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Sample records for irradiation afm images

  1. Investigation of the influence of UV irradiation on collagen thin films by AFM imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stylianou, Andreas, E-mail: styliand@mail.ntua.gr; Yova, Dido; Alexandratou, Eleni

    2014-12-01

    Collagen is the major fibrous extracellular matrix protein and due to its unique properties, it has been widely used as biomaterial, scaffold and cell-substrate. The aim of the paper was to use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to investigate well-characterized collagen thin films after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. The films were also used as in vitro culturing substrates in order to investigate the UV-induced alterations to fibroblasts. A special attention was given in the alteration on collagen D-periodicity. For short irradiation times, spectroscopy (fluorescence/absorption) studies demonstrated that photodegradation took place and AFM imaging showed alterations in surface roughness. Also, it was highlighted that UV-irradiation had different effects when it was applied on collagen solution than on films. Concerning fibroblast culturing, it was shown that fibroblast behavior was affected after UV irradiation of both collagen solution and films. Furthermore, after a long irradiation time, collagen fibrils were deformed revealing that collagen fibrils are consisting of multiple shells and D-periodicity occurred on both outer and inner shells. The clarification of the effects of UV light on collagen and the induced modifications of cell behavior on UV-irradiated collagen-based surfaces will contribute to the better understanding of cell–matrix interactions in the nanoscale and will assist in the appropriate use of UV light for sterilizing and photo-cross-linking applications. - Highlights: • Collagen thin films were formed and exposed in UV irradiation. • Collagen thin films were formed from UV-irradiated collagen solution. • Nanocharacterization of collagen thin films by AFM • Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy studies on collagen films • Investigation of fibroblast response on collagen films.

  2. Investigation of the influence of UV irradiation on collagen thin films by AFM imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stylianou, Andreas; Yova, Dido; Alexandratou, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Collagen is the major fibrous extracellular matrix protein and due to its unique properties, it has been widely used as biomaterial, scaffold and cell-substrate. The aim of the paper was to use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to investigate well-characterized collagen thin films after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. The films were also used as in vitro culturing substrates in order to investigate the UV-induced alterations to fibroblasts. A special attention was given in the alteration on collagen D-periodicity. For short irradiation times, spectroscopy (fluorescence/absorption) studies demonstrated that photodegradation took place and AFM imaging showed alterations in surface roughness. Also, it was highlighted that UV-irradiation had different effects when it was applied on collagen solution than on films. Concerning fibroblast culturing, it was shown that fibroblast behavior was affected after UV irradiation of both collagen solution and films. Furthermore, after a long irradiation time, collagen fibrils were deformed revealing that collagen fibrils are consisting of multiple shells and D-periodicity occurred on both outer and inner shells. The clarification of the effects of UV light on collagen and the induced modifications of cell behavior on UV-irradiated collagen-based surfaces will contribute to the better understanding of cell–matrix interactions in the nanoscale and will assist in the appropriate use of UV light for sterilizing and photo-cross-linking applications. - Highlights: • Collagen thin films were formed and exposed in UV irradiation. • Collagen thin films were formed from UV-irradiated collagen solution. • Nanocharacterization of collagen thin films by AFM • Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy studies on collagen films • Investigation of fibroblast response on collagen films

  3. Surface study of irradiated sapphires from Phrae Province, Thailand using AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monarumit, N.; Jivanantaka, P.; Mogmued, J.; Lhuaamporn, T.; Satitkune, S.

    2017-09-01

    The irradiation is one of the gemstone enhancements for improving the gem quality. Typically, there are many varieties of irradiated gemstones in the gem market such as diamond, topaz, and sapphire. However, it is hard to identify the gemstones before and after irradiation. The aim of this study is to analyze the surface morphology for classifying the pristine and irradiated sapphires using atomic force microscope (AFM). In this study, the sapphire samples were collected from Phrae Province, Thailand. The samples were irradiated by high energy electron beam for a dose of ionizing radiation at 40,000 kGy. As the results, the surface morphology of pristine sapphires shows regular atomic arrangement, whereas, the surface morphology of irradiated sapphires shows the nano-channel observed by the 2D and 3D AFM images. The atomic step height and root mean square roughness have changed after irradiation due to the micro-structural defect on the sapphire surface. Therefore, this study is a frontier application for sapphire identification before and after irradiation.

  4. High accuracy FIONA-AFM hybrid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fronczek, D.N.; Quammen, C.; Wang, H.; Kisker, C.; Superfine, R.; Taylor, R.; Erie, D.A.; Tessmer, I.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-protein complexes are ubiquitous and play essential roles in many biological mechanisms. Single molecule imaging techniques such as electron microscopy (EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are powerful methods for characterizing the structural properties of multi-protein and multi-protein-DNA complexes. However, a significant limitation to these techniques is the ability to distinguish different proteins from one another. Here, we combine high resolution fluorescence microscopy and AFM (FIONA-AFM) to allow the identification of different proteins in such complexes. Using quantum dots as fiducial markers in addition to fluorescently labeled proteins, we are able to align fluorescence and AFM information to ≥8 nm accuracy. This accuracy is sufficient to identify individual fluorescently labeled proteins in most multi-protein complexes. We investigate the limitations of localization precision and accuracy in fluorescence and AFM images separately and their effects on the overall registration accuracy of FIONA-AFM hybrid images. This combination of the two orthogonal techniques (FIONA and AFM) opens a wide spectrum of possible applications to the study of protein interactions, because AFM can yield high resolution (5-10 nm) information about the conformational properties of multi-protein complexes and the fluorescence can indicate spatial relationships of the proteins in the complexes. -- Research highlights: → Integration of fluorescent signals in AFM topography with high (<10 nm) accuracy. → Investigation of limitations and quantitative analysis of fluorescence-AFM image registration using quantum dots. → Fluorescence center tracking and display as localization probability distributions in AFM topography (FIONA-AFM). → Application of FIONA-AFM to a biological sample containing damaged DNA and the DNA repair proteins UvrA and UvrB conjugated to quantum dots.

  5. Reconstruction Algorithms in Undersampled AFM Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a study of spatial undersampling in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging followed by different image reconstruction techniques based on sparse approximation as well as interpolation. The main reasons for using undersampling is that it reduces the path length and thereby...... the scanning time as well as the amount of interaction between the AFM probe and the specimen. It can easily be applied on conventional AFM hardware. Due to undersampling, it is then necessary to further process the acquired image in order to reconstruct an approximation of the image. Based on real AFM cell...... images, our simulations reveal that using a simple raster scanning pattern in combination with conventional image interpolation performs very well. Moreover, this combination enables a reduction by a factor 10 of the scanning time while retaining an average reconstruction quality around 36 dB PSNR...

  6. AFM of metallic nano-particles and nano-structures in heavily irradiated NaCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaynutdinov, R; Vainshtein, DI; Hak, SJ; Tolstikhina, A; Den Hartog, HW

    2003-01-01

    AFM investigations are reported for heavily, electron irradiated NaCl crystals in ultra high vacuum (UHV) in the non-contact mode-with an UHV AFM/STM Omicron system. To avoid chemical reactions between the radiolytic Na and oxygen and water, the irradiated samples were cleaved and prepared for the

  7. AFM of metallic nano-particles and nano-structures in heavily irradiated NaCl

    OpenAIRE

    Gaynutdinov, R; Vainshtein, DI; Hak, SJ; Tolstikhina, A; Den Hartog, HW

    2003-01-01

    AFM investigations are reported for heavily, electron irradiated NaCl crystals in ultra high vacuum (UHV) in the non-contact mode-with an UHV AFM/STM Omicron system. To avoid chemical reactions between the radiolytic Na and oxygen and water, the irradiated samples were cleaved and prepared for the experiments in UHV At the surface of freshly cleaved samples, we have observed sodium nano-precipitates with shapes, which depend on the irradiation dose and the volume fraction of the radiolytic Na...

  8. AFM image of an entire polygene chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Minqian; Takeuchi; Ikai, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author present AFM images of an entire polygene chromosome of Drosophila for the first time. Comparing with conventional optical microscope, the AFM image of the polygene chromosomes provides much higher resolution and 3-D measurement capability which will lead to finer scale gene mapping and identification

  9. Systematic UHV-AFM experiments on Na nano-particles and nano-structures in NaCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugonyako, A.V.; Turkin, A.A.; Gaynutdinov, R.; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den; Bukharaev, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of systematic AFM (atomic force microscopy) experiments on heavily and moderatly irradiated NaCl samples are presented. The sodium nanoparticles and structures of nanoparticles are poduced in sodium chloride during irradiation. The AFM images of the nanoparticles have been obtained in ultra

  10. Systematic UHV-AFM experiments on Na nano-particles and nano-structures in NaCl

    OpenAIRE

    Sugonyako, A.V.; Turkin, A.A.; Gaynutdinov, R.; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den; Bukharaev, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of systematic AFM (atomic force microscopy) experiments on heavily and moderatly irradiated NaCl samples are presented. The sodium nanoparticles and structures of nanoparticles are poduced in sodium chloride during irradiation. The AFM images of the nanoparticles have been obtained in ultra high vacuum (UHV) in the non-contact mode with an Omicron UHV AFM/STM system. The sizes and arrangements of the observed particles depend on the irradiation conditions. The melting behaviour of the...

  11. AFM studies on heavy ion irradiated YBCO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhani, Archana; Marhas, M.K.; Saravanan, P.; Ganesan, V.; Srinivasan, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Mehta, G.K.; Elizabeth, Suja; Bhat, H.L.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is extensively used to characterise the surface morphology of high energy ion irradiated single crystals of high temperature superconductor - YBCO. Our earlier systematic studies on thin films of YBCO under high energy and heavy ion irradiation shows clear evidence of ion induced sputtering or erosion, even though the effect is more on the grain boundaries. These earlier results were supported by electrical resistance measurements. In order to understand more clearly, the nature of surface modification at these high energies, AFM studies were carried out on single crystals of YBCO. Single crystals were chosen in order to see the effect on crystallites alone without interference from grain boundaries. 200 MeV gold ions were used for investigation using the facilities available at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The type of ion and the range of energies were chosen to meet the threshold for electronically mediated defect production. The results are in conformity with our earlier studies and will be described in detail in the context of electronic energy loss mediated sputtering or erosion. (author)

  12. Atom-resolved AFM imaging of calcite nanoparticles in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imada, Hirotake; Kimura, Kenjiro [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Kobe University, Rokko-dai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: oni@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Kobe University, Rokko-dai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► An advanced frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM) was applied for imaging particles. ► Atom-resolved topography of nano-sized particles of calcite was observed in water. ► Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of calcite. ► A promising ability of FM-AFM was demonstrated in imaging nano-sized particles. - Abstract: The atom-resolved topography of calcite nanoparticles was observed in water using a frequency-modulation atomic force microscope. Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of crystalline calcite.

  13. Atom-resolved AFM imaging of calcite nanoparticles in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Hirotake; Kimura, Kenjiro; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An advanced frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM) was applied for imaging particles. ► Atom-resolved topography of nano-sized particles of calcite was observed in water. ► Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of calcite. ► A promising ability of FM-AFM was demonstrated in imaging nano-sized particles. - Abstract: The atom-resolved topography of calcite nanoparticles was observed in water using a frequency-modulation atomic force microscope. Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of crystalline calcite

  14. Simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging: A method for aligning an AFM-tip with an excitation beam using a 2D galvanometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, A. N.; Cadby, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    Correlative fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is a highly attractive technique for use in biological imaging, enabling force and mechanical measurements of particular structures whose locations are known due to the specificity of fluorescence imaging. The ability to perform these two measurements simultaneously (rather than consecutively with post-processing correlation) is highly valuable because it would allow the mechanical properties of a structure to be tracked over time as changes in the sample occur. We present an instrument which allows simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging by aligning an incident fluorescence excitation beam with an AFM-tip. Alignment was performed by calibrating a 2D galvanometer present in the excitation beam path and using it to reposition the incident beam. Two programs were developed (one manual and one automated) which correlate sample features between the AFM and fluorescence images, calculating the distance required to translate the incident beam towards the AFM-tip. Using this method, we were able to obtain beam-tip alignment (and therefore field-of-view alignment) from an offset of >15 μm to within one micron in two iterations of the program. With the program running alongside data acquisition for real-time feedback between AFM and optical images, this offset was maintained over a time period of several hours. Not only does this eliminate the need to image large areas with both techniques to ensure that fields-of-view overlap, but it also raises the possibility of using this instrument for tip-enhanced fluorescence applications, a technique in which super-resolution images have previously been achieved.

  15. Temperature-dependent imaging of living cells by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenel, Cedric; Giocondi, Marie-Cecile; Seantier, Bastien; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of lateral organization of plasma membranes is a prerequisite to the understanding of membrane structure-function relationships in living cells. Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions are responsible for the existence of various membrane microdomains involved in cell signalization and in numerous pathologies. Developing approaches for characterizing microdomains associate identification tools like recognition imaging with high-resolution topographical imaging. Membrane properties are markedly dependent on temperature. However, mesoscopic scale topographical information of cell surface in a temperature range covering most of cell biology experimentation is still lacking. In this work we have examined the possibility of imaging the temperature-dependent behavior of eukaryotic cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results establish that the surface of living CV1 kidney cells can be imaged by AFM, between 5 and 37 deg. C, both in contact and tapping modes. These first temperature-dependent data show that large cell structures appeared essentially stable at a microscopic scale. On the other hand, as shown by contact mode AFM, the surface was highly dynamic at a mesoscopic scale, with marked changes in apparent topography, friction, and deflection signals. When keeping the scanning conditions constant, a progressive loss in the image contrast was however observed, using tapping mode, on decreasing the temperature

  16. Immobilisation of living bacteria for AFM imaging under physiological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louise Meyer, Rikke; Zhou, Xingfei; Tang, Lone; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Kingshott, Peter; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) holds great potential for studying the nanoscale surface structures of living cells, and to measure their interactions with abiotic surfaces, other cells, or specific biomolecules. However, the application of AFM in microbiology is challenging due to the difficulty of immobilising bacterial cells to a flat surface without changing the cell surface properties or cell viability. We have performed an extensive and thorough study of how to functionalise surfaces in order to immobilise living bacteria for AFM studies in liquid environments. Our aim was to develop a scheme which allows bacterial cells to be immobilised to a flat surface with sufficient strength to avoid detachment during the AFM scanning, and without affecting cell surface chemistry, structure, and viability. We compare and evaluate published methods, and present a new, reproducible, and generally applicable scheme for immobilising bacteria cells for an AFM imaging. Bacterial cells were immobilised to modified glass surfaces by physical confinement of cells in microwells, physisorption to positively charged surfaces, covalent binding to amine- or carboxyl-terminated surfaces, and adsorption to surfaces coated with highly adhesive polyphenolic proteins originating from the mussel Mytilus edulis. Living cells could be immobilised with all of these approaches, but many cells detached when immobilised by electrostatic interactions and imaged in buffers like PBS or MOPS. Cells were more firmly attached when immobilised by covalent binding, although some cells still detached during AFM imaging. The most successful method revealed was immobilisation by polyphenolic proteins, which facilitated firm immobilisation of the cells. Furthermore, the cell viability was not affected by this immobilisation scheme, and adhesive proteins thus provide a fast, reproducible, and generally applicable scheme for immobilising living bacteria for an AFM imaging.

  17. Quantitative analysis and classification of AFM images of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurden, S P; Monteiro, V F; Longo, E; Ferreira, M M C

    2004-07-01

    The surface topography of human hair, as defined by the outer layer of cellular sheets, termed cuticles, largely determines the cosmetic properties of the hair. The condition of the cuticles is of great cosmetic importance, but also has the potential to aid diagnosis in the medical and forensic sciences. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been demonstrated to offer unique advantages for analysis of the hair surface, mainly due to the high image resolution and the ease of sample preparation. This article presents an algorithm for the automatic analysis of AFM images of human hair. The cuticular structure is characterized using a series of descriptors, such as step height, tilt angle and cuticle density, allowing quantitative analysis and comparison of different images. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated by a classification study. Thirty-eight AFM images were measured, consisting of hair samples from (a) untreated and bleached hair samples, and (b) the root and distal ends of the hair fibre. The multivariate classification technique partial least squares discriminant analysis is used to test the ability of the algorithm to characterize the images according to the properties of the hair samples. Most of the images (86%) were found to be classified correctly.

  18. AFM imaging of functionalized carbon nanotubes on biological membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamprecht, C; Danzberger, J; Rangl, M; Gruber, H J; Hinterdorfer, P; Kienberger, F; Ebner, A; Liashkovich, I; Neves, V; Heister, E; Coley, H M; McFadden, J; Flahaut, E

    2009-01-01

    Multifunctional carbon nanotubes are promising for biomedical applications as their nano-size, together with their physical stability, gives access into the cell and various cellular compartments including the nucleus. However, the direct and label-free detection of carbon nanotube uptake into cells is a challenging task. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of resolving details of cellular surfaces at the nanometer scale and thus allows following of the docking of carbon nanotubes to biological membranes. Here we present topographical AFM images of non-covalently functionalized single walled (SWNT) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) immobilized on different biological membranes, such as plasma membranes and nuclear envelopes, as well as on a monolayer of avidin molecules. We were able to visualize DWNT on the nuclear membrane while at the same time resolving individual nuclear pore complexes. Furthermore, we succeeded in localizing individual SWNT at the border of incubated cells and in identifying bundles of DWNT on cell surfaces by AFM imaging.

  19. Restoration of high-resolution AFM images captured with broken probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. F.; Corrigan, D.; Forman, C.; Jarvis, S.; Kokaram, A.

    2012-03-01

    A type of artefact is induced by damage of the scanning probe when the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) captures a material surface structure with nanoscale resolution. This artefact has a dramatic form of distortion rather than the traditional blurring artefacts. Practically, it is not easy to prevent the damage of the scanning probe. However, by using natural image deblurring techniques in image processing domain, a comparatively reliable estimation of the real sample surface structure can be generated. This paper introduces a novel Hough Transform technique as well as a Bayesian deblurring algorithm to remove this type of artefact. The deblurring result is successful at removing blur artefacts in the AFM artefact images. And the details of the fibril surface topography are well preserved.

  20. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  1. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yongda, E-mail: yanyongda@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing of Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Xue, Bo [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing of Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen [Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods. - Highlights: • The AFM tips with different radii were simulated to scan a nano-step structure. • The spectra of the simulation scans under different radii were analyzed. • The functions of tip radius and harmonic amplitude were used for evaluating tip. • The proposed method has been validated by SEM imaging and blind reconstruction.

  2. Statistical analysis of AFM topographic images of self-assembled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevriuk, V. A.; Brunkov, P. N., E-mail: brunkov@mail.ioffe.ru; Shalnev, I. V.; Gutkin, A. A.; Klimko, G. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Konnikov, S. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    To obtain statistical data on quantum-dot sizes, AFM topographic images of the substrate on which the dots under study are grown are analyzed. Due to the nonideality of the substrate containing height differences on the order of the size of nanoparticles at distances of 1-10 {mu}m and the insufficient resolution of closely arranged dots due to the finite curvature radius of the AFM probe, automation of the statistical analysis of their large dot array requires special techniques for processing topographic images to eliminate the loss of a particle fraction during conventional processing. As such a technique, convolution of the initial matrix of the AFM image with a specially selected matrix is used. This makes it possible to determine the position of each nanoparticle and, using the initial matrix, to measure their geometrical parameters. The results of statistical analysis by this method of self-assembled InAs quantum dots formed on the surface of an AlGaAs epitaxial layer are presented. It is shown that their concentration, average size, and half-width of height distribution depend strongly on the In flow and total amount of deposited InAs which are varied within insignificant limits.

  3. Methodological development of topographic correction in 2D/3D ToF-SIMS images using AFM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seokwon; Lee, Nodo; Choi, Myungshin; Lee, Jungmin; Cho, Eunkyunng; Joo, Minho

    2018-02-01

    Time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is an emerging technique that provides chemical information directly from the surface of electronic materials, e.g. OLED and solar cell. It is very versatile and highly sensitive mass spectrometric technique that provides surface molecular information with their lateral distribution as a two-dimensional (2D) molecular image. Extending the usefulness of ToF-SIMS, a 3D molecular image can be generated by acquiring multiple 2D images in a stack. These imaging techniques by ToF-SIMS provide an insight into understanding the complex structures of unknown composition in electronic material. However, one drawback in ToF-SIMS is not able to represent topographical information in 2D and 3D mapping images. To overcome this technical limitation, topographic information by ex-situ technique such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been combined with chemical information from SIMS that provides both chemical and physical information in one image. The key to combine two different images obtained from ToF-SIMS and AFM techniques is to develop the image processing algorithm, which performs resize and alignment by comparing the specific pixel information of each image. In this work, we present methodological development of the semiautomatic alignment and the 3D structure interpolation system for the combination of 2D/3D images obtained by ToF-SIMS and AFM measurements, which allows providing useful analytical information in a single representation.

  4. Investigations of environmental induced effects on AlQ3 thin films by AFM phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Vivek Kumar; Kumar, Satyendra

    2007-01-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) metal complex (AlQ 3 ) is a widely used light-emitting material in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The environmental stability is still a major problem with OLEDs and needs further improvement. In this report, an additional feature of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was exploited with the aim to understand the environmental induced effects and physical phenomenon involved on AlQ 3 thin films. We have used phase imaging to identify the presence of other aggregation phases formed after annealing the thin film in different ambient and after white light exposure. An enhanced photoluminescence intensity is observed for the samples annealed in oxygen near 100 deg. C. The enhanced photoluminescence is understood in terms of formation of a new aggregation phase. The phase change and the fraction of new phase is estimated by phase images taken by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Light induced effects on AlQ 3 films exposed to white light in air and vacuum are characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface morphology and phases present. The AFM images indicate enhanced crystallinity for the vacuum exposed samples. The phase with increased lifetime and hence enhanced crystallinity for vacuum exposed films has also been found by time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements. To the best of our knowledge, this study is applied for the first time on this material with the combination of topography and phase imaging in atomic force microscopy (AFM). The major aim was to take advantage of the additional feature of AFM-mode over the conventionally used

  5. Measuring bacterial cells size with AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Osiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images of bacteria revealing surface details and cell integrity. During scanning however, the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane results in distortion of the images. Such distortions or artifacts are the result of geometrical effects related to bacterial cell height, specimen curvature and the AFM probe geometry. The most common artifact in imaging is surface broadening, what can lead to errors in bacterial sizing. Several methods of correction have been proposed to compensate for these artifacts and in this study we describe a simple geometric model for the interaction between the tip (a pyramidal shaped AFM probe and the bacterium (Escherichia coli JM-109 strain to minimize the enlarging effect. Approaches to bacteria immobilization and examples of AFM images analysis are also described.

  6. Neutron detection using CR-39 and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez L, C.; Fragoso, R.; Felix, R.; Golzarri, J.I.; Espinosa, G.; Castillo, F.

    2007-01-01

    AFM has been applied in many CR-39 track formation analyses. In this paper, the use of AFM in the neutron detection and analysis of the track formation is reported. The irradiation was made with an 1.5 GBq (0.5 Ci) 241 Am-Be neutron source, with and without a polyethylene radiator. The surface analysis was made to the CR-39 fresh material without irradiation, after the irradiation, and after a very short etching time. The results show important differences between the irradiation, with and without polyethylene radiator, and the latent tracks of the neutron in the CR-39 polycarbonate. The development of track formation after very short etching time and pits characterization were measured too using the AFM facilities. (Author)

  7. Automatic determination of the size of elliptical nanoparticles from AFM images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlář, Jiří; Zitová, Barbara; Kopeček, Jaromír; Flusser, Jan; Todorciuc, Tatiana; Kratochvílová, Irena

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an accurate method for automatic determination of the size of elliptical nanoparticles from atomic force microscopy (AFM) images that would yield results consistent with results of manual measurements by experts. The proposed method was applied on phenylpyridyldiketopyrrolopyrrole (PPDP), a granular organic material with a wide scale of application and highly sensitive particle-size properties. A PPDP layer consists of similarly sized elliptical particles (c. 100 nm × 50 nm) and its properties can be estimated from the average length and width of the particles. The developed method is based on segmentation of salient particles by the watershed transform and approximation of their shapes by ellipses computed by image moments; it estimates the lengths and widths of the particles by the major and minor axes, respectively, of the corresponding ellipses. Its results proved to be consistent with results of manual measurements by a trained expert. The comparison showed that the developed method could be used in practice for precise automatic measurement of PPDP particles in AFM images

  8. Surface analysis with STM and AFM

    CERN Document Server

    Magonov, Sergi N

    1996-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are powerful tools for surface examination. In the past, many STM and AFM studies led to erroneous conclusions due to lack of proper theoretical considerations and of an understanding of how image patterns are affected by measurement conditions. For this book, two world experts, one on theoretical analysis and the other on experimental characterization, have joined forces to bring together essential components of STM and AFM studies: The practical aspects of STM, the image simulation by surface electron density plot calculat

  9. Improving the speed of AFM by mechatronic design and modern control methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schitter, Georg

    2009-01-01

    In Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) high-performance and high-precision control of the AFM scanner and of the imaging forces is crucial. Particularly at high imaging speeds the dynamic behaviour of the scanner may cause imaging artifacts and limit the maximum imaging rate. This contribution discusses and presents recent improvements in AFM instrumentation for faster imaging by means of mechatronic design and utilizing modern control engineering methods. Combining these improvements enables AFM imaging at more than two orders of magnitudes faster than conventional AFMs. (orig.)

  10. High-speed AFM of human chromosomes in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picco, L M; Dunton, P G; Ulcinas, A; Engledew, D J; Miles, M J [H H Wills Physics Laboratory and IRC in Nanotechnology, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Hoshi, O; Ushiki, T [Division of Microscopic Anatomy and Bio-Imaging, Department of Cellular Function, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Asahimachi-Dori 1, Niigata, 951-8150 (Japan)], E-mail: m.j.miles@bristol.ac.uk

    2008-09-24

    Further developments of the previously reported high-speed contact-mode AFM are described. The technique is applied to the imaging of human chromosomes at video rate both in air and in water. These are the largest structures to have been imaged with high-speed AFM and the first imaging in liquid to be reported. A possible mechanism that allows such high-speed contact-mode imaging without significant damage to the sample is discussed in the context of the velocity dependence of the measured lateral force on the AFM tip.

  11. A new approach of recognition of ellipsoidal micro- and nanoparticles on AFM images and determination of their sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmadeev, Albert A; Kh Salakhov, Myakzyum

    2016-01-01

    In this work we develop an approach of automatic recognition of ellipsoidal particles on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image and determination of their size, which is based on image segmentation and the surface approximation by ellipsoids. In addition to the comparative simplicity and rapidity of processing, this method allows us to determine the size of particles, the surface of which is not completely visible on the image. The proposed method showed good results on simulated images including noisy ones. Using this algorithm the size distributions of silica particles on experimental AFM images have been determined. (paper)

  12. Nanospot soldering polystyrene nanoparticles with an optical fiber probe laser irradiating a metallic AFM probe based on the near-field enhancement effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianlei; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Yang; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Hou, Chaojian

    2015-02-04

    With the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology for the bottom-up nanofabrication of nanostructures formed from polystyrene nanoparticles, joining technology is an essential step in the manufacturing and assembly of nanodevices and nanostructures in order to provide mechanical integration and connection. To study the nanospot welding of polystyrene nanoparticles, we propose a new nanospot-soldering method using the near-field enhancement effect of a metallic atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip that is irradiated by an optical fiber probe laser. On the basis of our theoretical analysis of the near-field enhancement effect, we set up an experimental system for nanospot soldering; this approach is carried out by using an optical fiber probe laser to irradiate the AFM probe tip to sinter the nanoparticles, providing a promising technical approach for the application of nanosoldering in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  13. Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit by SNEM: effects of AFM tip modifications with thiol monolayers on imaging quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Diaz, Jordi; Lindsay, Ian D; de Beer, Sissi; Duvigneau, Joost; Schön, Peter; Julius Vancso, G

    2015-03-01

    Tip-enhanced nanoscale optical imaging techniques such as apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (a-SNOM) and scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) applications can suffer from a steady degradation in performance due to adhesion of atmospheric contaminants to the metal coated tip. Here, we demonstrate that a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of ethanethiol (EtSH) is an effective means of protecting gold-coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tips from accumulation of surface contaminants during prolonged exposure to ambient air. The period over which they yield consistent and reproducible results for scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) imaging is thus extended. SNEM optical images of a microphase separated polystyrene-block-poly (methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer film, which were captured with bare and SAM-protected gold-coated AFM probes, both immediately after coating and following five days of storage in ambient air, were compared. During this period the intensity of the optical signals from the untreated gold tip fell by 66%, while those from the SAM protected tip fell by 14%. Additionally, gold coated AFM probe tips were modified with various lengths of alkanethiols to measure the change in intensity variation in the optical images with SAM layer thickness. The experimental results were compared to point dipole model calculations. While a SAM of 1-dodecanethiol (DoSH) was found to strongly suppress field enhancement we find that it can be locally removed from the tip apex by deforming the molecules under load, restoring SNEM image contrast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. tRNA conjugation with chitosan nanoparticles: An AFM imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-04-01

    The conjugation of tRNA with chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes 15,100 and 200 kDa was investigated in aqueous solution using multiple spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Structural analysis showed that chitosan binds tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs as well as backbone PO2 group, through electrostatic, hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of KCh-15-tRNA=4.1 (±0.60)×10(3)M(-1), KCh-100-tRNA=5.7 (±0.8)×10(3)M(-1) and KCh-200-tRNA=1.2 (±0.3)×10(4)M(-1). As chitosan size increases more stable polymer-tRNA conjugate is formed. AFM images showed major tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred as chitosan concentration increased. Even though chitosan induced major biopolymer structural changes, tRNA remains in A-family structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multifractural analysis of AFM images of Nb thin film surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altajskij, M.V; Chernenko, L.P.; Balebanov, V.M.; Erokhin, N.S.; Moiseev, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    The multifractal analysis of the atomic Force Microscope (AFM) images of the Niobium (Nb) thin film surfaces has been performed. These Nb films are being used for the measurements of the London penetration depth of stationary magnetic field by polarized neutron reflectometry. The analysis shows the behavior of Renyi dimensions of images (in the range of available scales 6-2000 nm), like the known multifractal p-model, with typical Hausdorff dimension of prevalent color in the range of 1.6-1.9. This indicates the fractal nature of film landscape on those scales. The perspective of new mechanism of order parameter suppression on superconductor-vacuum boundary, manifested in anomalous magnetic field penetration in discussed

  16. Three-channel false colour AFM images for improved interpretation of complex surfaces: A study of filamentous cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurk, Toby; Adams, David G.; Connell, Simon D.; Thomson, Neil H.

    2010-01-01

    Imaging signals derived from the atomic force microscope (AFM) are typically presented as separate adjacent images with greyscale or pseudo-colour palettes. We propose that information-rich false-colour composites are a useful means of presenting three-channel AFM image data. This method can aid the interpretation of complex surfaces and facilitate the perception of information that is convoluted across data channels. We illustrate this approach with images of filamentous cyanobacteria imaged in air and under aqueous buffer, using both deflection-modulation (contact) mode and amplitude-modulation (tapping) mode. Topography-dependent contrast in the error and tertiary signals aids the interpretation of the topography signal by contributing additional data, resulting in a more detailed image, and by showing variations in the probe-surface interaction. Moreover, topography-independent contrast and topography-dependent contrast in the tertiary data image (phase or friction) can be distinguished more easily as a consequence of the three dimensional colour-space.

  17. Three-channel false colour AFM images for improved interpretation of complex surfaces: A study of filamentous cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurk, Toby, E-mail: phytak@leeds.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Adams, David G., E-mail: D.G.Adams@leeds.ac.uk [Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Connell, Simon D., E-mail: S.D.A.Connell@leeds.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Thomson, Neil H., E-mail: N.H.Thomson@leeds.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Dental Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Imaging signals derived from the atomic force microscope (AFM) are typically presented as separate adjacent images with greyscale or pseudo-colour palettes. We propose that information-rich false-colour composites are a useful means of presenting three-channel AFM image data. This method can aid the interpretation of complex surfaces and facilitate the perception of information that is convoluted across data channels. We illustrate this approach with images of filamentous cyanobacteria imaged in air and under aqueous buffer, using both deflection-modulation (contact) mode and amplitude-modulation (tapping) mode. Topography-dependent contrast in the error and tertiary signals aids the interpretation of the topography signal by contributing additional data, resulting in a more detailed image, and by showing variations in the probe-surface interaction. Moreover, topography-independent contrast and topography-dependent contrast in the tertiary data image (phase or friction) can be distinguished more easily as a consequence of the three dimensional colour-space.

  18. Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit by SNEM: Effects of AFM tip modifications with thiol monolayers on imaging quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede NL-7500 (Netherlands); Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P.O. Box 902, 5600 AX, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Diaz, Jordi [Scientific and Technological Centers of the University of Barcelona, C/ Lluís Solé i Sabaris, 1-3, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lindsay, Ian D. [Nanophysics and Soft Matter Group, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Beer, Sissi de; Duvigneau, Joost [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede NL-7500 (Netherlands); Schön, Peter [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede NL-7500 (Netherlands); NanoBioInterface, Research Center Design and Technology, Saxion University of Applied Sciences, 7500 KB Enschede (Netherlands); Julius Vancso, G., E-mail: g.j.vancso@utwente.nl [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede NL-7500 (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Tip-enhanced nanoscale optical imaging techniques such as apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (a-SNOM) and scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) applications can suffer from a steady degradation in performance due to adhesion of atmospheric contaminants to the metal coated tip. Here, we demonstrate that a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of ethanethiol (EtSH) is an effective means of protecting gold-coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tips from accumulation of surface contaminants during prolonged exposure to ambient air. The period over which they yield consistent and reproducible results for scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) imaging is thus extended. SNEM optical images of a microphase separated polystyrene-block-poly (methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer film, which were captured with bare and SAM-protected gold-coated AFM probes, both immediately after coating and following five days of storage in ambient air, were compared. During this period the intensity of the optical signals from the untreated gold tip fell by 66%, while those from the SAM protected tip fell by 14%. Additionally, gold coated AFM probe tips were modified with various lengths of alkanethiols to measure the change in intensity variation in the optical images with SAM layer thickness. The experimental results were compared to point dipole model calculations. While a SAM of 1-dodecanethiol (DoSH) was found to strongly suppress field enhancement we find that it can be locally removed from the tip apex by deforming the molecules under load, restoring SNEM image contrast. - Highlights: • SAM of ethanethiol is used to prevent contamination of gold coated tips. • Functionalizing gold coated tips with a SAM lead to reproducible SNEM imaging. • Point dipole model agreed with the experimental results of the SNEM images. • SAM of 1-dodecanethiol was found to strongly suppress field enhancement in SNEM. • SAM of 1-dodecanethiol

  19. AFM imaging and fractal analysis of surface roughness of AlN epilayers on sapphire substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallaeva, Dinara, E-mail: dinara.dallaeva@yandex.ru [Brno University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication, Physics Department, Technická 8, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Ţălu, Ştefan [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of AET, Discipline of Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Graphics, 103-105 B-dul Muncii Street, Cluj-Napoca 400641, Cluj (Romania); Stach, Sebastian [University of Silesia, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, Institute of Informatics, Department of Biomedical Computer Systems, ul. Będzińska 39, 41-205 Sosnowiec (Poland); Škarvada, Pavel; Tománek, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír [Brno University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication, Physics Department, Technická 8, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We determined the complexity of 3D surface roughness of aluminum nitride layers. • We used atomic force microscopy and analyzed their fractal geometry. • We determined the fractal dimension of surface roughness of aluminum nitride layers. • We determined the dependence of layer morphology on substrate temperature. - Abstract: The paper deals with AFM imaging and characterization of 3D surface morphology of aluminum nitride (AlN) epilayers on sapphire substrates prepared by magnetron sputtering. Due to the effect of temperature changes on epilayer's surface during the fabrication, a surface morphology is studied by combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fractal analysis methods. Both methods are useful tools that may assist manufacturers in developing and fabricating AlN thin films with optimal surface characteristics. Furthermore, they provide different yet complementary information to that offered by traditional surface statistical parameters. This combination is used for the first time for measurement on AlN epilayers on sapphire substrates, and provides the overall 3D morphology of the sample surfaces (by AFM imaging), and reveals fractal characteristics in the surface morphology (fractal analysis)

  20. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    OpenAIRE

    G. Helas; M. O. Andreae

    2008-01-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly...

  1. Optimization of specimen preparation of thin cell section for AFM observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xinhui [Nanobiology Laboratory, Bio-X Life Science Research Center, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ji Tong [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Affiliated Ninth People' s Hospital, Medical School, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200011 (China); Hu Jun [Nanobiology Laboratory, Bio-X Life Science Research Center, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Sun Jielin [Nanobiology Laboratory, Bio-X Life Science Research Center, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: jlsun@sjtu.edu.cn

    2008-08-15

    High resolution imaging of intracellular structures of ultrathin cell section samples is critical to the performance of precise manipulation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Here, we test the effect of multiple factors during section sample preparation on the quality of the AFM image. These factors include the embedding materials, the annealing process of the specimen block, section thickness, and section side. We found that neither the embedding materials nor the temperature and speed of the annealing process has any effect on AFM image resolution. However, the section thickness and section side significantly affect the surface topography and AFM image resolution. By systematically testing the image quality of both sides of cell sections over a wide range of thickness (40-1000 nm), we found that the best resolution was obtained with upper-side sections approximately 50-100 nm thick. With these samples, we could observe precise structure details of the cell, including its membrane, nucleoli, and other organelles. Similar results were obtained for other cell types, including Tca8113, C6, and ECV-304. In brief, by optimizing the condition of ultrathin cell section preparation, we were able to obtain high resolution intracellular AFM images, which provide an essential basis for further AFM manipulation.

  2. Multiple regimes of operation in bimodal AFM: understanding the energy of cantilever eigenmodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kiracofe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key goals in atomic force microscopy (AFM imaging is to enhance material property contrast with high resolution. Bimodal AFM, where two eigenmodes are simultaneously excited, confers significant advantages over conventional single-frequency tapping mode AFM due to its ability to provide contrast between regions with different material properties under gentle imaging conditions. Bimodal AFM traditionally uses the first two eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever. In this work, the authors explore the use of higher eigenmodes in bimodal AFM (e.g., exciting the first and fourth eigenmodes. It is found that such operation leads to interesting contrast reversals compared to traditional bimodal AFM. A series of experiments and numerical simulations shows that the primary cause of the contrast reversals is not the choice of eigenmode itself (e.g., second versus fourth, but rather the relative kinetic energy between the higher eigenmode and the first eigenmode. This leads to the identification of three distinct imaging regimes in bimodal AFM. This result, which is applicable even to traditional bimodal AFM, should allow researchers to choose cantilever and operating parameters in a more rational manner in order to optimize resolution and contrast during nanoscale imaging of materials.

  3. Neural network approximation of tip-abrasion effects in AFM imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakucz, Peter; Dziomba, Thorsten; Koenders, Ludger; Krüger-Sehm, Rolf; Yacoot, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The abrasion (wear) of tips used in scanning force microscopy (SFM) directly influences SFM image quality and is therefore of great relevance to quantitative SFM measurements. The increasing implementation of automated SFM measurement schemes has become a strong driving force for increasing efforts towards the prediction of tip wear, as it needs to be ensured that the probe is exchanged before a level of tip wear is reached that adversely affects the measurement quality. In this paper, we describe the identification of tip abrasion in a system of SFM measurements. We attempt to model the tip-abrasion process as a concatenation of a mapping from the measured AFM data to a regression vector and a nonlinear mapping from the regressor space to the output space. The mapping is formed as a basis function expansion. Feedforward neural networks are used to approximate this mapping. The one-hidden layer network gave a good quality of fit for the training and test sets for the tip-abrasion system. We illustrate our method with AFM measurements of both fine periodic structures and randomly oriented sharp features and compare our neural network results with those obtained using other methods

  4. Neural network approximation of tip-abrasion effects in AFM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakucz, Peter; Yacoot, Andrew; Dziomba, Thorsten; Koenders, Ludger; Krüger-Sehm, Rolf

    2008-06-01

    The abrasion (wear) of tips used in scanning force microscopy (SFM) directly influences SFM image quality and is therefore of great relevance to quantitative SFM measurements. The increasing implementation of automated SFM measurement schemes has become a strong driving force for increasing efforts towards the prediction of tip wear, as it needs to be ensured that the probe is exchanged before a level of tip wear is reached that adversely affects the measurement quality. In this paper, we describe the identification of tip abrasion in a system of SFM measurements. We attempt to model the tip-abrasion process as a concatenation of a mapping from the measured AFM data to a regression vector and a nonlinear mapping from the regressor space to the output space. The mapping is formed as a basis function expansion. Feedforward neural networks are used to approximate this mapping. The one-hidden layer network gave a good quality of fit for the training and test sets for the tip-abrasion system. We illustrate our method with AFM measurements of both fine periodic structures and randomly oriented sharp features and compare our neural network results with those obtained using other methods.

  5. AFM imaging and analysis of local mechanical properties for detection of surface pattern of functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knotek, Petr, E-mail: petr.knotek@upce.cz [University of Pardubice, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Joint Laboratory of Solid State Chemistry of IMC ASCR and University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Chanova, Eliska; Rypacek, Frantisek [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovskeho sq. 2, 162 06 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01

    In this work we evaluate the applicability of different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes, such as Phase Shift Imaging, Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy (AFAM) and Force Spectroscopy, for mapping of the distribution pattern of low-molecular-weight biomimetic groups on polymer biomaterial surfaces. Patterns with either random or clustered spatial distribution of bioactive peptide group derived from fibronectin were prepared by surface deposition of functional block copolymer nano-colloids and grafted with RGDS peptide containing the sequence of amino acids arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–serine (conventionally labeled as RGDS) and carrying biotin as a tag. The biotin-tagged peptides were labeled with 40 nm streptavidin-modified Au nanospheres. The peptide molecules were localized through the detection of bound Au nanospheres by AFM, and thus, the surface distribution of peptides was revealed. AFM techniques capable of monitoring local mechanical properties of the surface were proved to be the most efficient for identification of Au nano-markers. The efficiency was successfully demonstrated on two different patterns, i.e. random and clustered distribution of RGDS peptides on structured surface of the polymer biomaterial. Highlights: ► Bioactive peptides for cell adhesion on PLA-b-PEO biomimetic surface were visualized. ► The biotin-tagged RGDS peptides were labeled with streptavidin-Au nanospheres. ► The RGDS pattern was detected using different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes. ► Phase Shift Image was proved to be suitable method for studying peptide distribution.

  6. AFM (Atomic force microscope and its use in studying the surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škvarla Jiří

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the present knowledge about the use of AFM in the mineral processing research. First, the development and fundamentals of the AFM imaging are presented in relation to other imaging techniques (especially STM, Scanning tunneling microscope. Further, the role of the sensing tip-surface interactions is mentioned. Finally, the surface force measurements in the AFM force calibration mode are diskussed.

  7. AFM indentation study of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Q.S.; Lee, G.Y.H.; Ong, C.N.; Lim, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical properties of individual living cells are known to be closely related to the health and function of the human body. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation using a micro-sized spherical probe was carried out to characterize the elasticity of benign (MCF-10A) and cancerous (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells. AFM imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging were also used to investigate their corresponding sub-membrane cytoskeletal structures. Malignant (MCF-7) breast cells were found to have an apparent Young's modulus significantly lower (1.4-1.8 times) than that of their non-malignant (MCF-10A) counterparts at physiological temperature (37 deg. C), and their apparent Young's modulus increase with loading rate. Both confocal and AFM images showed a significant difference in the organization of their sub-membrane actin structures which directly contribute to their difference in cell elasticity. This change may have facilitated easy migration and invasion of malignant cells during metastasis

  8. AFM tip-sample convolution effects for cylinder protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Fei-Hu; Gan, Yang

    2017-11-01

    A thorough understanding about the AFM tip geometry dependent artifacts and tip-sample convolution effect is essential for reliable AFM topographic characterization and dimensional metrology. Using rigid sapphire cylinder protrusions (diameter: 2.25 μm, height: 575 nm) as the model system, a systematic and quantitative study about the imaging artifacts of four types of tips-two different pyramidal tips, one tetrahedral tip and one super sharp whisker tip-is carried out through comparing tip geometry dependent variations in AFM topography of cylinders and constructing the rigid tip-cylinder convolution models. We found that the imaging artifacts and the tip-sample convolution effect are critically related to the actual inclination of the working cantilever, the tip geometry, and the obstructive contacts between the working tip's planes/edges and the cylinder. Artifact-free images can only be obtained provided that all planes and edges of the working tip are steeper than the cylinder sidewalls. The findings reported here will contribute to reliable AFM characterization of surface features of micron or hundreds of nanometers in height that are frequently met in semiconductor, biology and materials fields.

  9. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM phase images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  10. Replication and dimensional quality control of industrial nanoscale surfaces using calibrated AFM measurements and SEM image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Marinello, F.

    2010-01-01

    application of AFM to calibrate height, depth and pitch of sub-micrometer features and SEM image processing to detect replication accuracy in terms of number of replicated features. Surface replication is analyzed using a metrological approach: nano-features on nickel stampers and injection...

  11. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPC1 channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, Nelson P.; Shaifta, Yasin; McFadzean, Ian; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential C1 (TRPC1) channel by imaging isolated channels using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of individual channel particles had two peaks, at 170 and 720 nm 3 , corresponding with the expected sizes of TRPC1 monomers and tetramers, respectively. Complexes were formed between TRPC1 channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 88 o and 178 o . This result again indicates that the channel assembles as a tetramer

  12. Simulated structure and imaging of NTCDI on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 : a combined STM, NC-AFM and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, S. P.; Sweetman, A. M.; Lekkas, I.; Champness, N. R.; Kantorovich, L.; Moriarty, P.

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide (NTCDI) on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 is investigated through a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We show that NTCDI adopts multiple planar adsorption geometries on the Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 surface which can be imaged with intramolecular bond resolution using NC-AFM. DFT calculations reveal adsorption is dominated by covalent bond formation between the molecular oxygen atoms and the surface silicon adatoms. The chemisorption of the molecule is found to induce subtle distortions to the molecular structure, which are observed in NC-AFM images.

  13. Carboxylated nanodiamonds inhibit γ-irradiation damage of human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K; Silva-Campa, E; Melendrez-Amavizca, R; Teran Arce, F; Mata-Haro, V; Landon, P B; Zhang, C; Pedroza-Montero, M; Lal, R

    2016-04-07

    Nanodiamonds when carboxylated (cNDs) act as reducing agents and hence could limit oxidative damage in biological systems. Gamma (γ)-irradiation of whole blood or its components is required in immunocompetent patients to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). However, γ-irradiation of blood also deoxygenates red blood cells (RBCs) and induces oxidative damage, including abnormalities in cellular membranes and hemolysis. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we examined the effect of cNDs on γ-irradiation mediated deoxygenation and morphological damage of RBCs. γ-Radiation induced several morphological phenotypes, including stomatocytes, codocytes and echinocytes. While stomatocytes and codocytes are reversibly damaged RBCs, echinocytes are irreversibly damaged. AFM images show significantly fewer echinocytes among cND-treated γ-irradiated RBCs. The Raman spectra of γ-irradiated RBCs had more oxygenated hemoglobin patterns when cND-treated, resembling those of normal, non-irradiated RBCs, compared to the non-cND-treated RBCs. cND inhibited hemoglobin deoxygenation and morphological damage, possibly by neutralizing the free radicals generated during γ-irradiation. Thus cNDs have the therapeutic potential to preserve the quality of stored blood following γ-irradiation.

  14. Investigations on 40 MeV Li3+ ions irradiated GaN epilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, V.; Kumar, J.; Kanjilal, D.; Asokan, K.; Mohanty, T.; Tripathi, A.; Rossi, Francisca; Zappettini, A.; Lazzarani, L.; Ferrari, C.

    2008-01-01

    The Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD) grown n-type Gallium nitride (GaN) layers on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates have been irradiated at low and room temperatures with 40 MeV Li 3+ ions at the fluence of 1 x 10 13 ions cm -2 . Irradiated samples were characterised by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). XRD results show that the formation of Ga 2 O 3 has been observed upon irradiation. This is due to interface mixing of GaN/Al 2 O 3 , at both temperatures. Also the GaN (0 0 0 2) peak splits into two at low temperature irradiation. PL measurements show a yellow emission band shift towards blue band side upon irradiation at 77 K. Raman studies indicate that the lattice disorder is high at room temperature irradiation compared to low temperature irradiation. AFM images indicate the increasing surface roughness after ion irradiation at room temperature when compared to pristine GaN and low temperature irradiated GaN. These observations are discussed in detail with the use of complementary techniques

  15. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  16. A study on the influence of surface active agent molecules on the AFM scanning and imaging of SWCNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Ke; Yu Haibo; Tian Xiaojun; Dong Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wu Chengdong [Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)], E-mail: xuke08@sia.cn

    2009-09-01

    The paper proposed a preprocessing method for scanning samples based on rinsing technology, and solved the effective fabrication problem of AFM scanning samples based on facilitated dispersing SWCNTs with SDS surface active agents. First, the ultrasonication oscillation method was applied, and the uniform alignment of SWCNTs in SDS was realized. Then, SDS solution of different concentrations was scanned and imaged with AFM, the influence of SDS solution on the imaging quality of SWCNTs was analyzed, and the method to effectively fabricate scanning samples after dispersing SWCNTs was found. The results of the experiments showed that the preprocessing of the SWCNTs solution scanning samples was the decisive factor to influence SWCNTs imaging quality, that the result of rinsing SWCNTs scanning samples for 5s at 0.1ml/s with di-ionized water was the best, and that with the same rinsing rate and angle, the rinsing di-ionized water quantity would influence the alignment degree of SWCNTs on the substrates and SDS macromolecules' residual quantity on SWCNTs scanning samples.

  17. Recent developments in dimensional nanometrology using AFMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger

    2011-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopes, in particular the atomic force microscope (AFM), have developed into sophisticated instruments that, throughout the world, are no longer used just for imaging, but for quantitative measurements. A role of the national measurement institutes has been to provide traceable metrology for these instruments. This paper presents a brief overview as to how this has been achieved, highlights the future requirements for metrology to support developments in AFM technology and describes work in progress to meet this need.

