 103 patients (28 DWI positive). At baseline, SCI and fatigue were less severe in DWI positive than in DWI negative patients, whereas at follow-up, there were no differences. SCI ( p = 0.02) and fatigue ( p = 0.01) increased in severity only in DWI positive patients. There were no differences between TIA and TNA. Subjective complaints are highly prevalent in TIA and TNA patients. The short-term prognosis is not different between DWI-positive and DWI negative patients, but SCI and fatigue increase in severity within six months after the event when an initial DWI lesion is present.

  9. Structural MRI markers of brain aging early after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werden, Emilio; Cumming, Toby; Li, Qi; Bird, Laura; Veldsman, Michele; Pardoe, Heath R; Jackson, Graeme; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Brodtmann, Amy

    2017-07-11

    To examine associations between ischemic stroke, vascular risk factors, and MRI markers of brain aging. Eighty-one patients (mean age 67.5 ± 13.1 years, 31 left-sided, 61 men) with confirmed first-ever (n = 66) or recurrent (n = 15) ischemic stroke underwent 3T MRI scanning within 6 weeks of symptom onset (mean 26 ± 9 days). Age-matched controls (n = 40) completed identical testing. Multivariate regression analyses examined associations between group membership and MRI markers of brain aging (cortical thickness, total brain volume, white matter hyperintensity [WMH] volume, hippocampal volume), normalized against intracranial volume, and the effects of vascular risk factors on these relationships. First-ever stroke was associated with smaller hippocampal volume ( p = 0.025) and greater WMH volume ( p = 0.004) relative to controls. Recurrent stroke was in turn associated with smaller hippocampal volume relative to both first-ever stroke ( p = 0.017) and controls ( p = 0.001). These associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, education, and, in stroke patients, infarct volume. Total brain volume was not significantly smaller in first-ever stroke patients than in controls ( p = 0.056), but the association became significant after further adjustment for atrial fibrillation ( p = 0.036). Cortical thickness and brain volumes did not differ as a function of stroke type, infarct volume, or etiology. Brain structure is likely to be compromised before ischemic stroke by vascular risk factors. Smaller hippocampal and total brain volumes and increased WMH load represent proxies for underlying vascular brain injury. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Blood levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in patients with neurological diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Mayer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The brain-specific astroglial protein GFAP is a blood biomarker candidate indicative of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with symptoms suspicious of acute stroke. Comparably little, however, is known about GFAP release in other neurological disorders. In order to identify potential "specificity gaps" of a future GFAP test used to diagnose intracerebral hemorrhage, we measured GFAP in the blood of a large and rather unselected collective of patients with neurological diseases. METHODS: Within a one-year period, we randomly selected in-patients of our university hospital for study inclusion. Patients with ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack and intracerebral hemorrhage were excluded. Primary endpoint was the ICD-10 coded diagnosis reached at discharge. During hospital stay, blood was collected, and GFAP plasma levels were determined using an advanced prototype immunoassay at Roche Diagnostics. RESULTS: A total of 331 patients were included, covering a broad spectrum of neurological diseases. GFAP levels were low in the vast majority of patients, with 98.5% of cases lying below the cut-off that was previously defined for the differentiation of intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. No diagnosis or group of diagnoses was identified that showed consistently increased GFAP values. No association with age and sex was found. CONCLUSION: Most acute and chronic neurological diseases, including typical stroke mimics, are not associated with detectable GFAP levels in the bloodstream. Our findings underline the hypothesis that rapid astroglial destruction as in acute intracerebral hemorrhage is mandatory for GFAP increase. A future GFAP blood test applied to identify patients with intracerebral hemorrhage is likely to have a high specificity.

  11. Computer assisted radionuclide angiography to confirm reversible ischemic cerebral dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buell, U.; Lanksch, W.; Tosch, U.; Kleinhans, E.; Steinhoff, H.

    1982-01-01

    Computer assisted radionuclide angiography (CARNA) was employed in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or prolonged reversible ischemic neurologic deficit (PRIND) to establish the sensitivity of CARNA in detecting and quantifying changes of cerebral perfusion in such selected patients. Moreover, results of CARNA were compared with findings of cranial radiographic angiography (RGA) to obtain data on combined sensitivities of these methods. CARNA may be the preferred noninvasive procedure employed because it detects and quantifies the vascular supply disorder in patients with TIA and PRIND. If no computer assistance is used to evaluate cranial radionuclide angiography, results are considerable less accurate. Specifity of CARNA is 84.6%. If CARNA is negative (25.2% in TIA; 12.7% in PRIND), a further method must be employed to confirm the cranial vascular origin of the attack. This may be RGA in TIA and transmission computed axial tomography (T-CAT) T-CAT in PRIND. This diagnos - tic sequence lead to 92.4% true positive in TIA and to 93.2% true positives in PRIND

  12. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities predict early ischemic recurrence in TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Woong; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Tae Jung; Oh, Kyungmi; Han, Moon-Ku; Ko, Sang-Bae; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2018-02-27

    To evaluate the relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) vascular hyperintensity (FVH) and early ischemic lesion recurrence (follow-up diffusion-weighted imaging [FU-DWI] [+]) in patients with lesion-negative TIA. We recruited consecutive patients with lesion-negative TIA within 24 hours of symptom onset, who underwent follow-up MRI during the acute period. FVH was defined as a focal or serpentine high signal intensity on FLAIR images. Other potential confounders were adjusted to evaluate the relationship between FVH and FU-DWI (+). Furthermore, to compare clinical outcomes between the FU-DWI (+) and FU-DWI (-) groups, we assessed 1-year recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA. Among 392 patients with lesion-negative TIA, 82 patients had FU-DWI (+) on the follow-up MRI. In the multivariate analysis, FVH remained an independent predictor of FU-DWI (+) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.45-9.29, p TIA. As FU-DWI (+) frequently occurs during the acute period and has a subsequent worse outcome after discharge, additional radiologic or clinical markers for it are necessary. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Blunt Traumatic Extracranial Cerebrovascular Injury and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Foreman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic stroke occurs in a significant subset of patients with blunt traumatic cerebrovascular injury (TCVI. The patients are victims of motor vehicle crashes, assaults or other high-energy collisions, and suffer ischemic stroke due to injury to the extracranial carotid or vertebral arteries. Summary: An increasing number of patients with TCVI are being identified, largely because of the expanding use of computed tomography angiography for screening patients with blunt trauma. Patients with TCVI are particularly challenging to manage because they often suffer polytrauma, that is, numerous additional injuries including orthopedic, chest, abdominal, and head injuries. Presently, there is no consensus about optimal management. Key Messages: Most literature about TCVI and stroke has been published in trauma, general surgery, and neurosurgery journals; because of this, and because these patients are managed primarily by trauma surgeons, patients with stroke due to TCVI have been essentially hidden from view of neurologists. This review is intended to bring this clinical entity to the attention of clinicians and investigators with specific expertise in neurology and stroke.

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chou Chiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is a recommended regimen for newborn infants who are at or near term with evolving moderate-to-severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. The Task Force of the Taiwan Child Neurology Society and the Taiwan Society of Neonatology held a joint meeting in 2015 to establish recommendations for using TH on newborn patients with HIE. Based on current evidence and experts' experiences, this review article summarizes the key points and recommendations regarding TH for newborns with HIE, including: (1 selection criteria for TH; (2 choices of method and equipment for TH; (3 TH prior to and during transport; (4 methods for temperature maintenance, monitoring, and rewarming; (5 systemic care of patients during TH, including the care of respiratory and cardiovascular systems, management of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition, as well as sedation and drug metabolism; (6 monitoring and management of seizures; (7 neuroimaging, prognostic factors, and outcomes; and (8 adjuvant therapy for TH. Key Words: hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, neonate, patient care, perinatal asphyxia, therapeutic hypothermia

  15. Baseline characteristics of the 3096 patients recruited into the 'Triple Antiplatelets for Reducing Dependency after Ischemic Stroke' trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Philip Mw; Appleton, Jason P; Beridze, Maia; Christensen, Hanne; Dineen, Robert A; Duley, Lelia; England, Timothy J; Heptinstall, Stan; James, Marilyn; Krishnan, Kailash; Markus, Hugh S; Pocock, Stuart; Ranta, Annemarei; Robinson, Thompson G; Flaherty, Katie; Scutt, Polly; Venables, Graham S; Woodhouse, Lisa J; Sprigg, Nikola

    2017-07-01

    Background The risk of recurrence following ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack is highest immediately after the event. Antiplatelet agents are effective in reducing the risk of recurrence and two agents are superior to one in the early phase after ictus. Design The triple antiplatelets for reducing dependency after ischemic stroke trial was an international multicenter prospective randomized open-label blinded-endpoint trial that assessed the safety and efficacy of short-term intensive antiplatelet therapy with three agents (combined aspirin, clopidogrel and dipyridamole) as compared with guideline treatment in acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. The primary outcome was stroke recurrence and its severity, measured using the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included recurrent vascular events, functional measures (cognition, disability, mood, quality of life), and safety (bleeding, death, serious adverse events). Data are number (%) or mean (standard deviation, SD). Results Recruitment ran from April 2009 to March 2016; 3096 patients were recruited from 106 sites in four countries (Denmark 1.6%, Georgia 2.7%, New Zealand 0.2%, UK 95.4%). Randomization characteristics included: age 69.0 (10.1) years; male 1945 (62.8%); time onset to randomization 29.4 (11.9) h; stroke severity (National Institutes for Health Stroke Scale) 2.8 (3.6); blood pressure 143.5 (18.2)/79.5 (11.4) mmHg; IS 2143 (69.2%), transient ischemic attack 953 (30.8%). Conclusion Triple antiplatelets for reducing dependency after ischemic stroke was a large trial of intensive/triple antiplatelet therapy in acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack, and included participants from four predominantly Caucasian countries who were representative of patients in many western stroke services.

  16. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  17. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  18. [Neurology in medieval regimina sanitatis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frutos González, V; Guerrero Peral, A L

    2011-09-01

    In medical medieval literature some works about dietetics stand out. Dietetics, as a separate branch of medicine, includes not only food or drinks, but other environmental factors influencing on health. They are known as regimina sanitatis or salutis, and specially developed in the Christian west. They generally consisted of a balance between the Galenic "six non-natural things"; factors regulating health and its protection: environment, exercise, food, sleep, bowel movements and emotions. After reviewing the sources and defining the different stages of this genre, we have considered three of the most out-standing medieval regimina, the anonymous Regimen sanitatis salernitanum, Arnaldo de Vilanova's Regimen sanitatis ad regem aragonum and Bernardo de Gordon's Tractatus of conservatione vite humane. In them we review references to neurological disease. Though not independently considered, there is a significant presence of neurological diseases in the regimina. Dietetics measures are proposed to preserve memory, nerves, or hearing, as well as for the treatment of migraine, epilepsy, stroke or dizziness. Regimina are quiet representative among medical medieval literature, and they show medieval physicians vision of neurological diseases. Dietetics was considered useful to preserve health, and therapeutics was based on natural remedies. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test.

  20. Perfusion differences on SPECT and PWI in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuutinen, Juho [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Liu, Yawu; Laakso, Mikko P. [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, P. O. Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Karonen, Jari O. [Mikkeli Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, Mikkeli (Finland); Vanninen, Esko J. [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Kuikka, Jyrki T. [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J. [University of Turku, Department of Radiology, Turku (Finland); Vanninen, Ritva L. [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, P. O. Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-10-15

    The purposes of the present study were to compare the flow defect volumes on perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PWI) and {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ethylcysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at acute and subacute stages of ischemic stroke and to analyze the relationship between the detected flow defects on the two methods and neurological status and clinical outcomes. Perfusion defects on PWI and SPECT were measured within 48 h and on day 8 of the onset of stroke from 22 patients with their first-ever acute supratentorial ischemic stroke. The primary neurological status was evaluated prior to the imaging. Clinical outcome was assessed at 3 months after the onset of the stroke. The volumes of cerebral blood flow (CBF) defects did not differ between SPECT and PWI within the 48-h examinations. However, the volume of CBF defect was significantly larger on SPECT than on PWI on day 8 (p = 0.03). Within the 48-h examinations, the CBF defect volumes on SPECT and PWI were comparably related to the neurological status. On day 8, the CBF defect volume on SPECT showed higher correlation to the neurological status and more precisely predicted the clinical outcomes at 3 months than PWI. {sup 99m}TC-ECD-SPECT and PWI both have ability to detect cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with ischemic stroke but with some differences. The value of SPECT is more accurate in terms of the delayed outcome, such as prognosis and rehabilitation planning. (orig.)

  1. Caring for Patients With Intractable Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nagase

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative descriptive study examining nurses’ attitudes about caring for patients with intractable neurological diseases, with a focus on dedication and conflicts. Semistructured interviews were conducted on 11 nurses with more than 5 years of clinical experience in addition to more than 3 years of experience in neurology wards. Senior nursing officers from each hospital selected the participants. In general, these nurses expressed distress over the inevitable progression of disease. Nurses talked about the “basis of dedication,” “conflicts with dedication,” “reorganization for maintaining dedication,” and “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment.” “Reorganization for maintaining dedication” meant that nurses were able to handle the prospect of rededicating themselves to their patients. Furthermore, “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment” referred to events that changed nurses’ outlooks on nursing care, their pride as nurses, or their learning experiences. They felt dedicated and conflicted both simultaneously and separately. While committing to their patients’ physical care, nurses were empowered to think positively and treat patients with dignity in spite of the care taking much time and effort, as well as entailing considerable risk.

  2. International electives in neurology training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L.; Coleman, Mary E.; Engstrom, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. Background: There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. Methods: A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012–February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Results: Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health–related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%–9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%–19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. Conclusions: In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority

  3. Behavior outcome after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, with similar brain damage, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Saur, Lisiani; Boisserand, Lígia Simões Braga; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Xavier, Léder Leal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    Stroke causes disability and mortality worldwide and is divided into ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes. Although clinical trials suggest distinct recovery profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic events, this is not conclusive due to stroke heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to produce similar brain damage, using experimental models of ischemic (IS) and hemorrhagic (HS) stroke and evaluate the motor spontaneous recovery profile. We used 31 Wistar rats divided into the following groups: Sham (n=7), ischemic (IS) (n=12) or hemorrhagic (HS) (n=12). Brain ischemia or hemorrhage was induced by endotelin-1 (ET-1) and collagenase type IV-S (collagenase) microinjections, respectively. All groups were evaluated in the open field, cylinder and ladder walk behavioral tests at distinct time points as from baseline to 30 days post-surgery (30 PS). Histological and morphometric analyses were used to assess the volume of lost tissue and lesion length. Present results reveal that both forms of experimental stroke had a comparable long-term pattern of damage, since no differences were found in volume of tissue lost or lesion size 30 days after surgery. However, behavioral data showed that hemorrhagic rats were less impaired at skilled walking than ischemic ones at 15 and 30 days post-surgery. We suggest that experimentally comparable stroke design is useful because it reduces heterogeneity and facilitates the assessment of neurobiological differences related to stroke subtypes; and that spontaneous skilled walking recovery differs between experimental ischemic and hemorrhagic insults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Limb Remote Ischemic Conditioning: Mechanisms, Anesthetics, and the Potential for Expanding Therapeutic Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gangling; Thakkar, Mrugesh; Robinson, Christopher; Doré, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    Novel and innovative approaches are essential in developing new treatments and improving clinical outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke. Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) is a series of mechanical interruptions in blood flow of a distal organ, following end organ reperfusion, shown to significantly reduce infarct size through inhibition of oxidation and inflammation. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is what ultimately leads to the irreversible brain damage and clinical picture seen in stroke patients. There have been several reports and reviews about the potential of RIC in acute ischemic stroke; however, the focus here is a comprehensive look at the differences in the three types of RIC (remote pre-, per-, and postconditioning). There are some limited uses of preconditioning in acute ischemic stroke due to the unpredictability of the ischemic event; however, it does provide the identification of biomarkers for clinical studies. Remote limb per- and postconditioning offer a more promising treatment during patient care as they can be harnessed during or after the initial ischemic insult. Though further research is needed, it is imperative to discuss the importance of preclinical data in understanding the methods and mechanisms involved in RIC. This understanding will facilitate translation to a clinically feasible paradigm for use in the hospital setting. PMID:29467715

  5. Peripheral Mechanisms of Ischemic Myalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Queme

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal pain due to ischemia is present in a variety of clinical conditions including peripheral vascular disease (PVD, sickle cell disease (SCD, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, and even fibromyalgia (FM. The clinical features associated with deep tissue ischemia are unique because although the subjective description of pain is common to other forms of myalgia, patients with ischemic muscle pain often respond poorly to conventional analgesic therapies. Moreover, these patients also display increased cardiovascular responses to muscle contraction, which often leads to exercise intolerance or exacerbation of underlying cardiovascular conditions. This suggests that the mechanisms of myalgia development and the role of altered cardiovascular function under conditions of ischemia may be distinct compared to other injuries/diseases of the muscles. It is widely accepted that group III and IV muscle afferents play an important role in the development of pain due to ischemia. These same muscle afferents also form the sensory component of the exercise pressor reflex (EPR, which is the increase in heart rate and blood pressure (BP experienced after muscle contraction. Studies suggest that afferent sensitization after ischemia depends on interactions between purinergic (P2X and P2Y receptors, transient receptor potential (TRP channels, and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs in individual populations of peripheral sensory neurons. Specific alterations in primary afferent function through these receptor mechanisms correlate with increased pain related behaviors and altered EPRs. Recent evidence suggests that factors within the muscles during ischemic conditions including upregulation of growth factors and cytokines, and microvascular changes may be linked to the overexpression of these different receptor molecules in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG that in turn modulate pain and sympathetic reflexes. In this review article, we will discuss the

  6. Sex Hormones and Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Whether endogenous sex hormones are associated with ischemic stroke (IS) is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of endogenous sex hormones are associated with risk of IS in the general population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Adult men (n...... = 4615) and women (n = 4724) with measurements of endogenous sex hormones during the 1981-1983 examination of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, Denmark, were followed for up to 29 years for incident IS, with no loss to follow-up. Mediation analyses assessed whether risk of IS was mediated through...