  18. Recent developments in dimensional nanometrology using AFMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger

    2011-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopes, in particular the atomic force microscope (AFM), have developed into sophisticated instruments that, throughout the world, are no longer used just for imaging, but for quantitative measurements. A role of the national measurement institutes has been to provide traceable metrology for these instruments. This paper presents a brief overview as to how this has been achieved, highlights the future requirements for metrology to support developments in AFM technology and describes work in progress to meet this need. (perspective)

  19. High-speed AFM for Studying Dynamic Biomolecular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Biological molecules show their vital activities only in aqueous solutions. It had been one of dreams in biological sciences to directly observe biological macromolecules (protein, DNA) at work under a physiological condition because such observation is straightforward to understanding their dynamic behaviors and functional mechanisms. Optical microscopy has no sufficient spatial resolution and electron microscopy is not applicable to in-liquid samples. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize molecules in liquids at high resolution but its imaging rate was too low to capture dynamic biological processes. This slow imaging rate is because AFM employs mechanical probes (cantilevers) and mechanical scanners to detect the sample height at each pixel. It is quite difficult to quickly move a mechanical device of macroscopic size with sub-nanometer accuracy without producing unwanted vibrations. It is also difficult to maintain the delicate contact between a probe tip and fragile samples. Two key techniques are required to realize high-speed AFM for biological research; fast feedback control to maintain a weak tip-sample interaction force and a technique to suppress mechanical vibrations of the scanner. Various efforts have been carried out in the past decade to materialize high-speed AFM. The current high-speed AFM can capture images on video at 30-60 frames/s for a scan range of 250nm and 100 scan lines, without significantly disturbing week biomolecular interaction. Our recent studies demonstrated that this new microscope can reveal biomolecular processes such as myosin V walking along actin tracks and association/dissociation dynamics of chaperonin GroEL-GroES that occurs in a negatively cooperative manner. The capacity of nanometer-scale visualization of dynamic processes in liquids will innovate on biological research. In addition, it will open a new way to study dynamic chemical/physical processes of various phenomena that occur at the liquid-solid interfaces.

  20. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  1. Noise in NC-AFM measurements with significant tip–sample interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannis Lübbe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency shift noise in non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM imaging and spectroscopy consists of thermal noise and detection system noise with an additional contribution from amplitude noise if there are significant tip–sample interactions. The total noise power spectral density DΔf(fm is, however, not just the sum of these noise contributions. Instead its magnitude and spectral characteristics are determined by the strongly non-linear tip–sample interaction, by the coupling between the amplitude and tip–sample distance control loops of the NC-AFM system as well as by the characteristics of the phase locked loop (PLL detector used for frequency demodulation. Here, we measure DΔf(fm for various NC-AFM parameter settings representing realistic measurement conditions and compare experimental data to simulations based on a model of the NC-AFM system that includes the tip–sample interaction. The good agreement between predicted and measured noise spectra confirms that the model covers the relevant noise contributions and interactions. Results yield a general understanding of noise generation and propagation in the NC-AFM and provide a quantitative prediction of noise for given experimental parameters. We derive strategies for noise-optimised imaging and spectroscopy and outline a full optimisation procedure for the instrumentation and control loops.

  2. Noncontact AFM Imaging of Atomic Defects on the Rutile TiO2 (110) Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jeppe Vang

    2015-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) operated in the noncontact mode (nc-AFM) offers a unique tool for real space, atomic-scale characterisation of point defects and molecules on surfaces, irrespective of the substrate being electrically conducting or non-conducting. The nc-AFM has therefore in rece...

  3. Study on grafting glycidyl methacrylate onto HDPE membranes by pre-irradiation graft copolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Long; Zu Jianhua; Liu Xinwen; Sun Guisheng; Yu Chunhui

    2006-01-01

    Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was grafted onto HDPE membranes by pre-irradiation method with 1.8 MeV E-beam and a kind of membranes having reactive epoxy groups was successfully synthesized. Effects of monomer concentration, reaction temperature and time and irradiation dose on the grafting yield were studied. Composition, thermo-property and surface morphology of the grafted membranes were studied by FTIR, DSC and Tapping-mode AFM, respectively. The FTIR measurements proved the synthesized copolymer is HDPE-g-GMA. The DSC results indicated the grafted HDPE's melting temperature (T m ) and heat of fusion (ΔH f ( HDPE) ) which was reduced with increasing grafting yield. The AFM images indicated that surface of the HDPE-g-GMA membranes was rougher than the virgin HDPE. (authors)

  4. AFM imaging of bacteria in liquid media immobilized on gelatin coated mica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, M.J.; Sullivan, C.J.; Hoyt, P.R.; Pelletier, D.A.; Wu, S.; Allison, D.P

    2003-10-15

    Immobilization of particulates, especially biomolecules and cells, onto surfaces is critical for imaging with the atomic force microscope (AFM). In this paper, gelatin coated mica surfaces are shown to be suitable for immobilizing and imaging both gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus, and gram negative, Escherichia coli, bacteria in both air and liquid environments. Gelatin coated surfaces are shown to be superior to poly-L-lysine coated surfaces that are commonly used for the immobilization of cells. This cell immobilization technique is being developed primarily for live cell imaging of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The genome of R. palustris has been sequenced and the organism is the target of intensive studies aimed at understanding genome function. Images of R. palustris grown both aerobically and anaerobically in liquid media are presented. Images in liquid media show the bacteria is rod shaped and smooth while images in air show marked irregularity and folding of the surface. Significant differences in the vertical dimension are also apparent with the height of the bacteria in liquid being substantially greater than images taken in air. In air immobilized bacterial flagella are clearly seen while in liquid this structure is not visible. Additionally, significant morphological differences are observed that depend on the method of bacterial growth.

  5. Transient Tip-Sample Interactions in High-Speed AFM Imaging of 3D nano structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyvani Janbahan, A.; Sadeghian Marnani, H; Goosen, H.; Keulen, F. van

    2015-01-01

    The maximum amount of repulsive force applied to the surface plays a very important role in damage of tip or sample in Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM). So far, many investigations have focused on peak repulsive forces in tapping mode AFM in steady state conditions. However, it is known that AFM could

  6. Application of focused ion beam for the fabrication of AFM probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiytsev, A. S.; Lisitsyn, S. A.; Smirnov, V. A.; Fedotov, A. A.; Varzarev, Yu N.

    2017-10-01

    The results of an experimental study of the probe tips fabrication for critical-dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) using the focused ion beam (FIB) induced deposition are presented. Methods of the FIB-induced deposition of tungsten and carbon onto the tip of an AFM probe are studied. Based on the results obtained in the study, probes for the CD-AFM technique with a tip height about 1 μm and radius of 20 nm were created. The formation of CD-AFM probes by FIB-induced deposition allows creating a high efficiency tool for nanotechnology and nanodiagnostics. The use of modified cantilevers allows minimizing the artefacts of AFM images and increasing the accuracy of the relief measurement. The obtained results can be used for fabrication of AFM probes for express monitoring of the technological process in the manufacturing of the elements for micro- and nanoelectronics.

  7. Statistical length of DNA based on AFM image measured by a computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinqing; Qiu Xijun; Zhang Yi; Hu Jun; Wu Shiying; Huang Yibo; Ai Xiaobai; Li Minqian

    2001-01-01

    Taking advantage of image processing technology, the contour length of DNA molecule was measured automatically by a computer. Based on the AFM image of DNA, the topography of DNA was simulated into a curve. Then the DNA length was measured automatically by inserting mode. It was shown that the experimental length of a naturally deposited DNA (180.4 +- 16.4 nm) was well consistent with the theoretical length (185.0 nm). Comparing to other methods, the present approach had advantages of precision and automatism. The stretched DNA was also measured. It present approach had advantages of precision and automatism. The stretched DNA was also measured. It was shown that the experimental length (343.6 +- 20.7 nm) was much longer than the theoretical length (307.0 nm). This result indicated that the stretching process had a distinct effect on the DNA length. However, the method provided here avoided the DNA-stretching effect

  8. Physical-mechanical image of the cell surface on the base of AFM data in contact mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubtseva, M. N.; Starodubtsev, I. E.; Yegorenkov, N. I.; Kuzhel, N. S.; Konstantinova, E. E.; Chizhik, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    Physical and mechanical properties of the cell surface are well-known markers of a cell state. The complex of the parameters characterizing the cell surface properties, such as the elastic modulus (E), the parameters of adhesive (Fa), and friction (Ff) forces can be measured using atomic force microscope (AFM) in a contact mode and form namely the physical-mechanical image of the cell surface that is a fundamental element of the cell mechanical phenotype. The paper aims at forming the physical-mechanical images of the surface of two types of glutaraldehyde-fixed cancerous cells (human epithelial cells of larynx carcinoma, HEp-2c cells, and breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 cells) based on the data obtained by AFM in air and revealing the basic difference between them. The average values of friction, elastic and adhesive forces, and the roughness of lateral force maps, as well as dependence of the fractal dimension of lateral force maps on Z-scale factor have been studied. We have revealed that the response of microscale areas of the HEp-2c cell surface having numerous microvilli to external mechanical forces is less expressed and more homogeneous in comparison with the response of MCF-7 cell surface.

  9. Visualising the Micro World of Chemical/Geochemical Interactions Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G M; Sorbie, K S

    1997-12-31

    Scanning force microscopy, in particular AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), provides a particular useful and interesting tool for the examination of surface structure at the near-atomic level. AFM is particularly well suited to the study of interactions at the surface in aqueous solutions using real time in-situ measurements. In this paper there is presented AFM images showing in situ crystal growth from supersaturated BaSO{sub 4} solutions onto the surface of barite. Growth structures in the form of spiral crystal growth features, presumably originating from screw dislocations, are illustrated. AFM images of novel scale crystal growth inhibition experiments are presented. Examination of the manner in which generically different species adsorb onto growth structures may help to explain mechanistic differences in the way which different inhibitor species perform against barium sulphate scale formation. Adsorption of polyacrylamide species onto mica surfaces have been viewed. The general utility of AFM to a number of other common surface interactions in oil field chemistry will be discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonergan, N.E.; Britt, L.D.; Sullivan, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-L-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-L-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane stabilization while

  11. Implementing atomic force microscopy (AFM) for studying kinetics of gold nanoparticle's growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiev, P.; Bojinova, A.; Kostova, B.

    2013-01-01

    In a novel experimental approach Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was applied as a tool for studying the kinetics of gold nanoparticle growth. The gold nanoparticles were obtained by classical Turkevich citrate synthesis at two different temperatures. From the analysis of AFM images during...... the synthesis process the nanoparticle s' sizes were obtained. To demonstrate the applicability and the reliability of the proposed experimental approach we studied the nanoparticles growth at two different temperatures by spectrophotometric measurements and compared them with the results from AFM experimental...

  12. Structural analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations by atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after Giemsa staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Kanda, R.; Minamihisamatsu, M.; Hayata, I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have studied structures of chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation by an atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM could visualize the fine structure of chromosomes on Giemsa stained or unstained samples, although it was difficult to visualize unstained chromosomes by light microscope. The height data of chromosomes obtained by AFM provided useful information to describe detailed structure of chromatid gaps induced by heavy ion irradiation. A fibrous structure was observed on the unstained chromosome and these structures were considered to be the 30nm fibers on the chromosome. These types of structures were observed in the gaps as well as on surface of the chromosome. Further more, other types of chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation visualized by AFM will be presented

  13. Electrical characterisation of semiconductor structures using AFM techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac jr, J.; Kovac, J.; Hotovy, J.; Novotny, I.; Skriniarova, J.; Dutkova, E.; Balaz, P.

    2011-01-01

    The microscopic dimensions appear to be a fundamental limitation to many common measurement techniques. The use of Current-Atomic Force Microscopy (I-AFM) bids a possibility to acquire topography image along with the current flow mappings which can be lapped over in resulting image as presented in this paper. A current distribution on the ZnO surface of p-Si/n- ZnO diode structure with CdS or ZnS nanocrystalline quantum dot clusters at the interface has been measured. The resulting images show a conductivity mapping different from topography what induces a conductive channels at the edges of the ZnO grains. We have successfully used I-AFM method where conductive AFM tip is scanning over the surface of the sample to create a topography image along with a current flow mapping of p-Si substrate covered with CdS or ZnS nanocrystalline clusters overlapped by 100 nm thick n-ZnO layer. The measured current mappings of both samples revealed a formation of conductive channels between the clusters of quantum dots when the sample is forward biased. We are able to create 3D topography images of combined with the forward biased current mapping textures which gives complex information about local conductivity and using this method it should be possible to find hidden current leaks in the samples for example defects in most semiconductor materials. A drift current generated in p-n junction was recorded when the sample was reverse biased while the sample has been exposed to light. Possible UV light source should cause a higher reverse current due to high bandgap of ZnS clusters which is a motivation to further research. The devices fabricated from these structures have the potential applications for solar cells or broadband photodetectors. (authors)

  14. Direct manipulation of intracellular stress fibres using a hook-shaped AFM probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Shinichi; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Harada, Ichiro; Afrin, Rehana; Nakayama, Tomonobu; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a highly successful technique for imaging nanometre-sized samples and measuring pico- to nano-newton forces acting between atoms and molecules. When it comes to the manipulation of larger samples with forces of tens and hundreds of nano-newtons, however, the present chemistry-based modification protocols for functionalizing AFM cantilevers to achieve the formation of covalent/non-covalent linkages between the AFM probe and the sample surface do not produce strong enough bonds. For the purpose of measuring the fracture strength and other mechanical properties of stress fibres (SFs) in living as well as semi-intact fibroblast cells, we fabricated an AFM probe with a hooking function by focused ion beam technology and used the AFM probe hook to capture, pull and eventually sever a chosen SF labelled with green or red fluorescent protein.

  15. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodology will allow future in situ investigations to temporally monitor mixed culture drinking water biofilm structural changes during disinfection treatments. Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodo

  16. Tip-enhanced Raman mapping with top-illumination AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2011-04-29

    Tip-enhanced Raman mapping is a powerful, emerging technique that offers rich chemical information and high spatial resolution. Currently, most of the successes in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements are based on the inverted configuration where tips and laser are approaching the sample from opposite sides. This results in the limitation of measurement for transparent samples only. Several approaches have been developed to obtain tip-enhanced Raman mapping in reflection mode, many of which involve certain customisations of the system. We have demonstrated in this work that it is also possible to obtain TERS nano-images using an upright microscope (top-illumination) with a gold-coated Si atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever without significant modification to the existing integrated AFM/Raman system. A TERS image of a single-walled carbon nanotube has been achieved with a spatial resolution of ∼ 20-50 nm, demonstrating the potential of this technique for studying non-transparent nanoscale materials.

  17. Tip-enhanced Raman mapping with top-illumination AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G, E-mail: s.kazarian@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-29

    Tip-enhanced Raman mapping is a powerful, emerging technique that offers rich chemical information and high spatial resolution. Currently, most of the successes in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements are based on the inverted configuration where tips and laser are approaching the sample from opposite sides. This results in the limitation of measurement for transparent samples only. Several approaches have been developed to obtain tip-enhanced Raman mapping in reflection mode, many of which involve certain customisations of the system. We have demonstrated in this work that it is also possible to obtain TERS nano-images using an upright microscope (top-illumination) with a gold-coated Si atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever without significant modification to the existing integrated AFM/Raman system. A TERS image of a single-walled carbon nanotube has been achieved with a spatial resolution of {approx} 20-50 nm, demonstrating the potential of this technique for studying non-transparent nanoscale materials.

  18. Tip-enhanced Raman mapping with top-illumination AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2011-01-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman mapping is a powerful, emerging technique that offers rich chemical information and high spatial resolution. Currently, most of the successes in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements are based on the inverted configuration where tips and laser are approaching the sample from opposite sides. This results in the limitation of measurement for transparent samples only. Several approaches have been developed to obtain tip-enhanced Raman mapping in reflection mode, many of which involve certain customisations of the system. We have demonstrated in this work that it is also possible to obtain TERS nano-images using an upright microscope (top-illumination) with a gold-coated Si atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever without significant modification to the existing integrated AFM/Raman system. A TERS image of a single-walled carbon nanotube has been achieved with a spatial resolution of ∼ 20-50 nm, demonstrating the potential of this technique for studying non-transparent nanoscale materials.

  19. Sub ablative Er: YAG laser irradiation on surface roughness of eroded dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curylofo-Zotti, Fabiana Almeida; Lepri, Taísa Penazzo; Colucci, Vivian; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation applied at varying pulse repetition rate on the surface roughness of eroded enamel. Bovine enamel slabs (n = 10) were embedded in polyester resin, ground, and polished. To erosive challenges, specimens were immersed two times per day in 20mL of concentrated orange juice (pH = 3.84) under agitation, during a two-day period. Specimens were randomly assigned to irradiation with the Er:YAG laser (focused mode, pulse energy of 60 mJ and energy density of 3.79 J/cm(2) ) operating at 1, 2, 3, or 4 Hz. The control group was left nonirradiated. Surface roughness measurements were recorded post erosion-like formation and further erosive episodes by a profilometer and observed through atomic force microscopy (AFM). Analysis of variance revealed that the control group showed the lowest surface roughness, while laser-irradiated substrates did not differ from each other following post erosion-like lesion formation. According to analysis of covariance, at further erosive episodes, the control group demonstrated lower surface roughness (P > 0.05), than any of the irradiated groups (P enamel eroded. The AFM images showed that the specimens irradiated by the Er:YAG laser at 1 Hz presented a less rough surface than those irradiated at 2, 3, and 4 Hz. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release

  1. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  2. An AFM-SIMS Nano Tomography Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinford, Richard William

    An instrument, adding the capability to measure 3D volumetric chemical composition, has been constructed by me as a member of the Sanchez Nano Laboratory. The laboratory's in situ atomic force microscope (AFM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry systems (SIMS) are functional and integrated as one instrument. The SIMS utilizes a Ga focused ion beam (FIB) combined with a quadrupole mass analyzer. The AFM is comprised of a 6-axis stage, three coarse axes and three fine. The coarse stage is used for placing the AFM tip anywhere inside a (13x13x5 mm3) (xyz) volume. Thus the tip can be moved in and out of the FIB processing region with ease. The planned range for the Z-axis piezo was 60 microm, but was reduced after it was damaged from arc events. The repaired Z-axis piezo is now operated at a smaller nominal range of 18 microm (16.7 microm after pre-loading), still quite respectable for an AFM. The noise floor of the AFM is approximately 0.4 nm Rq. The voxel size for the combined instrument is targeted at 50 nm or larger. Thus 0.4 nm of xyz uncertainty is acceptable. The instrument has been used for analyzing samples using FIB beam currents of 250 pA and 5.75 nA. Coarse tip approaches can take a long time so an abbreviated technique is employed. Because of the relatively long thro of the Z piezo, the tip can be disengaged by deactivating the servo PID. Once disengaged, it can be moved laterally out of the way of the FIB-SIMS using the coarse stage. This instrument has been used to acquire volumetric data on AlTiC using AFM tip diameters of 18.9 nm and 30.6 nm. Acquisition times are very long, requiring multiple days to acquire a 50-image stack. New features to be added include auto stigmation, auto beam shift, more software automation, etc. Longer term upgrades to include a new lower voltage Z-piezo with strain-gauge feedback and a new design to extend the life for the coarse XY nano-positioners. This AFM-SIMS instrument, as constructed, has proven to be a great proof

  3. Modification of polycrystalline copper by proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia S, F.; Cabral P, A.; Saniger B, J.M.; Banuelos, J.G.; Barragan V, A.

    1997-01-01

    Polished copper samples were irradiated with proton beams of 300 and 700 keV at room temperature and at -150 Centigrade. In this work the obtained results are reported when such copper irradiated samples are analysed with Sem, Tem, AFM. The Sem micrographs showed evident changes in surface of these copper samples, therefore an EDAX microanalysis was done for its characterization. additionally, the Tem micrographs showed heaps formation until 200 nm. Its electron diffraction spectra indicated that these heaps consist of a copper compound. Finally with AFM were observed changes in coloration of the irradiated sample surface, as well as changes in texture and rugosity of them. These results show in general that irradiation process with protons which is known as an innocuo process produces changes in the copper properties. (Author)

  4. Mechanism of high-resolution STM/AFM imaging with functionalized tips

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hapala, Prokop; Kichin, G.; Wagner, C.; Tautz, F.S.; Temirov, R.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 8 (2014), "085421-1"-"085421-9" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM * STM * high resolution Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  5. Direct comparison of AFM and SEM measurements on the same set of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvallée, A; Feltin, N; Ducourtieux, S; Trabelsi, M; Hochepied, J F

    2015-01-01

    This article is the first step in the development of a hybrid metrology combining AFM and SEM techniques for measuring the dimensions of a nanoparticle population in 3D space (X,Y,Z). This method exploits the strengths of each technique on the same set of nanoparticles. AFM is used for measuring the nanoparticle height and the measurements along X and Y axes are deduced from SEM images. A sampling method is proposed in order to obtain the best deposition conditions of SiO 2 and gold nanoparticles on mica or silicon substrates. Only the isolated nanoparticles are taken into account in the histogram of size distribution. Moreover, a semi-automatic Matlab routine has also been developed to process the AFM and SEM images, measure and count the nanoparticles. This routine allows the user to exclusively select the isolated nanoparticles through a control interface. The measurements have been performed on spherical-like nanoparticles to test the method by comparing the results obtained with both techniques. (paper)

  6. Characterization of deep nanoscale surface trenches with AFM using thin carbon nanotube probes in amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of deep surface trenches with atomic force microscopy (AFM) presents significant challenges due to the sharp step edges that disturb the instrument and prevent it from faithfully reproducing the sample topography. Previous authors have developed AFM methodologies to successfully characterize semiconductor surface trenches with dimensions on the order of tens of nanometers. However, the study of imaging fidelity for features with dimensions smaller than 10 nm has not yet received sufficient attention. Such a study is necessary because small features in some cases lead to apparently high-quality images that are distorted due to tip and sample mechanical deformation. This paper presents multi-scale simulations, illustrating common artifacts affecting images of nanoscale trenches taken with fine carbon nanotube probes within amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation AFM (AM-AFM and FFM-AFM, respectively). It also describes a methodology combining FFM-AFM with a step-in/step-out algorithm analogous to that developed by other groups for larger trenches, which can eliminate the observed artifacts. Finally, an overview of the AFM simulation methods is provided. These methods, based on atomistic and continuum simulation, have been previously used to study a variety of samples including silicon surfaces, carbon nanotubes and biomolecules

  7. AFM measurements of novel solar cells. Studying electronic properties of Si-based radial junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hývl, Matěj

    -, č. 1 (2014), s. 52-53 ISSN 1439-4243 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA ČR GA13-12386S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM measurements * conductive cantilever * electronic properties * nanowires * PF TUNA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.imaging-git.com/science/scanning-probe-microscopy/afm-measurements-novel-solar- cells

  8. The substructure of immunoglobulin G resolved to 25 kDa using amplitude modulation AFM in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, Neil H.

    2005-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (or tapping-mode) atomic force microscopy (AM AFM or TM AFM) in air can reveal sub-molecular details of isolated multi-subunit proteins, such as immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, on atomically flat support surfaces such as mica [A. San Paulo, R. Garcia, Biophys. J. 78(3) (2000) 1599]. This is achieved by controlling the microscope imaging parameters (e.g. cantilever drive frequency and set-point amplitude) to keep the AFM tip predominantly in the attractive force regime. Under these conditions, the 50 kDa F c and F ab subunits can be resolved when the molecule has the appropriate orientation on the surface. The presence of a water layer on hydrophilic mica is an important factor affecting imaging contrast, a consequence of capillary neck formation between tip and surface [L. Zitzler, S. Herminghaus, F. Mugele, Phys. Rev. B 66(15) (2002) 155436]. Desiccation of samples to remove surface bound water layers can yield reproducible imaging of the IgG substructure [N.H. Thomson, J. Microsc. (Oxford) 217(3) (2004) 193]. This approach has also given higher resolution than previously achieved, down to about 25 kDa, and these data are detailed here. These subdomains are formed as two immunoglobulin folds from the light and heavy peptide chains of the IgG crossover. This result has been validated by comparing the AFM images with X-ray crystallography data from the protein data bank. These data show that the AFM can obtain 25 kDa resolution on isolated protein molecules with commercially available silicon tips, but, as expected for a local probe technique, resolution is highly dependent on the macromolecular orientation on the support surface

  9. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro [Hygo Ion Beam Medical Center, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  10. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri; Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  11. Microbial Cell Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Sullivan, Claretta [Eastern Virginia Medical School; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Allison, David P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is finding increasing application in a variety of fields including microbiology. Until the emergence of AFM, techniques for ivnestigating processes in single microbes were limited. From a biologist's perspective, the fact that AFM can be used to generate high-resolution images in buffers or media is its most appealing feature as live-cell imaging can be pursued. Imaging living cells by AFM allows dynamic biological events to be studied, at the nanoscale, in real time. Few areas of biological research have as much to gain as microbiology from the application of AFM. Whereas the scale of microbes places them near the limit of resolution for light microscopy. AFM is well suited for the study of structures on the order of a micron or less. Although electron microscopy techniques have been the standard for high-resolution imaging of microbes, AFM is quickly gaining favor for several reasons. First, fixatives that impair biological activity are not required. Second, AFM is capable of detecting forces in the pN range, and precise control of the force applied to the cantilever can be maintained. This combination facilitates the evaluation of physical characteristics of microbes. Third, rather than yielding the composite, statistical average of cell populations, as is the case with many biochemical assays, the behavior of single cells can be monitored. Despite the potential of AFM in microbiology, there are several limitations that must be considered. For example, the time required to record an image allows for the study of gross events such as cell division or membrane degradation from an antibiotic but precludes the evaluation of biological reactions and events that happen in just fractions of a second. Additionally, the AFM is a topographical tool and is restricted to imaging surfaces. Therefore, it cannot be used to look inside cells as with opticla and transmission electron microscopes. other practical considerations are the

  12. In Situ AFM Imaging of Microstructural Changes Associated with The Spin Transition in [Fe(Htrz)₂(Trz)](Bf₄) Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique-Juárez, María D; Suleimanov, Iurii; Hernández, Edna M; Salmon, Lionel; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2016-06-30

    Topographic images of [Fe(Htrz)₂(trz)](BF₄) nanoparticles were acquired across the first-order spin transition using variable-temperature atomic force microscopy (AFM) in amplitude modulation mode. These studies revealed a complex morphology of the particles consisting of aggregates of small nanocrystals, which expand, separate and re-aggregate due to the mechanical stress during the spin-state switching events. Both reversible (prompt or slow recovery) and irreversible effects (fatigue) on the particle morphology were evidenced and correlated with the spin crossover properties.

  13. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced modification of structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AFM analysis indicated that the pristine film consists of agglomerated grains with diffuse grain boundary. Irradiation led to reduced agglomeration of the grains with the formation of sharper grain boundaries. The rms roughness (rms) estimated from AFM analysis increased from 6.2 in pristine film to 12.7 nm when the film ...

  14. The effect of non-contact heating (microwave irradiation) and contact heating (annealing process) on properties and performance of polyethersulfone nanofiltration membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansourpanah, Y.; Madaeni, S.S.; Rahimpour, A.; Farhadian, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the effect of microwave irradiation on morphology and performance of polyethersulfone (PES) membranes was investigated. The membranes were prepared with 20 wt.% of PES by phase inversion method. N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and mixture of water and ethyl alcohol (90/10 vol.%) were employed as solvent and coagulant respectively. Polyvinylpirrolidone (PVP) with the concentration of 2 wt.% was selected as pore former. The effects of irradiation time (10, 30, 60, 90, 120 s) and microwave power (180, 360, 720 and 900 W) on structure and performance of membranes were studied. Increasing the irradiation time and power caused variation in permeate flux and ion rejection. Moreover, the effects of annealing processes (60, 70, 80 deg. C) were studied. Transmembrane pressure was selected around 1.5 MPa for all experiments. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were employed to describe the surface morphology of the prepared membranes. The effect of microwave irradiation time in different power revealed alterations in membrane surface morphology and AFM images represented that surface parameters (such as surface roughness) have been changed. The membrane exhibited moderate rejection (47%) and low permeate flux (4.5 kg/m 2 h) at 80 deg. C for NaCl solution. The SEM images indicate that the dense skin layer is formed at 80 deg. C annealing.

  15. High Throughput Nanofabrication of Silicon Nanowire and Carbon Nanotube Tips on AFM Probes by Stencil-Deposited Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engstrøm, Daniel Southcott; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni

    2011-01-01

    scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor−liquid−solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where...... they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes....

  16. Finite element modeling of trolling-mode AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Mohammadreza; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Vossoughi, Gholamreza

    2018-06-01

    Trolling mode atomic force microscopy (TR-AFM) has overcome many imaging problems in liquid environments by considerably reducing the liquid-resonator interaction forces. The finite element model of the TR-AFM resonator considering the effects of fluid and nanoneedle flexibility is presented in this research, for the first time. The model is verified by ABAQUS software. The effect of installation angle of the microbeam relative to the horizon and the effect of fluid on the system behavior are investigated. Using the finite element model, frequency response curve of the system is obtained and validated around the frequency of the operating mode by the available experimental results, in air and liquid. The changes in the natural frequencies in the presence of liquid are studied. The effects of tip-sample interaction on the excitation of higher order modes of the system are also investigated in air and liquid environments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High resolution alpha-autoradiography for measurement of 10B distribution in subcellular scale using CR-39 and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, K.; Takahashi, H.; Yasuda, N.

    2000-01-01

    In order to measure 10 B distribution in tumor tissues for BNCT at subcellular scale, we have developed a new method for high resolution alpha-autoradiography using contact X-ray microscopy technique with CR-39 plastic track detectors. Sliced sections of boron-injected brain tumors in rats were mounted on CR-39 and irradiated with thermal neutrons at KUR. Then the samples were exposed to soft X-rays from a laser plasma source. After etching the CR-39 in NaOH solution for a short time (1-5 min.), transmission X-ray image of tumor cells appeared as relief on CR-39 surface, and could be observed with the atomic force microscopy (AFM). Very small etch pits of about 100 nm in diameter corresponding to particle tracks from 10 B(n, α) 7 Li reactions were also observed in the image simultaneously. This method provides an accurate distribution of 10 B inside the cell. (author)

  18. Towards easy and reliable AFM tip shape determination using blind tip reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flater, Erin E.; Zacharakis-Jutz, George E.; Dumba, Braulio G.; White, Isaac A.; Clifford, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative determination of the geometry of an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip is critical for robust measurements of the nanoscale properties of surfaces, including accurate measurement of sample features and quantification of tribological characteristics. Blind tip reconstruction, which determines tip shape from an AFM image scan without knowledge of tip or sample shape, was established most notably by Villarrubia [J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Tech. 102 (1997)] and has been further developed since that time. Nevertheless, the implementation of blind tip reconstruction for the general user to produce reliable and consistent estimates of tip shape has been hindered due to ambiguity about how to choose the key input parameters, such as tip matrix size and threshold value, which strongly impact the results of the tip reconstruction. These key parameters are investigated here via Villarrubia's blind tip reconstruction algorithms in which we have added the capability for users to systematically vary the key tip reconstruction parameters, evaluate the set of possible tip reconstructions, and determine the optimal tip reconstruction for a given sample. We demonstrate the capabilities of these algorithms through analysis of a set of simulated AFM images and provide practical guidelines for users of the blind tip reconstruction method. We present a reliable method to choose the threshold parameter corresponding to an optimal reconstructed tip shape for a given image. Specifically, we show that the trend in how the reconstructed tip shape varies with threshold number is so regular that the optimal, or Goldilocks, threshold value corresponds with the peak in the derivative of the RMS difference with respect to the zero threshold curve vs. threshold number. - Highlights: • Blind tip reconstruction algorithms have been implemented and augmented to determine the optimal input parameters. • We demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithms using a simulated AFM

  19. Statistical flaw strength distributions for glass fibres: Correlation between bundle test and AFM-derived flaw size density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foray, G.; Descamps-Mandine, A.; R’Mili, M.; Lamon, J.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper investigates glass fibre flaw size distributions. Two commercial fibre grades (HP and HD) mainly used in cement-based composite reinforcement were studied. Glass fibre fractography is a difficult and time consuming exercise, and thus is seldom carried out. An approach based on tensile tests on multifilament bundles and examination of the fibre surface by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used. Bundles of more than 500 single filaments each were tested. Thus a statistically significant database of failure data was built up for the HP and HD glass fibres. Gaussian flaw distributions were derived from the filament tensile strength data or extracted from the AFM images. The two distributions were compared. Defect sizes computed from raw AFM images agreed reasonably well with those derived from tensile strength data. Finally, the pertinence of a Gaussian distribution was discussed. The alternative Pareto distribution provided a fair approximation when dealing with AFM flaw size.

  20. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu; Gao Weidong

    2007-01-01

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces

  1. Optical Beam Deflection Based AFM with Integrated Hardware and Software Platform for an Undergraduate Engineering Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu Hong Loh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has been used extensively in nanoscience research since its invention. Recently, many teaching laboratories in colleges, undergraduate institutions, and even high schools incorporate AFM as an effective teaching tool for nanoscience education. This paper presents an optical beam deflection (OBD based atomic force microscope, designed specifically for the undergraduate engineering laboratory as a teaching instrument. An electronic module for signal conditioning was built with components that are commonly available in an undergraduate electronic laboratory. In addition to off-the-shelf mechanical parts and optics, the design of custom-built mechanical parts waskept as simple as possible. Hence, the overall cost for the setup is greatly reduced. The AFM controller was developed using National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Suite (NI ELVIS, an integrated hardware and software platform which can be programmed in LabVIEW. A simple yet effective control algorithm for scanning and feedback control was developed. Despite the use of an educational platform and low-cost components from the undergraduate laboratory, the developed AFM is capable of performing imaging in constant-force mode with submicron resolution and at reasonable scanning speed (approximately 18 min per image. Therefore, the AFM is suitable to be used as an educational tool for nanoscience. Moreover, the construction of the system can be a valuable educational experience for electronic and mechanical engineering students.

  2. The AFm phase in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matschei, T.; Lothenbach, B.; Glasser, F.P.

    2007-01-01

    The AFm phase of Portland cements refers to a family of hydrated calcium aluminates based on the hydrocalumite-like structure of 4CaO.Al 2 O 3 .13-19 H 2 O. However OH - may be replaced by SO 4 2- and CO 3 2- . Except for limited replacement (50 mol%, maximum) of sulfate by hydroxide, these compositions do not form solid solutions and, from the mineralogical standpoint, behave as separate phases. Therefore many hydrated cements will contain mixtures of AFm phases. AFm phases have been made from precursors and experimentally-determined phase relationships are depicted at 25 deg. C. Solubility data are reported and thermodynamic data are derived. The 25 deg. C stability of AFm phases is much affected by the nature of the anion: carbonate stabilises AFm and displaces OH and SO 4 at species activities commonly encountered in cement systems. However in the presence of portlandite, and as carbonate displaces sulfate in AFm, the reaction results in changes in the amount of both portlandite and ettringite: specimen calculations are presented to quantify these changes. The scheme of phase balances enables calculation of the mineralogical balances of a hydrated cement paste with greater accuracy than hitherto practicable

  3. A small animal image guided irradiation system study using 3D dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xin; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Admovics, John

    2015-01-01

    In a high resolution image-guided small animal irradiation platform, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is integrated with an irradiation unit for precise targeting. Precise quality assurance is essential for both imaging and irradiation components. The conventional commissioning techniques with films face major challenges due to alignment uncertainty and labour intensive film preparation and scanning. In addition, due to the novel design of this platform the mouse stage rotation for CBCT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for irradiation. Because these two rotations are associated with different mechanical systems, discrepancy between rotation isocenters exists. In order to deliver x-ray precisely, it is essential to verify coincidence of the imaging and the irradiation isocenters. A 3D PRESAGE dosimeter can provide an excellent tool for checking dosimetry and verifying coincidence of irradiation and imaging coordinates in one system. Dosimetric measurements were performed to obtain beam profiles and percent depth dose (PDD). Isocentricity and coincidence of the mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated with starshots acquired using PRESAGE dosimeters. A single PRESAGE dosimeter can provide 3 -D information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies

  4. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya 462-8508 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  5. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy

  6. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  7. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  8. Characterisation of tissue factor-bearing extracellular vesicles with AFM: comparison of air-tapping-mode AFM and liquid Peak Force AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hardij

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are shed from cells and carry markers of the parent cells. Vesicles derived from cancer cells reach the bloodstream and locally influence important physiological processes. It has been previously shown that procoagulant vesicles are circulating in patients’ fluids. These EVs are therefore considered as promising biomarkers for the thrombotic risk. Because of their small size, classical methods such as flow cytometry suffer from limitation for their characterisation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM has been proposed as a promising complementary method for the characterisation of EVs. Objectives: The objectives of this study are: (a to develop and validate AFM with specific antibodies (anti-TF and (b to compare air and liquid modes for EVs’ size and number determination as potential biomarkers of the prothrombotic risk. Methods: AFM multimode nanoscope III was used for air tapping mode (TM. AFM catalyst was used for liquid Peak Force Tapping (PFT mode. Vesicles are generated according to Davila et al.'s protocol. Substrates are coated with various concentrations of antibodies, thanks to ethanolamine and glutaraldehyde. Results: Vesicles were immobilised on antibody-coated surfaces to select tissue factor (TF-positive vesicles. The size range of vesicles observed in liquid PFT mode is 6–10 times higher than in air mode. This corresponds to the data found in the literature. Conclusion: We recommend liquid PFT mode to analyse vesicles on 5 µg/ml antibody-coated substrates.

  9. AFM annual report 1983 (Petroleum Industry). [Export Federation for Mineral Oil, Federal Republic of Germany]. AFM Jahresbericht 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The annual report 1983 of the Export Federation for Mineral Oil (AFM) contains informations about the mineral oil economics, the market development for selected main products and the environmental protection. The AFM terms (standard conditions for barge transactions) for the mineral oil industry are given. The AFM Oil Market Report Daily has extended the frame of its reports in 1983.

  10. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  11. AFM surface imaging of AISI D2 tool steel machined by the EDM process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guu, Y.H.

    2005-01-01

    The surface morphology, surface roughness and micro-crack of AISI D2 tool steel machined by the electrical discharge machining (EDM) process were analyzed by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. Experimental results indicate that the surface texture after EDM is determined by the discharge energy during processing. An excellent machined finish can be obtained by setting the machine parameters at a low pulse energy. The surface roughness and the depth of the micro-cracks were proportional to the power input. Furthermore, the AFM application yielded information about the depth of the micro-cracks is particularly important in the post treatment of AISI D2 tool steel machined by EDM

  12. AFM surface imaging of AISI D2 tool steel machined by the EDM process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guu, Y. H.

    2005-04-01

    The surface morphology, surface roughness and micro-crack of AISI D2 tool steel machined by the electrical discharge machining (EDM) process were analyzed by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. Experimental results indicate that the surface texture after EDM is determined by the discharge energy during processing. An excellent machined finish can be obtained by setting the machine parameters at a low pulse energy. The surface roughness and the depth of the micro-cracks were proportional to the power input. Furthermore, the AFM application yielded information about the depth of the micro-cracks is particularly important in the post treatment of AISI D2 tool steel machined by EDM.

  13. Photoacoustic imaging driven by an interstitial irradiation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Mitcham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA imaging has shown tremendous promise in providing valuable diagnostic and therapy-monitoring information in select clinical procedures. Many of these pursued applications, however, have been relatively superficial due to difficulties with delivering light deep into tissue. To address this limitation, this work investigates generating a PA image using an interstitial irradiation source with a clinical ultrasound (US system, which was shown to yield improved PA signal quality at distances beyond 13 mm and to provide improved spectral fidelity. Additionally, interstitially driven multi-wavelength PA imaging was able to provide accurate spectra of gold nanoshells and deoxyhemoglobin in excised prostate and liver tissue, respectively, and allowed for clear visualization of a wire at 7 cm in excised liver. This work demonstrates the potential of using a local irradiation source to extend the depth capabilities of future PA imaging techniques for minimally invasive interventional radiology procedures.

  14. Quantitative numerical method for analysing slip traces observed by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselý, J; Cieslar, M; Coupeau, C; Bonneville, J

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used more and more routinely to study, at the nanometre scale, the slip traces produced on the surface of deformed crystalline materials. Taking full advantage of the quantitative height data of the slip traces, which can be extracted from these observations, requires however an adequate and robust processing of the images. In this paper an original method is presented, which allows the fitting of AFM scan-lines with a specific parameterized step function without any averaging treatment of the original data. This yields a quantitative and full description of the changes in step shape along the slip trace. The strength of the proposed method is established on several typical examples met in plasticity by analysing nano-scale structures formed on the sample surface by emerging dislocations. (paper)

  15. Integration of optical imaging with a small animal irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weersink, Robert A.; Ansell, Steve; Wang, An; Wilson, Graham; Shah, Duoaud; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors describe the integration of optical imaging with a targeted small animal irradiator device, focusing on design, instrumentation, 2D to 3D image registration, 2D targeting, and the accuracy of recovering and mapping the optical signal to a 3D surface generated from the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The integration of optical imaging will improve targeting of the radiation treatment and offer longitudinal tracking of tumor response of small animal models treated using the system. Methods: The existing image-guided small animal irradiator consists of a variable kilovolt (peak) x-ray tube mounted opposite an aSi flat panel detector, both mounted on a c-arm gantry. The tube is used for both CBCT imaging and targeted irradiation. The optical component employs a CCD camera perpendicular to the x-ray treatment/imaging axis with a computer controlled filter for spectral decomposition. Multiple optical images can be acquired at any angle as the gantry rotates. The optical to CBCT registration, which uses a standard pinhole camera model, was modeled and tested using phantoms with markers visible in both optical and CBCT images. Optically guided 2D targeting in the anterior/posterior direction was tested on an anthropomorphic mouse phantom with embedded light sources. The accuracy of the mapping of optical signal to the CBCT surface was tested using the same mouse phantom. A surface mesh of the phantom was generated based on the CBCT image and optical intensities projected onto the surface. The measured surface intensity was compared to calculated surface for a point source at the actual source position. The point-source position was also optimized to provide the closest match between measured and calculated intensities, and the distance between the optimized and actual source positions was then calculated. This process was repeated for multiple wavelengths and sources. Results: The optical to CBCT registration error was 0.8 mm. Two

  16. Biochemical and topological analysis of bovine sperm cells induced by low power laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, T. R.; Siqueira, A. F. P.; Magrini, T. D.; Fiorito, P. A.; Assumpção, M. E. O. A.; Nichi, M.; Martinho, H. S.; Milazzotto, M. P.

    2011-07-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) increases ATP production and energy supply to the cell which could increase sperm motility, acrossomal reaction and consequently the fertilizing potential. The aim of this study was to characterize the biochemical and topological changes induced by low power laser irradiation on bull sperm cells. Post-thawing sperm were irradiated with a 633nm laser with fluence rates of 30, 150 and 300mJ.cm-2 (power of 5mW for 1, 5 and 10minutes, respectively); 45, 230, and 450mJ.cm-2 (7.5mW for 1, 5 and 10 minutes); and 60, 300 and 600mJ.cm-2 (10mW for 1, 5 and 10 minutes). Biochemical and metabolical changes were analyzed by FTIR and flow cytometry; oxygen reactive species production was assessed by TBARS and the morphological changes were evaluated by AFM. Motility had no difference among times or powers of irradiation. Increasing in ROS generation was observed with power of 5mW compared to 7.5 and 10mW, and with 10min of irradiation in comparison with 5 and 1min of irradiation. This higher ROS generation was related to an increase in acrossomal and plasma membrane damage. FTIR results showed that the amount of lipids was inversely proportional to the quantity of ROS generated. AFM images showed morphological differences in plasma/acrossomal membrane, mainly on the equatorial region. We conclude that LLLI is an effective method to induce changes on sperm cell metabolism but more studies are necessary to establish an optimal dose to increase the fertility potential of these cells.

  17. Vacuolar structures can be identified by AFM elasticity mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riethmueller, Christoph; Schaeffer, Tilman E.; Kienberger, Ferry; Stracke, Werner; Oberleithner, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Fluid-filled organelles like vesicles, endosomes and pinosomes are inevitable parts of cellular signalling and transport. Endothelial cells, building a barrier between blood and tissue, can form vacuolar organelles. These structures are implicated in upregulated fluid transport across the endothelium under inflammatory conditions. Vacuolar organelles have been described by transmission electron microscopy so far. Here, we present a method that images and mechanically characterizes intracellular structures in whole cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). After crosslinking the cellular proteins with the fixative glutaraldehyde, plasma membrane depressions become observable, which are scattered around the cell nucleus. Nanomechanical analysis identifies them as spots of reduced stiffness. Scanning electron microscopy confirms their pit-like appearance. In addition, fluorescence microscopy detects an analogous pattern of protein-poor spots, thereby confirming mechanical rigidity to arise from crosslinked proteins. This AFM application opens up a mechanical dimension for the investigation of intracellular organelles

  18. A surface evolution scheme to identify nanoscale intrinsic geometry from AFM experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hong-Lae; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2013-01-01

    The geometrical properties of metallic nanoparticles such as the size and morphology have significant impacts on the structure and stability of the adsorbed biological entities as well as the nanoscale structural performances. To identify the nanoscale intrinsic geometry from the height images by atomic force microscopy (AFM), we developed a curvature-dependent evolution scheme that can eliminate the noise and smoothen the surfaces. The principal curvatures are computed directly from the first and second derivatives of the discrete AFM height data. The principal curvatures and directions correspond to the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of shape operator matrix, respectively. The evolution equation using the principal curvature flows smoothens the images in the corresponding principal directions. For an idealized model, κ 2 flow successfully identifies the major valley lines to represent the boundary of nanoparticles without referring to the phase information, whereas the mean curvature flow eliminates all the minor ones leaving only the major feature of the boundary. To demonstrate the capability of noise removal, smoothing surfaces, the identification of ridge and valley lines, and the extraction of intrinsic geometry, the developed numerical scheme is applied to real AFM data that include the silver nanoparticles of 24 nm diameter and the gold nanoparticles of 33–56 nm diameters

  19. Measurement of nanosize etched pits in SiO2 optical fiber conduit using AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Vazquez, C.; Fragoso, R.

    2003-01-01

    Fission fragment tracks from 252 Cf have been observed in SiO 2 optical fiber, using an atomic force microscope (AFM), after a very short chemical etching in hydrofluoric acid solution at normal temperature. The nuclear track starting and evolution process is followed by the AFM direct measurements on the material surface and beyond a fine layer of the surface material. The images of the scanned cones were determined observing the two predominant energies from 252 Cf fission fragments and the development of the tracks in the 150 μm diameter optical fiber conduit

  20. Refining the statistical model for quantitative immunostaining of surface-functionalized nanoparticles by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCuspie, Robert I; Gorka, Danielle E

    2013-10-01

    Recently, an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based approach for quantifying the number of biological molecules conjugated to a nanoparticle surface at low number densities was reported. The number of target molecules conjugated to the analyte nanoparticle can be determined with single nanoparticle fidelity using antibody-mediated self-assembly to decorate the analyte nanoparticles with probe nanoparticles (i.e., quantitative immunostaining). This work refines the statistical models used to quantitatively interpret the observations when AFM is used to image the resulting structures. The refinements add terms to the previous statistical models to account for the physical sizes of the analyte nanoparticles, conjugated molecules, antibodies, and probe nanoparticles. Thus, a more physically realistic statistical computation can be implemented for a given sample of known qualitative composition, using the software scripts provided. Example AFM data sets, using horseradish peroxidase conjugated to gold nanoparticles, are presented to illustrate how to implement this method successfully.

  1. The study of the ion beam induced swelling in crystalline germanium irradiated by a 30 keV Ga+ focused ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Munroe, P.R.; Stevens-Kalceff, M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of swelling of crystalline Ge irradiated at room temperature with 30 keV Ga + focused ion beam (FIB) was studied by means of in situ FIB imaging, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The swelling occurred in the surface region of amorphous damage layer which was formed during ion irradiation. The degree of swelling reaches values up to 10 times for an implantation dose of ∼10 17 ions/cm 2 . Cross-secitonal TEM examination showed that the swelling is due to formation of a porous layer with a honeycomb structure. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  2. Binding behavior of CRP and anti-CRP antibody analyzed with SPR and AFM measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Keun; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Cho, Sang-Joon; Jeong, Sang Won; Jeon, Won Bae

    2008-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) was exploited to take picture of the molecular topology of C-reactive protein (CRP) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution. An explicit molecular image of CRP demonstrated a pentagonal structure composed of five subunits. Dimensions of the doughnut-shaped CRP molecule measured by AFM were about 25 nm in outside diameter and 10 nm in central pore diameter, and the height of CRP molecule was about 4 nm which was comparable to the value determined by X-ray crystallography. Bis(N-succinimido)-11,11'-dithiobis (undecyl succinate) (DSNHS) was synthesized for use as a linker for immobilizing anti-CRP antibody (anti-CRP) onto the gold surface of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor chip. DSNHS formed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the gold surface. By use of an AFM tip, a pattern of ditch was engraved within the SAM of DSNHS, and anti-CRP was immobilized on the engraved SAM through replacement of N-hydroxysuccinimide group on the outside surface of DSNHS by the amine group of anti-CRP. Formation of CRP/anti-CRP complex on the gold surface of SPR sensor chip was clearly demonstrated by measuring SPR angle shift. A consecutive series of SAM, SAM/anti-CRP, and SAM/anti-CRP/CRP complexes was generated on a SPR sensor chip, and the changes in depth of the ditch were monitored by taking AFM images of the complexes. Comparative analysis of the depth differences indicates that binding of CRP to anti-CRP occurs in a planar mode

  3. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumí-Audenis, B. [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France); Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona (Spain); Physical Chemistry Department, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Networking Biomedical Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Madrid (Spain); Carlà, F. [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France); Vitorino, M. V. [University of Lisboa, Falculty of Science, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute - BIOISI, Lisbon (Portugal); Panzarella, A. [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France); Porcar, L. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Boilot, M. [ORTEC, Marseille (France); Guerber, S. [CEA, LETI Grenoble (France); Bernard, P. [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France); Rodrigues, M. S. [University of Lisboa, Falculty of Science, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute - BIOISI, Lisbon (Portugal); Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I. [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona (Spain); Physical Chemistry Department, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Networking Biomedical Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Madrid (Spain); Costa, L., E-mail: luca.costa@esrf.fr [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-30

    The performance of a custom atomic force microscope for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments on hydrated soft and biological samples is presented. A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions.

  4. AFM measurements on ferrous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ros Yáñez, T.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM has been successfully used for the characterisation of the surface topography of a very wide range of materials. The AFM is an interesting technique to study the surface of materials and specifically to study surface effects in steel, e.g. after polishing and/or after etching. This technique allows not only to study the topography of the samples, but it is also a useful tool to obtain structural details of surfaces and for the identification of different phases. In this paper, some applications are shown concerning the study of the microstructure of multiphase-steels.

    El Microcopio de Fuerza Atómica (AFM es utilizado en la caracterización topográfica de una gran variedad de materiales. El AFM es una interesante técnica para el estudio de la superficie de los aceros, ya sea con ataque químico o no. Esta técnica es también una útil herramienta para obtener detalles estructurales en las superficies y en la identificación de fases. En este trabajo algunas de estas aplicaciones son mostradas en el estudio de la microestructura de aceros multifásicos.

  5. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; De Witt, Joel M [OSU, PHYSICS; Benton, Eric R [OSU, PHYSICS; Yasuda, Nakahiro [NIRS, HIMAC; Benton, Eugene V [UNIV OF SAN FRANCISCO

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  6. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Carl Edward; DeWitt, Joel M.; Benton, Eric R.; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V.