  7. miRNA Expression Profiles in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sofie Sølvsten; Nygaard, Ann-Britt; Nielsen, Ming-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    in the cell-free fractions of CSF and blood were analyzed by a microarray technique (miRCURY LNA™ microRNA Array, Exiqon A/S, Denmark) using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) platform containing 378 miRNA primers. In total, 183 different miRNAs were detected in the CSF, of which two miRNAs (let-7c and miR-221-3p......The aims of the study were (1) to determine whether miRNAs (microRNAs) can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of patients with ischemic stroke and (2) to compare these miRNA profiles with corresponding profiles from other neurological patients to address whether the mi......RNA profiles of CSF or blood have potential usefulness as diagnostic biomarkers of ischemic stroke. CSF from patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 10) and patients with other neurological diseases (n = 10) was collected by lumbar puncture. Blood samples were taken immediately after. Expression profiles...

  8. Meta-analysis of factor V Leiden and ischemic stroke in young adults: the importance of case ascertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Ali G; Cole, John W; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2010-08-01

    The factor V Leiden mutation is associated with ischemic stroke in children but not in adults. Whether it is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults, however, is uncertain. To address this issue, we performed a meta-analysis of 18 case-control studies of ischemic stroke in adults 50 years of age and younger published before June 2009. Across all studies, factor V Leiden was detected in 154 of 2045 cases (7.5%) and 217 of 5307 controls (4.1%), yielding a fixed-effect odds ratio of 2.00 (95% CI, 1.59-2.51). However, further analyses revealed substantial heterogeneity among these studies (P=0.005 for Q-test of heterogeneity). Hypothesizing that this heterogeneity could be related to differences among studies in case selection criteria, we stratified the meta-analysis into studies for which case samples were enriched or not enriched to include cases having an increased likelihood of prothrombotic genetic involvement ("selected" ischemic stroke studies, n=9) and those that recruited cases from consecutive neurology referrals or hospitalizations ("unselected" ischemic stroke studies, n=8). Among the 9 "selected" ischemic stroke studies, factor V Leiden was more strongly associated with stroke (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.98-3.75), whereas among the 8 "unselected" ischemic stroke studies, the association between factor V Leiden and stroke was substantially weaker (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.998-1.95). This difference was found to be statistically significant (P=0.003 for Woolf test for heterogeneity). We conclude that factor V Leiden is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults, particularly in patient populations in which there is an increased clinical suspicion of prothrombotic state.

  9. Thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: where and when?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Micieli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of acute ischemic stroke remains an open challenge for the clinicians and is closely connected to the ready acknowledgment of symptoms, to the promptness of the instrumental diagnosis and consequently to the rapidity of the pharmacological intervention. Although several studies have validated the effectiveness and the safety profileof the intravenous fibrinolytic treatment, the number of patients who benefit of such therapeutic opportunity is still too little. This data is partially due to the delay within patients arrive to the hospital and to the doubts of the physicians on the possible collateral effects, but it is also related to logistic and organizational-managerial problematic of the patient with acute stroke.These last ones mainly derive from the deficiency on the national territory of dedicated structures (Stroke Unit, from the absence of operative connections between the 118-service and the Stroke Unit, from the delay of the neurologist calling in the emergency room that does not allow an adapted diagnostic evaluation of the ischemic event. The spread of the intravenous fibrinolysis must therefore necessarily pass through the creation of participation protocols between hospitals with stroke unit and primary aid, and between department of emergency/ urgency and staff of the stroke unit also previewing the creation of professional figures like those of the urgency neurologist that could have the full right of the management and the treatment of cerebral ischemic pathology.

  10. Remote Ischemic Conditioning to Protect against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevoord, Daniel; Kranke, Peter; Kuijpers, Marijn; Weber, Nina; Hollmann, Markus; Preckel, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic conditioning is gaining interest as potential method to induce resistance against ischemia reperfusion injury in a variety of clinical settings. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether remote ischemic conditioning reduces mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events, length of stay in hospital and in the intensive care unit and biomarker release in patients who suffer from or are at risk for ischemia reperfusion injury. Methods and Results Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized clinical trials comparing remote ischemic conditioning, regardless of timing, with no conditioning. Two investigators independently selected suitable trials, assessed trial quality and extracted data. 23 studies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery (15 studies), percutaneous coronary intervention (four studies) and vascular surgery (four studies), comprising in total 1878 patients, were included in this review. Compared to no conditioning, remote ischemic conditioning did not reduce mortality (odds ratio 1.22 [95% confidence interval 0.48, 3.07]) or major adverse cardiovascular events (0.65 [0.38, 1.14]). However, the incidence of myocardial infarction was reduced with remote ischemic conditioning (0.50 [0.31, 0.82]), as was peak troponin release (standardized mean difference −0.28 [−0.47, −0.09]). Conclusion There is no evidence that remote ischemic conditioning reduces mortality associated with ischemic events; nor does it reduce major adverse cardiovascular events. However, remote ischemic conditioning did reduce the incidence of peri-procedural myocardial infarctions, as well as the release of troponin. PMID:22860077

  11. Predictors of early infection in cerebral ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Wmr; Al-Anwar, A D; Kamel, A E; Aidaros, M A

    2016-01-01

    Infection is the most common complication of stroke. To determine the risk factors and predictors of post-stroke infection (PSI), which developed within 7 days from the onset of acute ischemic stroke. The study included 60 ischemic stroke patients admitted in the Neurology Department of Zagazig University, Egypt, who were subdivided into: [Non Stroke Associated Infection group (nSAI); 30 patients having stroke without any criteria of infection within 7 days from the onset and Stroke Associated Infection group (SAI); 30 patients having stroke with respiratory tract infection (RTI) or urinary tract infection within 7 days], in addition to 30 healthy sex and age-matching subjects as control. All the patients had a detailed history taking, thorough clinical general and neurological examination, laboratory tests (Urine analysis & urine culture, blood sugar, lipid profile and serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-10), a chest radiography to assess RTI and brain computed tomography (CT) to exclude the hemorrhagic stroke and to confirm the ischemic stroke. SAI patients were found to be significantly older with higher baseline blood glucose level. Also the number of patients with tube feeding, lower conscious level, more stroke severity and more large size infarcts were significantly higher in SAI patients. There was a significant elevation in the IL-10, a significant decrease in the TNF-α and a significant decrease in the TNF-α/ IL-10 ratio, in the SAI group. The baseline serum level of IL-10 ≥ 14.5 pg/ ml and size of infarct area > 3.5 cm3 were found to be the independent predictors of PSI. Patients with older age, tube feeding, lower conscious level, worse baseline stroke severity, large cerebral infarcts in CT scan, and increased IL-10 serum level were more susceptible to infection. The baseline serum level of IL-10 ≥ 14.5 pg/ ml and the size of infarct area > 3.5 cm3 were the independent predictors of PSI.

  12. Cerebral ischemic stroke: is gender important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Claire L

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral stroke continues to be a major cause of death and the leading cause of long-term disability in developed countries. Evidence reviewed here suggests that gender influences various aspects of the clinical spectrum of ischemic stroke, in terms of influencing how a patients present with ischemic stroke through to how they respond to treatment. In addition, this review focuses on discussing the various pathologic mechanisms of ischemic stroke that may differ according to gender and compares how intrinsic and hormonal mechanisms may account for such gender differences. All clinical trials to date investigating putative neuroprotective treatments for ischemic stroke have failed, and it may be that our understanding of the injury cascade initiated after ischemic injury is incomplete. Revealing aspects of the pathophysiological consequences of ischemic stroke that are gender specific may enable gender relevant and effective neuroprotective strategies to be identified. Thus, it is possible to conclude that gender does, in fact, have an important role in ischemic stroke and must be factored into experimental and clinical investigations of ischemic stroke.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V

    2015-01-01

    summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many...

  14. Value of Perfusion CT, Transcranial Doppler Sonography, and Neurological Examination to Detect Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, E.; Raslan, F.; Stetter, Ch.; Lee, J.Y.; Solymosi, L.; Ernestus, R.I.; Vince, G.H.; Westermaier, Th.; Pham, M.; Solymosi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background. If detected in time, delayed cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be treated by balloon angioplasty or chemical vasospasmolysis in order to enhance cerebral blood flow (CBF) and protect the brain from ischemic damage. This study was conceived to compare the diagnostic accuracy of detailed neurological examination, Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD), and Perfusion-CT (PCT) to detect angiographic vasospasm. Methods. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of delayed ischemic neurological deterioration (DIND), pathological findings on PCT-maps, and accelerations of the mean flow velocity (MVF) were calculated. Results. The accuracy of DIND to predict angiographic vasospasm was 0.88. An acceleration of MFV in TCD (>140 cm/s) had an accuracy of 0.64, positive PCT-findings of 0.69 with a higher sensitivity, and negative predictive value than TCD. Interpretation. Neurological assessment at close intervals is the most sensitive and specific parameter for cerebral vasospasm. PCT has a higher accuracy, sensitivity and negative predictive value than TCD. If detailed neurological evaluation is possible, it should be the leading parameter in the management and treatment decisions. If patients are not amenable to detailed neurological examination, PCT at regular intervals is a helpful tool to diagnose secondary vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH

  15. Neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubin, E.; Thom, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    The most used radiopharmaceuticals in encephaloscintigraphy are analysed, such as: sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, sup(113m)In- DTPA, 203 Hg-or 197 Hg-clormerodrine and 131 I-albumin. A comparative study is made of scintiscanning of normal brain and that of pathological states. The uses of 131 I-albumin, sup(113m)In-DTPA an 169 Y - DTPA are commented in liquor spaces scintiscanning and clinical indications are given [pt

  16. Not only the sugar, early infarct sign, hyperDense middle cerebral artery, age, neurologic deficit score but also atrial fibrillation is predictive for symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sombat Muengtaweepongsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH is the most unwanted adverse event in patients with acute ischemic stroke who received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (i.v. rt-PA. Many tool scores are available to predict the probability of sICH. Among those scores, the Sugar, Early infarct sign, hyperDense middle cerebral artery, Age, Neurologic deficit (SEDAN gives the highest area under the curve-receiver operating characteristic value. Objective: We aimed to examine any factors other than the SEDAN score to predict the probability of sICH. Methods: Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with i.v. rt-PA within 4.5 h time window from January 2010 to July 2012 were evaluated. Compiling demographic data, risk factors, and comorbidity (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, atrial fibrillation (AF, ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, previous stroke, gout, smoking cigarette, drinking alcoholic beverage, family history of stroke, and family history of ischemic heart disease, computed tomography scan of patients prior to treatment with rt-PA, and assessing the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score for the purpose of calculating SEDAN score were analyzed. Results: Of 314 patients treated with i.v. rt-PA, there were 46 ICH cases (14.6% with 14 sICH (4.4% and 32 asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage cases (10.2%. The rate of sICH occurrence was increased in accordance with the increase in the SEDAN score and AF. Age over 75 years, early infarction, hyperdense cerebral artery, baseline blood sugar more than 12 mmol/l, NIHSS as 10 or more, and AF were the risk factors to develop sICH after treated with rt-PA at 1.535, 2.501, 1.093, 1.276, 1.253, and 2.492 times, respectively. Conclusions: Rather than the SEDAN score, AF should be a predictor of sICH in patients with acute ischemic stroke after i.v. rt-PA treatment in Thai population.

  17. Reporting time of ischemic stroke patients within the time window for thrombolysis in a tertiary care hospital at rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.; Ishtiaq, S.; Anwar, S.O.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the reporting time of ischemic stroke patients within the time window for thrombolysis at Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi. Design: A descriptive study. Place and duration of Study: Military Hospital Rawalpindi over a period of four months from Dec 2013 to Mar 2014. Patients and Methods: Patients admitted to MH Rawalpindi with symptoms suggestive of stroke and having objective focal neurologic deficits consistent with stroke were included in the study. A CT scan of brain was carried out immediately to rule out intracranial bleed. The CT scan of brain was either normal or revealed radiological findings suggestive of an infarct. Results: A total of 86 patients met the inclusion criteria of the study. Only 19 (22%) patients with ischemic stroke presented to the hospital within 4.5 hours after onset of their symptoms. Conclusion: Only a small number of ischemic stroke patients report to the hospital within the therapeutic window for thrombolytic therapy. (author)

  18. Genetic variation in WRN and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G.

    2017-01-01

    trends for ischemic cerebrovascular disease (P = 0.06). In meta-analyses including 59,190 individuals in 5 studies, the hazard ratio for ischemic stroke for C1367R TT homozygotes versus CC/CT was 1.14 (1.04–1.25; P = 0.008). Conclusions This study suggests that common genetic variation in WRN......Background Werner syndrome, a premature genetic aging syndrome, shares many clinical features reminiscent of normal physiological aging, and ischemic vascular disease is a frequent cause of death. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the WRN gene was associated with risk of ischemic...... vascular disease in the general population. Methods We included 58,284 participants from two general population cohorts, the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS). Of these, 6,312 developed ischemic vascular disease during follow-up. In the CCHS (n = 10...

  19. Rosiglitazone, myocardial ischemic risk, and recent regulatory actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, Catherine A; Phillips, Beth Bryles

    2012-02-01

    To review the evidence surrounding rosiglitazone and ischemic cardiovascular risk and discuss the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision to revise safety information and restrict access to the drug. A literature search was conducted through MEDLINE (1950-January 2012), PubMed (1966-January 2012), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-December 2011) using the search terms rosiglitazone and cardiovascular risk. Regulatory documents from the FDA and the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, as well as reference citations from publications identified, were reviewed. All articles in English identified from the data sources were evaluated for inclusion. Literature regarding rosiglitazone and ischemic cardiovascular risk has shown inconsistent results. Meta-analyses by the FDA, GlaxoSmithKline, and several independent research groups suggest an increased risk for myocardial infarction (MI), while others have not. Long-term, controlled trials not designed to evaluate cardiovascular outcomes did not find a significant increase in cardiovascular events and had low event rates overall. The RECORD (Rosiglitazone Evaluated for Cardiovascular Outcomes in Oral Agent Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes) trial is the only prospective randomized trial to date designed to evaluate cardiovascular outcomes of rosiglitazone; the results were limited because of issues with study design and event adjudication. The only direct comparisons between rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are observational studies in which pioglitazone had a more favorable MI risk profile. Data involving rosiglitazone and an association with ischemic cardiovascular risk have yielded variable results. The FDA made the decision to restrict access to rosiglitazone in September 2010 by requiring GlaxoSmithKline to submit a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS). Drug labeling was revised in February 2011, and the rosiglitazone REMS program took full effect in November 2011.