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (∼< 10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (∼< 1 μm) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  7. High-resolution AFM structure of DNA G-wires in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Krishnashish; Lech, Christopher J; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2018-05-17

    We investigate the self-assembly of short pieces of the Tetrahymena telomeric DNA sequence d[G 4 T 2 G 4 ] in physiologically relevant aqueous solution using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Wire-like structures (G-wires) of 3.0 nm height with well-defined surface periodic features were observed. Analysis of high-resolution AFM images allowed their classification based on the periodicity of these features. A major species is identified with periodic features of 4.3 nm displaying left-handed ridges or zigzag features on the molecular surface. A minor species shows primarily left-handed periodic features of 2.2 nm. In addition to 4.3 and 2.2 nm ridges, background features with periodicity of 0.9 nm are also observed. Using molecular modeling and simulation, we identify a molecular structure that can explain both the periodicity and handedness of the major G-wire species. Our results demonstrate the potential structural diversity of G-wire formation and provide valuable insight into the structure of higher-order intermolecular G-quadruplexes. Our results also demonstrate how AFM can be combined with simulation to gain insight into biomolecular structure.

  8. BOREAS AFM-11 Aircraft Flux Analysis Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reports from the BOREAS AFM-11 team regarding quality control and sampling analysis of data collected by other AFM personnel using the Electra, LongEZ, and Twin...

  9. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataraman, S.; Allison, D.P.; Qi, H.; Morrell-Falvey, J.L.; Kallewaard, N.L.; Crowe, J.E.; Doktycz, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM

  10. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Allison, D.P. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Molecular Imaging Inc. Tempe, AZ, 85282 (United States); Qi, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Morrell-Falvey, J.L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kallewaard, N.L. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Crowe, J.E. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Doktycz, M.J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: doktyczmj@ornl.gov

    2006-06-15

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM.

  11. Localized irradiation of mouse legs using an image-guided robotic linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufeld, Markus; Escobar, Helena; Marg, Andreas; Pasemann, Diana; Budach, Volker; Spuler, Simone

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the potential of human satellite cells in muscle regeneration small animal models are useful to evaluate muscle regeneration. To suppress the inherent regeneration ability of the tibialis muscle of mice before transplantation of human muscle fibers, a localized irradiation of the mouse leg should be conducted. We analyzed the feasibility of an image-guided robotic irradiation procedure, a routine treatment method in radiation oncology, for the focal irradiation of mouse legs. After conducting a planning computed tomography (CT) scan of one mouse in its customized mold a three-dimensional dose plan was calculated using a dedicated planning workstation. 18 Gy have been applied to the right anterior tibial muscle of 4 healthy and 12 mice with immune defect in general anesthesia using an image-guided robotic linear accelerator (LINAC). The mice were fixed in a customized acrylic mold with attached fiducial markers for image guided tracking. All 16 mice could be irradiated as prevised without signs of acute radiation toxicity or anesthesiological side effects. The animals survived until scarification after 8, 21 and 49 days as planned. The procedure was straight forward and the irradiation process took 5 minutes to apply the dose of 18 Gy. Localized irradiation of mice legs using a robotic LINAC could be conducted as planned. It is a feasible procedure without recognizable side effects. Image guidance offers precise dose delivery and preserves adjacent body parts and tissues.

  12. The Columbia University microbeam II endstation for cell imaging and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, A.W.; Ross, G.J.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Brenner, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Columbia University Microbeam II has been built to provide a focused ion beam for irradiating designated mammalian cells with single particles. With the interest in irradiating non-stained cells and cells in three-dimensional tissue samples, the endstation was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging techniques, in addition to fluorescent microscopy. Non-stained cells are imaged either by quantitative phase microscopy (QPm) [IATIA, Box Hill North, Victoria, 3129, Australia [1

  13. Modification of polycrystalline copper by proton irradiation; Modificacion de cobre policristalino por irradiacion con protones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia S, F.; Cabral P, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Hipodromo Condesa, 06100 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Saniger B, J.M.; Banuelos, J.G. [UNAM Centro de Instrumentos, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Barragan V, A. [UNAM Instituto de Fisica, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Polished copper samples were irradiated with proton beams of 300 and 700 keV at room temperature and at -150 Centigrade. In this work the obtained results are reported when such copper irradiated samples are analysed with Sem, Tem, AFM. The Sem micrographs showed evident changes in surface of these copper samples, therefore an EDAX microanalysis was done for its characterization. additionally, the Tem micrographs showed heaps formation until 200 nm. Its electron diffraction spectra indicated that these heaps consist of a copper compound. Finally with AFM were observed changes in coloration of the irradiated sample surface, as well as changes in texture and rugosity of them. These results show in general that irradiation process with protons which is known as an innocuo process produces changes in the copper properties. (Author)

  14. On the nonlinear dynamics of trolling-mode AFM: Analytical solution using multiple time scales method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Mohammadreza; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Vossoughi, Gholamreza

    2018-06-01

    Trolling mode atomic force microscopy (TR-AFM) has resolved many imaging problems by a considerable reduction of the liquid-resonator interaction forces in liquid environments. The present study develops a nonlinear model of the meniscus force exerted to the nanoneedle of TR-AFM and presents an analytical solution to the distributed-parameter model of TR-AFM resonator utilizing multiple time scales (MTS) method. Based on the developed analytical solution, the frequency-response curves of the resonator operation in air and liquid (for different penetration length of the nanoneedle) are obtained. The closed-form analytical solution and the frequency-response curves are validated by the comparison with both the finite element solution of the main partial differential equations and the experimental observations. The effect of excitation angle of the resonator on horizontal oscillation of the probe tip and the effect of different parameters on the frequency-response of the system are investigated.

  15. Luminescence imaging of water during irradiation of X-ray photons lower energy than Cerenkov- light threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Koyama, Shuji; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence imaging of water using X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than maximum energy of ~200 keV is thought to be impossible because the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov- light. Contrary to this consensus assumption, we show that the luminescence imaging of water can be achieved by X-ray irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV. We placed water phantoms on a table with a conventional X-ray imaging system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during X-ray photon irradiation at energy below 120 keV. We also carried out such imaging of an acrylic block and plastic scintillator. The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during X-ray photon irradiation clearly showed X-ray photon distribution. The intensity of the X-ray photon images of the phantom increased almost proportionally to the number of X-ray irradiations. Lower-energy X-ray photon irradiation showed lower-intensity luminescence at the deeper parts of the phantom due to the higher X-ray absorption in the water phantom. Furthermore, lower-intensity luminescence also appeared at the deeper parts of the acrylic phantom due to its higher density than water. The intensity of the luminescence for water was 0.005% of that for plastic scintillator. Luminescence imaging of water during X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV was possible. This luminescence imaging method is promising for dose estimation in X-ray imaging systems.

  16. Luminescence imaging of water during irradiation of X-ray photons lower energy than Cerenkov- light threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Koyama, Shuji; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence imaging of water using X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than maximum energy of 200 keV is thought to be impossible because the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov- light. Contrary to this consensus assumption, we show that the luminescence imaging of water can be achieved by X-ray irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV. We placed water phantoms on a table with a conventional X-ray imaging system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during X-ray photon irradiation at energy below 120 keV. We also carried out such imaging of an acrylic block and plastic scintillator. The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during X-ray photon irradiation clearly showed X-ray photon distribution. The intensity of the X-ray photon images of the phantom increased almost proportionally to the number of X-ray irradiations. Lower-energy X-ray photon irradiation showed lower-intensity luminescence at the deeper parts of the phantom due to the higher X-ray absorption in the water phantom. Furthermore, lower-intensity luminescence also appeared at the deeper parts of the acrylic phantom due to its higher density than water. The intensity of the luminescence for water was 0.005% of that for plastic scintillator. Luminescence imaging of water during X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV was possible. This luminescence imaging method is promising for dose estimation in X-ray imaging systems.

  17. AFM studies of a new type of radiation defect on mica surfaces caused by highly charged ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehlicke, C.; Briere, M.A.; Schneider, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation induced defects on mica caused by the impact of slow very highly charged ions (SVHCI) have been investigated with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Freshly cleaved surfaces of different types of muscovite were irradiated with SVHCI extracted from the LLNL electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at velocities of ca. 2 keV/amu. Atomic force microscopy of the surface reveals the formation of blisterlike defects associated with single ion impact. The determined defect volume which appears to increase linearly with the incident charge state and exhibits a threshold incident charge state has been determined using the AFM. These results indicate that target atoms are subjected to mutual electrostatic repulsion due to ionization through potential electron emission upon approach of the ion. If the repulsion leads to permanent atomic displacement, surface defects are formed

  18. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  19. Topographical heterogeneity in transparent PVA hydrogels studied by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanick, Ashit Kumar; Gupta, Siddhi, E-mail: siddhigupta@nmlindia.org; Mishra, Trilochan; Sinha, Arvind

    2012-02-01

    Physically crosslinked poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels have a wide range of biomedical applications. Transparent and stable PVA hydrogels synthesized by freeze-thawing method are potential candidates to be used as tissue engineering scaffolds provided they exhibit suitable topographical roughness and surface energy. The effect of processing parameters i.e., polymer concentration and number of freeze-thaw cycles on the resulting topography of the freeze-thawed transparent hydrogels has been studied and quantified using non-contact mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and image analysis. Simultaneously captured phase contrast images have revealed significant information about morphological changes in the topographical features and crystallinity of the hydrogels. Topographical roughness was found to decrease as a function of number of freeze-thaw cycles.

  20. Tribological behavior of micro/nano-patterned surfaces in contact with AFM colloidal probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoliang; Wang Xiu; Kong Wen; Yi Gewen; Jia Junhong

    2011-01-01

    In effort to investigate the influence of the micro/nano-patterning or surface texturing on the nanotribological properties of patterned surfaces, the patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars were fabricated by replica molding technique. The surface morphologies of patterned PDMS surfaces with varying pillar sizes and spacing between pillars were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AFM/FFM was used to acquire the friction force images of micro/nano-patterned surfaces using a colloidal probe. A difference in friction force produced a contrast on the friction force images when the colloidal probe slid over different regions of the patterned polymer surfaces. The average friction force of patterned surface was related to the spacing between the pillars and their size. It decreased with the decreasing of spacing between the pillars and the increasing of pillar size. A reduction in friction force was attributed to the reduced area of contact between patterned surface and colloidal probe. Additionally, the average friction force increased with increasing applied load and sliding velocity.

  1. Tribological behavior of micro/nano-patterned surfaces in contact with AFM colloidal probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaoliang; Wang Xiu; Kong Wen [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yi Gewen [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Jia Junhong, E-mail: jhjia@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-10-15

    In effort to investigate the influence of the micro/nano-patterning or surface texturing on the nanotribological properties of patterned surfaces, the patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars were fabricated by replica molding technique. The surface morphologies of patterned PDMS surfaces with varying pillar sizes and spacing between pillars were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AFM/FFM was used to acquire the friction force images of micro/nano-patterned surfaces using a colloidal probe. A difference in friction force produced a contrast on the friction force images when the colloidal probe slid over different regions of the patterned polymer surfaces. The average friction force of patterned surface was related to the spacing between the pillars and their size. It decreased with the decreasing of spacing between the pillars and the increasing of pillar size. A reduction in friction force was attributed to the reduced area of contact between patterned surface and colloidal probe. Additionally, the average friction force increased with increasing applied load and sliding velocity.

  2. An Optimized Online Verification Imaging Procedure for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, David J.; Kron, Tomas; Chua, Boon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capabilities of a kilovoltage (kV) on-board imager (OBI)-equipped linear accelerator in the setting of on-line verification imaging for external-beam partial breast irradiation. Available imaging techniques were optimized and assessed for image quality using a modified anthropomorphic phantom. Imaging dose was also assessed. Imaging techniques were assessed for physical clearance between patient and treatment machine using a volunteer. Nonorthogonal kV image pairs were identified as optimal in terms of image quality, clearance, and dose. After institutional review board approval, this approach was used for 17 patients receiving accelerated partial breast irradiation. Imaging was performed before every fraction verification with online correction of setup deviations >5 mm (total image sessions = 170). Treatment staff rated risk of collision and visibility of tumor bed surgical clips where present. Image session duration and detected setup deviations were recorded. For all cases, both image projections (n = 34) had low collision risk. Surgical clips were rated as well as visualized in all cases where they were present (n = 5). The average imaging session time was 6 min, 16 sec, and a reduction in duration was observed as staff became familiar with the technique. Setup deviations of up to 1.3 cm were detected before treatment and subsequently confirmed offline. Nonorthogonal kV image pairs allowed effective and efficient online verification for partial breast irradiation. It has yet to be tested in a multicenter study to determine whether it is dependent on skilled treatment staff.

  3. Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Arildsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most advanced tools for high-resolution imaging and manipulation of nanoscale matter. Unfortunately, standard AFM imaging requires a timescale on the order of seconds to minutes to acquire an image which makes it complicated to observe dynamic processes....... Moreover, it is often required to take several images before a relevant observation region is identified. In this paper we show how to significantly reduce the image acquisition time by undersampling. The reconstruction of an undersampled AFM image can be viewed as an inpainting, interpolating problem...... should be reconstructed using interpolation....

  4. X-ray imaging of targets irradiated by the Nike KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Serlin, V.; Sethian, J.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Holland, G.

    1997-01-01

    Foil targets irradiated by the Naval Research Laboratory Nike KrF laser were imaged in the x-ray region with two-dimensional spatial resolution in the 2 endash 10 μm range. The images revealed the smoothness of the emission from target and backlighter foils, the acceleration of the target foils, and the growth of Rayleigh endash Taylor instabilities that were seeded by patterns on the irradiated sides of CH foils

  5. Dual frequency modulation with two cantilevers in series: a possible means to rapidly acquire tip–sample interaction force curves with dynamic AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solares, Santiago D; Chawla, Gaurav

    2008-01-01

    One common application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the acquisition of tip–sample interaction force curves. However, this can be a slow process when the user is interested in studying non-uniform samples, because existing contact- and dynamic-mode methods require that the measurement be performed at one fixed surface point at a time. This paper proposes an AFM method based on dual frequency modulation using two cantilevers in series, which could be used to measure the tip–sample interaction force curves and topography of the entire sample with a single surface scan, in a time that is comparable to the time needed to collect a topographic image with current AFM imaging modes. Numerical simulation results are provided along with recommended parameters to characterize tip–sample interactions resembling those of conventional silicon tips and carbon nanotube tips tapping on silicon surfaces

  6. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dague, E; Jauvert, E; Laplatine, L; Thibault, C; Viallet, B; Ressier, L

    2011-01-01

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  7. AFM lateral force calibration for an integrated probe using a calibration grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huabin; Gee, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) friction measurements on hard and soft materials remain a challenge due to the difficulties associated with accurately calibrating the cantilever for lateral force measurement. One of the most widely accepted lateral force calibration methods is the wedge method. This method is often used in a simplified format but in so doing sacrifices accuracy. In the present work, we have further developed the wedge method to provide a lateral force calibration method for integrated AFM probes that is easy to use without compromising accuracy and reliability. Raw friction calibration data are collected from a single scan image by continuous ramping of the set point as the facets of a standard grating are scanned. These data are analysed to yield an accurate lateral force conversion/calibration factor that is not influenced by adhesion forces or load deviation. By demonstrating this new calibration method, we illustrate its reliability, speed and ease of execution. This method makes accessible reliable boundary lubrication studies on adhesive and heterogeneous surfaces that require spatial resolution of frictional forces. - Highlights: • We develop a simple and accurate method for lateral force calibration in AFM friction measurements. • We detail the basis of the method and illustrate how to use it and its reliability with example data. • Our method is easy, accurate and accounts for the affects of adhesion on friction measurements. • The method is applicable to integrated probes, as opposed to colloidal probes. • This allows accurate AFM friction measurements on spatially heterogeneous and adhesive surfaces

  8. Temperature-Controlled High-Speed AFM: Real-Time Observation of Ripple Phase Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirohide; Miyagi, Atsushi; Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-11-01

    With nanometer lateral and Angstrom vertical resolution, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has contributed unique data improving the understanding of lipid bilayers. Lipid bilayers are found in several different temperature-dependent states, termed phases; the main phases are solid and fluid phases. The transition temperature between solid and fluid phases is lipid composition specific. Under certain conditions some lipid bilayers adopt a so-called ripple phase, a structure where solid and fluid phase domains alternate with constant periodicity. Because of its narrow regime of existence and heterogeneity ripple phase and its transition dynamics remain poorly understood. Here, a temperature control device to high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) to observe dynamics of phase transition from ripple phase to fluid phase reversibly in real time is developed and integrated. Based on HS-AFM imaging, the phase transition processes from ripple phase to fluid phase and from ripple phase to metastable ripple phase to fluid phase could be reversibly, phenomenologically, and quantitatively studied. The results here show phase transition hysteresis in fast cooling and heating processes, while both melting and condensation occur at 24.15 °C in quasi-steady state situation. A second metastable ripple phase with larger periodicity is formed at the ripple phase to fluid phase transition when the buffer contains Ca 2+ . The presented temperature-controlled HS-AFM is a new unique experimental system to observe dynamics of temperature-sensitive processes at the nanoscopic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Magnetic domain structure investigation of Bi: YIG-thin films by combination of AFM and cantilever-based aperture SNOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysokikh, Yu E; Shevyakov, V I; Krasnoborodko, S Yu; Shelaev, A V; Prokopov, A R

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of magnetic domain structure investigation by combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Special hollow-pyramid AFM cantilevers with aperture was used. This combination allows us use same probe for both topography and domain structure visualization of Bi -substituted ferrite garnet films of micro- and nano-meter thickness. Samples were excited through aperture by tightly focused linearly polarized laser beam. Magneto-optical effect rotates polarization of transmitted light depend on domain orientation. Visualization of magnetic domains was performed by detecting cross polarized component of transmitted light. SNOM allows to obtain high resolution magnetic domain image and prevent sample from any disturbance by magnetic probe. Same area SNOM and MFM images are presented. (paper)

  10. Topological and morphological analysis of gamma rays irradiated chitosan-poly (vinyl alcohol) blends using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Rinkesh; Bisen, D. S.; Bajpai, R.; Bajpai, A. K.

    2017-04-01

    In the present communication, binary blends of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (CS) were prepared by solution cast method and the roughness parameters of PVA, native CS and CS-PVA blend films were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Moreover, the changes in the morphology of the samples were also investigated after irradiation of gamma rays at absorbed dose of 1 Mrad and 10 Mrad for the scanning areas of 5×5 μm2, 10×10 μm2 and 20×20 μm2. Amplitude, statistical and spatial parameters, including line, 3D and 2D image profiles of the experimental surfaces were examined and compared to un-irradiated samples. For gamma irradiated CS-PVA blends the larger waviness over the surface was found as compared to un-irradiated CS-PVA blends but the values of average roughness for both the films were found almost same. The coefficient of skewness was positive for gamma irradiated CS-PVA blends which revealed the presence of more peaks than valleys on the blend surfaces.

  11. AFM ve farmaceutické technologii 3.

    OpenAIRE

    Ščuryová, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Charles University in Prague Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Student: Veronika Ščuryová Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Pavel Doležal, CSc. Title of thesis: AFM in Pharmaceutical Technology 3 The theoretical part deals first with the construction of AFM microscope, the principle of the method, determining the surface topography and regimes which can be used. Described therein are distinct advantages over previous traditional methods but also its pitfalls. ...

  12. A novel dog-bone oscillating AFM probe with thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-10-31

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments.

  13. Correlating TEM images of damage in irradiated materials to molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeublin, R.; Caturla, M.-J.; Wall, M.; Felter, T.; Fluss, M.; Wirth, B.D.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Victoria, M.

    2002-01-01

    TEM image simulations are used to couple the results from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to experimental TEM images. In particular we apply this methodology to the study of defects produced during irradiation. MD simulations have shown that irradiation of FCC metals results in a population of vacancies and interstitials forming clusters. The limitation of these simulations is the short time scales available, on the order of 100 s of picoseconds. Extrapolation of the results from these short times to the time scales of the laboratory has been difficult. We address this problem by two methods: we perform TEM image simulations of MD simulations of cascades with an improved technique, to relate defects produced at short time scales with those observed experimentally at much longer time scales. On the other hand we perform in situ TEM experiments of Au irradiated at liquid-nitrogen temperatures, and study the evolution of the produced damage as the temperature is increased to room temperature. We find that some of the defects observed in the MD simulations at short time scales using the TEM image simulation technique have features that resemble those observed in laboratory TEM images of irradiated samples. In situ TEM shows that stacking fault tetrahedra are present at the lowest temperatures and are stable during annealing up to room temperature, while other defect clusters migrate one dimensionally above -100 deg. C. Results are presented here

  14. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  15. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Cardoso Espejo, Luciana; Brossi Botta, Sergio; Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de; Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A.; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Bona Matos, Adriana; Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm x 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  16. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks. (paper)

  17. Short-Term Solar Irradiance Forecasts Using Sky Images and Radiative Transfer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Du

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel forecast method which addresses the difficulty in short-term solar irradiance forecasting that arises due to rapidly evolving environmental factors over short time periods. This involves the forecasting of Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI that combines prediction sky images with a Radiative Transfer Model (RTM. The prediction images (up to 10 min ahead are produced by a non-local optical flow method, which is used to calculate the cloud motion for each pixel, with consecutive sky images at 1 min intervals. The Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI and the diffuse radiation intensity field under clear sky and overcast conditions obtained from the RTM are then mapped to the sky images. Through combining the cloud locations on the prediction image with the corresponding instance of image-based DNI and diffuse radiation intensity fields, the GHI can be quantitatively forecasted for time horizons of 1–10 min ahead. The solar forecasts are evaluated in terms of root mean square error (RMSE and mean absolute error (MAE in relation to in-situ measurements and compared to the performance of the persistence model. The results of our experiment show that GHI forecasts using the proposed method perform better than the persistence model.

  18. Radiation myelopathy in over-irradiated patients: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, E.R.; Gregorio, M.A. de; Mateo, P.; Esco, R.; Bascon, N.; Morales, F.; Bellosta, R.; Lopez, P.; Gimeno, M.; Roca, M.; Villavieja, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to report the MRI findings in patients with radiation myelopathy due to accidental local over-irradiation syndrome. Eight patients (seven males and one female) were suffering from over-irradiation syndrome as a result of treatments from a malfunctioning linear electron accelerator. The mean accidental estimated dose was 136 Gy delivered to the ''open-neck'' (seven cases) and to the thoracic wall (one case), during a mean of 5.4 sessions (range 1-9 sessions). Paresthesia and weakness in the upper extremities were the earliest symptoms (87.5 %), with evolution to paralysis in all patients. No patient is alive (mean survival time 64 days). In all cases MRI was negative for neurologic lesions in the acute phase (< 90 days from irradiation; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system). Late signs of radiation myelitis manifested as high-intensity signals on T2-weighted images in three patients, and as Gd-DTPA enhancement of T1-weighted images in one case. Autopsies performed on four patients who died in acute phase showed morphologic alterations in white matter: edema in 75 %, and necrosis and glial reaction as well as obliterative vasculitis in all cases. In cases of over-irradiation, MRI may be normal in acute phase even if the patients have severe neurologic deficit, as positive MRI findings appear only in delayed radiation myelitis. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Radiation myelopathy in over-irradiated patients: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, E.R. [Radiology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Gregorio, M.A. de [Radiology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Mateo, P. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Esco, R. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Bascon, N. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Morales, F. [Neurology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Bellosta, R. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez, P. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Gimeno, M. [Hospital Miguel Servet, Zaragoza (Spain); Roca, M. [Radiology Service, Hospital Miguel Servet, E-50 009 Zaragoza (Spain); Villavieja, J.L. [Radiology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain)

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this work is to report the MRI findings in patients with radiation myelopathy due to accidental local over-irradiation syndrome. Eight patients (seven males and one female) were suffering from over-irradiation syndrome as a result of treatments from a malfunctioning linear electron accelerator. The mean accidental estimated dose was 136 Gy delivered to the ``open-neck`` (seven cases) and to the thoracic wall (one case), during a mean of 5.4 sessions (range 1-9 sessions). Paresthesia and weakness in the upper extremities were the earliest symptoms (87.5 %), with evolution to paralysis in all patients. No patient is alive (mean survival time 64 days). In all cases MRI was negative for neurologic lesions in the acute phase (< 90 days from irradiation; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system). Late signs of radiation myelitis manifested as high-intensity signals on T2-weighted images in three patients, and as Gd-DTPA enhancement of T1-weighted images in one case. Autopsies performed on four patients who died in acute phase showed morphologic alterations in white matter: edema in 75 %, and necrosis and glial reaction as well as obliterative vasculitis in all cases. In cases of over-irradiation, MRI may be normal in acute phase even if the patients have severe neurologic deficit, as positive MRI findings appear only in delayed radiation myelitis. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Synthesis and AFM visualization of DNA nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Rika; Haruta, Hirotaka; Morii, Takashi; Okada, Takao; Asakawa, Takeshi; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2004-01-01

    We propose a novel bottom-up approach for the fabrication of various desired nanostructures, based on self-assembly of oligonucleotides governed by Watson-Crick base pairing. Using this approach, we designed Y-shaped, closed Y-shaped, H-shaped, and hexagonal structures with oligonucleotides. These structures were autonomously fabricated simply by mixing equimolar solutions of oligonucleotides and performing hybridization. After synthesis of the nanostructures, we confirmed their validity by agarose gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscope (AFM) visualization. We detected bands of the desired molecular sizes in the gel electrophoresis and observed the desired structures by AFM analysis. We concluded that the synthesized structures were consistent with our intended design and that AFM visualization is a very useful tool for the observation of nanostructures

  1. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and 6 fps. These imaging protocols should result in high quality images that pass the set tolerance levels on all systems. Average SAPA computation time for complete QA analysis for a 0.20 mm voxel, 400 slice Shelley phantom microCT data set

  2. Ultra-thin MoS{sub 2} irradiated with highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopster, J.; Kozubek, R.; Krämer, J.; Sokolovsky, V.; Schleberger, M., E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de

    2013-12-15

    Single MoS{sub 2} layers exfoliated on KBr have been irradiated with highly charged Xe ions, i.e. with Xe{sup 35+} and Xe{sup 40+}. By atomic force microscopy (AFM) we identified pits and hillocks induced by single ion impacts. The latter ones appear on single layer and bulk-like MoS{sub 2} after both irradiations, whereas their diameter and height apparently depend on the charge state q and layer number. By comparison of contact mode and tapping mode AFM measurements we deduce that these ion induced defects are topographical hillocks accompanied by an enhanced friction. In contrast to this, pit-like structures were only observed on single layer MoS{sub 2} irradiated with q = 40. Taking into account the well known ion induced pit formation on KBr due to defect mediated sputtering, we deduce that pit formation takes place in the substrate and not in the MoS{sub 2} layer.

  3. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  4. AFM characterization of protein net formation on a fibrous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assis O.B.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme protein net is set on a glass fiber support using the self-assembly technique. Enzymatic film formation is followed by surface imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM. Change in roughness as a function of deposition time is used as an indirect indicator of film formation. The objective was to form a protein film that would have no effect on the permeability of the medium, aiming at its application as a bioactive membrane or reactor suitable for bacteria and chemical interactions in aqueous media.

  5. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamgain Hitesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and atomic force microscope (AFM can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and mouse melanoma (B16F1 cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor

  6. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  7. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO 2 , O 2 concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia

  8. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO2, O2 concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  9. Investigations on the optical, thermal and surface modifications of electron irradiated L-threonine single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh Kumar, G.; Gokul Raj, S. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chepauk, Chennai 600005 (India); Bogle, K.A.; Dhole, S.D.; Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Mohan, R. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chepauk, Chennai 600005 (India)], E-mail: professormohan@yahoo.co.in

    2008-06-15

    L-Threonine single crystals have been irradiated by 6 MeV electrons. Irradiated crystals at various electron fluences were subjected to various techniques such as UV-vis-NIR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thermomechanical analyses. Thermal strength of the irradiated crystals has also been studied through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The results have been discussed in detail.

  10. Ionic liquids influence on the surface properties of electron beam irradiated wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croitoru, Catalin [“Transilvania” University of Brasov, Product Design and Environment Department, 29 Eroilor Str., 500036, Brasov (Romania); Patachia, Silvia, E-mail: st.patachia@unitbv.ro [“Transilvania” University of Brasov, Product Design and Environment Department, 29 Eroilor Str., 500036, Brasov (Romania); Doroftei, Florica; Parparita, Elena; Vasile, Cornelia [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Physical Chemistry of Polymers Department, 41A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, Iasi (Romania)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Wood veneers impregnated with three imidazolium-based ionic liquids and irradiated with electron beam were studied by FTIR-ATR, SEM/EDX, AFM, contact angle and image analysis. • ILs preserve the surface properties of the wood (surface energy, roughness, color) upon irradiation, in comparison with the reference wood, but the surface composition is changed by treatment with IL-s, mainly with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. • Under electron beam irradiation covalent bonding of the imidazolium moiety to wood determines a higher resistance to water penetration and spreading on the surface. - Abstract: In this paper, the influence of three imidazolium-based ionic liquids (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) on the structure and surface properties of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) veneers submitted to electron beam irradiation with a dose of 50 kGy has been studied by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, as well as image, scanning electron microscopy/SEM/EDX, atomic force microscopy and contact angle analysis. The experimental results have proven that the studied ionic liquids determine a better preservation of the structural features of wood (cellulose crystallinity index and lignin concentration on the surface) as well as some of surface properties such as surface energy, roughness, color upon irradiation with electron beam, in comparison with the reference wood, but surface composition is changed by treatment with imidazolium-based ionic liquids mainly with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. Also, under electron beam irradiation covalent bonding of the imidazolium moiety to wood determines a higher resistance to water penetration and spreading on the surface.

  11. Combining adhesive contact mechanics with a viscoelastic material model to probe local material properties by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, Christian; Czibula, Caterina; Tscharnuter, Daniel; Schöberl, Thomas; Teichert, Christian; Hirn, Ulrich

    2017-12-20

    Viscoelastic properties are often measured using probe based techniques such as nanoindentation (NI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Rarely, however, are these methods verified. In this article, we present a method that combines contact mechanics with a viscoelastic model (VEM) composed of springs and dashpots. We further show how to use this model to determine viscoelastic properties from creep curves recorded by a probe based technique. We focus on using the standard linear solid model and the generalized Maxwell model of order 2. The method operates in the range of 0.01 Hz to 1 Hz. Our approach is suitable for rough surfaces by providing a defined contact area using plastic pre-deformation of the material. The very same procedure is used to evaluate AFM based measurements as well as NI measurements performed on polymer samples made from poly(methyl methacrylate) and polycarbonate. The results of these measurements are then compared to those obtained by tensile creep tests also performed on the same samples. It is found that the tensile test results differ considerably from the results obtained by AFM and NI methods. The similarity between the AFM results and NI results suggests that the proposed method is capable of yielding results comparable to NI but with the advantage of the imaging possibilities of AFM. Furthermore, all three methods allowed a clear distinction between PC and PMMA by means of their respective viscoelastic properties.

  12. Analysis of dark current images of a CMOS camera during gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Náfrádi, Gábor, E-mail: nafradi@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Czifrus, Szabolcs, E-mail: czifrus@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Kocsis, Gábor, E-mail: kocsis.gabor@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Pór, Gábor, E-mail: por@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Szepesi, Tamás, E-mail: szepesi.tamas@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Zoletnik, Sándor, E-mail: zoletnik.sandor@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Radiation tolerance of a fast framing CMOS camera EDICAM examined. • We estimate the expected gamma dose and spectrum of EDICAM with MCNP. • We irradiate EDICAM by 23.5 Gy in 70 min in a fission rector. • Dose rate normalised average brightness of frames grows linearly with the dose. • Dose normalised average brightness of frames follows the dose rate time evolution. -- Abstract: We report on the behaviour of the dark current images of the Event Detection Intelligent Camera (EDICAM) when placed into an irradiation field of gamma rays. EDICAM is an intelligent fast framing CMOS camera operating in the visible spectral range, which is designed for the video diagnostic system of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out in order to estimate the expected gamma spectrum and dose for an entire year of operation in W7-X. EDICAM was irradiated in a pure gamma field in the Training Reactor of BME with a dose of approximately 23.5 Gy in 1.16 h. During the irradiation, numerous frame series were taken with the camera with exposure times 20 μs, 50 μs, 100 μs, 1 ms, 10 ms, 100 ms. EDICAM withstood the irradiation, but suffered some dynamic range degradation. The behaviour of the dark current images during irradiation is described in detail. We found that the average brightness of dark current images depends on the total ionising dose that the camera is exposed to and the dose rate as well as on the applied exposure times.

  13. Stiffness and evolution of interfacial micropancakes revealed by AFM quantitative nanomechanical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Binyu; Wang, Xingya; Song, Yang; Hu, Jun; Lü, Junhong; Zhou, Xingfei; Tai, Renzhong; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Lijuan

    2015-05-28

    Micropancakes are quasi-two-dimensional micron-sized domains on crystalline substrates (e.g. highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)) immersed in water. They are only a few nanometers thick, and are suspected to come from the accumulation of dissolved air at the solid-water interface. However, the exact chemical nature and basic physical properties of micropancakes have been under debate ever since their first observation, primarily due to the lack of a suitable characterization technique. In this study, the stiffness of micropancakes at the interface between HOPG and ethanol-water solutions was investigated by using PeakForce Quantitative NanoMechanics (PF-QNM) mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Our measurements showed that micropancakes were stiffer than nanobubbles, and for bilayer micropancakes, the bottom layer in contact with the substrate was stiffer than the top one. Interestingly, the micropancakes became smaller and softer with an increase in the ethanol concentration in the solution, and were undetectable by AFM above a critical concentration of ethanol. But they re-appeared after the ethanol concentration in the solution was reduced. Clearly the evolution and stiffness of the micropancakes were dependent on the chemical composition in the solution, which could be attributed to the correlation of the mechanical properties of the micropancakes with the surface tension of the liquid phase. Based on the "go-and-come" behaviors of micropancakes with the ethanol concentration, we found that the micropancakes could actually tolerate the ethanol concentration much higher than 5%, a value reported in the literature. The results from this work may be helpful in alluding the chemical nature of micropancakes.

  14. Thermal imaging of high power diode lasers subject to back-irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.; Cao, C.; Thiagarajan, P.; Deri, R. J.; Leisher, P. O.

    2018-03-01

    CCD-based thermoreflectance imaging and finite element modeling are used to study the two-dimensional (2D) temperature profile of a junction-down broad-area diode laser facet subject to back-irradiance. By determining the temperature rise in the active region (ΔΤAR) at different diode laser optical powers, back-irradiance reflectance levels, and back-irradiance spot locations, we find that ΔΤAR increases by nearly a factor of three when the back-irradiance spot is centered in the absorbing substrate approximately 5 μm away from the active region, a distance roughly equal to half of the back-irradiance spot FWHM (9 μm). This corroborates prior work studying the relationship between the back-irradiance spot location and catastrophic optical damage, suggesting a strong thermal basis for reduced laser lifetime in the presence of back-irradiance for diode lasers fabricated on absorbing substrates.

  15. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen; Arildsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also pr...... as a convenient platform for researchers in compressed sensing aiming at obtaining a high degree of reproducibility of their research....

  16. Imaging of irradiated liver with Tc-99m-sulfur colloid and Tc-99m-IDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Saha, S.; Aron, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    In three cases, irradiated regions of liver failed to concentrate Tc-99m-sulfur colloid. In two of these three, imaging with Tc-99m-acetanilide iminodiacetic acid (IDA) agents within five days showed near normal hepatic uptake of this hepatobiliary imaging agent. The hepatic parenchymal cells may be imaged with Tc-99m-IDA in some irradiated regions of liver, despite loss of reticuloendothelial cell function

  17. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  18. Fabrication and buckling dynamics of nanoneedle AFM probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, J D; Gordeev, S N, E-mail: jdb28@bath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-29

    A new method for the fabrication of high-aspect-ratio probes by electron beam induced deposition is described. This technique allows the fabrication of cylindrical 'nanoneedle' structures on the atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip which can be used for accurate imaging of surfaces with high steep features. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging showed that needles with diameters in the range of 18-100 nm could be obtained by this technique. The needles were shown to undergo buckling deformation under large tip-sample forces. The deformation was observed to recover elastically under vertical deformations of up to {approx} 60% of the needle length, preventing damage to the needle. A technique of stabilizing the needle against buckling by coating it with additional electron beam deposited carbon was also investigated; it was shown that coated needles of 75 nm or greater total diameter did not buckle even under tip-sample forces of {approx} 1.5 {mu}N.

  19. Atomic force microscopy and mechanical testing of bovine pericardium irradiated to radiotherapy doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daar, Eman; Kaabar, W.; Woods, E.; Lei, C.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Within the context of radiotherapy our work investigates the feasibility of identifying changes in structural and biomechanical properties of pericardium resulting from exposure to penetrating photon irradiation. Collagen fibres extracted from bovine pericardium were chosen as a model of pericardium extracellular matrix as these form the main fibrous component of the medium. Tests of mechanical properties, controlled by the various structural elements of the tissues, were performed on frontal pericardium, including uni-axial tests and atomic force microscopy (AFM). While the irradiated collagen fibres showed no significant change in D-band spacing up to doses of 80 Gy, the fibre width was found to increase by 34±9% at 80 Gy when compared with that for un-irradiated samples. - Highlights: • Methods for identifying changes in tissue biophysical properties following photon irradiation. • Tests made using collagen fibres extracted from bovine pericardium. • Sensitivity of uni-axial tests and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigated. • Radiotherapy doses investigated up to 80 Gy, delivered by 6 MV photons

  20. A magnetic resonance imaging study on changes in rat mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue after high-dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Wonkwang Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Kyoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    This study was designed to evaluate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appropriate for detecting early changes in the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of rats after high-dose irradiation. The right mandibles of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 10 Gy (Group 1, n=5) and 20 Gy (Group 2, n=5). Five non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The MR images of rat mandibles were obtained before irradiation and once a week until week 4 after irradiation. From the MR images, the signal intensity (SI) of the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of the incisor was interpreted. The MR images were compared with the histopathologic findings. The SI of the mandibular bone marrow had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. There was little difference between Groups 1 and 2. The SI of the irradiated groups appeared to be lower than that of the control group. The histopathologic findings showed that the trabecular bone in the irradiated group had increased. The SI of the irradiated pulp tissue had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. However, the SI of the MR images in Group 2 was high in the atrophic pulp of the incisor apex at week 2 after irradiation. These patterns seen on MRI in rat bone marrow and pulp tissue were consistent with histopathologic findings. They may be useful to assess radiogenic sclerotic changes in rat mandibular bone marrow.

  1. Stitching Grid-wise Atomic Force Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mathias Zacho; Bengtson, Stefan Hein; Pedersen, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are able to capture images with a resolution in the nano metre scale. Due to this high resolution, the covered area per image is relatively small, which can be problematic when surveying a sample. A system able to stitch AFM images has been developed to solve this p...

  2. Automated setpoint adjustment for biological contact mode atomic force microscopy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most frequently used AFM imaging mode in biology. It is about 5-10 times faster than oscillating mode imaging (in conventional AFM setups), and provides topographs of biological samples with sub-molecular resolution and at a high signal-to-noise ratio. Unfortunately, contact mode imaging is sensitive to the applied force and intrinsic force drift: inappropriate force applied by the AFM tip damages the soft biological samples. We present a methodology that automatically searches for and maintains high resolution imaging forces. We found that the vertical and lateral vibrations of the probe during scanning are valuable signals for the characterization of the actual applied force by the tip. This allows automated adjustment and correction of the setpoint force during an experiment. A system that permanently performs this methodology steered the AFM towards high resolution imaging forces and imaged purple membrane at molecular resolution and live cells at high signal-to-noise ratio for hours without an operator.

  3. SU-E-T-296: Dosimetric Analysis of Small Animal Image-Guided Irradiator Using High Resolution Optical CT Imaging of 3D Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Y; Qian, X; Wuu, C; Adamovics, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator using a high-resolution of optical CT imaging of 3D dosimeters. Methods: PRESAEGE 3D dosimeters were used to determine dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator and compared with EBT2 films. Cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters with 7cm height and 6cm diameter were placed along the central axis of the beam. The films were positioned between 6×6cm 2 cubed plastic water phantoms perpendicular to the beam direction with multiple depths. PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films were then irradiated with the irradiator beams at 220kVp and 13mA. Each of irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters named PA1, PA2, PB1, and PB2, was independently scanned using a high-resolution single laser beam optical CT scanner. The transverse images were reconstructed with a 0.1mm high-resolution pixel. A commercial Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was used for readout of irradiated EBT2 films at a 0.4mm pixel resolution. PDD curves and beam profiles were measured for the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films. Results: The PDD agreements between the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2 and the EB2 films were 1.7, 2.3, 1.9, and 1.9% for the multiple depths at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50mm, respectively. The FWHM measurements for each PRESAEGE dosimeter and film agreed with 0.5, 1.1, 0.4, and 1.7%, respectively, at 30mm depth. Both PDD and FWHM measurements for the PRESAGE dosimeters and the films agreed overall within 2%. The 20%–80% penumbral widths of each PRESAGE dosimeter and the film at a given depth were respectively found to be 0.97, 0.91, 0.79, 0.88, and 0.37mm. Conclusion: Dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator have been demonstrated with the measurements of PRESAGE dosimeter and EB2 film. With the high resolution and accuracy obtained from this 3D dosimetry system, precise targeting small animal irradiation can be achieved

  4. Topological and morphological analysis of gamma rays irradiated chitosan-poly (vinyl alcohol) blends using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Rinkesh; Bisen, D.S.; Bajpai, R.; Bajpai, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    In the present communication, binary blends of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (CS) were prepared by solution cast method and the roughness parameters of PVA, native CS and CS-PVA blend films were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Moreover, the changes in the morphology of the samples were also investigated after irradiation of gamma rays at absorbed dose of 1 Mrad and 10 Mrad for the scanning areas of 5×5 µm 2 , 10×10 µm 2 and 20×20 µm 2 . Amplitude, statistical and spatial parameters, including line, 3D and 2D image profiles of the experimental surfaces were examined and compared to un-irradiated samples. For gamma irradiated CS-PVA blends the larger waviness over the surface was found as compared to un-irradiated CS-PVA blends but the values of average roughness for both the films were found almost same. The coefficient of skewness was positive for gamma irradiated CS-PVA blends which revealed the presence of more peaks than valleys on the blend surfaces. - Highlights: • Binary polymer blends of chitosan and PVA were prepared. • Irradiation by gamma rays exhibited a significant change in surface morphology. • Various topographical and morphological parameters were investigated. • The prepared irradiated blends may find biomedical applications.

  5. Sequential electrochemical oxidation and site-selective growth of nanoparticles onto AFM probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Yong; Pan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Zhongdang

    2008-08-19

    In this work, we reported an approach for the site-selective growth of nanoparticle onto the tip apex of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. The silicon AFM probe was first coated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) through a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Subsequently, COOH groups were selectively generated at the tip apex of silicon AFM probes by applying an appropriate bias voltage between the tip and a flat gold electrode. The transformation of methyl to carboxylic groups at the tip apex of the AFM probe was investigated through measuring the capillary force before and after electrochemical oxidation. To prepare the nanoparticle terminated AFM probe, the oxidized AFM probe was then immersed in an aqueous solution containing positive metal ions, for example, Ag+, to bind positive metal ions to the oxidized area (COOH terminated area), followed by chemical reduction with aqueous NaBH 4 and further development (if desired) to give a metal nanoparticle-modified AFM probe. The formation of a metal nanoparticle at the tip apex of the AFM probe was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA).

  6. The spin-3/2 Ising model AFM/AFM two-layer lattice with crystal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yigit, A.; Albayrak, E.

    2010-01-01

    The spin-3/2 Ising model is investigated for the case of antiferromagnetic (AFM/AFM) interactions on the two-layer Bethe lattice by using the exact recursion relations in a pairwise approach for given coordination numbers q=3, 4 and 6 when the layers are under the influences of equal external magnetic and equal crystal fields. The ground state (GS) phase diagrams are obtained on the different planes in detail and then the temperature dependent phase diagrams of the system are calculated accordingly. It is observed that the system presents both second- and first-order phase transitions for all q, therefore, tricritical points. It was also found that the system exhibits double-critical end points and isolated points. The model also presents two Neel temperatures, TN, and the existence of which leads to the reentrant behavior.

  7. Surface damage on 6H–SiC by highly-charged Xeq+ ions irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.Q.; Zhang, C.H.; Han, L.H.; Xu, C.L.; Li, J.J.; Yang, Y.T.; Song, Y.; Gou, J.; Li, J.Y.; Ma, Y.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Surface damage on 6H–SiC irradiated by highly-charged Xe q+ (q = 18, 26) ions to different fluences in two geometries was studied by means of AFM, Raman scattering spectroscopy and FTIR spectrometry. The FTIR spectra analysis shows that for Xe 26+ ions irradiation at normal incidence, a deep reflection dip appears at about 930 cm −1 . Moreover, the reflectance on top of reststrahlen band decreases as the ion fluence increases, and the reflectance at tilted incidence is larger than that at normal incidence. The Raman scattering spectra reveal that for Xe 26+ ions at normal incidence, surface reconstruction occurs and amorphous stoichiometric SiC and Si–Si and C–C bonds are generated and original Si–C vibrational mode disappears. And the intensity of scattering peaks decreases with increasing dose. The AFM measurement shows that the surface swells after irradiation. With increasing ion fluence, the step height between the irradiated and the unirradiated region increases for Xe 18+ ions irradiation; while for Xe 26+ ions irradiation, the step height first increases and then decreases with increasing ion fluence. Moreover, the step height at normal incidence is higher than that at tilted incidence by the irradiation with Xe 18+ to the same ion fluence. A good agreement between the results from the three methods is found

  8. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 08: Automated Imaging Quality Assurance for Image-Guided Small Animal Irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Chris; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena [University of Victoria (Australia)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To develop quality assurance (QA) standards and tolerance levels for image quality of small animal irradiators. Methods: A fully automated in-house QA software for image analysis of a commercial microCT phantom was created. Quantitative analyses of CT linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT number evaluation was performed. Phantom microCT scans from seven institutions acquired with varying parameters (kVp, mA, time, voxel size, and frame rate) and five irradiator units (Xstrahl SARRP, PXI X-RAD 225Cx, PXI X-RAD SmART, GE explore CT/RT 140, and GE Explore CT 120) were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using our in-house software to establish pass/fail criteria for each QA test. Results: CT linearity (R2>0.996) was excellent at all but Institution 2. Acceptable SNR (>35) and noise levels (<55HU) were obtained at four of the seven institutions, where failing scans were acquired with less than 120mAs. Acceptable MTF (>1.5 lp/mm for MTF=0.2) was obtained at all but Institution 6 due to the largest scan voxel size (0.35mm). The geometric accuracy passed (<1.5%) at five of the seven institutions. Conclusion: Our QA software can be used to rapidly perform quantitative imaging QA for small animal irradiators, accumulate results over time, and display possible changes in imaging functionality from its original performance and/or from the recommended tolerance levels. This tool will aid researchers in maintaining high image quality, enabling precise conformal dose delivery to small animals.

  9. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 08: Automated Imaging Quality Assurance for Image-Guided Small Animal Irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, Chris; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop quality assurance (QA) standards and tolerance levels for image quality of small animal irradiators. Methods: A fully automated in-house QA software for image analysis of a commercial microCT phantom was created. Quantitative analyses of CT linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT number evaluation was performed. Phantom microCT scans from seven institutions acquired with varying parameters (kVp, mA, time, voxel size, and frame rate) and five irradiator units (Xstrahl SARRP, PXI X-RAD 225Cx, PXI X-RAD SmART, GE explore CT/RT 140, and GE Explore CT 120) were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using our in-house software to establish pass/fail criteria for each QA test. Results: CT linearity (R2>0.996) was excellent at all but Institution 2. Acceptable SNR (>35) and noise levels (<55HU) were obtained at four of the seven institutions, where failing scans were acquired with less than 120mAs. Acceptable MTF (>1.5 lp/mm for MTF=0.2) was obtained at all but Institution 6 due to the largest scan voxel size (0.35mm). The geometric accuracy passed (<1.5%) at five of the seven institutions. Conclusion: Our QA software can be used to rapidly perform quantitative imaging QA for small animal irradiators, accumulate results over time, and display possible changes in imaging functionality from its original performance and/or from the recommended tolerance levels. This tool will aid researchers in maintaining high image quality, enabling precise conformal dose delivery to small animals.

  10. Correlated topographic and spectroscopic imaging by combined atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dehong; Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas; Suh, Y.D.; Lu, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Near-field scanning microscopy is a powerful approach to obtain topographic and spectroscopic characterization simultaneously for imaging biological and nanoscale systems. To achieve optical imaging at high spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, aperture-less metallic scanning tips have been utilized to enhance the laser illumination local electromagnetic field at the apex of the scanning tips. In this paper, we discuss and review our work on combined fluorescence imaging with AFM-metallic tip enhancement, finite element method simulation of the tip enhancement, and their applications on AFM-tip enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) and correlated AFM and FLIM imaging of the living cells

  11. Vickers Hardness of Diamond and cBN Single Crystals: AFM Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Dub

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy in different operation modes (topography, derivative topography, and phase contrast was used to obtain 3D images of Vickers indents on the surface of diamond and cBN single crystals with high spatial resolution. Confocal Raman spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy were used to study the structure of the material in the indents. It was found that Vickers indents in diamond has no sharp and clear borders. However, the phase contrast operation mode of the AFM reveals a new viscoelastic phase in the indent in diamond. Raman spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy revealed that the new phase in the indent is disordered graphite, which was formed due to the pressure-induced phase transformation in the diamond during the hardness test. The projected contact area of the graphite layer in the indent allows us to measure the Vickers hardness of type-Ib synthetic diamond. In contrast to diamond, very high plasticity was observed for 0.5 N load indents on the (001 cBN single crystal face. Radial and ring cracks were absent, the shape of the indents was close to a square, and there were linear details in the indent, which looked like slip lines. The Vickers hardness of the (111 synthetic diamond and (111 and (001 cBN single crystals were determined using the AFM images and with account for the elastic deformation of the diamond Vickers indenter during the tests.