  20. Swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camargo Remesso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate occurrences of swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke. METHOD: This was a retrospective study on 596 medical files. The inclusion criterion was that the patients needed to have been hospitalized with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke; the exclusion criteria were the presence of associated cardiac problems and hospital stay already more than 14 days. RESULTS: 50.5% were men and 49.5% women; mean age 65.3 years (SD=±11.7 (p<0.001. Among the risk factors, 79.4% had hypertension, 36.7% had diabetes (p<0.001 and 42.7% were smokers. 13.3% of the patients died. Swallowing disorders occurred in 19.6%, among whom 91.5% had mild difficulty and 8.5% had severe difficulty. 87.1% had spontaneous recovery after a mean of 2.4 months. A lesion in the brainstem region occurred in 6.8% (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Swallowing disorders occurred in almost 20% of the population and most of the difficulty in swallowing found was mild. The predictors for swallowing disorders were older age, diabetes mellitus and lesions in the brainstem region.

  1. Clinical hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy score of the Iberoamerican Society of Neonatology (Siben): A new proposal for diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, José Maria Rodriguez; Golombek, Sergio G; Sola, Augusto

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a major complication of perinatal asphyxia, with high morbidity, mortality and neurologic sequelae as cerebral palsy, mostly in poor or developing countries. The difficulty in the diagnosis and management of newborns in these countries is astonishing, thus resulting in unreliable data on this pathology and bad outcomes regarding mortality and incidence of neurologic sequelae. The objective of this article is to present a new clinical diagnostic score to be started in the delivery room and to guide the therapeutic approach, in order to improve these results.

  2. Clinical hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy score of the Iberoamerican Society of Neonatology (Siben: A new proposal for diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Rodriguez Perez

    Full Text Available Summary Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a major complication of perinatal asphyxia, with high morbidity, mortality and neurologic sequelae as cerebral palsy, mostly in poor or developing countries. The difficulty in the diagnosis and management of newborns in these countries is astonishing, thus resulting in unreliable data on this pathology and bad outcomes regarding mortality and incidence of neurologic sequelae. The objective of this article is to present a new clinical diagnostic score to be started in the delivery room and to guide the therapeutic approach, in order to improve these results.

  3. Perioperative erythropoietin protects the CNS against ischemic lesions in patients after open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakič, Nikola; Mrak, Miha; Šušteršič, Miha; Rakovec, Peter; Bunc, Matjaž

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish erythropoietin as a protective factor against brain ischemia during open heart surgery. A total of 36 consecutive patients scheduled for revascularization heart surgery were included in the study. Of the patients 18 received 3 intravenous doses of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo, 24,000 IU) and 18 patients received a placebo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect new brain ischemic lesions was performed. Additionally, S100A, S100B, neuron-specific enolase A and B (NSE-A and B) and the concentration of antibodies against N‑methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) to identify new neurological complications were determined. Patients who received rHuEpo showed no postoperative ischemic changes in the brain on MRI images. In the control group 5 (27.8 %) new ischemic lesions were found. The NMDAR antibody concentration, S100A, S100B and NSE showed no significant differences between the groups for new cerebral ischemia. High levels of lactate before and after external aortic compression (p = 0.022 and p = 0.048, respectively) and duration of operation could predict new ischemic lesions (p = 0.009). The addition of rHuEpo reduced the formation of lesions detectable by MRI in the brain and could be used clinically as neuroprotection in cardiac surgery.

  4. Prdx6 Upregulation by Curcumin Attenuates Ischemic Oxidative Damage via SP1 in Rats after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongwei Jia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The role of Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6 in brain ischemia remains unclear. Curcumin (Cur treatment elicits neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemic injury, and the associated mechanisms may involve Prdx6. In this study, we investigated whether Prdx6 and the transcription factor specific protein 1 (SP1 were involved in the antioxidant effect of Cur after stoke. Methods. Focal cerebral ischemic injury was induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 hours in male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with or without Prdx6 siRNA. Expression of Prdx6 in the penumbra was assessed by Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunoflourescent staining. In addition, infarct volume, neurological deficit score, and oxidative stress were evaluated. Prdx6 levels were also determined in the presence and absence of SP1 antagonist mithramycin A (MTM-A. Results. Cur treatment upregulated Prdx6 protein expression and the number of Prdx6-positive neuronal cells 24 hours after reperfusion. Cur treatment also attenuated oxidative stress and induced neuroprotective effects against ischemic damage, whereas the beneficial effects of Cur treatment were lost in animals treated with Prdx6-siRNA. Prdx6 upregulation by Cur treatment was abolished by SP1 antagonists MTM. Conclusions. Prdx6 upregulation by Cur treatment attenuates ischemic oxidative damage through SP1 induction in rats after stroke. This represents a novel mechanism of Cur-induced neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia.

  5. Relationships between brain and body temperature, clinical and imaging outcomes after ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaszewski, Bartosz; Carpenter, Trevor K; Thomas, Ralph G R; Armitage, Paul A; Lymer, Georgina Katherine S; Marshall, Ian; Dennis, Martin S; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2013-01-01

    Pyrexia soon after stroke is associated with severe stroke and poor functional outcome. Few studies have assessed brain temperature after stroke in patients, so little is known of its associations with body temperature, stroke severity, or outcome. We measured temperatures in ischemic and normal-appearing brain using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its correlations with body (tympanic) temperature measured four-hourly, infarct growth by 5 days, early neurologic (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS) and late functional outcome (death or dependency). Among 40 patients (mean age 73 years, median NIHSS 7, imaged at median 17 hours), temperature in ischemic brain was higher than in normal-appearing brain on admission (38.6°C-core, 37.9°C-contralateral hemisphere, P=0.03) but both were equally elevated by 5 days; both were higher than tympanic temperature. Ischemic lesion temperature was not associated with NIHSS or 3-month functional outcome; in contrast, higher contralateral normal-appearing brain temperature was associated with worse NIHSS, infarct expansion and poor functional outcome, similar to associations for tympanic temperature. We conclude that brain temperature is higher than body temperature; that elevated temperature in ischemic brain reflects a local tissue response to ischemia, whereas pyrexia reflects the systemic response to stroke, occurs later, and is associated with adverse outcomes. PMID:23571281

  6. Perception of Recurrent Stroke Risk among Black, White and Hispanic Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Survivors: The SWIFT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Carman, Heather; Moran, Megan; Doyle, Margaret; Paik, Myunghee C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Risk modification through behavior change is critical for primary and secondary stroke prevention. Theories of health behavior identify perceived risk as an important component to facilitate behavior change; however, little is known about perceived risk of vascular events among stroke survivors. Methods The SWIFT (Stroke Warning Information and Faster Treatment) study includes a prospective population-based ethnically diverse cohort of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors. We investigate the baseline relationship between demographics, health beliefs, and knowledge on risk perception. Regression models examined predictors of inaccurate perception. Results Only 20% accurately estimated risk, 10% of the participants underestimated risk, and 70% of the 817 study participants significantly overestimated their risk for a recurrent stroke. The mean perceived likelihood of recurrent ischemic stroke in the next 10 years was 51 ± 7%. We found no significant differences by race-ethnicity with regard to accurate estimation of risk. Inaccurate estimation of risk was associated with attitudes and beliefs [worry (p risk factors. Conclusion This paper provides a unique perspective on how factors such as belief systems influence risk perception in a diverse population at high stroke risk. There is a need for future research on how risk perception can inform primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21894045

  7. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  8. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Ghent Univ.; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van; Otte, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  9. Neurological complications of infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sonia A.A.; Yaqub, Basim A.; Al-Deeb, Saleh M.

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed the files of 80 successive patients with native and prosthetic valve endocarditis admitted to Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital. Neurolological complications (NC) occurred in 28 (35%) patients. The valves involved were mitral in 12 (43%), aortic in eight (29%), combined mitral and aortic lesions in six (21%) and others in two (7%). The common causative organisms were Streptococci in 12 (43%), Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermides, both occurring in four (14%). Compared to the 52 infective endocarditis patients with no neurological complications (NNC), the NC occurred more frequently in male patients, those with aortic valve lesion, those with atrial fibrillation, those with delayed therapy and those with causative organisms being Streptococci or Staphylococci. Eleven patients died (39%), 12 (43%) recovered with motor sequelae, six (21%) had seizure disorder and five (18%) had full recovery. The frequency of neurological complications and mortality is comparable to those reported in the literature: however, the frequency was higher in our patients. (author)

  10. Combined lysis of thrombus with ultrasound and systemic tissue plasminogen activator for emergent revascularization in acute ischemic stroke (CLOTBUST-ER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellinger, Peter D; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barreto, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    events. CONCLUSIONS: Since intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen-activator remains the only medical therapy to reverse ischemic stroke applicable in the emergency department, our trial will determine if the additional use of transcranial ultrasound improves functional outcomes in patients...

  11. Disease mongering in neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kochen, Sara Silvia; Córdoba, Marta

    2017-01-01

    “Diseases mongering”, than a simple definition would be enforced "to promote or sell disease". The main and common characteristhics of all these "diseases" is that they are amenable to treatment with drugs. So, the pharmaceutical industry redefining the concept of disease, the normal and pathological. In Neurology exploits the deepest atavistic fears of suffering and death. We select some diseases, the choise was based on lack or weak evidence in definition of disease; or cost benefit of trea...

  12. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and cinema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Jiménez-Antona, Carmen

    2010-12-16

    Cinema has been defined in many different ways, but most of them agree that it should be considered both a technique and an art. Although films often depict fantasy stories, in many cases they also reflect day-to-day realities. In its earliest days cinema was already attracted to the world of health and sickness, and frequently addressed topics like medical practice, how patients lived with their illnesses, bioethical issues, the relationship between physician and patient or research. To review the presence of neurological pathologies in the cinema with a view to identifying the main neurological disorders that have been portrayed in films. Likewise it also intends to describe the medical praxis that is employed, the relationship between physician and patient, how the experiences of the patient and the family are represented, the adaptation to social and occupational situations, and the intervention of other health care professionals related with neurological patients. Some of the most significant films that have addressed these topics were reviewed and it was seen that in some of them the illness is dealt with in a very true-to-life manner, whereas others tend to include a greater number of inaccuracies and a larger degree of fiction. Cinema has helped to shape certain ways of thinking about the health care professionals who work with neurological patients, the importance of support from the family and the social role, among other things. This confirms that resorting to cinematographic productions is a fruitful tool for stimulating a critical interest in the past and present of medical practice.

  13. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE) is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for ...

  14. Trends in risk of recurrence after the first ischemic stroke in adults younger than 55 years of age in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Kok Wai; Björck, Lena; Ståhl, Christina H; Nielsen, Susanne; Sandström, Tatiana Z; Jern, Christina; Torén, Kjell; Rosengren, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on stroke recurrence in younger adults often contain small sample size which makes it difficult to study trends in stroke recurrence over a long period of time. The aim of the present study was to investigate temporal trends in the risk of recurrence in younger patients with a first ischemic stroke. All men and women aged 18-54 years who had survived at least 28 days after a first ischemic stroke from 1987 to 2006 were identified in the Swedish Inpatient Register. The patients were stratified into four 5-year periods according to their admission period and were followed up for a total of four years after the index event with regard to recurrent ischemic stroke. A Cox regression model was used to analyze the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke. Of the 17,149 ischemic stroke patients who were identified, 2432 (14.2%) had a recurrent ischemic stroke event within four years. From the first to the last periods (1987-1991 versus 2002-2006), the four-year risk of recurrent ischemic stroke decreased by 55% (hazard ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.53) in men and 59% (hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.50) in women. The cumulative four-year risk was 11.8% (95% CI 10.55-13.25) in men and 9.8% (95% CI 8.40-11.46) in women during the last five-year period (2002-2006). The risk of recurrence among younger ischemic stroke patients has decreased over the past 20 years. Despite these improvements, younger patients are still at a high risk for recurrent ischemic stroke. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  15. How does number of risk factors affect prognosis in young patients with ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, Jukka; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kaste, Markku; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2012-02-01

    We aimed to explore clinical features of young patients with ischemic stroke with no traditional vascular risk factors and to assess the impact of risk factor counts on outcomes. We included 990 patients aged 15 to 49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke followed for a mean of 9.0 ± 3.8 years (survivors). Risk factors were categorized as well-documented and less well-documented. Outcome measures were unfavorable functional outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale 2-6); recurrent ischemic stroke; myocardial infarction or other arterial noncerebrovascular event; and death from any cause. Compared with those with at least 1 well-documented risk factor, the 127 (12.8%) patients without risk factors were younger (median age, 37 versus 44 years; Pischemic strokes (4.7% versus 13.6%; log rank P=0.014), noncerebrovascular arterial events (0% versus 6.1%; P=0.008), and lower long-term mortality (3.4% versus 14.3%; P=0.003) than did those with at least 1 risk factor. Adjusted for demographics and stroke etiology, the number of well-documented risk factors was associated with higher risk for noncerebrovascular events. Increasing count of less well-documented risk factors was, in turn, independently associated with higher long-term mortality. In young adults with first-ever ischemic stroke, risk factor counts added independent prognostic information regarding noncerebrovascular events and mortality.

  16. History of pediatric neurology in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinborn, Barbara; Józwiak, Sergiusz

    2010-02-01

    This review presents the past and the present of pediatric neurology in Poland. Pediatric neurology has its roots in Polish general neurology represented by many outstanding scientists. The founder of Polish school of neurology at the end of 19th century was Edward Flatau, known as the author of Flatau's law. The most famous Polish neurologist was Joseph Babiński, recognized for the first description of pathological plantar reflex. First Polish publication related to child neurology was Brudziński's report on a new meningeal symptom (the flexion of lower limbs during passive neck flexion with pain in neck). Contemporary child neurology in Poland was created by Professor Zofia Majewska after the Second World War. Now 10 academic centers of child neurology exist in Poland fulfilling educational, scientific, and therapeutic roles. Polish Society of Child Neurology was established in 1991 and now there are about 580 members, including 300 child neurologists.

  17. African Journal of Neurological Sciences: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Neurological Sciences: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  19. Nicotinamide mononucleotide inhibits post-ischemic NAD(+) degradation and dramatically ameliorates brain damage following global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji H; Long, Aaron; Owens, Katrina; Kristian, Tibor

    2016-11-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential cofactor for multiple cellular metabolic reactions and has a central role in energy production. Brain ischemia depletes NAD(+) pools leading to bioenergetics failure and cell death. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) is utilized by the NAD(+) salvage pathway enzyme, nicotinamide adenylyltransferase (Nmnat) to generate NAD(+). Therefore, we examined whether NMN could protect against ischemic brain damage. Mice were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia and treated with NMN or vehicle at the start of reperfusion or 30min after the ischemic insult. At 2, 4, and 24h of recovery, the proteins poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), hippocampal NAD(+) levels, and expression levels of NAD(+) salvage pathway enzymes were determined. Furthermore, animal's neurologic outcome and hippocampal CA1 neuronal death was assessed after six days of reperfusion. NMN (62.5mg/kg) dramatically ameliorated the hippocampal CA1 injury and significantly improved the neurological outcome. Additionally, the post-ischemic NMN treatment prevented the increase in PAR formation and NAD(+) catabolism. Since the NMN administration did not affect animal's temperature, blood gases or regional cerebral blood flow during recovery, the protective effect was not a result of altered reperfusion conditions. These data suggest that administration of NMN at a proper dosage has a strong protective effect against ischemic brain injury. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  1. Interobserver variability of the neurological optimality score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monincx, W. M.; Smolders-de Haas, H.; Bonsel, G. J.; Zondervan, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the interobserver reliability of the neurological optimality score. The neurological optimality score of 21 full term healthy, neurologically normal newborn infants was determined by two well trained observers. The interclass correlation coefficient was 0.31. Kappa for optimality (score of

  2. Paediatric Neurological Conditions Seen at the Physiotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric neurological conditions constitute a major cause of disability in childhood. However there seems to be an apparent dearth of published works on the patterns of neurological conditions seen in Nigerian physiotherapy clinics of rural locations. This study aimed at describing the spectrum of neurological conditions ...

  3. African Journal of Neurological Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences (AJNS) is owned and controlled by the Pan African Association of Neurological Sciences (PAANS). The AJNS's aim is to publish scientific papers of any aspects of Neurological Sciences. AJNS is published quarterly. Articles submitted exclusively to the AJNS are accepted if neither ...

  4. Prothrombin G20210A mutation, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and generalized vitiligo-related ischemic stroke in a young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoglu, Asuman Orhan; Kocatürk, Idris; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2010-06-01

    Cerebral infarction is a rare neurological situation in young adults, usually caused by genetic factors. We report here a case of multiple cerebral infarctions with prothrombin G20210A mutation, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and generalized vitiligo as a first case report. A 17-year-old female adolescent was admitted to our clinic due to a change in mental status. The patient's neurological examination revealed loss of consciousness and the presence of tetraparesia. Generalized vitiligo was also detected. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted investigations (DWIs) showed acute ischemic stroke in the bilateral cerebellum, pons and left occipital regions. Heterozygote prothrombin G20210A mutation was found upon genetic examination. She had never had a menstrual cycle. Laboratory data revealed that the level of luteinizing hormone (LH) was 0.5 mIU/mL (1.1-11.6) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was 1.7 mIU/mL (2.8-11.3). Therefore, she was diagnosed with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The causes of ischemic stroke are heterozygote prothrombin G20210A mutation, generalized vitiligo, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. After treatment, the patient's neurological deficit partially improved and she was discharged. In order to identify the etiology of ischemic stroke, we suggest physicians take into account heterozygote prothrombin G20210A mutation and endocrine abnormalities, especially hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and generalized vitiligo.

  5. Fetal stress and programming of hypoxic/ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain: mechanisms and possible interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Gonzalez, Pablo; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-08-01

    Growing evidence of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies has clearly shown a close link between adverse in utero environment and the increased risk of neurological, psychological and psychiatric disorders in later life. Fetal stresses, such as hypoxia, malnutrition, and fetal exposure to nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and glucocorticoids may directly or indirectly act at cellular and molecular levels to alter the brain development and result in programming of heightened brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and the development of neurological diseases in the postnatal life. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. However, glucocorticoids may play a crucial role in epigenetic programming of neurological disorders of fetal origins. This review summarizes the recent studies about the effects of fetal stress on the abnormal brain development, focusing on the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms and highlighting the central effects of glucocorticoids on programming of hypoxic-ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain, which may enhance the understanding of brain pathophysiology resulting from fetal stress and help explore potential targets of timely diagnosis, prevention and intervention in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and other brain disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Smartphone electrographic monitoring for atrial fibrillation in acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hans T; Chen, Ziyuan; Swift, Corey; Churilov, Leonid; Guo, Ruibing; Liu, Xinfeng; Jannes, Jim; Mok, Vincent; Freedman, Ben; Davis, Stephen M; Yan, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    Rationale Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is a common and preventable cause of devastating strokes. However, currently available monitoring methods, including Holter monitoring, cardiac telemetry and event loop recorders, have drawbacks that restrict their application in the general stroke population. AliveCor™ heart monitor, a novel device that embeds miniaturized electrocardiography (ECG) in a smartphone case coupled with an application to record and diagnose the ECG, has recently been shown to provide an accurate and sensitive single lead ECG diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. This device could be used by nurses to record a 30-s ECG instead of manual pulse taking and automatically provide a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. Aims To compare the proportion of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation detected by AliveCor™ ECG monitoring with current standard practice. Sample size 296 Patients. Design Consecutive ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack patients presenting to participating stroke units without known atrial fibrillation will undergo intermittent AliveCor™ ECG monitoring administered by nursing staff at the same frequency as the vital observations of pulse and blood pressure until discharge, in addition to the standard testing paradigm of each participating stroke unit to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Study outcome Proportion of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation detected by AliveCor™ ECG monitoring compared to 12-lead ECG, 24-h Holter monitoring and cardiac telemetry. Discussion Use of AliveCor™ heart monitor as part of routine stroke unit nursing observation has the potential to be an inexpensive non-invasive method to increase paroxysmal atrial fibrillation detection, leading to improvement in stroke secondary prevention.

  7. Functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Hao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To discuss the method of functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb and propose a classification protocol for ischemic contracture in the lower limb based on its severity and prognosis. Methods: A total of 42 patients with ischemic contracture in the lower limb were included in this study. According to different types of disturbance and degrees of severity, surgical reconstructions consisting of nerve decompression, tendon lengthening or transfer, intrinsic foot muscle release and sural-tibial nerve anastomosis were performed in every patient. Results: Postoperatively, all patients were able to walk on flat ground. Drop foot was corrected in 10 patients, and 5 patients still felt some difficulty during stair activity. Split Achilles tendon transfer to flexor hallucis longus tendon was performed in 12 patients, and their walking stability was improved. Seven patients accepted ipsilateral suraltibial nerve anastomosis, and sensitivity recovery reached to S2 in 2 patients and S3 in 5 patients. Conclusions: Ischemic contracture in the lower limb is a devastating complication after lower limb trauma. The prevention of contracture is much more important than the treatment of an established contracture. Split Achilles tendon transfer to flexor hallucis longus tendon and sural-tibial nerve anastomosis, which was initially implemented by us, could improve the functional recovery of ischemic contracture in lower limbs, and thus provides a new alternative for functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb. Key words: Ischemic contracture; Classification; Recovery of function

  8. Association of Vegetable Nitrate Intake With Carotid Atherosclerosis and Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease in Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Blekkenhorst, Lauren C; Prince, Richard L; Ivey, Kerry L; Lewis, Joshua R; Devine, Amanda; Woodman, Richard J; Lundberg, Jon O; Croft, Kevin D; Thompson, Peter L; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2017-07-01

    A short-term increase in dietary nitrate (NO 3 - ) improves markers of vascular health via formation of nitric oxide and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. Whether this translates into long-term vascular disease risk reduction has yet to be examined. We investigated the association of vegetable-derived nitrate intake with common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT), plaque severity, and ischemic cerebrovascular disease events in elderly women (n=1226). Vegetable nitrate intake, lifestyle factors, and cardiovascular disease risk factors were determined at baseline (1998). CCA-IMT and plaque severity were measured using B-mode carotid ultrasound (2001). Complete ischemic cerebrovascular disease hospitalizations or deaths (events) over 14.5 years (15 032 person-years of follow-up) were obtained from the West Australian Data Linkage System. Higher vegetable nitrate intake was associated with a lower maximum CCA-IMT (B=-0.015, P =0.002) and lower mean CCA-IMT (B=-0.012, P =0.006). This relationship remained significant after adjustment for lifestyle and cardiovascular risk factors ( P ≤0.01). Vegetable nitrate intake was not a predictor of plaque severity. In total 186 (15%) women experienced an ischemic cerebrovascular disease event. For every 1 SD (29 mg/d) higher intake of vegetable nitrate, there was an associated 17% lower risk of 14.5-year ischemic cerebrovascular disease events in both unadjusted and fully adjusted models ( P =0.02). Independent of other risk factors, higher vegetable nitrate was associated with a lower CCA-IMT and a lower risk of an ischemic cerebrovascular disease event. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Current status and outlook of endovascular therapy for cerebral ischemic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Minghua; Zhao Jungong

    2005-01-01

    Improvement of diagnostic technology and increasing advent of new materials for intervention has created a new area for endovascular therapy of cerebral ischemic diseases. Current research findings have shown that endovascular thrombolysis in acute stage of cerebral infarction can accelerate the rate of re-canalization of occluded arteries and greatly decrease the morbidity and mortality of cerebral ischemic vascular diseases. Stenting of arterial stenosis can the improve of blood supply distal to the lesion, prevent recurrent cerebral ischemic stroke. As a result, endovascular thrombolysis for acute cerebral infarction and stenting for intracranial and carotid arterial stenosis are booming both at home and abroad. Proper selection of patients of acute cerebral infarction for endovascular thrombolysis with less complications could be achieved through CT perfusion, MR perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and diffusion-weighted image (DWI), non-invasive vascular imaging technology including CEMRA and CTA for confirming and demonstrating the sites and causes of cerebral ischemia, and furthermore for evaluating the survival ability and etc. The research team administered albumin and magnesium sulfate as neurological protection drug to treat rat infarction model within 6 hours of onset resulting with the same effect of decreasing the damage of ischemic cerebral tissue and without hemorrhagic complication. It is certain that hemorrhagic complication in thrombolysis is a result of multiple factors with no single drug being able to solve the problem. It is predictable that, based on semi-quantitative or quantitative parameters of CT or MRI in conjunction with PWI/DWI mismatch model rather than simply on the onset time of infarction for proper selection of patients of cerebral infarction, mechanic thrombus-disruption and/or intra-arterial thrombolysis together with intervention of neurological protection drug will be the trend for treating acute cerebral infarction in the future

  10. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph R E G Geuskens

    Full Text Available CT perfusion (CTP is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up.This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0. Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBV<2.0 ml/100g and infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT regions. False discovery ratio (FDR, defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests.Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml; median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml. Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%. Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289% and 342% (IQR:249%-432% for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43-1.79 ml/100g (P<0.01 and 1.38 (IQR:1.15-1.49 ml/100g (P<0.01 for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly.For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core is misclassified. CTP parameters significantly

  11. Transient ischemic attack: diagnostic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messé, Steven R; Jauch, Edward C

    2008-08-01

    A transient ischemic attack portends significant risk of a stroke. Consequently, the diagnostic evaluation in the emergency department is focused on identifying high-risk causes so that preventive strategies can be implemented. The evaluation consists of a facilitated evaluation of the patient's metabolic, cardiac, and neurovascular systems. At a minimum, the following tests are recommended: fingerstick glucose level, electrolyte levels, CBC count, urinalysis, and coagulation studies; noncontrast computed tomography (CT) of the head; electrocardiography; and continuous telemetry monitoring. Vascular imaging studies, such as carotid ultrasonography, CT angiography, or magnetic resonance angiography, should be performed on an urgent basis and prioritized according to the patient's risk stratification for disease. Consideration should be given for echocardiography if no large vessel abnormality is identified.

  12. Neurological deficits in the life and works of Frida Kahlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrys, Valmantas

    2006-01-01

    World-famous Mexican painter Frida Kahlo is an impressive example of an artist whose entire life and creativity were extremely influenced by chronic, severe illness. Many of her best-known works depict her physical and mental suffering. She was one of those very uncommon artists who dared to show their nude, sick body. This article describes biographical events and works of Frida Kahlo that are closely related to neurology: congenital anomaly (spina bifida), poliomyelitis, spine injury, neuropathic pain.

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Demerdash, Salah [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Khorshid, Hazem, E-mail: hazemkhorshid@yahoo.com [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A. [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Salem, Alaa M. [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    Background: Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. Aim: We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. Methods: The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient’s symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3 months after the end of the study. Results: The mean age was 56.8 ± 3.1 years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3 months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3 ± 2.9 vs. 31.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001), and mean blood pressure (93.4 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 10.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). There was also a favorable effect on lipid profile and a significant improvement of the functional capacity in terms of NYHA functional class (2.1 ± 0.62 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). Despite that wall motion score index did not significantly change after CRP, there was a strong trend toward a better ejection fraction (53.7 ± 7.8 vs. 54.5 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.06) and significant improvement of Canadian cardiovascular class (1.42 ± 0.6 vs. 1.95 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) post CRP. Importantly, the difference between the SPECT

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Demerdash, Salah; Khorshid, Hazem; Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A.; Salem, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. Aim: We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. Methods: The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient’s symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3 months after the end of the study. Results: The mean age was 56.8 ± 3.1 years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3 months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3 ± 2.9 vs. 31.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001), and mean blood pressure (93.4 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 10.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). There was also a favorable effect on lipid profile and a significant improvement of the functional capacity in terms of NYHA functional class (2.1 ± 0.62 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). Despite that wall motion score index did not significantly change after CRP, there was a strong trend toward a better ejection fraction (53.7 ± 7.8 vs. 54.5 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.06) and significant improvement of Canadian cardiovascular class (1.42 ± 0.6 vs. 1.95 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) post CRP. Importantly, the difference between the SPECT

  15. Time-of-Day Dependent Neuronal Injury After Ischemic Stroke: Implication of Circadian Clock Transcriptional Factor Bmal1 and Survival Kinase AKT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker, Mustafa Caglar; Caglayan, Berrak; Yalcin, Esra; Caglayan, Ahmet Burak; Turkseven, Seyma; Gurel, Busra; Kelestemur, Taha; Sertel, Elif; Sahin, Zafer; Kutlu, Selim; Kilic, Ulkan; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2018-03-01

    Occurrence of stroke cases displays a time-of-day variation in human. However, the mechanism linking circadian rhythm to the internal response mechanisms against pathophysiological events after ischemic stroke remained largely unknown. To this end, temporal changes in the susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury were investigated in mice in which the ischemic stroke induced at four different Zeitgeber time points with 6-h intervals (ZT0, ZT6, ZT12, and ZT18). Besides infarct volume and brain swelling, neuronal survival, apoptosis, ischemia, and circadian rhythm related proteins were examined using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, planar surface immune assay, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry tools. Here, we present evidence that midnight (ZT18; 24:00) I/R injury in mice resulted in significantly improved infarct volume, brain swelling, neurological deficit score, neuronal survival, and decreased apoptotic cell death compared with ischemia induced at other time points, which were associated with increased expressions of circadian proteins Bmal1, PerI, and Clock proteins and survival kinases AKT and Erk-1/2. Moreover, ribosomal protein S6, mTOR, and Bad were also significantly increased, while the levels of PRAS40, negative regulator of AKT and mTOR, and phosphorylated p53 were decreased at this time point compared to ZT0 (06:00). Furthermore, detailed proteomic analysis revealed significantly decreased CSKP, HBB-1/2, and HBA levels, while increased GNAZ, NEGR1, IMPCT, and PDE1B at midnight as compared with early morning. Our results indicate that nighttime I/R injury results in less severe neuronal damage, with increased neuronal survival, increased levels of survival kinases and circadian clock proteins, and also alters the circadian-related proteins.

  16. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults: Profile of SARAH Hospital Brasília From 2008 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Vinícius V A; Freitas, Denise D S; Ruiz, Miguel C M; Cavalcanti, Eduardo B U; Marinho, Patricia B C; Freitas, Maria C D N B; Oliveira, Eleonora M J D

    2017-03-01

    The societal and economic impact of ischemic stroke in young adults is considerable. The etiological investigation of ischemic stroke in this population is also challenging. To describe the characteristics of young patients with ischemic stroke admitted to a neurological rehabilitation program in Brazil. This transversal retrospective study analyzed data from the electronic health records of 134 patients aged 18 to 45 years with ischemic stroke admitted from 2008 to 2012. The average patient age at the time of ictus was 33 years; 56% of the subjects were female, and 29.3% had undetermined etiologies of stroke, on the basis of both TOAST and SSS TOAST criteria. Further, 48.7% of the subjects had a known vascular risk factor, which was arterial hypertension in most cases. The results of thrombophilia testing were positive in 13.7% of patients, but in only 3.7% of patients, thrombophilia was determined to be the causal mechanism of the stroke. There was a significant association between thrombophilia and patent foramen ovale, but no significant association was found between thrombophilia and arterial dissection. Among the patients with artery dissections, 46% had a history of trauma, which was statistically significant. Etiological diagnosis of stroke in the young is challenging for clinicians. Hence, a more effective classification scheme, better investigative mechanisms, and correct determination of causal associations in ischemic stroke are needed. Thrombophilia screening should be performed in the presence of relevant clinical signs and/or family history.