  12. Depletion of new neurons by image guided irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Fang eTan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation continues to be a relevant tool in both imaging and the treatment of cancer. Experimental uses of focal irradiation have recently been expanded to studies of new neurons in the adult brain. Such studies have shown cognitive deficits following radiation treatment and raised caution as to possible unintentional effects that may occur in humans. Conflicting outcomes of the effects of irradiation on adult neurogenesis suggest that the effects are either transient or permanent. In this study, we used an irradiation apparatus employed in the treatment of human tumors to assess radiation effects on rat neurogenesis. For subjects we used adult male rats (Sprague-Dawley under anesthesia. The irradiation beam was directed at the hippocampus, a center for learning and memory and the site of neurogenic activity in adult brain. The irradiation was applied at a dose-rate 0.6 Gy/min for total single-fraction, doses ranging from 0.5-10.0 Gy. The animals were returned to home cages and recovered with no sign of any side effects. The neurogenesis was measured either 1 week or 6 weeks after the irradiation. At 1 week, the number of neuronal progenitors was reduced in a dose-dependent manner with the 50% reduction at 0.78 Gy. The dose-response curve was well fitted by a double exponential suggesting two processes. Examination of the tissue with quantitative immunohistochemistry revealed a dominant low-dose effect on neuronal progenitors resulting in 80% suppression of neurogenesis. This effect was partially reversible, possibly due to compensatory proliferation of the remaining precursors. At higher doses (> 5Gy there was additional, nearly complete block of neurogenesis without compensatory proliferation. We conclude that notwithstanding the usefulness of irradiation for experimental purposes, the exposure of human subjects to doses often used in radiotherapy treatment could be damaging and cause cognitive impairments.

  13. X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging via multiple intensity weighted narrow beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce and study a novel x-ray beam irradiation pattern for X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography (XLCT), termed multiple intensity-weighted narrow-beam irradiation. The proposed XLCT imaging method is studied through simulations of x-ray and diffuse lights propagation. The emitted optical photons from X-ray excitable nanophosphors were collected by optical fiber bundles from the right-side surface of the phantom. The implementation of image reconstruction is based on the simulated measurements from 6 or 12 angular projections in terms of 3 or 5 x-ray beams scanning mode. The proposed XLCT imaging method is compared against the constant intensity weighted narrow-beam XLCT. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity and quantitative ratio of targets have a certain degree of improvement. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can offer simultaneously high image quality and fast image acquisition.

  14. In situ EC-AFM study of the effect of nanocrystals on the passivation and pit initiation in an Al-based metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.D.; Liu, Z.W.; Wang, Z.M.; Wang, J.Q.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The nanoscale corrosion on Al-rich glass was characterised by in situ EC-AFM. • The nanocrystals were identified from amorphous matrix by tapping mode AFM. • The formation of corrosion products is associated with the galvanic coupling. • The nanocrystals changed the local structure and component of the passive film. - Abstract: The effect of nanocrystals on pit initiation in metallic glasses is an unresolved issue. The passive film formation and pit initiation in the Al–Ni–Ce metallic glass were investigated using in situ electrochemical atomic force microscope (EC-AFM). The α-Al nanophases were identified from the amorphous matrix based upon the phase imaging in the tapping mode AFM. In the early stage of the passive film formation, the corrosion products Al(OH) 3 formed on the α-Al nanoparticles due to the galvanic coupling. The corrosion products incorporated into the passive film changed the local structure and component of the passive film, lowering its stability

  15. AFM topographies of densely packed nanoparticles: a quick way to determine the lateral size distribution by autocorrelation function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekete, L.; Kůsová, K.; Petrák, V.; Kratochvílová, I.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of sizes is one of the basic characteristics of nanoparticles. Here, we propose a novel way to determine the lateral distribution of sizes from AFM topographies. Our algorithm is based on the autocorrelation function and can be applied both on topographies containing spatially separated and densely packed nanoparticles as well as on topographies of polycrystalline films. As no manual treatment is required, this algorithm can be easily automatable for batch processing. The algorithm works in principle with any kind of spatially mapped information (AFM current maps, optical microscope images, etc.), and as such has no size limitations. However, in the case of AFM topographies, the tip/sample convolution effects will be the factor limiting the smallest size to which the algorithm is applicable. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of this algorithm on objects with sizes ranging between 20 nm and 1.5 μm.

  16. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique.

  17. Endosonographic and color doppler flow imaging alterations observed within irradiated rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Archie A.; Palazzo, Juan P.; Ahmad, Neelofur R.; Liu, J.-B.; Forsberg, Flemming; Marks, John

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate the endosonographic and color Doppler flow imaging alterations observed in irradiated rectal cancers with the pathologic features of radiation response, and to evaluate the potential impact of altered blood flow on the integrity of the surgical anastamosis. Methods and Materials: Endosonography with color and pulsed wave Doppler was performed on 20 rectal cancer masses before and after high dose preoperative radiation (XRT). Pre- and post-XRT observations included comparing alterations in tumor size, sonographic echotexture, color Doppler flow, and pulsatility indices. Comparisons were made with pathologic findings in the irradiated specimens and with the incidence of anastomotic failure. Results: Compared to pre-XRT observations, irradiated rectal cancers decreased in size and became either mixed in echogenicity with less apparent color Doppler flow (16 of 20) or unchanged in color Doppler flow and echotexture (4 of 20). Those with less flow (16 of 20) were imaged later (mean = 90.2 ± 12.1 days) than those without change in color Doppler flow (mean = 21.7 ± 2.7 days). Pathologically, the group of four without change in color Doppler signal had features of acute inflammation which were not observed in 16 of 20 imaged later. Based on pulsatility index measurements, both high and low resistance vessels were detected and confirmed by immunohistochemical staining, and features of postradiation obliterative vasculitis were observed. Only one primary anastomosis in 14 patients with decreased flow failed. Conclusions: The sonographic and color Doppler flow imaging alterations observed within irradiated rectal cancer correlated with changes of postradiation obliterative vasculitis. The apparent diminished local blood flow within high and low resistance vessels post-XRT did not result in an increased incidence of anastomotic failures

  18. He+ irradiation temperature influence on the structure and nanohardness of hydrocarbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Hongyu; Yang, Deming; Sun, Li; Yang, Qi; Niu, Jinhai; Guo, Liping; Chen, Jihong; Bi, Zhenhua; Liu, Dongping

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-like hydrocarbon films were irradiated with 100 keV He + or annealed at sample temperatures varying from 25 to 600 °C. The effects of sample temperature on the structure and nanohardness of hydrocarbon films are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM-based nanoindentation, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Analysis shows that annealing results in the decrease in the nanohardness of hydrocarbon films from 4.0 GPa to 0.55 GPa while He + irradiation at an elevated sample temperature results in the formation of dense diamond-like carbon films with nanohardness up to 20.0 GPa. This indicates that polymer-like hydrocarbon films can be transformed into the hard diamond-like carbon films with a relatively low H content on vacuum vessels of fusion devices due to the energetic bombardments at an elevated wall temperature

  19. Simultaneous topography and recognition imaging: physical aspects and optimal imaging conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preiner, Johannes; Ebner, Andreas; Zhu Rong; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Chtcheglova, Lilia

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) allows for the investigation of receptor distributions on natural biological surfaces under physiological conditions. Based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with a cantilever tip carrying a ligand molecule, it enables us to sense topography and recognition of receptor molecules simultaneously with nanometre accuracy. In this study we introduce optimized handling conditions and investigate the physical properties of the cantilever-tip-sample ensemble, which is essential for the interpretation of the experimental data gained from this technique. In contrast to conventional AFM methods, TREC is based on a more sophisticated feedback loop, which enables us to discriminate topographical contributions from recognition events in the AFM cantilever motion. The features of this feedback loop were investigated through a detailed analysis of the topography and recognition data obtained on a model protein system. Single avidin molecules immobilized on a mica substrate were imaged with an AFM tip functionalized with a biotinylated IgG. A simple procedure for adjusting the optimal amplitude for TREC imaging is described by exploiting the sharp localization of the TREC signal within a small range of oscillation amplitudes. This procedure can also be used for proving the specificity of the detected receptor-ligand interactions. For understanding and eliminating topographical crosstalk in the recognition images we developed a simple theoretical model, which nicely explains its origin and its dependence on the excitation frequency.

  20. Satellite image analysis and a hybrid ESSS/ANN model to forecast solar irradiance in the tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Zibo; Yang, Dazhi; Reindl, Thomas; Walsh, Wilfred M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Satellite image analysis is performed and cloud cover index is classified using self-organizing maps (SOM). • The ESSS model is used to forecast cloud cover index. • Solar irradiance is estimated using multi-layer perceptron (MLP). • The proposed model shows better accuracy than other investigated models. - Abstract: We forecast hourly solar irradiance time series using satellite image analysis and a hybrid exponential smoothing state space (ESSS) model together with artificial neural networks (ANN). Since cloud cover is the major factor affecting solar irradiance, cloud detection and classification are crucial to forecast solar irradiance. Geostationary satellite images provide cloud information, allowing a cloud cover index to be derived and analysed using self-organizing maps (SOM). Owing to the stochastic nature of cloud generation in tropical regions, the ESSS model is used to forecast cloud cover index. Among different models applied in ANN, we favour the multi-layer perceptron (MLP) to derive solar irradiance based on the cloud cover index. This hybrid model has been used to forecast hourly solar irradiance in Singapore and the technique is found to outperform traditional forecasting models

  1. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Veldhoven, E. van; Maas, D.J.; Sadeghian Marnani, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope (AFM) probes by He+ beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+ beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the

  2. Atomic force microscopy imaging of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sergio; Billingsley, Daniel; Thomson, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews amplitude modulation (AM) AFM in air and its applications to high-resolution imaging and interpretation of macromolecular complexes. We discuss single DNA molecular imaging and DNA-protein interactions, such as those with topoisomerases and RNA polymerase. We show how relative humidity can have a major influence on resolution and contrast and how it can also affect conformational switching of supercoiled DNA. Four regimes of AFM tip-sample interaction in air are defined and described, and relate to water perturbation and/or intermittent mechanical contact of the tip with either the molecular sample or the surface. Precise control and understanding of the AFM operational parameters is shown to allow the user to switch between these different regimes: an interpretation of the origins of topographical contrast is given for each regime. Perpetual water contact is shown to lead to a high-resolution mode of operation, which we term SASS (small amplitude small set-point) imaging, and which maximizes resolution while greatly decreasing tip and sample wear and any noise due to perturbation of the surface water. Thus, this chapter provides sufficient information to reliably control the AFM in the AM AFM mode of operation in order to image both heterogeneous samples and single macromolecules including complexes, with high resolution and with reproducibility. A brief introduction to AFM, its versatility and applications to biology is also given while providing references to key work and general reviews in the field.

  3. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E., E-mail: georg.fantner@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  4. Correlation between resistance-change effect in transition-metal oxides and secondary-electron contrast of scanning electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, K.; Kishida, S.; Yoda, T.

    2011-01-01

    Conductive atomic-force microscopy (C-AFM) writing is attracting attention as a technique for clarifying the switching mechanism of resistive random-access memory by providing a wide area filled with filaments, which can be regarded as one filament with large radius. The writing area on a nickel-oxide (NiO) film formed by conductive atomic-force microscopy was observed by scanning electron microscope, and a correlation between the contrast in a secondary-electron image (SEI) and the resistance written by C-AFM was revealed. In addition, the dependence of the SEI contrast on the beam accelerating voltage (V accel ) suggests that the resistance-change effect occurs near the surface of the NiO film. As for the effects of electron irradiation and vacuum annealing on the C-AFM writing area, it was shown that the resistance-change effect is caused by exchange of oxygen with the atmosphere at the surface of the NiO film. This result suggests that the low-resistance and high-resistance areas are, respectively, p-type Ni 1+δ O (δ 1+δ O (δ≥ 0).

  5. Solar irradiance forecasting at one-minute intervals for different sky conditions using sky camera images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Montesinos, J.; Batlles, F.J.; Portillo, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The solar resource has been predicted for three hours at 1-min intervals. • Digital image levels and cloud motion vectors are joint for irradiance forecasting. • The three radiation components have been predicted under different sky conditions. • Diffuse and global radiation has an nRMSE value around 10% in all sky conditions. • Beam irradiance is predicted with an nRMSE value of about 15% in overcast skies. - Abstract: In the search for new techniques to predict atmospheric features that might be useful to solar power plant operators, we have carried out solar irradiance forecasting using emerging sky camera technology. Digital image levels are converted into irradiances and then the maximum cross-correlation method is applied to obtain future predictions. This methodology is a step forward in the study of the solar resource, essential to solar plant operators in adapting a plant’s operating procedures to atmospheric conditions and to improve electricity generation. The results are set out using different statistical parameters, in which beam, diffuse and global irradiances give a constant normalized root-mean-square error value over the time interval for all sky conditions. The average measure is 25.44% for beam irradiance; 11.60% for diffuse irradiance and 11.17% for global irradiance.

  6. Adhesion forces in AFM of redox responsive polymer grafts: Effects of tip hydrophilicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Xueling; Kieviet, B.D.; Song, Jing; Schön, Peter Manfred; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2014-01-01

    The adherence between silicon nitride AFM tips and redox-active poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) grafts ongold was investigated by electrochemical AFM force spectroscopy. Before the adhesion measurementssilicon nitride AFM probes were cleaned with organic solvents (acetone and ethanol) or piranha

  7. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schou Oxvig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also provides researchers in compressed sensing with a selection of algorithms for reconstructing undersampled general images, and offers a consistent and rigorous way to efficiently evaluate the researchers own developed reconstruction algorithms in terms of phase transitions. The package also serves as a convenient platform for researchers in compressed sensing aiming at obtaining a high degree of reproducibility of their research.

  8. Structural effects in UO{sub 2} thin films irradiated with fission-energy Xe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popel, A.J., E-mail: apopel@cantab.net [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Lebedev, V.A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Martin, P.G. [Interface Analysis Centre, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Shiryaev, A.A. [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Lampronti, G.I. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Springell, R. [Interface Analysis Centre, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Kalmykov, S.N. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 123098, Moscow (Russian Federation); Scott, T.B. [Interface Analysis Centre, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-Université de Caen, BP 5133, 14070, Caen, Cedex5 (France); Farnan, I. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Uranium dioxide thin films have been successfully grown on LSAT (Al{sub 10}La{sub 3}O{sub 51}Sr{sub 14}Ta{sub 7}) substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. Irradiation by 92 MeV {sup 129}Xe{sup 23+} ions to simulate fission damage that occurs within nuclear fuels caused microstructural and crystallographic changes. Initially flat and continuous thin films were produced by magnetron sputtering with a root mean square roughness of 0.35 nm determined by AFM. After irradiation, this roughness increased to 60–70 nm, with the films developing discrete microstructural features: small grains (∼3 μm), along with larger circular (up to 40 μm) and linear formations with non-uniform composition according to the SEM, AFM and EDX results. The irradiation caused significant restructuring of the UO{sub 2} films that was manifested in significant film-substrate mixing, observed through EDX analysis. Diffusion of Al from the substrate into the film in unirradiated samples was also observed. - Highlights: • Flat (001) single crystal UO{sub 2} thin films on LSAT (001) substrates produced. • Ion irradiation induced topographical and structural rearrangements in UO{sub 2} films.

  9. He{sup +} irradiation temperature influence on the structure and nanohardness of hydrocarbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Yang, Deming [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Sun, Li [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116023 (China); Yang, Qi; Niu, Jinhai [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Guo, Liping; Chen, Jihong [Accelerator Laboratory, School of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Bi, Zhenhua [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Liu, Dongping, E-mail: dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Electronic Science, Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Polymer-like hydrocarbon films were irradiated with 100 keV He{sup +} or annealed at sample temperatures varying from 25 to 600 °C. The effects of sample temperature on the structure and nanohardness of hydrocarbon films are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM-based nanoindentation, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Analysis shows that annealing results in the decrease in the nanohardness of hydrocarbon films from 4.0 GPa to 0.55 GPa while He{sup +} irradiation at an elevated sample temperature results in the formation of dense diamond-like carbon films with nanohardness up to 20.0 GPa. This indicates that polymer-like hydrocarbon films can be transformed into the hard diamond-like carbon films with a relatively low H content on vacuum vessels of fusion devices due to the energetic bombardments at an elevated wall temperature.

  10. Chemical Etching, AFM, Laser Damage Threshold, and Nonlinear Optical Studies of Potential Nonlinear Optical Crystal: Bis (L-Glutamine Potassium Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redrothu Hanumantharao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal bis (L-glutamine potassium nitrate (BGPN grown by slow evaporation technique at ambient temperature. The grown crystal surface has been analyzed by chemical etching and atomic force microscopy (AFM studies. Amplitude parameters like area roughness, roughness average, valley height, valley depth, peak height, and peak valley height were measured successfully from AFM studies. Etching studies were carried out by various solvents like water, methanol and ethanol. The etching study indicates the occurrence of different types of etch pit patterns like striations and steplike pattern. The laser damage threshold energy has been measured by irradiating laser beam using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm. Second harmonic generation (SHG studies have been performed by famous Kurtz powder technique with reference to standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate single crystals (KDP. It is found from this technique that SHG efficiency of BGPN is in comparison to that of standard KDP crystals.

  11. Effect of quality control implementation on image quality of radiographic films and irradiation doses to patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yuxi; Zhou Qipu; Ge Lijuan; Hou Changsong; Qi Xuesong; Yue Baorong; Wang Zuoling; Wei Kedao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes in the image quality of radiographic films and the irradiation doses to patients after quality control (QC) implementation. Methods: The entrance surface doses (ESD) to patients measured with TLD and the image quality of radiographic films were evaluated on the basis of CEC image quality criteria. Results: The ESD to patients were significantly reduced after QC implementation (P 0.05), but the post-QC image quality was significantly improved in chest PA, lumbar spine AP and pelvis AP(P0.01 or P<0.05). Conclusion: Significantly reduced irradiation dose with improved image quality can be obtained by QC implementation

  12. Micromechanical Characterization of Complex Polypropylene Morphologies by HarmoniX AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liparoti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the capability of the HarmoniX Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM technique to draw accurate and reliable micromechanical characterization of complex polymer morphologies generally found in conventional thermoplastic polymers. To that purpose, injection molded polypropylene samples, containing representative morphologies, have been characterized by HarmoniX AFM. Mapping and distributions of mechanical properties of the samples surface are determined and analyzed. Effects of sample preparation and test conditions are also analyzed. Finally, the AFM determination of surface elastic moduli has been compared with that obtained by indentation tests, finding good agreement among the results.

  13. Polarimetric analysis of a CdZnTe spectro-imager under multi-pixel irradiation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, M. [LIP-Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (Portugal); Physics Department, University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Curado da Silva, R.M., E-mail: rui.silva@coimbra.lip.pt [LIP-Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (Portugal); Physics Department, University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Maia, J.M. [LIP-Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (Portugal); Physics Department, University of Beira-Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Simões, N. [LIP-Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (Portugal); Physics Department, University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Marques, J. [LIP-Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (Portugal); Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Pereira, L.; Trindade, A.M.F. [LIP-Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (Portugal); and others

    2016-12-21

    So far, polarimetry in high-energy astrophysics has been insufficiently explored due to the complexity of the required detection, electronic and signal processing systems. However, its importance is today largely recognized by the astrophysical community, therefore the next generation of high-energy space instruments will certainly provide polarimetric observations, contemporaneously with spectroscopy and imaging. We have been participating in high-energy observatory proposals submitted to ESA Cosmic Vision calls, such as GRI (Gamma-Ray Imager), DUAL and ASTROGAM, where the main instrument was a spectro-imager with polarimetric capabilities. More recently, the H2020 AHEAD project was launched with the objective to promote more coherent and mature future high-energy space mission proposals. In this context of high-energy proposal development, we have tested a CdZnTe detection plane prototype polarimeter under a partially polarized gamma-ray beam generated from an aluminum target irradiated by a {sup 22}Na (511 keV) radioactive source. The polarized beam cross section was 1 cm{sup 2}, allowing the irradiation of a wide multi-pixelated area where all the pixels operate simultaneously as a scatterer and as an absorber. The methods implemented to analyze such multi-pixel irradiation are similar to those required to analyze a spectro-imager polarimeter operating in space, since celestial source photons should irradiate its full pixilated area. Correction methods to mitigate systematic errors inherent to CdZnTe and to the experimental conditions were also implemented. The polarization level (~40%) and the polarization angle (precision of ±5° up to ±9°) obtained under multi-pixel irradiation conditions are presented and compared with simulated data.

  14. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, S; Komori, M; Toshito, T; Watabe, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.

  15. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, S; Komori, M [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, T [Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Watabe, H [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.

  16. Fractal characterization of the silicon surfaces produced by ion beam irradiation of varying fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, R.P. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kumar, T. [Department of Physics, Central University of Haryana, Jant-Pali, Mahendergarh, Haryana 123029 (India); Mittal, A.K. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Dwivedi, S., E-mail: suneetdwivedi@gmail.com [K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Fractal analysis of Si(1 0 0) surface morphology at varying ion fluences. • Autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function as fractal measures. • Surface roughness and lateral correlation length increases with ion fluence. • Ripple pattern of the surfaces is found at higher ion fluences. • Wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each fluence. - Abstract: Si (1 0 0) is bombarded with 200 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at oblique incidence with fluences ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} to 3 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface morphology of the irradiated surfaces is captured by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) for each ion fluence. The fractal analysis is performed on the AFM images. The autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function are used as fractal measures. It is found that the average roughness, interface width, lateral correlation length as well as roughness exponent increase with ions fluence. The analysis reveals the ripple pattern of the surfaces at higher fluences. The wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each ion fluence.

  17. AFM-based nanolithography : manipulating poly(dimethylsiloxane) : loading force, scan speed and image resolution dependence on stick-slip outcomes in the slow and fast scan directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.A.; Brown, C.L.; Myhra, S.; Watson, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    The various properties of a polymer will affect its functionality in a wide range of applications including biosensors, tissue engineering and biomaterials technology. Some of those require precise manipulation of laterally differentiated regions, currently taking place on the μm-scale. It is now apparent that this need must now be driven into the nm-regime. Using the AFM, the principal objective is to explore and investigate lithographic outcomes during tip-induced manipulation with the aid of work on poly(dimethylsiloxane), (PDMS). The frictional effects (including any in-plane relaxation), and their dependence on the loading force, scan speed and image resolution are examined. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs

  18. AFM studies of environmental effects on nanomechanical properties and cellular structure of human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Chen, Nianhuan

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of cellular structure and physical and mechanical properties of hair are essential to develop better cosmetic products and advance biological and cosmetic science. Although the morphology of the cellular structure of human hair has been traditionally investigated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, these techniques provide limited capability to in situ study of the physical and mechanical properties of human hair in various environments. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) overcomes these problems and can be used for characterization in ambient conditions without requiring specific sample preparations and surface treatment. In this study, film thickness, adhesive forces and effective Young's modulus of various hair surfaces were measured at different environments (humidity and temperature) using force calibration plot technique with an AFM. Torsional resonance mode phase contrast images were also taken in order to characterize the morphology and cellular structure changes of human hair at different humidity. The correlation between the nanomechanical properties and the cellular structure of hair is discussed

  19. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  20. Effect of TMAH Etching Duration on the Formation of Silicon Nano wire Transistor Patterned by AFM Nano lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutagalung, S.D.; Lew, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) lithography was applied to produce nano scale pattern for silicon nano wire transistor fabrication. This technique takes advantage of imaging facility of AFM and the ability of probe movement controlling over the sample surface to create nano patterns. A conductive AFM tip was used to grow the silicon oxide nano patterns on silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer. The applied tip-sample voltage and writing speed were well controlled in order to form pre-designed silicon oxide nano wire transistor structures. The effect of tetra methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) etching duration on the oxide covered silicon nano wire transistor structure has been investigated. A completed silicon nano wire transistor was obtained by removing the oxide layer via hydrofluoric acid etching process. The fabricated silicon nano wire transistor consists of a silicon nano wire that acts as a channel with source and drain pads. A lateral gate pad with a nano wire head was fabricated very close to the channel in the formation of transistor structures. (author)

  1. AFM study of the morphologic change of HDPE surface photografted with glycidyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiliang; Han, Jianmei

    2009-05-01

    The UV-induced grafting of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and the atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of the morphologic change of the grafted surface are reported. The grafting was carried out in GMA acetone solutions with different monomer concentrations. Grafting was much faster in a solution with a higher monomer concentration. FTIR analyses proved that GMA had been successfully grafted onto HDPE. The morphologies of grafted HDPE surfaces changed with UV irradiation time. The monomer concentration had a significant effect on the morphologies of the grafted HDPE surfaces. The HDPE surface grafted in a solution with a higher monomer concentration was much rougher than that grafted in a solution with a lower monomer concentration. The growth models of the grafted granules or clusters are also proposed.

  2. Sensing inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human corneal Descemet's membrane with AFM nano-indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mundo, Rosa; Recchia, Giuseppina; Parekh, Mohit; Ruzza, Alessandro; Ferrari, Stefano; Carbone, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    The paper describes a highly space-resolved characterization of the surface mechanical properties of the posterior human corneal layer (Descemet's membrane). This has been accomplished with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nano-indentation by using a probe with a sharp tip geometry. Results indicate that the contact with this biological tissue in liquid occurs with no (or very low) adhesion. More importantly, under the same operating conditions, a broad distribution of penetration depth can be measured on different x-y positions of the tissue surface, indicating a high inhomogeneity of surface stiffness, not yet clearly reported in the literature. An important contribution to such inhomogeneity should be ascribed to the discontinuous nature of the collagen/proteoglycans fibers matrix tissue, as can be imaged by AFM when the tissue is semi-dry. Using classical contact mechanics calculations adapted to the specific geometry of the tetrahedral tip it has been found that the elastic modulus E of the material in the very proximity of the surface ranges from 0.23 to 2.6 kPa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of AFM studies of a single polymer chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenhai; Kistler, Kurt A.; Sadeghipour, Keya; Baran, George

    2008-01-01

    Single polymer chain force-extension behavior measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was interpreted by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation performed by applying a bead-spring (coarse-graining) model in which the bond potential function between adjacent beads is described by a worm-like chain (WLC) model. Simulation results indicate that caution should be applied when interpreting experimental AFM data, because the data vary depending on the point of AFM tip-polymer chain attachment. This approach offers an effective way for eventual analysis of the mechanical behavior of complex polymer networks

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of AFM studies of a single polymer chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wenhai [Center for Bioengineering and Biomaterials, College of Engineering, Temple University, 1947 N. 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Kistler, Kurt A. [Department of Chemistry, Temple University, 1901 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Sadeghipour, Keya [Center for Bioengineering and Biomaterials, College of Engineering, Temple University, 1947 N. 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Baran, George [Center for Bioengineering and Biomaterials, College of Engineering, Temple University, 1947 N. 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States)], E-mail: grbaran@temple.edu

    2008-11-24

    Single polymer chain force-extension behavior measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was interpreted by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation performed by applying a bead-spring (coarse-graining) model in which the bond potential function between adjacent beads is described by a worm-like chain (WLC) model. Simulation results indicate that caution should be applied when interpreting experimental AFM data, because the data vary depending on the point of AFM tip-polymer chain attachment. This approach offers an effective way for eventual analysis of the mechanical behavior of complex polymer networks.

  5. Modification of AFM Tips for Facilitating Picking-up of Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Wang; Hai-Jun, Yang; Hua-Bin, Wang; Hai, Li; Xin-Yan, Wang; Ying, Wang; Jun-Hong, Lü; Bin, Li; Yi, Zhang; Jun, Hu

    2008-01-01

    The radius of atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is a key factor that influences nonspecific interactions between AFM tip and nanoparticles. Generally, a tip with larger radius contributes to a higher efficiency of picking up nanoparticles. We provide two methods for modifying the AFM tip: one is to wear a tip apex on a solid substrate and the other is to coat a tip with poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Both the approaches can enhance the adhesion force between the tip and nanoparticles by increasing tip radius. The experimental results show that a modified tip, compared to an unmodified one, achieves six-fold efficiency improvement in the capture of targeted colloidal gold nanoparticles. (general)

  6. Wear-less floating contact imaging of polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, A; Rothuizen, H; Gotsmann, B; Duerig, U

    2010-01-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique is described combining two operating modes that previously were mutually exclusive: gentle imaging of delicate surfaces requiring slow dynamic AFM techniques, and passive feedback contact mode AFM enabling ultra-fast imaging. A high-frequency force modulation is used to excite resonant modes in the MHz range of a highly compliant cantilever force sensor with a spring constant of 0.1 N m -1 . The high-order mode acts as a stiff system for modulating the tip-sample distance and a vibration amplitude of 1 nm is sufficient to overcome the adhesion interaction. The soft cantilever provides a force-controlled support for the vibrating tip, enabling high-speed intermittent contact force microscopy without feedback control of the cantilever bending. Using this technique, we were able to image delicate polymer surfaces and to completely suppress the formation of the ripple wear patterns that are commonly observed in contact AFM.

  7. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Roder

    Full Text Available Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of CdO/GrO nanolayer for in vivo imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Pardakhty

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Nanomaterials are playing major roles in imaging by delivering large imaging payloads, yielding improved sensitivity. Nanoparticles have enabled significant advances in pre-clinical cancer research as drug delivery vectors. Inorganic nanoparticles such as CdO/GrO nanoparticles have novel optical properties that can be used to optimize the signal-to-background ratio. This paper reports on a novel processing route for preparation of CdO/GrO nanolayer and investigation of its optical properties for application in in vivo targeting and imaging.Materials and Methods: Nanostructures were synthesized by reacting cadmium acetate and graphene powder. The effects ofdifferent parameters such as power and time of irradiation were also studied. Finally, the efficiency of CdO/GrO nanostructures as an optical composite was investigated using photoluminescence spectrum irradiation. CdO/GrO nanostructures were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy.Results: According to SEM images, it was found that sublimation temperature had significant effect on morphology and layers. The spectrum shows an emission peak at 523 nm, indicating that CdO/GrO nanolayer can be used for in vivo imaging.Conclusion: The estimated optical band gap energy is an accepted value for application in in vivo imaging using a QD–CdO/GrO nanolayer.

  9. A comprehensive modeling and vibration analysis of AFM microcantilevers subjected to nonlinear tip-sample interaction forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslami, Sohrab; Jalili, Nader

    2012-01-01

    Precise and accurate representation of an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) system is essential in studying the effects of boundary interaction forces present between the probe's tip and the sample. In this paper, a comprehensive analytical model for the AFM system utilizing a distributed-parameters based approach is proposed. More specifically, we consider two important attributes of these systems; namely the rotary inertia and shear deformation when compared with the Euler–Bernoulli beam theory. Moreover, a comprehensive nonlinear interaction force is assumed between probe's and sample in order to reveal the response of the system more realistically. This nanoscale interaction force is based on a general form consisting of both attractive and repulsive components as well as a function of the tip-sample distance and the microcantilever's base and sample oscillations. Mechanical properties of the sample could interact with the nanomechanical coupling field between the probe' tip and sample and be implemented in studying the composition information of the sample and the ultra-small features inside it. Therefore, by modulating the dynamics of the AFM system such as the driving amplitude of the microcantilever the procedure for the subsurface imaging is described. The presented approach here could be implemented for designing the AFM probes by examining the tip-sample interaction forces dominant by the van der Waals forces. Several numerical case studies are presented and the force–distance diagram reveals that the proposed nonlinear nanomechanical force along with the distributed-parameters model for the microcantilever is able to fulfill the mechanics of the Lennard–Jones potential. -- Highlights: ► We present a comprehensive distributed-parameters model for AFM microcantilever. ► Assuming a nonlinear and implicit interaction force between tip and sample. ► Timoshenko beam is compared with the Euler–Bernoulli having the same force model. ► Frequency

  10. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Bertagnolli, E [Solid State Electronics Institute, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Wu, M; Gollas, B [Competence Centre for Electrochemical Surface Technology, Viktor Kaplan Strasse 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G, E-mail: alois.lugstein@tuwien.ac.at [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-08

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  11. AFM Imaging of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Mediated Signal Transmission Between two DNA Origami Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmig, Sarah Wendelbo; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-01-01

    transfer between two connected DNA nanostructures, using the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Two sets of metastable DNA hairpins - of which one is immobilized in specific points along tracks on DNA origami structures - are polymerized to form a continuous DNA duplex, which is visible using atomic force...... microscopy (AFM). Upon addition of a designed initiator, the initiation signal is efficiently transferred >200 nm from a specific location on one origami structure to an end point on another origami structure. The system shows no significant loss of signal when crossing from one nanostructure to another...

  12. Imaging of gamma-Irradiated Regions of a Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Danut; McClure, Steven; Johnston, Allan; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2004-01-01

    A holographic technique has been devised for generating a visible display of the effect of exposure of a photorefractive crystal to gamma rays. The technique exploits the space charge that results from trapping of electrons in defects induced by gamma rays. The technique involves a three-stage process. In the first stage, one writes a holographic pattern in the crystal by use of the apparatus shown in Figure 1. A laser beam of 532-nm wavelength is collimated and split into signal and reference beams by use of a polarizing beam splitter. On its way to the crystal, the reference beam goes through a two-dimensional optical scanner that contains two pairs of lenses (L1y, L2y and L1x,L2x) and mirrors M1 and M2, which can be rotated by use of micrometer drives to make fine adjustments. The signal beam is sent through a spatial light modulator that imposes the holographic pattern, then through two imaging lenses L(sub img) on its way to the crystal. An aperture is placed at the common focus of lenses Limg to suppress high-order diffraction from the spatial light modulator. The hologram is formed by interference between the signal and reference beams. A camera lens focuses an image of the interior of the crystal onto a charge-coupled device (CCD). If the crystal is illuminated by only the reference beam once the hologram has been formed, then an image of the hologram is formed on the CCD: this phenomenon is exploited to make visible the pattern of gamma irradiation of the crystal, as described next. In the second stage of the process, the crystal is removed from the holographic apparatus and irradiated with rays at a dose of about 100 krad. In the third stage of the process, the crystal is remounted in the holographic apparatus in the same position as in the first stage and illuminated with only the reference beam to obtain the image of the hologram as modified by the effect of the rays. The orientations of M1 and M2 can be adjusted slightly, if necessary, to maximize the

  13. AFM study of structure influence on butterfly wings coloration

    OpenAIRE

    Dallaeva, Dinara; Tománek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the structural coloration of the butterfly Vanessa Atalanta wings and shows how the atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be applied to the study of wings morphology and wings surface behavior under the temperature. The role of the wings morphology in colors was investigated. Different colors of wings have different topology and can be identified by them. AFM in semi-contact mode was used to study the wings surface. The wing surface area, which is close to the butterfly body,...

  14. Study of Si wafer surfaces irradiated by gas cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isogai, H.; Toyoda, E.; Senda, T.; Izunome, K.; Kashima, K.; Toyoda, N.; Yamada, I.

    2007-01-01

    The surface structures of Si (1 0 0) wafers subjected to gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) irradiation have been analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). GCIB irradiation is a promising technique for both precise surface etching and planarization of Si wafers. However, it is very important to understand the crystalline structure of Si wafers after GCIB irradiation. An Ar-GCIB used for the physically sputtering of Si atoms and a SF 6 -GCIB used for the chemical etching of the Si surface are also analyzed. The GCIB irradiation increases the surface roughness of the wafers, and amorphous Si layers are formed on the wafer surface. However, when the Si wafers are annealed in hydrogen at a high temperature after the GCIB irradiation, the surface roughness decreases to the same level as that before the irradiation. Moreover, the amorphous Si layers disappear completely

  15. Ultrasonically synthesized organic liquid-filled chitosan microcapsules: part 2: characterization using AFM (atomic force microscopy) and combined AFM-confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas; Ye, Qianyu; Zhou, Meifang; Dagastine, Raymond; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2018-04-25

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is used to measure the stiffness and Young's modulus of individual microcapsules that have a chitosan cross-linked shell encapsulating tetradecane. The oil filled microcapsules were prepared using a one pot synthesis via ultrasonic emulsification of tetradecane and crosslinking of the chitosan shell in aqueous solutions of acetic acid. The concentration of acetic acid in aqueous solutions of chitosan was varied from 0.2% to 25% v/v. The effect of acetic acid concentration and size of the individual microcapsules on the strength was probed. The deformations and forces required to rupture the microcapsules were also measured. Three dimensional deformations of microcapsules under large applied loads were obtained by the combination of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The stiffness, and hence the modulus, of the microcapsules was found to decrease with an increase in size with the average stiffness ranging from 82 to 111 mN m-1 and average Young's modulus ranging from 0.4 to 6.5 MPa. The forces required to rupture the microcapsules varied from 150 to 250 nN with deformations of the microcapsules up to 62 to 110% relative to their radius, respectively. Three dimensional images obtained using laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that the microcapsules retained their structure and shape after being subjected to large deformations and subsequent removal of the loads. Based on the above observations, the oil filled chitosan crosslinked microcapsules are an ideal choice for use in the food and pharmaceutical industries as they would be able to withstand the process conditions encountered.

  16. Magnetoelectric versus thermal actuation characteristics of shear force AFM probes with piezoresistive detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Dobrowolski, Rafał; Grabiec, Piotr; Kopiec, Daniel; Majstrzyk, Wojciech; Kunicki, Piotr; Gotszalk, Teodor; Rangelow, Ivo W

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the authors compare methods used for piezoresistive microcantilevers actuation for the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in the dynamic shear force mode. The piezoresistive detection is an attractive technique comparing the optical beam detection of deflection. The principal advantage is that no external alignment of optical source and detector are needed. When the microcantilever is deflected, the stress is transferred into a change of resistivity of piezoresistors. The integration of piezoresistive read-out provides a promising solution in realizing a compact non-contact AFM. Resolution of piezoresistive read-out is limited by three main noise sources: Johnson, 1/ f and thermomechanical noise. In the dynamic shear force mode measurement the method used for cantilever actuation will also affect the recorded noise in the piezoresistive detection circuit. This is the result of a crosstalk between an aluminium path (current loop used for actuation) and piezoresistors located near the base of the beam. In this paper authors described an elaborated in ITE (Institute of Electron Technology) technology of fabrication cantilevers with piezoresistive detection of deflection and compared efficiency of two methods used for cantilever actuation. (paper)

  17. Detection of stiff nanoparticles within cellular structures by contact resonance atomic force microscopy subsurface nanomechanical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Angeloni, Livia; Scaramuzzo, Francesca Anna; Barteri, Mario; De Angelis, Francesca; Persiconi, Irene; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Rossi, Marco

    2017-05-04

    Detecting stiff nanoparticles buried in soft biological matrices by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques represents a new frontier in the field of scanning probe microscopies, originally developed as surface characterization methods. Here we report the detection of stiff (magnetic) nanoparticles (NPs) internalized in cells by using contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) employed as a potentially non-destructive subsurface characterization tool. Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) NPs were internalized in microglial cells from cerebral cortices of mouse embryos of 18 days by phagocytosis. Nanomechanical imaging of cells was performed by detecting the contact resonance frequencies (CRFs) of an AFM cantilever held in contact with the sample. Agglomerates of NPs internalized in cells were visualized on the basis of the local increase in the contact stiffness with respect to the surrounding biological matrix. A second AFM-based technique for nanomechanical imaging, i.e., HarmoniX™, as well as magnetic force microscopy and light microscopy were used to confirm the CR-AFM results. Thus, CR-AFM was demonstrated as a promising technique for subsurface imaging of nanomaterials in biological samples.

  18. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  19. Spontaneous aggregation of humic acid observed with AFM at different pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Claudio; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Angelico, Ruggero; Cho, Hyen Goo; Francioso, Ornella; Ertani, Andrea; Nardi, Serenella

    2015-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy in contact (AFM-C) mode was used to investigate the molecular dynamics of leonardite humic acid (HA) aggregate formed at different pH values. HA nanoparticles dispersed at pH values ranging from 2 to 12 were observed on a mica surface under dry conditions. The most clearly resolved and well-resulted AFM images of single particle were obtained at pH 5, where HA appeared as supramolecular particles with a conic shape and a hole in the centre. Those observations suggested that HA formed under these conditions exhibited a pseudo-amphiphilic nature, with secluded hydrophobic domains and polar subunits in direct contact with hydrophilic mica surface. Based on molecular simulation methods, a lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) model was proposed to explain the HA ring-like morphology. The LCC model optimized the parameters of β-O-4 linkages between 14 units of 1-4 phenyl propanoid, and resulted in an optimized structure comprising 45-50 linear helical molecules looped spirally around a central cavity. Those results added new insights on the adsorption mechanism of HA on polar surfaces as a function of pH, which was relevant from the point of view of natural aggregation in soil environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Re-Irradiation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Clinical Applicability of Deformable Image Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Woo, Joong Yeol; Kim, Jun Won; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the deformable image registration (DIR) method is clinically applicable to the safe delivery of re-irradiation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Between August 2010 and March 2012, 12 eligible HCC patients received re-irradiation using helical tomotherapy. The median total prescribed radiation doses at first irradiation and re-irradiation were 50 Gy (range, 36-60 Gy) and 50 Gy (range, 36-58.42 Gy), respectively. Most re-irradiation therapies (11 of 12) were administered to previously irradiated or marginal areas. Dose summation results were reproduced using DIR by rigid and deformable registration methods, and doses of organs-at-risk (OARs) were evaluated. Treatment outcomes were also assessed. Thirty-six dose summation indices were obtained for three OARs (bowel, duodenum, and stomach doses in each patient). There was no statistical difference between the two different types of DIR methods (rigid and deformable) in terms of calculated summation ΣD (0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc, and max) in each OAR. The median total mean remaining liver doses (M(RLD)) in rigid- and deformable-type registration were not statistically different for all cohorts (p=0.248), although a large difference in M(RLD) was observed when there was a significant difference in spatial liver volume change between radiation intervals. One duodenal ulcer perforation developed 20 months after re-irradiation. Although current dose summation algorithms and uncertainties do not warrant accurate dosimetric results, OARs-based DIR dose summation can be usefully utilized in the re-irradiation of HCC. Appropriate cohort selection, watchful interpretation, and selective use of DIR methods are crucial to enhance the radio-therapeutic ratio.

  1. Preliminary study on effects of 60Co γ-irradiation on video quality and the image de-noising methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Mei; Zhao Jianbin; Cui Lei

    2011-01-01

    There will be variable noises appear on images in video once the play device irradiated by γ-rays, so as to affect the image clarity. In order to eliminate the image noising, the affection mechanism of γ-irradiation on video-play device was studied in this paper and the methods to improve the image quality with both hardware and software were proposed by use of protection program and de-noising algorithm. The experimental results show that the scheme of video de-noising based on hardware and software can improve effectively the PSNR by 87.5 dB. (authors)

  2. AFM study of growth of Bi2Sr2-xLaxCuO6 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haitao Yang; Hongjie Tao; Yingzi Zhang; Duogui Yang; Lin Li; Zhongxian Zhao

    1997-01-01

    c-axis-oriented Bi 2 Sr 1.6 La 0.4 CuO 6 thin films deposited on flat planes of (100)SrTiO 3 , (100)LaAlO 3 and (100)MgO substrates and vicinal planes (off-angle ∼ 6 deg.) of SrTiO 3 substrates by RF magnetron sputtering were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). T c of these films reached 29 K. Film thickness ranged from 15 nm to 600 nm. Two typical growth modes have been observed. AFM images of thin films on flat planes of substrates showed a terraced-island growth mode. By contrast, Bi-2201 thin films on vicinal planes of substrates showed a step-flow growth mode. The growth unit is a half-unit-cell in the c-axis for both growth modes. No example of spiral growth, which was thought to be the typical structure of YBCO thin films, was found in either of these kinds of thin films. (author)

  3. In Situ STM and AFM of the Copper Protein Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Esben P.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Madsen, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    to gold and facile electron tunnel routes between this group and the copper atom. Azurin adsorbed on Au(111) can be imaged to molecular resolution by in situ STM and shows regular arrays of individual structures corresponding well to the known molecular size of azurin. The current falls off approximately...... exponentially with increasing distance with a decay constant of 0.4–0.5 Å−1. In comparison in situ AFM shows structures laterally convoluted with the tip while the vertical extension is in the same range as the structural size of azurin. The results are of interest in relation to electron tunnel mechanisms...

  4. Changes in surface characteristics of two different resin composites after 1 year water storage: An SEM and AFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Pala, Kansad; Demirci, Mustafa; Tuncer, Safa

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate changes in surface characteristics of two different resin composites after 1 year of water storage using a profilometer, Vickers hardness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A total of 46 composite disk specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were fabricated using Clearfil Majesty Esthetic and Clearfil Majesty Posterior (Kuraray Medical Co, Tokyo, Japan). Ten specimens from each composite were used for surface roughness and microhardness tests (n = 10). For each composite, scanning electron microscope (SEM, n = 2) and atomic force microscope (AFM, n = 1) images were obtained after 24 h and 1 year of water storage. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a post-hoc Bonferroni test. Microhardness values of Clearfil Majesty Esthetic decreased significantly (78.15-63.74, p = 0.015) and surface roughness values did not change after 1 year of water storage (0.36-0.39, p = 0.464). Clearfil Majesty Posterior microhardness values were quite stable (138.74-137.25, p = 0.784), and surface roughness values increased significantly (0.39-0.48, p = 0.028) over 1 year. One year of water storage caused microhardness values for Clearfil Majesty Esthetic to decrease and the surface roughness of Clearfil Majesty Posterior increased. AFM and SEM images demonstrated surface detoration of the materials after 1 year and ensured similar results with the quantitative test methods. SCANNING 38:694-700, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Fluorescent nuclear track images of Ag-activated phosphate glass irradiated with photons and heavy charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurobori, Toshio, E-mail: kurobori@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yanagida, Yuka [Oarai Research Center, Chiyoda Technol Corporation, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kodaira, Satoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shirao, Taichi [Nikon Instech Co., Ltd., Tanakanishi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8221 (Japan)

    2017-05-21

    In this paper we report about the demonstration of the nuclear track imaging capabilities of Ag-activated phosphate glass. A 375 nm laser and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were respectively used for track excitation and detection. Specifically, the blue and orange radiophotoluminescent (RPL) tracks and dose distributions observed after irradiation with soft X-rays, gamma rays and heavy charged particles (HCPs) are examined. In addition, the origins of the reductions in RPL efficiency for high-dose X-ray irradiation and for irradiation with HCPs with high linear energy transfer (LET) values are investigated via a CLSM and a conventional fluorescent reader and discussed. - Highlights: • 3D track images are demonstrated using a confocal laser microscopy. • Fluorescent track detectors are based on RPL Ag-doped phosphate glass. • The dose distributions are examined for X-ray, gamma ray and HCP irradiations. • The origins of the reduction in RPL efficiency are investigated and discussed.

  6. Fluorescent nuclear track images of Ag-activated phosphate glass irradiated with photons and heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Yanagida, Yuka; Kodaira, Satoshi; Shirao, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report about the demonstration of the nuclear track imaging capabilities of Ag-activated phosphate glass. A 375 nm laser and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were respectively used for track excitation and detection. Specifically, the blue and orange radiophotoluminescent (RPL) tracks and dose distributions observed after irradiation with soft X-rays, gamma rays and heavy charged particles (HCPs) are examined. In addition, the origins of the reductions in RPL efficiency for high-dose X-ray irradiation and for irradiation with HCPs with high linear energy transfer (LET) values are investigated via a CLSM and a conventional fluorescent reader and discussed. - Highlights: • 3D track images are demonstrated using a confocal laser microscopy. • Fluorescent track detectors are based on RPL Ag-doped phosphate glass. • The dose distributions are examined for X-ray, gamma ray and HCP irradiations. • The origins of the reduction in RPL efficiency are investigated and discussed.

  7. Aspects of ion irradiations to study localized deformation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhijie, E-mail: zjiao@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, Gary [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Miura, Terumitsu; Fukuya, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety System (INSS) (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The effect of irradiation depth on localized deformation in strained SUS304 and SUS316 was assessed by irradiation to various doses using different energies of Fe{sup ++} and protons. The average height and spacing of slip steps formed on the surfaces after 2% plastic strain in 300 °C argon were characterized using AFM and SEM. The step height and spacing were nearly unchanged for irradiation depth greater than 1/3 of the average grain size. 2.8 MeV Fe{sup ++} irradiation, with an irradiation depth of <1 μm, resulted in slightly larger step spacing compared to the unirradiated samples but it was much smaller compared to that in proton-irradiated samples with much greater irradiation depths. Step height and spacing also appeared to be affected by the grain size as they were nearly double in magnitude for 30 μm compared to 14 μm grain sizes in SUS304.

  8. K{sub α} x-ray imaging of laser-irradiated, limited-mass zirconium foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, M.; Orban, C.; Jiang, S.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Eichman, B.; Fiksel, G.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Delettrez, J. A. [The Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Dyer, G.; Ditmire, T. [The Texas Center of High Energy Density Science, The University of Texas at Austin, 2511 Speedway Street, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Stephens, R. [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121-1200 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    X-ray fluorescence measurements to determine the effect of target heating on imaging efficiency, at a photon energy of 15.7 keV corresponding to the K{sub α} line of zirconium, have been carried out using limited-mass foils irradiated by the Texas Petawatt Laser. Zirconium foils that ranged in volume from 3000 × 3000 × 21 μm{sup 3} to 150 × 150 × 6 μm{sup 3} were irradiated with 100 J, 8 ps-long pulses and a mean intensity of 4 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The K{sub α} emission was measured simultaneously using a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometer and a curved quartz imaging crystal. The measured ratio of the integrated image signal to the integrated spectral signal was, within the experimental error, constant, indicating that the imaging efficiency's dependence on temperature is weak throughout the probed range. Based on our experience of target heating under similar conditions, we estimate a temperature of ∼200 eV for the smallest targets. The successful imaging of K{sub α} emission for temperatures this high represents an important proof of concept for Zr K{sub α} imaging. At these temperatures, the imaging of K{sub α} emission from lower-Z materials (such as Cu) is limited by temperature-dependent shifts in the K{sub α} emission energy.

  9. AFM-based identification of the dynamic properties of globular proteins: simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Deok Ho; Park, Jung Yul; Kim, Moon K.; Hong, Keum Shik

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays a mathematical model-based computational approach is getting more attention as an effective tool for understanding the mechanical behaviors of biological systems. To find the mechanical properties of the proteins required to build such a model, this paper investigates a real-time identification method based on an AFM nanomanipulation system. First, an AFM-based bio-characterization system is introduced. Second, a second-order time-varying linear model representing the interaction between an AFM cantilever and globular proteins in a solvent is presented. Finally, we address a real-time estimation method in which the results of AFM experiments are designed to be inputs of the state estimator proposed here. Our attention is restricted to a theoretical feasibility analysis of the proposed methodology. We simply set the mechanical properties of the particular protein such as mass, stiffness, and damping coefficient in the system model prior to running the simulation. Simulation results show very good agreement with the preset properties. We anticipate that the realization of the AFM-based bio-characterization system will also provide an experimental validation of the proposed identification procedure in the future. This methodology can be used to determine a model of protein motion for the purpose of computer simulation and for a real-time modification of protein deformation

  10. Separation of irradiance and reflectance from observed color images by logarithmical nonlinear diffusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hiromi; Komatsu, Takashi

    2006-02-01

    The Retinex theory was first proposed by Land, and deals with separation of irradiance from reflectance in an observed image. The separation problem is an ill-posed problem. Land and others proposed various Retinex separation algorithms. Recently, Kimmel and others proposed a variational framework that unifies the previous Retinex algorithms such as the Poisson-equation-type Retinex algorithms developed by Horn and others, and presented a Retinex separation algorithm with the time-evolution of a linear diffusion process. However, the Kimmel's separation algorithm cannot achieve physically rational separation, if true irradiance varies among color channels. To cope with this problem, we introduce a nonlinear diffusion process into the time-evolution. Moreover, as to its extension to color images, we present two approaches to treat color channels: the independent approach to treat each color channel separately and the collective approach to treat all color channels collectively. The latter approach outperforms the former. Furthermore, we apply our separation algorithm to a high quality chroma key in which before combining a foreground frame and a background frame into an output image a color of each pixel in the foreground frame are spatially adaptively corrected through transformation of the separated irradiance. Experiments demonstrate superiority of our separation algorithm over the Kimmel's separation algorithm.

  11. AFM-CMM integrated instrument user manual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, Francesco; Bariani, Paolo

    This manual gives general important guidelines for a proper use of the integrated AFM-CMM instrument. More information can be collected reading: • N. Kofod Ph.D thesis [1]; • P. Bariani Ph.D thesis [2]; • Dualscope DME 95-200 operation manuals [3]; • SPIP help [4] • Stitching software user manual...

  12. Coalescence and movement of nanobubbles studied with tapping mode AFM and tip-bubble interaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Wang Yuliang; Maali, Abdelhamid

    2008-01-01

    Imaging of a polystyrene (PS) coated silicon wafer immersed in deionized (DI) water was conducted using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode (TMAFM). As reported earlier, spherical cap-like domains, referred to as nanobubbles, were observed to be distributed on the PS surface. Experiments reveal that, in addition to the well-known parameter of scan load, scan speed is also an important parameter which affects nanobubble coalescence. The process of nanobubble coalescence was studied. It was found that during coalescence, small nanobubbles were easily moved and merged into bigger ones. Based on the interaction between the AFM cantilever tip and a bubble in the so-called force modulation mode of TMAFM, bubble height and adhesive force information for a given bubble was extracted. A viscoelastic model is used to obtain the interaction stiffness and damping coefficient, which provides a method to obtain the mechanical properties of nanobubbles. The model was further used to study the effect of surface tension force on attractive interaction force and contact angle hysteresis on the changes of the interaction damping coefficient during tip-bubble interaction.

  13. Solar irradiance assessment in insular areas using Himawari-8 satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liandrat, O.; Cros, S.; Turpin, M.; Pineau, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The high amount of surface solar irradiance (SSI) in the tropics is an advantage for a profitable PV production. It will allow many tropical islands to pursue their economic growth with a clean, affordable and locally produced energy. However, the local meteorological conditions induce a very high variability which is problematic for a safe and gainful injection into the power grid. This issue is even more critical in non-interconnected territories where network stability is an absolute necessity. Therefore, the injection of PV power is legally limited in some European oversea territories. In this context, intraday irradiance forecasting (several hours ahead) is particularly useful to mitigate the production variability by reducing the cost of power storage management. At this time scale, cloud cover evolves with a stochastic behaviour not properly represented in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Analysing cloud motion using images from geostationary meteorological satellites is a well-known alternative to forecasting SSI up to 6 hours ahead with a better accuracy than NWP models. In this study, we present and apply our satellite-based solar irradiance forecasting methods over two measurement sites located in the field of view of the satellite Himawari-8: Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Australia) and New Caledonia (France). In particular, we converted 4 months of images from Himawari-8 visible channel into cloud index maps. Then, we applied an algorithm computing a cloud motion vector field from a short sequence of consecutive images. Comparisons between forecasted SSI at 1 hour of time horizon and collocated pyranometric measurements show a relative RMSE between 20 and 27%. Error sources related to the tropic insular context (coastal area heterogeneity, sub-pixel scale orographic cloud appearance, convective situation…) are discussed at every implementation step for the different methods.

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Aflatoxin (AFM1) in Milk Collected from Dairy Farms in Faisalabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, M.W.; Randhawa, M.A.; Zahoor, T.; Sultan, J.I.

    2015-01-01

    Milk contamination with aflatoxin (AFM1) is an issue of great concern in developing countries like Pakistan which demands a great attention. Milk constitutes an important part of human diet, particularly for the youngs. So, it is our utmost need to assess the presence of AFM1 in milk. In the present study assessment of AFM1 in milk collected from different dairy farms of Faisalabad was carried out using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with Fluorescence detector. The results were compared with pre-established maximum residual limit (MRL) in order to evaluate the safety of milk for human consumption. The study revealed that all the 50 tested samples were found positive for AFM1 contamination at various levels. Among buffalo dairy farms concentration of AFM1 ranged between 0.0513 λg L-1 and 0.1006 μg L-1. From the cow dairy farms, the AFM1 contamination level was found lowest with a mean of 0.0397 μg L-1 and the highest AFM1 contamination level was with a mean of 0.1143 μg L-1. Overall percentage of AFM1 contamination and concentration levels were found higher in the milk collected from buffalo dairy farms as compared to cow dairy farms. 21 out of 25 (84 percentage) buffalo and 18 out of 25 (72 percentage) cow milk samples were exceeded the European Commission MRL of 0.050 mu g L-1. The results of the present study will be helpful for regulations implementation in order to minimize or avoid the AFM1 contamination in milk from the farms in the study area. (author)

  15. Techniques for imaging human metaphase chromosomes in liquid conditions by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Hoshi, Osamu [Division of Microscopic Anatomy and Bio-imaging, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 1-757 Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Shigeno, Masatsugu [SII NanoTechnology Incorporated, RBM Tsukiji Building, Shintomi 2-15-5, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0041 (Japan)], E-mail: t-ushiki@med.niigata-u.ac.jp

    2008-09-24

    The purpose of this study was to obtain three-dimensional images of wet chromosomes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions. Human metaphase chromosomes-obtained either by chromosome spreads or by an isolation technique-were observed in a dynamic mode by AFM in a buffer solution. Under suitable operating conditions with a soft triangular cantilever (with the spring constant of 0.08-0.4 N m{sup -1}), clear images of fixed chromosomes in the chromosome spread were obtained by AFM. For imaging isolated chromosomes with the height of more than 400 nm, a cantilever with a high aspect ratio probing tip was required. The combination of a Q-control system and the sampling intelligent scan (SIS) system in dynamic force mode AFM was useful for obtaining high-quality images of the isolated chromosomes, in which globular or cord-like structures about 50 nm thick were clearly observed on the surface of each chromatid.

  16. AFM visualization of sub-50nm polyplex disposition to the nuclear pore complex without compromising the integrity of the nuclear envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helene; Parhamifar, Ladan; Hunter, A Christy

    2016-01-01

    that were microinjected into the oocytes of Xenopus laevis, as an example of a non-dividing cell, is exclusive to the nuclear pore complex (NPC). AFM images show NPCs clogged only with sub-50nm polyplexes. This mode of disposition neither altered the morphology/integrity of the nuclear membrane nor the NPC...

  17. A new method of the light irradiation image by the computed radiography (imaging plate) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiba, Susumu; Nishi, Katsuki.

    1997-01-01

    There are two method for the purpose of diagnosing medically by using gamma-ray light irradiation image. One is to use of the scintillation camera for gamma-ray, the other is to use of the photostimulable luminescence point by the secondary excitation of the image plate (IP) system for X-ray. The standpoint of the spatial resolution at the total medical image, using gamma-ray, the first can get the image on a short time, but the first is a poor image quality, and the second is good image quality, but the second can get the image on a long time, because of insensitive to gamma-ray. We report on the improvement for IP's week point by our proposal method, and by our clinical and quantitative analysis data, to use the highly efficient IP (ST-III). We make the improvement on the imaging time (from 30 minutes to 20 minutes), and the inprocessing time (from 33-50 minutes to 27 minutes) for a former method on an organism. We strongly believe that our convenience improvement method, and our clinical quantitative analysis data can contribute to the wide application as well as the quality up for the clinical diagnosis to use gamma-ray. (author)

  18. The influence of neutron-irradiation at low temperatures on the dielectric parameters of 3C-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, J.A.A., E-mail: Japie.Engelbrecht@nmmu.ac.za [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Deyzel, G.; Minnaar, E.G.; Goosen, W.E. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Rooyen, I.J. van [Fuel Performance and Design Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    3C-SiC wafers were irradiated with neutrons of various fluences and at low (200–400 °C) irradiation temperatures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectra were obtained for the samples, and the spectra used to extract the dielectric parameters for each specimen, using statistical curve-fitting procedures. Analysis of all data revealed trends in reflectance peak heights as well as in the dielectric parameters. The surface roughness of the irradiated samples was measured by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and certain trends could be ascribed to surface roughness.

  19. The influence of neutron-irradiation at low temperatures on the dielectric parameters of 3C-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelbrecht, J.A.A.; Deyzel, G.; Minnaar, E.G.; Goosen, W.E.; Rooyen, I.J. van

    2014-01-01

    3C-SiC wafers were irradiated with neutrons of various fluences and at low (200–400 °C) irradiation temperatures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectra were obtained for the samples, and the spectra used to extract the dielectric parameters for each specimen, using statistical curve-fitting procedures. Analysis of all data revealed trends in reflectance peak heights as well as in the dielectric parameters. The surface roughness of the irradiated samples was measured by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and certain trends could be ascribed to surface roughness.

  20. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zujun; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-01-01

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10 8 n/cm 2 s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10 11 , 5 × 10 11 , and 1 × 10 12 n/cm 2 , respectively. The mean dark signal (K D ), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V N ), saturation output signal voltage (V S ), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike

  1. Tapping mode imaging and measurements with an inverted atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sandra S F; Green, John-Bruce D

    2006-07-18

    This report demonstrates the successful use of the inverted atomic force microscope (i-AFM) for tapping mode AFM imaging of cantilever-supported samples. i-AFM is a mode of AFM operation in which a sample supported on a tipless cantilever is imaged by one of many tips in a microfabricated tip array. Tapping mode is an intermittent contact mode whereby the cantilever is oscillated at or near its resonance frequency, and the amplitude and/or phase are used to image the sample. In the process of demonstrating that tapping mode images could be obtained in the i-AFM design, it was observed that the amplitude of the cantilever oscillation decreased markedly as the cantilever and tip array were approached. The source of this damping of the cantilever oscillations was identified to be the well-known "squeeze film damping", and the extent of damping was a direct consequence of the relatively shorter tip heights for the tip arrays, as compared to those of commercially available tapping mode cantilevers with integrated tips. The functional form for the distance dependence of the damping coefficient is in excellent agreement with previously published models for squeeze film damping, and the values for the fitting parameters make physical sense. Although the severe damping reduces the cantilever free amplitude substantially, we found that we were still able to access the low-amplitude regime of oscillation necessary for attractive tapping mode imaging of fragile molecules.

  2. Superior antibacterial activity of GlcN-AuNP-GO by ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindaraju, Saravanan; Samal, Monica; Yun, Kyusik, E-mail: ykyusik@gachon.ac.kr

    2016-12-01

    A complete bacterialysis analysis of glucosamine-gold nanoparticle-graphene oxide (GlcN-AuNP-GO) and UV-irradiated GlcN-AuNP-GO was conducted. Analytical characterization of GlcN-AuNPs, GO and GlcN-AuNP-GO revealed UV-Vis absorbance peak at around 230 and 500 nm. Microscopic characterization of prepared nanomaterials was performed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution transmission microscopy. The results confirmed that the GlcN-AuNPs were uniformly decorated on the surface and edges of graphene sheets. In addition, potent antibacterial activity of GlcN-AuNP-GO that was UV irradiated for 10 min and normal GlcN-AuNP-GO was detected, compared to the standard drug kanamycin, against both Gram-negative and positive bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and fluorescence intensity spectra results for Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis showed that the UV-irradiated GlcN-AuNP-GO has better antibacterial activity than normal GlcN-AuNP-GO and kanamycin. Morphological changes were detected by AFM after treatment. These results confirmed that GlcN-AuNP-GO is a potent antibacterial agent with good potential for use in manufacturing medical instruments, pharmaceutical industries and in waste water treatment. - Highlights: • Glucosamine-gold nanoaprticle-graphene oxide (GlcN-AuNPs-GO) was synthesized. • Analytical and morphological characterizations were revealed. • UV irradiated GlcN-AuNP-GO has provide better antibacterial activity. • Morphological changes of before and after treating bacterial strains were imaged.

  3. AFM plough YBCO micro bridges: substrate effects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Elkaseh, A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AFM nanolithography was used as a novel cutting technique to define micro-size YBCO superconducting constrictions. Researchers studied the substrate effects on MgO and STO substrates and showed that the observed Shapiro steps from the bridges on STO...

  4. Reconstruction of the solar EUV irradiance from 1996 to 2010 based on SOHO/EIT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haberreiter Margit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar Extreme UltraViolet (EUV spectrum has important effects on the Earth’s upper atmosphere. For a detailed investigation of these effects it is important to have a consistent data series of the EUV spectral irradiance available. We present a reconstruction of the solar EUV irradiance based on SOHO/EIT images, along with synthetic spectra calculated using different coronal features which represent the brightness variation of the solar atmosphere. The EIT images are segmented with the SPoCA2 tool which separates the features based on a fixed brightness classification scheme. With the SOLMOD code we then calculate intensity spectra for the 10–100 nm wavelength range and each of the coronal features. Weighting the intensity spectra with the area covered by each of the features yields the temporal variation of the EUV spectrum. The reconstructed spectrum is then validated against the spectral irradiance as observed with SOHO/SEM. Our approach leads to good agreement between the reconstructed and the observed spectral irradiance. This study is an important step toward understanding variations in the solar EUV spectrum and ultimately its effect on the Earth’s upper atmosphere.

  5. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoil, Charles [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Nonaka, Takahiro [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Miyata, Makoto [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Afrin, Rehana [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Biofrontier Center, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Ikai, Atsushi, E-mail: ikai.a.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  6. Application of Contact Mode AFM to Manufacturing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Michael A.; Schmid, Steven R.

    A review of the application of contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to manufacturing processes is presented. A brief introduction to common experimental techniques including hardness, scratch, and wear testing is presented, with a discussion of challenges in the extension of manufacturing scale investigations to the AFM. Differences between the macro- and nanoscales tests are discussed, including indentation size effects and their importance in the simulation of processes such as grinding. The basics of lubrication theory are presented and friction force microscopy is introduced as a method of investigating metal forming lubrication on the nano- and microscales that directly simulates tooling/workpiece asperity interactions. These concepts are followed by a discussion of their application to macroscale industrial manufacturing processes and direct correlations are made.

  7. Imaging and size measurement of nanoparticles in aqueous medium by use of atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Goda, Yukihiro; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko

    2018-02-01

    Size control of nanoparticles in nanotechnology-based drug products is crucial for their successful development, since the in vivo pharmacokinetics of nanoparticles are size-dependent. In this study, we evaluated the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for imaging and size measurement of nanoparticles in aqueous medium. The height sizes of rigid polystyrene nanoparticles and soft liposomes were measured by AFM and were compared with the hydrodynamic sizes measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The lipid compositions of the studied liposomes were similar to those of commercial products. AFM proved to be a viable method for obtaining images of both polystyrene nanoparticles and liposomes in aqueous medium. For the polystyrene nanoparticles, the average height size observed by AFM was similar to the average number-weighted diameter obtained by DLS, indicating the usefulness of AFM for measuring the sizes of nanoparticles in aqueous medium. For the liposomes, the height sizes obtained by AFM differed depending upon the procedures of immobilizing the liposomes onto a solid substrate. In addition, the resultant average height sizes of the liposomes were smaller than those obtained by DLS. This knowledge will help the correct use of AFM as a powerful tool for imaging and size measurement of nanotechnology-based drug products for clinical use.

  8. Study on radiation effect of poly (vinyl alcohol) films irradiated by tritium decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hairong; Peng Shuming; Zhou Xiaosong; Yu Mingming; Xia Lidong; Chen Xiaohua; Liang Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    The radiation effect of poly(vinyl alcohol) films used as a kind of gas-barrier material for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets was studied under the different conditions of β-ray from tritium decay. The changes of physical and chemical properties of the irradiated material samples were analyzed by FTIR, XRD and AFM. The tritium-hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction of the irradiated samples mainly occurs at C-H bond and the IR absorption peak of C-T bond obviously increases with the irradiation dose. For strong hydrogen bonding interaction, the isotopic exchange reaction doesn't occur at O-H bond. The crystallinity degree and surface morphology of the irradiated samples were changed. The tensile properties of irradiated poly(vinyl alcohol) films were measured by universal material testing machine. The results show that the change trend of mechanical properties is in accordance with the microstructures of the irradiated samples. (authors)

  9. Dynamic behavior of RNA nanoparticles analyzed by AFM on a mica/air interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajja, Sameer; Chandler, Morgan; Federov, Dmitry; Kasprzak, Wojciech K; Lushnikov, Alexander Y; Viard, Mathias; Shah, Ankit; Dang, Dylan; Dahl, Jared; Worku, Beamlak; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Shapiro, Bruce A; Afonin, Kirill A

    2018-04-18

    RNA is an attractive biopolymer for engineering self-assembling materials suitable for biomedical applications. Previously, programmable hexameric RNA rings were developed for the controlled delivery of up to six different functionalities. To increase the potential for functionalization with little impact on nanoparticle topology, we introduce gaps into the double-stranded regions of the RNA rings. Molecular dynamic simulations are used to assess the dynamic behavior and the changes in the flexibility of novel designs. The changes suggested by simulations, however, cannot be clearly confirmed by the conventional techniques such as non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (native-PAGE) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Also, an in vitro analysis in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells does not reveal any discrepancy in immunological recognition of new assemblies. To address these deficiencies, we introduce a computer-assisted quantification strategy. This strategy is based on an algorithmic atomic force microscopy (AFM)-resolved deformation analysis of the RNA nanoparticles studied on a mica/air interface. We validate this computational method by manual image analysis and fitting it to the simulation-predicted results. The presented nanoparticle modification strategy and subsequent AFM-based analysis are anticipated to provide a broad spectrum approach for the future development of nucleic acid-based nanotechnology.

  10. Surface modification and adhesion improvement of PTFE film by ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Hong, J.W.; Wye, M.Y.; Kim, J.H.; Kang, H.J.; Lee, Y.S.

    2004-01-01

    The polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surfaces, modified by 1 kV Ar + or O 2 + ion beam irradiation, was investigated with in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The surface of PTFE films modified by Ar + ion irradiation was carbonized and the surface roughness increased with increasing ion doses. The surface of PTFE films modified by both Ar + ion in O 2 atmosphere and O 2 + ion irradiation formed the oxygen function group on PTFE surface, and the surface roughness change was relatively small. The adhesion improvement in Ar + ion irradiated PTFE surface is attributed to mechanical interlocking due to the surface roughness and -CF-radical, but that in Ar + ion irradiation in an O 2 atmosphere was contributed by the C-O complex and -CF-radical with mechanical interlocking. The C-O complex and -CF-radical in O 2 + ion irradiated surface contributed to the adhesion

  11. Adhesion force imaging in air and liquid by adhesion mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Kees; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    A new imaging mode for the atomic force microscope(AFM), yielding images mapping the adhesion force between tip and sample, is introduced. The adhesion mode AFM takes a force curve at each pixel by ramping a piezoactuator, moving the silicon‐nitride tip up and down towards the sample. During the

  12. AFM of the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of lipid-raft-disrupted and/or cold-treated endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Huang, Jie; Yu, Xiaoxue; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Gan, Chaoye; Li, Ming; Chen, Yong

    2014-02-01

    The nonionic detergent extraction at 4 °C and the cholesterol-depletion-induced lipid raft disruption are the two widely used experimental strategies for lipid raft research. However, the effects of raft disruption and/or cold treatment on the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of cells are still unclear. Here, we evaluated the effects of raft disruption and/or cold (4 °C) treatment on these properties of living human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At first, the cholesterol-depletion-induced raft disruption was visualized by confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent quantum dots. Next, the cold-induced cell contraction and the formation of end-branched filopodia were observed by confocal microscopy and AFM. Then, the cell-surface ultrastructures were imaged by AFM, and the data showed that raft disruption and cold treatment induced opposite effects on cell-surface roughness (a significant decrease and a significant increase, respectively). Moreover, the cell-surface mechanical properties (stiffness and adhesion force) of raft-disrupted- and/or cold-treated HUVECs were measured by the force measurement function of AFM. We found that raft disruption and cold treatment induced parallel effects on cell stiffness (increase) or adhesion force (decrease) and that the combination of the two treatments caused dramatically strengthened effects. Finally, raft disruption was found to significantly impair cell migration as previously reported, whereas temporary cold treatment only caused a slight but nonsignificant decrease in cell migration performed at physiological temperature. Although the mechanisms for causing these results might be complicated and more in-depth studies will be needed, our data may provide important information for better understanding the effects of raft disruption or cold treatment on cells and the two strategies for lipid raft research.

  13. Modifications of structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of Er2O3/Si interface under Co-60 gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Senol; Yilmaz, Ercan

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the influences of gamma radiation on the structural, electrical, and chemical characteristics of erbium oxide (Er2O3) thin films and the possible mechanisms underlying these irradiation-induced effects. The crystallographic and morphological modifications under gamma irradiation were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively, while radiation influences on electrochemical characteristics were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore, changes in electrical characteristics were analyzed on the basis of capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/ω-V) measurements. The XRD results demonstrated that small atomic displacement was observed and that the grain size of the nanostructure slightly increased. Improvements in surface roughness were observed in AFM measurements. The observed variations in the XRD and AFM measurements can be attributed to the radiation-induced local heating and microscopic atomic mobility. In addition, the XPS analysis obviously demonstrated that the oxygen vacancies increased with irradiation dose because of the breaking of Er2O3 and ErxOy bonds. Significant influences of the generated oxygen vacancies on the electrical measurements were observed, and the radiation-induced hole traps, which caused large flat band shifts, can be attributed to the generated oxygen vacancies. The results show that radiation does not degrade the physical characteristics significantly, but the generation of oxygen vacancies considerably increases the electrical sensitivity of the Er2O3 dielectric.

  14. MeV ion irradiation induced evolution of morphological, structural and optical properties of nanostructured SnO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, Satyabrata; Bhardwaj, Neha; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured SnO 2 thin films were prepared by carbothermal evaporation method. Morphological, structural and optical properties of the SnO 2 thin films, before and after 8 MeV Si ion irradiation to fluences varying from 1 × 10 13 to 1 × 10 15 ions cm −2 , were well characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD studies revealed the presence of SnO 2 and Sn nanoparticles in the as-deposited samples. AFM and FESEM studies on the irradiated samples revealed formation of nanoring-like structures, at a fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions cm −2 , with a central hole and circular rim consisting of nearly monodisperse SnO 2 nanoparticles. PL studies revealed strong enhancement in UV emissions upon 8 MeV Si ion irradiation. A growth mechanism underlying the formation of SnO 2 nanorings involving self-assembly of SnO 2 nanoparticles around nanoholes is tentatively proposed. (paper)

  15. Correlation of simulated TEM images with irradiation induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeublin, R.; Almeida, P. de; Almazouzi, A.; Victoria, M.

    2000-01-01

    Crystal damage induced by irradiation is investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled to molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The displacement cascades are simulated for energies ranging from 10 to 50 keV in Al, Ni and Cu and for times of up to a few tens of picoseconds. Samples are then used to perform simulations of the TEM images that one could observe experimentally. Diffraction contrast is simulated using a method based on the multislice technique. It appears that the cascade induced damage in Al imaged in weak beam exhibits little contrast, which is too low to be experimentally visible, while in Ni and Cu a good contrast is observed. The number of visible clusters is always lower than the actual one. Conversely, high resolution TEM (HRTEM) imaging allows most of the defects contained in the sample to be observed, although experimental difficulties arise due to the low contrast intensity of the smallest defects. Single point defects give rise in HTREM to a contrast that is similar to that of cavities. TEM imaging of the defects is discussed in relation to the actual size of the defects and to the number of clusters deduced from MD simulations

  16. AFM Study of Structure Influence on Butterfly Wings Coloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinara Sultanovna Dallaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the structural coloration of the butterfly Vanessa Atalanta wings and shows how the atomic force microscopy (AFM can be applied to the study of wings morphology and wings surface behavior under the temperature. The role of the wings morphology in colors was investigated. Different colors of wings have different topology and can be identified by them. AFM in semi-contact mode was used to study the wings surface. The wing surface area, which is close to the butterfly body, has shiny brown color and the peak of surface roughness is about 600 nm. The changing of morphology at different temperatures is shown.

  17. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J.; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Warr, Gregory G.; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-06-01

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level

  18. Evaluation of set-of errors in pelvic irradiation with electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaoying; Zhang Zhen; Wang Wenchao; Ren Jun; Guo Xiaomei; Lu Huizhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the systematic and random set-up error in the pelvic irradiation u- sing electronic portal imaging device(EPID) to provide institution-specific margin for PTV design in pelvic cancer treatment planning with 3D conformal therapy and/or IMRT. Methods: From May to August 2005, twelve patients who received pelvic irradiation, were involved in this study. CT simulations were performed and DRRs were generated as the reference images. Ant-post and lateral portal images were taken daily, and total of 244 sets of EPID images were collected for the whole group. The translational shifts along right-left, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions were calculated with aligning the pelvic bony structures on the DRRs and electronic portal images. The systematic and random setup errors were evaluated based on the 244 sets of data. PTV margin was assessed assuming target rotation was negligible. Results: In the right- left (R-L), superior-inferior (S-I) and anterior-posterior (A-P) directions, the maximum shifts were 9.9, 14.0 and 21.1 mm and the systematic setup errors were 0.5, 0.2 and 2.3 mm respectively. For all 244 sets of data in this study, the frequency of the shift larger than 10 mm were 0% (R-L), 1% (S-I) and 3% (A -P); and in R-L and S-I direction, 92% and 91% of the times the shift was smaller than 5 mm. However, only 79% of the times the A-P shift was less than 5 mm. Conclusions: It is suggested in this study that in order to achieve a target coverage of better than 95% of the times throughout the pelvic irradiation in our institution, a 5 mm PTV margin in right-left and superior-inferior directions is required, however, the anterior-posterior margin needs to be increased to at least 10 mm. One needs to be cautious though when applying the PTV margin derived from small sample of patient population to individual patient. (authors)

  19. Charge storage in mesoscopic graphitic islands fabricated using AFM bias lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurra, Narendra; Basavaraja, S; Kulkarni, G U [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and DST Unit on Nanoscience, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur PO, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Prakash, Gyan; Fisher, Timothy S; Reifenberger, Ronald G, E-mail: kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: reifenbr@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2011-06-17

    Electrochemical oxidation and etching of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been achieved using biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) lithography, allowing patterns of varying complexity to be written into the top layers of HOPG. The graphitic oxidation process and the trench geometry after writing were monitored using intermittent contact mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy reveals that the isolated mesoscopic islands formed during the AFM lithography process become positively charged, suggesting that they are laterally isolated from the surrounding HOPG substrate. The electrical transport studies of these laterally isolated finite-layer graphitic islands enable detailed characterization of electrical conduction along the c-direction and reveal an unexpected stability of the charged state. Utilizing conducting-atomic force microscopy, the measured I(V) characteristics revealed significant non-linearities. Micro-Raman studies confirm the presence of oxy functional groups formed during the lithography process.

  20. Mutual irradiation grafting on indigenous aramid fiber-3 in diethanolamine and epichlorohydrin and its effect on interfacially reinforced epoxy composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Lixin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001,China (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Liu, Li, E-mail: liuli@hit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001,China (China); Xie, Fei [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001,China (China); Huang, Yudong [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001,China (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • High energy gamma rays were used to decorate the surface of aramid fiber via mutual irradiation grafting process in two medium. • The effects of different grafting medium on aramid fiber surface were investigated through SEM, AFM, XPS, wettability and adsorption measurements. • Interfacial properties of aramid reinforced polymer composites were remarkable improved after mutual irradiation. - Abstract: The surface of indigenous aramid fiber-3 (IAF3) was decorated via mutual irradiation grafting process in diethanolamine (DEA) and epichlorohydrin (ECH), respectively, with the assist of high energy gamma rays. This modification method with great permeability produced the homogeneous and ameliorative AF3 surfaces, which were observed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom forced microscopy (AFM). Enhanced surface free energy and reduced contact angles of irradiated AF3 verified the fabulous effectiveness of mutual irradiation without seriously injured tensile strength. The composites based on epoxy resin (ER) polymer as the matrix and irradiated IAF3 grafted DEA and ECH as the reinforcement. By capitalizing on the irradiated IAF3 which has higher wettability and adsorption on resin, the irradiated IAF3-ECH/ER composites exhibit admirable interfacial mechanical performance as compared to the pristine IAF3 contained composites. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and flexural strength of composites were remarkable improved to 86.5, 60.13 and 511 MPa respectively, from the pristine IAF3/ER composite with IFSS of 65.9 MPa, ILSS of 48.1 MPa, and flexural strength of 479 MPa.

  1. Mutual irradiation grafting on indigenous aramid fiber-3 in diethanolamine and epichlorohydrin and its effect on interfacially reinforced epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Lixin; Liu, Li; Xie, Fei; Huang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • High energy gamma rays were used to decorate the surface of aramid fiber via mutual irradiation grafting process in two medium. • The effects of different grafting medium on aramid fiber surface were investigated through SEM, AFM, XPS, wettability and adsorption measurements. • Interfacial properties of aramid reinforced polymer composites were remarkable improved after mutual irradiation. - Abstract: The surface of indigenous aramid fiber-3 (IAF3) was decorated via mutual irradiation grafting process in diethanolamine (DEA) and epichlorohydrin (ECH), respectively, with the assist of high energy gamma rays. This modification method with great permeability produced the homogeneous and ameliorative AF3 surfaces, which were observed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom forced microscopy (AFM). Enhanced surface free energy and reduced contact angles of irradiated AF3 verified the fabulous effectiveness of mutual irradiation without seriously injured tensile strength. The composites based on epoxy resin (ER) polymer as the matrix and irradiated IAF3 grafted DEA and ECH as the reinforcement. By capitalizing on the irradiated IAF3 which has higher wettability and adsorption on resin, the irradiated IAF3-ECH/ER composites exhibit admirable interfacial mechanical performance as compared to the pristine IAF3 contained composites. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and flexural strength of composites were remarkable improved to 86.5, 60.13 and 511 MPa respectively, from the pristine IAF3/ER composite with IFSS of 65.9 MPa, ILSS of 48.1 MPa, and flexural strength of 479 MPa.

  2. Effect of SHI irradiation on structural, surface morphological and optical studies of CVT grown ZnSSe single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannappan, P.; Asokan, K.; Krishna, J.B.M.; Dhanasekaran, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CVT grown ZnSSe single crystals were irradiated with 120 MeV Au ion. •The GIXRD results show the FWHM increases with increasing ion fluency. •The AFM study show the surface roughness increases with ion fluency. •The optical band gap energy vary with increasing ion fluency. •The PL emission decreases with increasing ion fluency. -- Abstract: The ZnSSe single crystals grown by chemical vapour transport (CVT) method have been irradiated by 120 MeV Au 9+ ions at room temperature with fluences of 1 × 10 12 and 5 × 10 12 ions/cm 2 . The grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) results show that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for the as grown ZnSSe crystal is 0.215°; and for the irradiated samples, the FWHM values are 0.413° and 0.625°, with the increase of ion fluences. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies reveal the formation of the pits and islands due to irradiation. The optical absorption cut off wavelength is found to be 441 nm for as grown ZnSSe crystal. The cut off values are increased to 447 nm and 457 nm for the irradiated samples with increasing ion fluency. The photoluminescence studies show the emission for the as grown ZnSSe is 590 nm whereas for the irradiated samples in the emission range it is 580–590 nm and 575–595 nm due to SHI irradiation. FT-Raman spectra analysis has been made for the ZnSSe single crystals and irradiated samples. The results are discussed in detail

  3. Effect of SHI irradiation on structural, surface morphological and optical studies of CVT grown ZnSSe single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannappan, P. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India); Asokan, K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Krishna, J.B.M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, III-/LB-8, Bidhan nagar, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Dhanasekaran, R., E-mail: rdcgc@yahoo.com [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •CVT grown ZnSSe single crystals were irradiated with 120 MeV Au ion. •The GIXRD results show the FWHM increases with increasing ion fluency. •The AFM study show the surface roughness increases with ion fluency. •The optical band gap energy vary with increasing ion fluency. •The PL emission decreases with increasing ion fluency. -- Abstract: The ZnSSe single crystals grown by chemical vapour transport (CVT) method have been irradiated by 120 MeV Au{sup 9+} ions at room temperature with fluences of 1 × 10{sup 12} and 5 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) results show that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for the as grown ZnSSe crystal is 0.215°; and for the irradiated samples, the FWHM values are 0.413° and 0.625°, with the increase of ion fluences. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies reveal the formation of the pits and islands due to irradiation. The optical absorption cut off wavelength is found to be 441 nm for as grown ZnSSe crystal. The cut off values are increased to 447 nm and 457 nm for the irradiated samples with increasing ion fluency. The photoluminescence studies show the emission for the as grown ZnSSe is 590 nm whereas for the irradiated samples in the emission range it is 580–590 nm and 575–595 nm due to SHI irradiation. FT-Raman spectra analysis has been made for the ZnSSe single crystals and irradiated samples. The results are discussed in detail.

  4. Immobilization method of yeast cells for intermittent contact mode imaging using the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Tathagata; Chettoor, Antony M.; Agarwal, Pranav; Salapaka, Murti V.; Nettikadan, Saju

    2010-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used for studying the surface morphology and growth of live cells. There are relatively fewer reports on the AFM imaging of yeast cells (Kasas and Ikai, 1995), (Gad and Ikai, 1995). Yeasts have thick and mechanically strong cell walls and are therefore difficult to attach to a solid substrate. In this report, a new immobilization technique for the height mode imaging of living yeast cells in solid media using AFM is presented. The proposed technique allows the cell surface to be almost completely exposed to the environment and studied using AFM. Apart from the new immobilization protocol, for the first time, height mode imaging of live yeast cell surface in intermittent contact mode is presented in this report. Stable and reproducible imaging over a 10-h time span is observed. A significant improvement in operational stability will facilitate the investigation of growth patterns and surface patterns of yeast cells.

  5. Electrospray deposition from fountain pen AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, J.; Sarajlic, Edin; Berenschot, Johan W.; Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present for the first time electrospraying from fountain pen probes. By using electrospray contactless deposition in an AFM setup becomes possible. Experiments on a dedicated setup were carried out as first step towards this goal. Spraying from 8 and 2 µm apertures was observed. For

  6. An AFM and XPS study of corrosion caused by micro-liquid of dilute sulfuric acid on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongguang

    2004-01-01

    Micro-liquid of dilute sulfuric acid deposited on SUS304 steel surface were observed with the ac non-contact mode of an atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the detail of the corrosion process caused by them was investigated with the contact mode of the AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDXS). As a result, even not applying bias voltages between the tip of the cantilever and the specimen, micro-liquid of sulfuric acid can be successfully imaged using the ac non-contact mode of AFM. Two shapes of micro-acid, i.e., micro-droplets and micro-films, were found to co-exist on the specimen surface. On areas covered by micro-films of acid, only small corrosion product particles appeared and no corrosion pits were found. Beneath micro-droplets, corrosion reaction continue to produce pits until they were all consumed to form a corrosion product (mainly iron oxides) with almost the same shape with the droplet. The total corrosion reaction time was speculated to be between 690 and 1500 ks. The corrosion product formed from micro-droplets was believed to be a process of accumulating small corrosion product particles from the liquid/substrate interface to the surface of the formerly produced corrosion product. The XPS and WDXS analysis also supports the above results

  7. Structural and optical studies of 100 MeV Au irradiated thin films of tin oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Manoj Kumar; Kanjilal, D.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-11-01

    Thin films of tin(IV) oxide (SnO2) of 100 nm thickness were grown on silicon (1 0 0) matrices by electron beam evaporation deposition technique under high vacuum. The thicknesses of these films were monitored by piezo-sensor attached to the deposition chamber. Nanocrystallinity is achieved in these thin films by 100 MeV Au8+ using 1 pnA current at normal incidence with ion fluences varying from 1 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1013 ions/cm2. Swift Heavy Ion beam irradiation was carried out by using 15 UD Pelletron Accelerator at IUAC, New Delhi, India. Optical studies of pristine and ion irradiated thin films were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Prominent peak at 610 cm-1 in FTIR spectrum confirmed the O-Sn-O bonding of tin(IV) oxide. For Surface topographical studies and grain size calculations, these films were characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) using Nanoscope III-A. Crystallinity and phase transformation due to irradiation of pristine and irradiated films were characterized by Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD) using Brucker-D8 advance model. GAXRD results show improvement in crystallinity and phase transformation due to swift heavy ion irradiation. Grain size distribution was verified by AFM and GAXRD results. Swift heavy ion induced modifications in thin films of SnO2 were confirmed by the presence of prominent peaks at 2θ values of 30.65°, 32.045°, 43.94°, 44.96° and 52.36° in GAXRD spectrum.

  8. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, Andreas; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J

    2017-04-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM imaging in biology, various technological developments would be required to address certain limitations of the method. This has led to the creation of a range of new imaging modes, which continue to push the capabilities of the technique today. Here, we review the basic principles, advantages and limitations of the most common AFM bioimaging modes, including the popular contact and dynamic modes, as well as recently developed modes such as multiparametric, molecular recognition, multifrequency and high-speed imaging. For each of these modes, we discuss recent experiments that highlight their unique capabilities.

  9. High resolution imaging of surface patterns of single bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greif, Dominik; Wesner, Daniel; Regtmeier, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario

    2010-01-01

    We systematically studied the origin of surface patterns observed on single Sinorhizobium meliloti bacterial cells by comparing the complementary techniques atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Conditions ranged from living bacteria in liquid to fixed bacteria in high vacuum. Stepwise, we applied different sample modifications (fixation, drying, metal coating, etc.) and characterized the observed surface patterns. A detailed analysis revealed that the surface structure with wrinkled protrusions in SEM images were not generated de novo but most likely evolved from similar and naturally present structures on the surface of living bacteria. The influence of osmotic stress to the surface structure of living cells was evaluated and also the contribution of exopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by imaging two mutant strains of the bacterium under native conditions. AFM images of living bacteria in culture medium exhibited surface structures of the size of single proteins emphasizing the usefulness of AFM for high resolution cell imaging.

  10. Fast and controlled fabrication of porous graphene oxide: application of AFM tapping for mechano-chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Liangyong; Korobko, Alexander V.; Bus, Marcel; Boshuizen, Bart; Sudhölter, Ernst J. R.; Besseling, Nicolaas A. M.

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes a novel method to fabricate porous graphene oxide (PGO) from GO by exposure to oxygen plasma. Compared to other methods to fabricate PGO described so far, e.g. the thermal and steam etching methods, oxygen plasma etching method is much faster. We studied the development of the porosity with exposure time using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that the development of PGO upon oxygen-plasma exposure can be controlled by tapping mode AFM scanning using a Si tip. AFM tapping stalls the growth of pores upon further plasma exposure at a level that coincides with the fraction of sp2 carbons in the GO starting material. We suggest that AFM tapping procedure changes the bond structure of the intermediate PGO structure, and these stabilized PGO structures cannot be further etched by oxygen plasma. This constitutes the first report of tapping AFM as a tool for local mechano-chemistry.

  11. A universal fluid cell for the imaging of biological specimens in the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasas, Sandor; Radotic, Ksenja; Longo, Giovanni; Saha, Bashkar; Alonso-Sarduy, Livan; Dietler, Giovanni; Roduit, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Recently, atomic force microscope (AFM) manufacturers have begun producing instruments specifically designed to image biological specimens. In most instances, they are integrated with an inverted optical microscope, which permits concurrent optical and AFM imaging. An important component of the set-up is the imaging chamber, whose design determines the nature of the experiments that can be conducted. Many different imaging chamber designs are available, usually designed to optimize a single parameter, such as the dimensions of the substrate or the volume of fluid that can be used throughout the experiment. In this report, we present a universal fluid cell, which simultaneously optimizes all of the parameters that are important for the imaging of biological specimens in the AFM. This novel imaging chamber has been successfully tested using mammalian, plant, and microbial cells. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evolution of etched nuclear track profiles of alpha particles in CR-39 by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Félix-Bautista, R.; Hernández-Hernández, C.; Zendejas-Leal, B.E.; Fragoso, R.; Golzarri, J.I.; Vázquez-López, C.; Espinosa, G.

    2013-01-01

    A series of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of etched nuclear tracks has been obtained and used to calculate the nuclear track registration sensitivity parameter V(x) = Vt(x)/Vb. Due to the AFM limitations the samples were irradiated normally to the surface, and with energies attenuated in order to include the Bragg peak region in the AFM piezo-scanner z movement range. The simulation of the track profile evolution was then obtained. The different stages of etched nuclear track profiles were rendered. - Highlights: ► Using AFM we reach that Bragg peak region of etched tracks in CR-39. ► The etched track sensitivity V was calculated by data obtained by AFM. ► The evolucion of etched nuclear tracks was simulated by data achieved by AFM

  13. Atomic force microscope image contrast mechanisms on supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J; Dufrêne, Y F; Barger, W R; Lee, G U

    2000-08-01

    This work presents a methodology to measure and quantitatively interpret force curves on supported lipid bilayers in water. We then use this method to correlate topographic imaging contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of phase-separated Langmuir-Blodgett bilayers with imaging load. Force curves collected on pure monolayers of both distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) and monogalactosylethanolamine (MGDG) and dioleoylethanolamine (DOPE) deposited at similar surface pressures onto a monolayer of DSPE show an abrupt breakthrough event at a repeatable, material-dependent force. The breakthrough force for DSPE and MGDG is sizable, whereas the breakthrough force for DOPE is too small to measure accurately. Contact-mode AFM images on 1:1 mixed monolayers of DSPE/DOPE and MGDG/DOPE have a high topographic contrast at loads between the breakthrough force of each phase, and a low topographic contrast at loads above the breakthrough force of both phases. Frictional contrast is inverted and magnified at loads above the breakthrough force of both phases. These results emphasize the important role that surface forces and mechanics can play in imaging multicomponent biomembranes with AFM.

  14. Simulation of imaging in tapping-mode atomic-force microscopy: a comparison amongst a variety of approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pishkenari, H N; Mahboobi, S H; Meghdari, A, E-mail: mahboobi@sharif.edu [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-23

    Models capable of accurate simulation of microcantilever dynamics coupled with complex tip-sample interactions are essential for interpretation and prediction of the imaging results in amplitude modulation or tapping-mode atomic-force microscopy (AM-AFM or TM-AFM). In this paper, four approaches based on combinations of lumped and finite element methods for modelling of cantilever dynamics, and van der Waals and molecular dynamics for modelling of tip-sample interactions, are used to simulate the precise imaging by AM-AFM. Based on the simulated imaging and force determination, the efficiency of different modelling schemes is evaluated. This comparison is performed considering their coincidence with the realistic behaviour of AM-AFM in imaging of nanoscale features. In the conducted simulations, a diamond tip is used to scan a C60 molecule absorbed on a graphite substrate. The effects of amplitude set-point, cantilever stiffness and quality factor on the accuracy of different modelling approaches are studied.

  15. Superparamagnetism in AFM Cr2O3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobia, D.; Winkler, E.L.; Zysler, R.D.; Granada, M.; Troiani, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report the size effects on the magnetic properties of AFM Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles. From transmission electron microscopy we determined that the system presents high crystallinity and narrow lognormal size distribution centred at = 7.8 nm with σ = 0.3. The magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied by magnetization and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments. By EPR spectroscopy we established that the AFM order temperature, T N , shifted to ∼270 K when the size is reduced (T N (Bulk) ∼ 308 K). From the zero-field-cooling and the field-cooling magnetization curves we determined the blocking temperature T B = 28 K. Below T B the system presents exchange bias effect. We discuss the results by using recent models in terms of the internal magnetic structures of the nanoparticles.

  16. Comparison of different aminofunctionalization strategies for attachment of single antibodies to AFM cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, Andreas [Institute of Biophysics, University of Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria)], E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J. [Institute of Biophysics, University of Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2007-10-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has developed into a key technique for elucidation of biological systems on the single molecular level. In particular, molecular recognition force microscopy has proven to be a powerful tool for the investigation of biological interactions under near physiological conditions. For this purpose, ligands are tethered to AFM tips and the interaction forces with cognate receptors on the sample surface are measured with pico-Newton accuracy. In the first step of tip functionalization, amino groups are typically introduced on the initially inert AFM tip. Several methods have been developed to reproducibly adjust the desired low density of amino groups on the tip surface, i.e. esterification with ethanolamine, gas-phase silanization with aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES), or treatment with aminophenyl-trimethoxysilane (APhS) in toluene solution. In the present study, the usefulness of these methods for attachments of antibodies to AFM tips was characterized by a standardized test system, in which biotinylated IgG was bound to the tip and a dense monolayer of avidin on mica served as test sample. All three methods of aminofunctionalization were found fully satisfactory for attachment of single antibodies to AFM tips, only in a parallel macroscopic assay on silicon nitride chips a minor difference was found in that APTES appeared to yield a slightly lower surface density of amino groups.

  17. Structural and volume changes and their correlation in electron irradiated alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavenda, Tadeáš; Gedeon, Ondrej; Jurek, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Volume changes were correlated with both incubation dose and Raman spectra. • Irradiation decreases Si-O-Si angle and increases the amount of three-membered rings. • Levelling of the pits depends on the dose below and above incubation dose. • Restoration of the original structure was limited to low-frequency region. - Abstract: Two binary alkali silicate glasses (15K 2 O·85SiO 2 – denoted as K15 and 15Li 2 O·85SiO 2 – denoted as Li15) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 2.1–15.9 kC/m 2 . Volume changes induced by electron irradiation were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Raman spectra were taken from the irradiated spots to observe structural changes. Volume compaction observed at lower doses was correlated with the increase of the D2 peak. Volume expansion at higher doses was related to migration of alkali ions. Irradiated glasses were annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C for 60 min. After annealing irradiated spots were again examined by AFM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine volume and structural relaxation of radiation induced changes. Annealing at higher temperatures resulted in the levelling of the pits created by irradiation, but only for doses below incubation dose. The pits created by doses above incubation dose were not levelled. Annealing caused decrease of D2 peak and shift of the Si-O-Si vibrations band in direction to original structure. Low-frequency region of annealed Li15 glass was undistinguishable from that of pristine glass, while annealing of K15 glass did not result in the full reversion to the original shape. The differences between glasses were attributed to higher T g of K15 glass. Q-motives bands of both glasses were not completely restored after annealing due to the absence of alkali ions.

  18. Structural and volume changes and their correlation in electron irradiated alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavenda, Tadeáš, E-mail: gavendat@vscht.cz [Department of Glass and Ceramics, University of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Gedeon, Ondrej [Department of Glass and Ceramics, University of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Jurek, Karel [Institute of Physics, Academy of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Volume changes were correlated with both incubation dose and Raman spectra. • Irradiation decreases Si-O-Si angle and increases the amount of three-membered rings. • Levelling of the pits depends on the dose below and above incubation dose. • Restoration of the original structure was limited to low-frequency region. - Abstract: Two binary alkali silicate glasses (15K{sub 2}O·85SiO{sub 2} – denoted as K15 and 15Li{sub 2}O·85SiO{sub 2} – denoted as Li15) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 2.1–15.9 kC/m{sup 2}. Volume changes induced by electron irradiation were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Raman spectra were taken from the irradiated spots to observe structural changes. Volume compaction observed at lower doses was correlated with the increase of the D2 peak. Volume expansion at higher doses was related to migration of alkali ions. Irradiated glasses were annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C for 60 min. After annealing irradiated spots were again examined by AFM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine volume and structural relaxation of radiation induced changes. Annealing at higher temperatures resulted in the levelling of the pits created by irradiation, but only for doses below incubation dose. The pits created by doses above incubation dose were not levelled. Annealing caused decrease of D2 peak and shift of the Si-O-Si vibrations band in direction to original structure. Low-frequency region of annealed Li15 glass was undistinguishable from that of pristine glass, while annealing of K15 glass did not result in the full reversion to the original shape. The differences between glasses were attributed to higher T{sub g} of K15 glass. Q-motives bands of both glasses were not completely restored after annealing due to the absence of alkali ions.

  19. Tuning the conductivity of vanadium dioxide films on silicon by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hofsäss

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the generation of a persistent conductivity increase in vanadium dioxide thin films grown on single crystal silicon by irradiation with 1 GeV 238U swift heavy ions at room temperature. VO2 undergoes a temperature driven metal-insulator-transition (MIT at 67 °C. After room temperature ion irradiation with high electronic energy loss of 50 keV/nm the conductivity of the films below the transition temperature is strongly increased proportional to the ion fluence of 5·109 U/cm2 and 1·1010 U/cm2. At high temperatures the conductivity decreases slightly. The ion irradiation slightly reduces the MIT temperature. This observed conductivity change is persistent and remains after heating the samples above the transition temperature and subsequent cooling. Low temperature measurements down to 15 K show no further MIT below room temperature. Although the conductivity increase after irradiation at such low fluences is due to single ion track effects, atomic force microscopy (AFM measurements do not show surface hillocks, which are characteristic for ion tracks in other materials. Conductive AFM gives no evidence for conducting ion tracks but rather suggests the existence of conducting regions around poorly conducting ion tracks, possible due to stress generation. Another explanation of the persistent conductivity change could be the ion-induced modification of a high resistivity interface layer formed during film growth between the vanadium dioxide film and the n-Silicon substrate. The swift heavy ions may generate conducting filaments through this layer, thus increasing the effective contact area. Swift heavy ion irradiation can thus be used to tune the conductivity of VO2 films on silicon substrates.