  17. Validation of Diagnoses of Transient Ischemic Attack in the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) TIA-Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Fredrik; Ström, Jakob O; Norrving, Bo; Petersson, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke; RS) established a module for transient ischemic attacks (RS-TIA). We report a diagnostic validation study of patients included in RS-TIA. During the first year, 7,825 patients were registered at 59 out of 74 Swedish hospitals. A time-based TIA definition was applied. A sample of 180 patients (30 patients each from 6 hospitals), with a similar distribution of age and sex as in RS-TIA, was prepared. Two independent observers assessed medical records for quality of documentation and assigned a diagnosis of likely, possible, unlikely TIA or ischemic stroke, according to prespecified criteria. The 2 observers agreed in 77% of cases that the event was a likely or possible TIA, in 3% that the event was an ischemic stroke, and in 2% that the event was an unlikely TIA. The observers disagreed in 8% of patients on TIA vs. ischemic stroke, and in 11% on a vascular vs. non-vascular cause. Quality of documentation was fair. There was interobserver agreement on diagnosis of TIA in the majority of patients included in RS-TIA. Diagnostic accuracy may be further improved by more systematic documentation of symptoms and signs. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Ischemic Stroke Following Multiple Traumas in a Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Jung Lin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an uncommon disorder in children but an increasingly recognized cause of disability. Acute stroke may be attributable to trauma, but this topic is seldom discussed. In limited reports, most ischemic strokes following trauma were detected after a considerable delay. Early recognition of stroke following trauma might reduce secondary neurologic complications. We report a case of posterior cerebral artery area infarct following multiple traumas in a child. A comprehensive etiologic survey was undertaken and discussed. Although the definite pathogenesis is still unclear, adequate, individualized, and uncomplicated management can significantly affect the outcome.

  19. Brain metabolism in patients with freezing of gait after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Na Young; An, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong Wook

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Movement disorders are 1 of the long-term neurological complications that can occur after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI). However, freezing of gait (FOG) after HIBI is rare. The aim of this study was to examine the brain metabolism of patients with FOG after HIBI using F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET). We consecutively enrolled 11 patients with FOG after HIBI. The patients’ overall brain metabolism was measured by F-18 FDG PET, and we co...

  20. Prognostic Factors in Ischemic Arterial Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2001-01-01

    The predictive value of presenting symptoms, MRI and CT findings, and etiology in the outcome of ischemic arterial childhood stroke was determined in a consecutive series of 31 patients followed at the University Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

  1. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison with the NIHSS and the GCS. Methods: .... All patients received a CT scan of the brain on admission. Diagnostic ... adjusted for age, sex, Charlson Index and Oxfordshire. 248.

  2. Ischemic Stroke: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Thrombolytic therapy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Ischemic Stroke updates ... cardiogenic embolism Stroke - slideshow Thrombolytic therapy Related Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Stroke Stroke Rehabilitation National Institutes of ...

  3. Paraneoplastic Ischemic Stroke: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Sumer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Paraneoplastic etiology is not frequent among cerebrovascular disorders. This rare disorder is interesting with different mechanisms, clinical manifestations and treatment options. Diagnosis may be overlooked for its rarity. We present a paraneoplastic ischemic stroke patient with its clinical and imaging characteristics for recalling this rare disease. CASE: A sixty years old woman with a history of ovarian and colon cancer and liver metastasis admitted with acute left sided hemiplegia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple ischemic lesions at the same age. Laboratory findings were compatible with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. She was anticoagulated but the clinical findings were not changed. She died one month after her discharge from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Paraneoplastic ischemic stroke is rare and it should be recognized by the clinician to differentiate from other ischemic strokes by its different mechanisms, imaging characteristics and treatment modalities. Prognosis depends on the characteristics of the primary tumor

  4. Neurological aspects of lead intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, H

    1980-05-08

    This study gives a survey over the medical and scientific literature on lead intoxications, which were published until 1979. Neurologic aspects are of particular interest. At present dramatic cases of lead intoxications occur only rarely. However, there are numerous studies about cases of chronical, partly subclinical intoxications. This chronical type of lead intoxication can become manifest clinically as relatively vague symptoms, for example vertigos, insomnia, headaches and weakness. Contrary to this, serious encephalopathies, even with fatal outcome, and polyneuropathies with typical paresis of the radial nerve are preferably observed in acute lead intoxications. Besides the numerous sources of intoxication, also the different opinions found in literature are discussed, concerning the effects of lead on the human body. The fact that there are differing opinions about the limiting value of the blood-lead level at which intoxication symptoms have to be expected, becomes apparent when the determined blood-lead level values are compared and evaluated. Besides the description of general intoxication effects, the discussion of the neurologic aspects found in literature - not only those concerning the central, but also the peripheral system - are preferably concerned. Reports about neuropsychical alterations due to lead exposure, which are mainly found in children, supplement the numerous descriptions of the macroscopic and microscopic alterations of the nervous system provoked by lead. Finally the therapeutic and prophylactic measures given in the literature are discussed.

  5. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  6. Type 2 diabetes is not a risk factor for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion. The Funagata study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Tamotsu; Daimon, Makoto; Eguchi, Hideyuki; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kawanami, Toru; Kurita, Keiji; Tominaga, Makoto; Kato, Takeo [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify whether type 2 diabetes (DM) is a risk factor for asymptomatic (silent) ischemic brain lesion, which is controversial at present. The subjects (n=187), who showed normal results on both neurological and neuropsychological examinations, underwent a 75-g OGTT and were examined by brain MRI on T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) images. Their brain MRIs were evaluated quantitatively with the ischemia rating scale defined here. The subjects were grouped based on their glucose tolerance: normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n=48), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n=62), and DM (n=65). The subjects with DM were further divided based on their duration of illness: 20 with short duration (short DM: 1.3{+-}0.8 years) and 45 with long duration (long DM; 8.9{+-}5.4 years). Ages were matched among the groups. The percentages of individuals with asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion were 81% in NGT, 74% in IGT, 65% in short DM, and 78% in long DM. No significant difference was observed among the groups in terms of the percentage. Namely, even in individuals with a long history of DM without clinical stroke, the prevalence of asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion was not different from that of the other groups. Multiple regression and multiple logistic regression analyses showed that age and hypertension were significant independent risk factors for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion, whereas hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and glucose intolerance, including IGT, short DM and long DM, were not. DM is not a risk factor for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion. (author)

  7. Type 2 diabetes is not a risk factor for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion. The Funagata study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Tamotsu; Daimon, Makoto; Eguchi, Hideyuki; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kawanami, Toru; Kurita, Keiji; Tominaga, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify whether type 2 diabetes (DM) is a risk factor for asymptomatic (silent) ischemic brain lesion, which is controversial at present. The subjects (n=187), who showed normal results on both neurological and neuropsychological examinations, underwent a 75-g OGTT and were examined by brain MRI on T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) images. Their brain MRIs were evaluated quantitatively with the ischemia rating scale defined here. The subjects were grouped based on their glucose tolerance: normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n=48), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n=62), and DM (n=65). The subjects with DM were further divided based on their duration of illness: 20 with short duration (short DM: 1.3±0.8 years) and 45 with long duration (long DM; 8.9±5.4 years). Ages were matched among the groups. The percentages of individuals with asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion were 81% in NGT, 74% in IGT, 65% in short DM, and 78% in long DM. No significant difference was observed among the groups in terms of the percentage. Namely, even in individuals with a long history of DM without clinical stroke, the prevalence of asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion was not different from that of the other groups. Multiple regression and multiple logistic regression analyses showed that age and hypertension were significant independent risk factors for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion, whereas hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and glucose intolerance, including IGT, short DM and long DM, were not. DM is not a risk factor for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion. (author)

  8. Role of neuroinflammation in ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Liu; Meng-Xian Pan; Jun-Chun Tang; Ya Zhang; Hua-Bao Liao; Yang Zhuang; Dan Zhao; Qi Wan

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke causes the depletion of energy and induce excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation in the brain that results from thrombotic blockage. Neuroinflammation occurs initially depending on activated resident microglia that has the same function as the macrophage. Activated microglia participates in the neuroinflammatory process by phagocytosing the injured brain cells and producing the pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. In this review, the authors present an overview of the role of microglia in mediating neuroinflammation in ischemic stroke.

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia brings favorable neurologic outcomes in children with near drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chun; Chu, Chia-Hsiang; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lin, Jun-Song; Chen, Jui-Hsia; Chang, Yu-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    A 1-year-10-month-old boy was admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit due to near drowning with pulmonary edema. A conventional ventilator with 100% oxygen supplementation was used initially, but was shifted to high frequency oscillatory ventilation as his oxygen saturation was around 84-88%. Therapeutic hypothermia was applied due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with severe acidosis. His respiratory condition improved and he was extubated successfully on the 6 th hospital day. The patient had no obvious neurological defects and he was discharged in a stable condition after 17 days of hospitalization. Our case report demonstrates the advantages of therapeutic hypothermia on survival and neurological outcomes in treating pediatric near drowning patients.

  10. CT and MR findings of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tae [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    The onset of pregnancy may predispose women to a variety of neurological diseases due to changes in their hemodynamics, hormonal effects, and complications associated with childbirth. The spectrum of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth include hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhaging, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) (secondary to eclampsia), Wernicke encephalopathy, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, Sheehan's syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (secondary to pulmonary amniotic fluid embolism), multifocal infarctions, and extra-potine myelinolysis. The recognition of the various imaging findings of these diseases, along with the clinical presentations should aid in their early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The purpose of this pictorial assay is to describe the characteristic CT and MR findings of these diseases with a literature review to explain the mechanisms and clinical symptoms.

  11. CT and MR findings of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tae

    2008-01-01

    The onset of pregnancy may predispose women to a variety of neurological diseases due to changes in their hemodynamics, hormonal effects, and complications associated with childbirth. The spectrum of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth include hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhaging, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) (secondary to eclampsia), Wernicke encephalopathy, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, Sheehan's syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (secondary to pulmonary amniotic fluid embolism), multifocal infarctions, and extra-potine myelinolysis. The recognition of the various imaging findings of these diseases, along with the clinical presentations should aid in their early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The purpose of this pictorial assay is to describe the characteristic CT and MR findings of these diseases with a literature review to explain the mechanisms and clinical symptoms

  12. Neurological Disorders in Medical Use of Cannabis: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimini, Renata; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Medical cannabis is increasingly used as a treatment or adjunct treatment with different levels of efficacy in several neurological disorders or related symptoms (such as multiple sclerosis, autism, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease, Tourette's syndrome, Huntington's disease, neuropathic pain, epilepsy, headache), as well as in other medical conditions (e.g. nausea and vomiting, glaucoma, appetite stimulation, cancer, inflammatory conditions, asthma). Nevertheless, a number of neurological adverse effects from use of medical cannabis on the short- and on the longterm have been reported, in addition to other adverse health events. It has been noticed that the use of medical cannabis can lead to a paradoxical effects depending on the amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) -like cannabinoids the preparation contain. Accordingly, some neurological disorders or symptoms (e.g. multiple sclerosis, seizures, epilepsy, headache) may be caused or exacerbated by the same treatment supposed to cure them. The current review presents an update of the neurological adverse effects resulting from the use of cannabis for medical purposes, highlighting the need to weigh the benefits and risks, when using cannabinoidbased treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Proton MRS in neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonavita, S.; Di Salle, F.; Tedeschi, G

    1999-05-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) permits the acquisition of the signal arising from several brain metabolites. At long echo-time (TE) {sup 1}H MRS can detect N-acetyl-aspartate containing compounds, choline containing compounds, creatine+phosphocreatine and lactate. At short TE, lipids, tryglicerides, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, GABA, scyllo-inositol, glucose, myo-inositol, carnosine and histydine are visible. {sup 1}H MRS can be performed with single-voxel, multivoxel, single slice and multislice techniques. With single voxel {sup 1}H MRS it is possible to measure metabolites relaxation time, which allows the measurement of metabolite concentrations. This technique can be useful in the study of focal lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) such as epilepsy (pre-surgical identification of epileptic focus), brain tumors (evaluation of recurrence and radiation necrosis), stroke, multiple sclerosis, etc. Single slice and multislice {sup 1}H MRS imaging ({sup 1}H MRSI) can be performed only at long TE and permits the mapping of the brain metabolites distribution which makes them particularly useful in studying diffuse diseases and heterogeneous lesions of the CNS. {sup 1}H MRS can also be useful in the evaluation of 'ischemic penumbra' of stroke; developmental (myelin and neuronal dysgenesis); head trauma (evaluation of cerebral damage not visible with MRI); degenerative disorders (identification of microscopic pathology not visible with MRI); and metabolic diseases (metabolic disturbances with specific metabolic patterns)

  14. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of transient ischemic attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Il; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Seung Ik; Yoon, Pyung Ho; Heo, Ji Hoe; Lee, Byung In

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the findings of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in patients with transient ischemic attacks (TIA). Between August 1996 and June 1999, 41 TIA patients (M:F =3D 28:13, mean age 57 (range, 27-75) years) with neurologic symptoms lasting less than 24 hours underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging. The time interval between the onset of symptoms and MR examination was less than one week in 29 patients, from one week to one month in eight, and undetermined in four. Conventional MR and DWI were compared in terms of location of infarction and lesion size (less than 1 cm, 1-3 cm, greater than 3 cm), and we also determined the anatomical vascular territory of acute stroke lesions and possible etiologic mechanisms. The findings of DWI were normal in 24/41 patients (58.5%), while 15 (36.6%) showed acute ischemic lesions. The other two showed old lacunar infarcts. All acute and old DWI lesions were revealed by conventional MR imaging. Among the 15 acute stroke patients, seven had small vessel lacunar disease. In three patients, the infarction was less than 1 cm in size. Six patients showed large vessel infarction in the territory of the MCA, PCA, and PICA; the size of this was less than 1 cm in three patients, 1-3 cm in two, and more than 3 cm in one. In two patients, embolic infarction of cardiac origin in the territory of the MCA and AICA was diagnosed. The possible mechanism of TIA is still undetermined, but acute lesions revealed by DWI in TIA patients tend, in any case, to be small and multiple. (author)

  15. Utility of pharmacologic provocative neurological testing before embolization of occipital lobe arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawk, Rabih G; Tummala, Ramachandra P; Memon, Muhammad Z; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson; Levy, Elad I

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular treatment is an established option for treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, embolization has been associated with postprocedural neurological complications. We sought to evaluate the usefulness of intra-arterial pharmacologic provocative (superselective Wada) testing before embolization of occipital lobe AVMs. We performed a retrospective review of cases of occipital AVMs that were embolized at our institution (Millard Fillmore Gates Hospital) while the patient was under conscious sedation. Visual field testing was performed before and after superselective Wada testing and again after embolization. After microcatheterization of the target feeding pedicle, amobarbital (or, occasionally, methohexital) was administered, followed immediately by neurological testing. If the provocative test results were negative, the evaluated feeder was embolized with a liquid agent. Complications were categorized as transient or permanent neurological deficit, visual field loss, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, and death. Thirteen patients with occipital AVMs underwent 39 Wada tests of 34 pedicles before embolization during 26 endovascular treatment sessions. Patients were treated under conscious sedation with local anesthesia. The mean age of these patients was 43.5 years (range 16-62 years); 6 were women. Testing induced a neurological deficit in six patients. A positive test result led us to abort embolization attempts in four pedicles. In the two remaining cases, advancement of the catheter tip distally within the feeding pedicle allowed us to proceed with embolization after initial test failure. Neither patient developed a visual field deficit after embolization. Despite passing the Wada test before embolization, one other patient had a visual deficit that was detected a few hours after the procedure; this deficit lessened but was permanent. No further ischemic complications and no hemorrhagic complications occurred. Pharmacologic