  20. Nonlinear Phenomena in the Single-Mode Dynamics in an AFM Cantilever Beam

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura

    2016-12-05

    This study deals with the nonlinear dynamics arising in an atomic force microscope cantilever beam. After analyzing the static behavior, a single degree of freedom Galerkin reduced order model is introduced, which describes the overall scenario of the structure response in a neighborhood of the primary resonance. Extensive numerical simulations are performed when both the forcing amplitude and frequency are varied, ranging from low up to elevated excitations. The coexistence of competing attractors with different characteristics is analyzed. Both the non-resonant and the resonant behavior are observed, as well as ranges of inevitable escape. Versatility of behavior is highlighted, which may be attractive in applications. Special attention is devoted to the effects of the tip-sample separation distance, since this aspect is of fundamental importance to understand the operation of an AFM. We explore the metamorphoses of the multistability region when the tip-sample separation distance is varied. To have a complete description of the AFM response, comprehensive behavior charts are introduced to detect the theoretical boundaries of appearance and disappearance of the main attractors. Also, extensive numerical simulations investigate the AFM response when both the forcing amplitude and the tip-sample separation distance are considered as control parameters. The main features are analyzed in detail and the obtained results are interpreted in terms of oscillations of the cantilever-tip ensemble. However, we note that all the aforementioned results represent the limit when disturbances are absent, which never occurs in practice. Here comes the importance of overcoming local investigations and exploring dynamics from a global perspective, by introducing dynamical integrity concepts. To extend the AFM results to the practical case where disturbances exist, we develop a dynamical integrity analysis. After performing a systematic basin of attraction analysis, integrity

  1. FIVE YEARS OF SYNTHESIS OF SOLAR SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE FROM SDID/SISA AND SDO /AIA IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontenla, J. M. [NorthWest Research Associates, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Codrescu, M. [Space Weather Prediction Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Fedrizzi, M.; Fuller-Rowell, T. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Hill, F. [National Solar Observatory, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Climate and Space Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Woods, T., E-mail: johnf@digidyna.com [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe the synthetic solar spectral irradiance (SSI) calculated from 2010 to 2015 using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument, on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft. We used the algorithms for solar disk image decomposition (SDID) and the spectral irradiance synthesis algorithm (SISA) that we had developed over several years. The SDID algorithm decomposes the images of the solar disk into areas occupied by nine types of chromospheric and 5 types of coronal physical structures. With this decomposition and a set of pre-computed angle-dependent spectra for each of the features, the SISA algorithm is used to calculate the SSI. We discuss the application of the basic SDID/SISA algorithm to a subset of the AIA images and the observed variation occurring in the 2010–2015 period of the relative areas of the solar disk covered by the various solar surface features. Our results consist of the SSI and total solar irradiance variations over the 2010–2015 period. The SSI results include soft X-ray, ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and far-infrared observations and can be used for studies of the solar radiative forcing of the Earth’s atmosphere. These SSI estimates were used to drive a thermosphere–ionosphere physical simulation model. Predictions of neutral mass density at low Earth orbit altitudes in the thermosphere and peak plasma densities at mid-latitudes are in reasonable agreement with the observations. The correlation between the simulation results and the observations was consistently better when fluxes computed by SDID/SISA procedures were used.

  2. Estimation of global daily irradiation in complex topography zones using digital elevation models and meteosat images: Comparison of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Durban, M.; Zarzalejo, L.F.; Bosch, J.L.; Rosiek, S.; Polo, J.; Batlles, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge of the solar irradiation in a certain place is fundamental for the suitable location of solar systems, both thermal and photovoltaic. On the local scale, the topography is the most important modulating factor of the solar irradiation on the surface. In this work the global daily irradiation is estimated concerning various sky conditions, in zones of complex topography. In order to estimate the global daily irradiation we use a methodology based on a Digital Terrain Model (DTM), on one hand making use of pyranometer measurements and on the other hand utilizing satellite images. We underline that DTM application employing pyranometer measurements produces better results than estimation using satellite images, though accuracy of the same order is obtained in both cases for Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and Mean Bias Error (MBE).

  3. Estimation of global daily irradiation in complex topography zones using digital elevation models and meteosat images: Comparison of the results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Durban, M. [Dpto. de Lenguajes y Computacion, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Zarzalejo, L.F.; Polo, J. [Dpto. de Energia, CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bosch, J.L.; Rosiek, S.; Batlles, F.J. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2009-09-15

    The knowledge of the solar irradiation in a certain place is fundamental for the suitable location of solar systems, both thermal and photovoltaic. On the local scale, the topography is the most important modulating factor of the solar irradiation on the surface. In this work the global daily irradiation is estimated concerning various sky conditions, in zones of complex topography. In order to estimate the global daily irradiation we use a methodology based on a Digital Terrain Model (DTM), on one hand making use of pyranometer measurements and on the other hand utilizing satellite images. We underline that DTM application employing pyranometer measurements produces better results than estimation using satellite images, though accuracy of the same order is obtained in both cases for Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and Mean Bias Error (MBE). (author)

  4. Feature Tracking for High Speed AFM Imaging of Biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Brett; Andersson, Sean B

    2018-03-31

    The scanning speed of atomic force microscopes continues to advance with some current commercial microscopes achieving on the order of one frame per second and at least one reaching 10 frames per second. Despite the success of these instruments, even higher frame rates are needed with scan ranges larger than are currently achievable. Moreover, there is a significant installed base of slower instruments that would benefit from algorithmic approaches to increasing their frame rate without requiring significant hardware modifications. In this paper, we present an experimental demonstration of high speed scanning on an existing, non-high speed instrument, through the use of a feedback-based, feature-tracking algorithm that reduces imaging time by focusing on features of interest to reduce the total imaging area. Experiments on both circular and square gratings, as well as silicon steps and DNA strands show a reduction in imaging time by a factor of 3-12 over raster scanning, depending on the parameters chosen.

  5. Visualization of biomedical image data and irradiation planning using a parallel computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrig, R.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution explains the development of a novel, low-cost workstation for the processing of biomedical tomographic data sequences. The workstation was to allow both graphical display of the data and implementation of modelling software for irradiation planning, especially for calculation of dose distributions on the basis of the measured tomogram data. The system developed according to these criteria is a parallel computing system which performs secondary, two-dimensional image reconstructions irrespective of the imaging direction of the original tomographic scans. Three-dimensional image reconstructions can be generated from any direction of view, with random selection of sections of the scanned object. (orig./MM) With 69 figs., 2 tabs [de

  6. AFM cantilever with in situ renewable mercury microelectrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter Manfred; Geerlings, J.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Sarajlic, Edin

    2013-01-01

    We report here first results obtained on a novel, in situ renewable mercury microelectrode integrated into an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. Our approach is based on a fountain pen probe with appropriate dimensions enabling reversible filling with(nonwetting) mercury under changing the

  7. Amyloid and membrane complexity: The toxic interplay revealed by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Claudio; Oropesa-Nuñez, Reinier; Diaspro, Alberto; Dante, Silvia

    2018-01-01

    Lipid membranes play a fundamental role in the pathological development of protein misfolding diseases. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the lipid membrane could act as a catalytic surface for protein aggregation. Furthermore, a leading theory indicates the interaction between the cell membrane and misfolded oligomer species as the responsible for cytotoxicity, hence, for neurodegeneration in disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The definition of the mechanisms that drive the interaction between pathological protein aggregates and plasma membrane is fundamental for the development of effective therapies for a large class of diseases. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been employed to study how amyloid aggregates affect the cell physiological properties. Considerable efforts were spent to characterize the interaction with model systems, i.e., planar supported lipid bilayers, but some works also addressed the problem directly on living cells. Here, an overview of the main works involving the use of the AFM on both model system and living cells will be provided. Different kind of approaches will be presented, as well as the main results derived from the AFM analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A fully-automated neural network analysis of AFM force-distance curves for cancer tissue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Eleonora; Ciasca, Gabriele; Sassun, Tanya Enny; Antonelli, Manila; Palmieri, Valentina; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Santoro, Antonio; Giangaspero, Felice; Delfini, Roberto; Campi, Gaetano; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has the unique capability of probing the nanoscale mechanical properties of biological systems that affect and are affected by the occurrence of many pathologies, including cancer. This capability has triggered growing interest in the translational process of AFM from physics laboratories to clinical practice. A factor still hindering the current use of AFM in diagnostics is related to the complexity of AFM data analysis, which is time-consuming and needs highly specialized personnel with a strong physical and mathematical background. In this work, we demonstrate an operator-independent neural-network approach for the analysis of surgically removed brain cancer tissues. This approach allowed us to distinguish—in a fully automated fashion—cancer from healthy tissues with high accuracy, also highlighting the presence and the location of infiltrating tumor cells.

  9. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-03

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    dimensions: tips suitable for imaging high-aspect ratio structures and sidewall profiles were designed. Tip diameters in the order of 30 nm were reproducibly obtained with the FIB milling and the smallest tip diameter achieved was ... process by providing direct picking up of the NanoBits by the AFM probe was investigated. Two different bending mechanisms were studied for out-of-plane bending studies: FIB irradiation- and the residual stress-driven bending in bimorph structures. With FIB irradiation studies, NanoBits were demonstrated...... of the structure which may be starting at 170°C. The fabricated NanoBits were assembled and their performance as AFM probes were tested at OFFIS. The NanoBits were successfully picked up by a microgripper, collected in a cartridge and mounted to an AFM probe. Performances of the assembled high-aspect-ratio Nano...

  11. A comparison of reconstruction methods for undersampled atomic force microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Yufan; Andersson, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    Non-raster scanning and undersampling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images is a technique for improving imaging rate and reducing the amount of tip–sample interaction needed to produce an image. Generation of the final image can be done using a variety of image processing techniques based on interpolation or optimization. The choice of reconstruction method has a large impact on the quality of the recovered image and the proper choice depends on the sample under study. In this work we compare interpolation through the use of inpainting algorithms with reconstruction based on optimization through the use of the basis pursuit algorithm commonly used for signal recovery in compressive sensing. Using four different sampling patterns found in non-raster AFM, namely row subsampling, spiral scanning, Lissajous scanning, and random scanning, we subsample data from existing images and compare reconstruction performance against the original image. The results illustrate that inpainting generally produces superior results when the image contains primarily low frequency content while basis pursuit is better when the images have mixed, but sparse, frequency content. Using support vector machines, we then classify images based on their frequency content and sparsity and, from this classification, develop a fast decision strategy to select a reconstruction algorithm to be used on subsampled data. The performance of the classification and decision test are demonstrated on test AFM images. (paper)

  12. Ultra-high aspect ratio replaceable AFM tips using deformation-suppressed focused ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savenko, Alexey; Yildiz, Izzet; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio exchangeable and customizable tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) using lateral focused ion beam (FIB) milling is presented. While on-axis FIB milling does allow high aspect ratio (HAR) AFM tips to be defined, lateral milling gives far better flexibility...

  13. Adhesion experiments using an AFM-Parameters of influence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Santos Ferreira, O.; Gelinck, E.R.M.; Graaf, D. de; Fischer, H.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion measurements were performed by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). It was shown that many parameters need to be controlled in order to provide reproducible and quantitative results. Adhesion forces were shown to depend on combination of materials characteristics and testing geometry as well as

  14. Structural and optical studies of 100 MeV Au irradiated thin films of tin oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiswal, Manoj Kumar [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110 078 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshkumaripu@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110 078 (India)

    2013-11-01

    Thin films of tin(IV) oxide (SnO{sub 2}) of 100 nm thickness were grown on silicon (1 0 0) matrices by electron beam evaporation deposition technique under high vacuum. The thicknesses of these films were monitored by piezo-sensor attached to the deposition chamber. Nanocrystallinity is achieved in these thin films by 100 MeV Au{sup 8+} using 1 pnA current at normal incidence with ion fluences varying from 1 × 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2} to 5 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Swift Heavy Ion beam irradiation was carried out by using 15 UD Pelletron Accelerator at IUAC, New Delhi, India. Optical studies of pristine and ion irradiated thin films were characterized by UV–Visible spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Prominent peak at 610 cm{sup −1} in FTIR spectrum confirmed the O–Sn–O bonding of tin(IV) oxide. For Surface topographical studies and grain size calculations, these films were characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) using Nanoscope III-A. Crystallinity and phase transformation due to irradiation of pristine and irradiated films were characterized by Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD) using Brucker-D8 advance model. GAXRD results show improvement in crystallinity and phase transformation due to swift heavy ion irradiation. Grain size distribution was verified by AFM and GAXRD results. Swift heavy ion induced modifications in thin films of SnO{sub 2} were confirmed by the presence of prominent peaks at 2θ values of 30.65°, 32.045°, 43.94°, 44.96° and 52.36° in GAXRD spectrum.

  15. Structural characterization of Fe/Ag bilayers by RBS and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunyogi, A.; Tancziko, F.; Osvath, Z.; Paszti, F.

    2008-01-01

    Fe/Ag thin films are intensively investigated due to their special magnetic properties. Recently a deposition-order dependent asymmetric interface has been found. When iron is grown on silver, the interface is sharp, while the growth of Ag on Fe results in a long, low-energy tail of the Ag peak in the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) spectra. The main purpose of this paper is to show that the low-energy Ag tail is caused by grain boundary diffusion, and that, when elevating the growing temperature of the Ag layer this effect becomes more significant. Two sets of polycrystalline and epitaxial Fe/Ag bilayers were prepared simultaneously onto Si(1 1 1) and MgO(1 0 0), respectively. The iron layers were grown at 250 deg. C and annealed at 450 deg. C in both sets, while the Ag layer was grown in the first set at room temperature (RT) and in the second set at 250 deg. C (HT). The sample composition, the interface sharpness and the quality of the epitaxy were studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) combined with channeling effect. The surface morphology was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). RBS spectra show that in the case of RT samples the epitaxial MgO/Fe/Ag bilayer has sharp, well-defined interface, while for the polycrystalline Si/Fe/Ag sample the silver peak has a low-energy tail. Both the Fe and Ag peaks smeared out in the case of HT samples. AFM-images show that the RT samples have a continuous Ag layer, while the HT samples have fragmented surfaces. The RBS spectra taken on the HT samples were successfully simulated by the RBS-MAST code taking into account their fragmented structures.

  16. Scaling law to determine peak forces in tapping-mode AFM experiments on finite elastic soft matter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Horacio V

    2017-01-01

    Analytical equations to estimate the peak force will facilitate the interpretation and the planning of amplitude-modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) experiments. A closed-form analytical equation to estimate the tip-sample peak forces while imaging soft materials in liquid environment and within an elastic deformation regime has been deduced. We have combined a multivariate regression method with input from the virial-dissipation equations and Tatara's bidimensional deformation contact mechanics model. The equation enables to estimate the peak force based on the tapping mode observables, probe characteristics and the material properties of the sample. The accuracy of the equation has been verified by comparing it to numerical simulations for the archetypical operating conditions to image soft matter with high spatial resolution in tapping-mode AFM.

  17. Optimization of Easy Atomic Force Microscope (ezAFM) Controls for Semiconductor Nanostructure Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-MR-0965 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Optimization of Easy Atomic Force Microscope (ezAFM) Controls for... Optimization of Easy Atomic Force Microscope (ezAFM) Controls for Semiconductor Nanostructure Profiling by Satwik Bisoi Science and...REPORT TYPE Memorandum Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 2017 July 05–2017 August 18 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optimization of Easy Atomic Force

  18. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm 2 . For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm 2 , yielding good statistic results. (paper)

  19. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm2. For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm2, yielding good statistic results.

  20. Sensitivity of surface roughness parameters to changes in the density of scanning points in multi-scale AFM studies. Application to a biomaterial surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez-Vilas, A.; Bruque, J.M.; Gonzalez-Martin, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    In the field of biomaterials surfaces, the ability of the atomic force microscope (AFM) to access the surface structure at unprecedented spatial (vertical and lateral) resolution, is helping in a better understanding on how topography affects the overall interaction of biological cells with the material surface. Since cells in a wide range of sizes are in contact with the biomaterial surface, a quantification of the surface structure in such a wide range of dimensional scales is needed. With the advent of the AFM, this can be routinely done in the lab. In this work, we show that even when it is clear that such a scale-dependent study is needed, AFM maps of the biomaterial surface taken at different scanning lengths are not completely consistent when they are taken at the same scanning resolution, as it is usually done: AFM images of different scanning areas have different point-to-point physical distances. We show that this effect influences the quantification of the average (R a ) and rms (R q ) roughness parameters determined at different length scales. This is the first time this inconsistency is reported and should be taken into account when roughness is measured in this way. Since differences will be in general in the range of nanometres, this is especially interesting for those processes involving the interaction of the biomaterial surface with small biocolloids as bacteria, while this effect should not represent any problems for larger animal cells

  1. High-resolution x-ray imaging of planar foils irradiated by the Nike KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Mostovych, A.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Holland, G.

    1997-01-01

    Thin plastic (CH) foils were irradiated by the Naval Research Laboratory Nike [Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] KrF laser and were imaged in the x-ray and extreme ultraviolet regions with two-dimensional spatial resolution in the 3 endash 10 μm range. The CH foils were backlit by a silicon plasma. A spherically curved quartz crystal produced monochromatic images of the Si +12 resonance line radiation with energy 1865 eV that was transmitted by the CH foils. Instabilities that were seeded by linear ripple patterns on the irradiated sides of CH foils were observed. The ripple patterns had periods in the 31 endash 125 μm range and amplitudes in the 0.25 endash 5.0 μm range. The silicon backlighter emission was recorded by an x-ray spectrometer, and the 1865 eV resonance line emission was recorded by a fast x-ray diode. The multilayer mirror telescope recorded images of the C +3 1550 Angstrom emission (energy 8.0 eV) from the backside of the CH foils. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. AFM Imaging of Hybridization Chain Reaction Mediated Signal Transmission between Two DNA Origami Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Sarah; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-10-23

    Signal transfer is central to the controlled exchange of information in biology and advanced technologies. Therefore, the development of reliable, long-range signal transfer systems for artificial nanoscale assemblies is of great scientific interest. We have designed such a system for the signal transfer between two connected DNA nanostructures, using the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Two sets of metastable DNA hairpins, one of which is immobilized at specific points along tracks on DNA origami structures, are polymerized to form a continuous DNA duplex, which is visible using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Upon addition of a designed initiator, the initiation signal is efficiently transferred more than 200 nm from a specific location on one origami structure to an end point on another origami structure. The system shows no significant loss of signal when crossing from one nanostructure to another and, therefore, has the potential to be applied to larger multi-component DNA assemblies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Structure, cell wall elasticity and polysaccharide properties of living yeast cells, as probed by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; Evoy, Kevin Mc; Dufrene, Yves F; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J

    2008-01-01

    Although the chemical composition of yeast cell walls is known, the organization, assembly, and interactions of the various macromolecules remain poorly understood. Here, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in three different modes to probe the ultrastructure, cell wall elasticity and polymer properties of two brewing yeast strains, i.e. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae. Topographic images of the two strains revealed smooth and homogeneous cell surfaces, and the presence of circular bud scars on dividing cells. Nanomechanical measurements demonstrated that the cell wall elasticity of S. carlsbergensis is homogeneous. By contrast, the bud scar of S. cerevisiae was found to be stiffer than the cell wall, presumably due to the accumulation of chitin. Notably, single molecule force spectroscopy with lectin-modified tips revealed major differences in polysaccharide properties of the two strains. Polysaccharides were clearly more extended on S. cerevisiae, suggesting that not only oligosaccharides, but also polypeptide chains of the mannoproteins were stretched. Consistent with earlier cell surface analyses, these findings may explain the very different aggregation properties of the two organisms. This study demonstrates the power of using multiple complementary AFM modalities for probing the organization and interactions of the various macromolecules of microbial cell walls

  4. Degradation of CMOS image sensors in deep-submicron technology due to γ-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Padmakumar R.; Wang, Xinyang; Theuwissen, Albert J. P.

    2008-09-01

    In this work, radiation induced damage mechanisms in deep submicron technology is resolved using finger gated-diodes (FGDs) as a radiation sensitive tool. It is found that these structures are simple yet efficient structures to resolve radiation induced damage in advanced CMOS processes. The degradation of the CMOS image sensors in deep-submicron technology due to γ-ray irradiation is studied by developing a model for the spectral response of the sensor and also by the dark-signal degradation as a function of STI (shallow-trench isolation) parameters. It is found that threshold shifts in the gate-oxide/silicon interface as well as minority carrier life-time variations in the silicon bulk are minimal. The top-layer material properties and the photodiode Si-SiO2 interface quality are degraded due to γ-ray irradiation. Results further suggest that p-well passivated structures are inevitable for radiation-hard designs. It was found that high electrical fields in submicron technologies pose a threat to high quality imaging in harsh environments.

  5. In-situ nanoscale imaging of clay minerals with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosbach, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay minerals play a key role in many concepts for high-level nuclear waste repository systems in deep geological formations. Various aspects related to the long-term safety of nuclear disposal are linked to their fundamental physical-chemical properties, in particular with respect to their reactivity in aqueous environments. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows high resolution imaging of clay minerals in-situ while they are exposed to an aqueous solution. The presentation is intended to provide an overview of examples of AFM studies on clay minerals: 1. AFM is an ideal tool to visualize the shape of individual clay particles down to molecular scales including a quantitative description of for example their aspect ratio. Furthermore, the particle size can be easily extracted from AFM data for individual particles as well as particle size distribution. 2. Surface area of clay minerals is a key issue when discussing heterogeneous reactions such as dissolution, adsorption or (surface) precipitation - total surface area, BET surface area, reactive surface area need to be distinguished. In particular reactive surface area is linked to specific reactive surface sites. AFM is of course able to identify such sites and consequently AFM data allow to characterize and to quantify reactive surface area. 3. The reactivity of clay mineral surfaces in aqueous environments controls the behaviour of clay minerals under repository conditions and also affects the migration/retention of radionuclides. It could be shown that the dissolution of smectite particles under acidic conditions at room temperature primarily occurs at (hk0) particle edges, whereas the reactivity of the (001) basal surfaces is very limited. The heterogeneous (surface) precipitation of secondary iron (hydr)oxides phase could be unraveled by AFM observations. Surface precipitation occurs preferentially at (hk0) edges surfaces. Ignoring the surface site specific

  6. A new image correction method for live cell atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y; Sun, J L; Zhang, A; Hu, J; Xu, L X

    2007-01-01

    During live cell imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM), the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane yield distorted cell images. In this work, an image correction method was developed based on the force-distance curve and the modified Hertzian model. The normal loading and lateral forces exerted on the cell membrane by the AFM tip were both accounted for during the scanning. Two assumptions were made in modelling based on the experimental measurements: (1) the lateral force on the endothelial cells was linear to the height; (2) the cell membrane Young's modulus could be derived from the displacement measurement of a normal force curve. Results have shown that the model could be used to recover up to 30% of the actual cell height depending on the loading force. The accuracy of the model was also investigated with respect to the loading force and mechanical property of the cell membrane

  7. STM, SECPM, AFM and Electrochemistry on Single Crystalline Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Stimming

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Scanning probe microscopy (SPM techniques have had a great impact on research fields of surface science and nanotechnology during the last decades. They are used to investigate surfaces with scanning ranges between several 100 mm down to atomic resolution. Depending on experimental conditions, and the interaction forces between probe and sample, different SPM techniques allow mapping of different surface properties. In this work, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM in air and under electrochemical conditions (EC-STM, atomic force microscopy (AFM in air and scanning electrochemical potential microscopy (SECPM under electrochemical conditions, were used to study different single crystalline surfaces in electrochemistry. Especially SECPM offers potentially new insights into the solid-liquid interface by providing the possibility to image the potential distribution of the surface, with a resolution that is comparable to STM. In electrocatalysis, nanostructured catalysts supported on different electrode materials often show behavior different from their bulk electrodes. This was experimentally and theoretically shown for several combinations and recently on Pt on Au(111 towards fuel cell relevant reactions. For these investigations single crystals often provide accurate and well defined reference and support systems. We will show heteroepitaxially grown Ru, Ir and Rh single crystalline surface films and bulk Au single crystals with different orientations under electrochemical conditions. Image studies from all three different SPM methods will be presented and compared to electrochemical data obtained by cyclic voltammetry in acidic media. The quality of the single crystalline supports will be verified by the SPM images and the cyclic voltammograms. Furthermore, an outlook will be presented on how such supports can be used in electrocatalytic studies.

  8. Atomic force microscopy imaging and 3-D reconstructions of serial thin sections of a single cell and its interior structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yong; Cai Jiye; Zhao Tao; Wang Chenxi; Dong Shuo; Luo Shuqian; Chen, Zheng W.

    2005-01-01

    The thin sectioning has been widely applied in electron microscopy (EM), and successfully used for an in situ observation of inner ultrastructure of cells. This powerful technique has recently been extended to the research field of atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, there have been no reports describing AFM imaging of serial thin sections and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of cells and their inner structures. In the present study, we used AFM to scan serial thin sections approximately 60 nm thick of a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell, and to observe the in situ inner ultrastructure including cell membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus membrane, and linear chromatin. The high-magnification AFM imaging of single mitochondria clearly demonstrated the outer membrane, inner boundary membrane and cristal membrane of mitochondria in the cellular compartment. Importantly, AFM imaging on six serial thin sections of a single mouse ES cell showed that mitochondria underwent sequential changes in the number, morphology and distribution. These nanoscale images allowed us to perform 3-D surface reconstruction of interested interior structures in cells. Based on the serial in situ images, 3-D models of morphological characteristics, numbers and distributions of interior structures of the single ES cells were validated and reconstructed. Our results suggest that the combined AFM and serial-thin-section technique is useful for the nanoscale imaging and 3-D reconstruction of single cells and their inner structures. This technique may facilitate studies of proliferating and differentiating stages of stem cells or somatic cells at a nanoscale

  9. Hematite/silver nanoparticle bilayers on mica--AFM, SEM and streaming potential studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Bielańska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-15

    Bilayers of hematite/silver nanoparticles were obtained in the self-assembly process and thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and in situ streaming potential measurements. The hematite nanoparticles, forming a supporting layer, were 22 nm in diameter, exhibiting an isoelectric point at pH 8.9. The silver nanoparticles, used to obtain an external layer, were 29 nm in diameter, and remained negative within the pH range 3 to 11. In order to investigate the particle deposition, mica sheets were used as a model solid substrate. The coverage of the supporting layer was adjusted by changing the bulk concentration of the hematite suspension and the deposition time. Afterward, silver nanoparticle monolayers of controlled coverage were deposited under the diffusion-controlled transport. The coverage of bilayers was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited particles from SEM micrographs and AFM images. Additionally, the formation of the hematite/silver bilayers was investigated by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ conditions. The effect of the mica substrate and the coverage of a supporting layer on the zeta potential of bilayers was systematically studied. It was established that for the coverage exceeding 0.20, the zeta potential of bilayers was independent on the substrate and the supporting layer coverage. This behavior was theoretically interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. Beside significance for basic sciences, these measurements allowed to develop a robust method of preparing nanoparticle bilayers of controlled properties, having potential applications in catalytic processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase shifting-based debris effect detection in USV-assisted AFM nanomachining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jialin [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shenyang, Liaoning 110016 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lianqingliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shenyang, Liaoning 110016 (China); Yu, Peng; Cong, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shenyang, Liaoning 110016 (China); Li, Guangyong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • The mechanism of the debris effect on machining depth in force control mode operation is analyzed. • The relationship between phase shifting and pile-up of debris is investigated. • The phase shifting-based method is hardly affected by the pile-up of debris. • Debris effect detection by phase shifting-based method is achived. - Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) mechanical-based lithography attracts much attention in nanomanufacturing due to its advantages of low cost, high precision and high resolution. However, debris effects during mechanical lithography often lead to an unstable machining process and inaccurate results, which limits further applications of AFM-based lithography. There is a lack of a real-time debris detection approach, which is the prerequisite to eventually eliminating the influence of the debris, and of a method that can solve the above problems well. The ultrasonic vibration (USV)-assisted AFM has the ability to sense the machining depth in real time by detecting the phase shifting of cantilever. However, whether the pile-up of debris affect the phase response of cantilever is still lack of investigation. Therefore, we analyzed the mechanism of the debris effect on force control mode and investigated the relationship between phase shifting and pile-up of debris. Theoretical analysis and experimental results reveal that the pile-up of debris have negligible effect on phase shifting of cantilever. Therefore, the phase shifting-based method can detect the debris effect on machining depth in force control mode of AFM machining.

  11. Application of heavy-ion microbeam system at Kyoto University: Energy response for imaging plate by single ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Hirose, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    2011-01-01

    A heavy-ion microbeam system for cell irradiation has been developed using an accelerator at Kyoto University. We have successfully developed proton-, carbon-, fluorine- and silicon-beams in order to irradiate a micro-meter sized area with ion counting, especially single ion irradiation. In the heavy-ion microbeam system, an imaging plate (IP) was utilized for beam diagnostics on the irradiation. The IP is widely used for radiography studies in biology. However, there are a few studies on the low linear energy transfer (LET) by single ions, i.e., low-intensity exposure. Thus we have investigated the energy response for the IP, which can be utilized for microbeam diagnostics.

  12. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, M. D.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Mamdouh, W.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display...... a reversible elastic behaviour. Based on AFM morphology and SMFS studies, we suggest that the observed elasticity is due to a force-induced conformational transition which is reversible due to the beta-helical conformation of protofibrils, allowing a high degree of extension. The elastic properties...... of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders...

  13. Feasibility of multi-walled carbon nanotube probes in AFM anodization lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ji Sun; Bae, Sukjong; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal Hyun; Jung, Ki Young; Han, Cheolsu; Chung, Chung Choo; Lee, Haiwon

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) tips were used in atomic force microscope (AFM) anodization lithography to investigate their advantages over conventional tips. The CNT tip required a larger threshold voltage than the mother silicon tip due to the Schottky barrier at the CNT-Si interface. Current-to-voltage curves distinguished the junction property between CNTs and mother tips. The CNT-platinum tip, which is more conductive than the CNT-silicon tip, showed promising results for AFM anodization lithography. Finally, the nanostructures with high aspect ratio were fabricated using a pulsed bias voltage technique as well as the CNT tip

  14. Simultaneous heating and compression of irradiated graphite during synchrotron microtomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodey, A. J.; Mileeva, Z.; Lowe, T.; Williamson-Brown, E.; Eastwood, D. S.; Simpson, C.; Titarenko, V.; Jones, A. N.; Rau, C.; Mummery, P. M.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear graphite is used as a neutron moderator in fission power stations. To investigate the microstructural changes that occur during such use, it has been studied for the first time by X-ray microtomography with in situ heating and compression. This experiment was the first to involve simultaneous heating and mechanical loading of radioactive samples at Diamond Light Source, and represented the first study of radioactive materials at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2. Engineering methods and safety protocols were developed to ensure the safe containment of irradiated graphite as it was simultaneously compressed to 450N in a Deben 10kN Open-Frame Rig and heated to 300°C with dual focused infrared lamps. Central to safe containment was a double containment vessel which prevented escape of airborne particulates while enabling compression via a moveable ram and the transmission of infrared light to the sample. Temperature measurements were made in situ via thermocouple readout. During heating and compression, samples were simultaneously rotated and imaged with polychromatic X-rays. The resulting microtomograms are being studied via digital volume correlation to provide insights into how thermal expansion coefficients and microstructure are affected by irradiation history, load and heat. Such information will be key to improving the accuracy of graphite degradation models which inform safety margins at power stations.

  15. A comparison of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods to characterize nanoparticle size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoo, Christopher M.; Starostin, Natasha; West, Paul; Mecartney, Martha L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of conventional dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for characterizing size distributions of polystyrene nanoparticles in the size range of 20-100 nm. Average DLS values for monosize dispersed particles are slightly higher than the nominal values whereas AFM values were slightly lower than nominal values. Bimodal distributions were easily identified with AFM, but DLS results were skewed toward larger particles. AFM characterization of nanoparticles using automated analysis software provides an accurate and rapid analysis for nanoparticle characterization and has advantages over DLS for non-monodispersed solutions.

  16. Controlled AFM detachments and movement of nanoparticles: gold clusters on HOPG at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Manoj; Paolicelli, Guido; D'Addato, Sergio; Valeri, Sergio

    2012-06-22

    The effect of temperature on the onset of movement of gold nanoclusters (diameter 27 nm) deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Using the AFM with amplitude modulation (tapping mode AFM) we have stimulated and controlled the movement of individual clusters. We show how, at room temperature, controlled detachments and smooth movements can be obtained for clusters having dimensions comparable to or smaller than the tip radius. Displacement is practically visible in real time and it can be started and stopped easily by adjusting only one parameter, the tip amplitude oscillation. Analysing the energy dissipation signal at the onset of nanocluster sliding we evaluated a detachment threshold energy as a function of temperature in the range 300-413 K. We also analysed single cluster thermal induced displacement and combining this delicate procedure with AFM forced movement behaviour we conclude that detachment threshold energy is directly related to the activation energy of nanocluster diffusion and it scales linearly with temperature as expected for a single-particle thermally activated process.

  17. Detecting onset of chain scission and crosslinking of γ-ray irradiated elastomer surfaces using frictional force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S; Sinha, N K; Gayathri, N; Ponraju, D; Dash, S; Tyagi, A K; Raj, Baldev

    2007-01-01

    We report here that atomic force microscopy (AFM) in frictional force mode can be used to detect the onset of chain scission and crosslinking in polymeric and macromolecular samples upon irradiation. A systematic investigation to detect chain scission and crosslinking of two elastomers (1) ethylene-propylene-diene monomer rubber and (2) fluorocarbon rubber, upon γ-ray irradiation has been carried out using frictional force microscopy (FFM). From the AFM results we observed that both the elastomers show a systematic smoothening of its surfaces, as the γ-ray dose rate increases. However, the frictional property studied using FFM of the sample surfaces show an initial increase and then a decrease as a function of dose rate. This behaviour of increase in its frictional property has been attributed to the onset of chain scission, and the subsequent decrease in friction has been attributed to the onset of crosslinking of the polymer chains. The evaluated qualitative and semi-quantitative changes observed in the overall frictional property as a function of the γ-ray dose rate for the two elastomers are presented in this paper

  18. Detecting onset of chain scission and crosslinking of {gamma}-ray irradiated elastomer surfaces using frictional force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, S [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 TN (India); Sinha, N K [Innovative Design Engineering and Synthesis Section, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 TN (India); Gayathri, N [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 TN (India); Ponraju, D [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 TN (India); Dash, S [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 TN (India); Tyagi, A K [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 TN (India); Raj, Baldev [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 TN (India)

    2007-02-07

    We report here that atomic force microscopy (AFM) in frictional force mode can be used to detect the onset of chain scission and crosslinking in polymeric and macromolecular samples upon irradiation. A systematic investigation to detect chain scission and crosslinking of two elastomers (1) ethylene-propylene-diene monomer rubber and (2) fluorocarbon rubber, upon {gamma}-ray irradiation has been carried out using frictional force microscopy (FFM). From the AFM results we observed that both the elastomers show a systematic smoothening of its surfaces, as the {gamma}-ray dose rate increases. However, the frictional property studied using FFM of the sample surfaces show an initial increase and then a decrease as a function of dose rate. This behaviour of increase in its frictional property has been attributed to the onset of chain scission, and the subsequent decrease in friction has been attributed to the onset of crosslinking of the polymer chains. The evaluated qualitative and semi-quantitative changes observed in the overall frictional property as a function of the {gamma}-ray dose rate for the two elastomers are presented in this paper.

  19. Gallotannin-Capped Gold Nanoparticles: Green Synthesis and Enhanced Morphology of AFM Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehyung; Yhim, Won Been; Park, Jong-Won; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Tae Yoon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jang, Hong-Lae; Cho, Miyeon; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by a green method using a plant secondary metabolite, gallotannin. Gallotannin was used as a reducing and capping agent to convert gold ions into AuNPs for the generation of gallotannin-capped AuNPs (GT-AuNPs). This synthetic route is ecofriendly and eliminates the use of toxic chemical reducing agents. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance of the GT-AuNPs was observed at 536 nm in the UV-visible spectra. The face-centered cubic structure of GT-AuNPs was verified by X-ray diffraction analysis. The majority of the GT-AuNPs had a spherical shape with an average diameter of 15.93 ± 8.60 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested that the hydroxyl functional groups of gallotannin were involved in the synthesis of GT-AuNPs. The size and shape of nanoparticles can have a crucial impact on their biological, mechanical, and structural properties. Herein, we developed a modified anisotropic diffusion equation to selectively remove nanoscale experimental noise while preserving nanoscale intrinsic geometry information. To demonstrate the performance of the developed method, the ridge and valley lines were plotted by utilizing the principle curvatures. Compared to the original anisotropic diffusion and raw atomic force microscopy (AFM) experimental data, the developed modified anisotropic diffusion shows excellent performance in nanoscale noise removal while preserving the intrinsic aeometry of the nanoparticles.

  20. A Study of Moisture Damage in Plastomeric Polymer Modified Asphalt Binder Using Functionalized AFM Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiqul Tarefder

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, moisture damage in plastomeric polymer modified asphalt binder is investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM with chemically functionalized AFM tips. Four different percentages of plastomeric polymers and two antistripping agents such as Kling Beta and Lime are used to modify a base asphalt binder. Chemical functional groups such as -COOH, -CH3, -NH3, and –OH, that are commonly present in plastomeric polymer modified asphalt system, are used to functionalize the AFM tips. The force distance mode of AFM is used to measure the adhesion forces between a modified asphalt sample surface and the functionalized AFM tips. This enables the measurement of adhesion within an asphalt binder system. It is shown that the adhesion force values in dry sample changed substantially from that in wet conditioned samples. It is evident from this study that plastomeric modification does not help reduce moisture damage in asphalt. The percentage change in adhesion forces due to moisture is about 20 nN for the lime modified samples, and about 50 nN for the Kling Beta modified samples. This indicates that lime is more effective than Kling Beta for reducing moisture damage in plastomeric polymer modified asphalt.

  1. First MR images obtained during megavoltage photon irradiation from a prototype integrated linac-MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallone, B. G.; Murray, B.; Rathee, S.; Stanescu, T.; Steciw, S.; Vidakovic, S.; Blosser, E.; Tymofichuk, D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the first magnetic resonance (MR) images produced by their prototype MR system integrated with a radiation therapy source. The prototype consists of a 6 MV linac mounted onto the open end of a biplanar 0.2 T permanent MR system which has 27.9 cm pole-to-pole opening with flat gradients (40 mT/m) running under a TMX NRC console. The distance from the magnet isocenter to the linac target is 80 cm. The authors' design has resolved the mutual interferences between the two devices such that the MR magnetic field does not interfere with the trajectory of the electron in the linac waveguide, and the radiofrequency (RF) signals from each system do not interfere with the operation of the other system. Magnetic and RF shielding calculations were performed and confirmed with appropriate measurements. The prototype is currently on a fixed gantry; however, in the very near future, the linac and MR magnet will rotate in unison such that the linac is always aimed through the opening in the biplanar magnet. MR imaging was found to be fully operational during linac irradiation and proven by imaging a phantom with conventional gradient echo sequences. Except for small changes in SNR, MR images produced during irradiation were visually and quantitatively very similar to those taken with the linac turned off. This prototype system provides proof of concept that the design has decreased the mutual interferences sufficiently to allow the development of real-time MR-guided radiotherapy. Low field-strength systems (0.2-0.5 T) have been used clinically as diagnostic tools. The task of the linac-MR system is, however, to provide MR guidance to the radiotherapy beam. Therefore, the 0.2 T field strength would provide adequate image quality for this purpose and, with the addition of fast imaging techniques, has the potential to provide 4D soft-tissue visualization not presently available in image-guided radiotherapy systems. The authors' initial design incorporates a

  2. Thermal annealing response following irradiation of a CMOS imager for the JUICE JANUS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthouse-Smith, D.-D.; Soman, M. R.; Allanwood, E. A. H.; Stefanov, K. D.; Holland, A. D.; Leese, M.; Turne, P.

    2018-03-01

    ESA's JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) spacecraft is an L-class mission destined for the Jovian system in 2030. Its primary goals are to investigate the conditions for planetary formation and the emergence of life, and how does the solar system work. The JANUS camera, an instrument on JUICE, uses a 4T back illuminated CMOS image sensor, the CIS115 designed by Teledyne e2v. JANUS imager test campaigns are studying the CIS115 following exposure to gammas, protons, electrons and heavy ions, simulating the harsh radiation environment present in the Jovian system. The degradation of 4T CMOS device performance following proton fluences is being studied, as well as the effectiveness of thermal annealing to reverse radiation damage. One key parameter for the JANUS mission is the Dark current of the CIS115, which has been shown to degrade in previous radiation campaigns. A thermal anneal of the CIS115 has been used to accelerate any annealing following the irradiation as well as to study the evolution of any performance characteristics. CIS115s have been irradiated to double the expected End of Life (EOL) levels for displacement damage radiation (2×1010 protons, 10 MeV equivalent). Following this, devices have undergone a thermal anneal cycle at 100oC for 168 hours to reveal the extent to which CIS115 recovers pre-irradiation performance. Dark current activation energy analysis following proton fluence gives information on trap species present in the device and how effective anneal is at removing these trap species. Thermal anneal shows no quantifiable change in the activation energy of the dark current following irradiation.

  3. Compaction of PDMS due to proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilasi, S.Z.; Huszank, R.; Rajta, I.; Kokavecz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. This work is about the detailed investigation of the changes of the surface topography, the degree of compaction/shrinkage and its relation to the irradiation fluence and the structure spacing in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patterned with 2 MeV proton microbeam. Sylgard 184 kit (Dow-Corning) was used to create the PDMS samples. The density of the PDMS samples was determined with pycnometer. The penetration depth for 2 MeV protons is ∼85 μm, the PDMS layer was ∼95 μm thick, so the incident protons stop in the PDMS, they do not reach the substrate. The irradiations have been performed at the nuclear microprobe facility at ATOMKI. The irradiated periodic structures consisted of parallel lines with different widths and spacing. To achieve different degrees of compaction, each structure was irradiated with five different fluences. The surface topography, the phase modification of the surface, and the connection between them were revealed using an atomic force microscope (AFM PSIA XE 100). The shrinkage data were obtained from the topography images. The structures with different line widths and spacing show different degrees of compaction as a function of irradiation fluence. By plotting them in the same graph (Fig. 1) it is clearly seen that the degree of compaction depends on both the irradiation fluence and the distance of the structures. The fluence dependence of the compaction can be explained with the chemical changes of PDMS. When an energetic ion penetrates through the material it scissions the polymer chain, whereupon among other things volatile products form. In the case of PDMS, these are mainly hydrogen, methane and ethane gases that can be released from PDMS. The irradiated volume shrinks due to significant structural change during which silicate derivatives (SiO x ) are formed. The phase change and the corresponding surface topography was compared and studied at all applied irradiation fluences. It was concluded

  4. A new image correction method for live cell atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Y; Sun, J L; Zhang, A; Hu, J; Xu, L X [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2007-04-21

    During live cell imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM), the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane yield distorted cell images. In this work, an image correction method was developed based on the force-distance curve and the modified Hertzian model. The normal loading and lateral forces exerted on the cell membrane by the AFM tip were both accounted for during the scanning. Two assumptions were made in modelling based on the experimental measurements: (1) the lateral force on the endothelial cells was linear to the height; (2) the cell membrane Young's modulus could be derived from the displacement measurement of a normal force curve. Results have shown that the model could be used to recover up to 30% of the actual cell height depending on the loading force. The accuracy of the model was also investigated with respect to the loading force and mechanical property of the cell membrane.

  5. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, A.H.; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM

  6. Synthesis of Specific Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging Tumor Angiogenesis Using Electron-Beam Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizza, G.; Deshayes, S.; Maurizot, V.; Clochard, M. -C.; Berthelot, T.; Baudin, C.; Déléris, G., E-mail: giancarlo.rizza@polytechnique.edu [Commissariat à l' énergie atomique (CEA), Institut Rayonnement Matière de Saclay (IRaMIS), B.P. 52, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    We have succeeded to synthesize PVDF nanoparticles by nanoemulsion polymerization and their functionalization with a peptide that presents an anti-angiogenic activity. Resulted nanoparticles present a radius of 60 nm. From FESEM images and light scattering measurements, we deduced that they were spherical and monodisperse. The alkyl radicals induced from electron beam irradiation combine immediately with the oxygen to form peroxide radicals. Because of a high specific area and small crystallite size, the radical decay with time is evidenced from EPR measurements. Despite this radical decay, electron beam irradiation allows us to graft PAA by radical polymerization onto freshly irradiated PVDF nanoparticles and then to immobilize CBO-P11 by click chemistry via a spacer arm. Evidences of grafting were shown using HRMAS NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Nanoparticles functionalized with an angiogenesis-targeting agent are an attractive option for anti-tumor therapy.

  7. Synthesis of Specific Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging Tumor Angiogenesis Using Electron-Beam Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizza, G.; Deshayes, S.; Maurizot, V.; Clochard, M.-C.; Berthelot, T.; Baudin, C.; Déléris, G.

    2010-01-01

    We have succeeded to synthesize PVDF nanoparticles by nanoemulsion polymerization and their functionalization with a peptide that presents an anti-angiogenic activity. Resulted nanoparticles present a radius of 60 nm. From FESEM images and light scattering measurements, we deduced that they were spherical and monodisperse. The alkyl radicals induced from electron beam irradiation combine immediately with the oxygen to form peroxide radicals. Because of a high specific area and small crystallite size, the radical decay with time is evidenced from EPR measurements. Despite this radical decay, electron beam irradiation allows us to graft PAA by radical polymerization onto freshly irradiated PVDF nanoparticles and then to immobilize CBO-P11 by click chemistry via a spacer arm. Evidences of grafting were shown using HRMAS NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Nanoparticles functionalized with an angiogenesis-targeting agent are an attractive option for anti-tumor therapy

  8. Polymer nanocomposite of laponite RD prepared by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Maria J.A.; Silva, Estefania O.; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo; Parra, Duclerc Fernandes, E-mail: mariajhho@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amato, Valdir S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Divisao de Doencas Infecciosas e Parasitarias

    2012-07-01

    Nanocomposite hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVAl) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) containing 0-5 wt % of the synthetic laponite RD clay were prepared by gamma irradiation process. The morphology of the nanocomposite hydrogel was observed by characterizations techniques using: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The structural properties crosslinking was determined by measuring the crosslink gel content extraction on mesh 500 sizes and swelling kinetics at 22 °C. The results showed that crosslinks have inverse dependence on the clay level in the nanocomposite hydrogels, while swelling shows direct dependence. (author)

  9. Polymer nanocomposite of laponite RD prepared by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Maria J.A.; Silva, Estefania O.; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo; Parra, Duclerc Fernandes; Amato, Valdir S.

    2012-01-01

    Nanocomposite hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVAl) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) containing 0-5 wt % of the synthetic laponite RD clay were prepared by gamma irradiation process. The morphology of the nanocomposite hydrogel was observed by characterizations techniques using: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The structural properties crosslinking was determined by measuring the crosslink gel content extraction on mesh 500 sizes and swelling kinetics at 22 °C. The results showed that crosslinks have inverse dependence on the clay level in the nanocomposite hydrogels, while swelling shows direct dependence. (author)

  10. Atomic force microscopy for cellular level manipulation: imaging intracellular structures and DNA delivery through a membrane hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rehana; Zohora, Umme Salma; Uehara, Hironori; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Ikai, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a versatile tool for imaging, force measurement and manipulation of proteins, DNA, and living cells basically at the single molecular level. In the cellular level manipulation, extraction, and identification of mRNA's from defined loci of a cell, insertion of plasmid DNA and pulling of membrane proteins, for example, have been reported. In this study, AFM was used to create holes at defined loci on the cell membrane for the investigation of viability of the cells after hole creation, visualization of intracellular structure through the hole and for targeted gene delivery into living cells. To create large holes with an approximate diameter of 5-10 microm, a phospholipase A(2) coated bead was added to the AFM cantilever and the bead was allowed to touch the cell surface for approximately 5-10 min. The evidence of hole creation was obtained mainly from fluorescent image of Vybrant DiO labeled cell before and after the contact with the bead and the AFM imaging of the contact area. In parallel, cells with a hole were imaged by AFM to reveal intracellular structures such as filamentous structures presumably actin fibers and mitochondria which were identified with fluorescent labeling with rhodamine 123. Targeted gene delivery was also attempted by inserting an AFM probe that was coated with the Monster Green Fluorescent Protein phMGFP Vector for transfection of the cell. Following targeted transfection, the gene expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was observed and confirmed by the fluorescence microscope. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Metrological AFMs and its application for versatile nano-dimensional metrology tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Dziomba, T.; Pohlenz, F.; Danzebrink, H.-U.; Koenders, L.

    2010-08-01

    Traceable calibrations of various micro and nano measurement devices are crucial tasks for ensuring reliable measurements for micro and nanotechnology. Today metrological AFM are widely used for traceable calibrations of nano dimensional standards. In this paper, we introduced the developments of metrological force microscopes at PTB. Of the three metrological AFMs described here, one is capable of measuring in a volume of 25 mm x 25 mm x 5 mm. All instruments feature interferometers and the three-dimensional position measurements are thus directly traceable to the metre definition. Some calibration examples on, for instance, flatness standards, step height standards, one and two dimensional gratings are demonstrated.

  12. Energy-separated sequential irradiation for ripple pattern tailoring on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Tanuj [Department of Physics, Central University of Haryana, Jant-Pali, Mahendergarh 1123029 (India); Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kumar, Manish, E-mail: manishbharadwaj@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Central University of Rajasthan, Kishangarh 305801 (India); Panchal, Vandana [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Sahoo, P.K. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • A new process for controlling the near-surface amorphization of ripples on Si surfaces. • Ripples generation by 100 KeV Ar{sup +} and amorphization control by 60 KeV Ar{sup +} irradiation. • Advantage of energy-separated irradiation demonstrated by detailed RBS and AFM studies. • Relevant mechanism is presented on the basis of DAMAGE and SIMNRA simulations. • Key role of solid flow towards the amorphous/crystalline interface is demonstrated. - Abstract: Nanoscale ripples on semiconductor surfaces have potential application in biosensing and optoelectronics, but suffer from uncontrolled surface-amorphization when prepared by conventional ion-irradiation methods. A two-step, energy-separated sequential-irradiation enables simultaneous control of surface-amorphization and ripple-dimensions on Si(1 0 0). The evolution of ripples using 100 keV Ar{sup +} bombardment and further tuning of the patterns using a sequential-irradiation by 60 keV Ar{sup +} at different fluences are demonstrated. The advantage of this approach as opposed to increased fluence at the same energy is clarified by atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy investigations. The explanation of our findings is presented through DAMAGE simulation.

  13. Corrosion behaviour of Ni in aprotic solvents an electrochemical, XPS and AFM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellucci, F.; Monetta, T.; Capobianco, G.; Deganello, A.; Glisenti, A.; Moretti, G.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) techniques have been used to study the passivation of nickel in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 DMF and ACN solutions with different water content. Electrochemical results indicate the anodic formation of a thin, poor protective layer and the possibility of salt precipitation onto the metallic surface. ARXPS results indicate that while in the anodic film formed in DMF, Ni(OH) 2 constitute the superficial component under which a discontinuous layer of NiO and NiSO 4 is present. Ni(OH) 2 and NiSO 4 are the more superficial constituents in the passivation layer formed in ACN, while NiO becomes prevalent in the underlying layers. AFM images show that in both the solvents the sample surface is very dishomogeneous with flakes and fractures. (orig.)

  14. Effect of Irradiation Parameters on Morphology of Polishing DF2 (AISI-O1 Surface by Nd:YAG Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse Nd:YAG laser was used to polish DF2 cold work steel. Influence of irradiation parameters on the 3D surface morphology was studied by 3D profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscope (AFM. Results among the tests showed when DF2 specimens were irradiated with parameters of (i laser input energy P=1 J, (ii pulse feedrate=300 mm/min, (iii pulse duration (PD =3 milliseconds, and (iv pulse frequency f=20∼25 Hz, laser polishing of DF2 cold work steel seemed to be successful.