  16. Infectious and non-infectious neurologic complications in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; Palomo, Jesús; Fernández-Yáñez, Juan; Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Guinea, Jesús; Bouza, Emilio

    2010-05-01

    Neurologic complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in heart transplant (HT) recipients. New immunomodulating agents have improved survival rates, although some have been associated with a high rate of neurologic complications (infectious and non-infectious). We conducted this study to analyze the frequency of these complications, before and after the use of daclizumab induction therapy. We reviewed all neurologic complications in our HT cohort, comparing infectious with non-infectious complications over 2 periods of time in which different induction therapies were used (316 patients with OKT3 or antithymocyte globulin from 1988 to 2002, and 68 patients with daclizumab from 2003 to 2006). Neurologic complications were found in 75/384 patients (19.5%) with a total of 78 episodes. Non-infectious complications accounted for 68% of the 78 episodes of neurologic complications. A total of 51 patients and 53 episodes were detailed as follows: 25 episodes of stroke (25 of 78 total episodes, 32%; 19 ischemic, 6 hemorrhagic); 7 neuropathies; 6 seizures; 4 episodes of transient ischemic attack (TIA); 3 anoxic encephalopathy; 2 each brachial plexus palsy and metabolic encephalopathy; and 1 each myoclonia, central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, subdural hematoma, and Cotard syndrome. Mean time to presentation of stroke, TIA, and encephalopathy was 1 day (range, 1-19 d) posttransplant. Mortality rate among non-infectious complications was 12/53 (22.6%). Infectious complications accounted for 32% of the 78 total episodes. We found 25 episodes in 24 patients: 17 herpes zoster (median, 268 d after HT), 3 CNS aspergillosis (median, 90 d after HT), 1 CNS toxoplasmosis and tuberculosis (51 d after HT), 1 pneumococcal meningitis (402 d after HT), and 2 Listeria meningitis (median, 108 d after HT). The 3 patients with CNS aspergillosis died. The mortality rate among patients with infectious neurologic complications was 12% (42.8% if the CNS was involved). When we

  17. A lower baseline glomerular filtration rate predicts high mortality and newly cerebrovascular accidents in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Kai; Huang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Zhipeng; Ding, Jianping; Song, Haiqing

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is gradually recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and cardio-/cerebrovascular disease. This study aimed to examine the association of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and clinical outcomes at 3 months after the onset of ischemic stroke in a hospitalized Chinese population.Totally, 972 patients with acute ischemic stroke were enrolled into this study. Modified of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations were used to calculate eGFR and define CKD. The site and degree of the stenosis were examined. Patients were followed-up for 3 months. Endpoint events included all-cause death and newly ischemic events. The multivariate logistic model was used to determine the association between renal dysfunction and patients' outcomes.Of all patients, 130 patients (13.4%) had reduced eGFR (<60 mL/min/1.73 m), and 556 patients had a normal eGFR (≥90 mL/min/1.73 m). A total of 694 patients suffered from cerebral artery stenosis, in which 293 patients only had intracranial artery stenosis (ICAS), 110 only with extracranial carotid atherosclerotic stenosis (ECAS), and 301 with both ICAS and ECAS. The patients with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m had a higher proportion of death and newly ischemic events compared with those with a relatively normal eGFR. Multivariate analysis revealed that a baseline eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m increased the risk of mortality by 3.089-fold and newly ischemic events by 4.067-fold. In further analysis, a reduced eGFR was associated with increased rates of mortality and newly events both in ICAS patients and ECAS patients. However, only an increased risk of newly events was found as the degree of renal function deteriorated in ICAS patients (odds ratio = 8.169, 95% confidence interval = 2.445-14.127).A low baseline eGFR predicted a high mortality and newly ischemic events at 3 months in ischemic stroke patients. A low baseline eGFR was also a strong independent predictor for newly

  18. Spectroscopic photoacoustics for assessing ischemic kidney damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; He, Xiaolin; Yuen, Darren A.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2018-02-01

    Ischemic reperfusion injuries (IRIs) are caused by return of blood to a tissue or organ after a period without oxygen or nutrients. Damage in the microvasculature causes an inflammatory response and heterogeneous scarring, which is associated with an increase in collagen in the extracellular matrix. Although most often associated with heart attacks and strokes, IRI also occurs when blood reperfuses a transplanted organ. Currently, monitoring for IRI is limited to biopsies, which are invasive and sample a limited area. In this work, we explored photoacoustic (PA) biomarkers of scarring. IRI events were induced in mice (n=2) by clamping the left renal artery, then re-establishing flow. At 53 days post-surgery, kidneys were saline perfused and cut in half laterally. One half was immediately imaged with a VevoX system (Fujifilm-VisualSonics, Toronto) in two near infrared ranges - 680 to 970 nm (NIR), and 1200 to 1350 nm (NIR II). The other half was decellularized and then imaged at NIR and NIR II. Regions of interest were manually identified and analyzed for each kidney. For both cellularized and decellularized samples, the PA signal ratio based on irradiation wavelengths of 715:930 nm was higher in damaged kidneys than for undamaged kidneys (p collagen in the NIR II range, while healthy kidneys did not. Collagen rich spectra were more apparent in decellularized kidneys, suggesting that in the cellularized samples, other components may be contributing to the signal. PA imaging using spectral ratios associated with collagen signatures may provide a non-invasive tool to determine areas of tissue damage due to IRIs.

  19. Impact of living and socioeconomic characteristics on cardiovascular risk in ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Abboud, Halim; Labreuche, Julien; Arauz, Antonio; Bryer, Alan; Lavados, Pablo M; Massaro, Ayrton; Munoz Collazos, Mario; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Yamout, Bassem I; Vicaut, Eric

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to stratify the risk of vascular event recurrence in patients with cerebral infarction according to living and socioeconomic characteristics and geographic region. The Outcomes in Patients with TIA and Cerebrovascular Disease (OPTIC) study is an international prospective study of patients aged 45 years or older who required secondary prevention of stroke [following either an acute transient ischemic attack, minor ischemic strokes, or recent (less than six-months previous), stable, first-ever, nondisabling ischemic stroke]. A total 3635 patients from 245 centers in 17 countries in four regions (Latin America, Middle East, North Africa, South Africa) were enrolled between 2007 and 2008. The outcome measure was the two-year rate of a composite of major vascular events (vascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke). During the two-year follow-up period, 516 patients experienced at least one major cardiovascular event, resulting in an event rate of 15·6% (95% confidence interval 14·4-16·9%). Event rates varied across geographical region (P socioeconomic conditions (from 13·4% to 47·9%, adjusted P value for trend socioeconomic variables. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  20. Genetically elevated C-reactive protein and ischemic vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risks of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. Methods: We studied 10,276 persons from a general population cohort, including 1786 in whom...... ischemic heart disease developed and 741 in whom ischemic cerebrovascular disease developed. We examined another 31,992 persons from a cross-sectional general population study, of whom 2521 had ischemic heart disease and 1483 had ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we compared 2238 patients...... with ischemic heart disease with 4474 control subjects and 612 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease with 1224 control subjects. We measured levels of high-sensitivity CRP and conducted genotyping for four CRP polymorphisms and two apolipoprotein E polymorphisms. Results: The risk of ischemic heart...

  1. [Neurological complications of infective endocarditis in Burkina Faso. Clinical features, management and evolutionary profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaméogo, N V; Seghda, A; Kagambèga, L J; Diallo, O; Millogo, G R C; Toguyéni, B J Y; Samadoulougou, A K; Niakara, A; Simporé, J; Zabsonré, P

    2015-04-01

    Neurological complications are the most frequent extracardiac complications of infective endocarditis (IE). This study aimed to describe the epidemiological, clinical and paraclinical aspects, and outcome of neurological complications of infective endocarditis in three hospitals in the city of Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso. From 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012, we included all patients suffering from IE and selected those in whom a neurological complication was objectified. Neurological involvement was sought on clinical examination but especially CT brain (ischemic infarcts, hemorrhages, aneurysms and abscesses). Blood cultures were systematic. Echocardiography was done for vegetations and characteristics. Among 63 cases of IE, neurological complications were found in 14 patients (22.2%). The average age of patients with neurological complications was 37.4 ± 5.8 years. The sex ratio was 1.3 for women. Neurological damage consisted of nine cases of stroke (64.3%), three cases of hemorrhagic stroke (21.4%) and two cases of brain abscess (14.3%). Neurological complications had already occurred before hospitalization in 4 cases. Blood cultures were positive in 8 cases. Germs found were predominantly Staphylococcus aureus (5 cases) and Streptococcus a- viridans (2 cases). All cases of S. aureus were complicated by stroke. At echocardiography, vegetation was found in all cases. It was found on the mitral in 7 cases, the aorta in 3 cases, the mitral and aortic in 2 cases and the mitral and tricuspid in 2 cases also. The EI had occurred on a native valve in 11 cases, prosthesis in 4 cases (2 mitral and 2 aortic). The vegetations average diameter was 11.2 ± 2.1 mm (6.4 and 1 7.7 mm). Vegetations were mobile in 12 cases. The treatment consisted of antibiotics adapted to the antibiogram, neurological and cardiovascular monitoring. The evolution was marked by seven deaths (50%), including 5 deaths related to cerebral complication (71.4% of deaths). This study shows that

  2. Neurology of foreign language aptitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Biedroń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This state-of-the art paper focuses on the poorly explored issue of foreign language aptitude, attempting to present the latest developments in this field and reconceptualizations of the construct from the perspective of neuroscience. In accordance with this goal, it first discusses general directions in neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude, starting with the earliest attempts to define the neurological substrate for talent, sources of difficulties in the neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude and modern research methods. This is followed by the discussion of the research on the phonology of foreign language aptitude with emphasis on functional and structural studies as well as their consequences for the knowledge of the concept. The subsequent section presents the studies which focus on lexical and morphosyntactic aspects of foreign language aptitude. The paper ends with a discussion of the limitations of contemporary research, the future directions of such research and selec ed methodological issues.

  3. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovcevski, Mira; Akbarian, Schahram

    2012-08-01

    The exploration of brain epigenomes, which consist of various types of DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications, is providing new and unprecedented insights into the mechanisms of neural development, neurological disease and aging. Traditionally, chromatin defects in the brain were considered static lesions of early development that occurred in the context of rare genetic syndromes, but it is now clear that mutations and maladaptations of the epigenetic machinery cover a much wider continuum that includes adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Here, we describe how recent advances in neuroepigenetics have contributed to an improved mechanistic understanding of developmental and degenerative brain disorders, and we discuss how they could influence the development of future therapies for these conditions.

  4. [Autoantibodies in Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Izumi

    2018-04-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are caused by immune responses against neuronal antigens expressed by the tumor. Based on the immunological pathomechanisms and responsiveness of treatments, onconeuronal antibodies are divided into two categories: 1) antibodies against neural intracellular antigens and 2) antibodies against neuronal surface or synaptic antigens. The recent discovery of onconeuronal antibodies have radically changed concepts of CNS autoimmunity, including PNS. The recognition of PNS provides a foundation for the early detection of underlying tumors and initiations of prompt treatments, which can result in substantial improvement. We here review the characteristic onconeuronal antibodies, including anti-Hu, anti-Ma2, and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and discuss the algorithm for the diagnosis of PNS.

  5. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  6. Prehospital neurological deterioration in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Sabreena J; Sucharew, Heidi; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Woo, Daniel; Adeoye, Opeolu; Flaherty, Matthew L; Ferioli, Simona; McMullan, Jason; Mackey, Jason; De Los Rios La Rosa, Felipe; Martini, Sharyl; Kissela, Brett M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2018-04-27

    Patients with stroke can experience neurological deterioration in the prehospital setting. We evaluated patients with stroke to determine factors associated with prehospital neurological deterioration (PND). Among the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region (population ~1.3 million), we screened all 15 local hospitals' admissions from 2010 for acute stroke and included patients aged ≥20. The GCS was compared between emergency medical services (EMS) arrival and hospital arrival, with decrease ≥2 points considered PND. Data obtained retrospectively included demographics, medical history and medication use, stroke subtype (eg, ischaemic stroke (IS), intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH)) and IS subtype (eg, small vessel, large vessel, cardioembolic), seizure at onset, time intervals between symptom onset, EMS arrival and hospital arrival, EMS level of training, and blood pressure and serum glucose on EMS arrival. Of 2708 total patients who had a stroke, 1092 patients (median (IQR) age 74 (61-83) years; 56% women; 21% black) were analysed. PND occurred in 129 cases (12%), including 9% of IS, 24% of ICH and 16% of SAH. In multivariable analysis, black race, atrial fibrillation, haemorrhagic subtype and ALS level of transport were associated with PND. Haemorrhage and atrial fibrillation is associated with PND in stroke, and further investigation is needed to establish whether PND can be predicted. Further studies are also needed to assess whether preferential transport of patients with deterioration to hospitals equipped with higher levels of care is beneficial, identify why race is associated with deterioration and to test therapies targeting PND. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. The prospects of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Takahiro; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    The United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in 1996, on the basis of the results of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) rt-PA Stroke Study. IV rt-PA therapy at a dose of 0.9 mg/kg has been approved internationally for the treatment of hyperacute ischemic stroke. After a dose comparison study using duteplase and a multicenter study using a single dose of alteplase (Japan Alteplase Clinical Trial: J-ACT), the administration of IV rt-PA therapy at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg was approved in Japan in 2005. Immediately after the approval, the Japan Stroke Society published the Japanese guidelines for this low-dose therapy. Two years after the approval in Japan, the outcome of IV rt-PA therapy in Japan was observed to be comparable to that of NINDS rt-PA therapy and to those published in studies based in Western nations. Several trials have reported predictors of unfavorable outcome for IV rt-PA therapy. Patients with severe strokes (higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, coma), higher age at disease onset, aortic arch dissection, higher blood pressure, higher blood sugar, occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) or tandem lesion of the left ICA and right middle cerebral artery (MCA), or the presence of major early ischemic changes as observed upon computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), showed a greater probability for unfavorable response to treatment. The results of the randomised 2008 trial conducted by the third European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS III) suggested that treatment with IV rt-PA administered 3-4.5 hours after symptom onset can still induce significant improvement in clinical outcomes after an acute ischemic stroke as opposed to a placebo. MRI-based thrombolysis might be safer than standard CT-based thrombolysis. A combination of reperfusion therapies, IV rt-PA and

  8. Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner Frandsen, Nicole; Sørensen, Margit; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were ...

  9. Quantitative Measurement of Physical Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively measure and describe the amount and pattern of physical activity in patients within the first week after acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack using accelerometers. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with acute is...

  10. Occurrence and predictors of persistent impaired glucose tolerance after acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Fonville (Susanne); H.M. den Hertog (Heleen); A.A.M. Zandbergen (Adrienne); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); H.F. Lingsma (Hester)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Impaired glucose tolerance is often present in patients with a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or ischemic stroke and doubles the risk of recurrent stroke. This impaired glucose tolerance can be transient, reflecting an acute stress response, or persistent, representing

  11. How to minimize ischemic complication related to swollen temporalis muscle following indirect revascularization surgery in moyamoya disease: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Sun; Moon, Hyung Sik

    2014-05-01

    There are several reports in the literature of postoperative ischemic events due to swelling of the temporalis muscle after indirect revascularization surgery. Here, we report our surgical technique for preventing ischemic events during the acute postoperative recovery period in moyamoya patients. We used various types of titanium mesh to cover the bony defect area in 8 patients (10 operations) with moyamoya disease. The mesh was cut and manipulated according to the shape of the bony defect. Surgical results were favorable, with no newly developed ischemic event or infarction in the acute recovery period. The mesh formed an outer table of skull, so there was no compressive effect on the temporalis muscle and no cosmetic defects. The titanium mesh appears to be effective and useful for prevention of ischemic insult in the treatment of moyamoya disease. The choice of this procedure depends on both the operative findings of temporalis muscle thickness and the status of ischemic vulnerability of moyamoya brain. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Dysphagia and cerebrovascular accident: relationship between severity degree and level of neurological impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaquy, Roberta Baldino; Favero, Samara Regina; Ribeiro, Marlise de Castro; Barea, Liselotte Menke; Almeida, Sheila Tamanini de; Mancopes, Renata

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this case study was to verify the occurrence of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours after the onset of the first symptoms, in order to establish a possible relationship between the level of neurologic impairment and the severity degree of dysphagia. After emergency hospital admission, three patients underwent neurological clinical evaluation (general physical examination, neurological examination, and application of the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale - NIHSS), and clinical assessment of swallowing using the Protocolo Fonoaudiológico de Avaliação do Risco para Disfagia (PARD--Speech-Language Pathology Protocol for Risk Evaluation for Dysphagia). One of the patients presented functional swallowing (NIHSS score 11), while the other two had mild and moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia (NIHSS scores 15 and 19, respectively). The service flow and the delay on the patients' search for medical care determined the small sample. The findings corroborate literature data regarding the severity of the neurological condition and the manifestation of dysphagia.

  13. The Application of Nanomaterials in Stem Cell Therapy for Some Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guilong; Khan, Ahsan Ali; Wu, Hao; Chen, Lukui; Gu, Yuchun; Gu, Ning

    2018-02-08

    Stem cell therapy provides great promising therapeutic benefits for various neurological disorders. Cell transplantation has emerged as cell replacement application for nerve damage. Recently, nanomaterials obtain wide development in various industrial and medical fields, and nanoparticles have been applied in the neurological field for tracking and treating nervous system diseases. Combining stem cells with nanotechnology has raised more and more attentions; and it has demonstrated that the combination has huge effects on clinical diagnosis and therapeutics in multiple central nervous system diseases, meanwhile, improves prognosis. The aim of this review was to give a brief overview of the application of nanomaterials in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. Nanoparticles not only promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro or in vivo, but also play dominant roles on stem cell imaging and tracking. Furthermore, via delivering genes or drugs, nanoparticles can participate in stem cell therapeutic applications for various neurological diseases, such as ischemic stroke, spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and gliomas. However, nanoparticles have potential cytotoxic effects on nerve cells, which are related to their physicochemical properties. Nano-stem cell-based therapy as a promising strategy has the ability to affect neuronal repair and regeneration in the central nervous system. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Neurological Signs and Symptoms in Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Buchwald, Dedra; Goldberg, Jack; Noonan, Carolyn; Ellenbogen, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the type and frequency of neurological signs and symptoms in individuals with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods Persons with FM (n=166) and pain-free controls (n=66) underwent systematic neurological examination by a neurologist blinded to disease status. Neurological symptoms present over the preceding 3 months were assessed with a standard questionnaire. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of neurological symptoms and examination findings with FM status. Within the FM group we examined the correlation between self-reported symptoms and physical examination findings. Results Compared to the control group, age and gender adjusted estimates revealed the FM group had significantly more neurological abnormalities in multiple categories including: cranial nerves IX and X (42% vs. 8%), sensory (65% vs. 25%), motor (33% vs. 3%), and gait (28% vs. 7%). Similarly, the FM group endorsed significantly more neurological symptoms than the control group in 27 of 29 categories with the biggest differences observed for photophobia (70% vs. 6%), poor balance (63% vs. 4%), and weakness (58% vs. 2%) and tingling (54% vs. 4%) in the arms and legs. Poor balance, coordination, tingling, weakness in the arms and legs, and numbness in any part of body correlated with appropriate neurological exam findings in the FM group. Conclusions This blinded, controlled study demonstrated neurological physical examination findings in persons with FM. The FM group had more neurological symptoms than controls, with moderate correlation between symptoms and signs. These findings have implications for the medical work-up of patients with FM. PMID:19714636

  15. Stroke code improves intravenous thrombolysis administration in acute ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chen

    Full Text Available Timely intravenous (IV thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with "Stroke Code" (SC may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis.The study period was divided into the "pre-SC era" (January 2006 to July 2010 and "SC era" (August 2010 to July 2013. Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis, stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras.During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8% arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2% received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9% to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3% (P<0.001. SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001 and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001. The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2 at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11, with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality.The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time.

  16. Fluoro-Jade and TUNEL staining as useful tools to identify ischemic brain damage following moderate extradural compression of sensorimotor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrotiene, Jurgita; Wägner, Anna; Liljequist, Sture

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia was produced by moderate compression for 30 min of a specific brain area in the sensorimotor cortex of Sprague-Dawley rats. On day 1, that is 24 h after the transient sensorimotor compression, ischemia-exposed animals displayed a marked focal neurological deficit documented as impaired beam walking performance. This functional disturbance was mainly due to contralateral fore- and hind-limb paresis. As assessed by daily beam walking tests it was shown that there was a spontaneous recovery of motor functions over a period of five to seven days after the ischemic event. Using histopathological analysis (Nissl staining) we have previously reported that the present experimental paradigm does not produce pannecrosis (tissue cavitation) despite the highly reproducible focal neurological deficit. We now show how staining with fluorescent markers for neuronal death, that is Fluoro-Jade and TUNEL, respectively, identifies regional patterns of selective neuronal death. These observations add further support to the working hypothesis that the brain damage caused by cortical compression-induced ischemia consists of scattered, degenerating neurons in specific brain regions. Postsurgical administration of the AMPA receptor specific antagonist, LY326325 (30 mg/kg; i.p., 70 min after compression), not only improved beam walking performance on day 1 to 3, respectively but also significantly reduced the number of Fluoro-Jade stained neurons on day 5. These results suggest that enhanced AMPA/glutamate receptor activity is at least partially responsible for the ischemia-produced brain damage detected by the fluorescent marker Fluoro-Jade.

  17. Identifikasi Gangguan Neurologis Menggunakan Metode Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Kusanti

    2015-07-01

    Abstract             The use of Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS methods in the process of identifying one of neurological disorders in the head, known in medical terms ischemic stroke from the ct scan of the head in order to identify the location of ischemic stroke. The steps are performed in the extraction process of identifying, among others, the image of the ct scan of the head by using a histogram. Enhanced image of the intensity histogram image results using Otsu threshold to obtain results pixels rated 1 related to the object while pixel rated 0 associated with the measurement background. The result used for image clustering process, to process image clusters used fuzzy c-mean (FCM clustering result is a row of the cluster center, the results of the data used to construct a fuzzy inference system (FIS. Fuzzy inference system applied is fuzzy inference model of Takagi-Sugeno-Kang. In this study ANFIS is used to optimize the results of the determination of the location of the blockage ischemic stroke. Used recursive least squares estimator (RLSE for learning. RMSE results obtained in the training process of 0.0432053, while in the process of generated test accuracy rate of 98.66%   Keywords— Stroke Ischemik, Global threshold, Fuzzy Inference System model Sugeno, ANFIS, RMSE

  18. Risk for Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Ticagrelor Compared With Aspirin After Transient Ischemic Attack or Acute Ischemic Stroke in the SOCRATES Study (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, J Donald; Aunes, Maria; Albers, Gregory W; Amarenco, Pierre; Bokelund-Singh, Sara; Denison, Hans; Evans, Scott R; Held, Peter; Jahreskog, Marianne; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wang, Yongjun; Wong, K S Lawrence; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-09-05

    Patients with minor acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack are at high risk for subsequent stroke, and more potent antiplatelet therapy in the acute setting is needed. However, the potential benefit of more intense antiplatelet therapy must be assessed in relation to the risk for major bleeding. The SOCRATES trial (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes) was the first trial with ticagrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in which the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor were compared with those of aspirin. The main safety objective was assessment of PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes)-defined major bleeds on treatment, with special focus on intracranial hemorrhage (ICrH). An independent adjudication committee blinded to study treatment classified bleeds according to the PLATO, TIMI (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction), and GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definitions. The definitions of ICrH and major bleeding excluded cerebral microbleeds and asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of cerebral infarctions so that the definitions better discriminated important events in the acute stroke population. A total of 13 130 of 13 199 randomized patients received at least 1 dose of study drug and were included in the safety analysis set. PLATO major bleeds occurred in 31 patients (0.5%) on ticagrelor and 38 patients (0.6%) on aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.34). The most common locations of major bleeds were intracranial and gastrointestinal. ICrH was reported in 12 patients (0.2%) on ticagrelor and 18 patients (0.3%) on aspirin. Thirteen of all 30 ICrHs (4 on ticagrelor and 9 on aspirin) were hemorrhagic strokes, and 4 (2 in each group) were symptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of brain infarctions. The ICrHs were spontaneous in 6 and 13, traumatic in 3 and 3, and procedural in 3 and 2

  19. Ischemic Tolerance of the Brain and Spinal Cord: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Masatoshi; Kanda, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenta; Uneda, Atsuhito; Hirashita, Koji; Yoshino, Kimihiro

    2017-11-15

    Ischemic tolerance is an endogenous neuroprotective phenomenon induced by sublethal ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), the first discovered form of ischemic tolerance, is widely seen in many species and in various organs including the brain and the spinal cord. Ischemic tolerance of the spinal cord is less familiar among neurosurgeons, although it has been reported from the viewpoint of preventing ischemic spinal cord injury during aortic surgery. It is important for neurosurgeons to have opportunities to see patients with spinal cord ischemia, and to understand ischemic tolerance of the spinal cord as well as the brain. IPC has a strong neuroprotective effect in animal models of ischemia; however, clinical application of IPC for ischemic brain and spinal diseases is difficult because they cannot be predicted. In addition, one drawback of preconditioning stimuli is that they are also capable of producing injury with only minor changes to their intensity or duration. Numerous methods to induce ischemic tolerance have been discovered that vary in their timing and the site at which short-term ischemia occurs. These methods include ischemic postconditioning (IPoC), remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC), remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) and remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPoC), which has had a great impact on clinical approaches to treatment of ischemic brain and spinal cord injury. Especially RIPerC and RIPoC to induce spinal cord tolerance are considered clinically useful, however the evidence supporting these methods is currently insufficient; further experimental or clinical research in this area is thus necessary.

  20. Expanding the treatment window with mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, Kennith F.; Cloft, Harry J.; Kallmes, David F. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); White, J. Bradley [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, MN, (United States); Manno, Edward M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurology, Rochester, MN, (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common disease associated with high mortality and significant long-term disability. Treatment options for acute ischemic stroke continue to evolve and include pharmaceutical and mechanical therapies. With the recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of a new device for mechanical thrombectomy, the options available for treatment of acute ischemic stroke have been expanded. Thrombolytic therapy is generally given intravenously in the first 3 h and up to 6 h via the intraarterial route for pharmacological clot disruption. The maximum time-frame for mechanical thrombectomy devices has yet to be determined. A 78-year-old female presented to the emergency room with a dense right hemiparesis, leftward gaze preference and dense global aphasia. Eight hours after symptom onset, left carotid angiography confirmed a left internal carotid artery terminus occlusion. A single pass was made through the clot with an X6 Merci Retriever device. After a single pass, the vessel was reopened and normal flow in the left internal carotid artery was demonstrated. At the time of discharge, her neurological deficits had improved significantly. Furthermore, the final infarct area, as demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging, was probably much smaller than it would have been if the vessel had not been recanalized. (orig.)

  1. Ischemic stroke related to intracranial branch atheromatous disease and comparison with large and small artery diseases.

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    Kwan, May Wai-Mei; Mak, Windsor; Cheung, Raymond Tak-Fai; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2011-04-15

    The mechanism of ischemic stroke in intracranial branch atheromatous disease (BAD) is different from large artery atherothrombotic disease (LAD) or lacunar infarction (LACI). The concept of BAD is underused in clinical practice and research. Patients admitted over 24-months with ischemic stroke caused by atherosclerotic disease were reviewed retrospectively and classified according to radiological±clinical criteria into LAD, BAD and LACI. The BAD cases were further divided into 5 BAD syndromes. Clinical characteristics, vascular risk factors, results of vascular workup and outcome among these subgroups were compared. 123 cases of LAD (17% of all stroke patients or 33% of all studied patients), 147 BAD (20% or 40%) and 102 LACI (14% or 27%) presented during the study period. Compared to LAD, BAD patients had milder neurological deficits, were less often diabetic and carotid stenosis was less common, while stenosis of the intracranial arteries was more frequent in BAD as compared with LACI patients. Outcome in BAD patients was intermediate between LAD and LACI. Comparisons among the BAD syndromes indicated they were homogenous conditions. BAD is the most prevalent ischemic stroke subtype in our cohort. The homogeneity among the BAD syndromes suggests they might represent a distinctive stroke entity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent Advances in Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke Syndromes Causing Vertigo and Hearing Loss.

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    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar ischemic stroke is one of the common causes of vascular vertigo. It usually accompanies other neurological symptoms or signs, but a small infarct in the cerebellum can present with vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 11 % of the patients with isolated cerebellar infarction simulated acute peripheral vestibulopathy, and most patients had an infarct in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). A head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with PICA territory cerebellar infarction from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Acute hearing loss (AHL) of a vascular cause is mostly associated with cerebellar infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), but PICA territory cerebellar infarction rarely causes AHL. To date, at least eight subgroups of AICA territory infarction have been identified according to the pattern of neurotological presentations, among which the most common pattern of audiovestibular dysfunction is the combined loss of auditory and vestibular functions. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss can be the initial symptom of impending posterior circulation ischemic stroke (particularly within the territory of the AICA). Audiovestibular loss from cerebellar infarction has a good long-term outcome than previously thought. Approximately half of patients with superior cerebellar artery territory (SCA) cerebellar infarction experienced true vertigo, suggesting that the vertigo and nystagmus in the SCA territory cerebellar infarctions are more common than previously thought. In this article, recent findings on clinical features of vertigo and hearing loss from cerebellar ischemic stroke syndrome are summarized.

  3. Integrated analysis of ischemic stroke datasets revealed sex and age difference in anti-stroke targets

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    Wen-Xing Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a common neurological disorder and the burden in the world is growing. This study aims to explore the effect of sex and age difference on ischemic stroke using integrated microarray datasets. The results showed a dramatic difference in whole gene expression profiles and influenced pathways between males and females, and also in the old and young individuals. Furthermore, compared with old males, old female patients showed more serious biological function damage. However, females showed less affected pathways than males in young subjects. Functional interaction networks showed these differential expression genes were mostly related to immune and inflammation-related functions. In addition, we found ARG1 and MMP9 were up-regulated in total and all subgroups. Importantly, IL1A, ILAB, IL6 and TNF and other anti-stroke target genes were up-regulated in males. However, these anti-stroke target genes showed low expression in females. This study found huge sex and age differences in ischemic stroke especially the opposite expression of anti-stroke target genes. Future studies are needed to uncover these pathological mechanisms, and to take appropriate pre-prevention, treatment and rehabilitation measures.

  4. Immunomodulators and microRNAs as neurorestorative therapy for ischemic stroke

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    Bridget Martinez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of all strokes are ischemic due to occlusion of a vessel, and comprise two main types, thrombotic and embolic. Inflammation and immune response play an important role in the outcome of ischemic stroke. Pharmaceutical and cell-based therapies with immunomodulatory properties could be of benefit in treating ischemic stroke. Possible changes in microRNAs brought about by immunomodulatory treatments may be important. The pharmaceutical studies described in this review have identified several differentially regulated miRNAs associated with disregulation of mRNA targets or the upregulation of several neuroprotective genes, thereby highlighting the potential neuroprotective roles of specific miRNAs such as miR-762, -1892, -200a, -145. MiR-124, -711, -145 are the strongly associated miRNAs predicted to mediate anti-inflammatory pathways and microglia/macrophage M2-like activation phenotype. The cell-based therapy studies reviewed have mainly utilized mesenchymal stem cells or human umbilical cord blood cells and shown to improve functional and neurological outcomes in stroke animals. MiR-145 and miR-133b were implicated in nerve cell remodeling and functional recovery after stroke. Human umbilical cord blood cells decreased proinflammatory factors and promoted M2 macrophage polarization in stroke diabetic animals.