  15. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (small dark spots in the light microscope, that we believed to be the regions in the cell plasma where viruses are assembled; this is known from the literature on electron microscopy on pox-infected cells and referred to there as "virus factories" (e.g., Moss, B. 1986. Replication of pox viruses. In Fundamental Virology, B. N. Fields and D. M. Knape, editors. Raven Press, New York. 637-655). Therefore, we assume that the cells stay alive during imaging, in our experience for approximately 30-45 h p.i.).

  16. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; De Marco, Carmela; Turri, Stefano; Zandrini, Tommaso; Osellame, Roberto; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample–tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips. (paper)

  17. Dewetting of nickel oxide-films on silicon under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolse, Thunu; Elsanousi, Ammar; Paulus, Hartmut; Bolse, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Dewetting, occurring when a thin film on a non-wettable substrate turns into its liquid state, has gained strong interest during the last decade, since it results in nano-scale, large-area covering pattern formation. Recently we found that swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of thin NiO films on Si substrates at 80 K results in similar dewetting pattern, although in this case the coating has never reached its melting point. Careful inspection of the SEM images clearly revealed that the same nucleation mechanisms as observed for molten polymer films on Si (heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation) were active. AFM shows that the circular holes formed in the early stages of the dewetting process exhibit a high and asymmetric rim-structure. RBS analysis was used to measure the coverage of the surface by the oxide films and revealed that the holes grow at constant velocity. This, and the shape of the rims, indicate that the material removed from the substrate surface piles up by plastic deformation, which points at a balance of the capillary driving forces and the hindered material dissipation

  18. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  19. Atomic force microscopy-based antibody recognition imaging of proteins in the pathological deposits in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creasey, Rhiannon [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Sharma, Shiwani [School of Medicine, Ophthalmology, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Gibson, Christopher T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Craig, Jamie E. [School of Medicine, Ophthalmology, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ebner, Andreas [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Becker, Thomas [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, 6845 WA (Australia); Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Voelcker, Nicolas H., E-mail: nico.voelcker@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    The phenomenon of protein aggregation is of considerable interest to various disciplines, including the field of medicine. A range of disease pathologies are associated with this phenomenon. One of the ocular diseases hallmarked by protein aggregation is the Pseudoexfoliation (PEX) Syndrome. This condition is characterized by the deposition of insoluble proteinaceous material on the anterior human lens capsule. Genomic and proteomic analyses have revealed an association of specific genetic markers and various proteins, respectively, with PEX syndrome. However, the ultrastructure of the protein aggregates is poorly characterized. This study seeks to build capacity to determine the molecular nature of PEX aggregates on human lens capsules in their native state by AFM-based antibody recognition imaging. Lysyl oxidase-Like 1 (LOXL1), a protein identified as a component of PEX aggregates, is detected by an antibody-modified AFM probe. Topographical AFM images and antibody recognition images are obtained using three AFM-based techniques: TREC, phase and force-volume imaging. LOXL1 is found to be present on the lens capsule surface, and is localized around fibrous protein aggregates. Our evaluation shows that TREC imaging is best suited for human tissue imaging and holds significant potential for imaging of human disease tissues in their native state. -- Highlights: {yields} Atomic force microscopy techniques were applied to diseased human tissues. {yields} LOXL1 protein was detected on the small fibers of Pseudoexfoliation deposits. {yields} PicoTREC was the optimum technique for investigating protein aggregates.

  20. Ultra-high aspect ratio replaceable AFM tips using deformation-suppressed focused ion beam milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savenko, Alexey; Yildiz, Izzet; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter; Bartenwerfer, Malte; Krohs, Florian; Oliva, Maria; Harzendorf, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio exchangeable and customizable tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) using lateral focused ion beam (FIB) milling is presented. While on-axis FIB milling does allow high aspect ratio (HAR) AFM tips to be defined, lateral milling gives far better flexibility in terms of defining the shape and size of the tip. Due to beam-induced deformation, it has so far not been possible to define HAR structures using lateral FIB milling. In this work we obtain aspect ratios of up to 45, with tip diameters down to 9 nm, by a deformation-suppressing writing strategy. Several FIB milling strategies for obtaining sharper tips are discussed. Finally, assembly of the HAR tips on a custom-designed probe as well as the first AFM scanning is shown. (paper)

  1. High-stress study of bioinspired multifunctional PEDOT:PSS/nanoclay nanocomposites using AFM, SEM and numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J. Diaz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioinspired design has been central in the development of hierarchical nanocomposites. Particularly, the nacre-mimetic brick-and-mortar structure has shown excellent mechanical properties, as well as gas-barrier properties and optical transparency. Along with these intrinsic properties, the layered structure has also been utilized in sensing devices. Here we extend the multifunctionality of nacre-mimetics by designing an optically transparent and electron conductive coating based on PEDOT:PSS and nanoclays Laponite RD and Cloisite Na+. We carry out extensive characterization of the nanocomposite using transmittance spectra (transparency, conductive atomic force microscopy (conductivity, contact-resonance force microscopy (mechanical properties, and SEM combined with a variety of stress-strain AFM experiments and AFM numerical simulations (internal structure. We further study the nanoclay’s response to the application of pressure with multifrequency AFM and conductive AFM, whereby increases and decreases in conductivity can occur for the Laponite RD composites. We offer a possible mechanism to explain the changes in conductivity by modeling the coating as a 1-dimensional multibarrier potential for electron transport, and show that conductivity can change when the separation between the barriers changes under the application of pressure, and that the direction of the change depends on the energy of the electrons. We did not observe changes in conductivity under the application of pressure with AFM for the Cloisite Na+ nanocomposite, which has a large platelet size compared with the AFM probe diameter. No pressure-induced changes in conductivity were observed in the clay-free polymer either.

  2. Direct AFM observation of an opening event of a DNA cuboid constructed via a prism structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2011-04-07

    A cuboid structure was constructed using a DNA origami design based on a square prism structure. The structure was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering. The real-time opening event of the cuboid was directly observed by high-speed AFM.

  3. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application.

  4. Surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres: An AFM-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Jun; D’Haese, Cécile; Nysten, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface electrical conductivity of stainless steel fibre is measured and mapped by CS-AFM. • Surface potential of stainless steel fibre is measured and mapped by KPFM. • Surface electronic properties are governed by the chromium oxide passivation layer. • Electron tunnelling through the passivation layer is the dominant mechanisms for conduction. - Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) electrical modes were used to study the surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres. The surface electrical conductivity was studied by current sensing AFM and I–V spectroscopy. Kelvin probe force microscopy was used to measure the surface contact potential. The oxide film, known as passivation layer, covering the fibre surface gives rise to the observation of an apparently semiconducting behaviour. The passivation layer generally exhibits a p-type semiconducting behaviour, which is attributed to the predominant formation of chromium oxide on the surface of the stainless steel fibres. At the nanoscale, different behaviours are observed from points to points, which may be attributed to local variations of the chemical composition and/or thickness of the passivation layer. I–V curves are well fitted with an electron tunnelling model, indicating that electron tunnelling may be the predominant mechanism for electron transport

  5. The influence of image sensor irradiation damage on the tracking and pointing accuracy of optical communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoliang; Luo, Lei; Li, Pengwei; Yu, Qingkui

    2018-03-01

    The image sensor in satellite optical communication system may generate noise due to space irradiation damage, leading to deviation for the determination of the light spot centroid. Based on the irradiation test data of CMOS devices, simulated defect spots in different sizes have been used for calculating the centroid deviation value by grey-level centroid algorithm. The impact on tracking & pointing accuracy of the system has been analyzed. The results show that both the amount and the position of irradiation-induced defect pixels contribute to spot centroid deviation. And the larger spot has less deviation. At last, considering the space radiation damage, suggestions are made for the constraints of spot size selection.

  6. Influence of gamma irradiation on polymerization of pyrrole and glucose oxidase immobilization onto poly (pyrrole)/poly (vinyl alcohol) matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idris, Sarada, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Department of Radiation Technology, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600 (Malaysia); Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif A., E-mail: ashrif@ukm.edu.my [Department of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600 (Malaysia); Thevy Ratnam, Chantara [Department of Radiation Technology, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Kamaruddin, Nur Hasiba [Department of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600 (Malaysia); Shaari, Sahbudin [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600 (Malaysia)

    2017-04-01

    Graphical abstract: The illustration of pyrrole polymerization, PVA crosslinking and immobilization of GOx onto polymer matrix. - Highlights: • Immobilization of glucose oxidase onto polymer matrices by gamma irradiation is proposed. • Crosslinking and grafting of polymers implies the immobilization reaction. • The mechanisms relies on gamma irradiation doses. • A simple single step process of polymerization, cross linking and immobilization by mean of gamma irradiation as was shown in Graphical abstract. - Abstract: This paper describes the immobilization of glucose oxidase, GOx onto polymer matrix comprising of poly(pyrrole), PPy and poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA using gamma irradiation technique. Py/PVA-GOx film was prepared by spreading PVA:GOx, 1:1 solution onto dried pyrrole film and exposed to gamma irradiation from cobalt 60 source at doses ranging from 0 to 60 kGy. The films were subjected to structural and morphological analyses by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Atomic-force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Similar studies were also made on pristine pyrrole film which served as control. The SEM and FTIR spectra of Py/PVA-GOx film revealed that pyrrole has been successfully polymerized through irradiation-induced reactions. The results on the morphological properties of the samples characterize using FESEM, SEM and AFM further confirmed the occurrence of radiation-induced modification of Py/PVA-GOx film. The FTIR spectra showed the existence of intermolecular interaction between polymer matrix and GOx indicating that GOx had been successfully immobilized onto Ppy/PVA matrix by radiation-induced reactions. Results revealed that radiation induced reactions such as polymerization of pyrrole, crosslinking of PVA, grafting between the adjacent PVA and pyrrole molecules as well as immobilization of GOx onto Ppy

  7. Influence of gamma irradiation on polymerization of pyrrole and glucose oxidase immobilization onto poly (pyrrole)/poly (vinyl alcohol) matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris, Sarada; Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif A.; Thevy Ratnam, Chantara; Kamaruddin, Nur Hasiba; Shaari, Sahbudin

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The illustration of pyrrole polymerization, PVA crosslinking and immobilization of GOx onto polymer matrix. - Highlights: • Immobilization of glucose oxidase onto polymer matrices by gamma irradiation is proposed. • Crosslinking and grafting of polymers implies the immobilization reaction. • The mechanisms relies on gamma irradiation doses. • A simple single step process of polymerization, cross linking and immobilization by mean of gamma irradiation as was shown in Graphical abstract. - Abstract: This paper describes the immobilization of glucose oxidase, GOx onto polymer matrix comprising of poly(pyrrole), PPy and poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA using gamma irradiation technique. Py/PVA-GOx film was prepared by spreading PVA:GOx, 1:1 solution onto dried pyrrole film and exposed to gamma irradiation from cobalt 60 source at doses ranging from 0 to 60 kGy. The films were subjected to structural and morphological analyses by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Atomic-force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Similar studies were also made on pristine pyrrole film which served as control. The SEM and FTIR spectra of Py/PVA-GOx film revealed that pyrrole has been successfully polymerized through irradiation-induced reactions. The results on the morphological properties of the samples characterize using FESEM, SEM and AFM further confirmed the occurrence of radiation-induced modification of Py/PVA-GOx film. The FTIR spectra showed the existence of intermolecular interaction between polymer matrix and GOx indicating that GOx had been successfully immobilized onto Ppy/PVA matrix by radiation-induced reactions. Results revealed that radiation induced reactions such as polymerization of pyrrole, crosslinking of PVA, grafting between the adjacent PVA and pyrrole molecules as well as immobilization of GOx onto Ppy

  8. Force microscopy on insulators: imaging of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, O; Gnecco, E; Zimmerli, L; Maier, S; Meyer, E; Nony, L; Bennewitz, R; Diederich, F; Fang, H; Bonifazi, D

    2005-01-01

    So far, most of the high resolution scanning probe microscopy studies of organic molecules were restricted to metallic substrates. Insulating substrates are mandatory when the molecules need to be electrically decoupled in a electronic circuit. In such a case, atomic force microscopy is required. In this paper we will discuss our recent studies on different organic molecules deposited on KBr surfaces in ultra-high vacuum, and then imaged by AFM at room temperature. The distance between tip and surface was controlled either by the frequency-shift of the cantilever resonance or by the excitation signal required to keep the oscillation amplitude constant. Advantages and drawbacks of both techniques are discussed. The high mobility of the molecules, due to their weak interaction with the substrate, hinders the formation of regular self assembled structures. To overcome this problem we created artificial structures on the surface by annealing and by electron irradiation, which made possible the growth of the molecules onto step edges and their confinement into rectangular pits

  9. Accurate Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation of the Normal Spring Constant of Various AFM Cantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke’s law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals for neurotransmitter imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Neurotransmitter imaging with radiopharmaceuticals plays major role for understanding of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and depression. Radiopharmaceuticals for neurotransmitter imaging can be divided to dopamine transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals and serotonin transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals. Many kinds of new dopamine transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals has a tropane ring and they showed different biological properties according to the substituted functional group on tropane ring. After the first clinical trials with [{sup 123}I] {beta} -CIT, alkyl chain substituent introduced to tropane ring amine to decrease time for imaging acquisition and to increase selectivity. From these results, [{sup 123}I]PE2I, [18F]FE-CNT, [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and [{sup 18}F]FP-CIT were developed and they showed high uptake on the dopamine transporter rich regions and fast peak uptake equilibrium time within 4 hours after injection. [{sup 11}C]McN 5652 was developed for serotonin transporter imaging but this compound showed slow kinetics and high background radioactivity. To overcome these problems, new diarylsulfide backbone derivatives such as ADAM, ODAM, AFM, and DASB were developed. In these candidates, [{sup 11}C]AFM and [{sup 11}C]DASB showed high binding affinity to serotonin transporter and fast in vivo kinetics. This paper gives an overview of current status on dopamine and serotonin transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals and the development of new lead compounds as potential radiopharmaceuticals by medicinal chemistry.

  11. Surface ripple evolution by argon ion irradiation in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Meetika; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu

    2016-01-01

    In this report, an attempt has been made to investigate the morphological evolution of nanoscale surface ripples on aliphatic (polypropylene, PP) and aromatic (polyethylene terephthalate, PET) polymeric substrates irradiated with 50 keV Ar"+ ions. The specimens were sputtered at off normal incidence of 30° with 5 × 10"1"6 Ar"+ cm"−"2. The topographical features and structural behavior of the specimens were studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and UV-Visible spectroscopy techniques, respectively. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter simulations were performed to calculate sputtering yield of irradiated PP and PET polymers. Sputtering yield of carbon atoms has been found to be smaller for PP (0.40) as compared to PET (0.73), which is attributed to the different structures of two polymers. AFM analysis demonstrates the evolution of ripple like features with amplitude (2.50 nm) and wavelength (690 nm) on PET while that of lower amplitude (1.50 nm) and higher wavelength (980 nm) on PP specimen. The disorder parameter (Urbach energy) has been found to increase significantly from 0.30 eV to 1.67 eV in case of PP as compared to a lesser increase from 0.35 eV to 0.72 eV in case of PET as revealed by UV-Visible characterization. A mutual correlation between ion beam sputtering induced topographical variations with that of enhancement in the disorder parameter of the specimens has been discussed.

  12. Early evaluation of irradiated parotid glands with intravoxel incoherent motion MR imaging: correlation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Nan; Chu, Chen; Dou, Xin; Li, Ming; Liu, Song; Zhu, Lijing; Liu, Baorui; Guo, Tingting; Chen, Weibo; He, Jian; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced parotid damage is one of the most common complications in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been reported for evaluating irradiated parotid damage. However, the changes of IVIM perfusion-related parameters in irradiated parotid glands have not been confirmed by conventional perfusion measurements obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. The purposes of this study were to monitor radiation-induced parotid damage using IVIM and DCE MR imaging and to investigate the correlations between changes of these MR parameters. Eighteen NPC patients underwent bilateral parotid T1-weighted, IVIM and DCE MR imaging pre-RT (2 weeks before RT) and post-RT (4 weeks after RT). Parotid volume; IVIM MR parameters, including apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), pure diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (f); and DCE MR parameters, including maximum relative enhancement (MRE), time to peak (TTP), Wash in Rate, and the degree of xerostomia were recorded. Correlations of parotid MR parameters with mean radiation dose, atrophy rate and xerostomia degree, as well as the relationships between IVIM and DCE MR parameters, were investigated. From pre-RT to post-RT, all of the IVIM and DCE MR parameters increased significantly (p < 0.001 for ADC, D, f, MRE, Wash in Rate; p = 0.024 for D*; p = 0.037 for TTP). Change rates of ADC, f and MRE were negatively correlated with atrophy rate significantly (all p < 0.05). Significant correlations were observed between the change rates of D* and MRE (r = 0.371, p = 0.026) and between the change rates of D* and TTP (r = 0.396, p = 0.017). The intra- and interobserver reproducibility of IVIM and DCE MR parameters was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.633–0.983). Early radiation-induced changes of parotid glands could be evaluated by IVIM and

  13. Local control and image diagnosis of cases of esophageal carcinoma treated by external and intracavitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshio; Miura, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Discussions are made on local control of 31 cases of esophageal carcinoma which were treated by external and intracavitary irradiation between May 1980 and March 1983. X-ray and endoscopic findings have been used for the image diagnosis. Before the begining of radiotherapy, types of esophageal carcinoma were determined from X-ray findings according to Borrmann's classification. There were 10 cases of types 1 and 2, and 21 cases of types 3 and 4. After completion of external and intracvitary irradiation, all 10 cases of types 1 and 2 were locally controlled. Of the 21 cases of types 3 and 4, 8 cases which developed stenosis or deep ulcer after external irradiation all failed in local control. The remaining 13 cases of types 3 and 4 were locally controlled except 2 by radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Chung-Hsing [Division of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chang-Hsiang [Department of Dentistry, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China); Li, Hsi-Hsin, E-mail: mhho@mail.ntust.edu.t [Deputy Superintendent, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  15. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Li, Chung-Hsing; Hung, Chang-Hsiang; Li, Hsi-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  16. Influence of gamma irradiation on polymerization of pyrrole and glucose oxidase immobilization onto poly (pyrrole)/poly (vinyl alcohol) matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Sarada; A. Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif; Thevy Ratnam, Chantara; Kamaruddin, Nur Hasiba; Shaari, Sahbudin

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the immobilization of glucose oxidase, GOx onto polymer matrix comprising of poly(pyrrole), PPy and poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA using gamma irradiation technique. Py/PVA-GOx film was prepared by spreading PVA:GOx, 1:1 solution onto dried pyrrole film and exposed to gamma irradiation from cobalt 60 source at doses ranging from 0 to 60 kGy. The films were subjected to structural and morphological analyses by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Atomic-force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Similar studies were also made on pristine pyrrole film which served as control. The SEM and FTIR spectra of Py/PVA-GOx film revealed that pyrrole has been successfully polymerized through irradiation-induced reactions. The results on the morphological properties of the samples characterize using FESEM, SEM and AFM further confirmed the occurrence of radiation-induced modification of Py/PVA-GOx film. The FTIR spectra showed the existence of intermolecular interaction between polymer matrix and GOx indicating that GOx had been successfully immobilized onto Ppy/PVA matrix by radiation-induced reactions. Results revealed that radiation induced reactions such as polymerization of pyrrole, crosslinking of PVA, grafting between the adjacent PVA and pyrrole molecules as well as immobilization of GOx onto Ppy/PVA matrix occurred simultaneously upon gamma irradiation. The optimum dose for GOx immobilization in the polymer matrix found to be 40 kGy. Therefore it is clear that this irradiation technique offered a simple single process to produce Py/PVA-GOx film without additional crosslinking and polymerization agents.

  17. Influence of the surface chemistry on the nanotribological behaviour of (AFM tip/graphite) couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jradi, Khalil; Schmitt, Marjorie; Bistac, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The development of the nanotechnology has made essential the knowledge of the tribological behaviour of carbonaceous materials, and more particularly of graphite. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is thus used to study the friction properties at this nanoscopic scale. In this work, results concerning the friction of AFM tips against graphite pins are presented, with a particular emphasis on the effect of the chemical modification of these tips on the tribological behaviour of graphite.

  18. An improved in situ measurement of offset phase shift towards quantitative damping-measurement with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu Minfeng

    2008-01-01

    An improved approach is introduced in damping measurement with atomic force microscope (AFM) for the in situ measurement of the offset phase shift needed for determining the intrinsic mechanical damping in nanoscale materials. The offset phase shift is defined and measured at a point of zero contact force according to the deflection part of the AFM force plot. It is shown that such defined offset phase shift is independent of the type of sample material, varied from hard to relatively soft materials in this study. This improved approach allows the self-calibrated and quantitative damping measurement with AFM. The ability of dynamic mechanical analysis for the measurement of damping in isolated one-dimensional nanostructures, e.g. individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes, was demonstrated

  19. Analysis of interfraction and intrafraction variation during tangential breast irradiation with an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Ryan P.; Bloch, Peter; Harris, Eleanor E.; McDonough, James; Sarkar, Abhirup; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Steven; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the daily setup variation and the anatomic movement of the heart and lungs during breast irradiation with tangential photon beams, as measured with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and materials: Analysis of 1,709 portal images determined changes in the radiation field during a treatment course in 8 patients. Values obtained for every image included central lung distance (CLD) and area of lung and heart within the irradiated field. The data from these measurements were used to evaluate variation from setup between treatment days and motion due to respiration and/or patient movement during treatment delivery. Results: The effect of respiratory motion and movement during treatment was minimal: the maximum range in CLD for any patient on any day was 0.25 cm. The variation caused by day-to-day setup variation was greater, with CLD values for patients ranging from 0.59 cm to 2.94 cm. Similar findings were found for heart and lung areas. Conclusions: There is very little change in CLD and corresponding lung and heart area during individual radiation treatment fractions in breast tangential fields, compared with a relatively greater amount of variation that occurs between days

  20. SU-F-J-222: Using PET Imaging to Evaluate Proliferation and Blood Flow in Irradiated and Non-Irradiated Bone Marrow 1 Year After Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S; Ponto, L; Menda, Y [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare proliferation and blood flow in pelvic and thoracic bone marrow 1 year after pelvic chemoradiation. Methods: Sixteen pelvic cancer patients were enrolled in an IRB-approved protocol to acquire FLT PET images during radiation therapy simulation (baseline) and 1 year after chemoradiation therapy. Three subjects also had optional O-15 water PET images acquired 1 year after chemoradiation therapy. Baseline FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans to spare pelvic bone marrow identified as regions with FLT SUV ≥ 2 without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing. Marrow VOIs were defined using a 50% maximum pixel value threshold on baseline FLT PET images (VIEW, PMOD version 3.5) in the sacrum and thoracic spine representing irradiated and non-irradiated regions, respectively. FLT PET and O-15 water PET images acquired 1 year after therapy were co-registered to baseline images (FUSION PMOD) and the same VOIs were used to measure proliferation (FLT SUV) and blood flow (O-15 water uptake). Separate image-based input functions were used for blood flow quantitation in each VOI. Results: Mean 1 year FLT SUV in sacral and thoracic VOIs for were 1.1 ± 0.4 and 6.5 ± 1.7, respectively for N = 16 subjects and were 1.2 ± 0.2 and 5.6 ± 1.6, respectively for N = 3 subjects who also underwent O-15 water imaging. Blood flow measures in equivalent sacral and thoracic marrow regions (N = 3) were 21.3 ± 8.7 and 18.3 ± 4.9 mL/min/100mL respectively. Conclusion: Decreased bone marrow proliferation measured by FLT SUV does not appear to correspond to decreased blood flow as measured by O-15 water PET imaging. Based on this small sample at a single time point, reduced blood supply does not explain reductions in bone marrow proliferative activity 1 year after chemoradiation therapy.

  1. Nano-Electrochemistry and Nano-Electrografting with an Original Combined AFM-SECM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Ben Brahim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the advantages of the combination between atomic force microscopy and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The combined technique can perform nano-electrochemical measurements onto agarose surface and nano-electrografting of non-conducting polymers onto conducting surfaces. This work was achieved by manufacturing an original Atomic Force Microscopy-Scanning ElectroChemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM electrode. The capabilities of the AFM-SECM-electrode were tested with the nano-electrografting of vinylic monomers initiated by aryl diazonium salts. Nano-electrochemical and technical processes were thoroughly described, so as to allow experiments reproducing. A plausible explanation of chemical and electrochemical mechanisms, leading to the nano-grafting process, was reported. This combined technique represents the first step towards improved nano-processes for the nano-electrografting.

  2. Accuracy optimization of high-speed AFM measurements using Design of Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Marinello, F.; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is being increasingly employed in industrial micro/nano manufacturing applications and integrated into production lines. In order to achieve reliable process and product control at high measuring speed, instrument optimization is needed. Quantitative AFM measurement...... results are influenced by a number of scan settings parameters, defining topography sampling and measurement time: resolution (number of profiles and points per profile), scan range and direction, scanning force and speed. Such parameters are influencing lateral and vertical accuracy and, eventually......, the estimated dimensions of measured features. The definition of scan settings is based on a comprehensive optimization that targets maximization of information from collected data and minimization of measurement uncertainty and scan time. The Design of Experiments (DOE) technique is proposed and applied...

  3. Controlled AFM manipulation of small nanoparticles and assembly of hybrid nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suenne; Shafiei, Farbod; Ratchford, Daniel; Li Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controlled manipulation of semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles (NPs) with 5-15 nm diameters and assemble these NPs into hybrid structures. The manipulation is accomplished under ambient environment using a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM). There are particular difficulties associated with manipulating NPs this small. In addition to spatial drift, the shape of an asymmetric AFM tip has to be taken into account in order to understand the intended and actual manipulation results. Furthermore, small NPs often attach to the tip via electrostatic interaction and modify the effective tip shape. We suggest a method for detaching the NPs by performing a pseudo-manipulation step. Finally, we show by example the ability to assemble these small NPs into prototypical hybrid nanostructures with well-defined composition and geometry.

  4. Nano-Electrochemistry and Nano-Electrografting with an Original Combined AFM-SECM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbal, Achraf; Grisotto, Federico; Charlier, Julienne; Palacin, Serge; Goyer, Cédric; Demaille, Christophe; Ben Brahim, Ammar

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantages of the combination between atomic force microscopy and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The combined technique can perform nano-electrochemical measurements onto agarose surface and nano-electrografting of non-conducting polymers onto conducting surfaces. This work was achieved by manufacturing an original Atomic Force Microscopy-Scanning ElectroChemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) electrode. The capabilities of the AFM-SECM-electrode were tested with the nano-electrografting of vinylic monomers initiated by aryl diazonium salts. Nano-electrochemical and technical processes were thoroughly described, so as to allow experiments reproducing. A plausible explanation of chemical and electrochemical mechanisms, leading to the nano-grafting process, was reported. This combined technique represents the first step towards improved nano-processes for the nano-electrografting. PMID:28348337

  5. Effect of UV-irradiation on sol-gel optical films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Fan; Shen Jun; Zhou Bin; Wu Guangming; Luo Aiyun; Sun Qi

    2005-01-01

    Sol-gel optical films were deposited on K9 glass and silicon wafer substrates by spin-coating method and a high-pressure mercury lamp was used to perform ultraviolet treating to solidify these films and improve their performance. SEM, AFM, IR and ellipsometer were used to characterize the structure and optical properties of the films. Mechanical property of films was measured by pencil hardness-testing device. Laser damage threshold of films was measured by a Q-switched Nd:YAG high power laser with the wave length of 1064 nm and the pulse width of 15 ns. The results show that UV-irradiation can improve the mechanical property and increase the refractive index of the films. Besides, the nodules on the surface of the films can be changed into pits by UV-irradiation process, so the laser damage threshold of sol-gel thin films will be increased. After UV-irradiation the laser damage threshold of single-layer ZrO 2 film reached 50.6 J/cm 2 (1064 nm, 1 ns). It is found that UV-irradiation is an effective method to avoid the infiltrating between the layers, and the degree of homogeneity of the multilayer films can be improved by this way. (authors)

  6. AFM Nanotools for Surgery of Biological Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, J D; Gordeev, S N [Department of Physics, Claverton Down, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Guy, R H, E-mail: jdb28@bath.ac.uk [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Claverton Down, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    Using a method of electron-beam induced deposition, we have been able to fabricate specialized AFM probes with application as 'nanotools' for the manipulation of biological structures ('nanosurgery'). We describe several such tools, including a 'nanoscalpel', 'nanoneedles' for probing intracellular structures, and a 'nanotome' which can separate surface layers from a biological structure. These applications are demonstrated by performing nanomanipulation on corneocyte cells from the outer layer of human skin.

  7. Modular design of AFM probe with sputtered silicon tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, Jacob; Bouwstra, Siebe

    2001-01-01

    of the thin films constituting the cantilever. The AFM probe has an integrated tip made of a thick sputtered silicon layer, which is deposited after the probe has been defined and just before the cantilevers are released. The tips are so-called rocket tips made by reactive ion etching. We present probes...

  8. Design and control of multi-actuated atomic force microscope for large-range and high-speed imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani Bozchalooi, I.; Careaga Houck, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); AlGhamdi, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Dammam, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Youcef-Toumi, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents the design and control of a high-speed and large-range atomic force microscopy (AFM). A multi-actuation scheme is proposed where several nano-positioners cooperate to achieve the range and speed requirements. A simple data-based control design methodology is presented to effectively operate the AFM scanner components. The proposed controllers compensate for the coupled dynamics and divide the positioning responsibilities between the scanner components. As a result, the multi-actuated scanner behavior is equivalent to that of a single X–Y–Z positioner with large range and high speed. The scanner of the designed AFM is composed of five nano-positioners, features 6 μm out-of-plane and 120 μm lateral ranges and is capable of high-speed operation. The presented AFM has a modular design with laser spot size of 3.5 μm suitable for small cantilever, an optical view of the sample and probe, a conveniently large waterproof sample stage and a 20 MHz data throughput for high resolution image acquisition at high imaging speeds. This AFM is used to visualize etching of calcite in a solution of sulfuric acid. Layer-by-layer dissolution and pit formation along the crystalline lines in a low pH environment is observed in real time. - Highlights: • High-speed AFM imaging is extended to large lateral and vertical scan ranges. • A general multi-actuation approach to atomic force microscopy is presented. • A high-speed AFM is designed and implemented based on the proposed method. • Multi-actuator control is designed auxiliary to a PID unit to maintain flexibility. • Influence of calcite crystal structure on dissolution is visualized in video form.

  9. High-field magnetoconductance in La-Sr manganites of FM and AFM ground states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirák, Zdeněk; Kaman, Ondřej; Knížek, Karel; Levinský, Petr; Míšek, Martin; Veverka, Pavel; Hejtmánek, Jiří

    2018-06-01

    Large-grain La1-xSrxMnO3 ceramic samples of compositions x = 0.45 and 0.55, representing the ferromagnetic (FM) and A-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground states, were produced via classical sintering at 1500 °C of cold-pressed sol-gel prepared single-phase nanoparticles. Using the same precursors, nanogranular forms of both manganite ceramics were prepared by fast spark plasma sintering at low temperature of 900 °C, which limits the growth of crystal grains. The magnetotransport of both the bulk and nanogranular forms was investigated in a broad range of magnetic fields up to 130 kOe and analyzed on the basis of detailed magnetic measurements. Both the large-grain and nanogranular systems with x = 0.45, possessing a pure FM state with similar Curie tempereature TC ≈ 345 K), show nearly the same conductivity enhancement in external fields when expressed relatively to the zero-field values. This positive magnetoconductance (MC) can be separated into two terms: (i) the hysteretic low-field MC that reflects the field-induced orientation of magnetic moments of individual grains, and (ii) the high-field MC that depends linearly on external field. In the case of large-grain ceramics with x = 0.55, a partially ordered FM state formed below TC = 264 K is replaced by pure A-type AFM ground state below 204 K. This A-type AFM state is characterized by positive magnetoconductance that is essentially of quadratic dependence on external field in the investigated range up to 130 kOe. On contrary, the nanogranular product with x = 0.55 exhibits a mixed FM/AFM state at low temperatures, and, as a consequence, its magnetotransport combines the features of FM and A-type AFM systems, in which the quadratic term is much enhanced and clearly dominates at high fields. For interpretation of observed behaviors, the theory of grain-boundary tunneling is revisited.

  10. Improvement of the Correlative AFM and ToF-SIMS Approach Using an Empirical Sputter Model for 3D Chemical Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlier, T; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, Y

    2018-02-06

    Technological progress has spurred the development of increasingly sophisticated analytical devices. The full characterization of structures in terms of sample volume and composition is now highly complex. Here, a highly improved solution for 3D characterization of samples, based on an advanced method for 3D data correction, is proposed. Traditionally, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) provides the chemical distribution of sample surfaces. Combining successive sputtering with 2D surface projections enables a 3D volume rendering to be generated. However, surface topography can distort the volume rendering by necessitating the projection of a nonflat surface onto a planar image. Moreover, the sputtering is highly dependent on the probed material. Local variation of composition affects the sputter yield and the beam-induced roughness, which in turn alters the 3D render. To circumvent these drawbacks, the correlation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with SIMS has been proposed in previous studies as a solution for the 3D chemical characterization. To extend the applicability of this approach, we have developed a methodology using AFM-time-of-flight (ToF)-SIMS combined with an empirical sputter model, "dynamic-model-based volume correction", to universally correct 3D structures. First, the simulation of 3D structures highlighted the great advantages of this new approach compared with classical methods. Then, we explored the applicability of this new correction to two types of samples, a patterned metallic multilayer and a diblock copolymer film presenting surface asperities. In both cases, the dynamic-model-based volume correction produced an accurate 3D reconstruction of the sample volume and composition. The combination of AFM-SIMS with the dynamic-model-based volume correction improves the understanding of the surface characteristics. Beyond the useful 3D chemical information provided by dynamic-model-based volume correction, the approach permits us to enhance

  11. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  12. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N.L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D.M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R.P.; Garg, K.B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising

  13. Simulation of CNT-AFM tip based on finite element analysis for targeted probe of the biological cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh, E-mail: at.tyousefi@gmail.com; Miyake, Mikio, E-mail: miyakejaist@gmail.com; Ikeda, Shoichiro, E-mail: sho16.ikeda@gmail.com [ChECA IKohza, Dept. Environmental & Green Technology (EGT), Malaysia, Japan International Institute of Technology (MJIIT), University Technology Malaysia - UTM, Kualalumpur (Malaysia); Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop, E-mail: nano@uitm.gmail.com [NANO-SciTech Centre, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nano scale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cell’s. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis.

  14. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  15. Sub-nuclear irradiation, in-vivo microscopy and single-molecule imaging to study a DNA Polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, G; Mansilla, S; Belluscio, L; Speroni, J; D' Alessio, C; Gottifredi, V [Fundacion Leloir, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Essers, J; Kanaar, R [Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    When the DNA is damaged in cells progressing through S phase, replication blockage can be avoided by TLS (Translesion DNA synthesis). This is an auxiliary replication mechanism that relies on the function of specialized polymerases that accomplish DNA damage bypass. An example of a classical TLS polymerase is Pol {eta} ({eta}). The current model implies that Pol {eta} activity is circumscribed to S-phase. Here we perform a systematic characterization of Pol {eta} behaviour after DNA-damage. We show that Pol {eta} is recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions in cells outside S phase including cells permanently arrested in G1. This observation was confirmed by different sub-nuclear damage strategies including global UV irradiation, local UV irradiation and local multi-photon laser irradiation of single nuclei in living cells. By local UV irradiation and alpha particle irradiation we evaluated the potential connection between Pol h recruitment to DNA lesions outside S phase and Homologous recombination repair (HRR) or Nucleotide excision repair (NER). Finally, we employ a single-molecule imaging approach (known as DNA fiber-assay) to determine how Pol h influences the progression of the replication fork. Our data reveals that the re-localization of Pol {eta} to DNA lesions might be temporally and mechanistically uncoupled from replicative DNA synthesis and from DNA damage processing. (authors)

  16. Sub-nuclear irradiation, in-vivo microscopy and single-molecule imaging to study a DNA Polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, G.; Mansilla, S.; Belluscio, L.; Speroni, J.; D'Alessio, C.; Gottifredi, V.; Essers, J.; Kanaar, R.

    2009-01-01

    When the DNA is damaged in cells progressing through S phase, replication blockage can be avoided by TLS (Translesion DNA synthesis). This is an auxiliary replication mechanism that relies on the function of specialized polymerases that accomplish DNA damage bypass. An example of a classical TLS polymerase is Pol η (eta). The current model implies that Pol η activity is circumscribed to S-phase. Here we perform a systematic characterization of Pol η behaviour after DNA-damage. We show that Pol η is recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions in cells outside S phase including cells permanently arrested in G1. This observation was confirmed by different sub-nuclear damage strategies including global UV irradiation, local UV irradiation and local multi-photon laser irradiation of single nuclei in living cells. By local UV irradiation and alpha particle irradiation we evaluated the potential connection between Pol h recruitment to DNA lesions outside S phase and Homologous recombination repair (HRR) or Nucleotide excision repair (NER). Finally, we employ a single-molecule imaging approach (known as DNA fiber-assay) to determine how Pol h influences the progression of the replication fork. Our data reveals that the re-localization of Pol η to DNA lesions might be temporally and mechanistically uncoupled from replicative DNA synthesis and from DNA damage processing. (authors)

  17. Joint Research on Scatterometry and AFM Wafer Metrology

    OpenAIRE

    Bodermann, B.; Buhr, E.; Danzebrink, H.U.; Bär, M.; Scholze, F.; Krumrey, M.; Wurm, M.; Klapetek, P.; Hansen, P.E.; Korpelainen, V.; Van Veghel, M.; Yacoot, A.; Siitonen, S.; El Gawhary, O.; Burger, S.

    2011-01-01

    Supported by the European Commission and EURAMET, a consortium of 10 participants from national metrology institutes, universities and companies has started a joint research project with the aim of overcoming current challenges in optical scatterometry for traceable linewidth metrology. Both experimental and modelling methods will be enhanced and different methods will be compared with each other and with specially adapted atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) m...

  18. Formation of hexagonal silicon carbide by high energy ion beam irradiation on Si (1 0 0) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuyan, H; Favre, M; Valderrama, E; Avaria, G; Chuaqui, H; Mitchell, I; Wyndham, E; Saavedra, R; Paulraj, M

    2007-01-01

    We report the investigation of high energy ion beam irradiation on Si (1 0 0) substrates at room temperature using a low energy plasma focus (PF) device operating in methane gas. The unexposed and ion exposed substrates were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photothermal beam deflection, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the results are reported. The interaction of the pulsed PF ion beams, with characteristic energy in the 60-450 keV range, with the Si surface, results in the formation of a surface layer of hexagonal silicon carbide. The SEM and AFM analyses indicate clear step bunching on the silicon carbide surface with an average step height of 50 nm and a terrace width of 800 nm

  19. Cuticle scale measurement of animal fibers by SEM and AFM

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Notayi, M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available -1 51st Microscopy Society of Southern Africa (MSSA) Conference, Farm Inn, Pretoria, 3-6 December 2013 Cuticle scale measurement of animal fibers by SEM and AFM Notayi M, Engelbrechts JAA, Lee ME, Goosen WE, Hunter L and Botha AF Abstract...

  20. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-03

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results.

  1. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G. Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the ‘footprint’ of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7.

  2. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-01-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  3. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-11-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  4. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Sarah O.S., E-mail: s.osman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose {+-} standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 {+-} 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 {+-} 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 {+-} 8 Gy and 36 {+-} 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  5. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose ± standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 ± 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 ± 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 ± 8 Gy and 36 ± 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  6. Quantified Differentiation of Surface Topography for Nano-materials As-Obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mousumi; Chatterjee, Somenath

    2018-04-01

    Surface texture is an important issue to realize the nature (crest and trough) of surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) image is a key analysis for surface topography. However, in nano-scale, the nature (i.e., deflection or crack) as well as quantification (i.e., height or depth) of deposited layers is essential information for material scientist. In this paper, a gradient-based K-means algorithm is used to differentiate the layered surfaces depending on their color contrast of as-obtained from AFM images. A transformation using wavelet decomposition is initiated to extract the information about deflection or crack on the material surfaces from the same images. Z-axis depth analysis from wavelet coefficients provides information about the crack present in the material. Using the above method corresponding surface information for the material is obtained. In addition, the Gaussian filter is applied to remove the unwanted lines, which occurred during AFM scanning. Few known samples are taken as input, and validity of the above approaches is shown.

  7. Different imaging methods in the assessment of radiation-induced lung injury following hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maasilta, P.; Kivisaari, L.; Mattson, K.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have characterized the radiation-induced lung-injury on serial chest X-rays, CTs and ultralow field MRs and evaluated the clinical value and cost/benefit ratio of the different imaging methods in 30 patients receiving high-dose hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma. Lung injury was severe in all patients, but non-specific and essentially as described in text-books. CT provided no clinically relevant, cost effective diagnostic advantage over conventional X-rays in the detection of early or late radiation-induced lung injury, but it was necessary for the evaluation of the disease status of the mesothelioma. The possible advantage of MR over CT could not be evaluated and needs further studies. Optimal time-points for imaging CTs or MRs to detect early radiation-induced lung injury following high dose hemithorax irradiation were during the latter part of the treatment or very shortly after the end of the irradiation. Late injury or irreversible fibrosis develop rapidly after 6 months and was clearly documented by chest X-rays. The authors recommend serial chest X-rays at 1-2, 6 and 12 months following radiotherapy as a cost-effective method for the detection of radiation-induced lung injury with additional CTs to document the stage of mesothelioma, when needed. (author). 31 refs.; 4 figs

  8. Mechanical properties of in situ demineralised human enamel measured by AFM nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Manuela; Hughes, Julie A.; Parker, David M.; Jandt, Klaus D.

    2001-10-01

    Diet-induced demineralisation is one of the key factors in surface changes of tooth enamel, with soft drinks being a significant etiological agent. The first step in this dissolution process is characterised by a change in the mechanical properties of the enamel and a roughening of the surface. The objective of this pilot study was to measure early stages of in situ induced hardness changes of polished human enamel surfaces with high accuracy using a nanoindenter attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Human unerupted third molars were cleaned, sterilised with sodium hypochlorite, sectioned and embedded in epoxy resin. The outer enamel surface was polished and the samples partly covered with a tape, allowing a 2-mm-wide zone to be exposed to the oral environment. Samples were fitted in an intra-oral appliance, which was worn from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for one day. During this time the volunteer sipped 250 ml of a drink over 10 min periods at 9.00, 11.00, 13.00 and 15.00 h. Three different drinks, mineral water, orange juice and the prototype of a blackcurrant drink with low demineralisation potential were used in this study. At the end of the experiment the samples were detached from the appliance, the tape removed and the surfaces chemically cleaned. The surface hardness and reduced Young's modulus of the exposed and unexposed areas of each sample were determined. In addition, high resolution topographical AFM images were obtained. This study shows that by determining the hardness and reduced Young's modulus, the difference in demineralisation caused by the drinks can be detected and quantified before statistically significant changes in surface topography could be observed with the AFM. The maximum decrease in surface hardness and Young's modulus occurred in the samples exposed to orange juice, followed by those exposed to the blackcurrant drink, while exposure to water led to the same values as unexposed areas. A one-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant

  9. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°.

  10. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°

  11. EUV blank defect and particle inspection with high throughput immersion AFM with 1nm 3D resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, M.H. van; Sadeghian Marnani, H.

    2016-01-01

    Inspection of EUV mask substrates and blanks is demanding. We envision this is a good target application for massively parallel Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We envision to do a full surface characterization of EUV masks with AFM enabling 1nm true 3D resolution over the entire surface. The limiting

  12. Direct imaging of enhanced current collection on grain boundaries of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, JunHo, E-mail: jhk@incheon.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Incheon National University, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kim, SeongYeon [Department of Physics, Incheon National University, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Ramanathan, Kannan; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M. [National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We report on direct imaging of current collection by performing conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) measurement on a complete Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell. The localized current was imaged by milling away the top conductive layer of the device by repeated C-AFM scans. The result exhibits enhanced photocurrent collection on grain boundaries (GBs) of CIGS films, consistent with the argument for electric-field-assisted carrier collection on the GBs.

  13. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyratou, E.; Asproudis, I.; Tsoutsi, D.; Bacharis, C.; Moutsouris, K.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV (λ = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  14. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spyratou, E., E-mail: ellas5@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Department of Physics, Zografou Campus, Athens, 15780 (Greece); Asproudis, I. [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, 45110 (Greece); Tsoutsi, D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, 45110 (Greece); Bacharis, C.; Moutsouris, K.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A.A. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Department of Physics, Zografou Campus, Athens, 15780 (Greece)

    2010-02-01

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV ({lambda} = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  15. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Jorge R., E-mail: jorge.rr@cea.cu [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Canto Blanco, 28049 Madrid, España (Spain)

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  16. Assessment of radicular dentin permeability after irradiation with CO2 laser and endodontic irrigation treatments with thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heajin; Lee, Robert C.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the permeability changes due to the surface modification of dentin can be quantified via thermal imaging during dehydration. The CO2 laser has been shown to remove the smear layer and disinfect root canals. Moreover, thermal modification via CO2 laser irradiation can be used to convert dentin into a highly mineralized enamel-like mineral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radicular dentin surface modification after CO2 laser irradiation by measuring the permeability with thermal imaging. Human molar specimens (n=12) were sectioned into 4 axial walls of the pulp chamber and treated with either 10% NaClO for 1 minute, 5% EDTA for 1 minute, CO2 laser or none. The CO2 laser was operated at 9.4 μm with a pulse duration of 26 μs, pulse repetition rate of 300 Hz and a fluence of 13 J/cm2. The samples were dehydrated using an air spray for 60 seconds and imaged using a thermal camera. The resulting surface morphological changes were assessed using 3D digital microscopy. The images from digital microscopy confirmed melting of the mineral phase of dentin. The area enclosed by the time-temperature curve during dehydration, ▵Q, measured with thermal imaging increased significantly with treatments with EDTA and the CO2 laser (Ptreatment increases permeability of radicular dentin.

  17. Imaging of Au nanoparticles deeply buried in polymer matrix by various atomic force microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, some papers reported successful imaging of subsurface features using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Some theoretical studies have also been presented, however the imaging mechanisms are not fully understood yet. In the preceeding papers, imaging of deeply buried nanometer-scale features has been successful only if they were buried in a soft matrix. In this paper, subsurface features (Au nanoparticles) buried in a soft polymer matrix were visualized. To elucidate the imaging mechanisms, various AFM techniques; heterodyne force microscopy, ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM), 2nd-harmonic UAFM and force modulation microscopy (FMM) were employed. The particles buried under 960 nm from the surface were successfully visualized which has never been achieved. The results elucidated that it is important for subsurface imaging to choose a cantilever with a suitable stiffness range for a matrix. In case of using the most suitable cantilever, the nanoparticles were visualized using every technique shown above except for FMM. The experimental results suggest that the subsurface features buried in a soft matrix with a depth of at least 1 µm can affect the local viscoelasticity (mainly viscosity) detected as the variation of the amplitude and phase of the tip oscillation on the surface. This phenomenon presumably makes it possible to visualize such deeply buried nanometer-scale features in a soft matrix. - Highlights: • We visualized subsurface features buried in soft matrix, and investigated its imaging mechanism. • AFM techniques; UAFM, FMM, HFM and 2nd-harmonic UAFM were applied to elucidate the mechanism. • Au nanoparticles buried under 960 nm from surface were visualized, which has never been achieved. • Imaging at contact resonance using a cantilever of suitable stiffness is important. • Subsurface features in a soft matrix affect surface viscoelasticity, which are detected by AFM

  18. Electrostatic nanopatterning of PMMA by AFM charge writing for directed nano-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ressier, L; Nader, V Le

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic nanopatterning of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) thin films by atomic force microscopy (AFM) charge writing was investigated using Kelvin force microscopy (KFM). The lateral size of the electrostatic patterns and the amount of injected charges are closely correlated and can be controlled by the height of the voltage pulses applied to the AFM tip and the tip-sample separation during the writing process. Charge retention measurements show that PMMA has excellent charge storage properties in air under relative humidities from 1% to 60% and withstands immersion in ultra-pure water. This study thus reveals that PMMA is a very promising electret to create efficient electrostatic nanopatterns for directed self-assembly of nanoscale objects, including the broad range of colloidal particles or molecules in aqueous solutions

  19. Influence of smectite suspension structure on sheet orientation in dry sediments: XRD and AFM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbik, Marek S; Frost, Ray L

    2010-06-15

    The structure-building phenomena within clay aggregates are governed by forces acting between clay particles. Measurements of such forces are important to understand in order to manipulate the aggregate structure for applications such as dewatering of mineral processing tailings. A parallel particle orientation is required when conducting XRD investigation on the oriented samples and conduct force measurements acting between basal planes of clay mineral platelets using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate how smectite clay platelets were oriented on silicon wafer substrate when dried from suspension range of methods like SEM, XRD and AFM were employed. From these investigations, we conclude that high clay concentrations and larger particle diameters (up to 5 microm) in suspension result in random orientation of platelets in the substrate. The best possible laminar orientation in the clay dry film, represented in the XRD 001/020 intensity ratio of 47 was obtained by drying thin layers from 0.02 wt.% clay suspensions of the natural pH. Conducted AFM investigations show that smectite studied in water based electrolytes show very long-range repulsive forces lower in strength than electrostatic forces from double-layer repulsion. It was suggested that these forces may have structural nature. Smectite surface layers rehydrate in water environment forms surface gel with spongy and cellular texture which cushion approaching AFM probe. This structural effect can be measured in distances larger than 1000 nm from substrate surface and when probe penetrate this gel layer, structural linkages are forming between substrate and clay covered probe. These linkages prevent subsequently smooth detachments of AFM probe on way back when retrieval. This effect of tearing new formed structure apart involves larger adhesion-like forces measured in retrieval. It is also suggested that these effect may be enhanced by the nano-clay particles interaction. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All

  20. The effect of laser irradiation on electrical and structural properties of ZnO thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kameli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, ZnO thin film was prepared by sol-gel process on glass substrates. The deposited films were dried at 100 and 240 ˚C and then annealed at 300, 400 and 500 ˚C. The two-probe measurement showed that resistance of as-prepared films is very high. The KrF excimer (λ=248 nm laser irradiation with 1000 pulses, frequency of 1 Hz and 90 mJ/cm2 energy on surface of film resulted in the reduction of the films electrical resistance. X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns confirmed the improved hexagonal wurtzite structure of film, and AFM and FE-SEM analyses showed regular and spherical grain was formed on the surface. The particle size was increased from ~10 to ~30 nm after leaser irradiation. Generally, it was showed that electrical, structural and morphological properties of films improve considerably by laser irradiation.

  1. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  2. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva

    2016-01-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m −1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification. (paper)

  3. Confocal Raman and PL, AFM, and X-ray diffraction studies of CdS:O thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinori, Suzuki; Kazuki, Wakita; YongGu, Shim; Nazim, Mamedov; Ayaz, Bayramov; Emil, Huseynov

    2010-01-01

    Full text : CdS has much attention as a window material of thin-film solar cells, for example a CdTe solar cell. In this case, increasing band gap of CdS films leads to rise of conversion efficiency of a solar cell. Recently, it was reported that CdS:O films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering consist of nano-crystals of CdS resulting in increasing the band gap. This work reports confocal Raman and photoluminescence (PL), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction studies of CdS:O films deposited by cathode sputtering for formation of nano-crystal of CdS. It was shown that AFM image of CdS:O films annealed at 300, 400 and 500 degrees Celsium. The height of peak and dip on the surface is in the range of 5 and 20 nm in the samples annealed at less than 400 degrees Celsium, while the clear crystalline shape appears in the sample annealed at 500 degrees Celsium. There is also shown X-ray diffraction pattern of CdS:O films. As grown film shows amorphous structure of CdS. On the other hand, the samples annealed at 400 and 500 degrees Celsium display obvious crystalline pattern. The crystal radius of the samples annealed at 300, 400, and 500 degrees Celsium were estimated to be 20, 27, and 37 nm, respectively, according to Scherrers formula. Other results related with the confocal spectroscopy will be also presented.

  4. Magnetotransport measurements on AFM structured two-dimensional electron gases on cleaved edges of GaAs/AlGaAs; Magnetotransportmessungen an AFM-strukturierten zweidimensionalen Elektronengasen auf GaAs/AlGaAs-Spaltkanten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinwald, Elisabeth

    2009-06-25

    In this thesis a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) on a (110) cleavage plane of a GaAs/AlGaAs(001) heterostructure was produced by means of cleaved edge overgrowth (CEO) and modulated in two dimensions. The 2DEG was modulated in one direction by a superlattice of the subjacent GaAs/AlGaAs(001) heterostructure. A second modulation, perpendicular to the first was realized by local anodic oxidation (LAO) with an atomic force microscope (AFM). For the process of LAO an electric voltage is applied between the tip of the AFM and the surface of the GaAs. The natural water film on the surface acts as electrolyte so that the GaAs surface is locally oxidized underneath the AFM tip. This oxide leads to a band bending so that the 2DEG underneath the oxide is locally depleted. On these systems magnetotransport measurements revealed that it is actually possible to modulate 2DEGs on a sufficient large area by local anodic oxidation. On the cleaved surfaces the influence of the two dimensional modulation on the electron gas has been demonstrated. (orig.)

  5. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamov, Dimitar R; Stock, Erik; Franz, Clemens M; Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I

  6. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamov, Dimitar R, E-mail: stamov@jpk.com [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Stock, Erik [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Franz, Clemens M [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I.

  7. Initial Growth Process of Magnetron Sputtering 321 Stainless Steel Films Observed by Afm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongzhong; Wu, Wei; Liu, Dongliang; Chen, Jian; Sun, Yali

    To investigate the initial morphological evolution of 321 stainless steel (SS) films, we examined the effect of sputtering time on the morphology of 321 SS film. In this study, a group of samples were prepared at nine different sputtering times within 20 s using radio-frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Only globular-like grains were formed on mica substrates within 6 s, whose average grain size is ~ 21-44 nm. Meanwhile, few grains with larger size are subject to settle at the defect sites of mica substrates. At 8 s, we found large columnar crystallites with the average grain size of 61 nm. From 10 to 14 s, islands grew continuously and coalesced in order to form an interconnected structure containing irregular channels or grooves, with a depth of ~ 3.5-5 nm. Up to 16 s, a nearly continuous film was formed and some new globular-like grains were again present on the film. Study of the AFM image at 20 s suggests that the watercolor masking method designed by us is an effective method, by which we can prepare thin films with steps for the measurement of the thickness of continuous thin films. It is also found that the coverage rate of films increases with the increase in sputtering time (from 2 to 16 s). On the other hand, the increase in root mean square (RMS) roughness is much more significant from 6 to 10 s, and there is a maximum value, 2.81 nm at 10 s due to more islands during deposition. However, RMS roughness decreases with the decrease in length and width of channels or grooves from 10 to 16 s. Especially, a lower RMS roughness of 0.73 nm occurs at 16 s, because of the continuous film produced with a large coverage rate of 98.43%.

  8. Analysis of aflatoxin M1 in milk and yogurt and AFM1 reduction by lactic acid bacteria used in Lebanese industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khoury, A.; Yaghi, J.; Atoui, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study a screening survey was undertaken to determine the presence and levels of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in locally produced dairy products. For this purpose, a total of 138 dairy samples (milk and yogurt) were analyzed to quantify AFM1 levels in these products. Results obtained showed that AFM1 was found in 40.62% and 32.81% of milk and yogurt samples respectively. The range of contamination levels varied between lower and higher than European regulation limit. Lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) used in the Lebanese traditional industry were screened for their ability to reduce the level of AFM1. Due to the lack in data on the natural occurrence of AFM1 in Lebanese dairy products, the aim of this work was to report some information and to state these products according to EC regulations. (author)

  9. SiO{sub 2} on silicon: behavior under heavy ion irradiation; SiO{sub 2} sur silicium: comportement sous irradiation avec des ions lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotaru, C

    2004-03-15

    Heavy ion irradiation was performed on a-SiO{sub 2} layers deposited on Si. Damage of the surface was studied by means of Atomic Force Microscopy. Hillocks appear for an electronic stopping power higher than 16 keV/nm. The height of the hillocks decreases with the thickness of the oxide layer. Infrared Spectroscopy studies show that the damage threshold for a-SiO{sub 2} is at an electronic stopping power of 2 keV/nm. Therefore it is probable that the origin of the hillocks comes from the silicon layer. This could be explain within the frame of thermal spike model. The theoretical thresholds are 8 keV/nm and 1.8 keV/nm for silicon and a-SiO{sub 2} respectively. Chemical etching after irradiation gives a technical possibility to create nano-pits, whose size and shape can be controlled. Additionally, these structures allowed to determine the AFM tip radius. (author)

  10. Automated force volume image processing for biological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Polyakov

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has now become a powerful technique for investigating on a molecular level, surface forces, nanomechanical properties of deformable particles, biomolecular interactions, kinetics, and dynamic processes. This paper specifically focuses on the analysis of AFM force curves collected on biological systems, in particular, bacteria. The goal is to provide fully automated tools to achieve theoretical interpretation of force curves on the basis of adequate, available physical models. In this respect, we propose two algorithms, one for the processing of approach force curves and another for the quantitative analysis of retraction force curves. In the former, electrostatic interactions prior to contact between AFM probe and bacterium are accounted for and mechanical interactions operating after contact are described in terms of Hertz-Hooke formalism. Retraction force curves are analyzed on the basis of the Freely Jointed Chain model. For both algorithms, the quantitative reconstruction of force curves is based on the robust detection of critical points (jumps, changes of slope or changes of curvature which mark the transitions between the various relevant interactions taking place between the AFM tip and the studied sample during approach and retraction. Once the key regions of separation distance and indentation are detected, the physical parameters describing the relevant interactions operating in these regions are extracted making use of regression procedure for fitting experiments to theory. The flexibility, accuracy and strength of the algorithms are illustrated with the processing of two force-volume images, which collect a large set of approach and retraction curves measured on a single biological surface. For each force-volume image, several maps are generated, representing the spatial distribution of the searched physical parameters as estimated for each pixel of the force-volume image.

  11. Measuring the force of single protein molecule detachment from surfaces with AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapikouni, Theodora S; Missirlis, Yannis F

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure the non-specific detachment force of single fibrinogen molecules from glass surfaces. The identification of single unbinding events was based on the characteristics of the parabolic curves, recorded during the stretching of protein molecules. Fibrinogen molecules were covalently bound to Si(3)N(4) AFM tips, previously modified with 3-aminopropyl-dimethyl-ethoxysilane, through a homobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) linker bearing two hydroxysulfosuccinimide esters. The most probable detachment force was found to be 210 pN, when the tip was retracting with a velocity of 1400 nm/s, while the distribution of the detachment distances indicated that the fibrinogen chain can be elongated beyond the length of the physical conformation before detachment. The dependence of the most probable detachment force on the loading rate was examined and the dynamics of fibrinogen binding to the surface were found amenable to the simple expression of the Bell-Evans theory. The theory's expansion, however, by incorporating the concept of the rupture of parallel residue-surface bonds could only describe the detachment of fibrinogen for a small number of such bonds. Finally, the mathematical expression of the Worm-Like Chain model was used to fit the stretching curves before rupture and two interpretations are suggested for the description of the AFM curves with multiple detachment events.

  12. Characteristics of a single-channel superconducting flux flow transistor fabricated by an AFM modification technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seokcheol [Jeonnam Regional Innovation Agency, 1000 Namak-Ri, Samhyang-Myun, Muan-Gun, Jeollanam-Do 534-700 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: suntrac@jina.re.kr; Kim, Seong-Jong [Mokpo Maritime University, Chukkyo-Dong, Mokpo City, Cheonnam 530-729 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-11-01

    The demand for high performance, integrity, and miniaturization in the area of electronic and mechanic devices has drawn interest in the fabrication of nanostructures. However, it is difficult to fabricate the channel with nano-scale using a conventional photography techniques. AFM anodization technique is a maskless process and effective method to overcome the difficulty in fabricating a nano-scale channel. In this paper, we first present a new fabrication of a single-channel SFFT using a selective oxidation process induced by an AFM probe. The modified channel was investigated by electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) to find the compositional variation of the transformed region. In order to confirm the operation of a single-channel SFFT, we measured the voltage-current characteristics at the temperature of liquid nitrogen by an I-V automatic measurement system. Our results indicate that the single-channel SFFT having effect as a weak link is effectively fabricated by an AFM lithography process.

  13. Characteristics of a single-channel superconducting flux flow transistor fabricated by an AFM modification technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seokcheol; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2007-01-01

    The demand for high performance, integrity, and miniaturization in the area of electronic and mechanic devices has drawn interest in the fabrication of nanostructures. However, it is difficult to fabricate the channel with nano-scale using a conventional photography techniques. AFM anodization technique is a maskless process and effective method to overcome the difficulty in fabricating a nano-scale channel. In this paper, we first present a new fabrication of a single-channel SFFT using a selective oxidation process induced by an AFM probe. The modified channel was investigated by electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) to find the compositional variation of the transformed region. In order to confirm the operation of a single-channel SFFT, we measured the voltage-current characteristics at the temperature of liquid nitrogen by an I-V automatic measurement system. Our results indicate that the single-channel SFFT having effect as a weak link is effectively fabricated by an AFM lithography process

  14. Energy dissipation unveils atomic displacement in the noncontact atomic force microscopy imaging of Si(111 )-(7 ×7 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Toyoko; Inamura, Ryo; Kura, Daiki; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2018-03-01

    The kinetic energy of the oscillating cantilever of noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) at room temperature was considerably dissipated over regions between a Si adatom and its neighboring rest atom for Si(111 )-(7 ×7 ) in close proximity to a Si tip on the cantilever. However, nc-AFM topographic images showed no atomic features over those regions, which were the hollow sites of the (7 ×7 ). This energy dissipation likely originated from displacement of Si adatoms with respect to the tip over the hollow sites, leading to a lateral shift of the adatoms toward the rest atom. This interaction led to hysteresis over each cantilever oscillation cycle; when the tip was retracted, the Si adatom likely returned to its original position. To confirm the atomic processes involved in the force interactions through Si dangling bonds, the Si(111 )-(7 ×7 ) surface was partly terminated with atomic hydrogen (H) and examined by nc-AFM. When the Si adatoms and/or the rest atoms were terminated with H, the hollow sites were not bright (less dissipation) in images of the energy dissipation channels by nc-AFM. The hollow sites acted as metastable sites for Si adatoms in surface diffusion and atom manipulation; thus, the dissipation energy which is saturated on the tip likely corresponds to the difference in the potential energy between the hollow site and the Si adatom site. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of dissipation channels of nc-AFM to enable visualization of the dynamics of atoms and molecules on surfaces, which cannot be revealed by nc-AFM topographic images alone.

  15. Enhancing local absorption within a gold nano-sphere on a dielectric surface under an AFM probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebi Moghaddam, Sina; Ertürk, Hakan; Mengüç, M. Pınar

    2016-01-01

    This study considers enhancing localized absorption by a gold nanoparticle (NP) placed over a substrate where an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is in close proximity of the particle. The gold NP and AFM tip are interacting with a surface evanescent wave, resulting a near-field coupling between the tip and NP and consequently enhances the absorption. This concept can be used for selective heating of NPs placed over a surface that enables precise manufacturing at nanometer scales. Different tip positions are considered to identify the optimal tip location and the corresponding enhancement limits. The effects of these interactions on the absorption profiles of dielectric core/gold shell NPs are also studied. It is observed that using core–shell nanoparticles with a dielectric core leads to further enhancement of the absorption efficiency and a more uniform distribution of absorption over the shell. Discrete dipole approximation coupled with surface interactions (DDA-SI) is employed throughout the study, and it is vectorized to improve its computational efficiency. - Highlights: • Plasmonic coupling between solid or core-shell nanoparticles, dielectric surface and Si AFM tip is investigated for achieving localized heating for nano-manufacturing. • Absorption efficiency enhancement limits for core-shell and solid nanoparticles are identified using an AFM tip for surface evanescent wave heating. • The effect of tip location, relative to surface wave direction is outlined, identifying optimal locations, and heat absorption distribution over core-shell and solid nanoparticles. • While using a Si AFM tip enhances absorption, using a dielectric core result in further enhancement in absorption with a more uniform distribution. • DDA-SI-v developed by vectorizing the formulations of DDA-SI for improved computational efficiency.

  16. Resonance frequencies of AFM cantilevers in contact with a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbiest, G.J., E-mail: Verbiest@physik.rwth-aachen.de [JARA-FIT and II. Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Rost, M.J., E-mail: Rost@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-12-15

    To make the forces in an Atomic Force Microscope that operates in a dynamic mode with one or multiple vibrations applied to the cantilever, quantitative, one needs to relate a change in resonance frequency of the cantilever to a specific tip–sample interaction. Due to the time dependence of the force between the tip and sample caused by the vibrations, this task is not only difficult, but in fact only possible to solve for certain limiting cases, if one follows common theoretical approaches with a Taylor expansion around the deflection point. Here, we present an analytical method for calculating the resonance frequencies of the cantilever that is valid for any tip–sample interaction. Instead of linearizing the tip–sample interaction locally, we calculate an averaged, weighted linearization taking into account all positions of the tip while vibrating. Our method bridges, therefore, the difficult gap between a free oscillating cantilever and a cantilever that is pushed infinitely hard into contact with a surface, which describes a clamped-pinned boundary condition. For a correct description of the cantilever dynamics, we take into account both the tip mass and the tip moment of inertia. Applying our model, we show that it is possible to calculate the modal response of a cantilever as a function of the tip–sample interaction strength. Based on these modal vibration characteristics, we show that the higher resonance frequencies of a cantilever are completely insensitive to the strength of the tip–sample interaction. - Highlights: • A method to calculate the resonances of AFM cantilevers under any force is proposed. • The analytical model is based on Euler-beam theory. • The shift in resonance frequency due to forces decrease with increasing mode number. • The proposed method enables quantitative ultrasound AFM experiments. • Our results explain also the applicability of the higher modes in SubSurface-AFM.

  17. Application of AFM in microscopy and fabrication of micro/nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lopour, F.; Kalousek, R.; Škoda, D.; Spousta, J.; Matějka, František; Šikola, T.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2002), s. 352 - 355 ISSN 0142-2421 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 334; GA MŠk ME 480 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : AFM fabrication * local anodic oxidation * oxide nanostructures Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.071, year: 2002

  18. SEM and AFM studies of dip-coated CuO nanofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, V; Mahalingam, T; Ganesan, V

    2013-01-01

    Cupric oxide (CuO) semiconducting thin films were prepared at various copper sulfate concentrations by dip coating. The copper sulfate concentration was varied to yield films of thicknesses in the range of 445-685 nm by surface profilometer. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the deposited films were polycrystalline in nature with monoclinic structure of (-111) plane. The surface morphology and topography of monoclinic-phase CuO thin films were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Surface roughness profile was plotted using WSxM software and the estimated surface roughness was about ∼19.4 nm at 30 mM molar concentration. The nanosheets shaped grains were observed by SEM and AFM studies. The stoichiometric compound formation was observed at 30 mM copper sulfate concentration prepared film by EDX. The indirect band gap energy of CuO films was increased from 1.08 to 1.20 eV with the increase of copper sulfate concentrations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Force and Compliance Measurements on Living Cells Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcikiewicz Ewa P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM in studies of cell adhesion and cell compliance. Our studies use the interaction between leukocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1/intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 as a model system. The forces required to unbind a single LFA-1/ICAM-1 bond were measured at different loading rates. This data was used to determine the dynamic strength of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 complex and characterize the activation potential that this complex overcomes during its breakage. Force measurements acquired at the multiple- bond level provided insight about the mechanism of cell adhesion. In addition, the AFM was used as a microindenter to determine the mechanical properties of cells. The applications of these methods are described using data from a previous study.

  20. SiO2 on silicon: behavior under heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, C.

    2004-03-01

    Heavy ion irradiation was performed on a-SiO 2 layers deposited on Si. Damage of the surface was studied by means of Atomic Force Microscopy. Hillocks appear for an electronic stopping power higher than 16 keV/nm. The height of the hillocks decreases with the thickness of the oxide layer. Infrared Spectroscopy studies show that the damage threshold for a-SiO 2 is at an electronic stopping power of 2 keV/nm. Therefore it is probable that the origin of the hillocks comes from the silicon layer. This could be explain within the frame of thermal spike model. The theoretical thresholds are 8 keV/nm and 1.8 keV/nm for silicon and a-SiO 2 respectively. Chemical etching after irradiation gives a technical possibility to create nano-pits, whose size and shape can be controlled. Additionally, these structures allowed to determine the AFM tip radius. (author)

  1. Defect sizing of post-irradiated nuclear fuels using grayscale thresholding in their radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Usman Khurshid; Iqbal, Masood; Ahmad, Munir

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of different types of material defects in a number of reference standard post-irradiated nuclear fuel image samples have been carried out by virtue of developing a computer program that takes radiographic images of the fuel as input. The program is based on user adjustable grayscale thresholding in the regime of image segmentation whereby it selects and counts the pixels having graylevel values less than or equal to the computed threshold. It can size the defects due to chipping in nuclear fuel, cracks, voids, melting, deformation, inclusion of foreign materials, heavy isotope accumulation, non-uniformity, etc. The classes of fuel range from those of research and power reactors to fast breeders and from pellets to annular and vibro-compacted fuel. The program has been validated against ground truth realities of some locally fabricated metallic plates having drilled holes of known sizes simulated as defects in them in which the results indicate that it either correctly selects and quantifies at least 94% of the actual required regions of interest in a given image or it gives less than 8.1% false alarm rate. Also, the developed program is independent of image size.

  2. Defect sizing of post-irradiated nuclear fuels using grayscale thresholding in their radiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Usman Khurshid, E-mail: ukhurshid@hotmail.co [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Iqbal, Masood, E-mail: masiqbal@hotmail.co [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Munir [Nondestructive Testing Group, Directorate of Technology, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2010-10-15

    Quantification of different types of material defects in a number of reference standard post-irradiated nuclear fuel image samples have been carried out by virtue of developing a computer program that takes radiographic images of the fuel as input. The program is based on user adjustable grayscale thresholding in the regime of image segmentation whereby it selects and counts the pixels having graylevel values less than or equal to the computed threshold. It can size the defects due to chipping in nuclear fuel, cracks, voids, melting, deformation, inclusion of foreign materials, heavy isotope accumulation, non-uniformity, etc. The classes of fuel range from those of research and power reactors to fast breeders and from pellets to annular and vibro-compacted fuel. The program has been validated against ground truth realities of some locally fabricated metallic plates having drilled holes of known sizes simulated as defects in them in which the results indicate that it either correctly selects and quantifies at least 94% of the actual required regions of interest in a given image or it gives less than 8.1% false alarm rate. Also, the developed program is independent of image size.

  3. Laser excited novel near-infrared photoluminescence bands in fast neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad Saliqur; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Xu, Qiu; Evslin, Jarah; Cinausero, Marco

    2016-01-01

    New near-infrared photoluminescence bands were observed in neutron-irradiated spinel single crystal upon excitation by a 532 nm laser. The surface morphology of the unirradiated and fast neutron-irradiated samples was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. Fast neutron-irradiated samples show a strong emission peak at 1685 nm along with weak bands at 1065 and 2365 nm. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence intensity was also measured. At lower temperatures, the dominant peak at 1685 nm shifts toward lower energy whereas the other peaks remain fixed. Activation energies of luminescence quenching were estimated to be 5.7 and 54.6 meV for the lower and higher temperature regions respectively. - Highlights: • AFM and SPM were conducted to understand surface morphology of the unirrad and neutron-irradiated spinel. • Novel photoluminescence band at 1685 nm along with weak bands at 1065 and 2365 was observed. • Activation energy for luminescence quenching was estimated from Arrhenius equation.

  4. Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on structural and magnetic properties of GdFe{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 3} (x≤0.2) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Pawanpreet [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, H.P. 177005 (India); Sharma, K.K., E-mail: kknitham@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, H.P. 177005 (India); Pandit, Rabia [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, H.P. 177005 (India); Choudhary, R.J. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research at Indore, M.P. 452 001 (India); Kumar, Ravi [Centre for Material Science and Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, H.P 177005 (India)

    2016-01-15

    The present work reports the effect of Ni doping and 200 MeV Ag{sup 15+} ion irradiation on the structural and magnetic properties of GdFe{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 3} (x≤0.2) thin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrate by pulse laser deposition (PLD). From the XRD patterns ‘c-axis’ oriented growth in the pristine films is noticed, whereas after irradiation amorphization in the films is noticed. The atomic force microscopic (AFM) images reveal the increase in surface roughness with doping and irradiation as well. The irreversibility in the zero field cooled and field cooled magnetic curves indicates to the possibility of magnetic disorder in all the pristine as well as irradiated samples. Magnetization has been found to decrease with increasing Ni{sup 3+} ion substitution at room temperature whereas an enhancement in magnetization is noticed after ion irradiation for all the films. The disparity in the magnetic properties of pristine GdFe{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 3} (0.0≤x≤0.2) orthoferrites thin films can be correlated to the difference in hybridization in transition metal ion and O{sup 2−} ion orbitals. However, presence of strains caused by the columnar defects is responsible for the change in structural, morphological and magnetic properties in the irradiated samples. - Highlights: • ‘c-axis’ oriented GdFe{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 3} (x≤0.2) thin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. • Thin films have been irradiated by 200 MeV Ag{sup 15+} ions. • Presence of columnar defects have been estimated using SRIM. • Magnetic disorder in all the film samples have been seen at lower temperatures. • Structural and magnetic characteristics altered with doping and ion irradiation.

  5. 125 MeV Si 9+ ion irradiation of calcium phosphate thin film coated by rf-magnetron sputtering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elayaraja, K.; Joshy, M. I. Ahymah; Suganthi, R. V.; Kalkura, S. Narayana; Palanichamy, M.; Ashok, M.; Sivakumar, V. V.; Kulriya, P. K.; Sulania, I.; Kanjilal, D.; Asokan, K.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium substrate was coated with hydroxyapatite by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering (rf-magnetron sputtering) technique and subjected to swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of 125 MeV with Si 9+ at fluences of 1 × 10 10, 1 × 10 11 and 1 × 10 12 ions/cm 2. The glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis confirmed the HAp phase of the irradiated film. There was a considerable decrease in crystallinity and particle size after irradiation. In addition, DRS-UV reflectance spectra revealed a decrease in optical band gap ( Eg) from 5.2 to 4.6 eV. Wettability of biocompatible materials plays an important role in biological cells proliferation for tissue engineering, drug delivery, gene transfer and bone growth. HAp thin films irradiated with 1 × 10 11 ions/cm 2 fluence showed significant increase in wettability. While the SHI irradiated samples exhibited enhanced bioactivity, there was no significant variation in cell viability. Surface roughness, pores and average particle size were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  6. High resolution laser beam induced current images under trichromatic laser radiation: approximation to the solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, F J; Alcántara, R; Fernández-Lorenzo, C; Martín-Calleja, J

    2010-03-01

    A laser beam induced current (LBIC) map of a photoactive surface is a very useful tool when it is necessary to study the spatial variability of properties such as photoconverter efficiency or factors connected with the recombination of carriers. Obtaining high spatial resolution LBIC maps involves irradiating the photoactive surface with a photonic beam with Gaussian power distribution and with a low dispersion coefficient. Laser emission fulfils these characteristics, but against it is the fact that it is highly monochromatic and therefore has a spectral distribution different to solar emissions. This work presents an instrumental system and procedure to obtain high spatial resolution LBIC maps in conditions approximating solar irradiation. The methodology developed consists of a trichromatic irradiation system based on three sources of laser excitation with emission in the red, green, and blue zones of the electromagnetic spectrum. The relative irradiation powers are determined by either solar spectrum distribution or Planck's emission formula which provides information approximate to the behavior of the system if it were under solar irradiation. In turn, an algorithm and a procedure have been developed to be able to form images based on the scans performed by the three lasers, providing information about the photoconverter efficiency of photovoltaic devices under the irradiation conditions used. This system has been checked with three photosensitive devices based on three different technologies: a commercial silicon photodiode, a commercial photoresistor, and a dye-sensitized solar cell. These devices make it possible to check how the superficial quantum efficiency has areas dependent upon the excitation wavelength while it has been possible to measure global incident photon-to-current efficiency values approximating those that would be obtained under irradiation conditions with sunlight.

  7. Identification and ultrastructural imaging of photodynamic therapy-induced microfilaments by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Yoo, Je-Ok; Shin, Incheol; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an emerging technique for imaging biological samples at subnanometer resolution; however, the method is not widely used for cell imaging because it is limited to analysis of surface topology. In this study, we demonstrate identification and ultrastructural imaging of microfilaments using new approaches based on AFM. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with a new chlorin-based photosensitizer DH-II-24 induced cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, and reorganization of cytoskeletons in bladder cancer J82 cells. We investigated cytoskeletal changes using confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Extracellular filaments formed by PDT were analyzed with a tandem imaging approach based on confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Ultrathin filaments that were not visible by confocal microscopy were identified as microfilaments by on-stage labeling/imaging using atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging revealed that these microfilaments had a stranded helical structure. Thus, these new approaches were useful for ultrastructural imaging of microfilaments at the molecular level, and, moreover, they may help to overcome the current limitations of fluorescence-based microscopy and atomic force microscopy in cell imaging.

  8. Association between Urinary Aflatoxin (AFM1 and Dietary Intake among Adults in Hulu Langat District, Selangor, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Husna Sulaiman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin is a food contaminant and its exposure through the diet is frequent and ubiquitous. A long-term dietary aflatoxin exposure has been linked to the development of liver cancer in populations with high prevalence of aflatoxin contamination in foods. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the association between urinary aflatoxin M1 (AFM1, a biomarker of aflatoxin exposure, with the dietary intake among adults in Hulu Langat district, Selangor, Malaysia. Certain food products have higher potential for aflatoxin contamination and these were listed in a Food Frequency Questionnaire, which was given to all study participants. This allowed us to record consumption rates for each food product listed. Concomitantly, urine samples were collected, from adults in selected areas in Hulu Langat district, for the measurement of AFM1 levels using an ELISA kit. Of the 444 urine samples collected and tested, 199 were positive for AFM1, with 37 of them exceeding the limit of detection (LOD of 0.64 ng/mL. Cereal products showed the highest consumption level among all food groups, with an average intake of 512.54 g per day. Chi-square analysis showed that consumption of eggs (X2 = 4.77, p = 0.03 and dairy products (X2 = 19.36, p < 0.01 had significant associations with urinary AFM1 but both food groups were having a phi and Cramer’s V value that less than 0.3, which indicated that the association between these food groups’ consumption and AFM1 level in urine was weak.

  9. AFM Surface Roughness and Topography Analysis of Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pantić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is presenting AFM analysis of surface roughness of Lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD under different finishing procedure (techniques: polishing, glazing and grinding. Lithium disilicate glass ceramics is all-ceramic dental system which is characterized by high aesthetic quality and it can be freely said that properties of material provide all prosthetic requirements: function, biocompatibility and aesthetic. Experimental tests of surface roughness were investigated on 4 samples with dimensions: 18 mm length, 14 mm width and 12 mm height. Contact surfaces of three samples were treated with different finishing procedure (polishing, glazing and grinding, and the contact surface of the raw material is investigated as a fourth sample. Experimental measurements were done using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM of NT-MDT manufacturers, in the contact mode. All obtained results of different prepared samples are presented in the form of specific roughness parameters (Rа, Rz, Rmax, Rq and 3D surface topography.

  10. Direct visualization of glutamate transporter elevator mechanism by high-speed AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yi; Miyagi, Atsushi; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chami, Mohamed; Boudker, Olga; Scheuring, Simon

    2017-02-14

    Glutamate transporters are essential for recovery of the neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Crystal structures in the outward- and inward-facing conformations of a glutamate transporter homolog from archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii , sodium/aspartate symporter Glt Ph , suggested the molecular basis of the transporter cycle. However, dynamic studies of the transport mechanism have been sparse and indirect. Here we present high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) observations of membrane-reconstituted Glt Ph at work. HS-AFM movies provide unprecedented real-space and real-time visualization of the transport dynamics. Our results show transport mediated by large amplitude 1.85-nm "elevator" movements of the transport domains consistent with previous crystallographic and spectroscopic studies. Elevator dynamics occur in the absence and presence of sodium ions and aspartate, but stall in sodium alone, providing a direct visualization of the ion and substrate symport mechanism. We show unambiguously that individual protomers within the trimeric transporter function fully independently.

  11. Ultrafast switching in wetting properties of TiO2/YSZ/Si(001) epitaxial heterostructures induced by laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayati, M. R.; Molaei, R.; Narayan, J.; Joshi, S.; Narayan, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated dark hydrophilicity of single crystalline rutile TiO 2 (100) thin films, in which rapid switching from a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic surface was achieved using nanosecond excimer laser irradiation. The TiO 2 /YSZ/Si(001) single crystalline heterostructures were grown by pulsed laser deposition and were subsequently irradiated by a single pulse of a KrF excimer laser at several energies. The wettability of water on the surfaces of the samples was evaluated. The samples were hydrophobic prior to laser annealing and turned hydrophilic after laser annealing. Superhydrophilic surfaces were obtained at higher laser energy densities (e.g., 0.32 J.cm −2 ). The stoichiometries of the surface regions of the samples before and after laser annealing were examined using XPS. The results revealed the formation of oxygen vacancies on the surface, which are surmised to be responsible for the observed superhydrophilic behavior. According to the AFM images, surface smoothening was greater in films that were annealed at higher laser energy densities. The samples exhibited hydrophobic behavior after being placed in ambient atmosphere. The origin of laser induced wetting behavior was qualitatively understood to stem from an increase of point defects near the surface, which lowered the film/water interfacial energy. This type of rapid hydrophobic/hydrophilic switching may be used to facilitate fabrication of electronic and photonic devices with novel properties.

  12. Image simulation and surface reconstruction of undercut features in atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoping; Villarrubia, John; Tian, Fenglei; Dixson, Ronald

    2007-03-01

    CD-AFMs (critical dimension atomic force microscopes) are instruments with servo-control of the tip in more than one direction. With appropriately "boot-shaped" or flared tips, such instruments can image vertical or even undercut features. As with any AFM, the image is a dilation of the sample shape with the tip shape. Accurate extraction of the CD requires a correction for the tip effect. Analytical methods to correct images for the tip shape have been available for some time for the traditional (vertical feedback only) AFMs, but were until recently unavailable for instruments with multi-dimensional feedback. Dahlen et al. [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B23, pp. 2297-2303, (2005)] recently introduced a swept-volume approach, implemented for 2-dimensional (2D) feedback. It permits image simulation and sample reconstruction, techniques previously developed for the traditional instruments, to be extended for the newer tools. We have introduced [X. Qian and J. S. Villarrubia, Ultramicroscopy, in press] an alternative dexel-based method, that does the same in either 2D or 3D. This paper describes the application of this method to sample shapes of interest in semiconductor manufacturing. When the tip shape is known (e.g., by prior measurement using a tip characterizer) a 3D sample surface may be reconstructed from its 3D image. Basing the CD measurement upon such a reconstruction is shown here to remove some measurement artifacts that are not removed (or are incompletely removed) by the existing measurement procedures.

  13. Radiation Induced Polymerization of Pyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarada Idris; Ratnam, C.T.; Ahmad Ashrif Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the polymerization of pyrrole by gamma irradiation. The pyrrole films were exposed to gamma ray from cobalt 60 source at doses ranging from 0 to 150 kGy. The films were subjected to structural and morphological analyses by using FTIR, SEM and AFM techniques. Similar studies were also made on pristine pyrrole film which serve as control. Results revealed that pyrrole has been successfully polymerized through irradiation induced reactions. The SEM images depicted the formation of cauliflower shape upon gamma irradiation. The structural changes of pyrrole also evidenced by FTIR spectra. Surface topography and roughness of pyrrole before and after gamma irradiation found to show significant differences. (author)

  14. Design of a micro-cartridge system for the robotic assembly of exchangeable AFM-probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenwerfer, Malte; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Fatikow, Sergej

    2013-01-01

    demand an even higher lateral resolution of the measurements. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a common tool for this characterization and a standard instrument for all kinds of research and development disciplines. However, the characterization of three dimensional high-aspect ratio and sidewall...... structures remains a hardly accomplishable task. Novel exchangeable and customizable scanning probe tips, so-called NanoBits, can be attached to standard AFM cantilevers offering unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of the tips to the surface topology of the specific application. The ultimate...

  15. A concept for automated nanoscale atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements using a priori knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recknagel, C; Rothe, H

    2009-01-01

    The nanometer coordinate measuring machine (NCMM) is developed for comparatively fast large area scans with high resolution. The system combines a metrological atomic force microscope (AFM) with a precise positioning system. The sample is moved under the probe system via the positioning system achieving a scan range of 25 × 25 × 5 mm 3 with a resolution of 0.1 nm. A concept for AFM measurements using a priori knowledge is implemented. The a priori knowledge is generated through measurements with a white light interferometer and the use of CAD data. Dimensional markup language is used as a transfer and target format for a priori knowledge and measurement data. Using the a priori knowledge and template matching algorithms combined with the optical microscope of the NCMM, the region of interest can automatically be identified. In the next step the automatic measurement of the part coordinate system and the measurement elements with the AFM sensor of the NCMM is done. The automatic measurement involves intelligent measurement strategies, which are adapted to specific geometries of the measurement feature to reduce measurement time and drift effects

  16. Solar surface magnetism and irradiance on time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domingo, V.; Ermolli, I.; Fox, P.; Fröhlich, C.; Haberreiter, M.; Krivova, N.; Kopp, G.; Schmutz, W.; Solanki, S.K.; Spruit, H.C.; Unruh, Y.C.; Vögler, A.

    2009-01-01

    The uninterrupted measurement of the total solar irradiance during the last three solar cycles and an increasing amount of solar spectral irradiance measurements as well as solar imaging observations (magnetograms and photometric data) have stimulated the development of models attributing irradiance

  17. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A; Gimzewski, James K

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations

  18. Atomic Force Microscope Image Contrast Mechanisms on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, James; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Barger Jr., William R.; Lee, Gil U.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents a methodology to measure and quantitatively interpret force curves on supported lipid bilayers in water. We then use this method to correlate topographic imaging contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of phase-separated Langmuir-Blodgett bilayers with imaging load. Force curves collected on pure monolayers of both distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) and monogalactosylethanolamine (MGDG) and dioleoylethanolamine (DOPE) deposited at similar surface pressures o...

  19. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  20. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  1. Effects of high dose gamma irradiation on ITO thin film properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyamani, A. [National Nanotechnology Center, King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mustapha, N., E-mail: nazirmustapha@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physics, College of Sciences, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, P.O. Box 90950, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-07-29

    Transparent thin-film Indium Tin Oxides (ITO) were prepared on 0.7 mm thick glass substrates using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process with average thickness of 150 nm. The samples were then exposed to high gamma γ radiation doses by {sup 60}Co radioisotope. The films have been irradiated by performing exposure cycles up to 250 kGy total doses at room temperature. The surface structures before and after irradiation were analysed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was performed on all samples before and after irradiation to investigate any change in the grain sizes, and also in the roughness of the ITO surface. We investigated the influence of γ irradiation on the spectra of transmittance T, in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrum using spectrophotometer measurements. Energy band gap E{sub g} was then calculated from the optical spectra for all ITO films. It was found that the optical band gap values decreased as the radiation dose was increased. To compare the effect of the irradiation on refractive index n and extinction coefficient k properties, additional measurements were done on the ITO samples before and after gamma irradiation using an ellipsometer. The optical constants n and k increased by increasing the irradiation doses. Electrical properties such as resistivity and sheet resistance were measured using the four-point probe method. The good optical, electrical and morphological properties maintained by the ITO films even after being exposed to high gamma irradiation doses, made them very favourable to be used as anodes for solar cells and as protective coatings in space windows. - Highlights: • Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. • Effects of Gamma irradiation were investigated. • Changes of optical transmission and electrical properties of ITO films were studied. • Intensity of the diffraction peaks and the film's structure changed with increasing irradiation doses.

  2. AFM, SEM and in situ RHEED study of Cu texture evolution on amorphous carbon by oblique angle vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, F.; Gaire, C.; Ye, D.-X.; Karabacak, T.; Lu, T.-M.; Wang, G.-C.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the crystal orientation of a Cu film grown on an amorphous carbon substrate without intentional heating under 75±6 deg. oblique angle vapor deposition was investigated ex-situ by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and in-situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). At the initial stage of growth ( ∼100 nm thick) the diffraction pattern started to break symmetrically from the middle of the (111) and (200) rings representing the absence of (111) and (200) planes parallel to the substrate. However, after this transition stage, at the thickness of ∼410 nm, the intensity distribution of diffraction patterns appeared asymmetric about the middle of the rings, which is interpreted as the appearance of a tilted (111) texture. Finally the diffraction patterns developed into separated short arcs and showed only a II-O (two-orientation) texture. By comparing RHEED patterns with the SEM and AFM images of the final film, we argue that the tilted columns having tilted (111) top faces dominate in the later stage of growth. Furthermore, considering the geometry of crystals and shadowing effects, we argue that the vertices of columns having the highest growth velocity normal to the substrate and therefore receiving the maximum flux will dominate the film growth and determine the tilt angle of the texture and the preference of the azimuthal angle orientation

  3. AFM picking-up manipulation of the metaphase chromosome fragment by using the tweezers-type probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Saito, Masato; Shichiri, Motoharu; Sugiyama, Sigeru; Takamura, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Gen; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the development of a new procedure based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the analysis of metaphase chromosome. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information about the specific locations of genes on the metaphase chromosome. In this research, we performed the manipulation of the metaphase chromosome by using novel AFM probes to obtain chromosome fragments of a smaller size than the ones obtained using the conventional methods, such as glass microneedles. We could pick up the fragment of the metaphase chromosome dissected by the knife-edged probe by using our tweezers-type probe

  4. Atomic force microscopy employed as the final imaging stage for soft x-ray contact microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, R.A.; Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Fletcher, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Soft X-ray contact microscopy (SXCM) enables a high resolution image of a living biological specimen to be recorded in an X-ray sensitive photoresist at unity magnification. Until recently scanning electron microscopes (SEM) have been employed to obtain the final magnified image. Although this has been successful in producing many high resolution images, this method of viewing the resist has several disadvantages. Firstly, a metallic coating has to be applied to the resist surface to provide electrical conductivity, rendering further development of the resist impossible. Also, electron beam damage to the resist surface can occur, in addition to poor resolution and image quality. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows uncoated resists to be imaged at a superior resolution, without damage to the surface. The use of AFM is seen as a major advancement in SXCM. The advantages and disadvantages of the two technologies are discussed, with illustrations from recent studies of a wide variety of hydrated biological specimens imaged using SXCM

  5. Effects of temperature, packaging and electron beam irradiation processing conditions on the property behaviour of Poly (ether-block-amide) blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kieran A; Kennedy, James E; McEvoy, Brian; Vrain, Olivier; Ryan, Damien; Cowman, Richard; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2014-06-01

    The radiation stability of Poly (ether-block-amide) (PEBA) blended with a multifunctional phenolic antioxidant and a hindered amide light stabiliser was examined under various temperatures, packaging and electron beam processing conditions. FTIR revealed that there were slight alterations to the PEBA before irradiation; however, these became more pronounced following irradiation. The effect of varying the temperature, packaging and processing conditions on the resultant PEBA properties was apparent. For example, rheology demonstrated that the structural properties could be enhanced by manipulating the aforementioned criteria. Mechanical testing exhibited less radiation resistance when the PEBA samples were vacuum packed and exposed to irradiation. MFI and AFM confirmed that the melting strength and surface topography could be reduced/increased depending on the conditions employed. From this study it was concluded that virgin PEBA submerged in dry ice with non-vacuum packaging during the irradiation process, provided excellent radiation resistance (20.9% improvement) in contrast to the traditional method. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Surface study of nano-template anodic porous alumina pre-irradiated by ArF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaleh, B.; Saramad, S.; Farshchi-Tabrizi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-porous alumina membranes have widely used as matrix for the fabrication of nanomaterials for many applications including quantum-dot arrays, magnetic storage devices and composites for catalysis, due to their remarkable hardness, thermal and anti corrupted stability, uniform pore size and high pore density. In this experiment three sets of aluminum samples were chosen for fabrication nano-porous anodic alumina. One set has select for laser cleaning before chemical treatment and the two others with and without chemical treatment without laser irradiation. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films were characterized with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) micrograph and the SEM results were analyzed by Linear-Angular Fast Fourier Transform (LA-FFT) technique to investigate the arrangement and ordering of pores. According to these results the laser irradiated sample has much better regularity in comparison with the usual one.

  7. Changes in Imaging and Cognition in Juvenile Rats After Whole-Brain Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert J.; Jun, Brandon J. [Division of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Advanced Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Rudi Schulte Research Institute, Santa Barbara, California (United States); Cushman, Jesse D. [Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Nguyen, Christine; Beighley, Adam H.; Blanchard, Johnny; Iwamoto, Kei; Schaue, Dorthe [Division of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Harris, Neil G. [UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jentsch, James D. [Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bluml, Stefan [Advanced Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Rudi Schulte Research Institute, Santa Barbara, California (United States); McBride, William H., E-mail: wmcbride@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: In pediatric cancer survivors treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI), long-term cognitive deficits and morbidity develop that are poorly understood and for which there is no treatment. We describe similar cognitive defects in juvenile WBI rats and correlate them with alterations in diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) during brain development. Methods and Materials: Juvenile Fischer rats received clinically relevant fractionated doses of WBI or a high-dose exposure. Diffusion tensor imaging and MRS were performed at the time of WBI and during the subacute (3-month) and late (6-month) phases, before behavioral testing. Results: Fractional anisotropy in the splenium of the corpus callosum increased steadily over the study period, reflecting brain development. WBI did not alter the subacute response, but thereafter there was no further increase in fractional anisotropy, especially in the high-dose group. Similarly, the ratios of various MRS metabolites to creatine increased over the study period, and in general, the most significant changes after WBI were during the late phase and with the higher dose. The most dramatic changes observed were in glutamine-creatine ratios that failed to increase normally between 3 and 6 months after either radiation dose. WBI did not affect the ambulatory response to novel open field testing in the subacute phase, but locomotor habituation was impaired and anxiety-like behaviors increased. As for cognitive measures, the most dramatic impairments were in novel object recognition late after either dose of WBI. Conclusions: The developing brains of juvenile rats given clinically relevant fractionated doses of WBI show few abnormalities in the subacute phase but marked late cognitive alterations that may be linked with perturbed MRS signals measured in the corpus callosum. This pathomimetic phenotype of clinically relevant cranial irradiation effects may be useful for modeling, mechanistic

  8. Changes in Imaging and Cognition in Juvenile Rats After Whole-Brain Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Robert J.; Jun, Brandon J.; Cushman, Jesse D.; Nguyen, Christine; Beighley, Adam H.; Blanchard, Johnny; Iwamoto, Kei; Schaue, Dorthe; Harris, Neil G.; Jentsch, James D.; Bluml, Stefan; McBride, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In pediatric cancer survivors treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI), long-term cognitive deficits and morbidity develop that are poorly understood and for which there is no treatment. We describe similar cognitive defects in juvenile WBI rats and correlate them with alterations in diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) during brain development. Methods and Materials: Juvenile Fischer rats received clinically relevant fractionated doses of WBI or a high-dose exposure. Diffusion tensor imaging and MRS were performed at the time of WBI and during the subacute (3-month) and late (6-month) phases, before behavioral testing. Results: Fractional anisotropy in the splenium of the corpus callosum increased steadily over the study period, reflecting brain development. WBI did not alter the subacute response, but thereafter there was no further increase in fractional anisotropy, especially in the high-dose group. Similarly, the ratios of various MRS metabolites to creatine increased over the study period, and in general, the most significant changes after WBI were during the late phase and with the higher dose. The most dramatic changes observed were in glutamine-creatine ratios that failed to increase normally between 3 and 6 months after either radiation dose. WBI did not affect the ambulatory response to novel open field testing in the subacute phase, but locomotor habituation was impaired and anxiety-like behaviors increased. As for cognitive measures, the most dramatic impairments were in novel object recognition late after either dose of WBI. Conclusions: The developing brains of juvenile rats given clinically relevant fractionated doses of WBI show few abnormalities in the subacute phase but marked late cognitive alterations that may be linked with perturbed MRS signals measured in the corpus callosum. This pathomimetic phenotype of clinically relevant cranial irradiation effects may be useful for modeling, mechanistic

  9. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, Antje; Feigl, Daniela; Kuhn, David; Schaupp, Manuel; Quast, Günter; Busch, Kurt; Eichner, Ludwig; Schumacher, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry–Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10–15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force–distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students. (paper)

  11. Axial nonimaging characteristics of imaging lenses: discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Ronian

    2016-05-01

    At observation planes away from the image plane, an imaging lens is a nonimaging optic. We examine the variation of axial irradiance with distance in image space and highlight the following little-known observation for discussion: On a per-unit-area basis, the position of the highest concentration in image space is generally not at the focal plane. This characteristic is contrary to common experience, and it offers an additional degree of freedom for the design of detection systems. Additionally, it would also apply to lenses with negative refractive index. The position of peak concentration and its irradiance is dependent upon the location and irradiance of the image. As such, this discussion also includes a close examination of expressions for image irradiance and explains how they are related to irradiance calculations beyond the image plane. This study is restricted to rotationally symmetric refractive imaging systems with incoherent extended Lambertian sources.

  12. AFM Morphology Study of Si1-Y GeY:H Films Deposited by LF PE CVD from Silane-Germane with Different

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, L; Kosarev, A

    2005-01-01

    The morphology of Si 1-Y Ge Y :H films in the range of Y=0.23 to 0.9 has been studied by AFM. The films were deposited by Low Frequency (LF) PE CVD at substrate temperature T s =300 C and discharge frequency f=110 kHz from silane+germane mixture with and without, Ar and H 2 dilution. The films were deposited on silicon and glass substrates. AFM images were taken and analyzed for 2 x 2 mm 2 area. All the images demonstrated ''grain'' like structure, which was characterized by the height distribution function F(H) average roughness , standard height deviation Rq, lateral correlation length L c area distribution function F(s), mean grain area , diameter distribution function F(d), and mean grain diameter . The roughness of the films monotonically increases with Y for all dilutions, but more significantly in the films deposited without dilution. L c continuously grows with Y in the films deposited without dilution, while more complex behavior L c (Y) is observed in the films deposited with H- or Ar dilution. The sharpness of F(H) characterized by curtosis γ depends on dilution and the sharpest F(H) are for the films deposited with Ar (γ=5.30,Y=0.23) and without dilution (γ=4.3, Y=0.45). Isothermal annealing caused increase of , L c in the films deposited with H- and Ar dilutions, while in the films prepared without dilution the behavior was more complex, depending on the substrates. Significant narrowing of the height distribution was observed in the films deposited with H dilution or without dilution

  13. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowthami, T; Raina, Gargi; Kurra, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84–88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns. (paper)

  14. Characterisation of a smartphone image sensor response to direct solar 305nm irradiation at high air masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoe, D P; Amar, A; Parisi, A V; Turner, J

    2017-06-01

    This research reports the first time the sensitivity, properties and response of a smartphone image sensor that has been used to characterise the photobiologically important direct UVB solar irradiances at 305nm in clear sky conditions at high air masses. Solar images taken from Autumn to Spring were analysed using a custom Python script, written to develop and apply an adaptive threshold to mitigate the effects of both noise and hot-pixel aberrations in the images. The images were taken in an unobstructed area, observing from a solar zenith angle as high as 84° (air mass=9.6) to local solar maximum (up to a solar zenith angle of 23°) to fully develop the calibration model in temperatures that varied from 2°C to 24°C. The mean ozone thickness throughout all observations was 281±18 DU (to 2 standard deviations). A Langley Plot was used to confirm that there were constant atmospheric conditions throughout the observations. The quadratic calibration model developed has a strong correlation between the red colour channel from the smartphone with the Microtops measurements of the direct sun 305nm UV, with a coefficient of determination of 0.998 and very low standard errors. Validation of the model verified the robustness of the method and the model, with an average discrepancy of only 5% between smartphone derived and Microtops observed direct solar irradiances at 305nm. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the smartphone image sensor as a means to measure photobiologically important solar UVB radiation. The use of ubiquitous portable technologies, such as smartphones and laptop computers to perform data collection and analysis of solar UVB observations is an example of how scientific investigations can be performed by citizen science based individuals and groups, communities and schools. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Atomic-force microscopy: a powerful, multipurpose technique for the investigation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousty, J.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic-force microscope (AFM) comprises a probe (a tip) mounted at the free extremity of a spring of known stiffness, a control system, and a scanning system, which moves the probe across the sample's surface. The interaction between probe and surface (forces, or force gradient) is kept equal to a set value, by continuously adjusting the separation distance, via a feedback loop. An AFM image thus corresponds to a constant-interaction contour, obtained by moving the tip along the surface. This contour matches, as a rule, the topography of the sample. The image obtained is then the topography of the surface. The contribution made by AFM to materials science is illustrated in 4 examples. The first example concerns the first observations of irradiation damage in an electrical insulator material, thus one not readily observable by means of conventional electron microscopes. The second illustration relates to monitoring the emergence of defects due to plastic deformation observed in metals. The third example serves as an illustration of the capability afforded by AFM, of ensuring the acquisition of two types of information. Using an AFM fitted with a special module, the electrical resistivity of the passive layer that covers the surface of stainless steels was measured, concurrently with the sample's topography. The final illustration concerns the 3-dimensional self-organization of molecules at the interface between a solid and a liquid. (A.C.)

  16. Observation of Shapiro-steps in AFM-plought micron-size YBCO planar construction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Elkaseh, AAO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), micron size planar constriction type junctions was successfully ploughed on YBa