  5. Klotho upregulation contributes to the neuroprotection of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury in mice.

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    Long, Fang-Yi; Shi, Meng-Qi; Zhou, Hong-Jing; Liu, Dong-Ling; Sang, Na; Du, Jun-Rong

    2018-02-05

    Klotho, an aging-suppressor gene, encodes a protein that potentially acts as a neuroprotective factor. Our previous studies showed that ligustilide minimizes the cognitive dysfunction and brain damage induced by cerebral ischemia; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to investigate whether klotho is involved in the protective effects of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury in mice. Cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid arterial occlusion. Neurobehavioral tests as well as Nissl and Fluoro-Jade B staining were used to evaluate the protective effects of ligustilide in cerebral ischemia, and Western blotting and ELISA approaches were used to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Administration of ligustilide prevented the development of neurological deficits and reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 region and the caudate putamen after cerebral ischemia. The protective effects were associated with inhibition of the RIG-I/NF-κB p65 and Akt/FoxO1 pathways and with prevention of inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain. Further, downregulation of klotho could attenuate the neuroprotection of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury. Ligustilide exerted neuroprotective effects in mice after cerebral ischemia by regulating anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant signaling pathways. Furthermore, klotho upregulation contributes to the neuroprotection of LIG against cerebral ischemic injury. These results indicated that ligustilide may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Posterior communicating artery hypoplasia as a risk factor for acute ischemic stroke in the absence of carotid artery occlusion.

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    Chuang, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chih-Yang; Pan, Po-Jung; Lin, Ching-Po

    2008-12-01

    Posterior communicating artery (PCoA) hypoplasia is a fetal variant of the Circle of Willis. According to angiograms and autopsy reports, this congenital variation is found in 6-21% of the general population. PCoA hypoplasia only becomes a risk factor for ischemic stroke in the presence of ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. The aim of our study was to determine the role of PCoA hypoplasia in acute ischemic stroke in the absence of ICA occlusion. We examined 310 acute ischemic stroke patients (mean age+/-standard deviation; 68.9+/-15.6 years). Cerebral magnetic resonance angiography was performed within 72 hours of ischemic stroke onset. For comparison, a risk factor-matched control group was recruited. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to estimate the independent effect of potential risk factors. The overall incidence of PCoA hypoplasia in our experimental group was 19.35% (n=60), which was significantly higher than in the control group (8.20%, n=22, p=0.036, OR, 3.21; 95% CI, 1.43-9.62). The most common ischemic event was ipsilateral thalamic lacunar infarctions with or without occipital lobe involvement. Based on our results, PCoA hypoplasia appears to be a contributor to the risk of ischemic stroke, even in the absence of ICA occlusion. This risk is especially pronounced for strokes involving arteries that penetrate the thalamus.

  7. Arctigenin attenuates ischemic stroke via SIRT1-dependent inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome.

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    Zhang, Shimeng; Jiang, Liangjun; Che, Fengyuan; Lu, Yucheng; Xie, Zhongxiang; Wang, Hao

    2017-11-04

    Arctigenin (ARC), a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan derived from Arctium lappa L, has been reported to protect against cerebral ischemia injury in rats, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether ARC ameliorated ischemic stroke by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome-derived neuroinflammation and whether SIRT1 signaling was involved in this process. ARC (20 mg/kg) or vehicle were intraperitoneally injected to Sprague-Dawley rats for 3 days before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery performed. The infarct volume, neurological score, brain water content, neuroinflammation, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and SIRT1 protein expression were assessed. Furthermore, we also investigated whether ARC protected against cerebral ischemia via SIRT1-dependent inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by administrating EX527, a specific SIRT1 inhibitor, under oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) condition. We found that ARC pretreatment decreased infarct volume, neurological score and brain water content. Moreover, ARC treatment effectively inhibited cerebral ischemia induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β, IL-18 secretion both in vivo and in vitro. Futhermore, ARC treatment activated Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) singnaling in the brain. Importantly, suppress of SIRT1 reversed the inhibitory effect of ARC on NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Taken together our results demonstrated that ARC may confer protection against ischemic stroke by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The activation of SIRT1 signaling pathway may contribute to the neuroprotection of ARC in MCAO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Targets of vascular protection in acute ischemic stroke differ in type 2 diabetes

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    Kelly-Cobbs, Aisha I.; Prakash, Roshini; Li, Weiguo; Pillai, Bindu; Hafez, Sherif; Coucha, Maha; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Ogbi, Safia N.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation is an important complication of acute ischemic stroke, particularly in diabetic patients receiving thrombolytic treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, the only approved drug for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of acute manipulation of potential targets for vascular protection [i.e., NF-κB, peroxynitrite, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)] on vascular injury and functional outcome in a diabetic model of cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in control and type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. Treatment groups received a single dose of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)prophyrinato iron (III), the nonspecific NF-κB inhibitor curcumin, or the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor minocycline at reperfusion. Poststroke infarct volume, edema, hemorrhage, neurological deficits, and MMP-9 activity were evaluated. All acute treatments reduced MMP-9 and hemorrhagic transformation in diabetic groups. In addition, acute curcumin and minocycline therapy reduced edema in these animals. Improved neurological function was observed in varying degrees with treatment, as indicated by beam-walk performance, modified Bederson scores, and grip strength; however, infarct size was similar to untreated diabetic animals. In control animals, all treatments reduced MMP-9 activity, yet bleeding was not improved. Neuroprotection was only conferred by curcumin and minocycline. Uncovering the underlying mechanisms contributing to the success of acute therapy in diabetes will advance tailored stroke therapies. PMID:23335797

  9. Time interval between stroke onset and hospital arrival in acute ischemic stroke patients in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Yan, Weihong; Jiang, Guo-Xin; Li, Wei; Cheng, Qi

    2011-02-01

    To observe the time interval between stroke onset and hospital arrival (time-to-hospital) in acute ischemic stroke patients and analyze its putatively associated factors. During the period from November 1, 2006 to August 31, 2008, patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted consecutively to the Department of Neurology, Ninth Hospital, Shanghai, were enrolled in the study. Information of the patients was registered including the time-to-hospital, demographic data, history of stroke, season at attack, neurological symptom at onset, etc. Characteristics of the patients were analyzed and logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with the time-to-hospital. There were 536 patients in the study, 290 (54.1%) males and 246 (45.9%) females. The median time-to-hospital was 8h (ranged from 0.1 to 300 h) for all patients. Within 3h after the onset of stroke, 162 patients (30.2%) arrived at our hospital; and within 6h, 278 patients (51.9%). Patients with a history of stroke, unconsciousness at onset, or a high NIHSS score at admission had significantly less time-to-hospital. The time interval between stroke onset and hospital arrival was importance of seeking immediate medical help after stroke onset of patients and their relatives could significantly influence their actions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. New asymptomatic ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging after cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibazaki, Kensaku

    2006-01-01

    Conventional cerebral angiography (CAG) is relatively low risk for neurological complications. However, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) after CAG occasionally reveal an asymptomatic ischemic lesion on the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of new asymptomatic or symptomatic DWI lesions after CAG and to clarify the factors associated with them. Fifty-six patients with acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack were prospectively enrolled. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies including DWI were studied twice, within 48 hours before and after CAG. The following factors were assessed; age, gender, history of stroke, history of ischemic heart disease, vascular risk factors, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on admission, stroke subtype, treatment before stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) (antiplatelets or warfarin), approach for catheters (transbrachial or femoral artery), amount of contrast medium used, length of the angiographic procedure, and fluoroscophy time. We divided the patients into two groups according to the presence of new DWI lesions after CAG; Positive group had new DWI lesions, whereas the Negative group had none. After CAG, no patients had new neurological deficits. New asymptomatic DWI lesions were observed in 24 patients (42.9%). The significant differences observed between two groups were as follows; age (69.8±11.3 for the Positive group versus 61.9±11.3 for the Negative group, p=0.043), female (54% versus 28%, p=0.048), non-small vessel occlusion (100% versus 66%, p=0.009), catheter approach for transfemoral artery (63% versus 13%, p<0.001), mean length of the angiographic procedure (63.1±21.6 min versus 43.7±14.2 min, p<0.001), mean fluoroscopy time (26.5±13.0 min versus 14.9±5.9 mm, p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity analysis to discriminate the positive and negative groups revealed 17 minutes to be the critical threshold point (sensitivity 66.6% and specificity 68

  11. Neurologic involvement in scleroderma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Tiago Nardi; Peres, Fernando Augusto; Lapa, Aline Tamires; Marques-Neto, João Francisco; Appenzeller, Simone

    2013-12-01

    To perform a systematic review of neurologic involvement in Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Localized Scleroderma (LS), describing clinical features, neuroimaging, and treatment. We performed a literature search in PubMed using the following MeSH terms, scleroderma, systemic sclerosis, localized scleroderma, localized scleroderma "en coup de sabre", Parry-Romberg syndrome, cognitive impairment, memory, seizures, epilepsy, headache, depression, anxiety, mood disorders, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D), SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), neuropsychiatric, psychosis, neurologic involvement, neuropathy, peripheral nerves, cranial nerves, carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar entrapment, tarsal tunnel syndrome, mononeuropathy, polyneuropathy, radiculopathy, myelopathy, autonomic nervous system, nervous system, electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Patients with other connective tissue disease knowingly responsible for nervous system involvement were excluded from the analyses. A total of 182 case reports/studies addressing SSc and 50 referring to LS were identified. SSc patients totalized 9506, while data on 224 LS patients were available. In LS, seizures (41.58%) and headache (18.81%) predominated. Nonetheless, descriptions of varied cranial nerve involvement and hemiparesis were made. Central nervous system involvement in SSc was characterized by headache (23.73%), seizures (13.56%) and cognitive impairment (8.47%). Depression and anxiety were frequently observed (73.15% and 23.95%, respectively). Myopathy (51.8%), trigeminal neuropathy (16.52%), peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy (14.25%), and carpal tunnel syndrome (6.56%) were the most frequent peripheral nervous system involvement in SSc. Autonomic neuropathy involving cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems was regularly described

  12. The Myocardial Unfolded Protein Response during Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease

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    Edward B. Thorp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a progressive and disabling disease. The incidence of heart failure is also on the rise, particularly in the elderly of industrialized societies. This is in part due to an increased ageing population, whom initially benefits from improved, and life-extending cardiovascular therapy, yet ultimately succumb to myocardial failure. A major cause of heart failure is ischemia secondary to the sequence of events that is dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. In the case of heart failure postmyocardial infarction, ischemia can lead to myocardial cell death by both necrosis and apoptosis. The extent of myocyte death postinfarction is associated with adverse cardiac remodeling that can contribute to progressive heart chamber dilation, ventricular wall thinning, and the onset of loss of cardiac function. In cardiomyocytes, recent studies indicate that myocardial ischemic injury activates the unfolded protein stress response (UPR and this is associated with increased apoptosis. This paper focuses on the intersection of ischemia, the UPR, and cell death in cardiomyocytes. Targeting of the myocardial UPR may prove to be a viable target for the prevention of myocyte cell loss and the progression of heart failure due to ischemic injury.

  13. Association between atherogenic dyslipidemia and recurrent stroke risk in patients with different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Ruihao; Song, Bo; Tan, Song; Gao, Yuan; Fang, Hui; Lu, Jie; Xu, Yuming

    2015-07-01

    The association between atherogenic dyslipidemia and stroke recurrence remains unclear, and may be influenced by different subtypes of ischemic stroke. We aimed to investigate whether atherogenic dyslipidemia contributed to stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients and in those with certain subtypes of ischemic stroke. We conducted a prospective hospital-based study enrolling patients with acute ischemic stroke. Atherogenic dyslipidemia was defined as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol dyslipidemia and stroke recurrence was analyzed by using multivariable Cox regression model. In the 510 ischemic stroke patients, 64 patients (12·5%) had atherogenic dyslipidemia, and 66 patients (12·9%) experienced stroke recurrence events within 24 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that stroke recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia than those without in all the stroke patients (20·3% vs. 11·9%; P = 0·048), and more evident in those of large-artery atherosclerosis subtype (31·0% vs. 14·1%; P = 0·014), but not in the other subtypes. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed that atherogenic dyslipidemia was associated with higher stroke recurrence risk among stroke patients of large-artery atherosclerosis subtype (hazard ratio, 2·79; 95% confidence interval, 1·24-6·28), but not significant in all the stroke patients (hazard ratio, 1·69; 95% confidence interval, 0·85-3·37). Atherogenic dyslipidemia is associated with higher risk of stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients. Such association might be more pronounced in large-artery atherosclerosis subtype and needs further investigation to establish such relationship. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  14. Stroke Mortality in Intensive Care Unit from Tertiary Care Neurological Center

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    Lekhjung Thapa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. About a quarter of stroke patients are dead within a month, about a third by 6 months, and a half by 1 year. Although the most substantial advance in stroke has been the routine management of patients in stroke care units, intensive care unit has remained the choice for stroke patients’ care in developing countries. This study explores the mortality of stroke patients in intensive care unit setting in tertiary care neurological centre in a developing country. Methods: We collected data of stroke patients admitted in our ICU from August 2009 to Aug 2010 and analyzed. Results: Total 44 (10.25% patients were admitted for acute stroke. Age ranged from 17-93 years. Low GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale, uncontrolled hypertension and aspiration pneumonia were common indications for admission in ICU. Total 23 (52.3% patients had hemorrhagic stroke and 21(47.7% patients had ischemic stroke. 13 (29.54% patients of stroke died within 7 days, 9 (69.23% patients of hemorrhagic stroke died within 6 days, and 4 patients (30.76% of ischemic stroke died within 7 days. 6 (13.63% patients left hospital against medical advice. All of these patients had ischemic stroke. Conclusions: Stroke mortality in intensive care unit remains high despite of care in tertiary neurological center in resource poor settings. Stroke care unit, which would also help dissemination of knowledge of stroke management, is an option for improved outcome in developing countries Keywords: intensive care unit; mortality; stroke; stroke care unit.

  15. Effects Of Ischemic Preconditioning On The Renal Ischemia- Reperfusion Injury

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    Anyamanesh S

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available  During kidney and other organ transplantation, the organ to be transplanted, must inevitably remain out of the body with little or no blood perfusion at all for a long period of time (ischemia. These events have been suggested to cause the formation of oxygen- derived free radicals (OFR. Reperfusion (reintroduction of blood flow will further exacerbate the initial damage caused by the ischemic insult and may result in the production of free radicals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether induction of brief periods of renal artery occlusion (ischemic pre¬conditioning, IPC can provide protection from the effects of a subsequent period of ischemia and reperfusion (IR in the rat kidney."nMaterials and Methods: In this regard, 28 white, male rats were randomly and equally divided into four groups: Control (sham- operated, IPC alone, IR alone (30 min ischemia followed by 10 min reperfusion, and IPC- IR. Preconditioning involved the sequential clamping of the right renal artery for 5 min and declamping for 5 min for a total of 3 cycles. To demonstrate the effectiveness of IPC regimen, vitamin E as an endogenous antioxidant and an index of lipid peroxidation was measured by HPLC after its extraction from right renal venous plasma and right renal tissue."nResults: Results of this study showed that the amount of vitamin E of renal tissue and venous plasma in the IR group had a significant decrease when compared to the control group (P< 0.0001. Whereas the amount of this vitamin in both renal tissue and venous plasma of the IPC- IR group was significantly higher than that in the IR group (P< 0.0001, but did not show any significant difference with the control group."nConclusion: In this study, preconditioning method prevented the reduction of the endogenous antioxidant (Vit. E in encountering the following sustained isc